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Sample records for thick lead shield

  1. Radiation shielding lead shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei, Shoichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns lead shields for radiation shielding. Shield boxes are disposed so as to surround a pipeline through which radioactive liquids, mists or like other objects are passed. Flanges are formed to each of the end edges of the shield boxes and the shield boxes are connected to each other by the flanges. Upon installation, empty shield boxes not charged with lead particles and iron plate shields are secured at first at the periphery of the pipeline. Then, lead particles are charged into the shield boxes. This attains a state as if lead plate corresponding to the depth of the box is disposed. Accordingly, operations for installation, dismantling and restoration can be conducted in an empty state with reduced weight to facilitate the operations. (I.S.)

  2. Comparative study of tungsten and lead as gamma ray shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Zou Shuliang

    2011-01-01

    This article firstly compares the tungsten and lead's physical properties, price and environmental performance, then calculates the thickness of tungsten and lead with the gamma ray 10% transmission when the photon energy are 0.1 MeV, 0.2 MeV, 0.5, 1 MeV and 1.25 MeV, and makes a comparison chart. Finally, it establishes a commonly used shielding model, through which to validate whether the thickness of theoretical calculation can achieve an effective shielding effect by MCNP program. The results showers that tungsten as a new type of shielding material has a lot of advantages, which shielding ability is far higher than the lead. Thus it provides the reference to choose the suitable shielding materials in special occasions. (authors)

  3. Determination of material and its thickness for Cs-137 gamma source shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiman

    2008-01-01

    Its has been determined the shielding material and its thickness necessarily conducted due to every material will have different half-thickness characteristics, and by the selection a suitable material and its thickness will be obtained. Half-thickness of any material is the ability of the material at a certain thickness to absorb any radiation intensity so that the intensity becomes half of its source. Sample materials to be used are concrete, wood, and lead with their thickness varied. From experiment data and theoretical computation can be concluded that lead is the suitable material for shielding with the value of HVT for gamma radiation 0,732 cm. For wood and concrete will give half-thickness of 11,0 cm and 3,164 cm respectively. (author)

  4. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation. Lead bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The standard contains specifications for the shape and requirements set for lead bricks such that they can be used to construct radiation-shielding walls according to the building kit system. The dimensions of the bricks are selected in such a way as to permit any modification of the length, height and thickness of said shielding walls in units of 50 mm. The narrow side of the lead bricks juxtaposed to one another in a wall construction to shield against radiation have to form prismatic grooves and tongues: in this way, direct penetration by radiation is prevented. Only cuboid bricks (serial nos. 55-60 according to Table 10) do not have prismatic tongues and grooves. (orig.) [de

  5. Calculation analysis of the thickness of radiation shield for the RIA equipment IP10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benar Bukit; Kristiyanti; Hari Nurcahyadi

    2011-01-01

    Calculation Analysis has been performed on the thickness of radiation shield for the design of the Radioimmunoassay (RIA) IP10 counters using five detectors arranged in parallel. The calculation is intended to ensure that the radiation on each detector does not influence each other. The radiation shield is made of lead. The calculation of lead thickness was based on the principle of the lead plates absorptive power toward the gamma ray of a certain energy. which is the function of linear absorption coefficient and the material thickness. Assuming the use of Iodium-125(I-125) source with an activity 10 µCi, and expecting an absorptive power of 95%, calculations showed that the required lead thickness is equal to 0,013 cm. Since lead is soft and its availability in the market is limited, lead plate of 2 mm thickness are used instead, so that counting result for the detectors do not influence each other. (author)

  6. Technical products for radiation shielding. Shield assembled from lead blocks for radiation protection. General technical requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The object of this standard description is the general technological requirements of 50 and 100 mm thick radiation protection shields assembled from lead blocks. The standard contains the definitions, types, parameters and dimensions of shields, their technical and acceptance criteria with testing methods, tagging, packaging, transportation and storage requirements, producer's liability. Some illustrated assembling examples, preferred parameters and dosimetry methods for shield inspection are given. (R.P.)

  7. Thick Galactic Cosmic Radiation Shielding Using Atmospheric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stanley O.; Koontz, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    NASA is concerned with protecting astronauts from the effects of galactic cosmic radiation and has expended substantial effort in the development of computer models to predict the shielding obtained from various materials. However, these models were only developed for shields up to about 120 g!cm2 in thickness and have predicted that shields of this thickness are insufficient to provide adequate protection for extended deep space flights. Consequently, effort is underway to extend the range of these models to thicker shields and experimental data is required to help confirm the resulting code. In this paper empirically obtained effective dose measurements from aircraft flights in the atmosphere are used to obtain the radiation shielding function of the earth's atmosphere, a very thick shield. Obtaining this result required solving an inverse problem and the method for solving it is presented. The results are shown to be in agreement with current code in the ranges where they overlap. These results are then checked and used to predict the radiation dosage under thick shields such as planetary regolith and the atmosphere of Venus.

  8. Optimal beta-ray shielding thicknesses for different therapeutic radionuclides and shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of the room shielding thickness of Hi-Art tomotherapy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haikuan; Wu Jinhai; Gu Naigu; Gao Yiming; Wang Li; Huang Weiqin; Wang Fengxian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate and evaluate the room shielding thickness of a Hi-Art tomotherapy system, which is a new type of radiotherapy facility. Due to the self-shielding of the accelerator,only scattered beam and beam leakage were considered in calculating the room shielding thickness. The radiation field of the tomotherapy system was used as the basic data to calculate the shielding thickness of every 15 degree solid angle. The maximum shielding thickness required of each shielding wall was at the position with the angle of 15 degree, and the calculated shielding thickness were 1023, 975, 917, 1460, 1147 and 1189 mm for the east wall,south wall,west wall, north wall, the roof and the floor,respectively. According to the calculation results, all shielding walls, ceiling and floor could meet the requirement of the radiation protection, but the north wall thickness of 1200 mm was a little thinner. (authors)

  10. Estimation of Shielding Thickness for a Prototype Department of Energy National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program Transport Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANCHEZ,LAWRENCE C.; MCCONNELL,PAUL E.

