WorldWideScience

Sample records for thin bonded concrete

  1. Bond behavior of self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponmalar S.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The success of an optimum design lies in the effective load transfer done by the bond forces at the steel-concrete interface. Self Compacting Concrete, is a new innovative concrete capable of filling intrinsic reinforcement and gets compacted by itself, without the need of external mechanical vibration. For this reason, it is replacing the conventional vibrated concrete in the construction industry. The present paper outlays the materials and methods adopted for attaining the self compacting concrete and describes about the bond behavior of this concrete. The bond stress-slip curve is similar in the bottom bars for both SCC and normal concrete whereas a higher bond stress and stiffness is experienced in the top and middle bars, for SCC compared to normal concrete. Also the interfacial properties revealed that the elastic modulus and micro-strength of interfacial transition zone [ITZ] were better on the both top and bottom side of horizontal steel bar in the SCC mixes than in normal vibrated concrete. The local bond strength of top bars for SCC is about 20% less than that for NC. For the bottom bars, however, the results were almost the same.

  2. Bond behavior of self compacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponmalar, S.

    2018-03-01

    The success of an optimum design lies in the effective load transfer done by the bond forces at the steel-concrete interface. Self Compacting Concrete, is a new innovative concrete capable of filling intrinsic reinforcement and gets compacted by itself, without the need of external mechanical vibration. For this reason, it is replacing the conventional vibrated concrete in the construction industry. The present paper outlays the materials and methods adopted for attaining the self compacting concrete and describes about the bond behavior of this concrete. The bond stress-slip curve is similar in the bottom bars for both SCC and normal concrete whereas a higher bond stress and stiffness is experienced in the top and middle bars, for SCC compared to normal concrete. Also the interfacial properties revealed that the elastic modulus and micro-strength of interfacial transition zone [ITZ] were better on the both top and bottom side of horizontal steel bar in the SCC mixes than in normal vibrated concrete. The local bond strength of top bars for SCC is about 20% less than that for NC. For the bottom bars, however, the results were almost the same.

  3. Bond-Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-02-26

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond-slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond-slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond-slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond-slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond-slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond-slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results.

  4. Effect of Silica fume and superplasticizer on steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the influence of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength. The study included tests of fifty short length pull-out specimens in five series. The effect of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength was evaluated separately by tests of specimens made of concretes with similar strengths but different admixtures. Test results showed that the addition of silica fume in the concrete mixture had not a negative effect on bond strength. Also, there was not a considerable decrease in bond strength of specimens made of concrete with super plasticizer. Comparing the measured bond strengths normalized with respect to the square root of the concrete compressive strength, it was seen that the normalized bond strength increased with the concrete strength. this result agrees with the model previously proposed by the author for local bond strength. For the specimens made of high strength concrete including silica fume and super plasticizer, the normalized bond strength did not increase with the concrete strength

  5. Steel-concrete bond model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Chetra

    2015-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structure behavior can be extremely complex in the case of exceeding the cracking threshold. The composite characteristics of reinforced concrete structure should be finely presented especially in the distribution stress zone between steel-concrete at their interface. In order to compute the industrial structures, a perfect relation hypothesis between steel and concrete is supposed in which the complex phenomenon of the two-material relation is not taken into account. On the other hand, this perfect relation is unable to predict the significant disorders, the repartition, and the distribution of the cracks, which is directly linked to the steel. In literature, several numerical methods are proposed in order to finely study the concrete-steel bond behavior, but these methods give many difficulties in computing complex structures in 3D. With the results obtained in the thesis framework of Torre-Casanova (2012), the new concrete-steel bond model has been developed to improve performances (iteration numbers and computational time) and the representation (cyclic behavior) of the initial one. The new model has been verified with analytical solution of steel-concrete tie and validated with the experimental results. The new model is equally tested with the structural scale to compute the shear wall behavior in the French national project (CEOS.fr) under monotonic load. Because of the numerical difficulty in post-processing the crack opening in the complex crack formation, a new crack opening method is also developed. This method consists of using the discontinuity of relative displacement to detect the crack position or using the slip sign change between concrete-steel. The simulation-experiment comparison gives validation of not only the new concrete-steel bond model but also the new crack post-processing method. Finally, the cyclic behavior of the bond law with the non-reduced envelope is adopted and integrated in the new bond model in order to take

  6. GROUT-CONCRETE INTERFACE BOND PERFORMANCE: EFFECT OF INTERFACE MOISTURE ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH AND GROUT MICROSTRUCTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Varga, I; Muñoz, J F; Bentz, D P; Spragg, R P; Stutzman, P E; Graybeal, B A

    2018-05-01

    Bond between two cementitious materials is crucial in applications such as repairs, overlays, and connections of prefabricated bridge elements (PBEs), to name just a few. It is the latter that has special interest to the authors of this paper. After performing a dimensional stability study on grout-like materials commonly used as connections between PBEs, it was observed that the so-called 'non-shrink' cementitious grouts showed a considerable amount of early-age shrinkage. This might have negative effects on the integrity of the structure, due not only to the grout material's early degradation, but also to a possible loss of bond between the grout and the prefabricated concrete element. Many factors affect the bond strength between two cementitious materials (e.g., grout-concrete), the presence of moisture at the existing concrete substrate surface being one of them. In this regard, pre-moistening the concrete substrate surface prior to the application of the grout material is sometimes recommended for bond enhancement. This topic has been the focus of numerous research studies in the past; however, there is still controversy among practitioners on the real benefits that this practice might provide. This paper evaluates the tensile bond performance of two non-shrink cementitious grouts applied to the exposed aggregate surface of a concrete substrate, and how the supply of moisture at the grout-concrete interface affects the bond strength. "Pull-off" bond results show increased tensile bond strength when the concrete surface is pre-moistened. Reasons to explain the observed increased bond strength are given after a careful microstructural analysis of the grout-concrete interface. Interfaces where sufficient moisture is provided to the concrete substrate such that moisture movement from the grout is prevented show reduced porosity and increased hydration on the grout side of the interface, which is thought to directly contribute to the increased tensile bond

  7. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, L.; West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  8. The assessment of bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M. Z. A. Mohd; Muhamad, K.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and high strength fibre reinforced concrete (HPFRC). Firstly, this paper presents the various steps taken to prepare the HPFRC with self-compacting property. The minimum targeted slump flow is 600 mm and minimum targeted compressive strength is 80 MPa. The key mix variables considered are such as type of superplasticizer, water cement ratio and silica fume content. Then, the bond strength between the heat damaged concrete with HPFRC was examined. The experimental parameters are heating temperature, surface treatment technique and curing method and the results show that, all experimental parameters are significantly affected the bond strength between heat damaged concrete and HPFRC.

  9. Bond slip model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, A.; Jason, L.; Davenne, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new finite element approach to model the steel-concrete bond effects. This model proposes to relate steel, represented by truss elements, with the surrounding concrete in the case where the two meshes are not necessary coincident. The theoretical formulation is described and the model is applied on a reinforced concrete tie. A characteristic stress distribution is observed, related to the transfer of bond forces from steel to concrete. The results of this simulation are compared with a computation in which a perfect relation between steel and concrete is supposed. It clearly shows how the introduction of the bond model can improve the description of the cracking process (finite number of cracks). (authors)

  10. Performance of thin bonded epoxy overlays on asphalt and concrete bridge deck surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This study is the evaluation of two thin bonded epoxy overlays: SafeLane (marketed by Cargill), and Flexogrid : (developed by PolyCarb). SafeLane is advertised as an anti-skid/anti-icing overlay that stores deicing chemicals for : release during wint...

  11. Vibrational characteristics of FRP-bonded concrete interfacial defects in a low frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tin Kei; Lau, Denvid

    2014-04-01

    As externally bonded fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) is a critical load-bearing component of strengthened or retrofitted civil infrastructures, the betterment of structural health monitoring (SHM) methodology for such composites is imperative. Henceforth the vibrational characteristics of near surface interfacial defects involving delamination and trapped air pockets at the FRP-concrete interface are investigated in this study using a finite element approach. Intuitively, due to its lower interfacial stiffness compared with an intact interface, a damaged region is expected to have a set of resonance frequencies different from an intact region when excited by acoustic waves. It has been observed that, when excited acoustically, both the vibrational amplitudes and frequency peaks in the response spectrum of the defects demonstrate a significant deviation from an intact FRP-bonded region. For a thin sheet of FRP bonded to concrete with sizable interfacial defects, the fundamental mode under free vibration is shown to be relatively low, in the order of kHz. Due to the low resonance frequencies of the defects, the use of low-cost equipment for interfacial defect detection via response spectrum analysis is highly feasible.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON THE EFFECT OF NATURAL TROPICAL WEATHER ON INTERFACIAL BONDING PERFORMANCE OF CFRP-CONCRETE BONDING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHD H. MOHD HASHIM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The existing reinforced concrete structures may require rehabilitation and strengthening to overcome deficiencies due to defect and environmental deterioration. Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP-concrete bonding systems can provide solution for the deficiencies, but the durability of the bonded joint needs to be investigated for reliable structural performance. In this research the interfacial bonding behaviour of CFRP-concrete system under tropical climate exposure is main interest. A 300 mm concrete prism was bonded with CFRP plate on its two sides and exposed for 3, 6, and 9 months to laboratory environment, continuous natural weather, and wet-dry exposure in 3.5% saltwater solution at room and 40 °C temperature. The prisms were subjected to tension and compression load under bonding test to measure the strain and determine stress distribution and shear stress transfer behaviour. The results of the bonding test showed that load transfer was fairly linear and uniform at lower load level and changed to non-linear and non- uniform at higher load level. The force transfers causes the shear stress distribution being shifted along the bonded length. The combination of climate effects may have provided better curing of the bonded joints, but longer duration of exposure may be required to weaken the bond strength. Nevertheless, CFRP-concrete bonding system was only minimally affected under the tropical climate and salt solution.

  13. A Comparison of Bond Performance of Concrete Reinforced with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transfer of stress from a deformed bar to the concrete is achieved by mechanical locking of the steel into the surrounding concrete. This interfacial bond strength between steel and the surrounding concrete is an important factor influencing the strength and durability of reinforced concrete structure. This paper presents ...

  14. Improved Bond Equations for Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour, Sadaf Moallemi; Alam, M Shahria; Milani, Abbas S

    2016-08-30

    This paper explores a set of new equations to predict the bond strength between fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) rebar and concrete. The proposed equations are based on a comprehensive statistical analysis and existing experimental results in the literature. Namely, the most effective parameters on bond behavior of FRP concrete were first identified by applying a factorial analysis on a part of the available database. Then the database that contains 250 pullout tests were divided into four groups based on the concrete compressive strength and the rebar surface. Afterward, nonlinear regression analysis was performed for each study group in order to determine the bond equations. The results show that the proposed equations can predict bond strengths more accurately compared to the other previously reported models.

  15. Experimental Study on Fatigue Behaviour of BFRP-Concrete Bond Interfaces under Bending Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhe Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP composites are increasingly being used to retrofit concrete structures by external bonding. For such strengthened members, the BFRP-concrete interface plays the crucial role of transferring stresses. This study aims to investigate the fatigue behaviour of the interface under bending load. A series of tests were conducted on BFRP-concrete bonded joint, including static, fatigue, and postfatigue loading. The fatigue failure modes, the development of deflection, the evolution of BFRP strains, and the propagation of interfacial cracks were analysed. In addition, the debonding-induced fatigue life of BFRP-concrete bonded joints was studied. Finally, a new model of fatigue life was proposed by defining the effective fatigue bond stress. The results showed that the fatigue experience has a significant effect on the BFRP strength especially near the root of concrete transverse crack and on the bond performance of the adhesive near the interface crack tip. There are two main fatigue failure modes: BFRP rupture and BFRP debonding. The fatigue damage development of the bond interface has three stages: rapid, stable, and unstable growth. The proposed model for the debonding-induced fatigue life is more conservative for the BFRP-concrete bonded joints under pure shear load than for those under bending load.

  16. The influence of main bar corrosion on bond strength in selfcompacting concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayop, S. S.; Emhemed, A. N. K.; Jamaluddin, N.; Sadikin, A.

    2017-11-01

    The experimental study was conducted to determine the influence of main bar corrosion on bond strength in self-compacting concrete (SCC). A total 16 tension pullout tests specimens reinforced with 10 mm and 14 mm diameter bar were used for the bond strength test. The properties of SCC were determined from the slump flow, T50cm, V-funnel and L box test. Reinforcing bars in the concrete were submitted to impressed current to accelerate the corrosion of the bar. It was found that the relationship between bond strength and concrete strength in un-corroded specimens differed from that of corroded specimens set in high-strength concrete because of brittleness in the corroded specimens, which caused a sudden loss of bond strength. The results revealed that specimens of un-corroded and corroded showed a higher percentage of bond strength degradation during the pullout tests.

  17. Collaboration of polymer composite reinforcement and cement concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin, V. G.; Gizdatullin, A. R.

    2018-04-01

    The results of experimental study of bond strength of cement concrete of different types with fiber reinforcing polymer (FRP) bars are reported. The reinforcing bars were manufactured of glass fibers and had a rebar with different types of the surface relief formed by winding a thin strip impregnated with a binder or by “sanding”. The pullout tests were carried out simultaneously for the steel reinforcing ribbed bars A400. The impact of friction, adhesion and mechanical bond on the strength of bonds between FRP and concrete was studied. The influence of the concrete strength and different operation factors on the bond strength of concrete was evaluated.

  18. Ultra thin continuously reinforced concrete pavement research in south Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Perrie, BD

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultra thin continuously reinforced concrete pavements (UTCRCP), in literature also referred to as Ultra Thin Reinforced High Performance Concrete (UTHRHPC), have been used in Europe successfully as a rehabilitation measure on steel bridge decks...

  19. Experimental and finite element analysis of bond-slip in reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. V. WOLENSKI

    Full Text Available Abstract The modeling of reinforced concrete structures has taken advantage of the increasing progress on Computational Mechanics, in such way that complex phenomena, such as cracking and crushing, creep, reinforcement yielding, steel-concrete bond loss, can be modeled in a reasonable realistic way, using the proper set of numerical and computational resources. Among several options, the ones based on the Finite Element Method (FEM allow complex analysis simulations of reinforced concrete structures, including the interaction of different nonlinear effects. This paper deals with the nonlinear finite element analysis of the bond-slip between reinforcing steel and concrete, taking into account an experimental study previously performed. The FEM analysis presented uses a combination of resources where the material behavior of concrete is described by the Microplane Constitutive Model, and an embedded reinforcement model is used to represent steel inside the concrete and take into account the effect of bond-slip. The FEM models were created using the INSANE (INteractive Structural ANalysis Environment computational system, open source software that has a set of FEM tools for nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete structures. The correlations between numerical-experimentals results and several parameters validate the proposed combination of resources and identifies the significance of various effects on the response.

  20. An Investigation of Bond Strength of Reinforcing Bars in Fly Ash and GGBS Based Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopalan C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are amorphous aluminosilicate materials. Geopolymers are binders formed by alkali activation of Geopolymer Source Materials (GSM using an alkaline activator solution. Concretes made using Geopolymer binders are excellent alternative to the Ordinary Portland Cement concretes from strength, durability, and ecological considerations. Especially, usage of industrial waste materials such as Fly Ash and Slags as GSMs considerably lower the carbon footprint of concrete and mitigate the damage due to the unscientific dumping/disposal of these materials. To use the Geopolymer concrete (GPC for reinforced structural members, the composite action of reinforcing bars with Geopolymer concrete i.e. the bond behaviour should be well understood. This paper describes the bond behaviour of 12mm and 16mm dia. bars embedded in Fly ash and GGBS based Geopolymer concrete and conventional Portland Pozzolana cement concrete specimens investigated using the pull-out tests as per Indian Standard Code IS:2770(Part-I; the bond stresses and corresponding slips were found out. The bond stress increased with increase in compressive strength. The peak bond stress was found to be 4.3 times more than the design bond stress as per IS:456-2000. The Geopolymer concretes possess higher bond strength compared to the conventional cement concretes.

  1. Temperature effects on bond between concrete and reinforcing steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lublóy Éva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bond behaviour between concrete and reinforcing bars was observed under elevated temperatures. Five different concrete compositions were used. Hundred five pull-out specimens (Ø120 mm, 100 mm were prepared. After removing the specimens from the formwork, they were stored in water for seven days then kept at laboratory conditions until testing. The specimens were 28 days old by testing. After heating up the specimens, they were kept for two hours at these maximum temperatures (20 °C, 150 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C, 500 °C, 800 °C. Specimens were then cooled down in laboratory conditions. Finally the specimens were tested at room temperature. In order to check the compressive strength standard cubes were cast, cured, and heat treated, then tested to compressive strength. The results showed reduction in residual compressive strength and considerable changes in steel-concrete bond under high temperatures. Based on test results, a proposal is presented for the modification of MC2010 bond-ship formula in order to consider temperature effect.

  2. Corrosion-induced bond strength degradation in reinforced concrete-Analytical and empirical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, Kapilesh; Ghosh, A.K.; Mori, Yasuhiro; Ramanujam, S.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper aims to investigate the relationship between the bond strength and the reinforcement corrosion in reinforced concrete (RC). Analytical and empirical models are proposed for the bond strength of corroded reinforcing bars. Analytical model proposed by Cairns.and Abdullah [Cairns, J., Abdullah, R.B., 1996. Bond strength of black and epoxy-coated reinforcement-a theoretical approach. ACI Mater. J. 93 (4), 362-369] for splitting bond failure and later modified by Coronelli [Coronelli, D. 2002. Corrosion cracking and bond strength modeling for corroded bars in reinforced concrete. ACI Struct. J. 99 (3), 267-276] to consider the corroded bars, has been adopted. Estimation of the various parameters in the earlier analytical model has been proposed by the present authors. These parameters include corrosion pressure due to expansive action of corrosion products, modeling of tensile behaviour of cracked concrete and adhesion and friction coefficient between the corroded bar and cracked concrete. Simple empirical models are also proposed to evaluate the reduction in bond strength as a function of reinforcement corrosion in RC specimens. These empirical models are proposed by considering a wide range of published experimental investigations related to the bond degradation in RC specimens due to reinforcement corrosion. It has been found that the proposed analytical and empirical bond models are capable of providing the estimates of predicted bond strength of corroded reinforcement that are in reasonably good agreement with the experimentally observed values and with those of the other reported published data on analytical and empirical predictions. An attempt has also been made to evaluate the flexural strength of RC beams with corroded reinforcement failing in bond. It has also been found that the analytical predictions for the flexural strength of RC beams based on the proposed bond degradation models are in agreement with those of the experimentally

  3. Bond Behavior of Wet-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Concrete Interface Subjected to Moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Yiyan Lu; Tao Zhu; Shan Li; Zhenzhen Liu

    2018-01-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials to strengthen concrete structures has become popular in coastal regions with high humidity levels. However, many concrete structures in these places remain wet as a result of tides and wave-splashing, so they cannot be completely dried before repair. Therefore, it is vital to investigate the effects of moisture on the initial and long-term bond behavior between CFRP and wet concrete. This research assesses the effects of mo...

  4. Bond–Slip Relationship for CFRP Sheets Externally Bonded to Concrete under Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Cao, Shuangyin; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Juntao

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to explore the bond–slip relationship between carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and concrete under cyclic loading through experimental and analytical approaches. Modified beam tests were performed in order to gain insight into the bond–slip relationship under static and cyclic loading. The test variables are the CFRP-to-concrete width ratio, and the bond length of the CFRP sheets. An analysis of the test results in this paper and existing test results indicated that the slope of the ascending segment of the bond–slip curve decreased with an increase in the number of load cycles, but the slip corresponding to the maximum shear stress was almost invariable as the number of load cycles increased. In addition, the rate of reduction in the slope of the ascending range of the bond–slip curve during cyclic loading decreased as the concrete strength increased, and increased as the load level or CFRP-to-concrete width ratio enhanced. However, these were not affected by variations in bond length if the residual bond length was longer than the effective bond length. A bilinear bond–slip model for CFRP sheets that are externally bonded to concrete under cyclic loading, which considered the effects of the cyclic load level, concrete strength, and CFRP-to-concrete ratio, was developed based on the existing static bond–slip model. The accuracy of this proposed model was verified by a comparison between this proposed model and test results. PMID:29495383

  5. Numerical approach of the bond stress behavior of steel bars embedded in self-compacting concrete and in ordinary concrete using beam models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Almeida Filho

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the bond behavior between steel bars and concrete by means of a numerical analysis based on Finite Element Method. Results of a previously conducted experimental program on reinforced concrete beams subjected to monotonic loading are also presented. Two concrete types, self-compacting concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered in the study. Non-linear constitutive relations were used to represent concrete and steel in the proposed numerical model, aiming to reproduce the bond behavior observed in the tests. Experimental analysis showed similar results for the bond resistances of self-compacting and ordinary concrete, with self-compacting concrete presenting a better performance in some cases. The results given by the numerical modeling showed a good agreement with the tests for both types of concrete, especially in the pre-peak branch of the load vs. slip and load vs. displacement curves. As a consequence, the proposed numerical model could be used to estimate a reliable development length, allowing a possible reduction of the structure costs.

  6. Improving the Bond Strength of Rice Husk Ash Concrete by Incorporating Polymer: A New Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Bangwar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an insight of how to improve the bond strength of cement in which concrete is replaced with rice husk ash. A concrete mix was prepared and was used in different types of mixes i.e. Control Mix, 10% cement substituted concrete with rice husk ash and polymer modified concrete by incorporation different dosages of polymer in the 10% cement substituted concrete. A bar of 12mm diameter, 300mm in length was placed in the center of the cylindrical specimens for pull out test. It was observed that the bond strength between concrete and steel decreases with the replacement of cement with ash, conversely the bond strength improves with the addition of polymer dosages.

  7. Feasibility of using ultrasonic pulse velocity to measure the bond between new and old concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareed Hameed Majeed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Connecting new and old concrete is required in many practical situations, such as repairing, strengthening or extending existing reinforced concrete buildings or members. In addition to using this technique at construction joints. It is obvious the practical difficulties to measure the bond attained at the interface surface between the new and old concrete. Doing the destructive shear test at the interface surface is not an option in most practical cases due to its destructive character. So, this paper aims to study the feasibility of using the nondestructive ultrasonic pulse velocity to evaluate the bond attained at the interface surface between new and old concrete. An experimental work has been done to 24 specimens of normal and high strength concrete, with and without using an epoxy bonding agent at the interface that connect the two materials. The results of experiments clearly shown that this method can be used to evaluate the acquired bond between the new and old concrete.

  8. Monotonic and cyclic bond behavior of confined concrete using NiTiNb SMA wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Wook; Kim, Joo-Woo

    2011-01-01

    This study conducts bond tests of reinforced concrete confined by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires which provide active and passive confinement of concrete. This study uses NiTiNb SMA which usually shows wide temperature hysteresis; this is a good advantage for the application of shape memory effects. The aims of this study are to investigate the behavior of SMA wire under residual stress and the performance of SMA wire jackets in improving bond behavior through monotonic-loading tests. This study also conducts cyclic bond tests and analyzes cyclic bond behavior. The use of SMA wire jackets transfers the bond failure from splitting to pull-out mode and satisfactorily increases bond strength and ductile behavior. The active confinement provided by the SMA plays a major role in providing external pressure on the concrete because the developed passive confinement is much smaller than the active confinement. For cyclic behavior, slip and circumferential strain are recovered more with larger bond stress. This recovery of slip and circumferential strain are mainly due to the external pressure of the SMA wires since cracked concrete cannot provide any elastic recovery

  9. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongmin Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and concrete strength on the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete cured in artificial seawater were investigated, and then an improved Bertero, Popov, and Eligehausen (BPE model was employed to describe the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars in concrete. The results indicated that the maximum bond stress and corresponding slip decreased gradually with the increase of corrosion age and size of BFRP bars, and ultimate slip also decreased sharply. The ascending segment of bond-slip curve tends to be more rigid and the descending segment tends to be softer after corrosion. A horizontal end in bond-slip curve indicates that the friction between BFRP bars and concrete decreased sharply.

  10. Influence of Freeze-Thaw Damage on the Steel Corrosion and Bond-Slip Behavior in the Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangzhi Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly studies the behavior of steel corrosion in various reinforced concrete under freeze-thaw environment. The influence of thickness of concrete cover is also discussed. Additionally, the bond-slip behavior of the reinforced concrete after suffering the freeze-thaw damage and steel corrosion has also be presented. The results show that the freeze-thaw damage aggravates the steel corrosion in concrete, and the results become more obvious in the concrete after suffering serious freeze-thaw damage. Compared with the ordinary concrete, both air entrained concrete and waterproofing concrete possess better resistance to steel corrosion under the same freeze-thaw environment. Moreover, increasing the thicknesses of concrete cover is also an effective method of improving the resistance to steel corrosion. The bond-slip behavior of reinforced concrete with corroded steel decreases with the increase of freeze-thaw damage, especially for the concrete that suffered high freeze-thaw cycles. Moreover, there exists a good correlation between the parameters of bond-slip and freeze-thaw cycles. The steel corrosion and bond-slip behavior of reinforced concrete should be considered serious under freeze-thaw cycles environment, which significantly impact the durability and safety of concrete structure.

  11. Experimental Study on Bond Behavior of FRP-Concrete Interface in Hygrothermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the technique of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP composite material strengthened reinforced concrete structures is widely used in the field of civil engineering, durability of the strengthened structures has attracted more attention in recent years. Hygrothermal environment has an adverse effect on the bond behavior of the interface between FRP and concrete. This paper focuses on the bond durability of carbon fiber laminate- (CFL- concrete interface in hygrothermal condition which simulates the climate characteristic in South China. Twenty 100 mm × 100 mm × 720 mm specimens were divided into 6 groups based on different temperature and humidity. After pretreatment in hygrothermal environment, the specimens were tested using double shear method. Strain gauges bonded along the CFL surface and linear variation displacement transducers (LVDTs were used to measure longitudinal strains and slip of the interface. Failure mode, ultimate capacity, load-deflection relationship, and relative slip were analyzed. The bond behavior of FRP-concrete interface under hygrothermal environment was studied. Results show that the ultimate bearing capacity of the interface reduced after exposure to hygrothermal environments. The decreasing ranges were up to 27.9% after exposure at high temperature and humidity (60°C, 95% RH. The maximum strains (εmax of the specimens pretreated decreased obviously which indicated decay of the bond behavior after exposure to the hygrothermal environment.

  12. Corrosion Mechanism and Bond-Strength Study on Galvanized Steel in Concrete Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouril, M.; Pokorny, P.; Stoulil, J. [University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Zinc coating on carbon steels give the higher corrosion resistance in chloride containing environments and in carbonated concrete. However, hydrogen evolution accompanies the corrosion of zinc in the initial activity in fresh concrete, which can lead to the formation of a porous structure at the reinforcement -concrete interface, which can potentially reduce the bond-strength of the reinforcement with concrete. The present study examines the mechanism of the corrosion of hot-dip galvanized steel in detail, as in the model pore solutions and real concrete. Calcium ion plays an important role in the corrosion mechanism, as it prevents the formation of passive layers on zinc at an elevated alkalinity. The corrosion rate of galvanized steel decreases in accordance with the exposure time; however, the reason for this is not the zinc transition into passivity, but the consumption of the less corrosion-resistant phases of hot-dip galvanizing in the concrete environment. The results on the electrochemical tests have been confirmed by the bond-strength test for the reinforcement of concrete and by evaluating the porosity of the cement adjacent to the reinforcement.

  13. Durability of thin-walled concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomon, M.; Gallias, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present document is to draw up a survey of knowledge of the problems of ageing of reinforced concrete shell structure atmospheric coolers. The exposure conditions are particularly favourable to the induction and development of degradation which, because of the thinness of the reinforced concrete can compromise the stability and the durability of coolers. The study will be axed on the link between the specific characteristics of coolers from the point of view of operation, design and environment, also the durability of reinforced concrete. The set of factors exerting their influence on the reinforced concrete of the shell structure (condensates, rain water, temperature and humidity gradients, dynamic loads, weathering, etc.) is particularly complex. The principal degradation reactions involved are classified according to the chemical and physical action on concrete and on the reinforcement. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of degradation processes and the influence of the characteristics of the materials and of the medium. The aim is to determine the mechanisms which present the greatest risk for coolers. The interaction between the degradation to concrete and the change in mechanical characteristics is also studied [fr

  14. Towards Rational Design Method for Strengthening of Concrete Structures by External Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuuchi H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many infrastructures need to be repaired or strengthened due to various reasons, such as unexpected deterioration and changes in performance requirement. This paper presents the following recent achievements by the authors’ group on design method for flexural strengthening of concrete structures by external bonding; (i fracture characteristics of interface between substrate concrete and cementitious overlay, (ii crack spacing of flexural strengthened beams, which affects debonding strength, (iii strengths of intermediate crack (IC debonding and end peeling, (iv strength of concrete cover separation, and (v effectiveness of strengthening by external bonding. A unified approach for flexural strengthening by steel plate, fiber reinforced polymer lami¬nate and cementitious overlay, for both intermediate crack (IC debonding, including end peeling, and concrete cover separation is pre¬sented with consideration of crack spacing in the streng¬thened members. Appropriate interfacial rough¬¬¬ness to achieve efficient interface bond property is clari¬fied and the concept of effectiveness of strengthen¬ing is proposed for better strengthening design.

  15. Relationship between thin-film bond strength as measured by a scratch test, and indentation hardness for bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Shusuke; Rawls, H Ralph; Hotta, Masato

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate thin-film bond strength between a bonding agent and human dentin, using a scratch test, and the characteristics and accuracy of measurement. One-step bonding agents (BeautiBond; Bond Force; Adper Easy Bond; Clearfil tri-S Bond) and two-step bonding agents (Cleafil SE Bond; FL-Bond II) were investigated in this study. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared for extracted human molars. The dentin surfaces were ground and bonding agents were applied and light cured. The thin-film bond strength test of the specimens was evaluated by the critical load at which the coated bonding agent failed and dentin appeared. The scratch mark sections were then observed under a scanning electron microscope. Indentation hardness was evaluated by the variation in depth under an applied load of 10gf. Data were compared by one-way ANOVA with the Scheffé's post hoc multiple comparison test (pstrength and indentation hardness were analyzed using analysis of correlation and covariance. The thin-film bond strength of two-step bonding agents were found to be significantly higher than that of one-step bonding agents with small standard deviations. Scratch marks consistently showed adhesive failure in the vicinity of the bonding agent/dentin interface. The indentation hardness showed a trend that two-step bonding agents have greater hardness than one-step bonding agents. A moderately significant correlation (r(2)=0.31) was found between thin-film bond strength and indentation hardness. Thin-film bond strength test is a valid and reliable means of evaluating bond strength in the vicinity of the adhesive interface and is more accurate than other methods currently in use. Further, the thin-film bond strength is influenced by the hardness of the cued bonding agent. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A unified bond theory, probabilistic meso-scale modeling, and experimental validation of deformed steel rebar in normal strength concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenglin

    Bond between deformed rebar and concrete is affected by rebar deformation pattern, concrete properties, concrete confinement, and rebar-concrete interfacial properties. Two distinct groups of bond models were traditionally developed based on the dominant effects of concrete splitting and near-interface shear-off failures. Their accuracy highly depended upon the test data sets selected in analysis and calibration. In this study, a unified bond model is proposed and developed based on an analogy to the indentation problem around the rib front of deformed rebar. This mechanics-based model can take into account the combined effect of concrete splitting and interface shear-off failures, resulting in average bond strengths for all practical scenarios. To understand the fracture process associated with bond failure, a probabilistic meso-scale model of concrete is proposed and its sensitivity to interface and confinement strengths are investigated. Both the mechanical and finite element models are validated with the available test data sets and are superior to existing models in prediction of average bond strength (rib spacing-to-height ratio of deformed rebar. It can accurately predict the transition of failure modes from concrete splitting to rebar pullout and predict the effect of rebar surface characteristics as the rib spacing-to-height ratio increases. Based on the unified theory, a global bond model is proposed and developed by introducing bond-slip laws, and validated with testing of concrete beams with spliced reinforcement, achieving a load capacity prediction error of less than 26%. The optimal rebar parameters and concrete cover in structural designs can be derived from this study.

  17. Effect of Different Bar Embedment Length on Bond-Slip in Plain and Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jankovic, D.; Chopra, M.B.; Kunnath, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This research aims to study the behaviour of the concrete-steel bond using numerical models, taking into account the effect of the different bar embedment length. Both plain and fiber reinforced concrete (FRC) are modeled. The interface bond stress as well as load-displacement response of the

  18. The effect of air thinning on dentin adhesive bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T J; Schwartz, R S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if air thinning three dentin adhesives would affect bond strength to dentin. Ninety human molars were mounted in acrylic and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Thirty teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following dentin bonding agent/composite combinations: A) Universal Bond 3/TPH (Caulk), B) All-Bond 2/Bis-Fil-P (Bisco), and C) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose/Z-100 (3m). The primers were applied following the manufacturers' instructions. The adhesives were applied by two methods. A thin layer of adhesive was applied with a brush to 15 specimens in each group and light cured. Adhesive was brushed on to the remaining 15 teeth in the group, air thinned for 3 seconds, and then polymerized. The appropriate composite was applied in 2 mm increments and light cured utilizing a 5 mm-in-diameter split Teflon mold. Following 3 months of water storage, all groups were shear tested to failure on an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Bond strength was significantly higher in all groups when the dentin bonding agent was painted on without being air thinned. Scotchbond Multi-Purpose had significantly higher bond strength than All-Bond 2, which had significantly higher bond strength than Universal Bond 3.

  19. Long-Term Bending Creep Behavior of Thin-Walled CFRP Tendon Pretensioned Spun Concrete Poles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni P. Terrasi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the long-term behavior of a series of highly-loaded, spun concrete pole specimens prestressed with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP tendons, which were subjected to outdoor four-point bending creep tests since 1996 in the frame of collaboration with the Swiss precast concrete producer, SACAC (Società Anonima Cementi Armati Centrifugati. The 2 m span cylindrical beams studied are models for lighting poles produced for the last 10 years and sold on the European market. Five thin-walled pole specimens were investigated (diameter: 100 mm; wall-thickness: 25–27 mm. All specimens were produced in a pretensioning and spinning technique and were prestressed by pultruded CFRP tendons. Initially, two reference pole specimens were tested in quasi-static four-point bending to determine the short-term failure moment and to model the short-term flexural behavior. Then, three pole specimens were loaded to different bending creep moments: while the lowest loaded specimen was initially uncracked, the second specimen was loaded with 50% of the short-term bending failure moment and exhibited cracking immediately after load introduction. The highest loaded pole specimen sustained a bending moment of 72% of the short-term bending failure moment for 16.5 years before failing in July 2013, due to the bond failure of the tendons, which led to local crushing of the high-performance spun concrete (HPSC. Besides this, long-term monitoring of the creep tests has shown a limited time- and temperature-dependent increase of the deflections over the years, mainly due to the creep of the concrete. A concrete creep-based model allowed for the calculation of the long-term bending curvatures with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, the pole specimens showed crack patterns that were stable over time and minimal slippage of the tendons with respect to the pole’s end-faces for the two lower load levels. The latter proves the successful and durable

  20. Bonded or Unbonded Technologies for Nuclear Reactor Prestressed Concrete Containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrishami, Homayoun; Tcherner, Julia; Barre, Francis; Borgerhoff, Michael; Bumann, Urs; Calonius, Kim; Courtois, Alexis; Debattista, Jean-Marc; Gallitre, Etienne; Isard, Cedric; Elison, Oscar; Graves, Herman; Sircar, Madhumita; Huerta, Alejandro; White, Andrew; ); Jackson, Paul; Kjellin, Daniel; Lillhoek, Sofia; Louhivirta, Jari; Myllymaeki, Jukka; Vaelikangas, Pekka; Martin, Jose; Nakano, Makio; Puttonen, Jari; Rambach, Jean-Mathieu; Tarallo, Francois; Smith, Leslie; Stepan, Jan; Touret, Jean-Pierre; Varpasuo, Pentti

    2015-01-01

    OECD/NEA/CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing of Components and Structures (WGIAGE) has the main mission to advance the current understanding of those aspects relevant to ensuring the integrity of structures, systems and components under design and beyond design loads, to provide guidance in choosing the optimal ways of dealing with challenges to the integrity of operating as well as new nuclear power plants, and to make use of an integrated approach to design, safety and plant life management. The work related to the risks of the loss of pre-stressing force in concrete structures has been in high priority during the activities of the concrete sub-group of WGIAGE. Therefore, the CAPS of WGIAGE: Study on post-tensioning methodologies in containments, was approved by CSNI in June 2009. In this study the two post-tensioning methodologies: bonded and un-bonded methods and their technological features are analysed. In the bonded technology, the tendon cannot slide in its duct due to the cement grouting which is injected after tensioning. In the un-bonded technology, the tendon can slide inside its duct, the corrosion protection is given by grease, wax or dry air. A key point concerning the assessment of durability and safety of prestressed concrete containments is the technology chosen for tendon protection: bonded with cement grout or un-bonded and protected by grease or soft products. The mechanical behaviour of the containment is directly influenced by the adherence of the tendons to the concrete, locally and under high stresses in case of severe accident. The bonded or un-bonded tendons of post-tensioned concrete containment of the Nuclear Power Plants have the major role of containment (balance of the pressure effect during design basis and beyond design accident). Many difficulties around the design, the construction and the in service inspection are related to the tendons. The main goal of the CAPS work was to clarify the consequences and necessary

  1. Effect of confinement on bond strength of hot-dip galvanized lap splices in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhran, Mazen

    2004-01-01

    Galvanizing the reinforcing steel is one of the methods used to protect bars against corrosion. Galvanizing is a hot dip process where the reinforcing bars are immersed in an aqueous pre flux solution of zinc ammonium chloride at a controlled temperature between 840 and 850 degrees F. In 2001, a research program was started at AUB to evaluate experimentally the effect of hot dip galvanizing on the bond capacity of tension lap splices anchored in full-scale beam specimens designed to fail in bond splitting mode. The test results indicated that the use of galvanized bars had a negligible effect on bond strength of reinforcement in normal strength. However, galvanizing caused an average of 20 percent decrease in bond strength of reinforcement in high strength concrete. The primary objective of research reported in this thesis, is the need to find a solution to eliminate the bond reduction of galvanized bars in high strength concrete. It is significant to evaluate the positive effect of the addition of transverse reinforcement in the splice region. The hypothesis to be tested is that such transverse reinforcement will insure uniform bond stress distribution over the entire splice region, thus mobilizing all bar lugs along the splice in the stress transfer mechanism between the bar and the surrounding concrete. Such mechanism might reduce the significant decrease in bond strength in high strength concrete due to galvanizing. To achieve this objective, eighteen full-scale beam specimens were tested in positive bending. Each beam was reinforced with bars spliced in a constant moment region at midspam. The splice length was chosen in such a way that the beams failed in bond splitting of the concrete cover in the splice region. The main variables were type of coating (black or galvanized bars), bar size (20, 25 and 32 mm), and amount of transverse reinforcement in the splice region (0, 2 or 4 stirrups). The test results indicated that confinement did not have a significant

  2. Two-course bonded concrete bridge deck construction : condition and performance after six years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the findings from a six-year study of two-course bonded concrete bridge decks constructed in Virginia. Each of three special portland cement concretes was applied as an overlay, or wearing course, on two experimental spans. The o...

  3. Stable Failure-Inducing Micro-Silica Aqua Epoxy Bonding Material for Floating Concrete Module Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Ho Jay Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies in the development of floating concrete structures focused on a connection system made of modules. In the connection system, the modules are designed to be attached by pre-stressing (PS while floating on the water, which exposes them to loads on the surface of the water. Therefore, the development of a pre-connection material becomes critical to ensure successful bonding of floating concrete modules. Micro-silica mixed aqua-epoxy (MSAE was developed for this task. To find the proper MSAE mix proportion, 0% to 4% micro-silica was mixed in a standard mixture of aqua-epoxy for material testing. Also, the effect of micro-silica on the viscosity of the aqua epoxy was evaluated by controlling the epoxy silane at proportions of 0%, ±5%, and ±10%. After completion of the performance tests of the MSAE, we evaluated the effect of MSAE in a connected structure. The plain unreinforced concrete module joint specimens applied with MSAE at thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 mm were prepared to be tested. Finally, we evaluated the performance of MSAE-applied reinforced concrete (RC module specimens connected by PS tendons, and these were compared with those of continuous RC and non-MSAE-applied beams. The results showed that the mix of micro-silica in the aqua-epoxy changed the performance of the aqua-epoxy and the mix ratio of 2% micro-silica gave a stable failure behavior. The flexural capacity of concrete blocks bonded with MSAE changed according to the bond thickness and was better than that of concrete blocks bonded with aqua-epoxy without micro-silica. Even though MSAE insignificantly increases the load-carrying capacity of the attached concrete module structure, the stress concentration reduction effect stabilized the failure of the structure.

  4. Flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xuhui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jianren; Ma, Yafei; Liu, Yongming

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Flexural behavior of bonded PT beams with strand corrosion is experimental tested. • Cracking, stiffness, ultimate strength, failure & ductility of beams are clarified. • A coefficient is proposed to measure incompatible strain between strand & concrete. - Abstract: An experimental test is performed to investigate the flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion. Eight beams are designed and subjected to accelerated method to different corrosion levels. The initial stiffness of beams is observed by cyclic loading-unloading test during the corrosion procedure. Corrosion effects on concrete cracking, post-cracking stiffness, ultimate strength, failure mode and ductility are then clarified by the flexural test. And, a coefficient is introduced to quantify the incompatible strain between corroded strand and concrete. Results show that the prestress force loss of strand has almost the linear relation with corrosion loss. Strand corrosion affects slightly the initial stiffness of beam before flexural cracking, but degrades significantly the post-cracking stiffness of beam as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%. Slight corrosion of strand has little effects on beams flexural behavior. The severe corrosion, however, decreases the number of crack, changes the failure mode form the concrete crushing to strand rupture, degrades the ductility and the ultimate strength of beams, and leads to the incompatible strain between strand and concrete. In the present test, the incompatible strain decreases about 20% of the flexural strength as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%.

  5. Flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuhui [College of Civil Engineering and Mechanics, Xiangtan University, 411105 Xiangtan (China); School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: leiwlei@hotmail.com [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Zhang, Jianren; Ma, Yafei [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Changsha University of Science & Technology, 410114 Changsha (China); Industry Key Laboratory of Traffic Infrastructure Security Risk Management (CSUST), 410114 Changsha (China); Liu, Yongming [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, 85281 Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Flexural behavior of bonded PT beams with strand corrosion is experimental tested. • Cracking, stiffness, ultimate strength, failure & ductility of beams are clarified. • A coefficient is proposed to measure incompatible strain between strand & concrete. - Abstract: An experimental test is performed to investigate the flexural behavior of bonded post-tensioned concrete beams under strand corrosion. Eight beams are designed and subjected to accelerated method to different corrosion levels. The initial stiffness of beams is observed by cyclic loading-unloading test during the corrosion procedure. Corrosion effects on concrete cracking, post-cracking stiffness, ultimate strength, failure mode and ductility are then clarified by the flexural test. And, a coefficient is introduced to quantify the incompatible strain between corroded strand and concrete. Results show that the prestress force loss of strand has almost the linear relation with corrosion loss. Strand corrosion affects slightly the initial stiffness of beam before flexural cracking, but degrades significantly the post-cracking stiffness of beam as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%. Slight corrosion of strand has little effects on beams flexural behavior. The severe corrosion, however, decreases the number of crack, changes the failure mode form the concrete crushing to strand rupture, degrades the ductility and the ultimate strength of beams, and leads to the incompatible strain between strand and concrete. In the present test, the incompatible strain decreases about 20% of the flexural strength as the corrosion loss exceeds 27.0%.

  6. Evaluating the time-dependent and bond characteristics of lightweight concrete mixes for Kansas prestressed concrete bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This report details results from testing that was conducted to determine the bond and time-dependent : characteristics of two lightweight concrete mixes. The lightweight mixes were evaluated to possibly : provide a more cost-effective solution to rep...

  7. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Hwang, Soo-Duck; Xing, Feng

    2014-10-10

    With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC) of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration.

  8. Cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams: experiment and simulations on the numerical influence of the steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, L.; Torre-Casanova, A.; Pinelli, X.; Davenne, L.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are provided in this contribution to study the global and cracking behaviors of two reinforced concrete beams subjected to four point bending. Experimentally, the use of image correlation technique enables to obtain precise information concerning the cracking properties (spacing, cumulated, maximum and mean values of the opening). Numerically, two simulations are compared taking into account a bond model between steel and concrete or supposing a perfect relation between the two materials. In both cases, a good agreement is achieved between numerical and experimental results even if the introduction of the bond effects has a direct influence during the development of the cracks (better agreement during the 'active' cracking phase). (authors)

  9. Transfer and anchorage bond behaviour in self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigueira-Víctor, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concretes (SCC provide solutions to the problems facing precast concrete construction, enhancing competitiveness, reducing turnaround times and improving final product quality. SCC is fast becoming a key product for the future development of the precast pre-stressed concrete industry.The present paper compares the bond performance of SCC and traditional concrete (TC. The bond performance results confirm the viability of SCC in precast pre-stressed concrete manufacture, despite a slightly higher loss of pre-stressing force and slightly greater anchorage lengths in SCC with a low water/cement ratio. No differences in transfer or anchorage length were detected,however, when high strength TC and SCC were compared. The ECADA test method proved to be well suited to detecting the differences between the concretes analyzed.El desarrollo de los hormigones autocompactantes (SCCofrece muchas posibilidades a las construcciones con hormigón prefabricado, aumentando su competitividad, reduciéndolos plazos de fabricación y ofreciendo mejoras en la calidad del producto final. El SCC se está convirtiendo en un producto clave para el futuro desarrollo de la industria de prefabricados de hormigón pretensado.En este estudio se compara el comportamiento adherente de los SCC con el de los hormigones tradicionales (TC actuales. Los resultados obtenidos confirman la viabilidad del uso de los SCC para la fabricación de elementos prefabricados con hormigón pretensado, en lo relativo a su comportamiento adherente, aunque con la necesidad de considerar unas pérdidas de pretensado ligeramente mayores. Asimismo,debe esperarse un ligero aumento de las longitudes de anclaje cuando se trabaje con SCC de baja relación agua/cemento. Sin embargo, no se han detectado diferencias de comportamiento entre ambos tipos de hormigón cuando la resistencia a compresión es alta en lo relativo a las longitudes de transmisión y anclaje. El método de ensayo ECADA

  10. Behavior of Hollow Thin Welded Tubes Filled with Sand Slag Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Ferhoune

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the axial bearing capacity of thin welded rectangular steel stubs filled with concrete sand. A series of tests was conducted to study the behavior of short composite columns under axial compressive load; the cross section dimensions were 100 × 70 × 2 mm. A total of 20 stubs have been tested, as follows: 4 hollow thin welded tubes were tested to axial and eccentric load compression, 4 were filled with ordinary concrete appointed by BO columns, 6 were filled with concrete whose natural sand was completely substituted by a crystallized sand slag designated in this paper by BSI, and 6 were tucked in concrete whose natural sand was partially replaced by a crystallized sand slag called BSII. The main parameters studied are the height of the specimen (300 mm–500 mm, eccentricity of load and type of filling concrete. Based on test results obtained, it is confirmed that the length of the tubes has a considerable effect on the bearing capacity and the failure mode. In all test tubes, fracture occurred by the convex local buckling of steel section due to the outward thrust of the concrete; it was observed that the sand concrete improves the bearing capacity of tubes compounds compared to those filled with ordinary concrete.

  11. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Jian Long

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration.

  12. Potentialities of infrared thermography to assess damage in bonding between concrete and GFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. CALDEIRA

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the application of the active infrared thermography to detect damage in bonding between concrete and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP. Specimens of concrete and mortar with GFRP externally bonded were prepared and at their interfaces were inserted polystyrene discs to simulate damages. The samples were divided into two groups. In group 1, one sample was correctly bonded by a GFRP plate to the concrete, but in the other three were inserted polystyrene discs which had different diameters to simulate damages in bonding. In group 2, all of the samples contained identical polystyrene discs at their interfaces, but the total thickness of each specimen was different, because the objective was to evaluate the ability of the camera to capture the simulated damage in depth. The experimental procedure was divided into two stages. In the first stage, four types of heating were used to heat samples of group 1: incandescent lamp, kiln, blended lamp and fan heater. Thus, it was possible to detect the damage and to observe its format and length. It was noticed that the infrared images are different depending on the heat source incident on the specimen. Therefore, group 2 was tested only for the more efficient heating (incandescent lamp. In the second stage, the infrared equipment was tested. Some of the parameters that must be inserted in the camera were varied in order to understand their influence on image formation. The results show the effectiveness of infrared thermography to assess adherence in GFRP/concrete interface. In the present work, the best results were obtained when the image is captured towards GFRP/concrete and using incandescent lamp. It was observed that the image and measured temperature suffer significant distortion when a false value was inserted for the parameter emissivity.

  13. A new way to increase the long-term bond strength of new-to-old concrete by the use of fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Gengying

    2003-01-01

    The short-term and long-term bond strengths of new-to-old concrete were experimentally investigated with an emphasis on the influence of new concretes and binders. These new concretes included ordinary Portland cement concrete, expansive concrete and high-volume fly ash concrete, while the binders included pure cement paste (C-binder), expansive binder (E-binder) and fly ash mortar (F-binder). The results showed that the short-term bond strength of all specimens with fly ash concrete was lower than that with ordinary Portland cement concrete, which in turn was lower than that with expansive concrete. The bond strength of the specimens with F-binder was the lowest at the age of 7 days. However, the long-term bond strength of all specimens with added fly ash was the highest and strength losses were observed in the specimens repaired with expansive concrete or E-binder at the age of 3 years. The microstructure of the transition zone with F-binder was also studied by using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) at the ages of 28 days and 1 year, respectively

  14. Influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates in cement hidratation process on corrosion steel bars in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić Farzet H.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chlorides in concrete is a permanent subject of research because they cause corrosion of steel bars. Chlorides added to the concrete during preparation, as accelerators of the bonding of cement minerals process, enter into reaction with aluminates, creating a phase known as chloroaluminate hydrates. In everyday conditions the product of chemical bonding between chlorides and aluminates is usually monochloridealuminate C3A·CaCl2·Hx, better known as Friedel's salt. In this paper, the influence of chemical bonding of chlorides with aluminates during the process of cement hydration on corrosion of steel bars in concrete was investigated. The process of chlorides bonding with aluminates yielding monochloride aluminate is monitored by XRD analyses. It was found that the amount of chlorides bonding with aluminates increases with an increase of temperature, and as a result, reduces the amount of 'free' chlorides in concrete. Potentiodynamic measurements have shown that increase in temperature of the heat treatment of working electrodes by chlorides leads to a reduction of steel bars corrosion as a result of either the increase of the monochloride-aluminate content or the decrease of free chlorides amount. Chlorides bound in chloroaluminate hydrates do not cause activation of steel bars corrosion in concrete. It was also proven that the increase of free chlorides concentration in the concrete leads to intensification of steel bars corrosion. This additionally approves that free chlorides are only the activators of process of steel bars corrosion in the concrete.

  15. Behavior of bonded and unbonded prestressed normal and high strength concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.F. Hussien

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental program conducted to study the behavior of bonded and unbounded prestressed normal strength (NSC and high strength concrete (HSC beams. The program consists of a total of nine beams; two specimens were reinforced with non-prestressed reinforcement, four specimens were reinforced with bonded tendons, and the remaining three specimens were reinforced with unbonded tendons. The overall dimensions of the beams are 160 × 340 × 4400-mm. The beams were tested under cyclic loading up to failure to examine its flexural behavior. The main variables in this experimental program are nominal concrete compressive strength (43, 72 and 97 MPa, bonded and unbonded tendons and prestressing index (0%, 70% and 100%. Theoretical analysis using rational approach was also carried out to predict the flexural behavior of the specimens. Evaluation of the analytical work is introduced and compared to the results of the experimental work.

  16. Tensile strength of structural concrete repaired with hi-bond polymer modified mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaskheli, G.B.

    2009-01-01

    Repair of cracks in concrete is often required to save the concrete structures. Appearance of crack in concrete is bound with the tensile strength of concrete. Recently a cement factory in Sindh has launched a HBPMM (Hi-Bond Polymer Modified Mortar) that can be used as a concrete repairing material instead of normal OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement). It is needed to investigate its performance compared to that of OPC. In total 144 concrete cylinders (150x300mm) having strength of 3000 and 5000 psi were manufactured. These cylinders were then splitted by using a UTM (Universal Testing Machine) and their actual tensile strength was obtained. The concrete cylinders were then repaired with different applications of HBPMM and arc. The repaired samples were again splitted at different curing ages (3, 7 and 28 days) and their tensile strength after repair was obtained. The results show that the concrete cylinders repaired with HBPMM could give better tensile strength than that repaired with arc, the tensile strength of concrete cylinders after repair could increase with increase in the application of repairing material i.e. HBPMM or OPC and with curing time, and HBPMM could remain more effective in case of rich mix concrete than that of normal mix concrete. (author)

  17. Improving the Bond Strength of Rice Husk Ash Concrete by Incorporating Polymer: A New Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bangwar, Daddan Khan; Ali Soomro, Mohsin; Ali Laghari, Nasir; Ali Soomro, Mukhtiar; Ali Buriro, Ahsan

    2018-01-01

    This paper gives an insight of how to improve the bond strength of cement in which concrete is replaced with rice husk ash. A concrete mix was prepared and was used in different types of mixes i.e. Control Mix, 10% cement substituted concrete with rice husk ash and polymer modified concrete by incorporation different dosages of polymer in the 10% cement substituted concrete. A bar of 12mm diameter, 300mm in length was placed in the center of the cylindrical specimens for pull out test. It was...