    2000-07-01

    Preliminary shielding calculations were performed for a prototype National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) transport cask. This analysis is intended for use in the selection of cask shield material type and preliminary estimate of shielding thickness. The radiation source term was modeled as cobalt-60 with radiation exposure strength of 100,000 R/hr. Cobalt-60 was chosen as a surrogate source because it simultaneous emits two high-energy gammas, 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV. This gamma spectrum is considered to be large enough that it will upper bound the spectra of all the various spent nuclear fuels types currently expected to be shipped within the prototype cask. Point-kernel shielding calculations were performed for a wide range of shielding thickness of lead and depleted uranium material. The computational results were compared to three shielding limits: 200 mrem/hr dose rate limit at the cask surface, 50 mR/hr exposure rate limit at one meter from the cask surface, and 10 mrem/hr limit dose rate at two meters from the cask surface. The results obtained in this study indicated that a shielding thickness of 13 cm is required for depleted uranium and 21 cm for lead in order to satisfy all three shielding requirements without taking credit for stainless steel liners. The system analysis also indicated that required shielding thicknesses are strongly dependent upon the gamma energy spectrum from the radiation source term. This later finding means that shielding material thickness, and hence cask weight, can be significantly reduced if the radiation source term can be shown to have a softer, lower energy, gamma energy spectrum than that due to cobalt-60.

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of lead and tungsten eye shields in electron beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, Almon S.; Tung, Samuel S.; Gastorf, Robert J.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Morrison, William H.; Peters, Lester J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to report that commercially available eye shields (designed for orthovoltage x-rays) are inadequate to protect the ocular structures from penetrating electrons for electron beam energies equal to or greater than 6 MeV. Therefore, a prototype medium size tungsten eye shield was designed and fabricated. The advantages of the tungsten eye shield over lead are discussed. Methods and Materials: Electron beams (6-9 MeV) are often used to irradiate eyelid tumors to curative doses. Eye shields can be placed under the eyelids to protect the globe. Film and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used within a specially constructed polystyrene eye phantom to determine the effectiveness of various commercially available internal eye shields (designed for orthovoltage x-rays). The same procedures were used to evaluate a prototype medium size tungsten eye shield (2.8 mm thick), which was designed and fabricated for protection of the globe from penetrating electrons for electron beam energy equal to 9 MeV. A mini-TLD was used to measure the dose enhancement due to electrons backscattered off the tungsten eye shield, both with or without a dental acrylic coating that is required to reduce discomfort, permit sterilization of the shield, and reduce the dose contribution from backscattered electrons. Results: Transmission of a 6 MeV electron beam through a 1.7 mm thick lead eye shield was found to be 50% on the surface (cornea) of the phantom and 27% at a depth of 6 mm (lens). The thickness of lead required to stop 6-9 MeV electron beams is impractical. In place of lead, a prototype medium size tungsten eye shield was made. For 6 to 9 MeV electrons, the doses measured on the surface (cornea) and at 6 mm (lens) and 21 mm (retina) depths were all less than 5% of the maximum dose of the open field (4 x 4 cm). Electrons backscattered off a tungsten eye shield without acrylic coating increased the lid dose from 85 to 123% at 6 MeV and 87 to 119% at

  12. Measurement Of Lead Equivalent Thickness For Irradiation Room: An Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Azuhar Ripin; Husaini Salleh; Mohd Khairusalih Mohd Zin; Muhammad Jamal Muhd Isa; Mohd Faizal Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have a sufficient thickness of shielding to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for irradiation room at health clinics own by MOH. Results of measurement of 8 irradiation rooms conducted in 2014 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that almost all the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  13. Shielding ability of lead loaded radiation resistant gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao; Ebihara, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The shielding ability of radiation resistant gloves were examined. The gloves are made of lead loaded (as PbO 2 ) polyvinyl chloride resin and are about 0.4 mm of thickness (70 mg/cm 2 ). Eleven test pieces were sampled from each of three gloves (total were thirty three) and the transmission rates for radiations (X-ray or γ-ray) through the test pieces were measured with radiation sources, 99m Tc, 57 Co, 133 Ba, 133 Xe and 241 Am. The differences of the transmission rate for radiations by the positions of the gloves were smaller than 15%, and the differences by three gloves were smaller than 5% in the case of 60 keV and 141 keV radiations. The average transmission rates for radiations in thirty three test pieces were about 40% for 30 keV radiation, about 90% for 80 keV and 140 keV radiations. The shielding characteristic of the gloves could be equivalent to about 0.026 mm thick lead plate. (author)

  14. Dosimetric perturbations of a lead shield for surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Granero, Domingo; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    In surface and interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy with either 60 Co, 192 Ir, or 169 Yb sources, some radiosensitive organs near the surface may be exposed to high absorbed doses. This may be reduced by covering the implants with a lead shield on the body surface, which results in dosimetric perturbations. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed for the three radionuclides placed at a single dwell position. Four different shield thicknesses (0, 3, 6, and 10 mm) and three different source depths (0, 5, and 10 mm) in water were considered, with the lead shield placed at the phantom surface. Backscatter dose enhancement and transmission data were obtained for the lead shields. Results were corrected to account for a realistic clinical case with multiple dwell positions. The range of the high backscatter dose enhancement in water is 3 mm for 60 Co and 1 mm for both 192 Ir and 169 Yb. Transmission data for 60 Co and 192 Ir are smaller than those reported by Papagiannis et al (2008 Med. Phys. 35 4898–4906) for brachytherapy facility shielding; for 169 Yb, the difference is negligible. In conclusion, the backscatter overdose produced by the lead shield can be avoided by just adding a few millimetres of bolus. Transmission data provided in this work as a function of lead thickness can be used to estimate healthy organ equivalent dose saving. Use of a lead shield is justified. (paper)

  15. Study of x-ray medical mitigation with lead and aluminium shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malheiros, Emiliane A.; Ramos, Roberto Paulo B.; Oliveira, Ezequias Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    In this work, lead and aluminum as shielding materials and their variations in the spectra emitted by the X-ray equipment through the use of a computer program that determines the photon fluence . The study of the primary beam for power spectra used in the practice of diagnostic radiology allows you to analyze data representative of the average transmission and fluency for the studied materials. So we seek to analyze the transmission curves of lead and aluminum, as well as its influence on the thickness of shielding and changing the radiation spectrum characteristics X in the transmission of photons. (author)

  16. Lead Equivalent Thickness Measurement for Mixed Compositions of Barium Plaster Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norriza Mohd Isa; Muhammad Jamal Muhammad Isa; Nur Shahriza Zainuddin; Mohd Khairusalih Md Zin; Shahrul Azlan Azizan

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of lead equivalent thickness for ionizing radiation exposure room wall shall be performed as stated in Malaysian Standard MS 838. A few numbers of sample blocks with different mixture of barium plaster compositions based and varies certain thickness as a shielding material for exposure room wall belong to a local company were tested by using Cs-137, Co-60 and Am-241 with different activities . Radiations passed through the samples were detected with calibrated survey meter. The distance between radiation source and the detector is about 40 cm. Lead uniformity test on the samples was also determined at three labeled points on the samples. Lead equivalent thicknesses for the samples were evaluated based on a calibration graph that was plotted with lead sheets and with the radiation sources. Results shown that lead equivalent thickness for the samples with same actual physical thickness represent different values for different sources. (author)

  17. Radiation shielding application of lead glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathuram, R.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy centers equipped with high intensity X-ray or teletherapy sources use lead glasses as viewing windows to protect personal from radiation exposure. Lead is the main component of glass which is responsible for shielding against photons. It is therefore essential to check the shielding efficiency before they are put in use. This can be done by studying photon transmission through the lead glasses. The study of photon transmission in shielding materials has been an important subject in medical physics and is potential useful in the development of radiation shielding materials

  18. A code for leakage neutron spectra through thick shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, P.S.; Sethulakshmi, P.; Raghavendran, C.P.

    1975-01-01

    An exponential transform Monte Carlo code has been developed for deep penetration of neutrons and the results of leakage neutron spectra of this code have been compared with those of a basic Monte Carlo code for small thickness. The development of the code and optimisation of certain transform parameters are discussed and results are presented for a few thick shields of concrete and water in the context of neutron monitoring in the environs of accelerator and reactor shields. (author)

  19. Americium-241 use of measurement lead equivalent thickness for medical x-ray room: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Husaini Saleh; Abd Aziz Mhd Ramli; Muhammad Jamal Md Isa; Mohd Firdaus Abd Rahman; Zainal Jamaluddin

    2010-01-01

    Lead equivalent thickness measurement of a shielding material in diagnostic radiology is very important to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have sufficient shielding thickness, for example for general radiography it must be at least equal to 2.0 mm of Pb, for panoramic dental radiography at least equal to 1.5 mm of Pb and for mammography should be a minimum of 1.0 mm of Pb. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for X-ray room at health centres. Results of measurement of 30 irradiation rooms conducted from 2009 to mid 2010 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that 96.7 % of the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Shielding Wall Optimization in Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Ju Young; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) system is nondestructive technology for analyzing isotope fissile content in spent fuel and pyro processed material, in real time and directly. The high intensity neutron and gamma ray were generated from a nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel), electron beam-target reaction and fission of fissile material. Therefore, shielding analysis of LSDS system should be carried out. In this study, Borax, B{sub 4}C, Li{sub 2}Co{sub 3}, Resin were chosen for shielding analysis. The radiation dose limit (<0.1 μSv/hr) was adopted conservatively at the outer wall surface. The covering could be able to reduce the concrete wall thickness from 5cm to 15cm. The optimized shielding walls evaluation will be used as an important data for future real LSDS facility design and shielding door assessment.

  1. Calculation of Buildup Factor for Gamma-ray Exposure in Two Layered Shields Made of Water and Lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saadi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The buildup factor for gamma ray exposure is most useful in calculations for biological protective shields.The buildup factors for gamma ray exposure were calculated in tow layered shields consist of water-lead and lead-water up to optical Thickness 20 mean free path (mfp) at gamma ray energies 1, 2 and 6MeV by using kalos's formula.The program has been designed to work at any atomic number of the attenuating medium, photon energy, slab thickness and and the arrangement of materials.The results obtained in this search leading to the buildup factor for gamma ray exposure at energies (1and2MeV) in lead-water were higher than the reverse case,while at energy 6 MeV the effect was opposite.The calculated data were parameterized by an empirical formula as a function of optical thickness of tow materials.The results obtained were in reasonable agreement with a previous work

  2. Study of neutron and gamma shielding by lead borate and bismuth lead borate glasses: transparent radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Badiger, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation shielding for gamma and neutron is the prominent area in nuclear reactor technology, medical application, dosimetry and other industries. Shielding of these types of radiation requires an appropriate concrete with mixture of low-to-high Z elements which is an opaque medium. The transparent radiation shielding in visible light for gamma and neutron is also extremely essential in the nuclear facilities as lead window. Presently various types of lead equivalent glass oxides have been invented which are transparent as well as provide protection from radiation. In our study we have assessment of effectiveness of neutron and gamma radiation shielding of xPbO.(1-x) B 2 O 3 (x=0.15 to 0.60) and xBi 2 O 3 .(0.80-x) PbO.0.20 B 2 O 3 (x=0.10 to 0.70) transparent borate and bismuth glasses by NXCOM program. The neutron effective mass removal cross section, Σ R /ρ (cm 2 /g) of the lead, bismuth and boron oxides are given. We found invariable Σ R /ρ of various combinations of the lead borate glass for x=0.15 to 0.60 and bismuth lead borate glass for x=0.10 to 0.70. It is observed that the effective removal cross-section for fast neutron (cm -1 ) of lead borate reduces significantly whereas roughly constant for bismuth borate. The gamma mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of the glasses were also compared with possible experimental values and found comparable. High (μ/ρ) for gamma radiation of the bismuth glasses shows that it is better gamma shielding compared with lead containing glass. However lead borate glasses are better neutron shielding as the neutron removal coefficient are higher. Our investigation is very useful for nuclear reactor technology where prompt neutron of energy 17 MeV and gamma photon up to 10 MeV produced. (author)

  3. Simulation of photon attenuation coefficients for high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Jia, M. C.; Gong, J. J.; Xia, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The mass attenuation coefficient of various Lead-Boron Polyethylene samples which can be used as the photon shielding materials in marine reactor, have been simulated using the MCNP-5 code, and compared with the theoretical values at the photon energy range 0.001MeV—20MeV. A good agreement has been observed. The variations of mass attenuation coefficient, linear attenuation coefficient and mean free path with photon energy between 0.001MeV to 100MeV have been plotted. The result shows that all the coefficients strongly depends on the photon energy, material atomic composition and density. The dose transmission factors for source Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60 have been worked out and their variations with the thickness of various sample materials have also been plotted. The variations show that with the increase of materials thickness the dose transmission factors decrease continuously. The results of this paper can provide some reference for the use of the high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene.