  18. Coated steel rebar for enhanced concrete-steel bond strength and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations on the use of enamel coating in reinforced concrete structures both for bond strength and : corrosion resistance of steel rebar. Extensive laboratory tests were conducted to characterize the pro...

  19. Experimental Studies on the Fire Behaviour of High Performance Concrete Thin Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Hodicky, Kamil; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of structural high performance concrete (HPC) sandwich panels made with thin plates has increased as a response to modern environmental challenges. Fire endurance is a requirement in structural HPC elements, as for most structural elements. This paper presents experimen......In recent decades, the use of structural high performance concrete (HPC) sandwich panels made with thin plates has increased as a response to modern environmental challenges. Fire endurance is a requirement in structural HPC elements, as for most structural elements. This paper presents....... The parametric assessment of the specimen performance included: thickness of the specimen, testing apparatus, and concrete mix (both with and without polypropylene fibres). The results verified the ability of H-TRIS to impose an equivalent thermal boundary condition to that imposed during a standard furnace test......, with good repeatability, and at comparatively low economic and temporal costs. The results demonstrated that heat induced concrete spalling occurred 1 to 5 min earlier, and in a more destructive manner, for thinner specimens. An analysis is presented combining the thermal material degradation, vapour pore...

  20. Behavior of corroded bonded partially prestressed concrete beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moawad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Prestressed concrete is widely used in the construction industry in buildings. And corrosion of reinforcing steel is one of the most important and prevalent mechanisms of deterioration for concrete structures. Consequently the capacity of post-tension elements decreased after exposure to corrosion. This study presents results of the experimental investigation of the performance and the behavior of partially prestressed beams, with 40 and 80 MPa compressive strength exposed to corrosion. The experimental program of this study consisted of six partially prestressed beams with overall dimensions equal to 150 × 400 × 4500 mm. The variables were considered in terms of concrete compressive strength, and corrosion location effect. The mode of failure, and strain of steel reinforcement, cracking, yield, ultimate load and the corresponding deflection of each beam, and crack width and distribution were recorded. The results showed that the partially prestressed beam with 80 MPa compressive strength has higher resistance to corrosion exposure than that of partially prestressed concrete beam with 40 MPa compressive strength. Not big difference in deterioration against fully/partially corrosion exposure found between partially prestressed beams at the same compressive strength. The most of deterioration incident in partially prestressed beam acts on non prestressed steel reinforcement. Because the bonded tendons are less likely to corrode, cement grout and duct act as a barrier to moisture and chloride penetration, especially plastic duct without splices and connections. The theoretical analysis based on strain compatibility and force equilibrium gave a good prediction of the deformational behavior for high/normal partially prestressed beams. Keywords: Beam, Corrosion, Deterioration, Partially prestressed, High strength concrete

  1. Bond behavior between CFRP sheet and concrete. Part 2. Improvement of bond strength by out-of plane confinement; CFRP sheet to concrete no fuchaku kyodo (2). Mengai kosoku ni yoru fuchaku tairyoku no kaizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kobatake, Y. [Obayashigumi Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-30

    Behavior of phase at the bond interface between CFRP sheet and concrete is modeled basing on the result of anchoring experiment, and specimens are subjected to finite element analysis to investigate necessary confining stress and anchoring length. Improvement of bonding strength is confirmed by providing lateral sheet for anchoring on the sheet bonded on concrete. The out-of-plane stress acted on the sheet and the out-of-plane displacement during confinement in the experiment are estimated as average 0.5MPa and 0.16mm, respectively. Providing appropriate angle to a two-node joint and setting proper stress/deformation relation of springs crossing each other, the behavior of the phase at the bond interface subjected to out-of-plane confinement is modeled. The maximum bond stress is improved from 4.56MPa to 5.10MPa, and the area where the bond stress becomes larger than 4.56MPa increases from 25mm to 30mm. To anchor the sheet employed in this experiment, larger than 30mm out-of-plane confining stress of 0.5MPa must be provided in the direction of fiber. 16 refs., 17 figs., (plus 1 appended fig.), 3 tabs.

  2. Steel Fibres: Effective Way to Prevent Failure of the Concrete Bonded with FRP Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gribniak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the efficiency of steel fibres for improving mechanical properties (cracking resistance and failure toughness of the concrete has been broadly discussed in the literature, the number of studies dedicated to the fibre effect on structural behaviour of the externally bonded elements is limited. This experimental study investigates the influence of steel fibres on the failure character of concrete elements strengthened with external carbon fibre reinforced polymer sheets. The elements were subjected to different loading conditions. The test data of four ties and eight beams are presented. Different materials were used for the internal bar reinforcement: in addition to the conventional steel, high-grade steel and glass fibre reinforced polymer bars were also considered. The experimental results indicated that the fibres, by significantly increasing the cracking resistance, alter the failure character from splitting of the concrete to the bond loss of the external sheets and thus noticeably increase the load bearing capacity of the elements.

  3. Impact of Thin-Walled Projectiles with Concrete Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayment E. Moxley

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program to determine the response of thin-walled steel projectiles to the impact with concrete targets was recently conducted. The projectiles were fired against 41-MPa concrete targets at an impact velocity of 290 m/s. This article contains an outline of the experimental program, an examination of the results of a typical test, and predictions of projectile deformation by classical shell theory and computational simulation. Classical shell analysis of the projectile indicated that the predicted impact loads would result in circumferential buckling. A computational simulation of a test was conducted with an impact/penetration model created by linking a rigid-body penetration trajectory code with a general-purpose finite element code. Scientific visualization of the resulting data revealed that circumferential buckling was induced by the impact conditions considered.

  4. Requirements for Weatherproofing Thin Shell Concrete Roofs. Proceedings of the Conference of Building Research Institute, Division of Engineering and Industrial Research (Spring 1961).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Topics discussed include--(1) requirements for weatherproofing and sealant materials for thin shell concrete roof, (2) effect of physical factors on weatherproofing of thin shell concrete roofs, (3) problems and limitations imposed by thin shell concrete roofs and their effect on weatherproofing and sealant materials, and (4) properties and uses…

  5. Effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at interface between asphalt concrete layers; Asphalt concrete no sokan fuchaku ni okeru tack concrete no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachiya, Y. [Port and Harbour Research Inst., Kanagawa (Japan); Umeno, S. [Ministry of Transport, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, K. [Nagaoka National College of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    The effect of tack coat on bonding characteristics at the interface between surface and base layers was studied for airport asphalt pavement. In a fracture behavior, shear stress is first caused by horizontal loading at the interface between surface and base layers, resulting in peeling of the layers in the case of poor bonding. Further loading under the above condition results in fracture of asphalt concrete layers by bending or tensile actions. The bonding strength between layers decreases with an increase in interval of construction between surface and base layers, while the bonding strength between layers increases with sufficient curing of tack coat. Curing for 1 hour in the daytime and 6 hours or more in the nighttime is sufficient for evaporation of water content in asphalt emulsion. The use of conventional asphalt emulsion for the sandy interface as tack coat deduces the bonding strength in the case of poor curing. Asphalt emulsion containing high-penetration rubber can improve the bonding strength. 12 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Polymers). The method is very efficient and has achieved world wide attention. However, there are some drawbacks with the use of epoxy, e.g. working environment, compatibility and permeability. Substituting the epoxy adherent with a cement based bonding agent will render a strengthening system...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  7. Bond-Slip Behavior of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer Bar in Concrete Subjected to Simulated Marine Environment: Effects of BFRP Bar Size, Corrosion Age, and Concrete Strength

    OpenAIRE

    Yongmin Yang; Zhaoheng Li; Tongsheng Zhang; Jiangxiong Wei; Qijun Yu

    2017-01-01

    Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) bars have bright potential application in concrete structures subjected to marine environment due to their superior corrosion resistance. Available literatures mainly focused on the mechanical properties of BFRP concrete structures, while the bond-slip behavior of BFRP bars, which is a key factor influencing the safety and service life of ocean concrete structures, has not been clarified yet. In this paper, effects of BFRP bars size, corrosion age, and c...

  8. Embedded Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors in Reinforced Concrete Structures-A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrias, António; Casas, Joan R; Villalba, Sergi

    2018-03-26

    When using distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS) on reinforced concrete structures, a compromise must be achieved between the protection requirements and robustness of the sensor deployment and the accuracy of the measurements both in the uncracked and cracked stages and under loading, unloading and reloading processes. With this in mind the authors have carried out an experiment where polyimide-coated DOFS were installed on two concrete beams, both embedded in the rebar elements and also bonded to the concrete surface. The specimens were subjected to a three-point load test where after cracking, they are unloaded and reloaded again to assess the capability of the sensor when applied to a real loading scenarios in concrete structures. Rayleigh Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) was used as the most suitable technique for crack detection in reinforced concrete elements. To verify the reliability and accuracy of the DOFS measurements, additional strain gauges were also installed at three locations along the rebar. The results show the feasibility of using a thin coated polyimide DOFS directly bonded on the reinforcing bar without the need of indention or mechanization. A proposal for a Spectral Shift Quality (SSQ) threshold is also obtained and proposed for future works when using polyimide-coated DOFS bonded to rebars with cyanoacrylate adhesive.

  9. Embedded Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors in Reinforced Concrete Structures—A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Sergi

    2018-01-01

    When using distributed optical fiber sensors (DOFS) on reinforced concrete structures, a compromise must be achieved between the protection requirements and robustness of the sensor deployment and the accuracy of the measurements both in the uncracked and cracked stages and under loading, unloading and reloading processes. With this in mind the authors have carried out an experiment where polyimide-coated DOFS were installed on two concrete beams, both embedded in the rebar elements and also bonded to the concrete surface. The specimens were subjected to a three-point load test where after cracking, they are unloaded and reloaded again to assess the capability of the sensor when applied to a real loading scenarios in concrete structures. Rayleigh Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) was used as the most suitable technique for crack detection in reinforced concrete elements. To verify the reliability and accuracy of the DOFS measurements, additional strain gauges were also installed at three locations along the rebar. The results show the feasibility of using a thin coated polyimide DOFS directly bonded on the reinforcing bar without the need of indention or mechanization. A proposal for a Spectral Shift Quality (SSQ) threshold is also obtained and proposed for future works when using polyimide-coated DOFS bonded to rebars with cyanoacrylate adhesive. PMID:29587449

  10. Accelerated testing for studying pavement design and performance (FY 2000) : effectiveness of fiber reinforced and plain, ultra-thin concrete overlays on Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The objective of the research was to compare the performance of fiber reinforced and plain PCC concrete overlay when used as a thin non-dowelled overlay on top of a rubblized, distressed concrete pavement. The experiment was conducted at the Accelera...

  11. Influence of sand to coarse aggregate ratio on the interfacial bond strength of steel fibers in concrete for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Jin; Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Su Tae; Lee, Jang Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. ► We investigated the effect of S/a on the bond strength of steel fibers. ► Deformed steel fibers produced much higher interfacial bond strength. ► As S/a increased, twisted fiber showed a significant enhancement in bond strength. ► Smooth and hooked fiber showed no clear difference as S/a increased. - Abstract: The interfacial bond strength of three high strength steel fibers (smooth, hooked, and twisted fiber) in concrete of nuclear power plants was investigated to develop fiber reinforced concrete for containment building. Sand to aggregate ratio (S/a) was adjusted to compensate reduction in the workability due to adding fibers; the influence of S/a ratio on the interfacial bond strength was investigated. As the S/a ratio increased from 0.444 to 0.615, the bond strength of twisted steel fiber was significantly improved while smooth and hooked steel fiber showed no clear difference. The different sensitivity according to the S/a ratio results from the different pullout mechanism: twisted steel fiber generates more mechanical interaction during fiber pullout at the interface between fiber and matrix than smooth and hooked fibers. The microscopic observation by scanning electron microscope back-scattered electrons images discovered lower porosity at the interfacial transition zone between fiber and concrete with higher S/a ratio.

  12. Influence of sand to coarse aggregate ratio on the interfacial bond strength of steel fibers in concrete for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Jin, E-mail: jjinslow@nate.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, SeJong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Joo, E-mail: djkim75@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, SeJong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Su Tae, E-mail: stkang@daegu.ac.kr [Department of Civil Engineering, Daegu University, 201 Daegudae-ro, Jillyang, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jang Hwa, E-mail: jhlee@kict.re.kr [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 2311 Daewha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of S/a on the bond strength of steel fibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deformed steel fibers produced much higher interfacial bond strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As S/a increased, twisted fiber showed a significant enhancement in bond strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth and hooked fiber showed no clear difference as S/a increased. - Abstract: The interfacial bond strength of three high strength steel fibers (smooth, hooked, and twisted fiber) in concrete of nuclear power plants was investigated to develop fiber reinforced concrete for containment building. Sand to aggregate ratio (S/a) was adjusted to compensate reduction in the workability due to adding fibers; the influence of S/a ratio on the interfacial bond strength was investigated. As the S/a ratio increased from 0.444 to 0.615, the bond strength of twisted steel fiber was significantly improved while smooth and hooked steel fiber showed no clear difference. The different sensitivity according to the S/a ratio results from the different pullout mechanism: twisted steel fiber generates more mechanical interaction during fiber pullout at the interface between fiber and matrix than smooth and hooked fibers. The microscopic observation by scanning electron microscope back-scattered electrons images discovered lower porosity at the interfacial transition zone between fiber and concrete with higher S/a ratio.

  13. Roodekrans trial sections: The role of structural support under very thin jointed CRC pavements subjected to heavy traffic

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, WJvdM

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Slab Thickness (mm) M a x . T e n s i l e S t r e s s ( M P a ) 300 unbonded 300 bonded 1500 unb. 1500 bonded 12000 unb. 12000 bonded 11 The 140 MPa case was taken as the reference stiffness, with two additional....O.Box 588, La Montagne 0184, South Africa e-mail: pieterst@lantic.net 3 Technical Manager, Cement & Concrete Institute, PO Box 168, Halfway House, 1685, South Africa e-mail: bryan@cnci.org.za 2 Introduction The Roodekrans thin concrete pavement...

  14. Soft projectile impacts analysis on thin reinforced concrete slabs: Tests, modelling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontiroli, C.; Rouquand, A.; Daudeville, L.; Baroth, J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures subjected to high velocity impacts and explosions remain a difficult task today. For 10 years and more now, the CEA-Gramat has maintained a continuous research effort with the help of different French universities in order to overcome encountered difficulties in modelling the behaviour of concrete structures under severe loading. To get more data on aircraft impact problems and then validate numerical models, soft projectile impacts tests at small scale on thin reinforced concrete slabs has been carried out at CEA-Gramat. Numerical simulations of these tests have been carried out and compared with experimental results to validate our numerical approach. (authors)

  15. Thin and thick layers of resin-based sealer cement bonded to root dentine compared: Adhesive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, Epita S; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate tensile and shear bond strengths of one epoxy (AH) and two methacrylate resin-based sealers (EZ and RS) in thin and thick layers bonded to root dentine. An alignment device was prepared for accurate positioning of 20 root dentine cylinders in a predefined gap of 0.1 or 1 mm. Sealer was placed in the interface. Bond strength tests were conducted. Mode of failures and representative surfaces were evaluated. Data were analysed using anova and post-hoc tests, with P thick layer of sealer produced higher bond strength, except for the shear bond strength of EZ. Significant differences between thin and thick layers were found only in tensile bond strengths of AH and RS. Mixed type of failure was constantly found with all sealers. Bond strengths of thick layers of resin-based sealers to root dentine tended to be higher than with thin layers. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  16. A realistic structural analysis of the integrity of the liner of reinforced and prestressed concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchhardt, F.; Brandl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The BWR Gundremmingen II is the first German nuclear power plant with a concrete containment having a thin steel plate liner directly attached to the interior concrete surface to provide an air-tight seal. Due to this monolithic way of anchorage a bonded system of concrete and metal liner membrane is obtained so that the same deformations of the loading or strain conditions are induced to the very stiff concrete hull as well as to the liner. Because of the complex structural behaviour of the bonded system the evaluation is carried out by the finite element method. The overall system is decoupled in several steps. Due to its considerable stiffness the concrete structure can be regarded as the liner supporting basis. The liner system itself might be subdivided into perfect and imperfect sections discretized by plain or curved elements which are supported by point-wise spring elements representing the stud anchors. (orig.)

  17. The Influence of Disorder in Multifilament Yarns on the Bond Performance in Textile Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Konrad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the performance of a bond layer between the multi-filament yarn and the cementitious matrix. The performance of the bond layer is a central issue in the development of textile-reinforced concrete. The changes in the microstructure during the loading result in distinguished failure mechanisms on the micro, meso and macro scales. The paper provides a brief review of these effects and describes a modeling strategy capable of reflecting the failure process. Using the model of the bond layer we illuminate the correspondence between the disorder in the microstructure of the yarn and the bonding behavior at the meso- and macro level. Particular interest is paid to the influence of irregularities in the micro-structure (relative differences in filament lengths, varying bond quality, bond-free length for different levels of local bond quality between the filament surface and the matrix. 

  18. Short and long term behaviour of externally bonded fibre reinforced polymer laminates with bio-based resins for flexural strengthening of concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSwiggan, Ciaran

    The use of bio-based resins in composites for construction is emerging as a way to reduce of embodied energy produced by a structural system. In this study, two types of bio-based resins were explored: an epoxidized pine oil resin blend (EP) and a furfuryl alcohol resin (FA) derived from corn cobs and sugar cane. Nine large-scale reinforced concrete beams strengthened using externally bonded carbon and glass fibre reinforced bio-based polymer (CFRP and GFRP) sheets were tested. The EP resin resulted in a comparable bond strength to conventional epoxy (E) when used in wet layup, with a 7% higher strength for CFRP. The FA resin, on the other hand, resulted in a very weak bond, likely due to concrete alkalinity affecting curing. However, when FA resin was used to produce prefabricated cured CFRP plates which were then bonded to concrete using conventional epoxy paste, it showed an excellent bond strength. The beams achieved an increase in peak load ranging from 18-54% and a 9-46% increase in yielding load, depending on the number of FRP layers and type of fibres and resin. Additionally, 137 concrete prisms with a mid-span half-depth saw cut were used to test CFRP bond durability, and 195 CFRP coupons were used to examine tensile strength durability. Specimens were conditioned in a 3.5% saline solution at 23, 40 or 50°C, for up to 240 days. Reductions in bond strength did not exceed 15%. Bond failure of EP was adhesive with traces of cement paste on CFRP, whereas that of FA was cohesive with a thicker layer of concrete on CFRP, suggesting that the bond between FA and epoxy paste is excellent. EP tension coupons had similar strength and modulus to E resin, whereas FA coupons had a 9% lower strength and 14% higher modulus. After 240 days of exposure, maximum reductions in tensile strength were 8, 19 and 10% for EP, FA and E resins, respectively. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was also performed to assess the significance of the reductions observed. High degrees of

  19. Fabrication of 3D Microfluidic Devices by Thermal Bonding of Thin Poly(methyl methacrylate) Films

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Paul

    2012-07-01

    The use of thin-film techniques for the fabrication of microfluidic devices has gained attention over the last decade, particularly for three-dimensional channel structures. The reasons for this include effective use of chip volume, mechanical flexibility, dead volume reduction, enhanced design capabilities, integration of passive elements, and scalability. Several fabrication techniques have been adapted for use on thin films: laser ablation and hot embossing are popular for channel fabrication, and lamination is widely used for channel enclosure. However, none of the previous studies have been able to achieve a strong bond that is reliable under moderate positive pressures. The present work aims to develop a thin-film process that provides design versatility, speed, channel profile homogeneity, and the reliability that others fail to achieve. The three building blocks of the proposed baseline were fifty-micron poly(methyl methacrylate) thin films as substrates, channel patterning by laser ablation, and device assembly by thermal-fusion bonding. Channel fabrication was characterized and tuned to produce the desired dimensions and surface roughness. Thermal bonding was performed using an adapted mechanical testing device and optimized to produce the maximum bonding strength without significant channel deformation. Bonding multilayered devices, incorporating conduction lines, and integrating various types of membranes as passive elements demonstrated the versatility of the process. Finally, this baseline was used to fabricate a droplet generator and a DNA detection chip based on micro-bead agglomeration. It was found that a combination of low laser power and scanning speed produced channel surfaces with better uniformity than those obtained with higher values. In addition, the implemented bonding technique provided the process with the most reliable bond strength reported, so far, for thin-film microfluidics. Overall, the present work proved to be versatile

  20. Nonlinear finite element modeling of concrete deep beams with openings strengthened with externally-bonded composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawileh, Rami A.; El-Maaddawy, Tamer A.; Naser, Mohannad Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 3D nonlinear FE model is developed of RC deep beams with web openings. ► We used cohesion elements to simulate bond. ► The developed FE model is suitable for analysis of such complex structures. -- Abstract: This paper aims to develop 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) models for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams containing web openings and strengthened in shear with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sheets. The web openings interrupted the natural load path either fully or partially. The FE models adopted realistic materials constitutive laws that account for the nonlinear behavior of materials. In the FE models, solid elements for concrete, multi-layer shell elements for CFRP and link elements for steel reinforcement were used to simulate the physical models. Special interface elements were implemented in the FE models to simulate the interfacial bond behavior between the concrete and CFRP composites. A comparison between the FE results and experimental data published in the literature demonstrated the validity of the computational models in capturing the structural response for both unstrengthened and CFRP-strengthened deep beams with openings. The developed FE models can serve as a numerical platform for performance prediction of RC deep beams with openings strengthened in shear with CFRP composites.

  1. Determinação da tensão de aderência do bambu-concreto Determination of the bamboo-concrete bond stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia P. Mesquita

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se e se discute, neste trabalho, o estudo da aderência entre o bambu e o concreto; através de dois estudos baseados em uma programação estatística de experimento, em que no primeiro se investigaram as influências da dimensão da seção transversal das varetas de bambu e da resistência do concreto na aderência bambu-concreto e, no segundo, avaliou-se o efeito da colocação de pinos artificiais nas varetas de bambu. Em cada estudo realizaram-se 10 réplicas para cada combinação de fatores, resultando no total de 159 ensaios de arrancamento. Curvas tensão de aderência versus deslocamento relativo bambu-concreto, são apresentadas e discutidas, e a tensão de aderência de cálculo é calculada e comparada com os valores sugeridos por normas internacionais para barras lisas de aço. Constatou-se, na primeira fase da investigação, que apenas a resistência do concreto influencia na aderência bambu-concreto e que esta tensão é apenas 20% inferior que a do aço liso-concreto; já na segunda fase verificou-se que os pinos de bambu e de aço elevam a capacidade de transferência de tensões bambu-concreto, de forma significativa.This paper presents and discusses a study about the bamboo-concrete bond stress. Based on a statistical design of experiment, the investigation was divided in two steps: the first one, where the effects of the concrete compressive strength and the dimensions of the bamboo-splint cross-section were investigated; and the second, where the effect of artificial pins studding in the bamboo splints were evaluated. In both steps, ten replicates for each factor combination were done, resulting in 159 push-out tests. Bond stress versus relative displacement curves were presented and discussed. In addition, the design bond stresses of bamboo-concrete were calculated and their values were compared with those specified by International Building Codes for smooth steel and concrete. In the first step, it was

  2. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  3. Development and implementation of ultra-thin concrete road technology for suburban streets in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Louw, MR

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Louw, FC Rust, AO Bergh and AH McKay DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATIONN OF ULTRA- THIN CONCRETE ROAD TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBURBAN STREETS IN SOUTH AFRICA MR Louw, FC Rust, AO Bergh and AH McKay CSIR, Republic of South Africa rlouw...

  4. Slippage of steel in high and normal strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; Siddiqi, Z.A.; Yousaf, M.

    2007-01-01

    Composite action of any reinforced concrete member is only possible if sufficient bond strength exists between steel reinforcing bars and concrete, which can adequately transfer shear stress between them. Bond strength is a function of compressive strength of concrete and hence high strength concrete has higher bond strength (1-2). Therefore required development length can be reduced. In order to investigate the effect of development length on bond stress and slip relationships, experimental investigation was carried out. In this experimentation 24 pull-out samples of high strength concrete and normal strength concrete were casted and tested. The results of this investigation revealed that by increasing the development length from 5db to 10db bond strength increases for both high and normal strength concrete as shown in Figure 11, 12 and 13. However in case of normal strength concrete increase in bond strength is more compared to that in high strength concrete as it is clear from Figure 11 and Figure 13. The increase in bond strength is observed even at 10db development length but the extent is less for 19 mm than 16 mm bars as shown in Figure 12 and Figure 13. This is in agreement with the earlier findings of Chen et al (3) and Harajli et al (1). However in case of HSC the total slippage at 10db is 50% greater than at 5db. This may be due to the fact that more no of concrete keys participate in resisting the slippage. (author)

  5. Glazed Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Anja Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    Why glazed concrete? Concrete hardens and finds its strength at room temperature whereas clay products must first be fired before they achieve this strength. They are stronger and three times as durable as clay products, which is a weighty reason for choosing concrete.5 Another reason, which....... If this succeeds, it will be possible to manufacture thin, large-scale glazed concrete panels comparable in size to concrete sandwich construction and larger which, with or without back-casting, can work as load-bearing construction elements....

  6. Comparative Study on Interface Elements, Thin-Layer Elements, and Contact Analysis Methods in the Analysis of High Concrete-Faced Rockfill Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xiang Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the numerical performance of three contact simulation methods, namely, the interface element, thin-layer element, and contact analysis methods, through the analysis of the contact behavior between the concrete face slab and the dam body of a high concrete-faced rockfill dam named Tianshengqiao-I in China. To investigate the accuracy and limitations of each method, the simulation results are compared in terms of the dam deformation, contact stress along the interface, stresses in the concrete face slab, and separation of the concrete face slab from the cushion layer. In particular, the predicted dam deformation and slab separation are compared with the in-situ observation data to classify these methods according to their agreement with the in-situ observations. It is revealed that the interface element and thin-layer element methods have their limitations in predicting contact stress, slab separation, and stresses in the concrete face slab if a large slip occurs. The contact analysis method seems to be the best choice whether the separation is finite or not.

  7. Effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohammad; Egba, Ernest Ituma

    2017-11-01

    Corrosion of steel is a damaging agent that reduces the functional and structural responsibilities of reinforced concrete structures. Accordingly, reinforced concrete members in the environments that are prone to concrete carbonation or chloride attack coupled with high temperature and relative humidity suffer from accelerated corrosion of reinforcing material. Also, literature proves that climate influences corrosion of concrete, and suggests investigation of impact of corrosion on concrete based on climate zone. Therefore, this paper presents the effects of climate and corrosion on concrete behavior, using bond strength of concrete as a case study. Concrete specimens were prepared form concrete mix that was infested with 3.5 kgm-3 of sodium chloride to accelerate corrosion. The specimens were cured sodium chloride solution 3.5% by weight of water for 28 days before placing them in the exposure conditions. Pull-out tests were conducted at time intervals for one year to measure the impact of exposure condition and corrosion on bond strength of concrete. The results show reduction of bond strength of concrete by 32%, 28% and 8% after one year of subjection of the specimens to the unsheltered natural climate, sheltered natural climate, and laboratory ambient environment respectively. The findings indicate that the climate influences corrosion, which reduces the interlocking bond between the reinforcing bar and the adjacent concrete.

  8. Electrostatic bonding of thin (cycle sine 3 mil) 7070 cover glass to Ta2O5 AR-coated thin (cycle sine 2 mil) silicon wafers and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelkrout, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding of thin cover glass to thin solar cells was researched. Silicon solar cells, wafers, and Corning 7070 glass of from about 0.002" to about 0.003" in thickness were used in the investigation to establish optimum parameters for producing mechanically acceptable bonds while minimizing thermal stresses and resultant solar cell electrical parameter degradation.

  9. Bond slip and crack development in FRC and regular concrete specimens longitudinally reinforced with FRP or steel under tension loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    tensile loading using high definition image analysis in two unique test setups. Two different types of cementitious materials, conventional concrete and highly ductile Engineered Cementitious Composite (ECC), and two types of reinforcement bars, regular steel and Glass Fiber Reinforcement Polymer (GFRP......The governing mechanism in the structural response of reinforced concrete members in tension is the interaction between structural reinforcement and the surrounding concrete matrix. The composite response and the mechanical integrations of reinforced cementitious members were investigated during......), were tested. It was found that the ductile ECC in contrast to regular brittle concrete decreases crack widths significantly which effectively results in decreased bond slip between the reinforcement and surrounding matrix. Furthermore the use of elastic GFRP in comparison to elastic/plastic steel...

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  11. Shielding properties of protective thin film coatings and blended concrete compositions for high level waste storage packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusco, Michael A.; Winfrey, Leigh; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured linear attenuation coefficients are the same for bare and coated steels. • Gamma mean free path is much larger than coating thickness; buildup is negligible. • ‘Concrete-6’ reduces exposure rate outside spent fuel cask significantly over ordinary concrete. - Abstract: Various thin film coatings have been proposed to protect stainless steel high level waste (HLW) containers from premature failure due to localized corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and mechanical wear. These coatings include TiN, ZrO 2 , MoS 2 , TiO 2 , and Al 2 O 3 , to be deposited either in multiple layers or as a thicker, single-layer composite. Linear attenuation coefficients of these materials have been simulated using MicroShield and measured experimentally for various photon energies. Additionally, spent fuel casks with overpacks made of two different types of concrete were simulated to compare exposure rate at the cask surface. In the energy range that is significant for high level waste storage all coating materials possess very similar attenuation behavior. A specialty concrete, containing magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) and lead oxide (PbO), reduces the exposure rate at the outer surface of the overpack by several orders of magnitude. The higher-Z elements not present in ordinary concrete greatly increase attenuation of intermediate-energy gammas (0.4–1.0 MeV). The thin film coatings do not affect the shielding capabilities of the HLW packaging, as their total proposed thickness is nearly three orders of magnitude less than the mean free path (MFP) of the primary photons of interest.

  12. Impact of recycled gravel obtained from low or medium concrete grade on concrete properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Abdelghany Fawzy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effect of recycled gravel obtained from low (Gl or medium (Gm concrete grade on fresh property of concrete (slump, mechanical properties (compressive-splitting tensile strength and mass transport properties (ISAT-sorptivity of concrete containing dolomite as a natural coarse aggregate. Concrete specimens were prepared with cement, water, sand and dolomite admixed with recycled gravel. The percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite was 0:100, 25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at w/c = 0.50, 0.55 and 0.60. The effect of silica fume and bonding admixture at w/c = 0.55 on concrete properties were also considered. The results indicated that, increasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite led to decreasing the slump. All mechanical properties of concrete discussed were inversely affected by increasing percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite from low and medium concrete. Adding 10% SF or bonding admixture increased the mechanical properties of concrete. Mass transport properties of concrete (ISAT-sorptivity were enhanced by decreasing the percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite. The optimum percentage of recycled gravel/dolomite = 25%. Keywords: Recycled gravel, Concrete, Silica fume, Compressive strength, Mass transport

  13. Cost optimization of load carrying thin-walled precast high performance concrete sandwich panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hansen, Sanne; Hulin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    and HPCSP’s geometrical parameters as well as on material cost function in the HPCSP design. Cost functions are presented for High Performance Concrete (HPC), insulation layer, reinforcement and include labour-related costs. The present study reports the economic data corresponding to specific manufacturing......The paper describes a procedure to find the structurally and thermally efficient design of load-carrying thin-walled precast High Performance Concrete Sandwich Panels (HPCSP) with an optimal economical solution. A systematic optimization approach is based on the selection of material’s performances....... The solution of the optimization problem is performed in the computer package software Matlab® with SQPlab package and integrates the processes of HPCSP design, quantity take-off and cost estimation. The proposed optimization process outcomes in complex HPCSP design proposals to achieve minimum cost of HPCSP....

  14. Recycling ground granulated blast furnace slag as cold bonded artificial aggregate partially used in self-compacting concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesoğlu, Mehmet; Güneyisi, Erhan; Mahmood, Swara Fuad; Öz, Hatice Öznur; Mermerdaş, Kasım

    2012-10-15

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), a by-product from iron industry, was recycled as artificial coarse aggregate through cold bonding pelletization process. The artificial slag aggregates (ASA) replaced partially the natural coarse aggregates in production of self-compacting concrete (SCC). Moreover, as being one of the most widely used mineral admixtures in concrete industry, fly ash (FA) was incorporated as a part of total binder content to impart desired fluidity to SCCs. A total of six concrete mixtures having various ASA replacement levels (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 100%) were designed with a water-to-binder (w/b) ratio of 0.32. Fresh properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) were observed through slump flow time, flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, and L-box filling height ratio. Compressive strength of hardened SCCs was also determined at 28 days of curing. It was observed that increasing the replacement level of ASA resulted in decrease in the amount of superplasticizer to achieve a constant slump flow diameter. Moreover, passing ability and viscosity of SCC's enhanced with increasing the amount of ASA in the concrete. The maximum compressive strength was achieved for the SCC having 60% ASA replacement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental investigation of bond strength under high loading rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural behaviour of reinforced concrete is governed significantly by the transmission of forces between steel and concrete. The bond is of special importance for the overlapping joint and anchoring of the reinforcement, where rigid bond is required. It also plays an important role in the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, where a ductile bond behaviour is preferable. Similar to the mechanical properties of concrete and steel also the characteristics of their interaction changes with the velocity of the applied loading. For smooth steel bars with its main bond mechanisms of adhesion and friction, nearly no influence of loading rate is reported in literature. In contrast, a high rate dependence can be found for the nowadays mainly used deformed bars. For mechanical interlock, where ribs of the reinforcing steel are bracing concrete material surrounding the bar, one reason can be assumed to be in direct connection with the increase of concrete compressive strength. For splitting failure of bond, characterized by the concrete tensile strength, an even higher dynamic increase is observed. For the design of Structures exposed to blast or impact loading the knowledge of a rate dependent bond stress-slip relationship is required to consider safety and economical aspects at the same time. The bond behaviour of reinforced concrete has been investigated with different experimental methods at the University of the Bundeswehr Munich (UniBw and the Joint Research Centre (JRC in Ispra. Both static and dynamic tests have been carried out, where innovative experimental apparatuses have been used. The bond stress-slip relationship and maximum pull-out-forces for varying diameter of the bar, concrete compressive strength and loading rates have been obtained. It is expected that these experimental results will contribute to a better understanding of the rate dependent bond behaviour and will serve for calibration of numerical models.

  16. Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Concrete is a component of coherent transition between a concrete base and a wooden construction. The structure is based on a quantity of investigations of the design possibilities that arise when combining digital fabrication tools and material capacities. Through tangible experiments the project...... specific for this to happen. And the knowledge and intention behind the drawing becomes specialised through the understanding of the fabrication processes and their affect on the materials.The structure Concrete is a result of a multi-angled kerf series in ash wood and a concrete base. The ash wood is cut...... using a 5-axis CNC router with a thin saw blade attached. The programming of the machining results in variations of kerfs that lets the ash wood twist into unique shapes.The shapes of the revolving ash ribbons continue into the concrete creating a cohesive shape. The form for the concrete itself is made...

  17. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture

  18. Determination of Bond Capacity in Reinforced Concrete Beam and Its Influence on the Flexural Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rashidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of an experimental investigation of actual performance of the reinforced concrete beam in bond under flexure, when reinforced with tension steel is going to consider. In this experiment four specimens of beam and a bar in the middle of the width of the beam has been used and 2.5 cm of concrete cover has been considered from the center of the bar. In addition, transverse bars have been used to reassure lack of shear yield at the two ends of the beam. Flexural bar has been put in the middle of the beam symmetrically and the length of the flexural bar in each of the samples shall be: 15, 20, 30 and 40 cm. Three cylindrical samples were made in order to determine f’c and were examined at 28 days and the compressive strength of concrete used in this study was about 35 MPa. The beam samples were examined after 28 days via two-point loading system. Based on the results, increasing the length of bar causes increase of flexural strength. The presence of longitudinal rebar resulted in the ultimate momentum to be more than the crack momentum of the cross-section in parts which have broken at the point of longitudinal bar cut.

  19. Experimental testing of a self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam using FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanlei; Hao, Qingduo; Ou, Jinping

    2009-03-01

    A new kind of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP)-concrete composite beam, which consists of a FRP box beam combined with a thin layer of concrete in the compression zone, was developed by using two embedded FBG sensors in the top and bottom flanges of FRP box beam at mid-span section along longitudinal direction, respectively. The flexural behavior of the proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam was experimentally studied in four-point bending. The longitudinal strains of the composite beam were recorded using the embedded FBG sensors as well as the surfacebonded electric resistance strain gauges. Test results indicate that the FBG sensors can faithfully record the longitudinal strain of the composite beam in tension at bottom flange of the FRP box beam or in compression at top flange over the entire load range, as compared with the surface-bonded strain gauges. The proposed self-sensing FRP-concrete composite beam can monitor its longitudinal strains in serviceability limit state as well as in strength limit state, and will has wide applications for long-term monitoring in civil engineering.

  20. Engineering Performance of Polyurethane Bonded Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimin WU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the engineering performance of polyurethane (PUR bonded aggregate were studied. The engineering performance, including compressive and flexural mechanical properties, void ratio, and coefficient of permeability were determined through laboratory tests. Moreover, the effects of two different curing conditions on the compressive strength properties of a PUR bonded aggregate were also evaluated. The compressive strengths of PUR bonded aggregates were found to be lower than that of conventional porous concrete, which is a commonly used cushion material. However, experimental results indicated a higher void ratio and coefficient of permeability, lower elasticity modulus, better toughness, and stronger adaptability to flexural deformation compared to porous concrete. Consequently, PUR bonded aggregate is a better solution than porous concrete when used as the cushion material of a geomembrane surface barrier for a high rock-fill dam.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.15798

  1. Direct bonding of ALD Al2O3 to silicon nitride thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laganà, Simone; Mikkelsen, E. K.; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) by improving low temperature annealing bonding strength when using atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide. We have investigated and characterized bonding of Al2O3-SixNy (low stress silicon rich nitride) and Al2O3-Si3N4 (stoichiometric nitride) thin films annealed from room temperature up......O3 can be bonded to. Preliminary tests demonstrating a well-defined nanochannel system with-100 nm high channels successfully bonded and tests against leaks using optical fluorescence technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization of liquid samples are also reported. Moreover...

  2. Self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Walraven, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    The project 'self-compacting fibre-reinforced concrete (SCFRC)' is part of the Dutch STW/PPM program - 'cement-bonded materials' - DCT.4010. Subproject III to which the project ,SCFRC' belongs deals with the development of new high performance concretes. The project 'SCFRC' aims at investigating the

  3. The effect of bond characteristics between steel slag fine aggregate and cement paste on mechanical properties of concrete and mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuji, W.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary fine aggregate in concrete has been replaced by ground and sieved steel slag fine aggregate, treated and exposed to air for three months. Compared with concrete made from natural sand, properties such as compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modules, permeability and abrasion resistance are considerably improved. The improvement increases with a decrease in w/c ratio, an increase in curing time and an increase in the replacement weight of sand. These results are due to the fact that the steel slag contains some active minerals such as C/sub 3/S, C/sub 2/S, C/sub 4/AF, etc., and shows favorable surface physical characteristics that improve the bond between steel slag particles and cement paste. The results of XRD, SEM and EPM microhardness showed that there are heavier concentration of ions, with finer crystals and a lower degree of CH orientation at the interfacial zone between steel slag particles and cement paste. The study also found small cementitious and fibrous C-S-H crystals growing from the fine aggregate, which are linked with hydrated products form cement paste making the bond and structural characteristic more favorable with cement. The steel slag fine aggregate is an active mineral similar to cement. The bond between the aggregate and cement paste is strengthened both physically and chemically

  4. Manufacture of thin-walled clad tubes by pressure welding of roll bonded sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Grydin, Olexandr; Stolbchenko, Mykhailo; Homberg, Werner; Schaper, Mirko

    2017-10-01

    Clad tubes are commonly manufactured by fusion welding of roll bonded metal sheets or, mechanically, by hydroforming. In this work, a new approach towards the manufacture of thin-walled tubes with an outer diameter to wall thickness ratio of about 12 is investigated, involving the pressure welding of hot roll bonded aluminium-steel strips. By preparing non-welded edges during the roll bonding process, the strips can be zip-folded and (cold) pressure welded together. This process routine could be used to manufacture clad tubes in a continuous process. In order to investigate the process, sample tube sections with a wall thickness of 2.1 mm were manufactured by U-and O-bending from hot roll bonded aluminium-stainless steel strips. The forming and welding were carried out in a temperature range between RT and 400°C. It was found that, with the given geometry, a pressure weld is established at temperatures starting above 100°C. The tensile tests yield a maximum bond strength at 340°C. Micrograph images show a consistent weld of the aluminium layer over the whole tube section.

  5. Optimization process for thin-walled high performance concrete sandwich panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    with the specifications of the design constrains and variables. The tool integrates the processes of HPCSP design, quantity take-off and cost estimation into a single system that would provide different costs for different HPCSP designs. The proposed multi-objective optimisation scheme results into derivation of basic......A Nearly zero energy buildings are to become a requirement as part of the European energy policy. There are many ways of designing nearly zero energy buildings, but there is a lack of knowledge on optimization processes in the sense of structurally and thermally efficient design with an optimal...... economical solution. The present paper aims to provide multi-objective optimisation procedure addressed to structural precast thin-walled High Performance Concrete Sandwich Panels (HPCSP). The research aim is concerned with developing a tool that considers the cost of HPCSP materials along...

  6. Mechanism of bonding and debonding using surface activated bonding method with Si intermediate layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kai; Fujino, Masahisa; Matsumoto, Yoshiie; Suga, Tadatomo

    2018-04-01

    Techniques of handling thin and fragile substrates in a high-temperature process are highly required for the fabrication of semiconductor devices including thin film transistors (TFTs). In our previous study, we proposed applying the surface activated bonding (SAB) method using Si intermediate layers to the bonding and debonding of glass substrates. The SAB method has successfully bonded glass substrates at room temperature, and the substrates have been debonded after heating at 450 °C, in which TFTs are fabricated on thin glass substrates for LC display devices. In this study, we conducted the bonding and debonding of Si and glass in order to understand the mechanism in the proposed process. Si substrates are also successfully bonded to glass substrates at room temperature and debonded after heating at 450 °C using the proposed bonding process. By the composition analysis of bonding interfaces, it is clarified that the absorbed water on the glass forms interfacial voids and cause the decrease in bond strength.

  7. Modeling the dynamic stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under low-amplitude vibration loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tengfei; Castel, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a model, initially developed to calculate the stiffness of cracked reinforced concrete beams under static loading, is used to assess the dynamic stiffness. The model allows calculating the average inertia of cracked beams by taking into account the effect of bending cracks (primary cracks) and steel-concrete bond damage (i.e. interfacial microcracks). Free and forced vibration experiments are used to assess the performance of the model. The respective influence of bending cracks and steel-concrete bond damage on both static and dynamic responses is analyzed. The comparison between experimental and simulated deflections confirms that the effects of both bending cracks and steel-concrete bond loss should be taken into account to assess reinforced concrete stiffness under service static loading. On the contrary, comparison of experimental and calculated dynamic responses reveals that localized steel-concrete bond damages do not influence significantly the dynamic stiffness and the fundamental frequency.

  8. Nonlocal Peridynamic Modeling and Simulation on Crack Propagation in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended peridynamic approach for crack propagation analysis in concrete structures was proposed. In the peridynamic constitutive model, concrete material was described as a series of interacting particles, and the short-range repulsive force and anisotropic behavior of concrete were taken into account in the expression of the interactive bonding force, which was given in terms of classical elastic constants and peridynamic horizon. The damage of material was defined locally at the level of pairwise bond, and the critical stretch of material bond was described as a function of fracture strength in the classical concrete failure theory. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed model and algorithms were validated by simulating the propagation of mode I and I-II mixed mode cracks in concrete slabs. Furthermore, crack propagation in a double-edge notched concrete beam subjected to four-point load was simulated, in which the experimental observations are captured naturally as a consequence of the solution.

  9. Bonding structure and mechanical properties of B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition at different laser fluences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.B.; Xiao, J.L.; Shen, Q.; Zhang, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Boron carbon nitride (B-C-N) thin films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition under different laser fluences changing from 1.0 to 3.0 J/cm"2. The influence of laser fluence on microstructure, bonding structure, and mechanical properties of the films was studied, so as to explore the possibility of improving their mechanical properties by controlling bonding structure. The bonding structure identified by FT-IR and XPS indicated the coexistence of B-N, B-C, N-C and N=C bonds in the films, suggesting the formation of a ternary B-C-N hybridization. There is a clear evolution of bonding structure in the B-C-N films with the increasing of laser fluence. The variation of the mechanical properties as a function of laser fluence was also in accordance with the evolution of B-C and sp"3 N-C bonds whereas contrary to that of sp"2 B-N and N=C bonds. The hardness and modulus reached the maximum value of 33.7 GPa and 256 GPa, respectively, at a laser fluence of 3.0 J/cm"2, where the B-C-N thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition possessed the highest intensity of B-C and N-C bonds and the lowest fraction of B-N and N=C bonds. - Highlights: • Improvement of mechanical property by controlling bonding structure is explored. • A clear evolution of bonding structure with the increasing of laser fluence • Variation of property is in accordance with the evolution of B−C and N−C bonds.

  10. Finite element-implementation of creep of concrete for thin-shell analysis using nonlinear constitutive relations and creep compliance functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, H.; Mang, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for combining nonlinear short-time behavior of concrete with nonlinear creep compliance functions is presented. It is an important ingredient of a computer code for nonlinear finite element (FE) analysis of prestressed concrete shells, considering creep, shrinkage and ageing of concrete, and relaxation of the prestressing steel. The program was developed at the Institute for Strength of Materials of Technical University of Vienna, Austria. The procedure has resulted from efforts to extend the range of application of a Finite Element program, abbreviated as FESIA, which originally was capable of modeling reinforeced concrete in the context of thin-shell analysis, using nonlinear constitutive relations for both, conrete and steel. The extension encompasses the time-dependent behavior of concrete: Creep, shrinkage and ageing. Creep is modeled with the help of creep compliance functions which may be nonlinear to conform with the short-time constitutive relations. Ageing causes an interdependence between long-time and short-time deformations. The paper contains a description of the physical background of the procedure and hints on the implementation of the algorithm. The focus is on general aspects. Details of the aforementioned computer program are considered only where this is inevitable. (orig.)

  11. Self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete applied in thin plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grunewald, S.; Shionaga, R.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Floor panels produced with traditionally vibrated concrete are relatively thick due to the need to reinforce concrete and consequently, heavy. Without the need to place rebars in panels and by applying self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete (SCFRC) the production process becomes more efficient.

  12. Research on Anchorage Performance of Grouting Anchor Connection of Precast Concrete Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Sheng; Cao, Xixi

    2018-03-01

    The bonding of grouted anchor bars is one of the vertical connection forms of steel bars in fabricated concrete structures. The performance of grouted connection is mainly affected by the anchorage length and lap length of steel bars. The mechanisms of bond and anchorage between steel bar and concrete are analyzed, and the factors that influence the anchorage performance of steel bar are systematically summarized. Results show that the bond and anchorage performance of steel and concrete have been studied widely, but there are still shortcomings, and the connection forms need to be further improved.

  13. Anchorage in concrete construction

    CERN Document Server

    Eligehausen, Rolf; Silva, John F

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of current fastening technology using inserts (anchor channels, headed stud), anchors (metal expansion anchor, undercut anchor, bonded anchor, concrete screw and plastic anchor) as well as power actuated fasteners in concrete. It describes in detail the fastening elements as well as their effects and load-bearing capacities in cracked and non-cracked concrete. It further focuses on corrosion behaviour, fire resistance and characteristics with earthquakes and shocks. It finishes off with the design of fastenings according to the European Technical Approval Guideline (ETAG 001), the Final Draft of the CEN Technical Specification 'Design of fastenings for use in concrete' and the American Standards ACI 318-05, Appendix D and ACI 349-01, Appendix B.

  14. Accelerated testing for studying pavement design and performance (FY 2004) : thin bonded rigid overlay on PCCP and HMA (CISL experiment no. 13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The thirteenth full-scale Accelerated Pavement Test (APT) experiment at the Civil Infrastructure Laboratory (CISL) : of Kansas State University aimed to determine the response and the failure mode of thin concrete overlays. Four : pavement structures...

  15. Influence of uncoated and coated plastic waste coarse aggregates to concrete compressive strength

    OpenAIRE

    Purnomo Heru; Pamudji Gandjar; Satim Madsuri

    2017-01-01

    The use of plastic waste as coarse aggregates in concrete is part of efforts to reduce environmental pollution. In one hand the use of plastic as aggregates can provide lighter weight of the concrete than concrete using natural aggregates, but on the other hand bond between plastic coarse aggregates and hard matrix give low concrete compressive strength. Improvement of the bond between plastic coarse aggregate and hard matrix through a sand coating to plastic coarse aggregate whole surface is...

  16. Bond Strength Mechanism of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Mortars: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zailani, W. W. A.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Razak, R. A.; Zainol, M. R. R. M. A.; Tahir, M. F. M.

    2017-11-01

    Geopolymer possess many excellent properties such as high compressive and bond strength, long term durability, better acid resistance and also known as a “Sustainable Material” due to its low carbon emission and low energy consumption. Thus, it is a good opportunity to develop and explore not only for cement and concrete but also as geopolymeric repair materials. This reviews showed that good bonding properties between geopolymeric repair material and concrete substrate is important in order to acquire an enhanced resistance against penetration of harmful substances and avoiding respalling of the repair material by understanding the bonding behaviour. Bond strength depends to the properties of the repair materials itself and also the surface preparations of concrete substrate.

  17. Shear behaviour of reinforced phyllite concrete beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Owusu Afrifa, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phyllite concrete beams often exhibited shear with anchorage bond failure. ► Different shear design provisions for reinforced phyllite beams are compared. ► Predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams must be modified by a reduction factor. -- Abstract: The shear behaviour of concrete beams made from phyllite aggregates subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading is reported. First diagonal shear crack load of beams with and without shear reinforcement was between 42–58% and 42–92% of the failure loads respectively. The phyllite concrete beams without shear links had lower post-diagonal cracking shear resistance compared to corresponding phyllite beams with shear links. As a result of hysteretic energy dissipation, limited cyclic loading affected the stiffness, strength and deformation of the phyllite beams with shear reinforcement. Generally, beams with and without shear reinforcement showed anchorage bond failure in addition to the shear failure due to high stress concentration near the supports. The ACI, BS and EC codes are conservative for the prediction of phyllite concrete beams without shear reinforcement but they all overestimate the shear strength of phyllite concrete beams with shear reinforcement. It is recommended that the predicted shear capacity of phyllite beams reinforced with steel stirrups be modified by a reduction factor of 0.7 in order to specify a high enough safety factor on their ultimate strength. It is also recommended that susceptibility of phyllite concrete beams to undergo anchorage bond failure is averted in design by the provision of greater anchorage lengths than usually permitted.

  18. Surface treatment of reinforced cement concrete mixtures of hpcm type

    OpenAIRE

    Vyrozhemsky, V.; Krayushkina, K.

    2006-01-01

    One of the most perspective ways of pavement roughness and durability improvement is the arrangement of thin cement concrete layer surface treatment reinforced with different types of fiber. The name of this material is known abroad as HPCM (High Performance Cementious Materials) durable thin layer concrete pavement in a thickness of 1 cm, dispersion-like reinforced with metal or polymer fibers. To enhance bind properties the stone material grade 3 7mm is applied on the top of concrete surfac...

  19. Stoichiometry and local bond configuration of In{sub 2}S{sub 3}:Cl thin films by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juma, Albert O., E-mail: jumaa@biust.ac.bw

    2016-10-15

    In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films deposited using chemical methods always contain residual elements from the precursors, which modify their properties. As buffer layers in solar cells, the residual elements in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} layer affect the performance of these devices. The stoichiometry of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films deposited by spray ion layer gas reaction (ILGAR) was studied as a function of the residual Cl from InCl{sub 3} precursor by varying the deposition parameters. The chemical formula was deduced from the elemental composition determined using Rutherford backscattering (RBS). Incomplete sulfurization of the precursor implies that residual Cl{sup −} remains bonded to the In{sup 3+} ions while some occupy interstitial and/or antisite positions in the In{sub 2}S{sub 3} matrix. This results in thin films with different stoichiometry, described by the formula In{sub 4}S{sub 6−x}Cl{sub 2x+2y}. This changes the local bond configuration and geometry and underpins the influence of residual Cl on the physical properties of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films.

  20. Modeling and Measurement of Sustained Loading and Temperature-Dependent Deformation of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bonded to Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoseok; Lee, Jaeha; Kim, WooSeok

    2015-01-29

    This paper aims at presenting the effects of short-term sustained load and temperature on time-dependent deformation of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bonded to concrete and pull-off strength at room temperature after the sustained loading period. The approach involves experimental and numerical analysis. Single-lap shear specimens were used to evaluate temperature and short-term sustained loading effects on time-dependent behavior under sustained loading and debonding behavior under pull-off loading after a sustained loading period. The numerical model was parameterized with experiments on the concrete, FRP, and epoxy. Good correlation was seen between the numerical results and single-lap shear experiments. Sensitivity studies shed light on the influence of temperature, epoxy modulus, and epoxy thickness on the redistribution of interfacial shear stress during sustained loading. This investigation confirms the hypothesis that interfacial stress redistribution can occur due to sustained load and elevated temperature and its effect can be significant.