  4. Verification of radiation exposure using lead shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenyu; Azuma, Masami

    2016-01-01

    A long time use of radiation during IVR (intervention radiology) treatment leads up to an increased exposure on IVR operator. In order to prepare good environment for the operator to work without worry about exposure, the authors examined exposure reduction with the shields attached to the angiography instrument, i. e. lead curtain and lead glass. In this study, the lumber spine phantom was radiated using the instrument and the radiation leaked outside with and without shields was measured by the ionization chamber type survey meter. The meter was placed at the position which was considered to be that for IVR operator, and changed vertically 20-100 cm above X-ray focus by 10 cm interval. The radiation at the position of 80 cm above X-ray focus was maximum without shield and was hardly reduced with lead curtain. However, it was reduced with lead curtain plus lead glass. Similar reduction effects were observed at the position of 90-100 cm above X-ray focus. On the other hand, the radiation at the position of 70 cm above X-ray focus was not reduced with either shield, because that position corresponded to the gap between lead curtain and lead glass. The radiation at the position of 20-60 cm above X-ray focus was reduced with lead curtain, even if without lead glass. These results show that lead curtain and lead glass attached to the instrument can reduce the radiation exposure on IVR operator. Using these shields is considered to be one of good means for IVR operator to work safely. (author)

  5. Re-evaluation of Baby EBM Shielding Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rizal Mohd Chulan; Siti Aisah Hashim; Wah, L.K.; Mukhlis Moktar

    2013-01-01

    The minimum energy required for an electron beam (EB) to be used as an irradiation device is 200 keV. Nuclear Malaysia's home grown EB machine, the Baby EB can generate up to 140 keV. Therefore, to enable it to be used for application, an internal funding was acquired to increase the energy to up to 300 keV. In doing so, the existing shielding with thickness of 0.35 cm for the top frame and 0.7 cm for the middle and bottom frame needs to be reevaluated. This is to ensure that the shield can still provide significant protection from harmful radiation. This re-evaluation is also needed because of the recent change of clean area dose limit from 2.5 μSv/ hr to 1.0 μSv/ hr. The location of Baby EBM also needs to be re-evaluated if the weight reached 4500 kg/ m 2 (concentrated load for laboratories area). From the calculation it was found that the existing shielding is unable to provide the required protection from the harmful radiation. The recommended thicknesses for the shielding are 3.26 cm for the top frame, 3.5 cm for the middle frame and 3.78 for the bottom frame. Therefore, the total weight of the Baby EBM becomes more than 3000 kg/ m 2 (3337.38 kg/ m 2 ) and this justify the need for the Baby EBM to be transferred from first floor (room no.43008), block 43 (ALUTRON building) to a more suitable location. It is preferable that the new location is in a ground floor that can bear the increased weight. (author)

  6. Self-shielding for thick slabs in a converging neutron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Mildner, D F R

    1999-01-01

    We have previously given a correction to the neutron self-shielding for a thin slab to account for the increased average path length through the slab when irradiated in a converging neutron beam. This expression overstates the case for the self-shielding for a thick (or highly absorbing) slab. We give a better approximation to the increase in effective shielding correction for a slab placed in a converging neutron beam. It is negligible at large absorption mean free paths. (author)

  7. Uranium-lead shielding for nuclear material transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, E.C.; Miller, N.E.; Basham, S.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basis for the selection of shielding materials for spent fuel shipping containers is described with comments concerning the favorable and unfavorable aspects of steel, lead, and depleted uranium. A concept for a new type of material made of depleted uranium and lead is described which capitalizes on the best cask shielding characteristics of both materials. This cask shielding is made by filling the shielding cavity with pieces of depleted uranium and then backfilling the interstitial voids with lead. The lead would be bonded to the uranium and also to the cask shells if desired. Shielding density approaching 80 percent of that of solid uranium could be achieved, while a density of 65 percent is readily obtainable. This material should overcome the problems of the effect of lead melting in the fire accident, high thermal gradients at uranium-stainless steel interfaces and at a major reduction in cost over that of a solid uranium shielded cask. A development program is described to obtain information on the properties of the composite material to aid in design analysis and licensing and to define the fabrication techniques

  8. Lead Thickness Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucinski, R.

    1998-01-01

    The preshower lead thickness applied to the outside of D-Zero's superconducting solenoid vacuum shell was measured at the time of application. This engineering documents those thickness measurements. The lead was ordered in sheets 0.09375-inch and 0.0625-inch thick. The tolerance on thickness was specified to be +/- 0.003-inch. The sheets all were within that thickness tolerance. The nomenclature for each sheet was designated 1T, 1B, 2T, 2B where the numeral designates it's location in the wrap and 'T' or 'B' is short for 'top' or 'bottom' half of the solenoid. Micrometer measurements were taken at six locations around the perimeter of each sheet. The width,length, and weight of each piece was then measured. Using an assumed pure lead density of 0.40974 lb/in 3 , an average sheet thickness was calculated and compared to the perimeter thickness measurements. In every case, the calculated average thickness was a few mils thinner than the perimeter measurements. The ratio was constant, 0.98. This discrepancy is likely due to the assumed pure lead density. It is not felt that the perimeter is thicker than the center regions. The data suggests that the physical thickness of the sheets is uniform to +/- 0.0015-inch.

  9. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  10. A study on the calculation of the shielding wall thickness in medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dongnam Ins. of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological science, college of health sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to calculate the thickness of shielding for concrete which is mainly used for radiation shielding and study of the walls constructed to shield medical linear accelerator. The optimal shielding thickness was calculated using MCNPX(Ver.2.5.0) for 10 MV of photon beam energy generated by linear accelerator. As a result, the TVL for photon shielding was formed at 50⁓100 cm for pure concrete and concrete with Boron+polyethylene at 80⁓100 cm. The neutron shielding was calculated 100⁓140 cm for pure concrete and concrete with Boron+polyethylene at 90⁓100 cm. Based on this study, the concrete is considered to be most efficient method of using steel plates and adding Boron+polyethylene th the concrete.

  11. The optimum lead thickness for lead-activation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si Fenni; Hu Qingyuan

    2009-01-01

    The optimum lead thickness for lead-activation detectors has been studied in this paper. First existence of the optimum lead thickness is explained theoretically. Then the optimum lead thickness is obtained by two methods, MCNP5 calculation and mathematical estimation. At last factors which affect the optimum lead thickness are discussed. It turns out that the optimum lead thickness is irrelevant to incident neutron energies. It is recommended 2.5 cm generally.

  12. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  13. Minimum thickness blanket-shield for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, Y.; Greenspan, E.

    1989-01-01

    A lower bound on the minimum thickness fusion reactor blankets can be designed to have, if they are to breed 1.267 tritons per fusion neutron, is identified by performing a systematic nucleonic optimization of over a dozen different blanket concepts which use either Be, Li 17 Pb 83 , W or Zr for neutron multiplication. It is found that Be offers minimum thickness blankets; that the blanket and shield (B/S) thickness of Li 17 Pb 83 based blankets which are supplemented by Li 2 O and/or TiH 2 are comparable to the thickness of Be based B/S; that of the Be based blankets, the aqueous self-cooled one offers one of the most compact B/S; and that a number of blanket concepts might enable the design of B/S which is approximately 12 cm and 39 cm thinner than the B/S thickness of, respectively, conventional self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and Li blankets. Aqueous self-cooled tungsten blankets could be useful for experimental fusion devices provided they are designed to be heterogeneous. (orig.)