  1. Bond length contraction in Au nanocrystals formed by ion implantation into thin SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, P.; Johannessen, B.; Giraud, V.; Cheung, A.; Glover, C.J.; Azevedo, G. de M; Foran, G.J.; Ridgway, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Au nanocrystals (NCs) fabricated by ion implantation into thin SiO 2 and annealing were investigated by means of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A bond length contraction was observed and can be explained by surface tension effects in a simple liquid-drop model. Such results are consistent with previous reports on nonembedded NCs implying a negligible influence of the SiO 2 matrix. Cumulant analysis of the EXAFS data suggests surface reconstruction or relaxation involving a further shortened bond length. A deviation from the octahedral closed shell structure is apparent for NCs of size 25 A

  2. Influence of uncoated and coated plastic waste coarse aggregates to concrete compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo Heru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of plastic waste as coarse aggregates in concrete is part of efforts to reduce environmental pollution. In one hand the use of plastic as aggregates can provide lighter weight of the concrete than concrete using natural aggregates, but on the other hand bond between plastic coarse aggregates and hard matrix give low concrete compressive strength. Improvement of the bond between plastic coarse aggregate and hard matrix through a sand coating to plastic coarse aggregate whole surface is studied. Sand used to coat the plastic aggregates are Merapi volcanic sand which are taken in Magelang. Three mixtures of polypropylene (PP coarse plastic aggregates, Cimangkok river sand as fine aggregates, water and Portland Cement Composite with a water-cement ratio of 0.28, 0.3 and 0.35 are conducted. Compression test are performed on concrete cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 10 cm and a height of 20 cm. The results in general show that concrete specimens using plastic aggregates coated with sand have higher compressive strength compared to those of concrete specimens using plastic aggregates without sand coating. The bond improvement is indirectly indicated by the betterment of concrete compressive strength.

  3. Influence of interface properties on fracture behaviour of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Interface; concrete; bond strength; fracture toughness; stiffness; ductility. 1. Introduction .... behaviour of concrete using sandwich, and direct rock-mortar compact specimens under mode I and mode II ... pulse velocity technique. 4.2 Geometry of ...

  4. Bond-length strain in buried Ga1-xInxAs thin-alloy films grown coherently on InP(001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woicik, J.C.; Gupta, J.A.; Watkins, S.P.; Crozier, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    The bond lengths in a series of strained, buried Ga 1-x In x As thin-alloy films grown coherently on InP(001) have been determined by high-resolution extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements. Comparison with a random-cluster calculation demonstrates that the external in-plane epitaxial strain imposed by pseudomorphic growth opposes the natural bond-length distortions due to alloying.copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  5. Rotation capacity of self-compacting steel fibre reinforced concrete beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Walraven, J.C.; Den Uijl, J.A.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.

    2009-01-01

    Steel fibres are known to enhance the toughness of concrete in compression and in tension. Steel fibres also improve the bond properties between concrete matrix and reinforcing steel bars. In order to investigate the effect of steel fibres on the rotation capacity of reinforced concrete members,

  6. Investigation of field corrosion performance and bond/development length of galvanized reinforcing steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In reinforced concrete systems, ensuring that a good bond between the concrete and the embedded reinforcing steel is critical to : long-term structural performance. Without good bond between the two, the system simply cannot behave as intended. The b...

  7. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Loeseth, S.; Holand, I.

    1977-01-01

    A computational model for circular symmetric reinforced concrete shell problems is described. The model is based on the Finite Element Method. Non-linear stress-strain constitutive relations are used for the concrete, the reinforcement and for the liner. The reinforcement layers may be of different steel qualities. Each layer may be given a specified prestressing. This can be done at the beginning of the computations or the specific reinforcement layer can be considered inactive until a specified level of loading is reached. Thus, the prestressing procedure may also be analyzed in detail. Bond-slip effects are not accounted for. However, no bond may be assumed for prestressing cables by inserting special reinforcement elements. Several models of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels which have been tested up to rupture have been analysed. Analytical (numerical) models for reinforced concrete are also discussed on a more general basis. (Auth.)

  8. FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF CAMBER OF PRESTRESSED CONCRETE BEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. Gaigerov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For large-span reinforced concrete beam structures developed by the method of determining the camber due to the prestressing of a steel rope on the concrete. Performed numerical experiments to study the impact of various schemes layout prestressed reinforcement without bonding with concrete on the distribution of the relief efforts along the path of the reinforcement.

  9. Interfacial debonding of ice-asphalt concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazawa, E.; Mizoue, Y. (Hiroshima Univ., Hiroshima (Japan)); Kojima, T. (Hitachi Chemical Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-09-20

    Series of experimental investigations were carried out to clarify the bonding mechanism between ice and asphalt and to develop a new technique to reduce bonding resistance. The surface bonding resistance was measured by three methods and the main variables taken into consideration have been surface energy, surface roughness and stiffness of asphalt. Surface energy was varied by using various water repellents and the stiffness of the concrete was varied by mixing rubber particles. Correlations of the three variables were studied and the following results have been obtained. Decreasing of surface energy and increasing of deformability of asphalt concrete has been the effective method to decrease the bonding between ice and asphalt. For the case of water repellent coated surface, shear debonding strength has been linearly related to the energy required for debonding by dynamic tension and the shear debonding strength has decreased with the decrease in roughness of pavement. In the case of surface without using repellent, shear debonding strength has not been influenced by surface energy and roughness of pavement. 6 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Effect of nano-SiO2 particles and curing time on development of fiber-matrix bond properties and microstructure of ultra-high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zemei; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Shi, Caijun

    2017-01-01

    Bond properties between fibers and cementitious matrix have significant effect on the mechanical behavior of composite materials. In this study, the development of steel fiber-matrix interfacial bond properties in ultra-high strength concrete (UHSC) proportioned with nano-SiO 2 varying between 0 and 2%, by mass of cementitious materials, was investigated. A statistical model relating either bond strength or pullout energy to curing time and nano-SiO 2 content was proposed by using the response surface methodology. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and backscatter scanning electron microscopy (BSEM) were used to characterize the microstructure of the matrix and the fiber-matrix interface, respectively. Micro-hardness around the embedded fiber and hydration products of the matrix were evaluated as well. Test results indicated that the optimal nano-SiO 2 dosage was 1% in terms of the bond properties and the microstructure. The proposed quadratic model efficiently predicted the bond strength and pullout energy with consideration of curing time and nano-SiO 2 content. The improvement in bond properties associated with nano-silica was correlated with denser matrix and/or interface and stronger bond and greater strength of hydration products based on microstructural analysis.

  11. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  12. Covalently bonded disordered thin-film materials. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings Volume 498

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.P.; Milne, W.I.; Jaskie, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The current and potential impact of covalently bonded disordered thin films is enormous. These materials are amorphous-to-nanocrystalline structures made from light atomic weight elements from the first row of the periodic table. Examples include amorphous tetrahedral diamond-like carbon, boron nitride, carbon nitride, boron carbide, and boron-carbon-nitride. These materials are under development for use as novel low-power, high-visibility elements in flat-panel display technologies, cold-cathode sources for microsensors and vacuum microelectronics, encapsulants for both environmental protection and microelectronics, optical coatings for laser windows, and ultra-hard tribological coatings. researchers from 17 countries and a broad range of academic institutions, national laboratories and industrial organizations come together in this volume to report on the status of key areas and recent discoveries. More specifically, the volume is organized into five sections. The first four highlight ongoing work primarily in the area of amorphous/nanocrystalline (disordered) carbon thin films; theoretical and experimental structural characterization; electrical and optical characterizations; growth methods; and cold-cathode electron emission results. The fifth section describes the growth, characterization and application of boron- and carbon-nitride thin films

  13. The Aspergillus niger growth on the treated concrete substrate using variable antifungals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parjo, U. K.; Sunar, N. M.; Leman, A. M.; Gani, P.; Embong, Z.; Tajudin, S. A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Aspergillus niger (A. niger) growth on substrates after incorporates with different compounds of antifungals which is normally used in food industry. The antifungals named as potassium sorbate (PS), calcium benzoate (CB) and zinc salicylate (ZS) were applied on concrete substrate covered with different wall finishing such as acrylic paint (AP), glycerol based paint (GBP), thin wallpaper (THIN) and thick wallpaper (THICK). The concrete substrate were inoculated with spore suspension, incubated at selected temperature (30oC) and relative humidity (90%)in plant growth chamber. The observations were done from the Day 3 until Day 27. The results showed that the growth of the A. niger for concrete treated by PS for AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 64%, 32%, 11% and 100%, respectively. Meanwhile for CB, the growth of A. niger on AP, GBP, THIN, and THICK were 100%, 12%, 41%, and 13%, respectively. Similarly, treated concrete by ZS revealed that the growth of A. niger on the same substrate cover were 33%, 47%, 40%, and 39%, respectively. The results obtained in this study provide a valuable knowledge on the abilities of antifungals to remediate A. niger that inoculated on the concrete substrate. Consequently, this study proved that the PS covering with THIN more efficiency compares CB and ZS to prevent A. niger growth.

  14. Enhanced Performance of Recycled Aggregate Concrete with Atomic Polymer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    The atomic polymer technology in form of mesoporous inorganic polymer (MIP) can effectively improve material durability and performance of concrete by dramatically increase inter/intragranular bond strength of concrete at nano-scale. The strategy of ...

  15. Structural performance of new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with bfrp shear connectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Hulin, Thomas; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new thin-walled concrete sandwich panel system reinforced with basalt fiber-reinforced plastic (BFRP) with optimum structural performances and a high thermal resistance developed by Connovate and Technical University of Denmark. The shear connecting system made of a BFRP grid...... is described and provides information on the structural design with its advantages. Experimental and numerical investigations of the BFRP connecting systems were performed. The experimental program included testing of small scale specimens by applying shear (push-off) loading and semi-full scale specimens...... on finite element modelling showed that the developed panel system meets the objectives of the research and is expected to have promising future....

  16. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear numerical methods to calculate structures of reinforced concrete or of prestressed concrete are mostly based on two idealizing assumptions: tension stiffness perpendicular to cracks is equal to the stiffness of reinforcement alone and shear modulus is taken as constant. In real reinforced concrete structures concrete contributes to the tension-stiffness perpendicular to cracks and thus to the global stiffness matrix because of bond action between concrete and reinforcement and shear transfer in cracks is depending on stresses acting in cracks. Only few authors are taking these aspects into account and only with rough semiempirical assumptions. In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include these effects, hitherto neglected, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u - uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r - reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c - crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). (Auth.)

  17. Durability and service life prediction of GFRP bars embedded in concrete under acid environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jikai, E-mail: jkzhou@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Xudong, E-mail: cxdong1985@hotmail.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China); Chen Shixue, E-mail: 710567525@qq.com [College of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210098 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Bond strength of GFRP bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Bond strength of steel bars decrease with an increase in pH of acid solutions. > Durability of GFRP bars could be predicted by modified Arrhenius relation. - Abstract: In recent years, glass fiber reinforcing polymers (GFRP) has emerged as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcing bars in concrete structures. The bond behavior of GFRP bars to concrete under acidic environment is important because of increasing acid rain in China nowadays. This paper presents an experimental investigation into comparison of the durability of the bond between GFRP and steel bars to concrete under acid environment. The specimens were subject to corrosion by immersion in acid solutions with different concentration. One hundred and twenty pullout specimens were used to study the effect of different environment on bond strength of GFRP and steel bars to concrete. Experimental results showed that, For GFRP bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 11%, 22%, 17.2% and 14% were observed in tap water, pH = 2, pH = 3, and pH = 4 environment, respectively. For steel bars, at the end of 75 days of conditioning duration, maximum bond strength loss of 19.6% and 12.3% were observed in pH = 2 and pH = 3 environment, respectively. The influence of solution concentration on bond strength of GFRP bars was determined using Arrhenius equation and time shift method (TSF).

  18. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  19. Modeling of crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks is a problem that has not yet been addressed properly. To investigate it, a cracked half-infinite disk of concrete is strengthened with a linear elastic material bonded to the surface, and analyzed using two different finite element modeling...... instead of 3D calculations to predict the response of a structure and that it opens up for simpler evaluation of strengthened concrete structures using the finite element method....

  20. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones ...

  1. Simulating distributed reinforcement effects in concrete analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the bond slip is brought into the TEMP-STRESS finite element code by relaxing the equal strain condition between concrete and reinforcement. This is done for the elements adjacent to the element which is cracked. A parabolic differential strain variation is assumed along the reinforcement from the crack, which is taken to be at the centroid of the cracked element, to the point where perfect bonding exists. This strain relationship is used to increase the strain of the reinforcement in the as yet uncracked elements located adjacent to a crack. By the same token the corresponding concrete strain is decreased. This estimate is made assuming preservation of strain energy in the element. The effectiveness of the model is shown by examples. Comparison of analytical results is made with structural test data. The influence of the bonding model on cracking is portrayed pictorially. 5 refs., 6 figs

  2. Investigation of field corrosion performance and bond/development length of galvanized reinforcing steel : [tech transfer summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    In reinforced concrete systems, ensuring that a good bond between the : concrete and the embedded reinforcing steel is critical to long-term structural : performance. Without good bond between the two, the system simply cannot : behave as intended. :...

  3. Fracture behaviour of heat cured fly ash based geopolymer concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarker, Prabir K.; Haque, Rashedul; Ramgolam, Karamchand V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fly ash geopolymer (GPC) can help reduce carbon footprint of concrete. ► Fracture behaviour of GPC as compared to OPC concrete was studied. ► Fracture energy of GPC was similar to that of OPC concrete. ► GPC showed higher fracture toughness than OPC concrete. ► Higher bond strength resulted in higher crack resistance of GPC. -- Abstract: Use of fly ash based geopolymer as an alternative binder can help reduce CO 2 emission of concrete. The binder of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is different from that of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete. Thus, it is necessary to study the effects of the geopolymer binder on the behaviour of concrete. In this study, the effect of the geopolymer binder on fracture characteristics of concrete has been investigated by three point bending test of RILEM TC 50 – FMC type notched beam specimens. The peak load was generally higher in the GPC specimens than the OPC concrete specimens of similar compressive strength. The failure modes of the GPC specimens were found to be more brittle with relatively smooth fracture planes as compared to the OPC concrete specimens. The post-peak parts of the load–deflection curves of GPC specimens were steeper than that of OPC concrete specimens. Fracture energy calculated by the work of fracture method was found to be similar in both types of concrete. Available equations for fracture energy of OPC concrete yielded conservative estimations of fracture energy of GPC. The critical stress intensity factor of GPC was found to be higher than that of OPC concrete. The different fracture behaviour of GPC is mainly because of its higher tensile strength and bond strength than OPC concrete of the same compressive strength.

  4. Suitability of geopolymeric concretes for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ipatti, A.; Kallio, L.

    1991-12-01

    Concrete barriers are in essential role in most of the disposal concepts for nuclear waste. As to the binders, the used high-quality, strong and dense concretes may be based both on the present types of cements and on new types of special cements. One feasible special cement discussed in this literature report is the geopolymeric cement, which is, at its cleanest, a completely lime-free binder composed mainly of aluminium silicates. However, in 1990 the lime-free aluminium silicate cement had not yet reached the stage of development required of a widely marketed factory product. On the other hand, as an applicable product the development work started as early as in the 70s in France and in the USA has reached a blended cement consisting both of geopolymeric and Portland cements. The main advantages of the geopolymeric concrete compared to the ordinary Portland cement concrete are based on richer and stronger chemical bonds of the cement stone. The strong three-dimensional networks of bonds make the geopolymeric concrete stronger, denser and, above all, more ductile. The geopolymeric concrete is particularly suitable for hazardous waste applications, since hazardous materials have been found to be locked inside the geopolymeric networks. The properties of the geopolymeric cements and concretes and the implemented applications seem to be highly promising, but as to the nuclear waste applications there is not sufficient amount of reliable experimental information available yet. The domestic cement and concrete industry will be in key position in accumulation of information and operating experiences. (orig.)

  5. Testing program for concrete at temperatures to 8940K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.; Robinson, G.C.

    1981-01-01

    A test program was conducted to define the variations in mechanical properties of a limestone aggregate concrete and a lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures. Four test series were conducted: (1) unconfined compression; (2) shear; (3) rebar bond; and (4) sustained loading (creep). Tests results are presented

  6. Experimental investigations on steel-concrete composite columns for varying parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, V.; Vivek, D.; Neelima, Kancharla; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the experimental investigations on steel tubes filled with different types of concrete are presented. Steel tubes filled with fibre reinforced concrete using lathe waste and steel tube with concerned confined with steel mesh were investigated. The combinations were compared with steel tubes with conventional concrete. A total of 4 concrete filled steel tube (CFST) combinations were made with tubes of diameter 100 mm with wall thickness 1.6 mm and a height of 300 mm. Axial compression test to examine the resisting capacity of the columns and push-out test for noting the bond strength were performed. Coupon tests were also conducted to determine the mechanical properties of steel. The structural behaviour of the composite columns was evaluated from on the test results. It was observed that steel tube filled fibre reinforced possessed better bond strength and resistance to axial load.

  7. Corrosion protection of the reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment through epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pour-Ali, Sadegh; Dehghanian, Changiz; Kosari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite coating well protects steel rebar. • Coating performance is evaluated by impedance measurements up to 1 year. • Ultimate bond strength between the coated rebars and concrete is measured. • Self-compacting concrete shows better anticorrosive property compared to normal one. - Abstract: In this study, an epoxy/polyaniline–camphorsulfonate nanocomposite (epoxy/PANI–CSA) is employed to protect reinforcing steels in chloride-laden concrete environment. The synthesized nanocomposite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Bare, epoxy-coated and epoxy/PANI–CSA nanocomposite-coated steel rebars were embedded in normal and self-compacting concretes. To evaluate their corrosion behaviors, open circuit potential and impedance measurements were performed for the duration of 1 year. Ultimate bond strength of concrete with the reinforcement bars were measured in corroded and uncorroded conditions. It was found that epoxy/PANI–CSA coating provides good corrosion resistance and durable bond strength with concrete for steel rebars

  8. Nonlinear micromechanics-based finite element analysis of the interfacial behaviour of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Baky, Hussien

    --slip relation is developed considering the interaction between the interfacial normal and shear stress components along the bonded length. A new approach is proposed to describe the entire tau-s relationship based on three separate models. The first model captures the shear response of an orthotropic FRP laminate. The second model simulates the shear characteristics of an adhesive layer, while the third model represents the shear nonlinearity of a thin layer inside the concrete, referred to as the interfacial layer. The proposed bond--slip model reflects the geometrical and material characteristics of the FRP, concrete, and adhesive layers. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional nonlinear displacement-controlled finite element (FE) models are then developed to investigate the flexural and FRP/concrete interfacial responses of FRP-strengthened reinforced concrete beams. The three-dimensional finite element model is created to accommodate cases of beams having FRP anchorage systems. Discrete interface elements are proposed and used to simulate the FRP/concrete interfacial behaviour before and after cracking. The FE models are capable of simulating the various failure modes, including debonding of the FRP either at the plate end or at intermediate cracks. Particular attention is focused on the effect of crack initiation and propagation on the interfacial behaviour. This study leads to an accurate and refined interpretation of the plate-end and intermediate crack debonding failure mechanisms for FRP-strengthened beams with and without FRP anchorage systems. Finally, the FE models are used to conduct a parametric study to generalize the findings of the FE analysis. The variables under investigation include two material characteristics; namely, the concrete compressive strength and axial stiffness of the FRP laminates as well as three geometric properties; namely, the steel reinforcement ratio, the beam span length and the beam depth. The parametric study is followed by a statistical

  9. Evaluation of Different Methods for Considering Bar-Concrete ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theory, but the perfect bond assumption has been removed. The precision of the proposed method in considering the real nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete frames has been compared to the precision of two other suggested methods for considering bond-slip effect in layer model. Among the capabilities of this ...

  10. Research Status on Bonding Behavior of Prefabricated Concrete Shear Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donghui; Liu, Xudong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Shanshan

    2018-03-01

    Prefabricated shear wall structure adapts to the development and requirements of China’s residential industrialization. The key to the prefabricated concrete shear wall structure is the connection between the prefabricated members, where the reliability of the connection of the concrete joint is related to the overall performance and seismic effect of the structure. In this paper, the microstructures of the joint surface and shear properties are analysed, and the formula for calculating the shear strength of the joint is obtained.

  11. Shear crack propagation in MBC strengthened concrete beams”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas; Carolin, Anders

    2008-01-01

    thermal compatibility to the base concrete and are often sensitive to the surface nature and surrounding temperature. By using mineral based composites (MBC) some of these challenges can be overcome. MBC refers here to a cementitious bonding agent and a carbon FRP grid. This paper is a part of an ongoing......Repair and upgrading existing concrete structures using FRPs and an epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent has some disadvantages when it comes to compatibility to the base concrete. Epoxies are often restricted by regulations of use, have low permeability which may create freeze/thaw problems, poor...... study of MBC systems. Emphasis is placed on the cracking behavior of the MBC system used for shear strengthening of RC beams. Traditional foil strain gauges and photometric measurements have been used for monitoring of the cracking behavior. In this study it is shown that the use of mineral based shear...

  12. Experimental investigations of sandwich panels using high performance concrete thin plates exposed to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Hodicky, Kamil; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2015-01-01

    Structural sandwich panels using thin high performance concrete (HPC) plates offer a possibility to address the modern environmental challenges faced by the construction industry. Fire resistance is a major necessity in structures using HPC. This paper presents experimental studies at elevated...... temperatures for panels with 30 mm thick plates stiffened by structural ribs, thick insulation layers, and steel shear connecting systems. Parametric variation assessing the role of each component of the sandwich structure was performed on unloaded specimens of reduced size. Full size walls were tested...... with load. Tests were performed in standard furnaces, following the conditions of REI certification tests. Unloaded specimens successfully passed tests. Loaded specimens met the R and I requirements, failing E due to sustained flaming of the insulation. They exhibited multiple cracking of their exposed...

  13. Adhesion characterization of tungsten mine waste geopolymeric binder. Influence of OPC concrete substance surface treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Gomes, J. P. Castro; Jalali, Said

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten mine waste mud (TMWM) was investigated for its potential use as repair material of ordinary portland cement (OPC) concrete. Bond strength between OPC concrete substrate and three repair materials was analysed. TMWM geopolymeric binder and two commercial repair products were used as repair materials. Bond strength behaviour was assessed from slant shear tests. A total of 128 slant shear specimens were made in order to evaluate bond strength at 1, 3, 7 and 28 days curing. Four ki...

  14. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowen Yang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  15. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use. PMID:22399929

  16. A reusable PZT transducer for monitoring initial hydration and structural health of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use.

  17. Stress Regression Analysis of Asphalt Concrete Deck Pavement Based on Orthogonal Experimental Design and Interlayer Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuntao; Feng, Jianhu; Wang, Hu; Hong, Shidi; Zheng, Supei

    2018-03-01

    A three-dimensional finite element box girder bridge and its asphalt concrete deck pavement were established by ANSYS software, and the interlayer bonding condition of asphalt concrete deck pavement was assumed to be contact bonding condition. Orthogonal experimental design is used to arrange the testing plans of material parameters, and an evaluation of the effect of different material parameters in the mechanical response of asphalt concrete surface layer was conducted by multiple linear regression model and using the results from the finite element analysis. Results indicated that stress regression equations can well predict the stress of the asphalt concrete surface layer, and elastic modulus of waterproof layer has a significant influence on stress values of asphalt concrete surface layer.

  18. Optimized ultra-thin manganin alloy passivated fine-pitch damascene compatible bump-less Cu-Cu bonding at sub 200 °C for three-dimensional Integration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Asisa Kumar; Hemanth Kumar, C.; Bonam, Satish; Ghosh, Tamal; Rama Krishna Vanjari, Siva; Govind Singh, Shiv

    2018-02-01

    Enhanced Cu diffusion, Cu surface passivation, and smooth surface at the bonding interface are the key essentials for high quality Cu-Cu bonding. Previously, we have demonstrated optimized 3 nm thin Manganin metal-alloy passivation from oxidation and also helps to reduce the surface roughness to about 0.8 nm which substantially led to high quality Cu-Cu bonding. In this paper, we demonstrated an ultra fine-pitch (indication of high quality bonding for future multilayer integrations. Furthermore, electrical characterization of the bonded structure was performed under various robust conditions as per International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS Roadmap) in order to satisfy the stability of the bonded structure.

  19. Bonding techniques for flexural strengthening of R.C. beams using CFRP laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Morsy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of an alternative method of attaching FRP laminates to reinforced concrete beams by the way of fasting steel rivets through the FRP laminate and concrete substrate. Five full scale R.C. beams were casted and strengthened in flexural using FRP laminate bonded with conventional epoxy and compared with other beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded with fastener “steel rivets” of 50 mm length and 10 mm diameter. Based on experimental evidence the beam strengthened with conventional bonding methods failed due to de-bonding with about 13% increase over the un-strengthened beam. On the other hand, the beams strengthened with FRP laminate and bonded by four steel fastener rivets only failed by de-bonding also but at higher flexural capacity with increase 19% over the un-strengthened beam.

  20. Solid Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding of (Pb, Sn)Te Thermoelectric Modules with Cu Electrodes Using a Thin-Film Sn Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, T. H.; Lin, H. J.; Chuang, C. H.; Yeh, W. T.; Hwang, J. D.; Chu, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    A (Pb, Sn)Te thermoelectric element plated with a Ni barrier layer and a Ag reaction layer has been joined with a Cu electrode coated with Ag and Sn thin films using a solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding method. This method allows the interfacial reaction between Ag and Sn such that Ag3Sn intermetallic compounds form at low temperature and are stable at high temperature. In this study, the bonding strength was about 6.6 MPa, and the specimens fractured along the interface between the (Pb, Sn)Te thermoelectric element and the Ni barrier layer. Pre-electroplating a film of Sn with a thickness of about 1 μm on the thermoelectric element and pre-heating at 250°C for 3 min ensures the adhesion between the thermoelectric material and the Ni barrier layer. The bonding strength is thus increased to a maximal value of 12.2 MPa, and most of the fractures occur inside the thermoelectric material. During the bonding process, not only the Ag3Sn intermetallics but also Cu6Sn5 forms at the Ag3Sn/Cu interface, which transforms into Cu3Sn with increases in the bonding temperature or bonding time.

  1. Steel fibre corrosion in cracks:durability of sprayed concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Nordström, Erik

    2000-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced sprayed concrete is common practice for permanent linings in underground construction. Today there is a demand on "expected technical service life" of 120 years. Thin steel fibres could be expected to discontinue carrying load fast with a decrease of fibre diameter caused by corrosion, especially in cracks. The thesis contains results from inspections on existing sprayed concrete structures and a literature review on corrosion of steel fibres in cracked concrete. To stu...

  2. Study on Mechanical Properties of Concrete Using Plastic Waste as an Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaivignesh, B.; Sofi, A.

    2017-07-01

    Disposal of large quantity of plastic causes land, water and air pollution etc.., so a study is conducted to recycle the plastic in concrete. This work investigates about the replacement of natural aggregate with non-biodegradable plastic aggregate made up of mixed plastic waste in concrete. Several tests are conducted such as compressive strength of cube, split tensile strength of cylinder, flexural strength test of prism to identify the properties and behavior of concrete using plastic aggregate. Replacement of fine aggregate weight by 10%, 15%, 20% with Plastic fine (PF) aggregate and for each replacement of fine aggregate 15%, 20%, 25% of coarse aggregate replacement also conducted with Plastic Coarse(PC) aggregate. In literatures reported that the addition of plastic aggregate in concrete causes the reduction of strength in concrete due to poor bonding between concrete and plastic aggregate, so addition of 0.3% of steel fiber by weight of cement in concrete is done to improve the concrete strength. Totally 60 cubes, 60 cylinders and 40 prisms are casted to identify the compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength respectively. Casted specimens are tested at 7 and 28 days. The identified results from concrete using plastic aggregate are compared with conventional concrete. Result shows that reduction in mechanical properties of plastic aggregate added concrete. This reduction in strength is mainly due to poor bond strength between cement and plastic aggregate.

  3. Flexural behaviour of partially bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymers strengthened concrete beams: Application to fire protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmo, J.P.; Arruda, M.R.T.; Correia, J.R.; Tiago, C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical behaviour of partially bonded CFRP strengthened beams was modelled. • Two dimensional non-linear finite element models were developed. • Partially bonded beams can present similar flexural strength to fully bonded ones. • Relations between the bonded length and the strength reduction were proposed. • The proposed relations were used for the design of fire protection systems. - Abstract: Recent fire resistance tests on reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) laminates showed that it is possible to attain considerable fire endurance provided that thermal insulation is applied at the anchorage zones of the strengthening system. With such protection, although the CFRP laminate prematurely debonds in the central part of the beam, it transforms into a cable fixed at the extremities until one of the anchorage zones loses its bond strength. The main objective of this paper is to propose a simplified methodology for the design of fire protection systems for CFRP strengthened-RC beams, which is based on applying thicker insulation at the anchorage zones (promoting the above mentioned “cable behaviour”) and a thinner one at the current zone (avoiding tensile rupture of the carbon fibres). As a first step towards the validation of this methodology, finite element (FE) models were developed to simulate the flexural behaviour at ambient temperature of full-scale RC beams strengthened with CFRP laminates according to the externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near surface mounted (NSM) techniques, in both cases fully or partially bonded (the latter simulating the cable). The FE models were calibrated with results of 4-point bending tests on small-scale beams and then extended for different beam geometries, with spans (L) varying from 2 m to 5 m, in which the influence of the CFRP bonded length (l b ) and the loading type (point or uniformly distributed) on the strength reduction was

  4. Influence of Basalt FRP Mesh Reinforcement on High-Performance Concrete Thin Plates at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Lauridsen, Dan H.; Hodicky, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    A basalt fiber–reinforced polymer (BFRP) mesh was introduced as reinforcement in high-performance concrete (HPC) thin plates (20–30 mm) for implementation in precast sandwich panels. An experimental program studied the BFRP mesh influence on HPC exposed to high temperature. A set of standard...... furnace tests compared performances of HPC with and without BFRP mesh, assessing material behavior; another set including polypropylene (PP) fibers to avoid spalling compared the performance of BFRP mesh reinforcement to that of regular steel reinforcement, assessing mechanical properties......, requiring the use of steel. Microscope observations highlighted degradation of the HPC-BFRP mesh interface with temperature due to the melting polymer matrix of the mesh. These observations call for caution when using fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcement in elements exposed to fire hazard....

  5. Residual Tensile Strength and Bond Properties of GFRP Bars after Exposure to Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon S. Ellis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP bars in reinforced concrete members enhances corrosion resistance when compared to traditional steel reinforcing bars. Although there is ample research available on the behavior of FRP bars and concrete members reinforced with FRP bars under elevated temperatures (due to fire, there is little published information available on their post-fire residual load capacity. This paper reports residual tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and bond strength (to concrete of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP bars after exposure to elevated temperatures of up to 400 °C and subsequent cooling to an ambient temperature. The results showed that the residual strength generally decreases with increasing temperature exposure. However, as much as 83% of the original tensile strength and 27% of the original bond strength was retained after the specimens were heated to 400 °C and then cooled to ambient temperature. The residual bond strength is a critical parameter in post-fire strength assessments of GFRP-reinforced concrete members.

  6. Residual Tensile Strength and Bond Properties of GFRP Bars after Exposure to Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Devon S; Tabatabai, Habib; Nabizadeh, Azam

    2018-02-27

    The use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bars in reinforced concrete members enhances corrosion resistance when compared to traditional steel reinforcing bars. Although there is ample research available on the behavior of FRP bars and concrete members reinforced with FRP bars under elevated temperatures (due to fire), there is little published information available on their post-fire residual load capacity. This paper reports residual tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and bond strength (to concrete) of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars after exposure to elevated temperatures of up to 400 °C and subsequent cooling to an ambient temperature. The results showed that the residual strength generally decreases with increasing temperature exposure. However, as much as 83% of the original tensile strength and 27% of the original bond strength was retained after the specimens were heated to 400 °C and then cooled to ambient temperature. The residual bond strength is a critical parameter in post-fire strength assessments of GFRP-reinforced concrete members.

  7. Comprehensive Die Shear Test of Silicon Packages Bonded by Thermocompression of Al Layers with Thin Sn Capping or Insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Satoh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermocompression bonding for wafer-level hermetic packaging was demonstrated at the lowest temperature of 370 to 390 °C ever reported using Al films with thin Sn capping or insertions as bonding layer. For shrinking the chip size of MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems, a smaller size of wafer-level packaging and MEMS–ASIC (application specific integrated circuit integration are of great importance. Metal-based bonding under the temperature of CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor backend process is a key technology, and Al is one of the best candidates for bonding metal in terms of CMOS compatibility. In this study, after the thermocompression bonding of two substrates, the shear fracture strength of dies was measured by a bonding tester, and the shear-fractured surfaces were observed by SEM (scanning electron microscope, EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and a surface profiler to clarify where the shear fracture took place. We confirmed two kinds of fracture mode. One mode is Si bulk fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 41.6 to 209 MPa, proportionally depending on the area of Si fracture. The other mode is bonding interface fracture mode, where the die shear strength is 32.8 to 97.4 MPa. Regardless of the fracture modes, the minimum die shear strength is practical for wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  8. Shear Strengthening of Concrete Structures with the use of mineral based composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanksvärd, Thomas; Täljsten, Björn; Carolin, Anders

    2009-01-01

    concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with the use of cementitious bonding agents and carbon fiber grids, denoted mineral based composites (MBC). In this study it is shown that the MBC system has a strengthening effect corresponding to that of strengthening systems using epoxy bonding agents and carbon...... for rehabilitation. In addition, more traffic and heavier loads lead to the need for upgrading. Existing externally bonded strengthening systems using FRP (fiber reinforced polymers) and epoxy as bonding agents have been proven to be a good approach to repair and strengthen concrete structures. However, the use...... fiber sheets. Different designs and material properties of the MBC system have been tested. An extensive monitoring set-up has been carried out using traditional strain gauges and photometric strain measurements to obtain strains in steel reinforcement, in FRP and strain fields on the strengthened...

  9. Using ESEM to analyze the microscopic property of basalt fiber reinforced asphalt concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Gao

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available The basalt fiber staggered distribution in the asphalt concrete matrix and the bonding situation between asphalt are analyzed by images collected using field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM test equipment. The results show that bonding of the fiber and the asphalt binder is very good and there is a strong binding force of chemical bonding connections between the two; the lipophilicity of basalt fiber is very good, the wrapped cover ability of asphalt for fiber is very strong; basalt fiber forms the local space network structure in the asphalt concrete matrix, effectively overcome the relative slip between the particles, connect the damaged parts into a whole; basalt fiber across internal micropores, and the internal defects in material can be remedied. At the same time, crack resistance mechanism of the fiber to internal micro cracks is qualitatively explained according to the magnitude of the stress intensity factor Kf. Keywords: Road engineering, Asphalt concrete, Basalt fiber, Microscopic analysis

  10. Two-component bond for coating materials coming into contact with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, L.; Fajfr, K.

    1989-01-01

    The two-component bonding agent consists of an epoxy resin of the diane-bis-glycidyl ether type and an amine hardener containing benzyl alcohol and bis-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. The claimed bond features high radiation stability and very good decontaminability. Thanks to low viscosity of the bond, pigmented reactor-plastics can be prepared. The procedure is described of applying the bond onto a concrete surface. (E.S.)

  11. How PE tape performs under concrete coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritt, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The program objectives were to evaluate the performance of polyethylene tape plant coating and fusion bonded epoxy powder systems with particular respect to the following: 1. Concrete coating application procedures; 2. The shear resistance during laying and retrieving operations of the coating at the various interfaces (a) Pipe and anti-corrosion coating; (b) Anti-corrosion coating and outerwrap; (c) Overlap areas of the anti-corrosion and outerwrap layers; (d) Between concrete and the various corrosion coatings during laying and retrieving operations. 3. Resistance to damage of the coating as a consequence of cracking or slippage of the concrete weight coating. 4. Ability of various coatings to withstand the damage during concrete application by both impact and compression methods; 5. Evaluation of tape and shrink sleeve joint coatings at the cut-back area as well as performance of tape under hot asphalt coating

  12. Development of new type concrete for spent fuel storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, J.; Mantani, K.; Owaki, E.; Sugihara, Y.; Hata, A.; Shimono, M.; Taniuchi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Heat resistant concrete has been developed to make it possible to design a new type cask that has been designed on the same concept of metal cask technologies for use in high temperature conditions. The allowable temperature of conventional concrete is limited to less than 100 degrees Celsius because most of its moisture is free water and therefore hydrogen, which is effective for neutron shielding, can be easily lost. Our newly developed concrete uses chemically bonded water and as a result can be used under high temperatures

  13. Development of new type concrete for spent fuel storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimojo, J.; Mantani, K. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Hyogo (Japan); Owaki, E.; Sugihara, Y.; Hata, A.; Shimono, M. [Taisei Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Taniuchi, H. [Transnuclear, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Heat resistant concrete has been developed to make it possible to design a new type cask that has been designed on the same concept of metal cask technologies for use in high temperature conditions. The allowable temperature of conventional concrete is limited to less than 100 degrees Celsius because most of its moisture is free water and therefore hydrogen, which is effective for neutron shielding, can be easily lost. Our newly developed concrete uses chemically bonded water and as a result can be used under high temperatures.

  14. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  15. Failure Monitoring and Condition Assessment of Steel-Concrete Adhesive Connection Using Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rucka

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonding is increasingly being incorporated into civil engineering applications. Recently, the use of structural adhesives in steel-concrete composite systems is of particular interest. The aim of the study is an experimental investigation of the damage assessment of the connection between steel and concrete during mechanical degradation. Nine specimens consisted of a concrete cube and two adhesively bonded steel plates were examined. The inspection was based on the ultrasound monitoring during push-out tests. Ultrasonic waves were excited and registered by means of piezoelectric transducers every two seconds until the specimen failure. To determine the slip between the steel and concrete a photogrammetric method was applied. The procedure of damage evaluation is based on the monitoring of the changes in the amplitude and phase shift of signals measured during subsequent phases of degradation. To quantify discrepancies between the reference signal and other registered signals, the Sprague and Gears metric was applied. The results showed the possibilities and limitations of the proposed approach in diagnostics of adhesive connections between steel and concrete depending on the failure modes.

  16. Numerical simulation of deformation and fracture of space protective shell structures from concrete and fiber concrete under pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, P A; Batuev, S P; Radchenko, A V; Plevkov, V S

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between aircraft Boeing 747-400 and protective shell of nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as complex multilayered cellular structure comprising layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was held three-dimensionally using the author's algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. The dynamics of stress-strain state and fracture of structure were studied. Destruction is described using two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of shell cellular structure—cells start to destruct in unloading wave, originating after output of compression wave to the free surfaces of cells. (paper)

  17. Experimental study on flexural members strengthened with variable bonded pre-stressed CFRP plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baojing; Shang, Shouping

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the problem that the structural adhesive between CFRP and concrete interface is aging with time and then lost the bond strength, the concept of variable bond prestressed CFRP is put forward. In order to obtain the bearing capacity and failure pattern of the beam strengthened with variable bonding prestressed CFRP plate, three concrete beams of 5.6m long were strengthened by the technology of non-bonding, bonding and variable bonding strengthened with prestressed CFRP plates respectively, the mechanical properties and crack changes of the test beams under three conditions had been compared and analyzed. Test results show that the variable bond strengthened with prestressed CFRP plates with unbonded prestressed CFRP, cracking load was increased by 36%, yield load increased by 4%, the ultimate load increased by 12%; The reinforcement technology of variable bonding prestressed CFRP plate has the characteristics of non-bonding and bonding prestressed CFRP plate reinforcement, which is similar to that of the bonded reinforcement in the early stage of the development of the cracks, then is gradually developing into the non-bonding prestressed reinforcement, the crack spacing and width have the same characteristics as the bonding reinforcement (both crack spacing and width are small), which is more conducive to enhance the durability of the structure.

  18. Use of image analysis for evaluating concrete as a waste isolation medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, W.F.; Spaw, J.; Peacock, E.B.

    1988-01-01

    A technique has been developed, tested and is presently being used for disposing of contaminated soil by incorporating the soil into a concrete matrix. A concrete mix is produced consisting of contaminated soil, portland cement and class F fly ash. Following a chemical process which fixes organic and metallic contaminants to the soil particles, the concrete mixture is poured on site as a monolith, replacing the excavated soil. During the course of the project, leaching procedures (ANS 10.1 MCC 1), permeability and compressive strength tests are performed. The quality of the mix and the blending process are ensured by examining the hardened concrete using a quantitative image analysis system. The concrete is thin sectioned and impregnated with a dyed epoxy. A computer image of the thin section is analyzed and the percentage of each solid phase and porosity is measured. Distribution of the contaminated soil in the sample is mapped along with the occurrence of porosity. Multiple samples are analyzed to determine the degree of heterogeneity in the sample

  19. Delamination of carbon-fiber strengthening layer from concrete beam during deformation (infrared thermography)

    OpenAIRE

    Shardakov, I. N.; Shestakov, A. P.; Bykov, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Technology of strengthening reinforced concrete structures with composite materials has found wide application. The effectiveness of strengthening of concrete structures with externally bonded reinforcement is supported by a great deal of experimental evidence. However, the problem of serviceability of such structures has not been adequately explored. The present work describes the results of experimental studies on the loadcarrying capacity of concrete beams strengthened with carbon fiber re...

  20. Effect of high temperature or fire on heavy weight concrete properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.; EL-Hakim, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temperature plays an important role in the use of concrete for shielding nuclear reactors. In the present work, the effect of different durations (1, 2 and 3 h) of high temperatures (250, 500, 750 and 950 deg. C) on the physical, mechanical and radiation properties of heavy concrete was studied. The effect of fire fitting systems on concrete properties was investigated. Results showed that ilmenite concrete had the highest density, modulus of elasticity and lowest absorption percent, and it had also higher values of compressive, tensile, bending and bonding strengths than gravel or baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete showed the highest attenuation of transmitted gamma rays. Firing (heating) exposure time was inversely proportional to mechanical properties of all types of concrete. Ilmenite concrete was more resistant to elevated temperature. Foam or air proved to be better than water as a cooling system in concrete structure exposed to high temperature because water leads to a big damage in concrete properties

  1. Influence of heat treatment on corrosive resistance of concrete steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldan, A.; Suliga, I.; Kusinski, J.; Jazowy, R.

    1998-01-01

    The reinforcing bars are essential elements of ferro-concrete structures. During the building structure service the reinforcing bars should co-operate with surrounding concrete. Any bonding defects as well as corrosion induced strength reduction may result in construction failure. The reinforcing steel working environment is determined by concrete chemical and phase composition and surrounding environmental properties. The aggressive corrosive activity of the letter implies necessity of effective ways development to protect elements against corrosion. The effect of heat treatment, increased Si content in steel on corrosion resistance of reinforcing steel in concrete was studied in the current work. Corrosion tests and metallographic examinations proved a positive influence of hardening and Si enrichment on corrosion resistance of reinforcing bars in ferro-concrete structures. (author)

  2. Proposal of new bonding technique 'Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) Bonding'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue-Chang; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Matsuda, Fukuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    A new bonding technique named ''Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) bonding'' suitable mainly for welding dissimilar materials was proposed by which instantaneous melting of one or two of the faying surfaces is utilized. The processes of ILP bonding are mainly consisted of three stages, namely the first stage forming thin liquid layer by rapid heating, the second stage joining both specimens by thin liquid layer, and the third stage cooling the specimens rapidly to avoid the formation of brittle layer. The welding temperatures of the specimens to be welded in ILP bonding are generally differentiated from each other. ILP bonding was applied for a variety of combinations of dissimilar materials of aluminum, aluminum alloys, titanium, titanium alloy, carbon steel, austenitic stainless steel, copper and tungsten, and for similar materials of stainless steel and nickel-base alloy. There were no microvoids in these welding joints, and the formation of brittle layer at the bonding interface was suppressed. The welded joints of Al + Ti, Cu + carbon steel and Cu + austenitic stainless steel showed the fracture in base metal having lower tensile strength. Further, the welded joints of Al + carbon steel, Al alloy + Ti, Al alloy + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel, Ti + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel showed better tensile properties in the comparison with diffusion welding. Furthermore, ILP bonding was available for welding same materials susceptible to hot cracking. Because of the existence of liquid layer, the welding pressure required was extremely low, and preparation of faying surface by simple tooling or polishing by no.80 emery paper was enough. The change in specimen length before and after welding was relatively little, only depending on the thickness of liquid layer. The welding time was very short, and thus high welding efficiency was obtained. (author)

  3. Micromechanical analysis of polyacrylamide-modified concrete for improving strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Zengzhi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chang' an University, Xi' an 710064 (China)], E-mail: zz-sun@126.com; Xu Qinwu [Pavement research, Transtec Group Inc., Austin 78731 (United States)], E-mail: qinwu_xu@yahoo.com

    2008-08-25

    This paper studies how polyacrylamide (PAM) alters the physicochemical and mechanical properties of concrete. The microstructure of PAM-modified concrete and the physicochemical reaction between PAM and concrete were studied through scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and infrared spectrum analysis. Meanwhile, the workability and strengths of cement paste and concrete were tested. PAM's modification mechanism was also discussed. Results indicate that PAM reacts with the Ca{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} cations produced by concrete hydration to form the ionic compounds and reduce the crystallization of Ca(OH){sub 2}, acting as a flexible filler and reinforcement in the porosity of concrete and, therefore, improving concrete's engineering properties. PAM also significantly alters the microstructure at the aggregate-cement interfacial transition zone. Mechanical testing results indicate that the fluidity of cement paste decreases initially, then increases, and decreases again with increasing PAM content. PAM can effectively improve the flexural strength, bonding strength, dynamic impact resistance, and fatigue life of concrete, though it reduces the compressive strength to some extent.

  4. Micromechanical analysis of polyacrylamide-modified concrete for improving strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zengzhi; Xu Qinwu

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies how polyacrylamide (PAM) alters the physicochemical and mechanical properties of concrete. The microstructure of PAM-modified concrete and the physicochemical reaction between PAM and concrete were studied through scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and infrared spectrum analysis. Meanwhile, the workability and strengths of cement paste and concrete were tested. PAM's modification mechanism was also discussed. Results indicate that PAM reacts with the Ca 2+ and Al 3+ cations produced by concrete hydration to form the ionic compounds and reduce the crystallization of Ca(OH) 2 , acting as a flexible filler and reinforcement in the porosity of concrete and, therefore, improving concrete's engineering properties. PAM also significantly alters the microstructure at the aggregate-cement interfacial transition zone. Mechanical testing results indicate that the fluidity of cement paste decreases initially, then increases, and decreases again with increasing PAM content. PAM can effectively improve the flexural strength, bonding strength, dynamic impact resistance, and fatigue life of concrete, though it reduces the compressive strength to some extent

  5. Influence of fly ash, slag cement and specimen curing on shrinkage of bridge deck concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Cracks occur in bridge decks due to restrained shrinkage of concrete materials. Concrete materials shrink as : cementitious materials hydrate and as water that is not chemically bonded to cementitious materials : migrates from the high humid environm...

  6. Suppression of interfacial voids formation during silane (SiH4)-based silicon oxide bonding with a thin silicon nitride capping layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Hong; Bao, Shuyu; Wang, Yue; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.; Seng Tan, Chuan

    2018-01-01

    The material properties and bonding behavior of silane-based silicon oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was employed to determine the chemical composition of the silicon oxide films. The incorporation of hydroxyl (-OH) groups and moisture absorption demonstrates a strong correlation with the storage duration for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. It is observed that moisture absorption is prevalent in the silane-based silicon oxide film due to its porous nature. The incorporation of -OH groups and moisture absorption in the silicon oxide films increase with the storage time (even in clean-room environments) for both as-deposited and annealed silicon oxide films. Due to silanol condensation and silicon oxidation reactions that take place at the bonding interface and in the bulk silicon, hydrogen (a byproduct of these reactions) is released and diffused towards the bonding interface. The trapped hydrogen forms voids over time. Additionally, the absorbed moisture could evaporate during the post-bond annealing of the bonded wafer pair. As a consequence, defects, such as voids, form at the bonding interface. To address the problem, a thin silicon nitride capping film was deposited on the silicon oxide layer before bonding to serve as a diffusion barrier to prevent moisture absorption and incorporation of -OH groups from the ambient. This process results in defect-free bonded wafers.

  7. Microstructural characterization of concrete prepared with recycled aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Mafalda; Evangelista, Luís; de Brito, Jorge; Ferro, Alberto C

    2013-10-01

    Several authors have reported the workability, mechanical properties, and durability of concrete produced with construction waste replacing the natural aggregate. However, a systematic microstructural characterization of recycled aggregate concrete has not been reported. This work studies the use of fine recycled aggregate to replace fine natural aggregate in the production of concrete and reports the resulting microstructures. The used raw materials were natural aggregate, recycled aggregate obtained from a standard concrete, and Portland cement. The substitution extent was 0, 10, 50, and 100 vol%; hydration was stopped at 9, 24, and 96 h and 28 days. Microscopy was focused on the cement/aggregate interfacial transition zone, enlightening the effect of incorporating recycled aggregate on the formation and morphology of the different concrete hydration products. The results show that concretes with recycled aggregates exhibit typical microstructural features of the transition zone in normal strength concrete. Although overall porosity increases with increasing replacement, the interfacial bond is apparently stronger when recycled aggregates are used. An addition of 10 vol% results in a decrease in porosity at the interface with a corresponding increase of the material hardness. This provides an opportunity for development of increased strength Portland cement concretes using controlled amounts of concrete waste.

  8. Tracking metal ions with polypyrrole thin films adhesively bonded to diazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Momath; Diaw, Abdou K D; Gningue-Sall, Diariatou; Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Oturan, Mehmet A; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2018-05-09

    Adhesively bonded polypyrrole thin films doped with benzene sulfonic acid (BSA) were electrodeposited on aminobenzenediazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes and further employed for the detection of Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ metal ions in aqueous medium. The aminophenyl (AP) adhesive layer was grafted to ITO by electroreduction of the in situ generated parent diazonium compound. Polypyrrole (PPy) thin films exhibited remarkable adhesion to aminophenyl (ITO-AP). The strongly adherent polypyrrole films exhibited excellent electroactivity in the doped state with BSA which itself served to chelate the metal ions in aqueous medium. The surface of the resulting, modified flexible electrode was characterized by XPS, SEM, and electrochemical methods. The ITO-AP-PPy electrodes were then used for the simultaneous detection of Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The detection limits were 11.1, 8.95, and 0.99 nM for Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ , respectively. In addition, the modified electrodes displayed a good reproducibility, making them suitable for the determination of heavy metals in real wastewater samples.

  9. Bond behavior of reinforcing steel in ultra-high performance concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Ultra-High Performance Concrete (UHPC) is a relatively new class of advanced cementitious composite : materials, which exhibits high compressive [above 21.7 ksi (150 MPa)] and tensile [above 0.72 ksi (5 MPa)] : strengths. The discrete steel fiber rei...

  10. STRENGTH OF NANOMODIFIED HIGH-STRENGTH LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOZEMTСEV Alexandr Sergeevich

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research aimed at development of nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete for construction. The developed concretes are of low average density and high ultimate compressive strength. It is shown that to produce this type of concrete one need to use hollow glass and aluminosilicate microspheres. To increase the durability of adhesion between cement stone and fine filler the authors offer to use complex nanodimensinal modifier based on iron hydroxide sol and silica sol as a surface nanomodifier for hollow microspheres. It is hypothesized that the proposed modifier has complex effect on the activity of the cement hydration and, at the same time increases bond strength between filler and cement-mineral matrix. The compositions for energy-efficient nanomodified high-strength lightweight concrete which density is 1300…1500 kg/m³ and compressive strength is 40…65 MPa have been developed. The approaches to the design of high-strength lightweight concrete with density of less than 2000 kg/m³ are formulated. It is noted that the proposed concretes possess dense homogeneous structure and moderate mobility. Thus, they allow processing by vibration during production. The economic and practical implications for realization of high-strength lightweight concrete in industrial production have been justified.

  11. Wafer-level hermetic vacuum packaging by bonding with a copper-tin thin film sealing ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Teruhisa; Funabashi, Hirofumi; Takagi, Hideki; Omura, Yoshiteru; Hata, Yoshiyuki

    2018-04-01

    A wafer-level hermetic vacuum packaging technology intended for use with MEMS devices was developed based on a copper-tin (CuSn) thin film sealing ring. To allow hermetic packaging, the shear strength of the CuSn thin film bond was improved by optimizing the pretreatment conditions. As a result, an average shear strength of 72.3 MPa was obtained and a cavity that had been hermetically sealed using wafer-level packaging (WLP) maintained its vacuum for 1.84 years. The total pressures in the cavities and the partial pressures of residual gases were directly determined with an ultra-low outgassing residual gas analyzer (RGA) system. Hermeticity was evaluated based on helium leak rates, which were calculated from helium pressures determined with the RGA system. The resulting data showed that a vacuum cavity following 1.84 years storage had a total pressure of 83.1 Pa, contained argon as the main residual gas and exhibited a helium leak rate as low as 1.67  ×  10-17 Pa · m3 s-1, corresponding to an air leak rate of 6.19  ×  10-18 Pa · m3 s-1. The RGA data demonstrate that WLP using a CuSn thin film sealing ring permits ultra-high hermeticity in conjunction with long-term vacuum packaging that is applicable to MEMS devices.

  12. An Analysis of Radiation Penetration through the U-Shaped Cast Concrete Joints of Concrete Shielding in the Multipurpose Gamma Irradiator of BATAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiyati, Tanti; Rozali, Bang; Kasmudin

    2018-02-01

    An analysis of radiation penetration through the U-shaped joints of cast concrete shielding in BATAN’s multipurpose gamma irradiator has been carried out. The analysis has been performed by calculating the radiation penetration through the U-shaped joints of the concrete shielding using MCNP computer code. The U-shaped joints were a new design in massive concrete construction in Indonesia and, in its actual application, it is joined by a bonding agent. In the MCNP simulation model, eight detectors were located close to the observed irradiation room walls of the concrete shielding. The simulation results indicated that the radiation levels outside the concrete shielding was less than the permissible limit of 2.5 μSv/h so that the workers could safely access electrical room, control room, water treatment facility and outside irradiation room. The radiation penetration decreased as the density of material increased.

  13. Carbon paint anode for reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cryer, C.B. (ODOT); Laylor, H.M. (ODOT)

    2002-01-01

    Solvent-based acrylic carbon paint anodes were installed on the north approach spans of the Yaquina Bay Bridge (Newport OR) in 1985. The anodes continue to perform satisfactorily after more than 15 years service. The anodes were inexpensive to apply and field repairs are easily made. Depolarization potentials are consistently above 100 mV with long-term current densities around 2 mA/m 2. Bond strength remains adequate, averaging 0.50 MPa (73 psi). Some deterioration of the anode-concrete interface has occurred in the form of cracks and about 4% of the bond strength measurements indicated low or no bond. Carbon anode consumption appears low. The dominant long-term anode reaction appears to be chlorine evolution, which results in limited further acidification of the anode-concrete interface. Chloride profiles were depressed compared to some other coastal bridges suggesting chloride extraction by the CP system. Further evidence of outward chloride migration was a flat chloride profile between the anode and the outer rebar.

  14. Effect of tension lap splice on the behavior of high strength concrete (HSC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Azab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many research efforts have been carried out on the bond strength between normal strength concrete (NSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. Many codes gave a minimum splice length for tension and compression reinforcement as a factor of the bar diameter depending on many parameters such as concrete strength, steel yield stress, shape of bar end, shape of bar surface and also bar location. Also, codes gave another restriction about the percentage of total reinforcement to be spliced at the same time. Comparatively limited attention has been directed toward the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. HSC has high modulus of elasticity, high density and long-term durability. This research presents an experimental study on the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. It reports the influence of several parameters on bond in splices. The parameters covered are casting position, splice length as a factor of bar diameter, bar diameter and reinforcement ratio. The research involved tests on sixteen simply-supported beams of 1800 mm span, 200 mm width and 400 mm thickness made of HSC. In each beam, the total tensile steel bars were spliced in the constant moment zone. Crack pattern, crack propagation, cracking load, failure load and mi span deflection were recorded and analyzed to study the mentioned parameters effect.

  15. Global methods for reinforced concrete slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, A.; Lepareux, M.; Combescure, A.

    1985-08-01

    This paper develops the global method strategy to compute elastoplastic thin shells or beams. It is shown how this methodology can be applied to the case of reinforced concrete structures. Two cases of applications are presented: one static, the other dynamic. The numerical results are compared to experimental data

  16. Room temperature Cu-Cu direct bonding using surface activated bonding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Howlader, M.M.R.; Itoh, T.; Suga, T.

    2003-01-01

    Thin copper (Cu) films of 80 nm thickness deposited on a diffusion barrier layered 8 in. silicon wafers were directly bonded at room temperature using the surface activated bonding method. A low energy Ar ion beam of 40-100 eV was used to activate the Cu surface prior to bonding. Contacting two surface-activated wafers enables successful Cu-Cu direct bonding. The bonding process was carried out under an ultrahigh vacuum condition. No thermal annealing was required to increase the bonding strength since the bonded interface was strong enough at room temperature. The chemical constitution of the Cu surface was examined by Auger electron spectroscope. It was observed that carbon-based contaminations and native oxides on copper surface were effectively removed by Ar ion beam irradiation for 60 s without any wet cleaning processes. An atomic force microscope study shows that the Ar ion beam process causes no surface roughness degradation. Tensile test results show that high bonding strength equivalent to bulk material is achieved at room temperature. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope observations reveal the presence of void-free bonding interface without intermediate layer at the bonded Cu surfaces

  17. EBR Strengthening Technique for Concrete, Long-Term Behaviour and Historical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Czaderski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Epoxy bonded steel plates (externally bonded reinforcemen: EBR for the strengthening of concrete structures were introduced to the construction industry in the late 1960s, and the use of fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs was introduced in the 1990s, which means that these techniques have already been used in construction for 50 and 25 years, respectively. In the first part of the paper, a historical survey of the development and introduction of these strengthening techniques into the construction industry are presented. The monitoring of such applications in construction is very important and gives more confidence to this strengthening technique. Therefore, in the second part of the paper, two long-term monitoring campaigns over an extraordinarily long duration will be presented. Firstly, a 47-year monitoring campaign on a concrete beam with an epoxy bonded steel plate and, secondly, a 20-year monitoring campaign on a road bridge with epoxy bonded CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymers strips are described. The paper is an expanded version of the paper presented at the SMAR2017 Conference.

  18. Analytical capability for predicting structural response of NPP concrete containments to severe loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planas, J.; Guinea, G.; Trbojevic, V.M.; Marti, J.; Martinez, F.; Cortes, P.

    1989-12-01

    A survey has been conducted on the state-of-the-art of analytical techniques for predicting the structural response of concrete containment buildings under severe accident conditions. The validity of inelastic analysis is often limited by the inadequacy of the material models adopted. This is specially true in the case of materials which undergo localization phenomena in the course of the deformation process. Because of this, the Joint Research Centre at Ispra has given a high priority to the review of existing constitutive models for concrete. Such models must be able to describe concrete behaviour with and without steel reinforcement across the complete stress range, from initial elastic behaviour to and beyond the point of failure. For reinforced and prestressed concrete, segregated models (where concrete and steel are independently simulated) are preferred. A review of existing constitutive models for mass concrete has been conducted. The review focused on necessary features for describing the near-peak and post-peak stages of deformation. Special attention was dedicated to the localization of strains in tension and the post-peak softening behaviour. Existing models for representing the concrete steel bond were also reviewed. These models are still relatively simplistic and incorporate seldom a number of effects of considerable importance: sustained, dynamic and cyclic loading, environmental effects, etc. Finally, the computational procedures currently available for modelling problems involving the ultimate capacity of concrete containments have also been reviewed. This includes methodologies for modelling amongst other mass concrete, cracking procedures, bond behaviour, in existing computer codes

  19. Enamel coated steel reinforcement for improved durability and life-cycle performance of concrete structures: microstructure, corrosion, and deterioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fujian

    This study is aimed (a) to statistically characterize the corrosion-induced deterioration process of reinforced concrete structures (concrete cracking, steel mass loss, and rebar-concrete bond degradation), and (b) to develop and apply three types of enamel-coated steel bars for improved corrosion resistance of the structures. Commercially available pure enamel, mixed enamel with 50% calcium silicate, and double enamel with an inner layer of pure enamel and an outer layer of mixed enamel were considered as various steel coatings. Electrochemical tests were respectively conducted on steel plates, smooth bars embedded in concrete, and deformed bars with/without concrete cover in 3.5 wt.% NaCl or saturated Ca(OH)2 solution. The effects of enamel microstructure, coating thickness variation, potential damage, mortar protection, and corrosion environment on corrosion resistance of the steel members were investigated. Extensive test results indicated that corrosion-induced concrete cracking can be divided into four stages that gradually become less correlated with corrosion process over time. The coefficient of variation of crack width increases with the increasing level of corrosion. Corrosion changed the cross section area instead of mechanical properties of steel bars. The bond-slip behavior between the corroded bars and concrete depends on the corrosion level and distribution of corrosion pits. Although it can improve the chemical bond with concrete and steel, the mixed enamel coating is the least corrosion resistant. The double enamel coating provides the most consistent corrosion performance and is thus recommended to coat reinforcing steel bars for concrete structures applied in corrosive environments. Corrosion pits in enamel-coated bars are limited around damage locations.

  20. Soft projectile impacts on thin reinforced concrete slabs: tests, modelling and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontiroli, C.; Rouquand, A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reinforced concrete structures subjected to high velocity impacts and explosions remain a difficult task today. Since ten years and more now, the CEA-Gramat has maintained a continuous research effort with the help of different French universities in order to overcome encountered difficulties in modelling the behaviour of concrete structures under severe loading. These difficulties are related to numerical aspects (convergence difficulties of the non linear stress strain relation in 3D configuration, efficiency of the numerical procedure and robustness), but also due to the ability of the material model to simulate the accurately behaviour of a very complex and heterogeneous material like concrete. A new concrete model, named PRM model, has been developed at CEA-Gramat (Pontiroli, Rouquand and Mazars) to predict the concrete response under a large range of dynamic loadings. Works presented in this paper have been performed in the framework of the French VULCAIN PGCU 2007 research project (founded by the French National Research Agency). This project aims at defining a theoretical and probabilistic methodology in order to assess the structural safety of industrial structures that might be submitted to transient loadings such as blasts or impacts generated by various projectiles. A complementary objective is to improve diagnosis, prevention or protection actions. This scientific program gathers well-known and complementary scientific institutes, firms and universities in France. (authors)

  1. Experimental Exploration of Metal Cable as Reinforcement in 3D Printed Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Freek P; Ahmed, Zeeshan Y; Jutinov, Evgeniy R; Salet, Theo A M

    2017-11-16

    The Material Deposition Method (MDM) is enjoying increasing attention as an additive method to create concrete mortar structures characterised by a high degree of form-freedom, a lack of geometrical repetition, and automated construction. Several small-scale structures have been realised around the world, or are under preparation. However, the nature of this construction method is unsuitable for conventional reinforcement methods to achieve ductile failure behaviour. Sometimes, this is solved by combining printing with conventional casting and reinforcing techniques. This study, however, explores an alternative strategy, namely to directly entrain a metal cable in the concrete filament during printing to serve as reinforcement. A device is introduced to apply the reinforcement. Several options for online reinforcement media are compared for printability. Considerations specific to the manufacturing process are discussed. Subsequently, pull-out tests on cast and printed specimens provide an initial characterisation of bond behaviour. Bending tests furthermore show the potential of this reinforcement method. The bond stress of cables in printed concrete was comparable to values reported for smooth rebar but lower than that of the same cables in cast concrete. The scatter in experimental results was high. When sufficient bond length is available, ductile failure behaviour for tension parallel to the filament direction can be achieved, even though cable slip occurs. Further improvements to the process should pave the way to achieve better post-crack resistance, as the concept in itself is feasible.

  2. Experimental Study on Welded Headed Studs Used In Steel Plate-Concrete Composite Structures Compared with Contactless Method of Measuring Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisała, Dawid; Tekieli, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    Steel plate-concrete composite structures are a new innovative design concept in which a thin steel plate is attached to the reinforced concrete beam by means of welded headed studs. The comparison between experimental studies and theoretical analysis of this type of structures shows that their behaviour is dependent on the load-slip relationship of the shear connectors used to ensure sufficient bond between the concrete and steel parts of the structure. The aim of this paper is to describe an experimental study on headed studs used in steel plate-concrete composite structures. Push-out tests were carried out to investigate the behaviour of shear connectors. The test specimens were prepared according to standard push-out tests, however, instead of I-beam, a steel plate 16 mm thick was used to better reflect the conditions in the real structure. The test specimens were produced in two batches using concrete with significantly different compressive strength. The experimental study was carried out on twelve specimens. Besides the traditional measurements based on LVDT sensors, optical measurements based on the digital image correlation method (DIC) and pattern tracking methods were used. DIC is a full-field contactless optical method for measuring displacements in experimental testing, based on the correlation of the digital images taken during test execution. With respect to conventional methods, optical measurements offer a wider scope of results and can give more information about the material or construction behaviour during the test. The ultimate load capacity and load-slip curves obtained from the experiments were compared with the values calculated based on Eurocodes, American and Chinese design specifications. It was observed that the use of the relationships developed for the traditional steel-concrete composite structures is justified in the case of ultimate load capacity of shear connectors in steel plate-concrete composite structures.

  3. Assembly and evaluation of a pyroelectric detector bonded to vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes over thin silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharous, E; Theocharous, S P; Lehman, J H

    2013-11-20

    A novel pyroelectric detector consisting of a vertically aligned nanotube array on thin silicon (VANTA/Si) bonded to a 60 μm thick crystal of LiTaO₃ has been fabricated. The performance of the VANTA/Si-coated pyroelectric detector was evaluated using National Physical Laboratory's (NPL's) detector-characterization facilities. The relative spectral responsivity of the detector was found to be spectrally flat in the 0.8-24 μm wavelength range, in agreement with directional-hemispherical reflectance measurements of witness samples of the VANTA. The spatial uniformity of response of the test detector exhibited good uniformity, although the nonuniformity increased with increasing modulation frequency. The nonuniformity may be assigned either to the dimensions of the VANTA or the continuity of the bond between the VANTA/Si coating and the pyroelectric crystal substrate. The test detector exhibited a small superlinear response, which is similar to that of pyroelectric detectors coated with good quality gold-black coatings.

  4. Uniaxial Tension Test of Slender Reinforced Early Age Concrete Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to obtain the tensile properties of early age concrete based on a uniaxial tension test employing RC slender members. First, the paper shows that concrete strain is equal to the strain of rebar at the mid-span of the RC member. The tensile Young’s modulus and the strain capacity of early age concrete are estimated using strain measurements. The experiment indicated that the tensile Young’s modulus at an early age is higher than the compressive modulus. This observation was similar to one found in a previous investigation which used a direct tension test of early age concrete. Moreover, the paper describes how an empirical equation for mature concrete can be applied to the relation between uniaxial tensile strength and splitting tensile strength even in early age concrete. Based on a uniaxial tension test, the paper proposes an empirical equation for the relationship between standard bond stresses and relative slip.

  5. Behavior of reinforced concrete columns strenghtened by partial jacketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. FERREIRA

    Full Text Available This article presents the study of reinforced concrete columns strengthened using a partial jacket consisting of a 35mm self-compacting concrete layer added to its most compressed face and tested in combined compression and uniaxial bending until rupture. Wedge bolt connectors were used to increase bond at the interface between the two concrete layers of different ages. Seven 2000 mm long columns were tested. Two columns were cast monolithically and named PO (original column e PR (reference column. The other five columns were strengthened using a new 35 mm thick self-compacting concrete layer attached to the column face subjected to highest compressive stresses. Column PO had a 120mm by 250 mm rectangular cross section and other columns had a 155 mm by 250mm cross section after the strengthening procedure. Results show that the ultimate resistance of the strengthened columns was more than three times the ultimate resistance of the original column PO, indicating the effectiveness of the strengthening procedure. Detachment of the new concrete layer with concrete crushing and steel yielding occurred in the strengthened columns.

  6. Reactive powder based concretes: Mechanical properties, durability and hybrid use with OPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cwirzen, A.; Penttala, V.; Vornanen, C.

    2008-01-01

    The basic mechanical properties, frost durability and the bond strength with normal strength concretes of the ultra high strength (UHS) mortars and concretes were studied. The produced mixes had plastic or fluid-like consistency. The 28-day compressive strength varied between 170 and 202 MPa for the heat-treated specimens and between 130 and 150 MPa for the non-heat-treated specimens. The shrinkage values were two times higher for the UHS mortars in comparison with the UHS concretes. After the initial shrinkage, swelling was noticed in the UHS mortars. The lowest creep values were measured for the non-heat-treated UHS concretes. The frost-deicing salts durability of the UHS mortars and concretes appeared to be very good even despite the increased water uptake of the UHS concretes. The study of the hybrid concrete beams indicated the formation of low strength transition zone between the UHS mortar and normal strength concrete

  7. Elasto-viscoplastic finite element model for prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates Junior, N.P.; Silva, C.S.B.; Campos Filho, A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model, based on the finite element method, for the study of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures under plane stress states. It comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete and steel relaxation are considered. Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive models are used to describe the behavior of the materials. The model includes prestressing and no prestressing reinforcement, on situation with pre- and post-tension with and without bond. A set of prestressed concrete slab elements were tested under instantaneous and long-term loading. The experimental data for deflections, deformations and ultimate strength are used to compare and validate the results obtained through the proposed model. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  8. Non-axisymmetric dynamic response of imperfectly bonded buried ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using thin shell theory, the effect of shear deformation and rotary inertia is not considered. The pipeline is modeled as an infinite thin cylindrical shell imperfectly bonded to surrounding. A thin layer is assumed between the shell and the surrounding medium (soil) such that this layer possesses the properties of stiffness and ...

  9. Durability as integral characteristic of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleymanova, L. A.; Pogorelova, I. A.; Suleymanov, K. A.; Kirilenko, S. V.; Marushko, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The carried-out research provides insight into the internal bonds energy in material as the basis of its durability, deformability, integrity and resistance to different factors (combined effects of external loadings and (or) environment), into the limits of technical possibilities, durability and physical reality of the process of concrete deterioration, which allows designing reliable and cost-effective ferroconcrete constructions for different purposes.

  10. Bonding mechanisms in spot welded three layer combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadam, Marcel; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Seyyedian Choobi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    this interface. It has been shown previously that such a joint can reach relatively high strength resulting in plug failure in tensileshear testing. Additional strength due to these bonding mechanisms is also obtained in common spot welds in the so-called corona band around the weld nugget.......The strength of a spot weld generally stems from fusion bonding of the metal layers, but other solid state bonding mechanisms also contribute to the overall strength. Metallographic analyses are presented to identify the phases formed near and across the weld interfaces and to identify...... the occurring bonding mechanisms. When welding a combination of three galvanized steel layers where one outer layer is a thin low-carbon steel it is a common challenge to obtain nugget penetration into the thin low-carbon steel. It therefore happens in real production that no nugget is formed across...

  11. Research on the Bond Anchorage Properties of Alkali-Activated Slag Cementitious Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Leng, Y. F.; Qin, C. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2017-12-01

    By bond-anchorage property tests at 20°C ∼500°C, the distribution of shear stress between carbon fiber sheets and concrete at all levels of loading and anchorage lengths were measured, which means the bond lengths during CFRP sheets are pulled off at the same time when the concrete is torn and stripped were gotten. The failure modes were obtained. In addition, the failure loads were measured, and the calculated formulas of anchorage lengths were identified by fitting at high temperature. It can be seen that the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets increase with increasing temperature at 20°C ∼100°C, the anchorage lengths of carbon fiber sheets decrease with increasing temperature at 100°C ∼500°C. Tests prove that AASCM has favorable high-temperature resistant and bond anchorage properties.

  12. Mechanical properties of refractory concretes for boilers; Propriedades mecanicas de concretos refratarios para caldeiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioletto, E.; Pelisser, F.; Peterson, M.; Angioletto, E.; Rocha, M.R.; Arnt, A.B.C. [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina (UDESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: ean@unesc.net; Coelho, R. [Tractebel Energia, Florianpolis, SC (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Refractory concretes are used in extremely physically demanding conditions. An important example is concretes used as sealing systems in boilers, where their dimensional stability at high temperatures is fundamental to durability and has a strong impact on maintenance costs and system idleness. In this work, refractory concretes with different compositions were characterized and then tested by dilatometry, for compressive strength and in assays involving adherence between tensile concrete/metal inserts, simulating the fixing system in boilers. Analysis of the results showed that refractory concretes do not present retraction due to air during drying, eliminating the possibility of cracking. While casting the plate/prototype with metal inserts, satisfactory concrete/metal adherence was verified and surface cracking occurred that did not influence the tensile bond strength between the insert and the concrete. (author)

  13. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  14. Behaviour of fibre reinforced polymer confined reinforced concrete columns under fire condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ershad Ullah

    In recent years, fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials have demonstrated enormous potential as materials for repairing and retrofitting concrete bridges that have deteriorated from factors such as electro-chemical corrosion and increased load requirements. However, concerns associated with fire remain an obstacle to applications of FRP materials in buildings and parking garages due to FRP's sensitivity to high temperatures as compared with other structural materials and to limited knowledge on their thermal and mechanical behaviour in fire. This thesis presents results from an ongoing study on the fire performance of FRP materials, fire insulation materials and systems, and FRP wrapped reinforced concrete columns. The overall goal of the study is to understand the fire behaviour of FRP materials and FRP strengthened concrete columns and ultimately, provide rational fire safety design recommendations and guidelines for FRP strengthened concrete columns. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was conducted to achieve the goals of this research study. The experimental work consisted of both small-scale FRP material testing at elevated temperatures and full-scale fire tests on FRP strengthened columns. A numerical model was developed to simulate the behaviour of unwrapped reinforced concrete and FRP strengthened reinforced concrete square or rectangular columns in fire. After validating the numerical model against test data available in literature, it was determined that the numerical model can be used to analyze the behaviour of concrete axial compressive members in fire. Results from this study also demonstrated that although FRP materials experience considerable loss of their mechanical and bond properties at temperatures somewhat below the glass transition temperature of the resin matrix, externally-bonded FRP can be used in strengthening concrete structural members in buildings, if appropriate supplemental fire protection system is provided over

  15. Non-linear analysis of the behaviour of a thin and squat reinforced concrete wall on a seismic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazars, J.; Ghavamian, S.; Ile, N.; Reynouard, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This work concerns the modeling and analysis of the seismic behaviour of a thin reinforced concrete wall using an experiment performed by the NUPEC (Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation) Japanese organisation with the Tadotsu seismic table. The wall with a height/width ratio close to 1, has its extremities stiffened and its base embedded. The wall, loaded on its top with a 122 t weight, is submitted to several seismic levels up to its collapse. A non-linear seismic analysis and different 2-D and 3-D finite elements modeling were used to simulate the behaviour of the structure submitted to a strong dynamic shear. The results presented in this paper belong to the ''Seismic Shear Wall Standard Problem'' benchmark jointly organized the NUPEC and OECD organizations. (J.S.)

  16. Ultimate stress increase in unbonded tendons in post-tensioned indeterminate I-beams cast with high strength normal and self compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Askari Dolatabad

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of un-bonded tendons is prevalent in post-tensioned concrete structures. Equations for prediction of stress in un-bonded tendons of post-tensioned normal (vibrating concrete flexural members have been given in various codes. They are based on experience and don’t account all of important parameters such as concrete strength (normal and high strength and its type (vibrating and non-vibrating concrete. Since self-compacting concrete (SCC is nearly a new innovation therefore, understanding the implementation of this type of non-vibrating concrete on the ultimate unbonded tendon stress is critical. For this aim, in this paper there are presented experimental results of six continuous un-bonded post-tensioned I-beams in two groups were casted and monitored by different electrical strain gauges. In the first tested group, the beams (UPN1-12, UPN1-18, UPN1-22 were consisting of high strength normal concrete (HSNC where as in the second group (UPS1-12, UPS1-18, UPS1-22 high strength self-compacting concrete (HSSCC were tested. The variables included the type of concrete and percentage of bounded non-prestressed steel. Experimental monitored results of ultimate stress increase in unbonded tendons are compared with predicted equations of different researchers and standards. It was found that, the proposed equation is in better agreement with the test results. The results of standard error of estimate Sy/x, indicates that for two types of HSCs, the ACI 318-2011 provides better estimates than AASHTO-2010 model whereas this model provides better estimates than BS 8110-97. Keywords: Post-tensioned, Unbonded tendons, Stress increase, High strength normal and self-compacting concrete, Continuous beams

  17. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  18. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB's) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing

  19. Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Russell [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kahn, Lawrence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kurtis, Kimberly [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Loreto, Giovanni [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Wyk, Jurie [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Canterero-Leal, Carlos [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This report outlines the development of a self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The self-roughening concrete produced as part of this research was assessed in SC structures at three scales: small-scale shear-friction specimens, mid-scale beams tested in in-plane and out-of-plane bending, and a full-scale validation test using an SC module produced by Westinghouse as part of the Plant Vogtle expansion. The experiments show that the self-roughening concrete can produce a cold-joint surface of 0.25 inches (6 mm) without external vibration during concrete placement. The experiments and subsequent analysis show that the shear friction provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9 can be used to assess the shear capacity of the cold-joints in SC modular construction, and that friction coefficient of 1.35 is appropriate for use with these provisions.

  20. Flexural strength of structural concrete repaired with HBPMM cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, G.H.; Khaskheli, G.B.; Kumar, A.

    2009-01-01

    To repair damaged concrete structures, Dadabhoy Cement Factory in Sindh has launched a product known as HBPMM (Hi-Bond Polymer Modified Mortar) cement. HBPMM is used to repair various concrete structures in Pakistan but the experimental back up regarding the real performance of the product, as far as flexural strength of concrete is concerned, is not well known yet. This study is thus aimed to investigate the flexural strength of structural concrete repaired with HBPMM compared to that repaired with OPC (Ordinary Portland Cement). In total 32 concrete beams (6x6x18) having compressive strength of 3000 and 5000 psi were manufactured. To obtain flexural strength of the beams, these were splitted by using a UTM (Universal Testing Machine). Beams were then repaired with different applications of HBPMM and OPC. After 28 days of curing, the repaired beams were re-splitted to determine the flexural strength of repaired beams. Results show that both HBPMM and OPC are not very effective. However, the performance of HBPMM remained slightly better than that of OPC. Both OPC and HBPMM remained more efficient in case of 5000 psi concrete than that of 3000 psi concrete. Flexural strength of repaired beams could be increased by increasing application of the repairing material. (author)

  1. Thin film metal sensors in fusion bonded glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Ek, Johan; Hedman, Ludvig; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehlstedt, Viktor; Stocklassa, Jesper; Snögren, Pär; Pettersson, Victor; Larsson, Jonas; Vizuete, Olivier; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure microfluidics offers fast analyses of thermodynamic parameters for compressed process solvents. However, microfluidic platforms handling highly compressible supercritical CO 2 are difficult to control, and on-chip sensing would offer added control of the devices. Therefore, there is a need to integrate sensors into highly pressure tolerant glass chips. In this paper, thin film Pt sensors were embedded in shallow etched trenches in a glass wafer that was bonded with another glass wafer having microfluidic channels. The devices having sensors integrated into the flow channels sustained pressures up to 220 bar, typical for the operation of supercritical CO 2 . No leakage from the devices could be found. Integrated temperature sensors were capable of measuring local decompression cooling effects and integrated calorimetric sensors measured flow velocities over the range 0.5–13.8 mm s −1 . By this, a better control of high-pressure microfluidic platforms has been achieved. (paper)

  2. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, P. A., E-mail: radchenko@live.ru; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S. [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  3. Modeling of fracture of protective concrete structures under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.; Plevkov, V. S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents results of numerical simulation of interaction between a Boeing 747-400 aircraft and the protective shell of a nuclear power plant. The shell is presented as a complex multilayered cellular structure consisting of layers of concrete and fiber concrete bonded with steel trusses. Numerical simulation was performed three-dimensionally using the original algorithm and software taking into account algorithms for building grids of complex geometric objects and parallel computations. Dynamics of the stress-strain state and fracture of the structure were studied. Destruction is described using a two-stage model that allows taking into account anisotropy of elastic and strength properties of concrete and fiber concrete. It is shown that wave processes initiate destruction of the cellular shell structure; cells start to destruct in an unloading wave originating after the compression wave arrival at free cell surfaces.

  4. Bond of reinforcing bars in self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Braam, C.R.; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Plain concrete demonstrates a rather brittle behavior both under compression and tension. By adding steel fibers, the post-cracking behavior becomes more ductile and an increase of the strain capacity under tension and compression is found. The research project currently being carried out aims at

  5. Inelastic analysis of prestressed concrete secondary containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.W.; Chitnuyanondh, L.; Wong, C.; Rijub-Agha, K.Y.

    1978-07-01

    An elastic-plastic constitutive model for the simulation of stress-strain response of concrete under any biaxial combination of compressive and/or tensile stresses is developed. An effective tensile stress-strain curve is obtained indirectly from experimental results of a test on a large scale prestressed concrete wall segment. These concrete properties are then utilized in predicting the response of a second test and the results compared with the experiment. Modificications to the BOSOR5 program, in order to incorporate the new constitutive relation into it, are described. Techniques of modelling structures in order to perform inelastic analysis of thin shell axisymmetric prestressed concrete secondary containments are investigated. The results of inelastic BOSOR5 analyses of two different models of the University of Alberta Test Structure are presented. The predicted deterioration of the structure and the limit states associated with its behaviour are determined and discussed. It is concluded that the technique is a practical one which can be used for the inelastic analysis of Gentilly-type containment structures. (author)

  6. Measured Prestress Loss of over 20-Year-Old Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Most nuclear reactors, both in Korea and worldwide, are enclosed by a prestressed concrete containment vessels(PCCVs). The containment wall is approximately 1 m thick and is prestressed in two directions by large prestressing tendons. The main purpose of the containment is to maintain the structural integrity of the containment in the event of a major internal accident. The main accidental scenario, which the containment is designed to withstand, is a so-called loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A LOCA is initiated by a pipe rupture in the cooling system, discharging hot steam into the containment. The escape of steam increases both the temperature and pressure inside the containment. The increased internal pressure arising from a LOCA is referred to as the design pressure. The prestressing system is designed to counterbalance the tensile forces arising from the design pressure. The status of the containment is gradually changed due to environmental factors and by alterations in the micro structure of the material. The prestress will be reduced due to shrinkage and creep in the concrete and relaxation in the tendons. The corrosion protection of tendons are for Korean containments arranged in two different ways, either by cement grouting (bonded tendons) or e.g. by grease injection (unbonded tendons). The major advantage using unbonded tendons is the possibilities of assessing their status (e.g. prestress losses or corrosion damages) which is not possible using bonded tendons. Both bonded and unbonded tendons are used worldwide. For example in the U.S. almost all tendons are unbonded, whereas in France almost all tendons are bonded. For Korean reactor containments with unbonded tendons (14 containments) the tendon force is monitored at regular in-service inspections. The power plant Wolsung in Korea has bonded tendons and several prestressed concrete beams were constructed with the single purpose to follow up the prestress losses. The remaining tendon forces in some

  7. Measured Prestress Loss of over 20-Year-Old Prestressed Concrete Containment Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Dae Gi; Choun, Young Sun; Choi, In Kil

    2010-01-01

    Most nuclear reactors, both in Korea and worldwide, are enclosed by a prestressed concrete containment vessels(PCCVs). The containment wall is approximately 1 m thick and is prestressed in two directions by large prestressing tendons. The main purpose of the containment is to maintain the structural integrity of the containment in the event of a major internal accident. The main accidental scenario, which the containment is designed to withstand, is a so-called loss of coolant accident (LOCA). A LOCA is initiated by a pipe rupture in the cooling system, discharging hot steam into the containment. The escape of steam increases both the temperature and pressure inside the containment. The increased internal pressure arising from a LOCA is referred to as the design pressure. The prestressing system is designed to counterbalance the tensile forces arising from the design pressure. The status of the containment is gradually changed due to environmental factors and by alterations in the micro structure of the material. The prestress will be reduced due to shrinkage and creep in the concrete and relaxation in the tendons. The corrosion protection of tendons are for Korean containments arranged in two different ways, either by cement grouting (bonded tendons) or e.g. by grease injection (unbonded tendons). The major advantage using unbonded tendons is the possibilities of assessing their status (e.g. prestress losses or corrosion damages) which is not possible using bonded tendons. Both bonded and unbonded tendons are used worldwide. For example in the U.S. almost all tendons are unbonded, whereas in France almost all tendons are bonded. For Korean reactor containments with unbonded tendons (14 containments) the tendon force is monitored at regular in-service inspections. The power plant Wolsung in Korea has bonded tendons and several prestressed concrete beams were constructed with the single purpose to follow up the prestress losses. The remaining tendon forces in some

  8. Behaviour of concrete containment under over-pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, R.J.; Asmis, G.J.K.; Campbell, F.R.

    1979-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada initiated June, 1975, a major study of the behaviour of concrete containment under over-pressure conditions. Although extensive theoretical and experimental work has been carried out for thick-walled Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessels (PCRV's), there is a want of information on the non-linear response of thin-walled structures typical of the CANDU, 600 MW(e) cylindrical/spherical, post-tensioned containment shells. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the total program, to present the reasons behind the research contract, and the specification and implementation of the work. The results of the theoretical and experimental work and their implications with respect to Canadian Concrete Containment practice are discussed. This study is unique, and, as far as is known, has no world-wide precedence. (orig.)

  9. Effect of High Temperature or fire on heavy weight concrete properties used in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakr, K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work the effect of different duration (1, 2 and 3 hours) of high temperatures (250 degree C, 500 degree C, 750 degree C and 950 degree C) on the physical and mechanical properties of heavy concrete shields were studied. The effect of fire fitting systems on ordinary concrete was investigated. The work was extended to determine the effect of high temperature or accidental fire on the radiation properties of heavy weight concrete. Results showed that ilmenite concrete had the highest density, absorption, and modulus of elasticity when compared to the other types of studied concrete and it had also higher values of compressive, tensile, bending and bonding strength than ordinary or baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete had the highest attenuation of transmitted gamma rays in comparing to gravel concrete and baryte concrete. Ilmenite concrete was more resistant to elevated temperature than gravel concrete and baryte concrete. Foam or air as a fire fitting system in concrete structure that exposed to high temperature or accidental fire proved that better than water

  10. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft 3 to 5.0 yd 3 , with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties

  11. A study of concrete properties using phyllite as coarse aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adom-Asamoah, Mark; Afrifa, Russell Owusu

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, industrial activities generate a huge amount of waste. One such activity is underground mining which generates phyllite wastes that are recycled as coarse aggregates for use in concrete production. Aggregate use in concrete is dependent on availability. This paper reports of an experimental study on some of the physical and mechanical properties of phyllite aggregate concrete as compared to granite (conventional) aggregate concrete. The obtained physical and mechanical properties of both aggregates for specific gravity, water absorption (%), dry density, aggregate impact value (%), aggregate crushing value (%), 10% fines, elongation index (%), flakiness index (%) and Los Angeles abrasion values satisfied minimum requirements for aggregates suitable for concrete production. Five mixes of concrete mix proportions designated M1, M2, M3, M4 and M5 were cast using phyllite and granite aggregates. A total of 400 concrete cubes and 210 modulus of rupture beams were cast and cured by total submerging in water for ages 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, 90, 180 and 360 days before compression and bending tests were performed. The results show that the trends in the development of compressive and bending strengths of plain phyllite concrete were similar to those in granite (conventional) aggregate concrete. However the compressive and bending strengths of phyllite concrete mixes were on the average 15-20% lower than those of the corresponding granite concrete mixes at all ages. The same concrete mix proportions gave lower concrete classes for phyllite compared to granite with the exception of the lowest grade. This was probably because the flakiness and elongation properties coupled with reactive materials in phyllite aggregates affect the absorption and bond characteristics of its concrete.

  12. Bending Moment Decrease of Reinforced Concrete Beam Supported by Additional CFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykolas Daugevičius

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The calculation method of reinforced concrete beam with additional CFRP composite is proposed in this article. This method estimates tangential angular concrete deformations in tensioned beam layers between steel and bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer. The horizontal slip of CFRP composite reduce beam bending moment capacity. An additional coefficient to reduce CFRP resultant force is necessary for better precision of bending moment capacity. Also, various calculation methods of bending moment capacity are considered. Article in Lithuanian

  13. Durability of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with fiber reinforced polymers under varying environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sadani, R.A.M.G

    2008-01-01

    Fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) materials were adopted by the aerospace and marine industries, not only for their lightweight and high strength characteristics but also due to their tough and durable nature . As the engineering community has become more familiar with the performance advantages of these materials, new applications have been investigated and implemented. Researches and design guidelines concluded that externally bonded FRP to concrete elements could efficiently increase the capacity of RC elements. Long-term exposure to harsh environments deteriorates concrete and the need for repair and rehabilitation is evident. In order to accept these FRP materials, they must be evaluated for durability in harsh environments. An experimental program was conducted at the materials laboratory- faculty of engineering-Ain Shams university to study the durability of RC beams strengthened with FRP sheets and to compare them with un strengthened beams.The effect of gamma rays on FRP materials and concrete specimens bonded to FRP sheets were also investigated.

  14. Historic Concrete : From Concrete Repair to Concrete Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinemann, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete like materials were already applied during the Roman Empire. After the decline of the Roman Empire, a wide scale application of concrete only reappeared in the 19th century. Here lies also the origin of modern (reinforced) concrete. Since then, both concrete application and composition have

  15. Nondestructive testing of thermocompression bonds. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, G.M.

    1981-02-01

    A Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope (SLAM) was used to characterize hybrid microcircuit beam lead bonds formed on thin film networks by a thermocompression process. Results from subsequent pull testing show that the SLAM offered no significant advantage over visual inspection for detecting bad bonds. Infrared microscopy and resistance measurements were also reviewed and rejected as being ineffective inspection methods

  16. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1965-04-01

    Aluminum can be bonded to zirconium without difficulty even when a thin layer of oxide is present on the surface of the zirconium . No detectable diffusion takes place during the bonding process. The bond layer can be stretched as much. as 8% without affecting the bond. The bond can be heated for 1000 hours at 260 o C (500 o F), and can be water quenched from 260 o C (500 o F) without any noticeable change in the bond strength. An extrusion technique has been devised for making transition sections of aluminum bonded to zirconium which can then be used to join these metals by conventional welding. Welding can be done close to the bond zone without seriously affecting the integrity of the bond. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965. (author)

  17. Innovative Method for Automatic Shape Generation and 3D Printing of Reduced-Scale Models of Ultra-Thin Concrete Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tomé

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A research and development project has been conducted aiming to design and produce ultra-thin concrete shells. In this paper, the first part of the project is described, consisting of an innovative method for shape generation and the consequent production of reduced-scale models of the selected geometries. First, the shape generation is explained, consisting of a geometrically nonlinear analysis based on the Finite Element Method (FEM to define the antifunicular of the shell’s deadweight. Next, the scale model production is described, consisting of 3D printing, specifically developed to evaluate the aesthetics and visual impact, as well as to study the aerodynamic behaviour of the concrete shells in a wind tunnel. The goals and constraints of the method are identified and a step-by-step guidelines presented, aiming to be used as a reference in future studies. The printed geometry is validated by high-resolution assessment achieved by photogrammetry. The results are compared with the geometry computed through geometric nonlinear finite-element-based analysis, and no significant differences are recorded. The method is revealed to be an important tool for automatic shape generation and building scale models of shells. The latter enables the performing of wind tunnel tests to obtain pressure coefficients, essential for structural analysis of this type of structures.

  18. RESEARCH OF HEAT-RESISTANT CONCRETE ON THE BASIS OF BASALT FILLER FOR CONCRETING OF METAL DESIGNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Curbanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expediency of use of heat-resistant concrete locates in article on the basis of a basalt filler. It is thin a ground additive promotes increase in power of internal friction between material particles. With increase in power of internal friction between particles viscosity knitting increases and as a result ryazmyagcheniye temperature under loading increases and fire resistance of a material increases

  19. Effect of hydroxyl bond formation on the adhesion improvement of a polyethylene copper thin film system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, M.; Blantocas, G.; Ramos, H.

    2009-01-01

    Formation of hydroxyl bonds on the surface of a gas plasma treated high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets significantly enhanced the adhesion strength of the polyethylene copper thin film system. Surface treatments using oxygen gas plasmas at varying plasma parameters are applied in this study to identify the most effective plasma parameters that would promote the best adhesion strength. Analysis of gas plasma adulterated HDPE sheets showed best enhancement of polyethylene copper adhesion after an oxygen gas plasma treatment for 60 minutes at 5mA discharge current. Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Adhesion measurements using Pull out Force Analysis were used to measure the changes in the surface chemistry and surface topology of the HDPE sheets. (author)

  20. The design of bonded reinforcement for thermal stresses in prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotulla, B.; Hansson, V.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with examples of thermal loadings where instationary growth of tensile zones and redistribution of stresses by cracking are of importance. Temperatures produce, in addition to prestressing and internal pressure, the most important stresses in a prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessel. Characteristic of thermal stresses is that they are influenced to a large extent by creep of concrete and that they influence stress redistributions by temperature dependent creep data. Computations show that during the first instationary heating process of the vessel stresses are reduced by creep effects to about fifty percent of the values of the stationary elastic case at the hot face. With a following cooling, creep effects are generally much less, so this case may produce tensile stresses on the internal face of the wall which lead to cracking of the concrete. Tensile stresses first occur due to the instationary growth of the temperature field in a narrow zone near the liner. If outside this zone compressive stresses exist due to prestressing then crack spreading is limited and restraint by the parts of the wall under compression causes crack distribution even without reinforcement in this zone. Growth of cracks with the instationary spreading of tensile zones according to temperature development was calculated. These calculations take into account discrete cracks, reinforcement and different assumptions for tensile strength. Reinforcement of small diameter near the surface has the best influence on crack spacing. Calculations show that for the stationary state of cooling the forces in the reinforcement may be as low as twenty to thirty percent of the tensile force not taking into account cracking of the concrete

  1. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA.

  2. Large-scale experiment with laying shielding concrete at Dukovany nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenig, A.; Svoboda, R.; Rosa, J.

    1984-01-01

    In some places the concrete walls of the biological shielding are so thin that it is not possible to control the density of the deposited concrete. An experiment was therefore carried out which was to demonstrate that concrete may be deposited by sinking through concrete tubes or by a concrete pump from a height of 8 metres. Two test walls A and B were concreted using the non-standardized method and the third wall was used as the standard. The following tests were conducted on the two non-standardized walls: test of miscibility of extra-heavy concrete, ultrasonic test of homogeneity, and samples were taken for tests of density. Density was determined radiometrically using a narrow gamma beam. Statistical evaluation of the results showed that the homogeneity of density of the concrete was the best in the standard wall, in walls A and B the variation coefficient did not exceed 8 per mille. An exception was made to the rule and concrete with a max. 16 mm grain size was deposited from the height of 8 m on condition of strict observance of production technology. (J.P.)

  3. Assessment of aggregates- cement paste border in concretes containing silica fume and fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sademomtazi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The bond between aggregate and cement paste, called the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is an important parameter that effect on the mechanical properties and durability of concrete. Transition zone microstructure and porosity (pores of cement paste or concrete are affected by the type and properties of materials used which evaluated in this research. On the other hand, the use of efficient, low-cost and reliable method is particularly important for evaluating of concrete performance against the chloride ion penetration and its relationships with transition zone as a suitable index to assess the durability. So far, various methods to approach the electrical Indices are presented. In this research, the effect of pozzolanic materials fly ash (10%, 20% and 30% and silica fume (5% and 10% as substitute of cement by weight in binary and ternary mixtures on the fresh and hardened concrete properties were investigated. To determine mechanical properties, the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity tests were performed. Also, water penetration depth, porosity, water sorptivity, specific electrical resistivity, rapid chloride penetration test (RCPT and rapid chloride migration test (RCMT tests were applied to evaluate concrete durability. To examine the border of aggregate and cement paste morphology of concrete specimens, scanning electron microscope images (SEM was used. The fresh concrete results showed that the presence of silica fume in binary and ternary mixtures reduced workability and air content but fly ash increased them. Adding silica fume to mixtures of containing flay ash while increasing mechanical strength reduced the porosity and pores to 18%. The presence of pozzolanic materials in addition to increasing bond quality and uniformity of aggregate-cement matrix border a considerably positive effect on the transport properties of concrete.

  4. Low-Temperature Bonding of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 Thermoelectric Material with Cu Electrodes Using a Thin-Film In Interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan-Cheng; Yang, Chung-Lin; Huang, Jing-Yi; Jain, Chao-Chi; Hwang, Jen-Dong; Chu, Hsu-Shen; Chen, Sheng-Chi; Chuang, Tung-Han

    2016-09-01

    A Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 thermoelectric material electroplated with a Ni barrier layer and a Ag reaction layer was bonded with a Ag-coated Cu electrode at low temperatures of 448 K (175 °C) to 523 K (250 °C) using a 4- μm-thick In interlayer under an external pressure of 3 MPa. During the bonding process, the In thin film reacted with the Ag layer to form a double layer of Ag3In and Ag2In intermetallic compounds. No reaction occurred at the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Ni interface, which resulted in low bonding strengths of about 3.2 MPa. The adhesion of the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Ni interface was improved by precoating a 1- μm Sn film on the surface of the thermoelectric element and preheating it at 523 K (250 °C) for 3 minutes. In this case, the bonding strengths increased to a range of 9.1 to 11.5 MPa after bonding at 473 K (200 °C) for 5 to 60 minutes, and the shear-tested specimens fractured with cleavage characteristics in the interior of the thermoelectric material. The bonding at 448 K (175 °C) led to shear strengths ranging from 7.1 to 8.5 MPa for various bonding times between 5 and 60 minutes, which were further increased to the values of 10.4 to 11.7 MPa by increasing the bonding pressure to 9.8 MPa. The shear strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3/Cu joints bonded with the optimized conditions of the modified solid-liquid interdiffusion bonding process changed only slightly after long-term exposure at 473 K (200 °C) for 1000 hours.

  5. The Efficiency of Basalt Fibres in Strengthening the Reinforced Concrete Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Şerbescu, Andreea; Kypros, Pilakoutas; Ţăranu, N.

    2006-01-01

    The technique of externally bonding fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminates on the tension side of reinforced concrete (RC) beams is already widely accepted as an easy to apply, corrosion resistant and effective solution due to the high strength as well as the low weight of the composite material. The basalt fibres are produced from volcano rocks by a simple process; their applicability as reinforcing material composites utilized for plate bonding of RC beams was not enough researc...

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Acrylic Primer for Concrete Substrate Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed Negim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study dealt with the properties of acrylic primer for concrete substrate using acrylic syrup, made from a methyl methacrylate monomer solution of terpolymers. Terpolymer systems consisting of methyl methacrylate (MMA, 2-ethylhexyl acrylate (2-EHA, and methacrylic acid (MAA with different chemical composition ratios of MMA and 2-EHA were synthesized through bulk polymerization using azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN as initiator. The terpolymer composition is characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, DSC, TGA, and SEM. The glass transition temperature and the thermal stability increased with increasing amounts of MMA in the terpolymer backbone. The effect of chemical composition of terpolymers on physicomechanical properties of primer films was investigated. However, increasing the amount of MMA in terpolymer backbone increased tensile and contact angle of primer films while elongation at break, water absorption, and bond strength are decreased. In particular, the primer syrup containing 65% 2-EHA has good bonding strength with concrete substrate around 1.1 MPa.

  7. Preliminary investigation on the suitablity of using fiber reinforced concrete in the construction of a hazardous waste disposal vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, M.R.; Daie-e, G.

    1988-07-01

    There are certain hazardous wastes that must be contained in an extremely secure vessel for transportation and disposal. The vessel, among other things, must be able to withstand relatively large impacts without rupturing. Such containment vessels therefore must be able to absorb substantial amounts of energy during an impact and still perform their function. One of the impacts that the vessel must withstand is a 30-foot fall onto an unyielding surface. For some disposal scenarios it is proposed to encase the waste in a steel enclosure which is to be surrounded by a thick layer of concrete which, in turn, is encased by a relatively thin steel shell. Tests on concrete in compression and flexure, including static, dynamic and impact tests, have shown that low modulus concretes tend to behave in a less brittle manner than higher modulus concretes. Tests also show that fiber reinforced concretes have significantly greater ductility, crack propagation resistance and toughness than conventional concretes. Since it is known that concrete is a reasonably brittle material, it is necessary to do impact tests on sample containment structures consisting of thin-walled metal containers having closed ends which are filled with concrete, grout, or fiber reinforced concrete. This report presents the results of simple tests aimed at observing the behavior of sample containment structures subjected to impacts due to a fall from 30 feet. 8 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Bond of reinforcing bars in self-compacting steel fiber reinforced concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, P.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Braam, C.R.; Uijl, J.A. den; Walraven, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Pull-out tests were performed on 10 mm diameter ribbed bars embedded along three times the bar diameter in 200 mm cubes made of plain and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) of normal strength (B45). The fiber content was 60 and 120 kg/m3, respectively, the aspect ratio of the fibers was 45 and

  9. Fatigue Performance and Multiscale Mechanisms of Concrete Toughened by Polymers and Waste Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For improving bending toughness and fatigue performance of brittle cement-based composites, two types of water-soluble polymers (such as dispersible latex powder and polyvinyl alcohol powder and waste tire-rubber powders are added to concrete as admixtures. Multiscale toughening mechanisms of these additions in concretes were comprehensively investigated. Four-point bending fatigue performance of four series concretes is conducted under a stress level of 0.70. The results show that the effects of dispersible latex powder on bending toughness and fatigue life of concrete are better than those of polyvinyl alcohol powder. Furthermore, the bending fatigue lives of concrete simultaneously containing polymers and waste rubber powders are larger than those of concrete with only one type of admixtures. The multiscale physics-chemical mechanisms show that high bonding effect and high elastic modulus of polymer films as well as good elastic property and crack-resistance of waste tire-rubber powders are beneficial for improving bending toughness and fatigue life of cementitious composites.

  10. Concrete structural analysis tools and properties for Hanford site waste tank evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Peterson, W.S.; Winkel, B.V.; Weiner, E.O.

    1995-09-01

    As Hanford Site Contractors address maintenance and future structural demands on nuclear waste tanks built as early as 1943, it is necessary to address their current safety margins and ensure safe margins are maintained. Although the current civil engineering practice has building codes for reinforced concrete design guidelines, the tanks were not constructed to today's building codes and future demands potentially result in loads and modifications to the tanks that are outside the original design basis and current practice. The Hanford Site engineering staff has embraced nonlinear finite-element modeling of concrete in an effort to obtain a more accurate understanding of the actual tank margins. This document brings together and integrates past Hanford Site nonlinear reinforced concrete analysis methods, past Hanford Site concrete testing, public domain research testing, and current concrete research directions. This document, including future revisions, provides the structural engineering overview (or survey) for a consistent, accurate approach to nonlinear finite-element modeling of reinforced concrete for Hanford Site waste storage tanks. This report addresses concrete strength and modulus degradation with temperature, creep, shrinkage, long-term sustained loads, and temperature degradation of rebar and concrete bonds. Recommendations are given for parameter studies and evaluation techniques for review of nonlinear finite-element analysis of concrete

  11. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  12. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Orozco, Carlos A.

    2017-03-24

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  13. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Carlos A; Chun, Byong W; Geng, Guoqing; Emwas, Abdul H; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2017-04-11

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29 Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  14. Characterization of the Bonds Developed between Calcium Silicate Hydrate and Polycarboxylate-Based Superplasticizers with Silyl Functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Orozco, Carlos A.; Chun, Byong W.; Geng, Guoqing; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Major developments in concrete technology have been achieved with the use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCEs) to improve the concrete rheology without increasing the mix water content. Currently, it is possible to control the fluidity of the fresh concrete and obtain stronger and more durable structures. Therefore, there is a strong incentive to understand the interactions between PCEs and cement hydrates at the atomic scale to design new customized functional PCEs according to the ever-increasing requirements of the concrete industry. Here, the bonding types generated between a PCE with silyl functionalities (PCE-Sil) and a synthetic calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) are analyzed using XRD, 29Si NMR spectroscopy, and synchrotron-based techniques, such as NEXAFS and EXAFS. The results indicated that the carboxylic groups present in PCE-Sil interact by a ligand-type bond with calcium, which modified not only the symmetry and coordination number of the calcium located at the surface of C-S-H but also the neighboring silicon atoms of the C-S-H. In addition, the silyl functionalities of the PCE-Sil generated covalent bonds through siloxane bridges between the silanol groups of PCE-Sil and the nonbonding oxygen located at the dimeric sites in C-S-H, forming new bridging silicon sites and subsequently increasing the silicate polymerization.

  15. An experimental investigation into the behavior of concrete elements rerofitted with NSM composite strips at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namrou, Abdul Rahman

    Near-surface-mounted (NSM) fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is another strengthening alternative of externally bonded fiber reinforced polymers. NSM FRP is a promising alternative technology that has emerged for enhancing the strength capacity of concrete structures. Most laboratory researches have focused mainly on the overall member performance and/or the bonding performance of the NSM bars or strips. Limited research has focused on the effect of temperature exposure on NSM FRP performance. The results of an experimental program performed on forty-eight (48) concrete block specimen with NSM carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) strengthening systems at elevated temperatures that reaches to 200°C [392°F] to investigate flexural performance. The effect of using two different adhesive systems (epoxy anchoring system) with manufacturer recommendation at ordinary and high temperature exposures is also studied. The adhesive was injected in a NSM groove size (25 mm [1 in] deep x 13 mm [0.5 in] wide) the width and depth of the groove were greater than 3 and 1.5 times the CFRP thickness and width, respectively. Test results show that the interfacial strength of the specimens bonded with the ordinary epoxy is maintained until 75°C [167°F] is reached, while the strength noticeably decreases with an increasing temperature above this limit. The specimens with the high-temperature epoxy preserve interfacial capacity up to 200°C [392°F] despite a trend of strength-decrease being observed. The failure of the test specimens is brittle irrespective of adhesive type. Interfacial damage is localized along the bond-line with the presence of hairline cracks that further develop when interfacial failure is imminent. This thesis also presents an experimental result concerning the bond performance of concrete-adhesive at elevated temperatures that reaches to 200°C [392°F] applied for three hours. Then, the concrete prisms were tested under three point flexural loading. The

  16. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringi, Gideon; Abolmaali, Ali; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Tire derived aggregate (TDA) has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA. PMID:26161440

  17. Properties of Concrete with Tire Derived Aggregate Partially Replacing Coarse Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Siringi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tire derived aggregate (TDA has been proposed as a possible lightweight replacement for mineral aggregate in concrete. The role played by the amount of TDA replacing coarse aggregate as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties is examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, splitting tensile strength based on ASTM C496, modulus of rupture (flexural strength based on ASTM C78, and bond stress based on ASTM C234. Results indicate that while replacement of coarse aggregates with TDA results in reduction in strength, it may be mitigated with addition of silica fume to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product while utilizing recycled TDA.