  14. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  15. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Yong Deok [Nonproliferation System Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea) is planned to utilize a high-flux (>101{sup 2n}/cm{sup 2}·s) neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV)/high-current (∼2 A) electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h), a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE)–Borax, B{sub 4}C, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in

  16. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Dong; Ahn, Sang Joon; Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je

    2015-01-01

    A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS) system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea) is planned to utilize a high-flux (>101 2n /cm 2 ·s) neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV)/high-current (∼2 A) electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h), a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE)–Borax, B 4 C, and Li 2 CO 3 ] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in the near future.

  17. Design optimization of radiation shielding structure for lead slowing-down spectrometer system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Dong Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS system is a promising nondestructive assay technique that enables a quantitative measurement of the isotopic contents of major fissile isotopes in spent nuclear fuel and its pyroprocessing counterparts, such as 235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, and, potentially, minor actinides. The LSDS system currently under development at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Daejeon, Korea is planned to utilize a high-flux (>1012 n/cm2·s neutron source comprised of a high-energy (30 MeV/high-current (∼2 A electron beam and a heavy metal target, which results in a very intense and complex radiation field for the facility, thus demanding structural shielding to guarantee the safety. Optimization of the structural shielding design was conducted using MCNPX for neutron dose rate evaluation of several representative hypothetical designs. In order to satisfy the construction cost and neutron attenuation capability of the facility, while simultaneously achieving the aimed dose rate limit (<0.06 μSv/h, a few shielding materials [high-density polyethylene (HDPE–Borax, B4C, and Li2CO3] were considered for the main neutron absorber layer, which is encapsulated within the double-sided concrete wall. The MCNP simulation indicated that HDPE-Borax is the most efficient among the aforementioned candidate materials, and the combined thickness of the shielding layers should exceed 100 cm to satisfy the dose limit on the outside surface of the shielding wall of the facility when limiting the thickness of the HDPE-Borax intermediate layer to below 5 cm. However, the shielding wall must include the instrumentation and installation holes for the LSDS system. The radiation leakage through the holes was substantially mitigated by adopting a zigzag-shape with concrete covers on both sides. The suggested optimized design of the shielding structure satisfies the dose rate limit and can be used for the construction of a facility in the near

  18. Determination of lead equivalent thickness to building blocks used in shielding of diagnostic x-ray rooms in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawash, A.; Khedr, M.; Wannus, K.; Souliman, J.; Al-Oudat, M.

    1998-06-01

    Lead equivalent thicknesses of various kinds of blocks (Hollow core, solid, filled, roof) with different thicknesses were determined. These blocks are widely used for building the diagnostic X-rya departments in Syria. Different applied voltages at X-ray tube (65, 85, 100, 125, 150 KVp) were examined. The results showed that the highest lead equivalent thicknesses for hollow core blocks were at 100 KVp. These equivalent thicknesses were 0.4372, 0.7008 and 0.928 mm for block thicknesses of 10, 15 and 20 cm, respectively. it was also found that, the lead equivalent thicknesses for filled, solid and concrete block were 3.5 to 4 times higher than that of the hollow core block for the same thicknesses and the applied KVp. Values obtained for roof blocks were similar to that of hollow core for the same conditions and geometry. (Author)

  19. Effect of low-Z absorber's thickness on gamma-ray shielding parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh, E-mail: ksmann6268@gmail.com [Department of Applied Sciences, Punjab Technical University, Kapurthala 144601 (India); Department of Physics, D.A.V. College, Bathinda 151001, Punjab (India); Heer, Manmohan Singh [Department of Physics, Kanya Maha Vidyalaya, Jalandhar 144001 (India); Rani, Asha [Department of Applied Sciences, Ferozpur College of Engineering and Technology, Ferozshah, Ferozpur 142052 (India)

    2015-10-11

    Gamma ray shielding behaviour of any material can be studied by various interaction parameters such as total mass attenuation coefficient (μ{sub m}); half value layer (HVL); tenth value layer (TVL); effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}), electron density (N{sub el}), effective atomic weight (A{sub eff}) and buildup factor. For gamma rays, the accurate measurements of μ{sub m} (cm{sup 2} g{sup −1}) theoretically require perfect narrow beam irradiation geometry. However, the practical geometries used for the experimental investigations deviate from perfect-narrowness thereby the multiple scattered photons cause systematic errors in the measured values of μ{sub m}. Present investigation is an attempt to find the optimum value of absorber thickness (low-Z) for which these errors are insignificant and acceptable. Both experimental and theoretical calculations have been performed to investigate the effect of absorber's thickness on μ{sub m} of six low-Z (10shielding parameters of any material. Good agreement of theoretical and measured values of μ{sub m} was observed for all absorbers with thickness ≤0.5 mean free paths, thus considered it as optimum thickness for low-Z materials in the selected energy range. White cement was found to possess maximum shielding effectiveness for the selected gamma rays. - Highlights: • Optimum thickness value is 0.5 mfp for low-Z absorbers in energy range 662–1332 keV. • For accurate measurement of μ{sub m} absorber's thickness should be ≤optimum thickness. • GRIC2-toolkit is useful for γ-ray shielding analysis of composite materials.

  20. RadShield: semiautomated shielding design using a floor plan driven graphical user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Matthew C; Wu, Dee H; Yang, Kai; Rutel, Isaac B

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to introduce and describe the development of RadShield, a Java-based graphical user interface (GUI), which provides a base design that uniquely performs thorough, spatially distributed calculations at many points and reports the maximum air-kerma rate and barrier thickness for each barrier pursuant to NCRP Report 147 methodology. Semiautomated shielding design calculations are validated by two approaches: a geometry-based approach and a manual approach. A series of geometry-based equations were derived giv-ing the maximum air-kerma rate magnitude and location through a first derivative root finding approach. The second approach consisted of comparing RadShield results with those found by manual shielding design by an American Board of Radiology (ABR)-certified medical physicist for two clinical room situations: two adjacent catheterization labs, and a radiographic and fluoroscopic (R&F) exam room. RadShield's efficacy in finding the maximum air-kerma rate was compared against the geometry-based approach and the overall shielding recommendations by RadShield were compared against the medical physicist's shielding results. Percentage errors between the geometry-based approach and RadShield's approach in finding the magnitude and location of the maximum air-kerma rate was within 0.00124% and 14 mm. RadShield's barrier thickness calculations were found to be within 0.156 mm lead (Pb) and 0.150 mm lead (Pb) for the adjacent catheteriza-tion labs and R&F room examples, respectively. However, within the R&F room example, differences in locating the most sensitive calculation point on the floor plan for one of the barriers was not considered in the medical physicist's calculation and was revealed by the RadShield calculations. RadShield is shown to accurately find the maximum values of air-kerma rate and barrier thickness using NCRP Report 147 methodology. Visual inspection alone of the 2D X-ray exam distribution by a medical physicist may not

  1. A gonadal shield with appropriate wall thicknesses for Co-60-teletherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlhoefer, J.