  18. Composition-dependent nanostructure of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} powders and thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnohr, C.S., E-mail: c.schnohr@uni-jena.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kämmer, H.; Steinbach, T.; Gnauck, M. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Rissom, T.; Kaufmann, C.A.; Stephan, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Schorr, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Institut für Geologische Wissenschaften, Freie Universität Berlin, Malteserstr. 74-100, 12249 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Atomic-scale structural parameters of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} powders and polycrystalline thin films were determined as a function of the In and Cu contents using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. No difference in the two sample types is observed for the average bond lengths demonstrating the strong tendency towards bond length conservation typical for tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors. In contrast, the bond length variation is significantly smaller in the thin films than in the powders, particularly for Cu-poor material. This difference in the nanostructure is proposed to originate from differences in the preparation conditions, most prominently from the different history of Cu composition. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} powders and thin films are studied with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. • Structural parameters are determined as a function of the In and Cu contents. • The element-specific average bond lengths are identical for powders and thin films. • The Ga-Se/In-Se bond length variation is smaller for thin films than for powders. • The differences are believed to stem from the different history of the Cu content.

  19. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  20. Effect of Material Composition and Environmental Condition on Thermal Characteristics of Conductive Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Pan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conductive asphalt concrete with high thermal conductivity has been proposed to improve the solar energy collection and snow melting efficiencies of asphalt solar collector (ASC. This paper aims to provide some insight into choosing the basic materials for preparation of conductive asphalt concrete, as well as determining the evolution of thermal characteristics affected by environmental factors. The thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete were studied by the Thermal Constants Analyzer. Experimental results showed that aggregate and conductive filler have a significant effect on the thermal properties of asphalt concrete, while the effect of asphalt binder was not evident due to its low proportion. Utilization of mineral aggregate and conductive filler with higher thermal conductivity is an efficient method to prepare conductive asphalt concrete. Moreover, change in thermal properties of asphalt concrete under different temperature and moisture conditions should be taken into account to determine the actual thermal properties of asphalt concrete. There was no noticeable difference in thermal properties of asphalt concrete before and after aging. Furthermore, freezing–thawing cycles strongly affect the thermal properties of conductive asphalt concrete, due to volume expansion and bonding degradation.

  1. Testing program for determining the mechanical properties of concrete to temperatures of 6210C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.; Robinson, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    Concrete temperatures in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) in excess of normal code limits can result from postulated large sodium spills in equipment cells. Elevated temperature concrete property data which may have application for providing a basis for the design and evaluation of such postulated accident conditions is limited. Data thus needed to be developed commensurate with LMFBR plant applications for critical physical and mechanical concrete properties under prototypic thermal accident conditions. A test program was conducted to define the variations in physical and mechanical properties of a limestone aggregate concrete and a lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures. Five test series were conducted: unconfined compression, shear, rebar bond, sustained loading (creep), and thermal properties. Testing procedures for determining the mechanical properties of concrete from ambient to 621 0 C (1150 0 F) are described. Ther thermal properties tests are discussed in a separate paper which is also being presented at this conference

  2. A Nonlocal Peridynamic Plasticity Model for the Dynamic Flow and Fracture of Concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogler, Tracy; Lammi, Christopher James

    2014-10-01

    A nonlocal, ordinary peridynamic constitutive model is formulated to numerically simulate the pressure-dependent flow and fracture of heterogeneous, quasi-brittle ma- terials, such as concrete. Classical mechanics and traditional computational modeling methods do not accurately model the distributed fracture observed within this family of materials. The peridynamic horizon, or range of influence, provides a characteristic length to the continuum and limits localization of fracture. Scaling laws are derived to relate the parameters of peridynamic constitutive model to the parameters of the classical Drucker-Prager plasticity model. Thermodynamic analysis of associated and non-associated plastic flow is performed. An implicit integration algorithm is formu- lated to calculate the accumulated plastic bond extension and force state. The gov- erning equations are linearized and the simulation of the quasi-static compression of a cylinder is compared to the classical theory. A dissipation-based peridynamic bond failure criteria is implemented to model fracture and the splitting of a concrete cylinder is numerically simulated. Finally, calculation of the impact and spallation of a con- crete structure is performed to assess the suitability of the material and failure models for simulating concrete during dynamic loadings. The peridynamic model is found to accurately simulate the inelastic deformation and fracture behavior of concrete during compression, splitting, and dynamically induced spall. The work expands the types of materials that can be modeled using peridynamics. A multi-scale methodology for simulating concrete to be used in conjunction with the plasticity model is presented. The work was funded by LDRD 158806.

  3. Static and dynamic experimental study of strengthened reinforced short concrete corbel by using carbon fabrics, crack path in shear zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an experimental analysis of tracking the path of the cracks and crack growth in strengthened or repair reinforced concrete short corbels bonded by carbon fiber fabrics under static and dynamic loads. The reinforced short concrete corbel is a used precast element, for industrial buildings and structures. In fact, their functioning interestingly unconventional is compared to classical beam type elements. Then the effects of bending and shearing are combined in this case. The horizontal reinforced steel is localized to resist to tensile strength induced in bending top and a transversal strength-absorbing contribution. The introduction of carbon fiber composite in the field of Civil Engineering allows to strengthen or repair reinforced concrete structures using adhesive. So the carbon fiber material has many advantages as its low weight, flexibility, easier handling and also interesting physicochemical properties. However maintenance of civil engineering works is to protect them by ensuring better sealing or limiting corrosion. Then strengthening is to repair structures by using bonding technique to compensate their rigidity loss and limit the cracking. This allows to improve their performance and durability. Bonding of composite material in tensile zone of corbel retrieves most tensile stress and allows the structure to extend their load-bearing capacity. The local behavior of the structure is measured by means of the extensometer technique based on electrical strain gauges. This technique allowed to measure strains of steel, carbon fiber fabrics and concrete. The results of this investigation showed that strengthened reinforced concrete corbel bonded by carbon fiber fabrics can improve the ultimate load to twice and stiffens less than a third. The ultimate load, strain and displacement of the specimen are compared to reference experimental model of monotonic and cyclic applied loads. The success of strengthening depends strongly

  4. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa K. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This investigation is to develop a numerical model suitable for nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete shells. A nine-node Lagrangian element Figure (1 with enhanced shear interpolation will be used in this study. Table (1 describes shape functions and their derivatives of this element.An assumed transverse shear strain is used in the formulation of this element to overcome shear locking. Degenerated quadratic thick plate elements employing a layered discrelization through the thickness will be adopted. Different numbers of layers for different thickness can be used per element. A number of layers between (6 and 10 have proved to be appropriate to represent the nonlinear material behavior in structures. In this research 8 layers will be adequate. Material nonlinearities due to cracking of concrete, plastic flow or crushing of concrete in compression and yield condition of reinforcing steel are considered. The maximum tensile strength is used as a criterion for crack initiation. Attention is given to the tension stiffening phenomenon and the degrading effect of cracking on the compressive and shear strength of concrete. Perfect bond between concrete and steel is assumed. Attention is given also to geometric nonlinearities. An example have been chosen in order to demonstrate the suitability of the models by comparing the predicted behaviour with the experimental results for shell exhibiting various modes of failure.

  5. Stripping demolition of reinforced concrete by electric heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Wahei; Nishita, Kiwamu; Kasai, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    The present paper describes the procedures and results of a series of experiments the authors conducted to verify the efficiency of the electric heating method, previously proposed for so-called stripping demolition by applying electric current through reinforcing bars. In this method, a low voltage high current is run from one end to the other of a reinforcing bar or bars existing in a concrete structure, inducing intense heat in the bar(s) which in its turn brings about cracks in the surrounding concrete mass, facilitating secondary demolition by hammer picks or other means. The experiments were performed on full-scale biological shield wall mock-ups of a BWR and a small reactor. The results of the experiments are summarized as follows. (1) When electric current is applied through reinforcing bars, the bond between concrete and bars is loosened, and cracks start from one bar and progress toward other bars. Under appropriate conditions, the cracks in concrete run from the contact surface at one bar all the way to its the contact surface on another bar. (2) Cracks appear and grow only between two electrodes between which current is applied, not extending out of the area thus defined. (3) The concrete in the region closer to a current-bearing bar is intensely heated, whereas the concrete far from the bars remains nearly unheated. (4) Concrete walls after electric heating of bars disintegrates, if demolished with hammers, with the covering concrete are removed from the remaining portion of the structure together with heated bars, in shapes of flakes. (5) The reinforced concrete collapses in massive pieces of concrete, without generating much dust as is the case with the demolition of a concrete structure not heated by electricity. Results of the experiments show that the electric heating method is worth applying also to the demolition of nuclear power plants where concrete in the radioactivated surface region of shield walls needs to be stripped off in flakes

  6. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinicki, Michał A; Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria; Gibas, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Mariusz

    2016-01-02

    The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement-ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  7. Influence of Blended Cements with Calcareous Fly Ash on Chloride Ion Migration and Carbonation Resistance of Concrete for Durable Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał A. Glinicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine the possible use of new blended cements containing calcareous fly ash in structural concrete, potentially adequate for structural elements of nuclear power plants. The investigation included five new cements made with different contents of non-clinker constituents: calcareous fly ash, siliceous fly ash, ground granulated blastfurnace slag, and a reference cement—ordinary Portland cement. The influence of innovative cements on the resistance of concrete to chloride and carbonation exposure was studied. Additionally, an evaluation of the microstructure was performed using optical microscopy on concrete thin sections. Test results revealed a substantial improvement of the resistance to chloride ion penetration into concrete containing blended cements. The resistance was higher for increased clinker replacement levels and increased with curing time. However, concrete made with blended cements exhibited higher depth of carbonation than the Portland cement concrete, except the Portland-fly ash cement with 14.3% of calcareous fly ash. The thin sections analysis confirmed the values of the carbonation depth obtained from the phenolphthalein test. Test results indicate the possible range of application for new cements containing calcareous fly ash.

  8. Modelling Dowel Action of Discrete Reinforcing Bars in Cracked Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, A. K. H.; Ng, P. L.; Lam, J. Y. K.

    2010-01-01

    Dowel action is one of the component actions for shear force transfer in cracked reinforced concrete. In finite element analysis of concrete structures, the use of discrete representation of reinforcing bars is considered advantageous over the smeared representation due to the relative ease of modelling the bond-slip behaviour. However, there is very limited research on how to simulate the dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars. Herein, a numerical model for dowel action of discrete reinforcing bars crossing cracks in concrete is developed. The model features the derivation of dowel stiffness matrix based on beam-on-elastic-foundation theory and the direct assemblage of dowel stiffness into the concrete element stiffness matrices. The dowel action model is incorporated in a nonlinear finite element programme with secant stiffness formulation. Deep beams tested in the literature are analysed and it is found that the incorporation of dowel action model improves the accuracy of analysis.

  9. Characterization of electron beam deposited thin films of HfO2 and binary thin films of (HfO2:SiO2) by XRD and EXAFS measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, N.C.; Sahoo, N.K.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Thakur, S.; Kamble, N.M.; Nanda, D.; Hazra, S.; Bal, J.K.; Lee, J.F.; Tai, Y.L.; Hsieh, C.A.

    2009-10-01

    In this report, we have discussed the microstructure and the local structure of composite thin films having varying hafnia and silica compositions and prepared by reactive electron beam evaporation. XRD and EXAFS studies have confirmed that the pure hafnium oxide thin film has crystalline microstructure whereas the films with finite hafnia and silica composition are amorphous. The result of EXAFS analysis has shown that the bond lengths as well as coordination numbers around hafnium atom change with the variation of hafnia and silica compositions in the thin film. Finally, change of bond lengths has been correlated with change of refractive index and band gap of the composite thin films. (author)

  10. Behavior of concrete cylinders confined by a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothay Heng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is beneficial to utilize geopolymers for their potential properties to rehabilitate concrete structures. These properties include high adhesion to Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete even at low degrees of interfacial roughness, high durability and good fire resistance. This paper introduces use of a ferro-geopolymer jacket to strengthen concrete columns. It is a kind of jacket constructed with a geopolymer mortar reinforced with a wire mesh. This study was conducted to investigate the behavior of concrete cylinders confined with a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression. OPC concrete cylinders with 100 mm diameter and 200 mm height were fabricated. High calcium fly ash-based geopolymer mortar, activated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3, cured at a temperature of 25 ºC was used. Ferro-geopolymer jackets with a25 mm thickness, were reinforced with 1, 2 and 3 layers of expanded metal mesh and cast around concrete cylinders. The study results revealed that the compressive load carrying capacity and axial stiffness of concrete cylinders were improved. A monolithic failure mode was obtained as a result of a strong adhesion between the geopolymer and the concrete core. Enhancement of compressive load carrying capacity of the jacketed concrete cylinders was caused by a combination of a confinement effect and the compressive load resistance of the jacket transferred from concrete core through bonding.

  11. Flexural behaviour of RCC beams with externally bonded FRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignesh, S. Arun; Sumathi, A.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The increasing use of carbon and glass fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets for strengthening existing reinforced concrete beams has generated considerable interest in understanding the behavior of the FRP sheets when subjected to bending. The study on flexure includes various parameters like percentage of increase in strength of the member due to the externally bonded Fiber reinforced polymer, examining the crack patterns, reasons of debonding of the fibre from the structure, scaling, convenience of using the fibres, cost effectiveness etc. The present work aims to study experimentally about the reasons behind the failure due to flexure of an EB-FRP concrete beam by studying the various parameters. Deflection control may become as important as flexural strength for the design of FRPreinforced concrete structures. A numerical model is created using FEM software and the results are compared with that of the experiment.

  12. Modelling of cracking and inelastic behaviour of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.G.; Albana, M.O.

    1989-09-01

    The report contains a review of work available in the literature on local bond transfer and the main factors which influence it, involving deformed reinfocing bar. Possible load transfer mechanisms are investigated and the significance of secondary cracking, local consolidation and shearing assessed. On the basis of these studies a linkage element which realistically models bond action, and is applicable to both monotonic and cyclic load, is proposed. Its ability to accurately predict stress, strain and crack geometry in typical reinforced concrete components is demonstrated by comparison of the results of finite element analysis using this model with experimental data. Aspects requiring further research are identified. An analysis of the dynamic response of a reinforced concrete beam is given which makes the simplifying assumption of rigid-plastic behaviour. A comparison of the analytical solution with experimental results obtained by bend tests in the Large Dynamic Test Facility at Ispra shows that, despite the neglect of elastic vibrations, a reasonable prediction of the fundamental response is obtained providing due allowance is made for rate-of-strain effects

  13. Influence of surface modified basalt fiber on strength of cinder lightweight aggregate concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liguang; Li, Jiheng; Liu, Qingshun

    2017-12-01

    In order to improve the bonding and bridging effect between volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete cement and basalt fiber, The basalt fiber was subjected to etching and roughening treatment by NaOH solution, and the surface of the basalt fiber was treated with a mixture of sodium silicate and micro-silica powder. The influence of modified basalt fiber on the strength of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete was systematically studied. The experimental results show that the modified basalt fiber volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete has a flexural strength increased by 47%, the compressive strength is improved by 16% and the toughness is increased by 27% compared with that of the non-fiber.

  14. Structural health and dynamic behavior of residential buildings: field challenges in the rehab of damaged reinforced concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalhoub M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete buildings require special consideration under dynamic excitations due to their anisotropic material properties. Strain compatibility equations are used in concrete analysis and design with assumptions about the stress and strain field across member section and member length. However, these assumptions fall short of describing real life behavior when concrete elements deteriorate, age or undergo cyclic loading. This paper addresses the structural health of reinforced concrete buildings and proposes an analytical model to account for concrete damage through loss of bond. The proposed model relates steel loading that causes bond distress to design parameters such as development length and bar properties, and therefore could be complemented by field measurement. The paper proposes a diagnosis method and discusses the sustainability of the structure by assisting in a simplistic decision rule as to whether to perform minor fixes, major rehabilitation, or disposal. Emphasis is placed on the difference between reversible and irreversible effects of cyclic loading on structural behaviour, and draws a distinction between damage to the girder and damage to the column in the overall structural system. The model is compared to empirical results to address field challenges faced when the structure is subjected to severe conditions in its ambient environment, or to unusual loading. Deterioration in concrete causes alteration in its composite behavior with the reinforcing steel. This affects the fundamental period of the structure, and its response to seismic loading.

  15. Evaluation and Observation of Autogenous Healing Ability of Bond Cracks along Rebar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choonghyun Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Micro cracks occurring in concrete around tensile rebar is well known latent damage phenomenon. These micro cracks develop, and can be detected after reaching the surface of the concrete. Detection of these cracks before they are fully formed is preferable, but observing the whole crack structure is difficult. Another problem is repairing micro cracks under the concrete surface. The autogenous ability of bond cracks along rebar was evaluated using the air permeability test. Air permeability coefficients were measured before and after tensile loading, and experimental air permeability coefficients became larger near cracks along rebar as a result of tensile loading. Recuring for 28 days after tensile loading made the air permeability coefficients smaller, but this restriction only occurred during water recuring. Observation of crack patterns helped the understanding of change in the air permeability coefficients. Several small cracks along rebar were observed after tensile loading, and most cracks along rebar were not found after water recuring. On the other hand, the crack pattern did not change after air recuring. These results indicate that bond cracks along rebar can be closed by autogenous healing, and cause the air permeability coefficients.

  16. Constitutive equations for cracked reinforced concrete based on a refined model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geistefeldt, H.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper a refined nonlinear three-dimensional mechanical model for reinforced concrete is presented which can include the effects, depending on the given state of stress. The model is composed of three model-elements: component u-uncracked reinforced concrete with perfect bond (stiffness equal to the sum of the stiffnesses of concrete and reinforcement), component r-reinforcement free in surrounding concrete (reinforcement and concrete are having equal normal strains in noncracked directions and equal shear strains), component c-crack-part (shear stiffnesses in cracks is equal to the sum of shear stiffnesses of the reinforcement mesh, interface shear transfer and dowel action in cracks). The stress tensor of all components is equal to the global stress tensor. The strains are different from component to component corresponding to the local strain distribution in cracked reinforced concrete. For example the uniaxial behavior of reinforced concrete is modelled out of three springs k(u), k(r) and k(c) in series each having variable length l(u), l(r) or l(c). The uncracked structure is represented by k(u) only, l(r) and l(c) are zero. After cracking l(r) and l(c) are growing with the tensile load. When concrete tension stiffness between cracks has diminished, l(u) has reached the zero-value. The stress-dependent weights of the components in the model are derived from uniaxial theory and uniaxial test results

  17. Crack identification for reinforced concrete using PZT based smart rebar active sensing diagnostic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, N. N.; Wu, F.

    2016-04-01

    An active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar for SHM of RC structure has been currently under investigation. Previous test results showed that the system could detect the de-bond of concrete from reinforcement, and the diagnostic signals were increased exponentially with the de-bonding size. Previous study also showed that the smart rebar could function well like regular reinforcement to undertake tension stresses. In this study, a smart rebar network has been used to detect the crack damage of concrete based on guided waves. Experimental test has been carried out for the study. In the test, concrete beams with 2 reinforcements have been built. 8 sets of PZT elements were mounted onto the reinforcement bars in an optimized way to form an active sensing diagnostic system. A 90 kHz 5-cycle Hanning-windowed tone burst was used as input. Multiple cracks have been generated on the concrete structures. Through the guided bulk waves propagating in the structures from actuators and sensors mounted from different bars, crack damage could be detected clearly. Cases for both single and multiple cracks were tested. Different crack depths from the surface and different crack numbers have been studied. Test result shows that the amplitude of sensor output signals is deceased linearly with a propagating crack, and is decreased exponentially with increased crack numbers. From the study, the active sensing diagnostic system using PZT based smart rebar network shows a promising way to provide concrete crack damage information through the "talk" among sensors.

  18. Effect of steel surface conditions on reinforcing steel corrosion in concrete exposed to marine environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzola, E.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory methods and experimental tests were deployed in the present study to evaluate corrosion in reinforced concrete exposed to marine environments. Reinforcing steel exhibiting two different surface conditions prior to embedment in concrete were studied, one the one hand to assess the electrochemical behaviour of the bars during exposure of the concrete specimens to a simulated marine environment, and on the other to determine the strength of the steel/concrete bond. The reinforced concrete specimens prepared were adapted as required for electrochemical potential and corrosion rate testing. A total of 56 7x15-cm cylindrical specimens containing 3/8" steel rods anchored at a depth of 11.5 cm were made to evaluate the steel / concrete bond and exposed to a natural marine environment for 28 or 190 days prior to testing. All the specimens were made with ready-mixed concrete. It may be concluded from the results of the corrosion tests on reinforcing steel with different surface conditions that the oxide initially covering the bars was dissolved and the steel passivated by the alkalinity in the concrete. The chief finding of the bonding study was that the layer of oxide formed in pre-embedment steel deterioration contributed to establishing a better bond.

    En el contexto de esta investigación, se tomaron en consideración métodos y ensayos experimentales de laboratorio, que permiten hacer una evaluación de la corrosión del hormigón armado expuesto en ambientes marinos. Por una parte se evaluó el comportamiento electroquímico de dos condiciones de estados superficiales del acero embebido en el hormigón, exponiéndolo en un ambiente marino simulado y, por otra parte, se estudió la adherencia entre el acero y el hormigón, con los mismos estados superficiales usados para la evaluación electroquímica. Las probetas se fabricaron de hormigón con acero de refuerzo en su interior, adecuándolas para realizar los ensayos de potenciales

  19. Non-autoclaved aerated concrete with mineral additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ina, L. V.; Rakov, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint grinding of Portland cement clinker, silica and carbonate components and mineral additives to specific surface of 280 - 300 m2/kg on the properties (strength, average density and thermal conductivity) of non-autoclaved aerated concrete, and the porosity of the hardened cement paste produced from Portland cement clinker with mineral additives. The joint grinding of the Portland cement clinker with silica and carbonate components and mineral additives reduces the energy consumption of non-autoclaved aerated concrete production. The efficiency of mineral additives (diopside, wollastonite) is due to the closeness the composition, the type of chemical bonds, physical and chemical characteristics (specific enthalpy of formation, specific entropy) to anhydrous clinker minerals and their hydration products. Considering the influence of these additions on hydration of clinker minerals and formation of hardened cement paste structure, dispersed wollastonite and diopside should be used as mineral additives. The hardness and, consequently, the elastic modulus of diopside are higher than that of hardened cement paste. As a result, there is a redistribution of stresses in the hardened cement paste interporous partitions and hardening, both the partitions and aerated concrete on the whole. The mineral additives introduction allowed to obtain the non-autoclaved aerated concrete with average density 580 kg/m3, compressive strength of 3.3 MPa and thermal conductivity of 0.131 W/(m.°C).

  20. Development of load and resistance factor design for FRP strengthening of reinforced concrete bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Externally bonded fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are an increasingly adopted technology for the renewal of existing concrete structures. In order to encourage the further use of these materials, a design code is needed that considers the i...

  1. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Malešev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycled coarse aggregate (50% and 100% replacement of coarse recycled aggregate. Ninety-nine specimens were made for the testing of the basic properties of hardened concrete. Load testing of reinforced concrete beams made of the investigated concrete types is also presented in the paper. Regardless of the replacement ratio, recycled aggregate concrete (RAC had a satisfactory performance, which did not differ significantly from the performance of control concrete in this experimental research. However, for this to be fulfilled, it is necessary to use quality recycled concrete coarse aggregate and to follow the specific rules for design and production of this new concrete type.

  2. Improving rubber concrete by waste organic sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Liang-Hisng; Lin, Chun-Nan; Lu, Chun-Ku; Lee, Cheng-Haw; Lee, Maw-Tien

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the use of crumb tyres as additives to concrete was investigated. For some time, researchers have been studying the physical properties of concrete to determine why the inclusion of rubber particles causes the concrete to degrade. Several methods have been developed to improve the bonding between rubber particles and cement hydration products (C-S-H) with the hope of creating a product with an improvement in mechanical strength. In this study, the crumb tyres were treated with waste organic sulfur compounds from a petroleum refining factory in order to modify their surface properties. Organic sulfur compounds with amphiphilic properties can enhance the hydrophilic properties of the rubber and increase the intermolecular interaction forces between rubber and C-S-H. In the present study, a colloid probe of C-S-H was prepared to measure these intermolecular interaction forces by utilizing an atomic force microscope. Experimental results showed that rubber particles treated with waste organic sulfur compounds became more hydrophilic. In addition, the intermolecular interaction forces increased with the adsorption of waste organic sulfur compounds on the surface of the rubber particles. The compressive, tensile and flexural strengths of concrete samples that included rubber particles treated with organic sulfur compound also increased significantly.

  3. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  4. Prefabricated floor panels composed of fiber reinforced concrete and a steel substructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus H.; Fischer, Gregor; Jönsson, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study on prefabricated composite and modular floor deck panels composed of relatively thin fiber reinforced concrete slabs connected to steel substructures. The study focuses on the design, manufacturing, structural improvements and behavior of the floor systems during...

  5. Intermediate Crack Induced Debonding in Concrete Beams Strengthened with CFRP Plates - An Experimental Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusinowski, Piotr Michal; Täljsten, Björn

    2009-01-01

    , ductility and even durability. Design of structural strengthening applications using externally bonded FRP composites is usually based on conventional design approaches with improvement to account for the presence and characteristics of the FRP material. Non-conventional design issues that are specific...... of the strengthening method. End-peeling has governed a large interest and several debonding models have been presented. However, interfacial peeling at flexural cracks has not attained the same focus – even though this debonding failure is most likely more common. This paper presents laboratory tests of concrete...... beams strengthened in flexure with CFRP epoxy bonded plates. Wrapping with CFRP sheets was applied in order to try to localize the failure initiation. Concrete cracking as well as debonding initiation and propagation was possible to observe with help of advanced optical measuring system and high speed...

  6. Note: Anodic bonding with cooling of heat-sensitive areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Henriksen, Toke Riishøj

    2010-01-01

    Anodic bonding of silicon to glass always involves heating the glass and device to high temperatures so that cations become mobile in the electric field. We present a simple way of bonding thin silicon samples to borosilicate glass by means of heating from the glass side while locally cooling hea......-sensitive areas from the silicon side. Despite the high thermal conductivity of silicon, this method allows a strong anodic bond to form just millimeters away from areas essentially at room temperature....

  7. Measurements of resonance frequencies on prestressed concrete beams during post-tensioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, P.; Ryden, N.

    2011-01-01

    The reactor containment, which is a concrete structure prestressed vertically and horizontally, is the most essential safety barrier in a nuclear power plant and is designed to withstand a severe internal accident. The safety of the containment depends on the induced compressive stresses in the concrete, however due to various long-term mechanisms the tendon forces will decrease with time. Today, no methods exist for measuring these prestress losses in containments with bonded tendons and thus there is a need for non-destructive methods for estimating the losses in these structures. Recent results from non-linear ultrasonic measurements during uniaxial loading have demonstrated a strong acoustic and elastic effect in concrete. The present research applies resonant acoustic spectroscopy (RAS) during static loading and unloading of three prestressed concrete beams. At each load step multiple modes of vibration are measured using an accelerometer and a small impact source. Measured resonant frequencies increase with increasing compressive stress. The stress dependency of the modulus of elasticity indicates that the change in state of stress in a simple concrete structure can be estimated by simply measuring the resonance frequency

  8. Usage of Crushed Concrete Fines in Decorative Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilipenko, Anton; Bazhenova, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The article is devoted to the questions of usage of crushed concrete fines from concrete scrap for the production of high-quality decorative composite materials based on mixed binder. The main problem in the application of crushed concrete in the manufacture of decorative concrete products is extremely low decorative properties of crushed concrete fines itself, as well as concrete products based on them. However, crushed concrete fines could have a positive impact on the structure of the concrete matrix and could improve the environmental and economic characteristics of the concrete products. Dust fraction of crushed concrete fines contains non-hydrated cement grains, which can be opened in screening process due to the low strength of the contact zone between the hydrated and non-hydrated cement. In addition, the screening process could increase activity of the crushed concrete fines, so it can be used as a fine aggregate and filler for concrete mixes. Previous studies have shown that the effect of the usage of the crushed concrete fines is small and does not allow to obtain concrete products with high strength. However, it is possible to improve the efficiency of the crushed concrete fines as a filler due to the complex of measures prior to mixing. Such measures may include a preliminary mechanochemical activation of the binder (cement binder, iron oxide pigment, silica fume and crushed concrete fines), as well as the usage of polycarboxylate superplasticizers. The development of specific surface area of activated crushed concrete fines ensures strong adhesion between grains of binder and filler during the formation of cement stone matrix. The particle size distribution of the crushed concrete fines could achieve the densest structure of cement stone matrix and improve its resistance to environmental effects. The authors examined the mechanisms of structure of concrete products with crushed concrete fines as a filler. The results of studies of the properties of

  9. Adhesive Bonding of Aluminium Alloy A5754 by Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Michalec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Joining thin sheets of aluminium and its alloys is a promising area in the field of joining materials. Nowadays, joining methods that do not melt the material itself are increasingly being utilised. This paper deals with adhesive bonding of aluminium alloy A5754 by two-component epoxy resins. Theresults show that joints bonded by Hysol 9466 have appropriate mechanical properties, but that joints bonded by Hysol 9492 have better thermal stability.

  10. Role of alkalis of aggregate origin in the deterioration of CAC concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco-Varela, M.T.; Martinez-Ramirez, S.; Vazquez, T.; Sanchez-Moral, S.

    2005-01-01

    Both hexagonal and cubic calcium aluminate cement (CAC) hydrates react with atmospheric CO 2 , bringing about mineralogical changes in concrete, which may, on occasion, lead to loss of mechanical strength. Alkaline hydrolysis or carbonation in the presence of alkalis is a highly destructive process. The purpose of the study was to determine what caused CAC concrete deterioration in a prestressed beam that had suffered intense external damage and showed signs of alkaline hydrolysis or a reaction between the aggregate and the cement. Samples of the internal (sound) and external (damaged) parts of the concrete were studied using XRF, XRD, FTIR, OM, SEM/EDX, and BSE techniques, and mechanical strength was measured on microspecimens extracted from both zones. The conclusion drawn from these analyses was that alkaline hydrolysis took place on or near the surface of the concrete. The white deposits observed around the alkali-containing aggregate were found to consist primarily of bayerite whose very loose consistency undermined the aggregate-matrix bond, greatly weakening the material

  11. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of the FRP Shear Mechanism for Concrete Sandwich Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodicky, Kamil; Sopal, G.; Rizkalla, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the composite action of 46 segments representing precast concrete sandwich panels (PCSPs) using a fiber-reinforced polymer [FRP; specifically, a carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP)] grid/rigid foam as a shear mechanism. The experimental aspect of the research reported...... reported in this paper indicated that increasing the spacing between vertical lines of CFRP grid increase the overall shear flow strengths due to the increase of the bonded contact area of the rigid foam to the concrete surface. However, the overall shear stresses were decreased due to the increase...

  12. Structural Effects of Reinforced Concrete Beam Due to Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hamidun Mohd; Idris, Nur'ain; Noor, Nurazuwa Md; Sarpin, Norliana; Zainal, Rozlin; Kasim, Narimah

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete is one of the main issues among construction stakeholders. The main consequences of steel corrosion include loss of cross section of steel area, generation of expansive pressure which caused cracking of concrete, spalling and delaminating of the concrete cover. Thus, it reduces the bond strength between the steel reinforcing bar and concrete, and deteriorating the strength of the structure. The objective of this study is to investigate the structural effects of corrosion damage on the performance of reinforced concrete beam. A series of corroded reinforced concrete beam with a corrosion rate of 0%, 20% and 40% of rebar corrosion is used in parametric study to assess the influence of different level of corrosion rate to the structural performance. As a result, the used of interface element in the finite element modelling predicted the worst case of corrosion analysis since cracks is induced and generate at this surface. On the other hand, a positive linear relationship was sketched between the increase of expansive pressure and the corrosion rate. Meanwhile, the gradient of the graph is decreased with the increase of steel bar diameter. Furthermore, the analysis shows that there is a significant effect on the load bearing capacity of the structure where the higher corrosion rate generates a higher stress concentration at the mid span of the beam. This study could predict the residual strength of reinforced concrete beam under the corrosion using the finite element analysis. The experimental validation is needed on the next stage to investigate the quantitative relation between the corrosion rate and its influence on the mechanical properties.

  13. Multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelev, A.Yu.; Grigor'ev, A.I.; Rakita, K.A.; Mamaenko, M.V.; Ivanenko, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Ferromanganese concretions are promising mineral resources of the ocean. Most often, they are analyzed by atomic-absorption, spectra, X-ray spectral, neutron-activation, and X-ray radiometric methods. Note that X-ray radiometric analysis (XRRA) allows the sufficiently rapid determination of a great number of elements in ferromanganese concretions. The possibility of using XRRA with saturated and thin layers was shown; however, the data on the precision and accuracy of the technique was not given. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the basic performance characteristics of the multielemental X-ray radiometric analysis of ferromanganese concretions (Pacific Ocean). Determinations for K,Ca and Ti content were made using a 55 Fe source and for Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo contents by using a 109 Cd source. The precision and accuracy of the method was investigated by using reference concretions; it was found the confidence intervals overlap for all of the elements except Ca and Pb. The relative standard deviation was 1-5%, indicating the high precision of the method. The described technique is successfully used on research vessels of the Far East Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and in South Pacific Ocean geological expeditions of PO open-quotes Dal'morgeologiyaclose quotes

  14. Recycled Concrete as Aggregate for Structural Concrete Production

    OpenAIRE

    Mirjana Malešev; Vlastimir Radonjanin; Snežana Marinković

    2010-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the experimental results of the properties of fresh and hardened concrete with different replacement ratios of natural with recycled coarse aggregate is presented in the paper. Recycled aggregate was made by crushing the waste concrete of laboratory test cubes and precast concrete columns. Three types of concrete mixtures were tested: concrete made entirely with natural aggregate (NAC) as a control concrete and two types of concrete made with natural fine and recycle...

  15. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Iureş, Liana; Bob, Corneliu

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  16. Nondestructive testing of welds on thin-walled tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemaier, D. J.; Posakony, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Special ultrasonic search unit, or transducer assembly, reliably inspects the quality of melt-through welds of fusion welded tubing couplers for hydraulic lines. This instrumentation can also be used to detect faulty braze bonds in thin-walled, small diameter joints and wall thickness of thin-walled metal tubing.

  17. Performance evaluation of thin wearing courses through scaled accelerated trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue performance of : several thin asphalt concrete wearing courses using a scaled-down accelerated pavement testing device. The accelerated testing : was ...

  18. Innovative Approaches To Improving The Bond Between Concrete and Steel Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Donna C; Carrasquillo, Mariangelica; Weiss, Jr., Charles A; Sykes, Melvin C; Baugher, Jr., Earl H; Malone, Philip G

    2006-01-01

    A reactive silicate layer fused onto the surface of reinforcing steel provides a coupling layer that allows a very strong bond to develop between hydrating Portland cement paste and the surface of the steel...

  19. XPS and AES investigations of the adhesive bonding properties of thin titanium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Mohr, J.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.

    1988-07-01

    The bonding properties of PMMA-microstructures on Ti-coated Cu-substrates after an oxidative treatment in alkaline hydrogenperoxide solution were investigated. In order to clarify the basic mechanism, surface analytical investigations by XPS-, AES-, and depth profile measurements have been performed. It was demonstrated that for optimum bonding a TiO 2 surface layer of ca. 30 nm thickness is necessary. Chemical effects as well as a mechanical bonding with open grain boundary structures (dimensions in the μm-range) could be ruled out as bonding mechanisms. A mechanical interlocking of the polymer with micropores (dimensions in the nm-range) of the oxidic overlayer is adopted as the most probable bonding mechanism. (orig.)

  20. The Future Concrete: Self-Compacting Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Iureş

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the characteristics of the self-compacting concretes, their advantages and disadvantages when they are used in buildings. Due to its properties and composition, the self-compacting concrete is described here as being one of the future friendly enviromental material for buildings. Tests concerning to obtaining a self-compacting concrete, together with the specific fresh concrete properties tests, are described.

  1. Influence of various bonding techniques on the fracture strength of thin CAD/CAM-fabricated occlusal glass-ceramic veneers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazigi, Christine; Kern, Matthias; Chaar, Mohamed Sad

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of immediate dentin sealing and the effects of different bonding protocols on the fracture strength of CAD/CAM occlusal veneers bonded to exposed dentin. Ninety-six extracted maxillary premolars were initially divided into three main groups with 32 specimens each: without immediate dentin sealing, immediate dentin sealing/total etching and immediate dentin sealing/selective etching. Teeth were identically prepared in the dentin to receive occlusal veneers of 0.8mm thickness, milled from lithium disilicate ceramic blocks (IPS e.max CAD). Each main group was later subdivided, according to the pre-cementation surface etching protocol (total/selective), into two subgroups with 16 specimens each. All restorations were adhesively bonded using a resin cement (Variolink Esthetic). Half of the specimens of each subgroup were subjected to thermo-dynamic loading in a chewing simulator with 1,200,000 cycles at 10kg load. The other half and the surviving specimens were subjected to quasi-static loading until failure. Statistical analysis was performed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests. All specimens except one survived the artificial aging. A significantly higher fracture strength of restorations (p ≤ 0.001) was obtained when immediate dentin sealing was followed regardless of the etching method with values ranging from a minimum of 1122 ± 336N to a maximum of 1853 ± 333N. Neither the pre-cementation treatment nor the artificial aging had a statistical significant effect on the fracture strength. Immediate dentin sealing protocol is recommended whenever dentin is exposed during the preparation for thin glass-ceramic occlusal veneers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  3. Effects of Elevated Temperature on Concrete with Recycled Coarse Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salau, M. A.; Oseafiana, O. J.; Oyegoke, T. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper discusses the effects of heating temperatures of 200°C, 400°C and 600°C each for 2 hours at a heating rate of 2.5°C/min on concrete with the content of Natural Coarse Aggregates (NCA) partially replaced with Recycled Coarse Aggregates (RCA), obtained from demolished building in the ratio of 0%, 15% and 30%.There was an initial drop in strength from 100°C to 200°C which is suspected to be due to the relatively weak interfacial bond between the RCA and the hardened paste within the concrete matrix;a gradual increase in strength continued from 200°C to 450°C and steady drop occurred again as it approached 600°C.With replacement proportion of 0%, 15% and 30% of NCA and exposure to peak temperature of 600°C, a relative concrete strength of 23.6MPa, 25.3MPa and 22.2MPa respectively can be achieved for 28 days curing age. Furthermore, RAC with 15% NCA replacement when exposed to optimum temperature of 450°C yielded high compressive strength comparable to that of control specimen (normal concrete). In addition, for all concrete samples only slight surface hairline cracks were noticed as the temperature approached 400°C. Thus, the RAC demonstrated behavior just like normal concrete and may be considered fit for structural use.

  4. Experimental research into the relation between the peeling angle and the debonding of CFRP laminates bonded to concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klamer, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    CFRP is a relatively new, innovative strengthening material to strengthen reinforced concrete structures. Main issue, when strengthening a concrete structure is the debonding of CFRP. Although a lot of research has been carried out into the debonding behavior, still some questions remain open. In

  5. Predicting fatigue service life extension of RC bridges with externally bonded CFRP repairs : [project brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Externally bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites (CFRPs) are increasingly used to : repair concrete bridges. CFRP design techniques are a proven approach for enhancing the strength : of existing structures. This project investigated the d...

  6. Relationship between surface area for adhesion and tensile bond strength--evaluation of a micro-tensile bond test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Shono, T; Sonoda, H; Takatsu, T; Ciucchi, B; Carvalho, R; Pashley, D H

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the null hypothesis that there is no relationship between the bonded surface area of dentin and the tensile strength of adhesive materials. The enamel was removed from the occlusal surface of extracted human third molars, and the entire flat surface was covered with resin composite bonded to the dentin to form a flat resin composite crown. Twenty-four hours later, the bonded specimens were sectioned parallel to the long axis of the tooth into 10-20 thin sections whose upper part was composed of resin composite with the lower half being dentin. These small sections were trimmed using a high speed diamond bur into an hourglass shape with the narrowest portion at the bonded interface. Surface area was varied by altering the specimen thickness and width. Tensile bond strength was measured using custom-made grips in a universal testing machine. Tensile bond strength was inversely related to bonded surface area. At surface areas below 0.4 mm2, the tensile bond strengths were about 55 MPa for Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (Kuraray Co., Ltd.), 38 MPa for Scotchbond MP (3M Dental Products), and 20 MPa for Vitremer (3M Dental Products). At these small surface areas all of the bond failures were adhesive in nature. This new method permits measurement of high bond strengths without cohesive failure of dentin. It also permits multiple measurements to be made within a single tooth.

  7. Crumb Rubber Recycling in Enhancing Damping Properties of Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugapriya, P.; Ramkrishnan, R.

    2018-02-01

    Damping plays a major role in the design of roadside structures that gets affected due to vibrations transmitted from moving traffic. In this study, fine aggregates were partially replaced with crumb rubber in concrete, at varying percentages of 5, 10, 15 and 20% by weight. Three different sets of concrete, mixed with crumb rubber were prepared using raw rubber, treated rubber and treated rubber with partial replacement of cement. Cement was partially replaced with Ultra-Fine Ground Granulated Blast furnace Slag (UFGGBS) for this study. Samples were cast, cured and tested for various properties on the 7th and 28th day. The damping ratio and frequency of the peak value from a number of waves in rubber incorporated beams were found out using a FFT Analyser along with its Strength, Damping and Sorptivity characteristics. SEM analysis was conducted to analyse the micro structural bonding between rubber and concrete. The mode shapes of pavement slabs were modelled and analysed using a FEM tool, ANSYS. From the results, the behaviour of the three sets of rubberized concrete were compared and analysed, and an optimum percentage for crumb rubber and UFGGBS was proposed to achieve best possible damping without compromising the strength properties.

  8. Effect of Elevated Temperature on the Residual Properties of Quartzite, Granite and Basalt Aggregate Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, A.; Shariq, M.; Alam, M. Masroor; Ahmad, T.; Beg, A.

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, experimental investigations have been carried out to determine the effect of elevated temperature on the residual properties of quartzite, granite and basalt aggregate concrete mixes. Ultrasonic pulse velocity and unstressed residual compressive strength tests on cube specimens have been conducted at ambient and after single heating-cooling cycle of elevated temperature ranging from 200 to 600 °C. The relationship between ultrasonic pulse velocity and residual compressive strength of all concrete mixes have been developed. Scanning electron microscopy was also carried out to study micro structure of quartzite, granite and basalt aggregate concrete subjected to single heating-cooling cycle of elevated temperature. The results show that the residual compressive strength of quartzite aggregate concrete has been found higher than granite and basalt aggregate concrete at ambient and at all temperatures. It has also been found that the loss of strength in concrete is due to the development of micro-cracks result in failure of cement matrix and coarse aggregate bond. Further, the basalt aggregate concrete has been observed lower strength due to low affinity with Portland cements ascribed to its ferro-magnesium rich mineral composition.

  9. Vibrated and self-compacting fibre reinforced concrete: experimental investigation on the fibre orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, A.; Plizzari, G. A.; Zerbino, R.

    2017-09-01

    In addition to the fibre type and content, the residual properties of fibre reinforced concrete are influenced by fibre orientation. Consequently, the performance fibre reinforced concrete can be affected by its fresh properties (workability, flowing capacity) and by casting and compaction processes adopted. This paper focuses on the study of the orientation of steel or macro-synthetic fibres in two materials characterized by very different fresh properties: vibrated and self-compacting concrete. Four rectangular slabs 1800 mm long, 925 mm wide and 100 mm high were produced changing concrete and fibre type. From each slab, eighteen small prisms (550 mm long) were firstly cut either orthogonal or parallel to casting direction and, secondly, notched and tested in bending according to EN 14651. Experimental results showed that the toughness properties of a thin slab significantly varies both in vibrated and self-compacting concrete, even if in case of self-compacting concrete this variation resulted higher. Steel fibres led to greater variability of results compared to polymer one, underlining a different fibre orientation. A discussion on the relative residual capacity measured on the prisms sawn from the slabs and the parameters obtained from standard specimens is performed.

  10. Potential of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Composites as Concrete Repair Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a virtually ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. It is evident from contemporary research that utilization of CNT in producing new cement-based composite materials has a great potential. Consequently, possible practical application of CNT reinforced cementitious composites has immense prospect in the field of applied nanotechnology within construction industry. Several repair, retrofit, and strengthening techniques are currently available to enhance the integrity and durability of concrete structures with cracks and spalling, but applicability and/or reliability is/are often limited. Therefore, there is always a need for innovative high performing concrete repair materials with good mechanical, rheological, and durability properties. Considering the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and the test results of CNT reinforced cement composites, it is apparent that such composites could be used conveniently as concrete repair material. With this end in view, the applicability of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT reinforced cement composites as concrete repair material has been evaluated in this study in terms of setting time, bleeding, and bonding strength (slant shear tests. It has been found that MWNT reinforced cement mortar has good prospective as concrete repair material since such composites exhibited desirable behavior in setting time, bleeding, and slant shear.

  11. RESEARCH OF THE STRESS STATE OF A MODIFIED IN-SITU CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article focuses on investigation of the stress state of a modified in-situ concrete of natural hardening. Methodology. To achieve the aim, the research of the microstructure of the modified cement matrix of concrete, as well as the mechanism of structure formation of modified concrete with natural hardening was conducted; the methods for reliable evaluation of concrete strength were defined. Findings. The development of internal stresses affects the properties of concretedifferently. With an increase in temperature-shrinkage deformations in time and, thus, with increasing structural stresses in the cement sheath around the grains of the filler two opposite processes may develop: zone of plastic flow or cracking. Originality. It was established that the structural features complex of the modified concrete when the load transfer leads to the formation of extensive zones of prefracture which is able to absorb a significant amount of elastic strain energy that provides the design deformation properties of the concrete for special purposes. Ideas about the definition of the criteria of cracking modified concrete, hardening under natural conditions had further development. Practical value. The resulting equations allow to solve the problem about the minimum level of structural stress in monolithic concrete in a saturated large placeholder, as well as to assess the influence of structural stresses on the properties of concrete. In normal concrete with a relatively thin cement sheath at temperature-shrinkage deformations, high tangential and low radial tension occur. In vivo, this stress is higher as a result of higher values of Δε(τ, which is not observed in the modified concrete. In the modified concretes only tangential stresses are the greatest danger to structures. The change of shrinkage stress with time is straightforward. The total temperature-shrinkage deformations have a sawtooth graph. For modified concrete the amplitude is 48

  12. Computer implementation of an elastic-plastic concrete relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.W.; Chitnuyanondh, L.; Wong, C.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the difficulties that arose, and the strategies that were developed to overcome these difficulties, during the incorporation of a relatively complex elastic-plastic concrete constitutive relationship into an existing computer code for the analysis of axisymmetric loading acting on thin shells of revolution. The program had the capability of elastic-plastic analysis using a von-Mises yield curve prior to any modification by the writers. (orig.)

  13. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  14. SHAPE CHARACTERIZATION OF CONCRETE AGGREGATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a composite material, the performance of concrete materials can be expected to depend on the properties of the interfaces between its two major components, aggregate and cement paste. The microstructure at the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is assumed to be different from the bulk material. In general, properties of conventional concrete have been found favoured by optimum packing density of the aggregate. Particle size is a common denominator in such studies. Size segregation in the ITZ among the binder particles in the fresh state, observed in simulation studies by concurrent algorithm-based SPACE system, additionally governs density as well as physical bonding capacity inside these shell-like zones around aggregate particles. These characteristics have been demonstrated qualitatively pertaining also after maturation of the concrete. Such properties of the ITZs have direct impact on composite properties. Despite experimental approaches revealed effects of aggregate grain shape on different features of material structure (among which density, and as a consequence on mechanical properties, it is still an underrated factor in laboratory studies, probably due to the general feeling that a suitable methodology for shape characterization is not available. A scientific argument hindering progress is the interconnected nature of size and shape. Presently, a practical problem preventing shape effects to be emphasized is the limitation of most computer simulation systems in concrete technology to spherical particles. New developments at Delft University of Technology will make it possible in the near future to generate jammed states, or other high-density fresh particle mixtures of non-spherical particles, which thereupon can be subjected to hydration algorithms. This paper will sketch the outlines of a methodological approach for shape assessment of loose (non-embedded aggregate grains, and demonstrate its use for two types of aggregate, allowing

  15. A Simple Visualization of Double Bond Properties: Chemical Reactivity and UV Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, easily visualized thin-layer chromatography (TLC) staining experiment is presented that highlights the difference in reactivity between aromatic double bonds and nonaromatic double bonds. Although the stability of aromatic systems is a major theme in organic chemistry, the concept is rarely reinforced "visually" in the undergraduate…

  16. Experimental research on the microstructure and compressive and tensile properties of nano-SiO2 concrete containing basalt fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinyong Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban underground space resources are gaining increasing attention for the sustainable development of cities. Traditional concrete cannot meet the needs of underground construction. High-performance concrete was prepared using varying dosages of nano-SiO2 and basalt fiber, and its compressive and tensile strength was measured. The concrete microstructure was analyzed and used to assess the mechanisms through which the nano-SiO2 and basalt fibers affect the strength of concrete. The cement hydration productions in concrete produced varied with the dosage of nano-SiO2. When the nano-SiO2 dosage was between 0 and 1.8%, the mass of the C-S-H gel and AFt crystals increased gradually with the nano-SiO2 dosage. When the nano-SiO2 dosage was 1.2%, optimum amounts of C-S-H gel and AFt crystals existed, and the compactness of concrete was well, which agreed with the results of the compressive strength tests. When the basalt-fiber dosage was between 3 and 4 kg/m3, the basalt fibers and the cement matrix were closely bonded, and the splitting tensile strength of the concrete markedly improved. When the basalt-fiber dosage exceeded 5 kg/m3, the basalt fibers clustered together, resulting in weak bonding between the basalt fibers and the cement matrix, consequently, the basalt fibers were easily pulled apart from the cement. When the nano-SiO2 and basalt fiber dosages were 1.2% and 3 kg/m3, respectively, the compactness of the concrete microstructure was well and the strength enhancement was the greatest; additionally, the compressive strength and splitting tensile strength were 9.04% and 17.42%, respectively, greater than those of plain concrete. The macroscopic tests on the mechanical properties of the nano-SiO2 concrete containing basalt fibers agreed well with the results of microstructure analysis.

  17. Experimental Assessment on the Flexural Bonding Performance of Concrete Beam with GFRP Reinforcing Bar under Repeated Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkwan Ju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to investigate the flexural bond performance of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforcing bar under repeated loading. The flexural bond tests reinforced with GFRP reinforcing bars were carried out according to the BS EN 12269-1 (2000 specification. The bond test consisted of three loading schemes: static, monotonic, and variable-amplitude loading to simulate ambient loading conditions. The empirical bond length based on the static test was 225 mm, whereas it was 317 mm according to ACI 440 1R-03. Each bond stress on the rib is released and bonding force is enhanced as the bond length is increased. Appropriate level of bond length may be recommended with this energy-based analysis. For the monotonic loading test, the bond strengths at pullout failure after 2,000,000 cycles were 10.4 MPa and 6.5 MPa, respectively: 63–70% of the values from the static loading test. The variable loading test indicated that the linear cumulative damage theory on GFRP bonding may not be appropriate for estimating the fatigue limit when subjected to variable-amplitude loading.

  18. Initiated chemical vapor deposited nanoadhesive for bonding National Ignition Facility's targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tom [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-19

    Currently, the target fabrication scientists in National Ignition Facility Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is studying the propagation force resulted from laser impulses impacting a target. To best study this, they would like the adhesive used to glue the target substrates to be as thin as possible. The main objective of this research project is to create adhesive glue bonds for NIF’s targets that are ≤ 1 μm thick. Polyglycidylmethacrylate (PGMA) thin films were coated on various substrates using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Film quality studies using white light interferometry reveal that the iCVD PGMA films were smooth. The coated substrates were bonded at 150 °C under vacuum, with low inflow of Nitrogen. Success in bonding most of NIF’s mock targets at thicknesses ≤ 1 μm indicates that our process is feasible in bonding the real targets. Key parameters that are required for successful bonding were concluded from the bonding results. They include inert bonding atmosphere, sufficient contact between the PGMA films, and smooth substrates. Average bond strength of 0.60 MPa was obtained from mechanical shearing tests. The bonding failure mode of the sheared interfaces was observed to be cohesive. Future work on this project will include reattempt to bond silica aerogel to iCVD PGMA coated substrates, stabilize carbon nanotube forests with iCVD PGMA coating, and kinetics study of PGMA thermal crosslinking.

  19. A study on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregates and ceramic as materials replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, N. B.; Khalid, F. S.; Irwan, J. M.; Anting, N.; Mazenan, P. N.

    2017-11-01

    Natural fine aggregate materials are commonly used in development and commercial construction in Malaysia. In fact, concrete production was increased as linear with the growing Malaysia economy. However, an issue was production of concrete was to locate adequate sources of natural fine aggregates. There lot of studies have been conducted in order to replace the fine aggregate in which natural fine aggregate replace with the waste material in concrete preparation. Therefore, this study aims to utilize the Recycled Concrete Aggregate (RCA) and ceramic waste which has great potential to replace the natural aggregate in concrete mix with different type of method, admixture, and parameters. This research were focused on compressive strength and water absorption test to determine the optimum mix ratio of concrete mix. The concrete aggregate was chosen due to improvement capillary bonding mechanisms and ceramic presented similar strength compared to the conventional concrete using natural aggregate. Percent of replacement have been used in this study was at 25%, 35% and 45% of the RCA and 5%, 10% and 15% for ceramic, respectively. Furthermore, this research was conduct to find the optimum percentage of aggregate replacement, using water-cement ratio of 0.55 with concrete grade 25/30. The best percentage of replacement was the RCA35% C15% with the compressive strength of 34.72 MPa and the water absorption was satisfied.

  20. Experimental Investigation of a Self-Sensing Hybrid GFRP-Concrete Bridge Superstructure with Embedded FBG Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanlei; Li, Yunyu; Ran, Jianghua; Cao, Mingmin

    2012-01-01

    A self-sensing hybrid GFRP-concrete bridge superstructure, which consists of two bridge decks and each bridge deck is comprised of four GFRP box sections combined with a thin layer of concrete in the compression zone, was developed by using eight embedded FBG sensors in the top and bottom flanges of the four GFRP box sections at midspan section of one bridge deck along longitudinal direction, respectively. The proposed self-sensing hybrid bridge superstructure was tested in 4-point loading to...

  1. How Concrete is Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics

  2. How Concrete is Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2010-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two diff...

  3. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  4. Properties of concrete with tire derived aggregate and crumb rubber as a lighthweight substitute for mineral aggregates in the concrete mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringi, Gideon Momanyi

    Scrap tires continue to be a nuisance to the environment and this research proposes one way of recycling them as a lightweight aggregate which can substitute for mineral aggregates in concrete. Aggregates derived from scrap tires are often referred to as Tire Derived Aggregate (TDA). First, the focus is how much mineral aggregate can be replaced by these waste tires and how the properties of concrete are affected with the introduction of rubber. This is being mindful of the fact that for a new material to be acceptable as an engineering material, its properties and behavior has to be well understood, the materials must perform properly and be acceptable to the regulating agencies. The role played by the quantity of TDA and Crumb Rubber replacing coarse aggregate and fine aggregate respectively as well as different treatment and additives in concrete on its properties are examined. Conventional concrete (without TDA) and concrete containing TDA are compared by examining their compressive strength based on ASTM C39, workability based on ASTM C143, Splitting Tensile Strength based on ASTM C496, Modulus of Rupture (flexural strength) based on ASTM C78 and Bond strength of concrete developed with reinforcing steel based on ASTM C234.Through stress-strain plots, the rubberized concrete is compared in terms of change in ductility, toughness and Elastic Modulus. Results indicate that while replacement of mineral aggregates with TDA results in reduction in compressive strength, this may be mitigated by addition of silica fume or using a smaller size of TDA to obtain the desired strength. The greatest benefit of using TDA is in the development of a higher ductile product with lower density while utilizing recycled TDA. From the results, it is observed that 7-10% of weight of mineral aggregates can be replaced by an equal volume of TDA to produce concrete with compressive strength of up to 4000 psi (27.5 MPa). Rubberized concrete would have higher ductility and toughness with

  5. Mathematical model of consolidation of fine concrete mixtures with different mobility, casted by vacuumizing and axial pressing in layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeneva Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model allowing establishing regularities in the consolidation processes of fine-grained concrete mixtures with different mobility and compaction methods has been worked out. This study is based on two-phase systems and nonlinear character of their consolidation. It resolves the question of the choice of vacuumizing optimal parameters and axial pressing in layers for molding of thin-walled products such as concrete roof tiles and concrete pipe products. Finally, we can get products without heat treatment by the materials and energy-saving technologies.

  6. Cohesive zone model for direct silicon wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubair, D. V.; Spearing, S. M.

    2007-05-01

    Direct silicon wafer bonding and decohesion are simulated using a spectral scheme in conjunction with a rate-dependent cohesive model. The cohesive model is derived assuming the presence of a thin continuum liquid layer at the interface. Cohesive tractions due to the presence of a liquid meniscus always tend to reduce the separation distance between the wafers, thereby opposing debonding, while assisting the bonding process. In the absence of the rate-dependence effects the energy needed to bond a pair of wafers is equal to that needed to separate them. When rate-dependence is considered in the cohesive law, the experimentally observed asymmetry in the energetics can be explained. The derived cohesive model has the potential to form a bridge between experiments and a multiscale-modelling approach to understand the mechanics of wafer bonding.

  7. Self-Placing Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2007-01-01

    Certain concrete pours have areas where the congestion of reinforcing bars make placement of concrete almost impossible. Using conventional placing and vibration techniques, the resulting concrete can have considerable honeycombing due to the development of voids. Self-placing concrete is a possible solution to the problem. Also known as self-compactable concrete, self-consolidating concrete, flowable concrete, and non-vibration concrete. These concretes eliminate the need for vibration in a ...

  8. Build-up Factor Calculation for Ordinary Concrete, Baryte Concrete and Blast-furnace Slugges Concrete as γ Radiation Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isman MT; Elisabeth Supriatni; Tochrul Binowo

    2002-01-01

    Calculation of build up factor ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast-furnace sludge concrete have been carried out. The calculations have been carried out by dose rate measurement of Cs 137 source before and after passing through shielding. The investigated variables were concrete type, thickness of concrete and relative possession of concrete. Concrete type variables are ordinary concrete, baryte concrete and blast sludge furnace concrete. The thickness variables were 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 cm. The relative position variables were dose to the source and close to detector. The result showed that concrete type and position did not have significant effect to build-up factor value, while the concrete thickness (r) and the attenuation coefficient (μ) were influenced to the build-up factor. The higher μr value the higher build-up factor value. (author)

  9. Design and analysis of reactor containment of steel-concrete composite laminated shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced and prestressed concrete containments for reactors have been developed in order to avoid the difficulties of welding of steel containments encountered as their capacities have become large: growing thickness of steel shells gave rise to the requirement of stress relief at the construction sites. However, these concrete vessels also seem to face another difficulty: the lack of shearing resistance capacity. In order to improve the shearing resistance capacity of the containment vessel, while avoiding the difficulty of welding, a new scheme of containment consisting of steel-concrete laminated shell is being developed. In the main part of a cylindrical vessel, the shell consists of two layers of thin steel plates located at the inner and outer surfaces, and a layer of concrete core into which both the steel plates are anchored. In order to validate the feasibility and safety of this new design, the results of analysis on the basis of up-to-date design loads are presented. The results of model tests in 1:30 scale are also reported. (Auth.)

  10. Bonding silicon nitride using glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobedoe, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon nitride has been successfully bonded to itself using magnesium-aluminosilicate glass and glass-ceramic. For some samples, bonding was achieved using a diffusion bonder, but in other instances, following an initial degassing hold, higher temperatures were used in a nitrogen atmosphere with no applied load. For diffusion bonding, a small applied pressure at a temperature below which crystallisation occurs resulted in intimate contact. At slightly higher temperatures, the extent of the reaction at the interface and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic joint was highly sensitive to the bonding temperature. Bonding in a nitrogen atmosphere resulted in a solution-reprecipitation reaction. A thin layer of glass produced a ''dry'', glass-free joint, whilst a thicker layer resulted in a continuous glassy join across the interface. The chromium silicide impurities within the silicon nitride react with the nucleating agent in the glass ceramic, which may lead to difficulty in producing a fine glass-ceramic microstructure. Slightly lower temperatures in nitrogen resulted in a polycrystalline join but the interfacial contact was poor. It is hoped that one of the bonds produced may be developed to eventually form part of a graded joint between silicon nitride and a high temperature nickel alloy. (orig.)

  11. Earthquake resistance of cracked concrete embedded with large size rebars (D43 and D57) in nuclear containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Y-C. [Chaoyang Univ. of Tech., Taichung, Taiwan (China); Pei, K-C. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    The bond behavior of varying size re-bar (D19, D32, D43 and D57) embedded in concrete, under cyclic load in a pullout test, were investigated through a series of experiments and monitored in real-time by acoustic emission (AE) herein. Parallel tests of specimens with an existing crack were also conducted to observe the behavior of cracked concrete subject to cyclic load. The detailed acoustics information can be used for analyzing and comparing the effects of concrete with varying size re-bar. The results provide useful in formation in evaluating the safety of NPP RC structure subjected to cyclic load. (author)

  12. New Trends for Reinforced Concrete Structures: Some Results of Exploratory Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo N. F. Carmo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, the concrete sector is being pushed to innovate in order to better address current challenges with higher competitiveness and more sustainable solutions. Different research studies have been conducted all over the world in which novel approaches and paths were proposed. It is important to spread information to define new strategies for the future of this industry. The enhancement of concrete properties and the impact of these changes in structural design are some of the topics analysed in those studies. This paper presents four experimental studies conducted by the authors where different types of concrete and structural members were tested. The common goal of these studies was to develop innovative solutions with high performance and low environmental impact. The scope of the first study was the structural behaviour of members produced with lightweight aggregate concrete (LWAC. Results of several beams, ties, and slabs are herein presented and analysed. The advantage of using glass fibre–reinforced polymer (GFRP rebars was addressed in a second study, and main results obtained with this type of rebar are also herein presented. Recent advances in nanotechnology led to the development of concretes incorporating nanoparticles into the binder matrix. Typically, these nanoparticles have a diameter of 10–300 nanometers and are added to the mixture to reduce the porosity and increase the density of the binder matrix, improving the mechanical properties and durability. To analyse their influence on steel-to-concrete bonding and on the shear and flexural behaviour of the beams was the main goal of the third study herein described. Finally, a new concept to produce reinforced concrete members with high durability using a special concrete cover, which was the goal of the fourth study, is also herein presented.

  13. NANOMODIFIED CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main directions in construction material science is the development of  next generation concrete that is ultra-dense, high-strength, ultra-porous, high heat efficient, extra corrosion-resistant. Selection of such direction is caused by extreme operational impacts on the concrete, namely: continuously increasing load on the concrete and various dynamics of such loads; the necessity in operation of concrete products in a wide temperature range and their exposure to various chemical and physical effects.The next generation concrete represents high-tech concrete mixtures with additives that takes on and retain the required properties when hardening and being used under any operational conditions. A differential characteristic of the next generation concrete is its complexity that presumes usage of various mineral dispersed components, two- and three fractional fine and coarse aggregates, complex chemical additives, combinations of polymer and iron reinforcement.Design strength and performance properties level of the next generation concrete is achieved by high-quality selection of the composition, proper selection of manufacturing techniques, concrete curing, bringing the quality of concrete items to the required level of technical condition during the operational phase. However, directed formation of its structure is necessary in order to obtain high-tech concrete.Along with the traditional methods for regulation of the next generation concrete structure, modification of concrete while using silica nanoparticles is also considered as a perspective one because the concrete patterning occurs due to introduction of a binder in a mineral matrix. Due to this it is possible to obtain nano-modified materials with completely new properties.The main problem with the creation of nano-modified concrete is a uniform distribution of nano-materials in the volume of the cement matrix which is particularly important in the cases of adding a modifier in

  14. Mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete state-of-the-art report of the RILEM technical committee 228-MPS on mechanical properties of self-compacting concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Schutter, Geert

    2014-01-01

    The State-of-the-Art Report of RILEM Technical Committee 228-MPS on Mechanical properties of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) summarizes an extensive body of information related to mechanical properties and mechanical behaviour of SCC. Due attention is given to the fact that the composition of SCC varies significantly. A wide range of  mechanical properties are considered, including compressive strength, stress-strain relationship, tensile and flexural strengths, modulus of elasticity, shear strength, effect of elevated temperature, such as fire spalling and residual properties after fire, in-situ properties, creep, shrinkage, bond properties, and structural behaviour. A chapter on fibre-reinforced SCC is included, as well as a chapter on specialty SCC, such as light-weight SCC, heavy-weight SCC, preplaced aggregate SCC, special fibre reinforced SCC, and underwater concrete.

  15. Digital-image-correlation-based experimental stress analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened using carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jeffrey; Kurtz, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The strengthening of reinforced concrete beams through the use of epoxy-bonded carbon composites has been widely researched in the United States since 1991. Despite the widespread attention of researchers, however, there are no reliable methods of predicting the failure of the repaired and strengthened beams by peeling of the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material from the parent concrete. To better understand peeling failure, several investigators have presented analytical work to predict the distribution of stresses along the interface between the FRP and the concrete. Several closed-form solutions can be found in the literature to predict the levels of shear stress present between the bonded composite plate and the parent concrete beam. However, there has been very little experimental verification of these analytical predictions because few experiments on large-scale beams have had sufficient instrumentation to facilitate the comparison. Some experiments have been presented1 in which electrical resistance strain gages were placed along the length of the carbon plate in order to deduce the interfacial shear stress using first differences. This method, though very crude, demonstrated that there are substantial differences between the distributions of interfacial shear stresses in actual repaired beams versus the analytical predictions. This paper presents a new test program in which large-scale carbon-fiber-strengthened reinforced concrete beams are load-tested to failure, while employing digital image correlation (DIC) to record the strains in the carbon fiber plate. Relying on the linear elasticity of carbon fiber, the interfacial shear can be determined and compared with the analytical predictions of the literature. The focus of this paper is the presentation of the experimental shear stress distributions and comparisons of these distributions with previous results available in the literature.

  16. Degradation of normal portland and slag cement concrete under load, due to reinforcement corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipose, K.E.; Beaudoin, J.J.; Feldman, R.F.

    1992-08-01

    The corrosion of reinforcement is one of the major degradation mechanisms of reinforced concrete elements. The majority of studies published on concrete-steel corrosion have been conducted on unstressed specimens. Structural concrete, however, is subjected to substantial strain near the steel reinforcing bars that resist tensile loads, which results in a system of microcracks. This report presents the initial results of an investigation to determine the effect of applied load and microcracking on the rate of ingress of chloride ion and corrosion of steel in concrete. Simply-supported concrete beam specimens were loaded to give a maximum strain of about 600 με on the tension face. Chloride ion ingress on cores taken from loaded specimens was monitored using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis techniques. Corrosion current and rate measurements using linear polarization electrochemical techniques were also obtained on the same loaded specimens. Variables investigated included two concrete types, two steel cover-depths, three applied load levels, bonded and unbonded rebars and the exposure of tension and compression beam faces to chloride solution. One concrete mixture was made with type 10 Portland cement, the other with 75% blast furnace slag, 22% type 50 cement and 3% silica fume. The rate of chloride ion ingress into reinforced concrete, and hence the time for chloride ion to reach the reinforcing steel, is shown to be dependent on applied load and the concrete quality. The dependence of corrosion process descriptors - passive layer formation, initiation period and propagation period - on the level of applied load is discussed. (Author) (6 refs., 3 tabs., 10 figs.)

  17. Polarization Induced Deterioration of Reinforced Concrete with CFRP Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Sun, Hongfang; Tang, Luping; Xing, Feng

    2015-07-15

    This paper investigates the deterioration of reinforced concrete with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) anode after polarization. The steel in the concrete was first subjected to accelerated corrosion to various extents. Then, a polarization test was performed with the external attached CFRP as the anode and the steel reinforcement as the cathode. Carbon fiber reinforced mortar and conductive carbon paste as contact materials were used to adhere the CFRP anode to the concrete. Two current densities of 1244 and 2488 mA/m², corresponding to the steel reinforcements were applied for 25 days. Electrochemical parameters were monitored during the test period. The deterioration mechanism that occurred at the CFRP/contact material interface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The increase of feeding voltage and the failure of bonding was observed during polarization process, which might have resulted from the deterioration of the interface between the contact material and CFRP. The formation and accumulation of NaCl crystals at the contact material/CFRP interface were inferred to be the main causes of the failure at the interface.

  18. Unified model to predict flexural shear behavior of externally bonded RC beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colotti, V.; Spadea, G.; Swamy, R.N.

    2006-01-01

    Structural strengthening with externally bonded reinforcement is now recognized as a cost-effective, structurally sound and practically efficient method of rehabilitating deteriorating and damaged reinforced concrete beams. There is now an urgent need to develop a sound engineering basis which can predict the failure loads of all such strengthened beams in a reliable and consistent manner. Existing models to predict the behavior at ultimate of strengthened beams suffer from many limitations and weaknesses. This paper presents a unified global model, based on the Strut-and-Tie approach, to predict the failure loads of reinforced concrete beams strengthened for flexure and/or shear. This structural model is based on rational engineering principles, considers all the possible failure modes, and incorporates the load transfer mechanism bond to reflect the debonding phenomena which has a dominant influence on the failure process of plated beams. The model is validated against about 200 strengthened beam test reported in the literature and failing in flexure and/or shear, involving a large number of structural variables and steel, carbon and glass fiber reinforced polymer laminates as reinforcing medium. (author)

  19. Design and analysis of reactor containment of steel-concrete composite laminated shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, K.; Isobata, O.; Kawamata, S.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme of containment consisting of steel-concrete laminated shell is being developed. In the main part of a cylindrical vessel, the shell consists of two layers of thin steel plates located at the inner and outer surfaces, and a layer of concrete core into which both the steel plates are anchored. Because of the compressive and shearing resistance of the concrete core, the layers behave as a composite solid shell. Membrane forces are shared by steel plates and partly by concrete core. Bending moment is effectively resisted by the section with extreme layers of steel. Therefore, both surfaces can be designed as extremely thin plates: the inner plate, which is a load carrying members as well as a liner, can be welded without the laborious process of stress-relieving, and various jointing methods can be applied to the outer plate which is free from the need for leak tightness. The capability of the composite layers of behaving as a unified solid shell section depends largely on the shearing rigidity of the concrete core. However, as its resisting capacity to transverse shearing force is comparatively low, a device for reducing the shearing stress at the junction to the base mat is needed. In the new scheme, this part of the cylindrical shell is divided into multiple layers of the same kind of composite shell. This device makes the stiffness of the bottom of the cylindrical shell to lateral movement minimum while maintaining the proper resistance to membrane forces. The analysis shows that the transverse shearing stress can be reduced to less than 1√n of the ordinary case by dividing the thickness of the shell into n layers which are able to slip against each other at the contact surface. In order to validate the feasibility and safety of this new design, the results of analysis on the basis of up-to-date design loads are presented

  20. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  1. Nonlinear analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    The numerical procedures for predicting the nonlinear behavior of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel over its design life are discussed. The numerical models are constructed by combining three-dimensional isoparametric finite elements which simulate the concrete, thin shell elements which simulate steel linear plates, and layers of reinforcement steel, and axial elements for discrete prestressing cables. Nonlinearity under compressive stress, multi-dimensional cracking, shrinkage and stress/temperature induced creep of concrete are considered in addition to the elasti-plastic behavior of the liner and reinforcing steel. Various failure theories for concrete have been proposed recently. Also, there are alternative strategies for solving the discrete system equations over the design life, accounting for test loads, pressure and temperature operational loads, creep unloading and abnormal loads. The proposed methods are reviewed, and a new formulation developed by the authors is described. A number of comparisons with experimental tests results and other numerical schemes are presented. These examples demonstrate the validity of the formulation and also provide valuable information concerning the cost and accuracy of the various solution strategies i.e., total vs. incremental loading and initial vs. tangent stiffness. Finally, the analysis of an actual PCRV is described. Stress contours and cracking patterns in the region of cutouts corresponding to operational pressure and temperature loads are illustrated. The effects of creep, unloading, and creep recovery are then shown. Lastly, a strategy for assessing the performance over its design life is discussed

  2. High Performance Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian Oneţ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the last studies and researches accomplished in Cluj-Napoca related to high performance concrete, high strength concrete and self compacting concrete. The purpose of this paper is to raid upon the advantages and inconveniences when a particular concrete type is used. Two concrete recipes are presented, namely for the concrete used in rigid pavement for roads and another one for self-compacting concrete.

  3. Fire performance of basalt FRP mesh reinforced HPC thin plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulin, Thomas; Hodicky, Kamil; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2013-01-01

    An experimental program was carried out to investigate the influence of basalt FRP (BFRP) reinforcing mesh on the fire behaviour of thin high performance concrete (HPC) plates applied to sandwich elements. Samples with BFRP mesh were compared to samples with no mesh, samples with steel mesh...

  4. How Concrete is Concrete?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koeno Gravemeijer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, ‘manipulatives’, in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own, abstract, knowledge; in the latter, we try to find an example that the others will be familiar with. This article first looks at the tension between these two different ways of making things concrete. Next another role of manipulatives, will be discussed, namely that of means for scaffolding and communication. In this role, manipulatives may function as means of support in a process that aims at helping students to build on their own thinking while constructing more sophisticated mathematics.Key words:  Conceret Learning Materials, School Math, Common Sense, Scaffolding, Communication DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.2.1.780.1-14

  5. Properties of high-workability concrete with recycled concrete aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Safiuddin,; Alengaram,Ubagaram Johnson; Salam,Abdus; Jumaat,Mohd Zamin; Jaafar,Fahrol Fadhli; Saad,Hawa Binti

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the effects of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) on the key fresh and hardened properties of concrete. RCA was used to produce high-workability concrete substituting 0-100% natural coarse aggregate (NCA) by weight. The slump and slump flow of fresh concretes were determined to ensure high workability. In addition, the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strengths, modulus of elasticity, and permeable voids of hardened concretes were determined. The test results rev...

  6. Structural Precast Concrete Handbook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly.......Structural concept for precast concrete systems. Design og precast reinforced concrete components. Design of precast concrete connections. Illustrations on design of precast concrete buildings. Precast concrete assembly....

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GLASS FIBRE CONCRETE AND NORMAL CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Mr.Yogesh S.Lanjewar*

    2018-01-01

    Concrete is basically the most important material concerning with the construction and infrastructural procedures, for which it should be of good strength and durability. Many researches are being conducted to make concrete more sustainable and of more strength and durability. Therefore keeping this in mind i have chosen to do the comparative study regarding the strength of normal concrete with the glass fibre added concrete using mix design procedure as per IS 10262-2009 for concrete. As w...

  8. Study of technological features of tubular compressed concrete members in concreting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskobiinyk Olena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological features of core concreting were analyzed as the main factor in ensuring of strength and reliability of compressed concrete-filled steel tubular (CFST members. We have conducted the analysis of existing concreting methods of CFST members. In this respect, the most dangerous types of possible technological defects of concrete core of CFST members are inhomogeneity along the height, voids, caverns, and concrete “weak spots”. The authors considered the influence of such technological factors of concreting: placeability, time, concrete mixture compaction method, concreting height on the concrete core strength of CFST members. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the regression correlations for determining the concrete strength of CFST members of different length depending on the movability of concrete mixture and a time for its compaction. The authors performed the correlation analysis of technological factors of concreting on the strength of the concrete core. We carried out the comparison of data on the concrete core strength of CFST members, that were determined by non-destructive methods (sclerometer test results, ultrasonic method and direct compression strength tests. We experimentally proved that using movable mixtures with the slump of about 4 – 9 cm the overall variation coefficient of concrete core strength of CFST members along the height reaches nearly 13%. Based on the experimental studies conducted we suggested the guidelines on optimal regimes of concrete compaction during manufacturing CFST members at a construction site environment.

  9. Properties of concretes produced with waste concrete aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Ilker Bekir; Sengel, Selim

    2004-01-01

    An environmentally friendly approach to the disposal of waste materials, a difficult issue to cope with in today's world, would only be possible through a useful recycling process. For this reason, we suggest that clearing the debris from destroyed buildings in such a way as to obtain waste concrete aggregates (WCA) to be reused in concrete production could well be a partial solution to environmental pollution. For this study, the physical and mechanical properties along with their freeze-thaw durability of concrete produced with WCAs were investigated and test results presented. While experimenting with fresh and hardened concrete, mixtures containing recycled concrete aggregates in amounts of 30%, 50%, 70%, and 100% were prepared. Afterward, these mixtures underwent freeze-thaw cycles. As a result, we found out that C16-quality concrete could be produced using less then 30% C14-quality WCA. Moreover, it was observed that the unit weight, workability, and durability of the concretes produced through WCA decreased in inverse proportion to their endurance for freeze-thaw cycle

  10. Concrete Hinges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the 20th century concrete hinges developed by Freyssinet and Mesnager were widely tested and implemented in concrete structures. The concrete hinges were used a great deal in closed-spandrel arch bridges. Since such a bridge type has not been competitive for the past 40 years......, the research in concrete hinges has not evolved significantly in that period. But introducing a new state-of-the-art concrete arch bridge solution (Pearl-Chain arches invented at the Technical University of Denmark) creates a necessity of a concrete hinge research based on modern standards. Back when research...... in concrete hinges was more common different designs were proposed for the geometry and reinforcement. Previous research focused on fatigue, multi-axial stresses around the hinge throat, and the relation between rotation- and moment. But many different test-setups were proposed by different researchers...

  11. COVALENTLY ATTACHED MULTILAYER ULTRA-THIN FILMS FROM DIAZORESIN AND CALIXARENES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-hui Yang; Wei-xiao Cao

    2003-01-01

    A kind of photosensitive ultra-thin film was fabricated from diazoresin (DR) and various calixarenes by using the self-assembly technique. Under UV irradiation both the ionic- and hydrogen bonds between the layers of the film will convert into covalent bonds. As a result, the stability of the film toward polar solvents increases dramatically.

  12. Final Report: Self-Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, Russell; Kahn, Lawrence; Kurtis, Kimberly; Petrovic, Bojan; Loreto, Giovanni; Van Wyk, Jurie; Canterero-Leal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on work completed on DE-NE0000667, Self-Consolidating Concrete for Modular Units, in connection with the Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (DOE-NEET) program. This project was completed in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with Westinghouse Corporation as the industrial partner. The primary objective of this project was to develop self-consolidating concrete (also termed ''self-compacting concrete'' or SCC) mixtures so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The SCC mixtures developed were able to carry shearing forces across the cold-joint boundaries. This ''self-roughening'' was achieved by adding a tailored fraction of lightweight aggregate (LWA) to the concrete mix, some of which raised to the surface during curing, forming a rough surface on which subsequent concrete placements were made. The self-roughening behavior was validated through three sets of structural tests. Shear friction on small-scale specimens with cold joints was assessed using varying fractions of LWA and with varying amounts of external steel plate reinforcement. The results show that the shear friction coefficient, to be used with the provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9, can be taken as 1.35. Mid-scale beam tests were completed to assess the cold-joint capacity in both in-plane and out-of-plane bending. The results showed that the self-roughened joints performed as well as monolithic joints. The final assessment was a full-scale test using a steel composite module supplied by

  13. Crack analysis of multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallix, R.; Liu, T.C.; Lu, S.C.H.

    1975-01-01

    A new method to perform the crack analysis of non-axisymmetric, multicavity prestressed concrete reactor vessels (PCRV's) subjected to hypothetical overpressure by using an axisymmetric two-dimensional finite element computer code is presented. Concrete, steel liner, bonded reinforcing steel and prestressing steel elements are modeled. The limiting tensile strain criterion is adopted for concrete cracking. The steel elements are assumed to be elastic/perfectly plastic. Von Mises yield criterion and Prandtl-Reuss flow equations define the behavior of the liner in the range of plastic deformations. An orthotropic stress-strain constitutive law is utilized for cracked concrete elements. To account for the presence of penetrations and secondary cavities in the PCRV, a modified finite element model based on the concept of effective moduli is adopted. The pressure in these cavities is simulated by equivalent axisymmetric pressure distributions. In the analysis, the pressure is applied incrementally. For a given pressure, the displacements, strains, and stresses are computed. The state of strains or stresses is then examined against the cracking or yield criteria. If cracking or yield is indicated, the stiffness and load matrices for the cracked and yielding elements are recomputed and a new equilibrium is sought. This procedure is repeated until the desired convergence of the solution is achieved. The validity of the adopted approach utilizing the two-dimensional finite element method for overpressure analyses of non-axisymmetric PCRV's is demonstrated through comparisons with two multicavity PCRV scale models. A reliable and conservative estimate of PCRV behavior under overpressure is obtained

  14. Quantitative studies on impact resistance of reinforced concrete panels with steel liners under impact loading. Part 1: Scaled model impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, H.; Kasai, Y.; Koshika, N.; Morikawa, H.; Uchida, T.; Ohno, T.; Kogure, K.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, extensive analytical and experimental studies have been carried out to establish a rational structural design method for nuclear power plants against local damage caused by various external missiles. Through these studies, several techniques for improving die impact resistance of reinforced concrete slabs have been proposed. Of these techniques, attaching a thin steel liner onto the impacted and/or rear face of the slab is considered to be one of the most effective methods. Muto et. al. carried out full-scale impact tests using actual aircraft engines and reported that a thin corrugated steel liner attached to the rear face of a concrete panel has a significant effect in preventing scattering of scabbed concrete debris from the rear face of the target. Based on many experimental and analytical studies, UKAEA reported that a steel liner attached to a reinforced concrete slab improves its perforation and scabbing resistance, and Walter et. al. proposed a formula for predicting the equivalent thickness of a slab with a steel liner attached. The object of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the effect of a steel liner attached to a reinforced concrete slab in preventing local damage caused by rigid missiles. To achieve the object, extensive impact tests were carried out. This paper summarizes the results of these tests

  15. Failure conditions from push-out tests of a steel-concrete joint: experimental results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Helincks, P.; De Corte, W.; Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; Boel, V.; De Schutter, G.

    488-489, - (2012), s. 714-717 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics - FDM 2011 /10./. Dubrovník, 19.09.2011-21.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : steel-concrete joint * push-out test * shear bond strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  16. Nanodiamond resonators fabricated on 8″ Si substrates using adhesive wafer bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V.; Lisec, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Reusch, M.; Iankov, D.; Giese, C.; Žukauskaitė, A.; Cimalla, V.; Ambacher, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the adhesive wafer bonding of diamond thin films onto 8″ silicon substrates is reported. In order to characterize bonded nano-crystalline diamond layers, vibrometry and interferometry studies of micro-fabricated flexural beam and disk resonators were carried out. In particular, surface topology along with resonant frequencies, eigenmodes and mechanical quality factors were recorded and analyzed in order to obtain physical parameters of the transferred films. The vibration properties of the bonded resonators were compared to those fabricated directly on 3″ silicon substrates.

  17. Significance of tests and properties of concrete and concrete-making materials

    CERN Document Server

    Pielert, James H

    2006-01-01

    Reflects a decade of technological changes in concrete industry! The newest edition of this popular ASTM publication reflects the latest technology in concrete and concrete-making materials. Six sections cover: (1) General information on the nature of concrete, sampling, variability, and testing laboratories. A new chapter deals with modeling cement and concrete properties. (2) Properties of freshly mixed concrete. (3) Properties of hardened concrete. (4) Concrete aggregates—this section has been revised and the chapters are presented in the order that most concerns concrete users: grading, density, soundness, degradation resistance, petrographic examination, reactivity, and thermal properties. (5) Materials other than aggregates—the chapter on curing materials now reflects the current technology of materials applied to new concrete surfaces. The chapter on mineral admixtures has been separated into two chapters: supplementary cementitious materials and ground slag. (6) Specialized concretes—contains a ...

  18. Design of ultra-lightweight concrete: towards monolithic concrete structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qing Liang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the development of ultra-lightweight concrete. A moderate strength and an excellent thermal conductivity of the lightweight concrete are set as the design targets. The designed lightweight aggregates concrete is targeted to be used in monolithic concrete façade structure, performing as both load bearing element and thermal insulator. The developed lightweight concrete shows excellent thermal properties, with a low thermal conductivity of about 0.12 W/(m·K; and moderate mechanical properties, with 28-day compressive strengths of about 10-12 N/mm . This combination of values exceeds, to the researchers’ knowledge, the performance of all other lightweight building materials. Furthermore, the developed lightweight concrete possesses excellent durability properties.

  19. Concrete structures

    CERN Document Server

    Setareh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    This revised, fully updated second edition covers the analysis, design, and construction of reinforced concrete structures from a real-world perspective. It examines different reinforced concrete elements such as slabs, beams, columns, foundations, basement and retaining walls and pre-stressed concrete incorporating the most up-to-date edition of the American Concrete Institute Code (ACI 318-14) requirements for the design of concrete structures. It includes a chapter on metric system in reinforced concrete design and construction. A new chapter on the design of formworks has been added which is of great value to students in the construction engineering programs along with practicing engineers and architects. This second edition also includes a new appendix with color images illustrating various concrete construction practices, and well-designed buildings. The ACI 318-14 constitutes the most extensive reorganization of the code in the past 40 years. References to the various sections of the ACI 318-14 are pro...

  20. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing

  1. Reinforced concrete structures under impact and impulsive loading: recent development, problems and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plauk, G.; Herter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear plant facilities and other reinforced concrete structures have to be regarded as to their safety in design and construction with respect to impact and impulsive loading in order to avoid serious damage to mankind and environment. The paper gives a survey on theoretical and experimental developments currently in progress, in particular regarding airplane crash. Some new results arising out of several research programs relevant to particular problems of impact loading have been reviewed and are presented. Experimental investigation for determination of material properties of plain concrete, reinforcing steel as well as steel-concrete bond under high strain-rates are treated in this paper including theoretical approaches for the respective material laws. An outline of soft missile impact tests performed on structural members, e.g. beams and plates, to determine the load deformation or fracture behaviour is given. Furthermore, numerical models and calculations to analyse structural components and structures under impact loading were discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. Morphological Instability in InAs/GaSb Superlattices due to Interfacial Bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.H.; Moss, S.C.; Stokes, D.W.; Caha, O.; Bassler, K.E.; Ammu, S.L.; Bai, J.

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to compare the misfit strain and composition in a self-organized nanowire array in an InAs/GaSb superlattice with InSb interfacial bonds to a planar InAs/GaSb superlattice with GaAs interfacial bonds. It is found that the morphological instability that occurs in the nanowire array results from the large misfit strain that the InSb interfacial bonds have in the nanowire array. Based on this result, we propose that tailoring the type of interfacial bonds during the epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor films provides a novel approach for producing the technologically important morphological instability in anomalously thin layers

  3. Fibre Concrete 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    9th international conference on fibre reinforced concretes (FRC), textile reinforced concretes (TRC) and ultra-high performance concretes (UHPC) Preface The Fibre Concrete Conference series is held biennially to provide a platform to share knowledge on fibre reinforced concretes, textile concretes and ultra-high performance concretes regarding material properties and behaviour, technology procedures, topics of long-term behaviour, creep, durability; sustainable aspects of concrete including utilisation of waste materials in concrete production and recycling of concrete. The tradition of Fibre Concrete Conferences started in eighties of the last century. Nowadays the conference is organized by the Department of Concrete and Masonry Structures of the Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Civil Engineering. The 9th International Conference Fibre Concrete 2017 had 109 participants from 27 countries all over the world. 55 papers were presented including keynote lectures of Professor Bažant, Professor Bartoš and Dr. Broukalová. The conference program covered wide range of topics from scientific research to practical applications. The presented contributions related to performance and behaviour of cement based composites, their long-term behaviour and durability, sustainable aspects, advanced analyses of structures from these composites and successful applications. This conference was organized also to honour Professor Zděnek P. Bažant on the occasion of his jubilee and to appreciate his merits and discoveries in the field of fibre reinforced composites, structural mechanics and engineering.

  4. Fluxless Sn-Ag bonding in vacuum using electroplated layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsung; Lee, Chin C.

    2007-01-01

    A fluxless bonding process in vacuum environment using newly developed electroplated Sn-Ag multilayer structure at eutectic composition is presented. The new bonding process is entirely fluxless, or flux-free. It is performed in vacuum (100 mTorr), in which the oxygen content is reduced by a factor of 7600 comparing to air, to inhibit solder oxidation. In the design, Cr/Au dual layer is employed as the UBM as well as the plating seed layer. This UBM design, seldom used in the electronic industry, is explained in some details. To realize the fluxless possibility, a proper layer design of the solder structure is needed. In this connection, we wish to point out that it is hard to achieve fluxless bonding using Sn-rich alloys because these alloys have numerous Sn atoms on the surface that are easily oxidized. To prevent Sn oxidation, a thin Ag layer is plated immediately over Sn layer. XRD results confirm that this thin Ag layer does act as a barrier to prevent oxidation of the inner Sn layer. The resulting solder joints are void free as examined by a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). SEM and EDX studies on the cross section of the joint indicate a homogeneous Sn-rich phase. The melting temperature is measured to be between 219 and 226 deg. C. This new fluxless bonding process is valuable in many applications where the use of flux is prohibited

  5. Concrete laying laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastlova, K.

    1986-01-01

    The task of the concrete laying laboratory established within a special department for quality control and assurance at the Dukovany nuclear power plant, is to check the composition of concrete mixes produced by the central concrete production plant on the site, and the shipment, laying and processing of concrete. The composition is given of special barite and serpentinite concretes designed for biological shields. The system of checks and of filing the results is briefly described. Esperience is summed up from the operation of the concrete laying laboratory, and conclusions are formulated which should be observed on similar large construction sites. They include the precise definition of the designer's requirements for the quality of concrete, the surface finish of concrete surfaces, the method of concreting specific structures around bushings, increased density reinforcements and various technological elements, and requirements for shipment to poorly accessible or remote places. As for the equipment of the laboratory, it should be completed with an instrument for the analysis of fresh concrete mixes, a large capacity drying kiln, etc. (Z.M.)

  6. Effect of releasing pretension for Rc Beams Bonded with Prestressed Fr Strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao-yang, Z.; Xue-jun, H.; Xing-guo, W.; Fei-fei, X

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of releasing pretension is theoretically and experimentally investigated for flexural members externally bonded with prestressed FRP laminate or near-surface-mounted with prestressed FRP plate or rod. The stresses of FRP on the interface and at cross sections of a beam are analyzed on the basis of linear elastic theory. The expressions are derived for effective prestress, prestress loss and camber at the midspan of the beam. Tests are performed on two reinforced concrete beams bonded with prestressed GFRP plate. The comparison between the analytical and the measured results shows the analyses in this paper are rational and correct. (author)

  7. Concrete with onyx waste aggregate as aesthetically valued structural concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyowati E., W.; Soehardjono, A.; Wisnumurti

    2017-09-01

    The utillization of Tulungagung onyx stone waste as an aggregate of concrete mixture will improve the economic value of the concrete due to the brighter color and high aesthetic level of the products. We conducted the research of 75 samples as a test objects to measure the compression stress, splits tensile stress, flexural tensile stress, elasticity modulus, porosity modulus and also studied 15 test objects to identify the concrete micro structures using XRD test, EDAX test and SEM test. The test objects were made from mix designed concrete, having ratio cement : fine aggregate : coarse aggregate ratio = 1 : 1.5 : 2.1, and W/C ratio = 0.4. The 28 days examination results showed that the micro structure of Tulungagung onyx waste concrete is similar with normal concrete. Moreover, the mechanical test results proved that Tulungagung onyx waste concretes also have a qualified level of strength to be used as a structural concrete with higher aesthetic level.

  8. Influence of the waste glass in the axial compressive strength of Portland cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Junior, E.J.P.; Paiva, A.E.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, was studied the influence of the incorporation of waste glass, coming from the stage of thinning and polishing of a company of thermal glass treatments, in the axial compressive strength of Portland cement concrete. The coarse and ground aggregates used was crushed stone and sand, respectively. For production of the concrete, percentages of glass residues of 5%, 10% and 20% had been used in substitution to the sand, and relations water/cement (a/c) 0,50, 0,55 and 0,58. The cure of the test bodies was carried through in 7, 14 and 28 days. The statistics analysis of the results was carried out through of the analysis of variance for each one of the cure times. From the results of the compressive strength of the concrete, it could be observed that the concrete has structural application for the relation a/c 0,5, independently of waste glass percentage used, and for the relation a/c 0,55 with 20% of waste glass. (author)

  9. Effects of spatial variation in cohesion over the concrete-rock interface on dam sliding stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Krounis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The limit equilibrium method (LEM is widely used for sliding stability evaluation of concrete gravity dams. Failure is then commonly assumed to occur along the entire sliding surface simultaneously. However, the brittle behaviour of bonded concrete-rock contacts, in combination with the varying stress over the interface, implies that the failure of bonded dam-foundation interfaces occurs progressively. In addition, the spatial variation in cohesion may introduce weak spots where failure can be initiated. Nonetheless, the combined effect of brittle failure and spatial variation in cohesion on the overall shear strength of the interface has not been studied previously. In this paper, numerical analyses are used to investigate the effect of brittle failure in combination with spatial variation in cohesion that is taken into account by random fields with different correlation lengths. The study concludes that a possible existence of weak spots along the interface has to be considered since it significantly reduces the overall shear strength of the interface, and implications for doing so are discussed.

  10. Pervious Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Torsvik, Øyvind André Hoff

    2012-01-01

    Pervious concrete is a material with a high degree of permeability but generally low strength. The material is primarily used for paving applications but has shown promise in many other areas of usage. This thesis investigates the properties of pervious concrete using normal Norwegian aggregates and practices. An overview of important factors when it comes to designing and producing pervious concrete is the result of this investigation. Several experiments have been performed in the concrete ...

  11. Sustainable Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sim J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growing concern over global warming and significant ecological changes requires sustainable development in all fields of science and technology. Concrete not only consumes huge amount of energy and natural sources, but also emits large amount of CO2, mainly due to the production of cement. It is evident that such large amount of concrete production has put significant impact on the energy, resource, environment, and ecology of the society. Hence, how to develop the concrete technology in a sustainable way has become a significant issue. In this paper, some of Korean researches for sustainable development of concrete are presented. These are sustainable strengthening for deteriorated concrete structure, sustainable reinforcement of new concrete structure, sustainable concrete using recycled aggregate and supplementary cementing materials and finally application of each technique to precast concrete.

  12. Properties of concrete containing foamed concrete block waste as fine aggregate replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthusamy, K.; Budiea, A. M. A.; Zaidan, A. L. F.; Rasid, M. H.; Hazimmah, D. S.

    2017-11-01

    Environmental degradation due to excessive sand mining dumping at certain places and disposal of foamed concrete block waste from lightweight concrete producing industry are issues that should be resolved for a better and cleaner environment of the community. Thus, the main intention of this study is to investigate the potential of foamed concrete block waste as partial sand replacement in concrete production. The foamed concrete waste (FCW) used in this research that were supplied by a local lightweight concrete producing industry. The workability and compressive strength of concrete containing various percentage of foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement has been investigated. Prior to the use, the foamed concrete waste were crushed to produce finer particles. Six concrete mixes containing various content of crushed foamed concrete waste that are 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% were used in this experimental work. Then the prepared specimens were placed in water curing until the testing age. Compressive strength test and flexural strength tests were conducted at 7, 14 and 28 days. The result shows that integration of crushed foamed concrete waste as partial sand replacement in concrete reduces the mix workability. It is interesting to note that both compressive strength and flexural strength of concrete improves when 30% crushed foamed concrete waste is added as partial sand replacement.

  13. Recycled construction and demolition concrete waste as aggregate for structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Wagih

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In major Egyptian cities there is a surge in construction and demolition waste (CDW quantities causing an adverse effect on the environment. The use of such waste as recycled aggregate in concrete can be useful for both environmental and economical aspects in the construction industry. This study discusses the possibility to replace natural coarse aggregate (NA with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA in structural concrete. An investigation into the properties of RCA is made using crushing and grading of concrete rubble collected from different demolition sites and landfill locations around Cairo. Aggregates used in the study were: natural sand, dolomite and crushed concretes obtained from different sources. A total of 50 concrete mixes forming eight groups were cast. Groups were designed to study the effect of recycled coarse aggregates quality/content, cement dosage, use of superplasticizer and silica fume. Tests were carried out for: compressive strength, splitting strength and elastic modulus. The results showed that the concrete rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate and used in concrete production with properties suitable for most structural concrete applications in Egypt. A significant reduction in the properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC made of 100% RCA was seen when compared to natural aggregate concrete (NAC, while the properties of RAC made of a blend of 75% NA and 25% RCA showed no significant change in concrete properties.

  14. Electronic hybridisation implications for the damage-tolerance of thin film metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Volker; Jaya, B Nagamani; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Kirchlechner, Christoph; Dehm, Gerhard; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2016-11-07

    A paramount challenge in materials science is to design damage-tolerant glasses. Poisson's ratio is commonly used as a criterion to gauge the brittle-ductile transition in glasses. However, our data, as well as results in the literature, are in conflict with the concept of Poisson's ratio serving as a universal parameter for fracture energy. Here, we identify the electronic structure fingerprint associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses. Our correlative theoretical and experimental data reveal that the fraction of bonds stemming from hybridised states compared to the overall bonding can be associated with damage tolerance in thin film metallic glasses.

  15. Special protective concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouniol, P.

    2001-01-01

    Concrete is the most convenient material when large-scale radiation protection is needed. Thus, special concretes for nuclear purposes are used in various facilities like reactors, reprocessing centers, storage sites, accelerators, hospitals with nuclear medicine equipment, food ionization centers etc.. The recent advances made in civil engineering for the improvement of concrete durability and compactness are for a large part transposable to protection concretes. This article presents the basic knowledge about protection concretes with the associated typological and technological aspects. A large part is devoted to the intrinsic properties of concretes and to their behaviour in irradiation and temperature conditions: 1 - definition and field of application of special protective concretes; 2 - evolution of concepts and technologies (durability of structures, techniques of formulation, new additives, market evolution); 3 - design of protective structures (preliminary study, radiation characteristics, thermal constraints, damping and dimensioning, mechanical criteria); 4 - formulation of special concretes (general principles, granulates, hydraulic binders, pulverulent additives, water/cement ratio, reference composition of some special concretes); 5 - properties of special concretes (damping and thermo-mechanical properties); 6 - induced-irradiation and temperature phenomena (activation, radiolysis, mineralogical transformations, drying, shrinking, creep, corrosion of reinforcement). (J.S.)

  16. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  17. A review on the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamir Senin, Mohamad; Shahidan, Shahiron; Radziah Abdullah, Siti; Anting Guntor, Nickholas; Syazani Leman, Alif

    2017-11-01

    Road authorities manage a large population of ageing bridges, a substantial number of which fail to meet the current requirements either due to deterioration and other structural deficiencies or as a result of the escalating demands imposed by increased traffic. This problem is related to the dynamic load from vehicles. This problem can be solved by producing a type of concrete that can reduce the amplitude of oscillation or vibration such as rubberized concrete. Green construction has been a very important aspect in concrete production field in the last decade. One of the most problematic waste materials is scrap tires. The use of scrap tires in civil engineering is increasing by producing rubberized concrete. Rubberized concrete is a type of concrete that is mixed with rubber. The purpose of this review is to justify the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Several parameters named physical, chemical and mechanical properties were measured to ensure the suitability of rubberized concrete for concrete bridge decks. Rubberized concrete has similar workability to normal concrete. The rubber reduced the density and compressive strength of the concrete while increased the flexural strength, water absorption and damping ratio. The used of rubber in concrete beyond 20% is not recommended due to decreasing in compressive strength. Rubberized concrete recommended to be used in circumstances where vibration damping was required such as in bridge construction as shock-wave absorber.

  18. Analysis of a flip-chip bonded tunable high-temperature superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator using the conformal mapping technique

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, M; Murakami, H; Tonouchi, M

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the tuning properties of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) half-wavelength coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonator operating at 5 GHz. The tuning schemes are based on flip-chip bonding of an electrically tunable ferroelectric (FE) thin film and a mechanically movable low-loss single crystal on top of the resonator. Using the conformal mapping method, closed-form analytical expressions have been derived for a flip-chip bonded conductor-backed and top-shielded CPW transmission line. The obtained expressions are used to analyse the volume effect of the FE thin film and the gap between the flip-chip and the CPW resonator on the tuning properties of the device. It has been found that large frequency modulation of the resonator produces impedance mismatch, which can considerably enhance the insertion loss of high-performance HTS microwave devices. Analysis also suggests that, for electrically tunable devices, flip-chip bonded FE thin films on HTS CPW devices provide a relatively higher performance...

  19. Thin hybrid pixel assembly fabrication development with backside compensation layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, R., E-mail: richard.bates@glasgow.ac.uk [Experimental Particle Physics Group, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Buttar, C.; McMullen, T.; Cunningham, L.; Ashby, J.; Doherty, F. [Experimental Particle Physics Group, SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pares, G.; Vignoud, L.; Kholti, B. [CEA Leti, MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, F38054, Grenoble (France); Vahanen, S. [Advacam Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2017-02-11

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments will both replace their entire tracking systems for operation at the HL-LHC in 2026. This will include a significantly larger pixel systems, for example, for ATLAS approximately 15 m{sup 2}. To keep the tracker material budget low it is crucial to minimize the mass of the pixel modules via thinning both the sensor and readout chip to about 150 μm each. The bump yield of thin module assemblies using solder based bump bonding can be problematic due to wafer bowing during solder reflow at high temperature. A new bump-bonding process using backside compensation on the readout chip to address the issue of low yield will be presented. The objective is to compensate dynamically the stress of the front side stack by adding a compensating layer to the backside of the wafer. A SiN and Al:Si stack has been chosen for the backside layer. The bow reducing effect of applying a backside compensation layer will be demonstrated using the FE-I4 wafer. The world's first results from assemblies produced from readout wafers thinned to 100 μm with a stress compensation layer are presented with bond yields close to 100% measured using the FE-I4 readout chip.

  20. Provisional results from accelerated testing of ultra thin-layer reinforced concrete in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR Built-Environment, in conjunction with the University of Pretoria and the Cement and Concrete Institute of South Africa, developed a low cost option for the upgrading of unsurfaced (gravel) roads. The proposed solution is the placing of a...

  1. Finite element analysis of prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.D.; Cook, W.A.; Anderson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a finite element code suitable for the safety analysis of prestressed concrete reactor vessels. The project has involved modification of a general purpose computer code to handle reinforced concrete structures as well as comparison of results obtained with the code against published experimental data. The NONSAP nonlinear structural analysis program was selected for the ease with which it can be modified to encompass problems peculiar to nuclear reactors. Pre- and post-processors have been developed for mesh generation and for graphical display of response variables. An out-of-core assembler and solver have been developed for the analysis of large three dimensional problems. The constitutive model for short term loads forms an orthotropic stress-strain relationship in which the concrete and the reinforcing steel are treated as a composite. The variation of stiffness and strength of concrete under multiaxial stress states is accounted for. Cracks are allowed to form at element integration points based on a three dimensional failure envelope in stress space. Composite tensile and shear properties across a crack are modified to account for bond degradation and for dowel action of the reinforcement. The constitutive law for creep is base on the expansion of the usual creep compliance function in the form of a Dirichlet exponential series. Empirical creep data are then fit to the Dirichlet series approximation by means of a least squares procedure. The incremental deformation process is subsequently reduced to a series of variable stiffness elasticity problems in which the past stress history is represented by a finite number of hidden material variables

  2. Quasi-static and dynamic experimental studies on the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaochao; Hou, Cheng; Fan, Xueling; Lu, Chunsheng; Yang, Huawei; Shu, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhihua

    2017-11-10

    As concrete and mortar materials widely used in structural engineering may suffer dynamic loadings, studies on their mechanical properties under different strain rates are of great importance. In this paper, based on splitting tests of Brazilian discs, the tensile strength and failure pattern of concrete and mortar were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic loadings with a strain rate of 1-200 s -1 . It is shown that the quasi-static tensile strength of mortar is higher than that of concrete since coarse aggregates weaken the interface bonding strength of the latter. Numerical results confirmed that the plane stress hypothesis lead to a lower value tensile strength for the cylindrical specimens. With the increase of strain rates, dynamic tensile strengths of concrete and mortar significantly increase, and their failure patterns change form a single crack to multiple cracks and even fragment. Furthermore, a relationship between the dynamic increase factor and strain rate was established by using a linear fitting algorithm, which can be conveniently used to calculate the dynamic increase factor of concrete-like materials in engineering applications.