    1982-01-01

    A gonadal shield for men has been designed especially for use in Co-60-teletherapy of ventral fields in supine position. It has been made by simple means in the clinical workshop. The thickness of the top, sides, and botton are equal to about 3 half value layers for scattered radiation incident in the respective directions. Radiation dose rate to the testicles during irradiation of a large abdominal field ('inverted Y') was measured in a phantom and was found to be 7.1% of tumour dose rate without shield and 0.9% with gonadal shield. (orig.) [de

  2. Shielding of the contralateral breast during tangential irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffman, Thomas E; Miller, Michael; Laronga, Christine; Oliver, Shelly; Wong, Ping

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate both optimal and practical contralateral breast shielding during tangential irradiation in young patients. A shaped sheet of variable thickness of lead was tested on a phantom with rubber breasts, and an optimized shield was created. Testing on 18 consecutive patients 50 years or younger showed shielding consistently reduced contralateral breast dose to at least half, with small additional reduction after removal of the medial wedge. For younger patients in whom radiation exposure is of considerable concern, a simple shield of 2 mm lead thickness proved practical and effective.

  3. Determination of 210Pb activity concentration in lead shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slivka, J.; Mrdja, D.; Varga, E.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    210 Pb is concentrated during the separation lead from the ore and therefore it is the main pollutant of lead products. The content of this isotope limits the applicability of lead for low-level shielding of gamma spectrometers. In this paper, a new method for the determination of 210 Pb activity concentration in lead shielding from 46.5 keV gamma line intensity is presented. (author) [sr

  4. Efficiency of the cervical lead shield during intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaffe, I.; Littner, M.M.; Shlezinger, T.; Segal, P.

    1986-01-01

    The cervical lead shield was compared with the conventional lead apron with regard to efficiency of protection against radiation during a full-month survey (fourteen periapical and two bitewing radiographs). The study was performed on a Temex tissue-equivalent human phantom, and thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure radiation absorption in the ovaries, testes, and thyroid gland areas. Results showed that the cervical shield significantly reduces the amount of radiation to the skin in all three areas and is equally as effective as the combination of lead apron and thyroid shield. It is therefore recommended as a protective measure during intraoral radiography

  5. Design of a Shielded Reflection Type Pulsed Eddy Current Probe for the Evaluation of Thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Kil; Choi, Dong Myung [Kunsan National University, Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    For better evaluation of material thickness by using the reflection type pulsed eddy current method, various probe models are designed and their response signals, characteristics, and sensitivities to thickness variation are investigated by a numerical analysis method. Since the sensor needs to detect magnetic fields from eddy currents induced in a test material, not from the exciter coil, two types of models that are shielded by the combination of copper and ferrite and only by ferrite are considered. By studying response signals from these shielded probe models, the peak value and the zero crossing time are selected as useful signal features for the evaluation of material thickness. Investigation of sensitivities of these two features shows that the sensitivity of peak value is more useful than that of zero crossing time and that the probe shielded only by ferrite gives much better sensitivity to thickness variation

  6. Thermoforming plastic in lead shield construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahams, M.E.; Chow, C.H.; Loyd, M.D.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation treatments using low energy X-rays or electrons frequently require a final field defining shield to be placed on the patient's skin. A custom made lead cut-out is used to provide a close fit to a particular patient's surface contours. We have developed a procedure which utilizes POLYFORM thermoplastic to obtain a negative mold of the patient instead of the traditional plaster bandage or dental impression gel. The Polyform is softened in warm water, molded carefully over the patient's surface, and is removed when set or hardened, usually within five minutes. Then lead sheet cut-outs can be formed within this negative. For shielding cut-outs requiring thicker lead sheet, a positive is made from dental stone using this Polyform negative. We have found this procedure to be neat, fast and comfortable for both patient and the dosimetrist

  7. Shielding practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauermann, P.F.

    1985-08-01

    The basis of shielding practice against external irradiation is shown in a simple way. For most sources of radiation (point sources) occurring in shielding practice, the basic data are given, mainly in the form of tables, which are required to solve the shielding problems. The application of these data is explained and discussed using practical examples. Thickness of shielding panes of glove boxes for α and β radiation; shielding of sealed γ-radiography sources; shielding of a Co-60 radiation source, and of the manipulator panels for hot cells; damping factors for γ radiation and neutrons; shielding of fast and thermal neutrons, and of bremsstrahlung (X-ray tubes, Kr-85 pressure gas cylinders, 42 MeV betatrons, 20 MeV linacs); two-fold shielding (lead glass windows for hot cells, 14 MeV neutron generators); shielding against scattered radiation. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Measurement of radiation shielding properties of polymer composites by using HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Anil; Pillay, H.C.M.; Kale, P.K.; Datta, D.; Suman, S.K.; Gover, V.

    2014-01-01

    Lead is the most common radiation shield and its composite with polymers can be used as flexible radiation shields for different applications. However, lead is very hazardous and has been found to be associated with neurological disorders, kidney failure and hematotoxicity. Lead free radiation shield material has been developed by synthesizing radiation cross linked PDMS/Bi 2 O 3 polymer composites. In order to have a lead free radiation shield the relevant shielding properties such as linear attenuation, half value thickness (HVT) and tenth value thickness (TVT) have been measured by using HPGe detector. The present study describes the methodology of measurement of the shielding properties of the lead free shield material. In the measurement gamma energies such as 59.537 keV ( 241 Am), 122.061 keV and 136.474 keV ( 57 Co) are taken into consideration

  9. Conservative method for determination of material thickness used in shielding of veterinary facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    For determination of an effective method for shielding of veterinary rooms, was provided shielding methods generally used in rooms which works with X-ray production and radiotherapy. Every calculation procedure is based in traditional variables used to transmission calculation. The thickness of the materials used for primary and secondary shieldings are obtained to respect the limits set by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). This work presents the development of a computer code in order to serve as a practical tool for determining rapid and effective materials and their thicknesses to shield veterinary facilities. The code determines transmission values of the shieldings and compares them with data from transmission 'maps' provided by NCRP-148 report. These 'maps' were added to the algorithm through interpolation techniques of curves of materials used for shielding. Each interpolation generates about 1,000,000 points that are used to generate a new curve. The new curve is subjected to regression techniques, which makes possible to obtain nine degree polynomial, and exponential equations. These equations whose variables consist of transmission of values, enable trace all the points of this curve with high precision. The data obtained from the algorithm were satisfactory with official data presented by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and can contribute as a practical tool for verification of shielding of veterinary facilities that require using Radiotherapy techniques and X-ray production