  3. Final Report: Self-Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentry, Russell [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kahn, Lawrence [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kurtis, Kimberly [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Loreto, Giovanni [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Van Wyk, Jurie [Westinghouse Inc., Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Canterero-Leal, Carlos [Westinghouse Inc., Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This report focuses on work completed on DE-NE0000667, Self-Consolidating Concrete for Modular Units, in connection with the Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (DOE-NEET) program. This project was completed in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with Westinghouse Corporation as the industrial partner. The primary objective of this project was to develop self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) mixtures so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The SCC mixtures developed were able to carry shearing forces across the cold-joint boundaries. This “self-roughening” was achieved by adding a tailored fraction of lightweight aggregate (LWA) to the concrete mix, some of which raised to the surface during curing, forming a rough surface on which subsequent concrete placements were made. The self-roughening behavior was validated through three sets of structural tests. Shear friction on small-scale specimens with cold joints was assessed using varying fractions of LWA and with varying amounts of external steel plate reinforcement. The results show that the shear friction coefficient, to be used with the provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9, can be taken as 1.35. Mid-scale beam tests were completed to assess the cold-joint capacity in both in-plane and out-of-plane bending. The results showed that the self-roughened joints performed as well as monolithic joints. The final assessment was a full-scale test using a steel composite module supplied by Westinghouse and similar in construction to

  4. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Francesco; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-07-25

    In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD), granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  5. Use of Cement Kiln Dust, Blast Furnace Slag and Marble Sludge in the Manufacture of Sustainable Artificial Aggregates by Means of Cold Bonding Pelletization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Cioffi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three different samples of solid industrial wastes cement kiln dust (CKD, granulated blast furnace slag and marble sludge were employed in a cold bonding pelletization process for the sustainable production of artificial aggregates. The activating action of CKD components on the hydraulic behavior of the slag was explored by evaluating the neo-formed phases present in several hydrated pastes. Particularly, the influence of free CaO and sulfates amount in the two CKD samples on slag reactivity was evaluated. Cold bonded artificial aggregates were characterized by determining physical and mechanical properties of two selected size fractions of the granules for each studied mixture. Eighteen types of granules were employed in C28/35 concrete manufacture where coarser natural aggregate were substituted with the artificial ones. Finally, lightweight concretes were obtained, proving the suitability of the cold bonding pelletization process in artificial aggregate sustainable production.

  6. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  7. The effects of heat treatment on optical, structural, electrochromic and bonding properties of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coşkun, Özlem Duyar, E-mail: duyar@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Physics Engineering, Thin Film Preparation and Characterization Laboratory, Ankara (Turkey); Demirel, Selen, E-mail: nymph24@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Physics Engineering, Thin Film Preparation and Characterization Laboratory, Ankara (Turkey); Hacettepe University, Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Department, Ankara (Turkey); Atak, Gamze, E-mail: gbaser@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Physics Engineering, Thin Film Preparation and Characterization Laboratory, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-11-05

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films were deposited onto heated glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering using a Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} target. The films were annealed in air at temperatures between 400 and 700 °C for 6 h. Effects of the crystalline structure on optical, structural, electrochromic and bonding properties of the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectrophotometry and electrochemical measurements. The film refractive index varied between 2.09 and 2.22 at the wavelength of 550 nm depending on the annealing temperature. The decrease of the optical band gap revealed for the films with increasing annealing temperature is attributed to oxygen-ion vacancies in the film structure. The orthorhombic structure of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films resulted in good electrochromic properties with high colouration efficiencies of 19.56 cm{sup 2}/C and 53.24 cm{sup 2}/C at 550 nm and 1000 nm, respectively. The optical, structural and electrochromic properties of the different crystalline polymorphic forms of the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films make them attractive for optical applications. - Highlights: • Stoichiometric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films prepared using RF magnetron sputtering technique. • The different crystalline forms of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films obtained by annealing. • The optical, structural and electrochromic properties of the films were investigated. • The optical band gap decreased with increasing annealing temperature. • The orthorhombic T-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films exhibited a higher colouration efficiency.

  8. Evaluation of ilmenite serpentine concrete and ordinary concrete as nuclear reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present study involves adapting a formal decision methodology to the selection of alternative nuclear reactor concrete shielding. Multiattribute utility theory is selected to accommodate decision maker's preferences. Multiattribute utility theory (MAU) is here employed to evaluate two appropriate nuclear reactor shielding concretes in terms of effectiveness to determine the optimal choice in order to meet the radiation protection regulations. These concretes are Ordinary concrete (O.C.) and Illmenite Serpentile concrete (I.S.C.). These are normal weight concrete and heavy weight heat resistive concrete, respectively. The effectiveness objective of the nuclear reactor shielding is defined and structured into definite attributes and subattributes to evaluate the best alternative. Factors affecting the decision are dose received by reactor's workers, the material properties as well as cost of concrete shield. A computer program is employed to assist in performing utility analysis. Based upon data, the result shows the superiority of Ordinary concrete over Illmenite Serpentine concrete. (Author)

  9. Towards Better Understanding of Concrete Containing Recycled Concrete Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Qasrawi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of using recycled concrete aggregates (RCA on the basic properties of normal concrete is studied. First, recycled aggregate properties have been determined and compared to those of normal aggregates. Except for absorption, there was not a significant difference between the two. Later, recycled aggregates were introduced in concrete mixes. In these mixes, natural coarse aggregate was partly or totally replaced by recycled aggregates. Results show that the use of recycled aggregates has an adverse effect on the workability and air content of fresh concrete. Depending on the water/cement ratio and on the percent of the normal aggregate replaced by RCA, the concrete strength is reduced by 5% to 25%, while the tensile strength is reduced by 4% to 14%. All results are compared with previous research. As new in this research, the paper introduces a simple formula for the prediction of the modulus of elasticity of RCA concrete. Furthermore, the paper shows the variation of the air content of RAC.

  10. Sealing of cavities with lateral feed-throughs by anodic bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fléron, René; Jensen, Flemming

    2003-01-01

    The SESiBon(1)) project under the EU Growth programme has focussed on the investigation and exploitation of various silicon bonding techniques. Both standard silicon to pyrex wafer bonding and the more advanced silicon-to-silicon thin film anodic bonding has been investigated. Here we present...... the results of the work done to enable bonding of structured wafer surfaces, allowing lateral feed-throughs into sealed cavities.Lateral feed throughs are formed by means of RIE in a high-doped poly-silicon film deposited on an oxidized 4" silicon wafer. Next a BPSG (Boron Phosphorus Silicate Glass) layer...... is deposited in a PECVD reaction chamber onto the structured surface. The BPSG is used as an intermediate planarization layer. Planarization is done by annealing the wafer in a N2-O2-H2O ambient for 4 - 8h @ 900 degreesC. After planarization the two wafers are bonded together, sealing the cavities.Our work...

  11. Effect of iodine on the corrosion of Au-Al wire bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Müller, Lutz; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion study was performed on Au-Al wire bonds, thin layers of sputter deposited Au and Al, and Au-Al intermetallic nuggets. The test environment was iodine-vapour in air (1. mg/L) at 85 °C with varying relative humidity, and 500 mg/L of KI in water. GDOES, XRD, SEM EDS, wire bond shear......, and electrochemical testing were used to characterize the samples. Failures of Au-Al wire bonds were found to be primarily attributed to the corrosion of Al via formation of Al iodides and consequent formation of Al oxides and/or hydroxides. Most susceptible to corrosion are Al metallization and Al rich intermetallic...

  12. Seismic Response Analysis of Concrete Lining Structure in Large Underground Powerhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the dynamic damage constitutive model of concrete material and seismic rock-lining structure interaction analysis method, the seismic response of lining structure in large underground powerhouse is studied in this paper. In order to describe strain rate dependence and fatigue damage of concrete material under cyclic loading, a dynamic constitutive model for concrete lining considering tension and shear anisotropic damage is presented, and the evolution equations of damage variables are derived. The proposed model is of simple form and can be programmed into finite element procedure easily. In order to describe seismic interaction characteristics of the surrounding rock and lining, an explicit dynamic contact analysis method considering bond and damage characteristics of contact face between the surrounding rock and lining is proposed, and this method can integrate directly without iteration. The proposed method is applied to seismic stability calculation of Yingxiuwan Underground Powerhouse, results reveal that the amplitude and duration of input seismic wave determine the damage degree of lining structure, the damage zone of lining structure is mainly distributed in its arch, and the contact face damage has great influence on the stability of the lining structure.

  13. Nanometre-scale 3D defects in Cr2AlC thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y T; Music, D; Shang, L; Mayer, J; Schneider, J M

    2017-04-20

    MAX-phase Cr 2 AlC containing thin films were synthesized by magnetron sputtering in an industrial system. Nanometre-scale 3D defects are observed near the boundary between regions of Cr 2 AlC and of the disordered solid solution (CrAl) x C y . Shrinkage of the Cr-Cr interplanar distance and elongation of the Cr-Al distance in the vicinity of the defects are detected using transmission electron microscopy. The here observed deformation surrounding the defects was described using density functional theory by comparing the DOS of bulk Cr 2 AlC with the DOS of a strained and unstrained Cr 2 AlC(0001) surface. From the partial density of states analysis, it can be learned that Cr-C bonds are stronger than Cr-Al bonds in bulk Cr 2 AlC. Upon Cr 2 AlC(0001) surface formation, both bonds are weakened. While the Cr-C bonds recover their bulk strength as Cr 2 AlC(0001) is strained, the Cr-Al bonds experience only a partial recovery, still being weaker than their bulk counterparts. Hence, the strain induced bond strengthening in Cr 2 AlC(0001) is larger for Cr d - C p bonds than for Cr d - Al p bonds. The here observed changes in bonding due to the formation of a strained surface are consistent with the experimentally observed elongation of the Cr-Al distance in the vicinity of nm-scale 3D defects in Cr 2 AlC thin films.

  14. Flexural Behavior of RC Members Using Externally Bonded Aluminum-Glass Fiber Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns improvement of flexural stiffness/strength of concrete members reinforced with externally bonded, aluminum-glass fiber composite (AGC beams. An experimental program, consisting of seven reinforced concrete slabs and seven reinforced concrete beams strengthened in flexure with AGC beams, was initiated under four-point bending in order to evaluate three parameters: the cross-sectional shape of the AGC beam, the glass fiber fabric array, and the installation of fasteners. The load-deflection response, strain distribution along the longitudinal axis of the beam, and associated failure modes of the tested specimens were recorded. It was observed that the AGC beam led to an increase of the initial cracking load, yielding load of the tension steels and peak load. On the other hand, the ductility of some specimens strengthened was reduced by more than 50%. The A-type AGC beam was more efficient in slab specimens than in beam specimens and the B-type was more suitable for beam specimens than for slabs.

  15. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge (100) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900 angstrom/surface to 300 angstrom/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500 angstrom/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300 angstrom/surface Au sample show epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200 angstrom/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150 angstrom across an interval of lmm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons

  16. Evaluation of the concrete shield compositions from the 2010 criticality accident alarm system benchmark experiments at the CEA Valduc SILENE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; Dunn, Michael E; Wagner, John C; McMahan, Kimberly L; Authier, Nicolas; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Wolff, Herve; Savanier, Laurence; Baclet, Nathalie; Lee, Yi-kang; Trama, Jean-Christophe; Masse, Veronique; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Naury, Sylvie; Blanc-Tranchant, Patrick; Hunter, Richard; Kim, Soon; Dulik, George Michael; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2010, a series of benchmark experiments were conducted at the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program and the CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems. This series of experiments consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. For the first experiment, the reactor was bare (unshielded), whereas in the second and third experiments, it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. The polyethylene shield of the third experiment had a cadmium liner on its internal and external surfaces, which vertically was located near the fuel region of SILENE. During each experiment, several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor. Nearly half of the foils and TLDs had additional high-density magnetite concrete, high-density barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond shields. CEA Saclay provided all the concrete, and the US Y-12 National Security Complex provided the BoroBond. Measurement data from the experiments were published at the 2011 International Conference on Nuclear Criticality (ICNC 2011) and the 2013 Nuclear Criticality Safety Division (NCSD 2013) topical meeting. Preliminary computational results for the first experiment were presented in the ICNC 2011 paper, which showed poor agreement between the computational results and the measured values of the foils shielded by concrete. Recently the hydrogen content, boron content, and density of these concrete shields were further investigated within the constraints of the previously available data. New computational results for the first experiment are now available

  17. Evaluation of recycled concrete as aggregate in new concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the use of recycled concrete as coarse aggregate in new concrete pavements. : Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) produced from demolished pavements in three geographically dispersed locations in Washington state were used to perfo...

  18. Electronic properties and bonding in Zr Hx thin films investigated by valence-band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Martin; Schmidt, Susann; Hultman, Lars; Högberg, Hans

    2017-11-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding in reactively magnetron sputtered Zr Hx (x =0.15 , 0.30, 1.16) thin films with oxygen content as low as 0.2 at.% are investigated by 4d valence band, shallow 4p core-level, and 3d core-level x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. With increasing hydrogen content, we observe significant reduction of the 4d valence states close to the Fermi level as a result of redistribution of intensity toward the H 1s-Zr 4d hybridization region at ˜6 eV below the Fermi level. For low hydrogen content (x =0.15 , 0.30), the films consist of a superposition of hexagonal closest-packed metal (α phase) and understoichiometric δ -Zr Hx (Ca F2 -type structure) phases, while for x =1.16 , the films form single-phase Zr Hx that largely resembles that of stoichiometric δ -Zr H2 phase. We show that the cubic δ -Zr Hx phase is metastable as thin film up to x =1.16 , while for higher H contents the structure is predicted to be tetragonally distorted. For the investigated Zr H1.16 film, we find chemical shifts of 0.68 and 0.51 eV toward higher binding energies for the Zr 4 p3 /2 and 3 d5 /2 peak positions, respectively. Compared to the Zr metal binding energies of 27.26 and 178.87 eV, this signifies a charge transfer from Zr to H atoms. The change in the electronic structure, spectral line shapes, and chemical shifts as a function of hydrogen content is discussed in relation to the charge transfer from Zr to H that affects the conductivity by charge redistribution in the valence band.

  19. Strength and leak testing of plasma activated bonded interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, M.M.; Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De

    2002-01-01

    on detection of changes in membrane deflections. The detection limit for leak was 8E-13 mbar l/s. For comparison, strength and leak tests were also performed with regular fusion bonded wafers annealed at 1100 degreesC. The PAB was found to withstand post-processing steps such as RCA cleaning, 24 h in de......-ionised water (DIW), 24 h in 2.5% HF, 24 h in acetone and 60 s in a resist developer. By analysing the thin silicon oxide present on the surfaces to be bonded with optical methods, the influence of pre-cleaning and activation process parameters was investigated....

  20. Comprehensive physical analysis of bond wire interfaces in power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2016-01-01

    causing failures. In this paper we present a review on the set of our experimental and theoretical studies allowing comprehensive physical analysis of changes in materials under active power cycling with focus on bond wire interfaces and thin metallisation layers. The developed electro-thermal and thermo...

  1. Effects of lithium doping on microstructure, electrical properties, and chemical bonds of sol-gel derived NKN thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Chan-Ching; Weng, Chung-Ming; Chu, Sheng-Yuan; Hong, Cheng-Shong; Tsai, Cheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Highly (100/110) oriented lead-free Li x (Na 0.5 K 0.5 ) 1−x NbO 3 (LNKN, x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06) thin films are fabricated on Pt/Ti/SiO 2 /Si substrates via a sol-gel processing method. The lithium (Li) dopants modify the microstructure and chemical bonds of the LNKN films, and therefore improve their electrical properties. The optimal values of the remnant polarization (P r  = 14.3 μC/cm 2 ), piezoelectric coefficient (d 33  = 48.1 pm/V), and leakage current (<10 −5 A/cm 2 ) are obtained for a lithium addition of x = 0.04 (i.e., 4 at. %). The observation results suggest that the superior electrical properties are the result of an improved crystallization, a larger grain size, and a smoother surface morphology. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by an Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect under high electric fields

  2. Automatic dam concrete placing system; Dam concrete dasetsu sagyo no jidoka system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Y; Hori, Y; Nakayama, T; Yoshihara, K; Hironaka, T [Okumura Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1994-11-15

    An automatic concrete placing system was developed for concrete dam construction. This system consists of the following five subsystems: a wireless data transmission system, an automatic dam concrete mixing system, a consistency determination system, an automatic dam concrete loading and transporting system, and a remote concrete bucket opening and closing system. The system includes the following features: mixing amount by mixing ratio and mixing intervals can be instructed from a concrete placing site by using a wireless handy terminal; concrete is mixed automatically in a batcher plant; a transfer car is started, and concrete is charged into a bucket automatically; the mixed concrete is determined of its properties automatically; labor cost can be reduced, the work efficiency improved, and the safety enhanced; and the system introduction has resulted in unattended operation from the aggregate draw-out to a bunker line, manpower saving of five persons, and reduction in cycle time by 10%. 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Recycled concrete aggregate in portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates can be produced by crushing hydraulic cement concrete and are known as recycled concrete : aggregates (RCA). This report provides results from a New Jersey Department of Transportation study to identify : barriers to the use of RCA in new ...

  4. Analysis of Possibilities for Using Recycled Concrete Aggregate in Concrete Pavement

    OpenAIRE

    R. Pernicova; D. Dobias

    2016-01-01

    The present article describes the limits of using recycled concrete aggregate (denoted as RCA) in the top layer of concrete roads. The main aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of reuse of recycled aggregates obtained by crushing the old concrete roads as a building material in the new top layers of concrete pavements. The paper is based on gathering the current knowledge about how to use recycled concrete aggregate, suitability, and modification of the properties and its standa...

  5. Quantum Devices Bonded Beneath a Superconducting Shield: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Corey Rae; Abdallah, Adel; Bejanin, Jeremy; Earnest, Carolyn; McConkey, Thomas; Pagel, Zachary; Mariantoni, Matteo

    The next-generation quantum computer will rely on physical quantum bits (qubits) organized into arrays to form error-robust logical qubits. In the superconducting quantum circuit implementation, this architecture will require the use of larger and larger chip sizes. In order for on-chip superconducting quantum computers to be scalable, various issues found in large chips must be addressed, including the suppression of box modes (due to the sample holder) and the suppression of slot modes (due to fractured ground planes). By bonding a metallized shield layer over a superconducting circuit using thin-film indium as a bonding agent, we have demonstrated proof of concept of an extensible circuit architecture that holds the key to the suppression of spurious modes. Microwave characterization of shielded transmission lines and measurement of superconducting resonators were compared to identical unshielded devices. The elimination of box modes was investigated, as well as bond characteristics including bond homogeneity and the presence of a superconducting connection.

  6. The electrical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition Ga doped ZnO thin films depending on chemical bonding configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hanearl [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoung [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ulsan College, 57 Daehak-ro, Nam-gu, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Undoped and Ga doped ZnO thin films were deposited using DEZ and TMGa. • Effects of Ga doping using TMGa in Ga doped ZnO were investigated. • Degraded properties from excessive doping were analyzed using chemical bondings. - Abstract: The electrical and chemical properties of low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LP-CVD) Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) films were systematically investigated using Hall measurement and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). Diethylzinc (DEZ) and O{sub 2} gas were used as precursor and reactant gas, respectively, and trimethyl gallium (TMGa) was used as a Ga doping source. Initially, the electrical properties of undoped LP-CVD ZnO films depending on the partial pressure of DEZ and O{sub 2} ratio were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) by changing partial pressure of DEZ from 40 to 140 mTorr and that of O{sub 2} from 40 to 80 mTorr. The resistivity was reduced by Ga doping from 7.24 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm for undoped ZnO to 2.05 × 10{sup −3} Ω cm for Ga doped ZnO at the TMG pressure of 8 mTorr. The change of electric properties of Ga doped ZnO with varying the amount of Ga dopants was systematically discussed based on the structural crystallinity and chemical bonding configuration, analyzed by XRD and XPS, respectively.

  7. Experimental study of a laboratory concrete material representative of containment buildings: desorption isotherms and permeability determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semete, P.; Fevrier, B.; Delorme, J.; Sanahuja, J.; Desgree, P.; Le Pape, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The isotherm sorption curve is a first order parameter for the calculations of concrete drying and/or creep using Finite Element Analysis. An experimental campaign was undertaken by EDF MMC in order to characterize the first desorption isotherm at room temperature of a laboratory material representative of concrete containment buildings. Long term drying tests were carried out on cement paste and on three samples geometries on concrete (with radial and axial one-dimensional drying on thin disks and multi-dimensional drying on Representative Elementary Volumes). The measurements results (porosity, densities and mass loss curves) are provided and the isotherms obtained for the four different configurations are compared. Several analyses of the results are proposed including the assessment of a criterion for the determination of the moisture content final balance (estimation of the asymptotic mass loss) and the back-analysis of equivalent permeability. (authors)

  8. Bonding capacity of the GFRP-S on strengthened RC beams after sea water immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Mufti Amir; Djamaluddin, Rudy

    2017-11-01

    Construction of concrete structures that located in extreme environments are such as coastal areas will result in decreased strength or even the damage of the structures. As well know, chloride contained in sea water is responsible for strength reduction or structure fail were hence maintenance and repairs on concrete structure urgently needed. One popular method of structural improvements which under investigation is to use the material Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer which has one of the advantages such as corrosion resistance. This research will be conducted experimental studies to investigate the bonding capacity behavior of reinforced concrete beams with reinforcement GFRP-S immersed in sea water using immersion time of one month, three months, six months and twelve months. Test specimen consists of 12 pieces of reinforced concrete beams with dimensions (150x200x3000) mm that had been reinforced with GFRP-S in the area of bending, the beam without immersion (B0), immersion one month (B1), three months (B3), six months (B6) and twelve months (B12). Test specimen were cured for 28 days before the application of the GFRP sheet. Test specimen B1, B3, B6 and B12 that have been immersed in sea water pool with a immersion time each 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. The test specimen without immersion test by providing a static load until it reaches the failure, to record data during the test strain gauge mounted on the surface of the specimen and the GFRP to collect the strain value. From the research it obvious that there is a decrease bonding capacity on specimens immersed for one month, three months, six months and twelve months against the test object without immersion of 8.85%; 8.89%; 9.33% and 11.04%.

  9. Use of fiber reinforced concrete for concrete pavement slab replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Unlike ordinary concrete pavement, replacement concrete slabs need to be open to traffic within 24 hours (sooner in : some cases). Thus, high early-strength concrete is used; however, it frequently cracks prematurely as a result of high : heat of hyd...

  10. Generalised fracture mechanics approach to the interfacial failure analysis of a bonded steel-concrete joint

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    De Corte, W.; Helincks, P.; Boel, V.; Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; De Schutter, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 42 (2017), s. 147-160 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18702S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Epoxy adhesive * Fracture mechanics * Interfacial properties * Numerical study * Push-out test * Steel-concrete joint Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  11. The evolution of concrete shells; innovations by Ildefonso Sánchez del Río

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassinello, P.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The legacy of Ildefonso Sánchez del Río Pisón (1898-1980 contains some of the most pioneer Spanish concrete shells. It’s a fact that the “Modern Architecture‘ s Thin Shells Adventure” had just start when he designed and built his first work in Spain (1924. In the international context prevailing in the twenties, the reinforced concrete was still evolving. The first Thin Concrete Shells was built by Dyckerhoff and Widman in Jena, Germany (1922-1925. Ildefonso Sánchez was looking for a system to design concrete shells in a simple way. Finally, he founded his own and innovate system based in a similar method to the ribbed Gothic Vault. He used his system to built a very different ribbed concrete shell, such as the Sport Hall of Oviedo, Spain (90 m span. This article contains some results about the research on Sánchez del Río´s work and its repercussion on the international context.El legado de Ildefonso Sánchez del Río Pisón (1898-1980 contiene algunas de las más pioneras estructuras laminares españolas. Es un hecho que la “Aventura Laminar de la Arquitectura Moderna” empezó cuando él proyectó y construyó sus primeros trabajos en España (1924. En el contexto internacional de la década de los años veinte, el hormigón armado estaba todavía en desarrollo. La primera estructura laminar fue construida por Dyckerhoff and Widman en Jena. Alemania (1922-1925. Ildefonso Sánchez buscó un método sencillo de diseño. Finalmente, encontró su propio e innovador sistema, que estaba basado en un método similar al de las bóvedas nervadas del Gótico. Usó este sistema para construir diferentes estructuras laminares, como el Palacio de Deportes de Oviedo, España (90 m luz. Este artículo contiene algunos de los resultados de la investigación que he realizado sobre el trabajo de Sánchez del Río y su repercusión en el contexto internacional.

  12. DETERMINING PULL – OUT DEFORMATIONS OF BONDED METAL ANCHORS EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE BY MEANS OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O. Avsar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemical anchorages are applied in many engineering implementations, particularly strengthening of reinforced concrete structures. During strengthening procedure; chemical anchorages should be tested, since they supply to transfer the load between existing construction elements and newly added elements. Therefore; the study of the quality of chemical anchorages is an important issue in construction materials science. In this context; the most important experiment is to determine the pull-out loads of embedded anchorage reinforcement by applying axial loads. In this study; it is aimed to determine the displacements of steel reinforcements, embedded into concrete by using chemical anchorages, while applying axial pulling loads. In order to determine the displacements and load – deformation graphs; starting conditions and every 10 bar pressure applied conditions of the steel reinforcements were captured by the cameras. The obtained images were evaluated by using photogrammetric software. Based on the photogrammetric post-processing results, the load – deformation graphs were plotted and the loads at loss of adhesion were determined.

  13. A multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete : with application to concrete mass products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hüsken, G.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis provides a multifunctional design approach for sustainable concrete, particularly earth-moist concrete (EMC), with application to concrete mass products. EMC is a concrete with low water content and stiff consistency that is used for the production of concrete mass products, such as

  14. Microstructure of Concrete with Aggregates from Construction and Demolition Waste Recycling Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Miguel; Santos Silva, António; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luís

    2016-02-01

    This paper intends to analyze the microstructure of concrete with recycled aggregates (RA) from construction and demolition waste from various Portuguese recycling plants. To that effect, several scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were performed. Various concrete mixes were evaluated in order to analyze the influence of the RA's collection point and consequently of their composition on the mixes' characteristics. Afterward all the mixes were subjected to the capillary water absorption test in order to quantitatively evaluate their porosity. Results from the SEM/EDS analysis were compared with those from capillary water absorption test. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that the bond capacity of aggregates to the new cement paste is greatly influenced by the RA's nature. On the other hand, there was an increase in porosity with the incorporation of RA.

  15. Cracking and debonding of a thin fiber reinforced concrete overlay : research brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Experimental tests found that the tensile interfacial energy : increased with fiber-reinforcement. Also bond tests indicated : that interfacial fracture occurred through the overlay mixture and : was proportional to the number of fibers which interse...

  16. Finite Element Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beam-Column Connections with Governing Joint Shear Failure Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Najafgholipour

    Full Text Available Abstract Reinforced concrete (RC beam-column connections especially those without transverse reinforcement in joint region can exhibit brittle behavior when intensive damage is concentrated in the joint region during an earthquake event. Brittle behavior in the joint region can compromise the ductile design philosophy and the expected overall performance of structure when subjected to seismic loading. Considering the importance of joint shear failure influences on strength, ductility and stability of RC moment resisting frames, a finite element modeling which focuses on joint shear behavior is presented in this article. Nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA of RC beam-column connections is performed in order to investigate the joint shear failure mode in terms of joint shear capacity, deformations and cracking pattern. A 3D finite element model capable of appropriately modeling the concrete stress-strain behavior, tensile cracking and compressive damage of concrete and indirect modeling of steel-concrete bond is used. In order to define nonlinear behavior of concrete material, the concrete damage plasticity is applied to the numerical model as a distributed plasticity over the whole geometry. Finite element model is then verified against experimental results of two non-ductile beam-column connections (one exterior and one interior which are vulnerable to joint shear failure. The comparison between experimental and numerical results indicates that the FE model is able to simulate the performance of the beam-column connections and is able to capture the joint shear failure in RC beam-column connections.

  17. The influence of recycled concrete aggregates in pervious concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. TAVARES

    Full Text Available The expansion of urban areas under constant changes in the hydrological cycle directly affects the drainage of rainwater. The problems of urban drainage become major engineering problems to be solved in order to avoid negative consequences for local populations. Another urban problem is the excessive production of construction and demolition waste (CDW, in which , even with a increasingly policy of waste management , have been an end up being thrown in inappropriate disposal sites. Alternatively aiming to a minimization of the problems presented, we propose the study of permeable concrete using recycled concrete aggregate. In this study, there were evaluated the performance of concrete by means of permeability, consistency, strength, and interface conditions of the materials . Satisfactory relationships of resistance/permeability of concrete with recycled aggregate in relation to the concrete with natural aggregates was obtained, showing their best potential.

  18. Molecular Engineering for Enhanced Charge Transfer in Thin-Film Photoanode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Soo; Kim, Byung-Man; Kim, Un-Young; Shin, HyeonOh; Nam, Jung Seung; Roh, Deok-Ho; Park, Jun-Hyeok; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk

    2017-10-11

    We developed three types of dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophene (DTT)-based organic sensitizers for high-performance thin photoactive TiO 2 films and investigated the simple but powerful molecular engineering of different types of bonding between the triarylamine electron donor and the conjugated DTT π-bridge by the introduction of single, double, and triple bonds. As a result, with only 1.3 μm transparent and 2.5-μm TiO 2 scattering layers, the triple-bond sensitizer (T-DAHTDTT) shows the highest power conversion efficiency (η = 8.4%; V OC = 0.73 V, J SC = 15.4 mA·cm -2 , and FF = 0.75) in an iodine electrolyte system under one solar illumination (AM 1.5, 1000 W·m -2 ), followed by the single-bond sensitizer (S-DAHTDTT) (η = 7.6%) and the double-bond sensitizer (D-DAHTDTT) (η = 6.4%). We suggest that the superior performance of T-DAHTDTT comes from enhanced intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) induced by the triple bond. Consequently, T-DAHTDTT exhibits the most active photoelectron injection and charge transport on a TiO 2 film during operation, which leads to the highest photocurrent density among the systems studied. We analyzed these correlations mainly in terms of charge injection efficiency, level of photocharge storage, and charge-transport kinetics. This study suggests that the molecular engineering of a triple bond between the electron donor and the π-bridge of a sensitizer increases the performance of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) with a thin photoactive film by enhancing not only J SC through improved ICT but also V OC through the evenly distributed sensitizer surface coverage.

  19. Utilisation of steel furnace slag coarse aggregate in a low calcium fly ash geopolymer concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.H.; Castel, Arnaud; Akbarnezhad, A.; Foster, Stephen J.; Smith, Marc

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates the performance of steel furnace slag (SFS) coarse aggregate in blended slag and low calcium fly ash geopolymer concrete (GPC). The geopolymer binder is composed of 90% of low calcium fly ash and 10% of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). Mechanical and physical properties, shrinkage, and detailed microstructure analysis were carried out. The results showed that geopolymer concrete with SFS aggregate offered higher compressive strength, surface resistivity and pulse velocity than that of GPC with traditional aggregate. The shrinkage results showed no expansion or swelling due to delayed calcium oxide (CaO) hydration after 320 days. No traditional porous interfacial transition zone (ITZ) was detected using scanning electron microscopy, indicating a better bond between SFS aggregate and geopolymer matrix. Energy dispersive spectroscopy results further revealed calcium (Ca) diffusion at the vicinity of ITZ. Raman spectroscopy results showed no new crystalline phase formed due to Ca diffusion. X-ray fluorescence result showed Mg diffusion from SFS aggregate towards geopolymer matrix. The incorporation of Ca and Mg into the geopolymer structure and better bond between SFS aggregate and geopolymer matrix are the most likely reasons for the higher compressive strength observed in GPC with SFS aggregate.

  20. Finite element elasto-plastic analysis of thin walled structures of reinforced concrete as applied to reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, F.; Tsuboi, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The authors developed a new program of elasto-plastic analysis of reinforced concrete shells, in which the simplest model of shell element and an orthotropic constitutive relation are adopted, and verified its validity with reference to the results of model experiments of containers and box-wall structures with various loading conditions. For the two-dimensional stress-strain relationship of concrete, an orthotropic nonlinear formula proposed by one of the authors was adopted. For concrete, the octahedral shear failure and tension cut-off criteria were also imposed. The Kirchhoff-Love's assumptions were assumed to be valid for the whole range of the analysis and the layered approach of elasto-plastic stiffness evaluation. Derivation of the shell element is outlined with examination of its accuracy in elastic range and the assumption of elasto-plastic material property and the procedure of nonlinear analysis are described. As examples, the method is applied to the analysis of a cylindrical container and a box-wall structure. Comparison of the computed results with the corresponding experimental data indicates the applicability of the proposed method. (orig./HP)

  1. Influence of Concrete Properties on Molten Core-Concrete Interaction: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-yang Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a severe nuclear power plant accident, the molten core can be released into the reactor pit and interact with sacrificial concrete. In this paper, a simulation study is presented that aims to address the influence of sacrificial concrete properties on molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI. In particular, based on the MELCOR Code, the ferrosiliceous concrete used in European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR is taken into account with respect to the different ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. Results indicate that the concrete ablation rate as well as the hydrogen generation rate depends much on the concrete ablation enthalpy and Fe2O3 and H2O contents. In practice, the ablation enthalpy of sacrificial concrete is the higher the better, while the Fe2O3 and H2O content of sacrificial concrete is the lower the better.

  2. Environmental Durability of Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders Strengthened for Shear with Surface-Bonded Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    "This research investigated the durability of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) used for shear strengthening reinforced concrete deck girders. Large beams were used to avoid accounting for size effects in the data analysis. The effort...

  3. Revealing the relationships between chemistry, topology and stiffness of ultrastrong Co-based metallic glass thin films: A combinatorial approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnabel, Volker; Köhler, Mathias; Evertz, Simon; Gamcova, Jana; Bednarcik, Jozef; Music, Denis; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2016-01-01

    An efficient way to study the relationship between chemical composition and mechanical properties of thin films is to utilize the combinatorial approach, where spatially resolved mechanical property measurements are conducted along a concentration gradient. However, for thin film glasses many properties including the mechanical response are affected by chemical topology. Here a novel method is introduced which enables spatially resolved short range order analysis along concentration gradients of combinatorially synthesized metallic glass thin films. For this purpose a CoZrTaB metallic glass film of 3 μm thickness is deposited on a polyimide foil, which is investigated by high energy X-ray diffraction in transmission mode. Through the correlative chemistry-topology-stiffness investigation, we observe that an increase in metalloid concentration from 26.4 to 32.7 at% and the associated formation of localized (hybridized) metal – metalloid bonds induce a 10% increase in stiffness. Concomitantly, along the same composition gradient, a metalloid-concentration-induced increase in first order metal - metal bond distances of 1% is observed, which infers itinerant (metallic) bond weakening. Hence, the metalloid concentration induced increase in hybridized bonding dominates the corresponding weakening of metallic bonds.

  4. Prediction of punching shear capacities of two-way concrete slabs reinforced with FRP bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M. Metwally

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Where corrosion of steel reinforcement is a concern, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP reinforcing bar or grid reinforcement provides an alternative reinforcement for concrete flat slabs. The existing provisions for punching of slabs in most international design standards for reinforced concrete are based on tests of steel reinforced slabs. The elastic stiffness and bonding characteristics of FRP reinforcement are sufficiently different from those of steel to affect punching strength [1]. This paper evaluates the punching shear strength of concrete flat slabs reinforced with different types of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP. A total of 59 full-size slabs were constructed and tested collected from the literature of FRP bars reinforced concrete slabs. The test parameters were the amount of FRP reinforcing bars, Young’s modulus of FRP bars, slab thickness, loaded areas and concrete compressive strength. The experimental punching shear strengths were compared with the available theoretical predictions, including the ACI 318 Code, BS 8110 Code, ACI 440 design guidelines, and a number of models proposed by some researchers in the literature. Two approaches for predicting the punching strength of FRP-reinforced slabs are examined. The first is an empirical new model which is considered as a modification of El-Gamal et al. [2] model. The second is a Neural Networks Technique; which has been developed to predict the punching shear capacity of FRP reinforced concrete slabs. The accuracies of both methods were evaluated against the experimental test data. They attained excellent agreement with available test results compared to the existing design formulas.

  5. Review of concrete properties for prestressed concrete pressure vesssels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.

    1976-10-01

    The desire for increasing power output along with safety requirements has resulted in consideration of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel (PCPV) for most current nuclear reactor systems, as well as for the very-high-temperature reactor for process heat and as primary pressure vessels for coal conversion systems. Results are presented of a literature review to ascertain current knowledge regarding plain concrete properties under conditions imposed by a mass concrete structure such as PCRV. The effects of high temperature on such properties as strength, elasticity, and creep are discussed, as well as changes in thermal properties, multiaxial behavior, and the mechanisms thought to be responsible for the observed behavior. In addition, the effects of radiation and moisture migration are discussed. It is concluded that testing results found in the technical literature show much disagreement as to the effects of temperature on concrete properties. The variations in concrete mixtures, curing and testing procedures, age at loading, and moisture conditions during exposure and testing are some of the reasons for such disagreement. Test results must be limited, in most cases, to the materials and conditions of a given test rather than applied to such a general class of materials such as concrete. It is also concluded that sustained exposure of normal concretes to current PCRV operating conditions will not result in any significant loss of properties. However, lack of knowledge regarding effects of temperatures exceeding 100 0 C (212 0 F), moisture migration, and multiaxial behavior precludes a statement advocating operation beyond current design limits. The report includes recommendations for future research on concrete for PCPVs

  6. TEM characterization of nanodiamond thin films.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, L.-C.; Zhou, D.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    The microstructure of thin films grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) from fullerene C{sub 60} precursors has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), bright-field electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM), and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS). The films are composed of nanosize crystallites of diamond, and no graphitic or amorphous phases were observed. The diamond crystallite size measured from lattice images shows that most grains range between 3-5 nm, reflecting a gamma distribution. SAED gave no evidence of either sp2-bonded glassy carbon or sp3-bonded diamondlike amorphous carbon. The sp2-bonded configuration found in PEELS was attributed to grain boundary carbon atoms, which constitute 5-10% of the total. Occasionally observed larger diamond grains tend to be highly faulted.

  7. The microstructure of petroleum vacuum residue films for bituminous concrete: a microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourty, E D; Tamminga, A Y; Michels, M A J; Vellinga, W-P; Meijer, H E H

    2011-02-01

    Selected carbon-rich refinery residues ('binders') mixed with mineral particles can form composite materials ('bituminous concrete') with bulk mechanical properties comparable to those of cement concrete. The microstructural mechanism underlying the remarkable composite properties has been related to the appearance of a rigid percolating network consisting of asphaltenes and mineral particles [Wilbrink M. et al. (2005) Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured visco-elastic matrix. Phys. Rev. E71, 031402]. In this paper, we explore the microstructure of thin binder films of varying thickness with a number of microscopic characterization techniques, and attempt to relate the observed microstructure to the distinctive mechanical behaviour. Two binders, only one of which has been proven to be suitable for bituminous concrete were investigated, and their microstructure compared. Both binders show the formation of asphaltene aggregates. The binder suitable for bituminous concrete is distinguished by the fact that the asphaltenes show a stronger tendency towards such aggregation, due to a higher concentration and less stabilization in the maltene phase. They also show a clear affinity to other species (such as waxes) and may act as nucleation sites for crystals and aggregates of those species. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Parametric analysis of AAR influent factors on thin-walled columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Madureira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chemical reaction involving the alkalis of the cement and some minerals of the concrete aggregates, the Alkali-Aggregate Reaction or, simply, the AAR, promotes swelling and material damages. Despite the development stage of the researches on this pathology effects, its solution modeling still lacks refinement. The numerical simulation is an important resource for the structural damages evaluation due to AAR, and their repairs. The aim of this work is the numerical simulation of concrete thin-walled columns, affected by the AAR, from the finite element approximation on an orthotropic nonlinear framework, and a thermodynamic model designed to the assessment of the AAR swelling, with highlight on the compressive stress, the reinforcement and the temperature influences on the phenomenon. The obtained results revealed that the AAR induced the concrete strength decrease and the consequent reduction in preventive safety margin to the material failure, being more precocious at higher temperatures.

  9. Electrical impedance tomography-based sensing skin for quantitative imaging of damage in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaji, Milad; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad; Seppänen, Aku

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a large-area sensing skin for damage detection in concrete structures. The developed sensing skin consists of a thin layer of electrically conductive copper paint that is applied to the surface of the concrete. Cracking of the concrete substrate results in the rupture of the sensing skin, decreasing its electrical conductivity locally. The decrease in conductivity is detected with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging. In previous works, electrically based sensing skins have provided only qualitative information on the damage on the substrate surface. In this paper, we study whether quantitative imaging of the damage is possible. We utilize application-specific models and computational methods in the image reconstruction, including a total variation (TV) prior model for the damage and an approximate correction of the modeling errors caused by the inhomogeneity of the painted sensing skin. The developed damage detection method is tested experimentally by applying the sensing skin to polymeric substrates and a reinforced concrete beam under four-point bending. In all test cases, the EIT-based sensing skin provides quantitative information on cracks and/or other damages on the substrate surface: featuring a very low conductivity in the damage locations, and a reliable indication of the lengths and shapes of the cracks. The results strongly support the applicability of the painted EIT-based sensing skin for damage detection in reinforced concrete elements and other substrates. (paper)

  10. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-02-25

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures.

  11. Reinforced sulphur concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Reinforced sulphur concrete wherein one or more metal reinforcing members are in contact with sulphur concrete is disclosed. The reinforced sulphur concrete comprises an adhesion promoter that enhances the interaction between the sulphur and the one or more metal reinforcing members.

  12. Room temperature direct bonding of LiNbO3 crystal layers and its application to high-voltage optical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulli, D; Janner, D; Pruneri, V

    2011-01-01

    LiNbO 3 is a crystal widely used in photonics and acoustics, for example in electro-optic modulation, nonlinear optical frequency conversion, electric field sensing and surface acoustic wave filtering. It often needs to be combined with other materials and used in thin layers to achieve the adequate device performance. In this paper, we investigate direct bonding of LiNbO 3 crystals with other dielectric materials, such as Si and fused silica (SiO 2 ), and we show that specific surface chemical cleaning, together with Ar or O 2 plasma activation, can be used to increase the surface free energy and achieve effective bonding at room temperature. The resulting hybrid material bonding is very strong, making the dicing and grinding of LiNbO 3 layers as thin as 15 µm possible. To demonstrate the application potentials of the proposed bonding technique, we have fabricated and characterized a high-voltage field sensor with high sensitivity in a domain inverted and bonded LiNbO 3 waveguide substrate

  13. Experimental analysis of two-layered dissimilar metals by roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanghui; Li, Yugui; Li, Juan; Huang, Qingxue; Ma, Lifeng

    2018-02-01

    Rolling reduction and base layers thickness have important implications for rolling compounding. A two-layered 304 stainless steel/Q345R low alloyed steel was roll bonded. The roll bonding was performed at the three thickness reductions of 25%, 40% and 55% with base layers of various thicknesses (Q345R). The microstructures of the composite were investigated by the ultra-deep microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Simultaneously, the mechanical properties of the composite were experimentally measured and the tensile fracture surfaces were observed by SEM. The interfaces were successfully bonded without any cracking or voids, which indicated a good fabrication of the 304/Q345R composite. The rolling reduction rate and thinning increase of the substrate contributed to the bonding effects appearance of the roll bonded sheet. The Cr and Ni enriched diffusion layer was formed by the interface elements diffusion. The Cr and Ni diffusion led to the formation of ˜10 μm wide Cr and Ni layers on the carbon steel side.

  14. Properties of laser-crystallized polycrystalline SiGe thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weizman, Moshe

    2008-06-06

    In this thesis, structural, electrical, and optical properties of laser-crystallized polycrystalline Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} thin films with 0thin films with 0.3thin films with 0bond concentration of about N{sub s}=4 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, which is roughly independent of the crystallization method and Ge content. The defect density for solid-phase crystallized SiGe films was lower and amounted to N{sub s}=7 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. - Germanium-rich laser-crystallized poly-SiGe thin films exhibited mostly a broad atypical electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) signal that was accompanied by a nearly temperature-independent electrical conductivity in the range 20-100 K. - Most likely, the origin of the grain boundary conductance is due to dangling-bond defects and not impurities. Metallic-like conductance occurs when the dangling-bond defect density is above a critical value of about N{sub C} {approx} 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. - Laser crystallized poly-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} thin films with x{>=}0.5 exhibit optical absorption behavior that is characteristic for disordered SiGe, implying that the absorption occurs primarily at the grain boundaries. A sub-band-gap absorption peak was found for

  15. Modeling of thin films growth processes in the early stage for atoms with covalent bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tupik, V A; Margolin, V I; Su, Chu Trong

    2017-01-01

    Computer simulation for obtaining thin film’s growth process at an early stage with the proposed model of atoms with isotropic and anisotropic interactions been considered. Carrying out the procedure for analyzing the problem on the basis of the program being implemented, computer simulation of thin film growth processes has been carried out on several examples. The results of computer simulation of the growth process of thin film on a given substrate and an aggregate in a vacuum condition are shown. Some characteristic distributions of the obtained structure have been carried out to evaluate the proposed adequate model and to reflect the high complexity of thin films growth process. (paper)

  16. Study of first electronic transition and hydrogen bonding state of ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness on an α-alumina surface by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeyoshi; Kinugasa, Tomoya

    2018-05-01

    The first electronic transition (A˜ ← X˜) and the hydrogen bonding state of an ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness between two α-alumina surfaces (0.5-20 nm) were studied using far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectroscopy in the wavelength range 140-180 nm. The ultra-thin water layer of nanometer thickness was prepared by squeezing a water droplet ( 1 μL) between a highly polished α-alumina prism and an α-alumina plate using a high pressure clamp ( 4.7 MPa), and the FUV spectra of the water layer at different thicknesses were measured using the attenuated total reflection method. As the water layer became thinner, the A˜ ← X˜ bands were gradually shifted to higher or lower energy relative to that of bulk water; at thicknesses smaller than 4 nm, these shifts were substantial (0.1-0.2 eV) in either case. The FUV spectra of the water layer with thickness lost at thicknesses below 4 nm, because of steric hydration forces between the α-alumina surfaces.

  17. Experimental investigation of the influence of the bond conditions on the shear bond strength between steel and self- compacting concrete using push-out tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Helincks, P.; De Corte, W.; Klusák, Jan; Boel, V.; De Schutter, D.

    525-526, č. 1 (2013), s. 205-208 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fracture and Damage Mechanics /11./. Xi'an, 18.09.2012-21.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/1551 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : steel-concrete joint * epoxy adhesive layer * push-out test Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  18. Detecting properties of thin film superconducting bridges made of YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulikov, V.A.; Matveets, L.V.; Serebryakov, A.Yu.; Laptev, V.N.; Makhov, V.I.; Emel'yanenkov, D.G.; Inkin, Yu.N.

    1989-01-01

    Results of study of detecting properties of thin film YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x bridges, subjected to the effect of 8 mm SHF-radiation are presented. The transition temperatures of bridges were equal to 80-85 K. Current-voltage characteristics and response dependences of bridges with 67, 150 and 425 Ω resistances were measured. It is shown that thin film bridges of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x , representing the system of weak bonds, demonstrate nonstationary Josephson effect and synchronization of weak bonds in bridge volume

  19. The use of a concrete additive to eliminate returned concrete waste volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bester Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of the use of a recently developed two-component powdered product made from polymers and inorganic compounds that can be mechanically mixed into returned fresh ready-mix concrete to allow for the separation of the concrete into fine and coarse aggregates. This allows for the re-use of the returned concrete as aggregates in the manufacturing of new concrete. The returned concrete waste can therefore be eliminated, thus reducing virgin aggregate usage, as well as reducing the environmental impact of returned concrete. In this study, the treated recycled fresh concrete was separated into fine and coarse aggregates, and then used at replacement levels of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The effect of the product on the material classification, and on important fresh and hardened properties of the concrete for the above-mentioned replacement values was tested. For the fine aggregate, the results indicate minimal changes in both the fresh and hardened properties. For the coarse aggregate, the results show a marked improvement of flexural strength with an increase in replacement value when coarse aggregates are used. Very high replacement levels may be used with very little effect on the quality of the new concrete.

  20. Seismic performance of interior precast concrete beam-column connections with T-section steel inserts under cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketiyot, Rattapon; Hansapinyo, Chayanon

    2018-04-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study the performance of precast beam-column concrete connections using T-section steel inserts into the concrete beam and joint core, under reversed cyclic loading. Six 2/3-scale interior beam-column subassemblies, one monolithic concrete specimen and five precast concrete specimens were tested. One precast specimen was a simple connection for a gravity load resistant design. Other precast specimens were developed with different attributes to improve their seismic performance. The test results showed that the performance of the monolithic specimen M1 represented ductile seismic behavior. Failure of columns and joints could be prevented, and the failure of the frame occurred at the flexural plastic hinge formation at the beam ends, close to the column faces. For the precast specimens, the splitting crack along the longitudinal lapped splice was a major failure. The precast P5 specimen with double steel T-section inserts showed better seismic performance compared to the other precast models. However, the dowel bars connected to the steel inserts were too short to develop a bond. The design of the precast concrete beams with lap splice is needed for longer lap lengths and should be done at the beam mid span or at the low flexural stress region.

  1. The corrosion pattern of reinforcement and its influence on serviceability of reinforced concrete members in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruijin; Castel, Arnaud; Francois, Raoul

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with two corroded reinforcement concrete beams, which have been stored under sustained load in a chloride environment for 14 and 23 years respectively. The evolution of corrosion pattern of reinforcement and its influence on serviceability are studied. In chloride-induced corrosion process, corrosion cracking affects significantly the corrosion pattern. During the corrosion cracking initiation period, only local pitting corrosion occurs. At early stage of cracking propagation, localized pitting corrosion is still predominant as cracks widths are very small and cracks are not interconnected, but a general corrosion slowly develops as the cracks widen. At late cracking stage, interconnected cracking with wide width develops along large parts of the beam leading to a general corrosion pattern. Macrocells and microcells concepts are used for the interpretation of the results. Mechanical experiments and corrosion simulation tests are performed to clarify the influence of this corrosion pattern evolution on the serviceability of the beams (deflection increase). Experimental results show that, when the corrosion is localized (early cracking stage), the steel-concrete bond loss is the main factor affecting the beams serviceability. The local cross-section loss resulting from pitting attack does not significantly influence the deflection of the beam. When corrosion is generalized (late cracking stage), as the steel-concrete bond is already lost, the generalized steel cross-section reduction becomes the main factor affecting the beams serviceability. But, at this stage, the deflection increase is slower due to the low general corrosion rate.

  2. Concrete Fibrations

    OpenAIRE

    Pagnan, Ruggero

    2017-01-01

    As far as we know, no notion of concrete fibration is available. We provide one such notion in adherence to the foundational attitude that characterizes the adoption of the fibrational perspective in approaching fundamental subjects in category theory and discuss it in connection with the notion of concrete category and the notions of locally small and small fibrations. We also discuss the appropriateness of our notion of concrete fibration for fibrations of small maps, which is relevant to a...

  3. Investigation of durability of silica fume concretes in coastal structures within tidal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganjian, E.; Sadeghi Pouya, H.

    2003-01-01

    In recent decade use of silica fume has been become greater in coastal concrete structures in the persona gulf, to increase durability of those establishments. In this research the durability of cement passers and concrete cubes with use of 7 and 10 percent of silica fume as a cement replacement have been investigated in three curing conditions (fresh water, coast of sea and simulation bonds) by measuring compressive strengths and capillary absorption. Silica fume specimens under wetting and drying condition showed more strength loss after 180 days compare to samples without silica fume or cured in the fresh water. In addition the greater silica fume amount in specimens cured within tidal zone and under wetting and drying simulation, the more water absorption by capillary. According to the results, good correspondence between simulated condition and real site exposure was obtained

  4. Maintenance and preservation of concrete structures. Report 3: Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T. C.

    1980-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory test program on abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete, including the development of a new underwater abrasion-erosion test method. This program was designed to evaluate the relative abrasion-erosion resistance of various materials considered for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures. The test program encompassed three concrete types (conventional concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete, and polymer concrete); seven aggregate types (limestone, chert, trap rock, quartzite, granite, siliceous gravel, and slag); three principal water-cement rations (0.72, 0.54, and 0.40); and six types of surface treatment (vacuum, polyurethane coating, acrylic mortar coating, epoxy mortar coating, furan resin mortar coating, and iron aggregate topping). A total of 114 specimens made from 41 batches of concrete was tested. Based on the test data obtained, a comprehensive evaluation of the effects of various parameters on the abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete was presented. Materials suitable for use in the repair of erosion-damaged concrete structures were recommended. Additional work to correlate the reported findings with field performance was formulated.

  5. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  6. An embedded stress sensor for concrete SHM based on amorphous ferromagnetic microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Jesús; González, Margarita; Fuente, José Vicente; Varga, Rastislav; Zhukov, Arkady; Anaya, José Javier

    2014-10-24

    A new smart concrete aggregate design as a candidate for applications in structural health monitoring (SHM) of critical elements in civil infrastructure is proposed. The cement-based stress/strain sensor was developed by utilizing the stress/strain sensing properties of a magnetic microwire embedded in cement-based composite (MMCC). This is a contact-less type sensor that measures variations of magnetic properties resulting from stress variations. Sensors made of these materials can be designed to satisfy the specific demand for an economic way to monitor concrete infrastructure health. For this purpose, we embedded a thin magnetic microwire in the core of a cement-based cylinder, which was inserted into the concrete specimen under study as an extra aggregate. The experimental results show that the embedded MMCC sensor is capable of measuring internal compressive stress around the range of 1-30 MPa. Two stress sensing properties of the embedded sensor under uniaxial compression were studied: the peak amplitude and peak position of magnetic switching field. The sensitivity values for the amplitude and position within the measured range were 5 mV/MPa and 2.5 µs/MPa, respectively.