  10. Calculation of shielding thickness by combining the LTSN and Decomposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco T. de

    1997-01-01

    A combination of the LTS N and Decomposition methods is reported to shielding thickness calculation. The angular flux is evaluated solving a transport problem in planar geometry considering the S N approximation, anisotropic scattering and one-group of energy. The Laplace transform is applied in the set of S N equations. The transformed angular flux is then obtained solving a transcendental equation and the angular flux is restored by the Heaviside expansion technique. The scalar flux is attained integrating the angular flux by Gaussian quadrature scheme. On the other hand, the scalar flux is linearly related to the dose rate through the mass and energy absorption coefficient. The shielding thickness is obtained solving a transcendental equation resulting from the application of the LTS N approach by the Decomposition methods. Numerical simulations are reported. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  11. The application of semianalytic method for calculating the thickness of biological shields of nuclear reactors. Part 2. Attenuation of gamma rays. An example of shield's thickness calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszek, W.; Kucypera, S.

    1982-01-01

    The semianalytic method was used for calculating the attenuation of gamma rays and the thickness of biological shield of graphite moderated reactor. A short description of computer code as well as the exemplary results of calculations are given. (A.S.)

  12. Shielding effect of lead glasses on radiologists' eye lens exposure in interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-01-01

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm"2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm"2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm"2 per glass) lens are recommended (authors)

  13. Radiation shielding method for pipes, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Shuichi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute shielding walls of a dense structure around pipes and enable to reduce the wall thickness thereof upon periodical inspection, etc. for nuclear power plants. Constitution: For those portions of pipes requring shieldings, cylindrical vessels surrounding the portions are disposed and connected to a mercury supply system, a mercury discharge system and a freezing system for solidifying mercury. After charging mercury in a tank by way of a supply hose to the cylindrical vessels, the temperature of the mercury is lowered below the freezing point thereof to solidify the mercury while circulating cooling medium, to thereby form dense cylindrical radioactive-ray shielding walls. The specific gravity of mercury is greater than that of lead and, accordingly, the thickness of the shielding walls can be reduced as compared with the conventional wall thickness of the entire laminates. (Takahashi, M.)

  14. Investigation and assessment of lead slag concrete as nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the efficiency of heavy weight concrete as a shielding material in constructing nuclear installations as well as for radioactive wastes disposal facilities.In this context, lead slag was used as a replacement for fine aggregates in heavy concrete shields that include local heavy weight aggregates (namely; barite and ilmenite) as well as normal concrete includes dolomite and sand as coarse and fine aggregates, as a reference. The effect of different percentages of lead slag was investigated to assess the produced lead slag concrete as a nuclear shielding material. The different properties (physical, mechanical and nuclear) of the produced lead slag concrete were investigated. The results obtained showed that increasing the lead slag percentage improving the investigated properties of the different concrete mixes. In addition, ilmenite concrete with 20% lead slag showed the best results for all the investigated properties.

  15. Nano lead oxide and epdm composite for development of polymer based radiation shielding material: Gamma irradiation and attenuation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Akbay, I. K.; Uzun, H.; Babucçuoglu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    It is important to have a shielding material that is not easily breaking in order to have a robust product that guarantee the radiation protection of the patients and radiation workers especially during the medical exposure. In this study, nano sized lead oxide (PbO) particles were used, for the first time, to obtain an elastomeric composite material in which lead oxide nanoparticles, after the surface modification with silane binding agent, was used as functional material for radiation shielding. In addition, the composite material including 1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% weight percent nano sized lead oxide was irradiated with doses of 81, 100 and 120 kGy up to an irradiation period of 248 days in a gamma ray source with an initial dose rate of 21.1 Gy/h. Mechanical, thermal properties of the irradiated materials were investigated using DSC, DMA, TGA and tensile testing and modifications in thermal and mechanical properties of the nano lead oxide containing composite material via gamma irradiation were reported. Moreover, effect of bismuth-III oxide addition on radiation attenuation of the composite material was investigated. Nano lead oxide and bismuth-III oxide particles were mixed with different weight ratios. Attenuation tests have been conducted to determine lead equivalent values for the developed composite material. Lead equivalent thickness values from 0.07 to 0.65 (2-6 mm sample thickness) were obtained.

  16. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  17. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLorenzo, M [Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Wu, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Ok (United States); Rutel, I [University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yang, K [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  18. Method of constructing shielding wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya.

    1990-01-01

    For instance, surfaces of lead particles each formed into a sphere of about 0.5 to 0.3 mm grain size are coated with a coating material of a synthetic resin comprising a polymeric material such as teflon. Subsequently, the floated lead particle are kneaded with concrete materials and then poured into a molding die by way of a hose. After coagulation, the molding die is removed to complete shielding walls in which lead particles are scattered substantially at an equal distance. In this way, since the lead particles are mixed into the shielding walls, shielding effects can be improved by so much as the lead particles are mixed, thereby enabling to reduce the thickness of the shielding walls. Further, since the lead particles are coated with the coating material, the lead particles are insulated from the concrete materials, thereby enabling to prevent the corrosion of the lead particles. Furthermore, since the lead particles and the concrete materials can be transported with ease, operation labors can be reduced. (T.M.)

  19. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from panoramic radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottke, D; Grossekettler, L; Sawada, K; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the absorbed doses in a full anthropomorphic body phantom from two different panoramic radiography devices, performing protocols with and without applying a lead apron. A RANDO(®) full body phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories Inc., Stamford, CT) was equipped with 110 thermoluminescent dosemeters at 55 different sites and set up in two different panoramic radiography devices [SCANORA(®) three-dimensional (3D) (SOREDEX, Tuusula, Finland) and ProMax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland)] and exposed. Two different protocols were performed in the two devices. The first protocol was performed without any lead shielding, whereas the phantom was equipped with a standard adult lead apron for the second protocol. A two-tailed paired samples t-test for the SCANORA 3D revealed that there is no difference between the protocol using lead apron shielding (m = 87.99, s = 102.98) and the protocol without shielding (m = 87.34, s = 107.49), t(54) = -0.313, p > 0.05. The same test for the ProMax 3D showed that there is also no difference between the protocol using shielding (m = 106.48, s = 117.38) and the protocol without shielding (m = 107.75, s = 114,36), t(54) = 0.938, p > 0.05. In conclusion, the results of this study showed no statistically significant differences between a panoramic radiography with or without the use of lead apron shielding.