  7. An Embedded Stress Sensor for Concrete SHM Based on Amorphous Ferromagnetic Microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Olivera

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A new smart concrete aggregate design as a candidate for applications in structural health monitoring (SHM of critical elements in civil infrastructure is proposed. The cement-based stress/strain sensor was developed by utilizing the stress/strain sensing properties of a magnetic microwire embedded in cement-based composite (MMCC. This is a contact-less type sensor that measures variations of magnetic properties resulting from stress variations. Sensors made of these materials can be designed to satisfy the specific demand for an economic way to monitor concrete infrastructure health. For this purpose, we embedded a thin magnetic microwire in the core of a cement-based cylinder, which was inserted into the concrete specimen under study as an extra aggregate. The experimental results show that the embedded MMCC sensor is capable of measuring internal compressive stress around the range of 1–30 MPa. Two stress sensing properties of the embedded sensor under uniaxial compression were studied: the peak amplitude and peak position of magnetic switching field. The sensitivity values for the amplitude and position within the measured range were 5 mV/MPa and 2.5 µs/MPa, respectively.

  8. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  9. Scalable bonding of nanofibrous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes on microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Mehdi; Fazeli, Abdolreza; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2018-01-01

    Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) nanofibrous membranes exhibit high porosity (80%-90%), high gas permeability, chemical inertness, and superhydrophobicity, which makes them a suitable choice in many demanding fields including industrial filtration, medical implants, bio-/nano- sensors/actuators and microanalysis (i.e. lab-on-a-chip). However, one of the major challenges that inhibit implementation of such membranes is their inability to bond to other materials due to their intrinsic low surface energy and chemical inertness. Prior attempts to improve adhesion of ePTFE membranes to other surfaces involved surface chemical treatments which have not been successful due to degradation of the mechanical integrity and the breakthrough pressure of the membrane. Here, we report a simple and scalable method of bonding ePTFE membranes to different surfaces via the introduction of an intermediate adhesive layer. While a variety of adhesives can be used with this technique, the highest bonding performance is obtained for adhesives that have moderate contact angles with the substrate and low contact angles with the membrane. A thin layer of an adhesive can be uniformly applied onto micro-patterned substrates with feature sizes down to 5 µm using a roll-coating process. Membrane-based microchannel and micropillar devices with burst pressures of up to 200 kPa have been successfully fabricated and tested. A thin layer of the membrane remains attached to the substrate after debonding, suggesting that mechanical interlocking through nanofiber engagement is the main mechanism of adhesion.

  10. Concrete quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, N. [Harza Engineering Company, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-08-01

    This short article reports on progress at the world's largest civil construction project, namely China's Three Gorges hydro project. Work goes on around the clock to put in place nearly 28 M m{sup 3} of concrete. At every stage of the work there is strong emphasis on quality assurance (QA) and concrete is no exception. The US company Harza Engineering has been providing QA since the mid-1980s and concrete QA has been based on international standards. Harza personnel work in the field with supervisors developing educational tools for supervising concrete construction and quality, as well as providing training courses in concrete technology. Some details on flood control, capacity, water quality and environmental aspects are given..

  11. Concrete and criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Concrete is a widely used structural material which occurs frequently in systems requiring criticality analyses. Ordinarily, we give little thought to what its actual composition is (as compared to reference compositions), yet in criticality safety, differences in composition can cause large changes in k-effective and it may not be easy to predict in which direction the change will occur. Concrete composition is quite variable with differences in the aggregate used in the concrete in various parts of the country providing relative large differences in k-effective. The water content of concrete can also strongly affect the reactivity of a system in which it acts as a reflector or is interspersed between fissile units. Because concrete is so common and is often (but not always) a better reflector than water, one must know the concrete compositions or be prepared to use a ''worst case'' composition. It may be a problem, however, to determine just what is the worst case. At the Hanford Plant, the aggregate normally used is basalt, which gives a composition very low in carbon as opposed to those areas (e.g., Oak Ridge) where the use of limestone aggregate will result in concrete with a high carbon content. The data presented show some of the effects found in situations using ''Hanford'' concrete, but similar effects might be found with other compositions. In some cases, the use of concrete may be incidental to the effects shown. While the numbers shown are those for actual systems, the primary intent is to alert the reader that these effects can occur. In applying this information, the analyst should use material specific to the systems being analyzed

  12. Biodecontamination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.; Rogers, R.D.; Benson, J.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technology for biologically decontaminating concrete is being jointly developed by scientists at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL). The technology exploits a naturally occurring phenomenon referred to as microbially influenced degradation (MID) in which bacteria produce acids that dissolve the cement matrix of concrete. Most radionuclide contamination of concrete is fixed in the outer few mm of the concrete surface. By capturing and controlling this natural process, a biological method of removing the surface of concrete to depths up to several mm is being developed. Three types of bacteria are known to be important in MID of concrete: nitrifying bacteria that produce nitric acid, sulfur oxidizing bacteria that produce sulfuric acid, and certain heterotrophic bacteria that produce organic acids. An investigation of natural environments demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy the presence of bacteria on concrete surfaces of a variety of structures, such as bridges and dams, where corrosion is evident. Enumeration of sulfur oxidizing and nitrifying bacteria revealed their presence and activity on structures to varying degrees in different environments. Under ideal conditions, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, a sulfur oxidizing bacteria, attached to and colonized the surface of concrete specimens. Over 1mm depth of material from a 10 cm x 10 cm square surface was removed in 68 days in the Thiobacillus treated specimen compared to a sterile control. Laboratory and field demonstrations are currently being conducted using experimental chambers designed to be mounted directly to concrete surfaces where radionuclide contamination exists. Data is being obtained in order to determine actual rates of surface removal and limitations to the system. This information will be used to develop a full scale decontamination technology

  13. Ultra-stiff metallic glasses through bond energy density design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Volker; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Bednarcik, Jozef; Clegg, William J; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2017-07-05

    The elastic properties of crystalline metals scale with their valence electron density. Similar observations have been made for metallic glasses. However, for metallic glasses where covalent bonding predominates, such as metalloid metallic glasses, this relationship appears to break down. At present, the reasons for this are not understood. Using high energy x-ray diffraction analysis of melt spun and thin film metallic glasses combined with density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the physical origin of the ultrahigh stiffness in both metalloid and non-metalloid metallic glasses is best understood in terms of the bond energy density. Using the bond energy density as novel materials design criterion for ultra-stiff metallic glasses, we are able to predict a Co 33.0 Ta 3.5 B 63.5 short range ordered material by density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations with a high bond energy density of 0.94 eV Å -3 and a bulk modulus of 263 GPa, which is 17% greater than the stiffest Co-B based metallic glasses reported in literature.

  14. Concrete and prestressing process, container made with this concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Shape memory alloy fibers or heat shrinking fibers are encapsulated in a standard concrete. Prestressed concrete is obtained by heat treatment. Application is made to the fabrication of radioactive waste containers

  15. Let’s Get Concrete!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Candace; Boxenbaum, Eva

    whereas in the United States market and professional logics interacted: manufacturers cooperated to create standards for concrete and appealed to architects as consumers. Our findings also illuminate that concrete was legitimated initially by imitation of stone, but this strategy soon de......-legitimated not only concrete but also stone. Concrete was perceived as merely imitative and thus inauthentic. For concrete to become a legitimate and widely adopted material, architects had to theorize concrete as unique material with distinctive aesthetic possibilities, which led to new kinds of buildings and new...... architectural styles. Our study illuminates the key role that materials and aesthetics played within architects’ professional logic and shaped processes of institutional change....

  16. Reinforced concrete beams with web openings: A state of the art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.; Fayyadh, M.M.; Naganathan, S.; Nasharuddin, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Present paper highlights the gaps in the work related RC beams with web opening. ► There is limited work on comparing of design approaches of RC beams with opening. ► Strengthening with externally bonded steel or FRP sheets needs to be investigated. ► There is no repair work been done on the RC beams with opening. -- Abstract: The construction of modern buildings requires many pipes and ducts in order to accommodate essential services such as air conditioning, electricity, telephone, and computer network. Web openings in concrete beams enable the installation of these services. A number of studies have been conducted with regards to reinforced concrete beams which contain web openings. The present paper aims to compile this state of the art work on the behaviour, analysis and design of Reinforced Concrete (RC) beams with transverse web openings. A variety of aspects will be highlighted and discussed including the classification of openings, guidelines for opening location, and the structural behaviour of RC beams with web openings. Various design approaches will also be detailed, for example the American Concrete Institute (ACI) approach, the Architectural Institute of Japan (AIJ) approach and the strut and tie method. Moreover, the strengthening of RC beams with openings using Fibre Reinforced Polymer (FRP) material and steel plates is presented. Finally, directions for future research based on the gaps which exist in the present work are presented.

  17. Bonding Properties of Basalt Fiber and Strength Reduction According to Fiber Orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jeong-Il; Lee, Bang

    2015-01-01

    The basalt fiber is a promising reinforcing fiber because it has a relatively higher tensile strength and a density similar to that of a concrete matrix as well as no corrosion possibility. This study investigated experimentally the bonding properties of basalt fiber with cementitious material as well as the effect of fiber orientation on the tensile strength of basalt fiber for evaluating basalt fiber?s suitability as a reinforcing fiber. Single fiber pullout tests were performed and then th...

  18. Ultrafine particles in concrete: Influence of ultrafine particles on concrete properties and application to concrete mix design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Carsten

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the influence of ultrafine particles on concrete properties was investigated. In the context of this work, ultrafine particles (reactive and inert materials) are particles finer than cement. Due to the development of effective superplasticizers, the incorporation of ultrafine particles in concrete is nowadays possible. Different minerals, usually considered inert, were tested. These minerals were also used in combination with reactive silica fume. The modified Andreassen model was used to optimise the particle size distribution and thus the packing density of the complete mix composition. Heat of hydration, compressive strength, shrinkage, frost resistance and the microstructure were investigated.The influence of different ultrafine inert materials on the cement hydration was investigated. The results show that most of the minerals have an accelerating effect. They provide nucleation sites for hydration products and contribute in that way to a faster dissolution of cement grains. Minerals containing calcium were found to influence the early stage of hydration as well. These minerals shortened the dormant period of the cement hydration, the effect is known from limestone filler in self-compacting concrete. In a first test series on concrete, different ultrafine inert particles were used to replace cement. That was done in several ways; with constant water content or constant w/c. The results from this test series show that the best effect is achieved when cement is replaced by suitable ultrafines while the w/c is kept constant. In doing so, the compressive strength can be increased and shrinkage can be reduced. The microstructure is improved and becomes denser with improved packing at microlevel. Efficiency factors (k values) for the ultrafine inert materials were calculated from the compressive strength results. The k values are strongly dependent on the mode of cement replacement, fineness and type of the replacement material and curing time. Drying

  19. Effects of lithium doping on microstructure, electrical properties, and chemical bonds of sol-gel derived NKN thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Cheng [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematic and Physical Sciences, R.O.C. Air Force Academy, Kaohsiung 820, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chan-Ching; Weng, Chung-Ming [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chu, Sheng-Yuan, E-mail: chusy@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hong, Cheng-Shong [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung Normal University, Kaohsiung 802, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Cheng-Che [Department of Digital Game and Animation Design, Tung-Fang Design University, Kaohsiung 829, Taiwan (China)

    2015-02-28

    Highly (100/110) oriented lead-free Li{sub x}(Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}){sub 1−x}NbO{sub 3} (LNKN, x = 0, 0.02, 0.04, and 0.06) thin films are fabricated on Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates via a sol-gel processing method. The lithium (Li) dopants modify the microstructure and chemical bonds of the LNKN films, and therefore improve their electrical properties. The optimal values of the remnant polarization (P{sub r} = 14.3 μC/cm{sup 2}), piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33} = 48.1 pm/V), and leakage current (<10{sup −5} A/cm{sup 2}) are obtained for a lithium addition of x = 0.04 (i.e., 4 at. %). The observation results suggest that the superior electrical properties are the result of an improved crystallization, a larger grain size, and a smoother surface morphology. It is shown that the ion transport mechanism is dominated by an Ohmic behavior under low electric fields and the Poole-Frenkel emission effect under high electric fields.

  20. Effects of replacement of binder content on bond strength of mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. C. Costa

    Full Text Available The reduction of binder content in cementitious systems is an effective way to mitigate environmental impacts without increasing costs. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of content binder on bond strength of mortar-brick interface. For thus, it was studied mortars produced with two limestone fines with different particle size distribution. The limestone fines were added at rates of 0% to 60% at increments of 15% as partial volume replacement of binder. Mortars were prepared in proportion of 1:3 (binder + limestone: sand in volume. The water content was kept constant and equal to 18% in relation to total weight of solids. The mechanical property of mortars was evaluated by tensile strength and the performance of interface by bond strength tests at 14 days. Results indicate that is possible make mortars with 45% less than binder without reducing bond strength. Thus, the use of appropriate particles of limestone can produce more environmentally friendly concrete and rendering mortars by reducing its binder factor without affecting its performance.

  1. Finite Element Model for Nonlinear Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beams and Plane Frames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S.B. STRAMANDINOLI

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, a two-dimensional finite element (FE model for physical and geometric nonlinear analysis of reinforced concrete beams and plane frames, developed by the authors, is presented. The FE model is based on the Euler-Bernoulli Beam Theory, in which shear deformations are neglected. The bar elements have three nodes with a total of seven degrees of freedom. Three Gauss-points are utilized for the element integration, with the element section discretized into layers at each Gauss point (Fiber Model. It is assumed that concrete and reinforcing bars are perfectly bonded, and each section layer is assumed to be under a uniaxial stress-state. Nonlinear constitutive laws are utilized for both concrete and reinforcing steel layers, and a refined tension-stiffening model, developed by the authors, is included. The Total Lagrangean Formulation is adopted for geometric nonlinear consideration and several methods can be utilized to achieve equilibrium convergence of the nonlinear equations. The developed model is implemented into a computer program named ANEST/CA, which is validated by comparison with some tests on RC beams and plane frames, showing an excellent correlation between numerical and experimental results.

  2. CONCRETE MIX DESIGN FOR STRUCTURES SUBJECTED TO EXPOSURE CLASS XC1 DEPENDING ON CONCRETE COVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Yu. Cherniakevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforced steel corrosion which is the most important problem of reinforced concrete structures durability is generally stipulated for carbonization of concrete surrounding it. Concrete cover calculation at the design stage is predicated one because of the differences in manufacturing conditions and use of constructions. The applying of the probabilistic approaches to the carbonation process modeling allows to get predicated grade of the depth of carbonization of concrete and, thus, to settle minimum concrete cover thickness for a given projected service life of a construction. The procedures for concrete mix design for different strength classes of concrete are described in the article. Current recommendations on assignment of concrete strength class as well as concrete cover are presented. The European Standard EN 206:2013 defines the content requirements for the concrete structures operated in the exposure class XC1, including the minimum values of water-cement ratio, minimum cement content, and minimum strength class of concrete. Since the standard does not include any basis or explanations of the requirements, we made an effort to develop a scientific justification for the mentioned requirements. We developed the probabilistic models for the process of carbonation of concrete based on the concrete mix which was designed using the software VTK-Korroziya. The reinforced concrete structures with concrete cover 20–35 mm operated in the most unfavorable conditions within the exposure class XC1 were analyzed. The corresponding probabilistic calculations of the depth of carbonated concrete are described in the article. 

  3. Concrete portable handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Woodson, R Dodge

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not, you are on the job site or back in the office, this book will help you to avoid mistakes, code violations, and wasted time and money. The book's four part treatment begins with constituent materials followed by self contained parts on Concrete Properties, Processes, and Concrete Repair and Rehabilitation. Designed to be an ""all in one"" reference, the author includes a wealth information for the most popular types of testing. This includes: Analysis of Fresh Concrete; Testing Machines; Accelerated Testing Methods; Analysis of Hardened Concrete and Mortar; Core Sampl

  4. Fluorine uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Iwami, Y.; Ebisu, S.; Komatsu, H.; Sakai, T.; Kamiya, T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method (TIARA, Japan), we have studied fluorine (F) distribution in the human tooth under various conditions. Here, we report F uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing low viscous resin (FLVR). Crowns of human teeth were horizontally cut and the dentin of the cut surface was first covered with four kinds of FLVR (FL-Bond, Reactmer Bond, Xeno Bond, and Protect Liner F; thickness, 50-150 μm) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Non-F-releasing and F-releasing filling resins were also hardened, on the cut surfaces of crowns covered with four kinds of FLVR thin layers. The type of the non-F-releasing filling materials used was LITE FIL IIP: G1-A (FL-Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G2-A (Reactmer Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G3-A (Xeno Bond and LITE FIL IIP), and G4-A (Protect Liner F and LITE FIL IIP). The types of F-releasing filling materials used were G1-B (FL-Bond and Beautifil), G2-B (Reactmer Bond and Reactmer Paste), G3-B (Xeno Bond and Xeno CF Paste), and G4-B (Protect Liner F and Teethmate F-1). Treatment and measurements of specimens were the same as previously reported [H. Yamamoto, M. Nomahci, K. Yasuda, Y. Iwami, S. Ebisu, N. Yamamoto, T. Sakai, T. Kamiya, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 210 (2003) 388]. F uptake from specimens following one month of application was estimated from 2-D maps. F penetration was observed in all teeth of G1-A-G4-A groups. The maximum values of F concentration in each tooth and F penetration depth were larger for larger F concentrations in FLVR. FLVR was useful for the F uptake into the tooth, and the F distribution near the thin layer of FLVR depended on the materials used. Between G1-A and G1-B or G4-A and G4-B, the F uptake was significantly different. We were able to obtain fundamental data, which were useful for the analysis of F transportation relating to prevention of caries

  5. Fluorine uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: yhiroko@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nomachi, M. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, Tsuruga, Fukui, 914-0192 (Japan); Iwami, Y. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Ebisu, S. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Komatsu, H. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8585 (Japan); Sakai, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology Center, JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma, 370-1292 (Japan); Kamiya, T. [Advanced Radiation Technology Center, JAERI, Takasaki, Gunma, 370-1292 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    Using the proton induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) method (TIARA, Japan), we have studied fluorine (F) distribution in the human tooth under various conditions. Here, we report F uptake into the human tooth from a thin layer of F-releasing low viscous resin (FLVR). Crowns of human teeth were horizontally cut and the dentin of the cut surface was first covered with four kinds of FLVR (FL-Bond, Reactmer Bond, Xeno Bond, and Protect Liner F; thickness, 50-150 {mu}m) according to the manufacturers' instructions. Non-F-releasing and F-releasing filling resins were also hardened, on the cut surfaces of crowns covered with four kinds of FLVR thin layers. The type of the non-F-releasing filling materials used was LITE FIL IIP: G1-A (FL-Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G2-A (Reactmer Bond and LITE FIL IIP), G3-A (Xeno Bond and LITE FIL IIP), and G4-A (Protect Liner F and LITE FIL IIP). The types of F-releasing filling materials used were G1-B (FL-Bond and Beautifil), G2-B (Reactmer Bond and Reactmer Paste), G3-B (Xeno Bond and Xeno CF Paste), and G4-B (Protect Liner F and Teethmate F-1). Treatment and measurements of specimens were the same as previously reported [H. Yamamoto, M. Nomahci, K. Yasuda, Y. Iwami, S. Ebisu, N. Yamamoto, T. Sakai, T. Kamiya, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 210 (2003) 388]. F uptake from specimens following one month of application was estimated from 2-D maps. F penetration was observed in all teeth of G1-A-G4-A groups. The maximum values of F concentration in each tooth and F penetration depth were larger for larger F concentrations in FLVR. FLVR was useful for the F uptake into the tooth, and the F distribution near the thin layer of FLVR depended on the materials used. Between G1-A and G1-B or G4-A and G4-B, the F uptake was significantly different. We were able to obtain fundamental data, which were useful for the analysis of F transportation relating to prevention of caries.

  6. Autogenous Deformation of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autogenous deformation of concrete can be defined as the free deformation of sealed concrete at a constant temperature. A number of observed problems with early age cracking of high-performance concretes can be attributed to this phenomenon. During the last 10 years , this has led to an increased...... focus on autogenous deformation both within concrete practice and concrete research. Since 1996 the interest has been significant enough to hold international, yearly conferences entirely devoted to this subject. The papers in this publication were presented at two consecutive half-day sessions...... at the American Concrete Institute’s Fall Convention in Phoenix, Arizona, October 29, 2002. All papers have been reviewed according to ACI rules. This publication, as well as the sessions, was sponsored by ACI committee 236, Material Science of Concrete. The 12 presentations from 8 different countries indicate...

  7. Behaviour of concrete beams reinforced withFRP prestressed concrete prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svecova, Dagmar

    The use of fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) to reinforce concrete is gaining acceptance. However, due to the relatively low modulus of FRP, in comparison to steel, such structures may, if sufficient amount of reinforcement is not used, suffer from large deformations and wide cracks. FRP is generally more suited for prestressing. Since it is not feasible to prestress all concrete structures to eliminate the large deflections of FRP reinforced concrete flexural members, researchers are focusing on other strategies. A simple method for avoiding excessive deflections is to provide sufficiently high amount of FRP reinforcement to limit its stress (strain) to acceptable levels under service loads. This approach will not be able to take advantage of the high strength of FRP and will be generally uneconomical. The current investigation focuses on the feasibility of an alternative strategy. This thesis deals with the flexural and shear behaviour of concrete beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms. FRP prestressed concrete prisms (PCP) are new reinforcing bars, made by pretensioning FRP and embedding it in high strength grout/concrete. The purpose of the research is to investigate the feasibility of using such pretensioned rebars, and their effect on the flexural and shear behaviour of reinforced concrete beams over the entire loading range. Due to the prestress in the prisms, deflection of concrete beams reinforced with this product is substantially reduced, and is comparable to similarly steel reinforced beams. The thesis comprises both theoretical and experimental investigations. In the experimental part, nine beams reinforced with FRP prestressed concrete prisms, and two companion beams, one steel and one FRP reinforced were tested. All the beams were designed to carry the same ultimate moment. Excellent flexural and shear behaviour of beams reinforced with higher prestressed prisms is reported. When comparing deflections of three beams designed to have the

  8. Evaluation of concrete recycling system efficiency for ready-mix concrete plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Luiz de Brito Prado; Figueiredo, Antonio Domingues de

    2016-10-01

    The volume of waste generated annually in concrete plants is quite large and has important environmental and economic consequences. The use of fresh concrete recyclers is an interesting way for the reuse of aggregates and water in new concrete production. This paper presents a study carried out for over one year by one of the largest ready-mix concrete producers in Brazil. This study focused on the evaluation of two recyclers with distinct material separation systems, herein referred to as drum-type and rotary sieve-type equipment. They were evaluated through characterization and monitoring test programs to verify the behaviour of recovered materials (aggregates, water, and slurry). The applicability of the recovered materials (water and aggregates) was also evaluated in the laboratory and at an industrial scale. The results obtained with the two types of recyclers used were equivalent and showed no significant differences. The only exception was in terms of workability. The drum-type recycler generated fewer cases that required increased pumping pressure. The analysis concluded that the use of untreated slurry is unfeasible because of its intense negative effects on the strength and workability of concrete. The reclaimed water, pre-treated to ensure that its density is less than 1.03g/cm(3), can be used on an industrial scale without causing any harm to the concrete. The use of recovered aggregates consequently induces an increase in water demand and cement consumption to ensure the workability conditions of concrete that is proportional to the concrete strength level. Therefore, the viability of their use is restricted to concretes with characteristic strengths lower than 25MPa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reliability Criteria for Thick Bonding Wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdelen, Turker; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2018-04-17

    Bonding wire is one of the main interconnection techniques. Thick bonding wire is widely used in power modules and other high power applications. This study examined the case for extending the use of traditional thin wire reliability criteria, namely wire flexure and aspect ratio, to thick wires. Eleven aluminum (Al) and aluminum coated copper (CucorAl) wire samples with diameter 300 μm were tested experimentally. The wire response was measured using a novel non-contact method. High fidelity FEM models of the wire were developed and validated. We found that wire flexure is not correlated to its stress state or fatigue life. On the other hand, aspect ratio is a consistent criterion of thick wire fatigue life. Increasing the wire aspect ratio lowers its critical stress and increases its fatigue life. Moreover, we found that CucorAl wire has superior performance and longer fatigue life than Al wire.

  10. Reliability Criteria for Thick Bonding Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    Bonding wire is one of the main interconnection techniques. Thick bonding wire is widely used in power modules and other high power applications. This study examined the case for extending the use of traditional thin wire reliability criteria, namely wire flexure and aspect ratio, to thick wires. Eleven aluminum (Al) and aluminum coated copper (CucorAl) wire samples with diameter 300 μm were tested experimentally. The wire response was measured using a novel non-contact method. High fidelity FEM models of the wire were developed and validated. We found that wire flexure is not correlated to its stress state or fatigue life. On the other hand, aspect ratio is a consistent criterion of thick wire fatigue life. Increasing the wire aspect ratio lowers its critical stress and increases its fatigue life. Moreover, we found that CucorAl wire has superior performance and longer fatigue life than Al wire. PMID:29673194

  11. Developing the Market for Local Currency Bonds by Foreign Issuers: Lessons from Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoschka, Tobias C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper surveys the experience of countries in the East Asian region that have introduced local currency bonds by foreign issuers. The countries that are examined include Australia; Hong Kong, China; Japan; Republic of Korea; and Singapore. It is suggested that there are sound reasons for many countries to develop the market for foreign issuers. Benefits and potential issues are analyzed, development policies are reviewed, and concrete policy options are discussed for those countries that ...

  12. Numerical Study Of The Effects Of Preloading, Axial Loading And Concrete Shrinkage On Reinforced Concrete Elements Strengthened By Concrete Layers And Jackets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampropoulos, A. P.; Dritsos, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the technique of seismic strengthening existing reinforced concrete columns and beams using additional concrete layers and jackets is examined. The finite element method and the finite element program ATENA is used in this investigation. When a reinforced jacket or layer is being constructed around a column it is already preloaded due to existing service loads. This effect has been examined for different values of the axial load normalized to the strengthened column. The techniques of strengthening with a concrete jacket or a reinforced concrete layer on the compressive side of the column are examined. Another phenomenon that is examined in this study is the shrinkage of the new concrete of an additional layer used to strengthen an existing member. For this investigation, a simply supported beam with an additional reinforced concrete layer on the tensile side is examined. The results demonstrate that the effect of preloading is important when a reinforced concrete layer is being used with shear connectors between the old and the new reinforcement. It was also found that the shrinkage of the new concrete reduces the strength of the strengthened beam and induces an initial sliding between the old and the new concrete

  13. Offshore concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamas Pardo, M.; Carral Couce, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the offshore industry there are two possible materials for the construction of the hull of a structure; the steel and concrete, with the first one widely used until now, as in the rest of the shiphuidling industry of merchant ships, warships, etc. Materials such as aluminum, GRP or timber areused in small units with lengths lower than 100 m, and in less adverse conditions than in the offshore industry. Nevertheless, some ships/barges have been built of concrete in the past, but have been rather isolated cases which have not changed the practice in the industry. In the First and Second World War were built by the scarcity of materials, while the series of barges by Alfred A. Yee was a rare exception. Other units were also made in concrete, but almost anecdotal. Still, the behaviour of these concrete structures, especially in terms of maintenance, has been excellent. Therefore, the fact that the concrete has not had an adequate reception so far in shipbuilding, does not mean that in will not be the material best suited for the offshore industry in the future. The extra displacement and associated fuel costs in concrete ships have been found prohibitive in the past. But the loss of mobility of a concrete hull in relation to a steel hull can be perfectly offset by the advantages offered by the concrete, as the shipping and offshore industry have very different priorities. One of the main differences in these priorities is in terms of maintenance and resistance to fatigue, precisely where the concrete performs better. ships can easily be dry docked for maintenance and repair, while in the offshore platforms these works have to be done in situ so maintenance and fatigue are crucial to them. Besides these, the concrete has other advantages according to findings of several studies. And although they are interested in the conclusions that the makes as they came from people in the concrete industry, the fact that in recent years concrete offshore unit shave been built

  14. Self-compacting concrete (SCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica

    2008-01-01

    In many aspects Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC, “Self-Consolidating Concrete” in North America) can be considered the concrete of the future. SCC is a family of tailored concretes with special engineered properties in the fresh state. SCC flows into the formwork and around even complicated...... reinforcement arrangements under its own weight. Thus, SCC is not vibrated like conventional concrete. This drastically improves the working environment during construction, the productivity, and potentially improves the homogeneity and quality of the concrete. In addition SCC provides larger architectural...

  15. Photocatalyticpaving concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyapidevskaya Ol'ga Borisovna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Today bituminous concrete is a conventional paving material. Among its advantages one can name dustlessness and noiselessness, fine wear (up to 1 mm a year and fine maintainability. As the main disadvantages of this material one can name high slipperiness under humidification, low durability and weather resistance. Besides that, during placement of the bituminous concrete a lot of different air pollutants are emitted, which are harmful for environment and human’s health (they are listed in the paper according to the US Environmental Protection Agency materials. As an alternative, one can use cement-concrete pavement, which is in many ways more efficient than the bituminous concrete. It is proposed to enhance environmental performance of the cement-concrete pavement via usage of photocatalysis. The mechanism of different photocatalytic reactions is described in the paper, namely heterogeneous and homogeneous photocatalysis, photo-induces, photoactivated catalysis and catalytical photoreactions. It is pro-posed to use heterogeneous photocatalysis with titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst. The mechanism of photo oxidation of air contaminants, with the usage of titanium dioxide is2described. The paper sets problems, connected with the sensibilization of TiOto thevisible light (it is proposed to use titanium dioxide, doped with the atoms of certain elements to increase its sensibility to the visible light and with the development of a new photocatalytic paving concrete, which will meet the requirements, specified for paving in the climatic and traffic conditions of the Russian Federation.

  16. Fibre-concrete container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the fibre-concrete container for radioactive wastes is described. The fibre container is made of fibre-concrete that contains cement, aggregate, sand, filter, flame-silica, super-plastificator, water and scattered metal fibres. The fibre-concrete container has a dice shape with outer dimension 1.7 x 1.7 x 1.7 m. It is mounted of a container body, a container cover and two caps. Total weight of container is 4,240 kg, maximum weight of loaded container do not must exceed 15,000 kg. The physical and mechanical properties of the fibre-concrete container are described in detail. The fibre-concrete container manufactured for storing of low and intermediate radioactive wastes. A fibre-concrete container utilization to store of radioactive wastes solves these problems: increase of stability of stored packages of radioactive waste; watertightness within 300 years at least; static stability of bearing space; better utilization of bearing spaces; insulation of radioactive waste in a case of seismic and geological event; increase of fire resistance; and transport of radioactive waste

  17. Very heavy iron-punching concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, F.

    1966-01-01

    The present report deals with all the heavy iron-punching concretes, metallic wastes produced by the transformation industry. After a detailed description of the physical properties of metallic aggregates, a classification of heavy mortars is given, into three main categories: steel-shot grouts d = 5,3 - 6; steel-shot grouts mixed with a mineral d = 3,7 - 4,2; injection heavy grouts d = 3,5 - 4. The following chapter describes iron-punching concretes the most used in the atomic industry: iron-punching concretes mixed with cast-iron - iron-punching concretes mixed with magnetite; iron-punching concretes mixed with barite; iron-punching concretes mixed with limonite; iron-punching concretes mixed with boron. The compositions of these concretes are given together with their physical and mechanical characteristics. Numerous diagrams make it possible to find rapidly the proportions of the constituents of these concretes as a function of the required density. Technical advice and specifications are given in an appendix together with a bibliography of these heavy concretes. (author) [fr

  18. Analytical and numerical study concerning the behaviour of single-sided bonded patch repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghi OPATCHI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesive bonded joints are used in the assembling of structural parts, especially of those which are made from dissimilar materials. Lightweight fibre reinforced polymer composites and other adhesive bonded components represent a major proportion of a modern aircraft. Bonded patch repair technology has been widely used to repair cracked thin-walled structures to extend their service life, because a correctly executed repair significantly enhances the structural performance.In practice, the single-sided bonded patch repair is the most used because a good solution like the double-sided repair may not be an option if the access to the structure is only available from one side.This paper presents a relatively simple and effective design procedure for the single strapped bonded joints. Also, the influence of various geometrical parameters of the joint is evaluated. The analytical development is validated based on nonlinear finite element analyses.

  19. Balanced improvement of high performance concrete material properties with modified graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha

    Graphite nanomaterials offer distinct features for effective reinforcement of cementitious matrices in the pre-crack and post-crack ranges of behavior. Thoroughly dispersed and well-bonded nanomaterials provide for effective control of the size and propagation of defects (microcracks) in matrix, and also act as closely spaced barriers against diffusion of moisture and aggressive solutions into concrete. Modified graphite nanomaterials can play multi-faceted roles towards enhancing the mechanical, physical and functional attributes of concrete materials. Graphite nanoplatelets (GP) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen for use in cementitious materials. Experimental results highlighted the balanced gains in diverse engineering properties of high-performance concrete realized by introduction of graphite nanomaterials. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in order to gain further insight into the effects of nanomaterials on the hydration process and structure of cement hydrates. NMR exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei, and the sensitivity of these properties to local environments to generate data which enables determination of the internal structure, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules and bulk materials. 27 Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to evaluate the effects of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure of cement hydrates, and their resistance to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), chloride ion diffusion, and sulfate attack. Results of 29Si NMR spectroscopy indicated that the percent condensation of C-S-H in cementitious paste was lowered in the presence of nanoplatelets at the same age. The extent of chloride diffusion was assessed indirectly by detecting Friedel's salt as a reaction product of chloride ions with aluminum-bearing cement hydrates. Graphite nanoplatelets were found to significantly reduce the concentration of Friedel's salt at different depths after various periods

  20. Microtensile bond strength of eleven contemporary adhesives to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoshi; Vargas, Marcos A; Abe, Yasuhiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido; Sano, Hidehiko; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2003-10-01

    To compare the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) to enamel of 10 contemporary adhesives, including three one-step self-etch systems, four two-step self-etch systems and three two-step total-etch systems, with that of a conventional three-step total-etch adhesive. Resin composite (Z100, 3M) was bonded to flat, #600-grit wet-sanded enamel surfaces of 18 extracted human third molars using the adhesives strictly according to the respective manufacturer's instructions. After storage overnight in 37 degrees C water, the bonded specimens were sectioned into 2-4 thin slabs of approximately 1 mm thickness and 2.5 mm width. They were then trimmed into an hourglass shape with an interface area of approximately 1 mm2, and subsequently subjected to microTBS-testing with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute. The microTBS to enamel varied from 3.2 MPa for the experimental one-step self-etch adhesive PQ/Universal (self-etch) to 43.9 MPa for the two-step total-etch adhesive Scotchbond 1. When compared with the conventional three-step total-etch adhesive OptiBond FL, the bond strengths of most adhesives with simplified application procedures were not significantly different, except for two one-step self-etch adhesives, experimental PQ/Universal (self-etch) and One-up Bond F, that showed lower bond strengths. Specimen failures during sample preparation were recorded for the latter adhesives as well.

  1. Concrete containments in Swedish nuclear power plants. A review of construction and material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Thomas; Silfwerbrand, Johan; Sundquist, Haakan

    2002-12-01

    attention. Current investigation shows that the documentation on the concrete containment structures of the Swedish nuclear power stations is fairly complete after the authors have obtained new information through a survey during 2001 and included these data in the report. The target group of this report are structural engineers and other people interested in knowing how the prestressed concrete containments in the Swedish nuclear power stations are designed, detailed and constructed. Uprising questions regarding the structural behaviour of the containment structures ought to be evaluated by using present material properties and not the data describing the used building materials at the design stage. The aim of this research project is to gain new knowledge on life span questions regarding prestressing steel in concrete structures, partly generally and partly with focus on Swedish nuclear power stations and Swedish bridges. The project covers both bonded and un bonded prestressing steel. This report describes the containment structures for all Swedish nuclear power stations. The information is both given in Chapters 5 through 16 and assembled in tables in Appendix A. The intention is that the documentation shall grow and be supplemented as soon as new information, either new data describing the containment structures or new measuring results, will be obtained or produced within current research project. Design and detailing of prestressed concrete structures are among others based on the knowledge of time-dependent material changes regarding concrete (creep and shrinkage) and prestressing steel (relaxation). The intention is that the following items will treated: general evaluation; testing of prestressing steel and concrete properties; assessment of the risk of a time-dependent increase of brittleness of the prestressing steel; comparisons with codes; modelling of steel relaxation; unidimensional modelling of prestressing losses; regard to elevated temperatures

  2. Dynamic rupture analysis of reinforced concrete shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebora, B.; Zimmermann, Th.; Wolf, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Extreme dynamic loading conditions often require the rupture analysis of reinforced and prestressed-concrete structures. The study presented in this paper extends a method of analysis of dynamic loading conditions which has proven efficient for short-time loads. Another aim is to adapt the method to thin-walled structures. It is not sufficient to work only with plastic rupture and yield surfaces locally which are compared to the elastic distribution of the stress resultants; it is essential to account for the redistribution of the latter. The method proposed consists of discretizing the structure into isoparametric three-dimensional elements with 20 nodes for the concrete and one-dimensional bar elements with three nodes for the steel. The latter can also be handled with a 'smeared' two-dimensional membrane element. In compression a three-dimensional non-linear elastic constitutive law is introduced for the concrete, and a triaxial failure surface expressed in the stress invariants is used, determining cracking and crushing. Two- and three-dimensional cracking surfaces in which no components of stress are transmitted are accounted for. The possibility exists that, during the history of loading, cracks can close up again. For steel, a yield criterion is selected. The non-linear analysis is based on the concept of initial stress. Residual loads are calculated using information in Gauss integration points. The ultimate load is reached when the algorithm does not converge. The corresponding failure modes can be interpreted as those for which a state of equilibrium is no longer possible. The equations of motion are discretized in time, using an extension of the linear acceleration method. (Auth.)

  3. Increased Durability of Concrete Made with Fine Recycled Concrete Aggregates Using Superplasticizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartuxo, Francisco; de Brito, Jorge; Evangelista, Luis; Jiménez, José Ramón; Ledesma, Enrique F

    2016-02-08

    This paper evaluates the influence of two superplasticizers (SP) on the durability properties of concrete made with fine recycled concrete aggregate (FRCA). For this purpose, three families of concrete were tested: concrete without SP, concrete made with a regular superplasticizer and concrete made with a high-performance superplasticizer. Five volumetric replacement ratios of natural sand by FRCA were tested: 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 100%. Two natural gravels were used as coarse aggregates. All mixes had the same particle size distribution, cement content and amount of superplasticizer. The w/c ratio was calibrated to obtain similar slump. The results showed that the incorporation of FRCA increased the water absorption by immersion, the water absorption by capillary action, the carbonation depth and the chloride migration coefficient, while the use of superplasticizers highly improved these properties. The incorporation of FRCA jeopardized the SP's effectiveness. This research demonstrated that, from a durability point of view, the simultaneous incorporation of FRCA and high-performance SP is a viable sustainable solution for structural concrete production.

  4. Non-silicon substrate bonding mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hainan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a simple and robust strategy for bonding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with various thermoplastic substrates to fabricate a thermoplastic-based closed microfluidic device and examine the feasibility of using the proposed method for realizing plastic-plastic bonding. The proposed bonding strategy was realized by first coating amine functionality on an oxidized thermoplastic surface. Next, the amine-functionalized surface was reacted with a monolayer of low-molecular-weight PDMS, terminated with epoxy functionality, by forming a robust amine-epoxy bond. Both the PDMS-coated thermoplastic and PDMS were then oxidized and permanently assembled at 25 °C under a pressure of 0.1 MPa for 15 min, resulting in PDMS-like surfaces on all four inner walls of the microchannel. Surface characterizations were conducted, including water contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and fluorescence measurement, to confirm the successful coating of the thin PDMS layer on the plastic surface, and the bond strength was analyzed by conducting a peel test, burst test, and leakage test. Using the proposed method, we could successfully bond various thermoplastics such as poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) with PDMS without the collapse or deformation of the microchannel, and the proposed method was successfully extended to the bonding of two thermoplastics, PMMA, and PC.

  5. Concrete construction engineering handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Nawy, Edward G

    2008-01-01

    Provides coverage of concrete construction engineering and technology. This work features discussions focusing on: the advances in engineered concrete materials; reinforced concrete construction; specialized construction techniques; and, design recommendations for high performance.

  6. Comparison of physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, Hyginus E.; Eziefula, Uchechi G.; Eziefula, Bennett I.

    2018-03-01

    This study compared the physical and mechanical properties of river sand concrete with quarry dust concrete. The constituent materials were batched by weight. The water-cement ratio and mix ratio selected for the experimental investigation were 0.55 and 1:2:4, respectively. The specimens were cured for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Slump, density and compressive strength tests were carried out. The results showed that river sand concrete had greater density and compressive strength than quarry dust concrete for all curing ages. At 28 days of curing, river sand concrete exceeded the target compressive strength by 36%, whereas quarry dust concrete was less than the target compressive strength by 12%. Both river sand concrete and quarry dust concrete for the selected water/cement ratio and mix ratio are suitable for non-structural applications and lightly-loaded members where high strength is not a prerequisite.

  7. Physical Characteristics of Laboratory Tested Concrete as a Substituion of Gravel on Normal Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butar-butar, Ronald; Suhairiani; Wijaya, Kinanti; Sebayang, Nono

    2018-03-01

    Concrete technology is highly potential in the field of construction for structural and non-structural construction. The amount uses of this concrete material raise the problem of solid waste in the form of concrete remaining test results in the laboratory. This waste is usually just discarded and not economically valuable. In solving the problem, this experiment was made new materials by using recycle material in the form of recycled aggregate which aims to find out the strength characteristics of the used concrete as a gravel substitution material on the normal concrete and obtain the value of the substitution composition of gravel and used concrete that can achieve the strength of concrete according to the standard. Testing of concrete characteristic is one of the requirements before starting the concrete mixture. This test using SNI method (Indonesian National Standard) with variation of comparison (used concrete : gravel) were 15: 85%, 25: 75%, 35:65%, 50:50 %, 75: 25%. The results of physical tests obtained the mud content value of the mixture gravel and used concrete is 0.03 larger than the standard of SNI 03-4142-1996 that is equal to 1.03%. so the need watering or soaking before use. The water content test results show an increase in the water content value if the composition of the used concrete increases. While the specific gravity value for variation 15: 85% until 35: 65% fulfilled the requirements of SNI 03-1969-1990. the other variasion show the specifics gravity value included on the type of light materials.

  8. Overview of studies on the effect of recycled aggregates sourced from tested cylinders on concrete material and structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Hamad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an overview of a two-phase research program that was designed at the American University of Beirut (AUB to investigate the effect of replacing different percentages of natural coarse aggregates (NCA with recycled coarse aggregates (RCA on the properties of the produced concrete. The source of RCA was tested cylinders in batching plants which would help recycling and reusing portion of the waste products of the concrete industry. In the first phase, the fresh and hardened mechanical properties of the produced concrete mix were investigated. The variables were the concrete strength (28 or 60 MPa and the percentage replacement of NCA with RCA from crushed tested cylinders [0 (control, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100%. Normal strength tested cylinders were used as source of the recycled aggregates for the normal strength concrete (NSC mix and high strength tested cylinders were used for the high strength concrete (HSC mix. Tests included plastic state slump and hardened state mechanical properties including cylinder compressive strength, cylinder splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, and standard beams flexural strength. The results indicated no significant effect on the slump and around 10% average reduction in the hardened mechanical properties for both investigated levels of concrete compressive strength. In the second phase, the structural behavior of normal strength concrete (NSC reinforced concrete beams prepared by replacing different percentages of NCA with RCA from tested concrete cylinders was studied. For each of three modes of failure (flexural, shear, or bond splitting, three beams with different percentages replacement [0 (control, 40, or 100 percent] were tested. One replicate was prepared for each beam to validate the test results. Results indicated no significant difference in the ultimate load reached or load-deflection behavior that could be related to the percentage replacement of NCA with RCA.

  9. Room temperature ferroelectricity in continuous croconic acid thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xuanyuan; Lu, Haidong; Yin, Yuewei; Ahmadi, Zahra; Costa, Paulo S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Zhang, Xiaozhe [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Department of Physics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Xiao; Yu, Le; Cheng, Xuemei [Department of Physics, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010 (United States); DiChiara, Anthony D. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu; Enders, Axel, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu; Xu, Xiaoshan, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu, E-mail: a.enders@me.com, E-mail: xiaoshan.xu@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2016-09-05

    Ferroelectricity at room temperature has been demonstrated in nanometer-thin quasi 2D croconic acid thin films, by the polarization hysteresis loop measurements in macroscopic capacitor geometry, along with observation and manipulation of the nanoscale domain structure by piezoresponse force microscopy. The fabrication of continuous thin films of the hydrogen-bonded croconic acid was achieved by the suppression of the thermal decomposition using low evaporation temperatures in high vacuum, combined with growth conditions far from thermal equilibrium. For nominal coverages ≥20 nm, quasi 2D and polycrystalline films, with an average grain size of 50–100 nm and 3.5 nm roughness, can be obtained. Spontaneous ferroelectric domain structures of the thin films have been observed and appear to correlate with the grain patterns. The application of this solvent-free growth protocol may be a key to the development of flexible organic ferroelectric thin films for electronic applications.

  10. Low-cost bump-bonding processes for high energy physics pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069357; Blank, Thomas; Colombo, Fabio; Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann; Husemann, Ulrich; Kudella, Simon; Weber, M

    2016-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area will be required at reasonable costs. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of five production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin (15 μm) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to 30 μm without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bump metallization. The sh...

  11. Concrete produced with recycled aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. L. Tenório

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of the mechanical and durable properties of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC for using in concrete. The porosity of recycled coarse aggregates is known to influence the fresh and hardened concrete properties and these properties are related to the specific mass of the recycled coarse aggregates, which directly influences the mechanical properties of the concrete. The recycled aggregates were obtained from construction and demolition wastes (CDW, which were divided into recycled sand (fine and coarse aggregates. Besides this, a recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density was obtained by mixing the recycled aggregates of the CDW with the recycled aggregates of concrete wastes (CW. The concrete was produced in laboratory by combining three water-cement ratios, the ratios were used in agreement with NBR 6118 for structural concretes, with each recycled coarse aggregates and recycled sand or river sand, and the reference concrete was produced with natural aggregates. It was observed that recycled aggregates can be used in concrete with properties for structural concrete. In general, the use of recycled coarse aggregate in combination with recycled sand did not provide good results; but when the less porous was used, or the recycled coarse aggregate of a specific mass with a greater density, the properties of the concrete showed better results. Some RAC reached bigger strengths than the reference concrete.

  12. Durability of lightweight concrete : Phase I : concrete temperature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-08-01

    This report describes a study conducted to determine the temperature gradient throughout the depth of a six inch concrete bridge deck. The bridge deck selected for study was constructed using lightweight concrete for the center spans and sand and gra...

  13. Highly uniform resistive switching properties of amorphous InGaZnO thin films prepared by a low temperature photochemical solution deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Zou, Lilan; Chen, Xinman; Qin, Ni; Li, Shuwei; Bao, Dinghua

    2014-04-09

    We report on highly uniform resistive switching properties of amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO) thin films. The thin films were fabricated by a low temperature photochemical solution deposition method, a simple process combining chemical solution deposition and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation treatment. The a-IGZO based resistive switching devices exhibit long retention, good endurance, uniform switching voltages, and stable distribution of low and high resistance states. Electrical conduction mechanisms were also discussed on the basis of the current-voltage characteristics and their temperature dependence. The excellent resistive switching properties can be attributed to the reduction of organic- and hydrogen-based elements and the formation of enhanced metal-oxide bonding and metal-hydroxide bonding networks by hydrogen bonding due to UV irradiation, based on Fourier-transform-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis of the thin films. This study suggests that a-IGZO thin films have potential applications in resistive random access memory and the low temperature photochemical solution deposition method can find the opportunity for further achieving system on panel applications if the a-IGZO resistive switching cells were integrated with a-IGZO thin film transistors.

  14. Mechanical properties of recycled concrete with demolished waste concrete aggregate and clay brick aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocan; Lou, Cong; Du, Geng; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Zhiwu; Li, Liqin

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the effect of the replacement of natural coarse aggregate (NCA) with either recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) or recycled clay brick aggregate (RBA) on the compressive strengths of the hardened concrete. Two grades (C25 and C50) of concrete were investigated, which were achieved by using different water-to-cement ratios. In each grade concrete five different replacement rates, 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% were considered. In order to improve the performance of the recycled aggregates in the concrete mixes, the RCA and RBA were carefully sieved by using the optimal degradation. In this way the largest reduction in the 28-day compressive strength was found to be only 7.2% and 9.6% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RCA, and 11% and 13% for C25 and C50 recycled concrete when the NCA was replaced 100% by RBA. In general, the concrete with RCA has better performance than the concrete with RBA. The comparison of the present experimental results with those reported in literature for hardened concrete with either RCA or RBA demonstrates the effectiveness in improving the compressive strength by using the optimal gradation of recycled aggregates.

  15. Material properties characterization - concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, G.L.; MacLeod, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    A review is presented of the six contributions in the SMiRT 4 conference to Session H5 on structural analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels. These relate to short term stress-strain aspects of concrete loaded beyond the linear range in uniaxial and biaxial stress fields, to some time and temperature dependent properties of concrete at working stress levels, and to a programme of strain-gauge testing for the assessment of concrete properties. From the information discussed, it is clear that there are difficulties in determining material properties for concrete, and these are summarised. (UK)

  16. SIMULATION MODELS OF RESISTANCE TO CONCRETE MOVEMENT IN THE CONCRETE CONVEYING PIPE OF THE AUTOCONCRETE PUMP

    OpenAIRE

    Anofriev, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. In modern construction the placing of concrete is often performed using distribution equipment of concrete pumps. Increase of productivity and quality of this construction work requires improvement of both concrete pumps and their tooling. The concrete pumps tooling consists of standardized concrete conveying pipes and connector bends radius of up to 2 m. A promising direction of tooling improvement is the reduce of resistance to movement of the concrete in the concrete conveying pip...

  17. Nanostructured silicate polymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figovskiy Oleg L'vovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that acid-resistant concretes on the liquid glass basis have high porosity (up to 18~20 %, low strength and insufficient water resistance. Significant increasing of silicate matrix strength and density was carried out by incorporation of special liquid organic alkali-soluble silicate additives, which block superficial pores and reduce concrete shrinkage deformation. It was demonstrated that introduction of tetrafurfuryloxisilane additive sharply increases strength, durability and shock resistance of silicate polymer concrete in aggressive media. The experiments showed, that the strength and density of silicate polymer concrete increase in case of decreasing liquid glass content. The authors obtained optimal content of silicate polymer concrete, which possesses increased strength, durability, density and crack-resistance. Diffusive permeability of concrete and its chemical resistance has been investigated in various corroding media.

  18. A historical examination of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallinson, L.G.; Li Davies, I.

    1987-01-01

    The requirement that concrete in radioactive waste repositories be stable physically and chemically for very long times has initiated studies of ancient and old concretes. This report is a contribution to this effort. After a description of the history of cement and concrete, the published literature relating to the analysis of old and ancient concrete is reviewed. A series of samples spanning the history of concrete has been obtained; a variety of physical and chemical techniques have been employed to characterize these samples. Reasons for survival of ancient concretes, and for durability of early, reinforced concretes are identified. Recommendations for further studies are given. 132 refs

  19. Concrete radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear energy has given rise to a growth in the amount of artificially produced radiation and radioactive materials. The design and construction of shielding to protect people, equipment and structures from the effects of radiation has never been more important. Experience has shown that concrete is an effective, versatile and economical material for the construction of radiation shielding. This book provides information on the principles governing the interaction of radiation with matter and on relevant nuclear physics to give the engineer an understanding of the design and construction of concrete shielding. It covers the physical, mechanical and nuclear properties of concrete; the effects of elevated temperatures and possible damage to concrete due to radiation; basic procedures for the design of concrete radiation shields and finally the special problems associated with their construction and cost. Although written primarily for engineers concerned with the design and construction of concrete shielding, the book also reviews the widely scattered data and information available on this subject and should therefore be of interest to students and those wishing to research further in this field. (author)

  20. Accelerated pavement testing of thin RCC over soil cement pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Three full-scale roller compacted concrete (RCC pavement sections built over a soil cement base were tested under accelerated pavement testing (APT. The RCC thicknesses varied from 102 mm (4 in. to 152 mm (6 in. and to 203 mm (8 in., respectively. A bi-directional loading device with a dual-tire load assembly was used for this experiment. Each test section was instrumented with multiple pressure cells and strain gages. The objective was to evaluate the structural performance and load carrying capacity of thin RCC-surfaced pavements under accelerated loading. The APT results generally indicated that all three RCC pavement sections tested in this study possessed very high load carrying capacity; an estimated pavement life in terms of equivalent single axle load (ESAL for the thinnest RCC section (i.e., RCC thickness of 102 mm evaluated was approximately 19.2 million. It was observed that a fatigue failure would be the primary pavement distress type for a thin RCC pavement under trafficking. Specifically, the development of fatigue cracking was found to originate from a longitudinal crack at the edge or in the center of a tire print, then extended and propagated, and eventually merged with cracks of other directions. Instrumentation results were used to characterize the fatigue damage under different load magnitudes. Finally, based on the APT performance of this experiment, two fatigue models for predicting the fatigue life of thin RCC pavements were developed. Keywords: Roller compacted concrete, APT, Pavement performance, Non-destructive testing, Fatigue analysis