  20. Nomogram for Determining Shield Thickness for Point and Line Sources of Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joenemalm, C; Malen, K

    1966-10-15

    A set of nomograms is given for the determination of the required shield thickness against gamma radiation. The sources handled are point and infinite line sources with shields of Pb, Fe, magnetite concrete (p = 3.6), ordinary concrete (p = 2.3) or water. The gamma energy range covered is 0.5 - 10 MeV. The nomograms are directly applicable for source and dose points on the surfaces of the shield. They can easily be extended to source and dose points in other positions by applying a geometrical correction. Also included are data for calculation of the source strength for the most common materials and for fission product sources.

  1. Nomogram for Determining Shield Thickness for Point and Line Sources of Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joenemalm, C.; Malen, K

    1966-10-01

    A set of nomograms is given for the determination of the required shield thickness against gamma radiation. The sources handled are point and infinite line sources with shields of Pb, Fe, magnetite concrete (p = 3.6), ordinary concrete (p = 2.3) or water. The gamma energy range covered is 0.5 - 10 MeV. The nomograms are directly applicable for source and dose points on the surfaces of the shield. They can easily be extended to source and dose points in other positions by applying a geometrical correction. Also included are data for calculation of the source strength for the most common materials and for fission product sources

  2. Gamma radiation shielding analysis of lead-flyash concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kanwaldeep; Singh, Sukhpal; Dhaliwal, A.S.; Singh, Gurmel

    2015-01-01

    Six samples of lead-flyash concrete were prepared with lead as an admixture and by varying flyash content – 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% (by weight) by replacing cement and keeping constant w/c ratio. Different gamma radiation interaction parameters used for radiation shielding design were computed theoretically and measured experimentally at 662 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV gamma radiation energy using narrow transmission geometry. The obtained results were compared with ordinary-flyash concretes. The radiation exposure rate of gamma radiation sources used was determined with and without lead-flyash concretes. - Highlights: • Concrete samples with lead as admixture were casted with flyash replacing 0%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% of cement content (by weight). • Gamma radiation shielding parameters of concretes for different gamma ray sources were measured. • The attenuation results of lead-flyash concretes were compared with the results of ordinary flyash concretes

  3. An attenuation Layer for Electromagnetic Shielding in X- Band Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Zaroushani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled exposure to X-band frequency leads to health damage. One of the principles of radiation protection is shielding. But, conventional shielding materials have disadvantages. Therefore, studies of novel materials, as an alternative to conventional shielding materials, are required to obtain new electromagnetic shielding material. Therefore, this study investigated the electromagnetic shielding of two component epoxy thermosetting resin for the X - band frequency with workplace approach. Two components of epoxy resin mixed according to manufacturing instruction with the weight ratio that was 100:10 .Epoxy plates fabricated in three different thicknesses (2, 4 and 6mm and shielding effectiveness measured by Vector Network Analyzer. Then, shielding effectiveness measured by the scattering parameters.The results showed that 6mm thickness of epoxy had the highest and 2mm had the lowest average of shielding effectiveness in X-band frequency that is 4.48 and 1.9 dB, respectively. Also, shielding effectiveness increased by increasing the thickness. But this increasing is useful up to 4mm. Percentage shielding effectiveness of attenuation for 6, 4 and 2mm thicknesses is 64.35%, 63.31% and 35.40%. Also, attenuation values for 4mm and 6mm thicknesses at 8.53 GHz and 8.52 GHz frequency are 77.15% and 82.95%, respectively, and can be used as favourite shields for the above frequency. 4mm-Epoxy is a suitable candidate for shielding application in X-band frequency range but, in the lower section, 6mm thickness is recommended. Finely, the shielding matrix can be used for selecting the proper thickness for electromagnetic shielding in X- Band frequency.

  4. Glasses impregnated with lead for radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Monem, A.M.; Kansouh, W.A.; Megahid, R.M.; Ismail, A.L.; Awad, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The attenuation properties of glasses with different concentration of lead have been investigated for the attenuation of gamma-rays from cesium-137 and for total gamma rays using a beam of neutrons and gamma rays emitted from californium-252 source. Measurements have been performed using a gamma-ray spectrometer with Nal(T1) detector for gamma-rays emitted from 137 Cs and a neutron/gamma spectrometer with stilbene scintillator for measurement of total gamma-rays from 252 Cf neutron source. The latter applied the pulse shape discrimination technique to distinguish between recoil proton and recoil electron pulses. The obtained results given the form displayed pulse height spectra and attenuation relations which were used to derive the linear attenuation coefficient (μ), and the mass attenuation coefficient (mu/p) of the investigated glasses. In addition, calculations were performed to determine the attenuation properties of glass shields under investigation using XCOM code given by the others. A comparison of the shielding properties of these glasses with some standard shielding materials indicated that, the investigated glasses process the shielding advantages required for different nuclear technology applications

  5. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  6. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  7. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO"R phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500"R, ProMax"R 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax"R 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 μSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 μSv (SD = 0.31 μSv). For the CS 9500"R, the ED was 88 and 86 μSv (SD = 0.95 μSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam. (authors)

  8. Some aspects of thick, soft nickel plating for end shields of atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, R.

    1987-01-01

    Thick (55 Thou) and soft (160 vickers) hardness number nickel plating over SS for RAPP end shields presented unusual problems as the thickness required was extremely large creating adhesion problems and the extremely stringent hardness conditions. A sulfamate bath with nickel anode was found suitable. The problems in thick, soft plating, the chemical and other procedures adopted to monitor the bath and the plated specimen and the other details are presented. (author). 11 refs

  9. The evaluation of the radiation shielding ability of lead glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Keisuke; Fukushi, Masahiro; Myojoyama, Atsushi; Kitamura, Hideaki; Nakaya, Giichiro; Hassan, Nabil; Inoue, Kazumasa; Kimura, Junichi; Sawaguchi, Masato; Kinase, Sakae; Saito, Kimiaki

    2008-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with the tracer 2-[F-18] Fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is widely used in the clinical PET. However, the photon energy used in the PET scans is considerably higher than that of the X-rays traditionally used in the diagnoses. The radiation protection in the PET institution, therefore, is the remaining problem. Meanwhile, lead glass has attracted considerable attention as a radiation-shielding material for the PET institution. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the radiation-shielding ability of the lead glass against the positron emitters. The shielding ability evaluations were done both in the actual experiments and in the Monte Carlo simulation. The lead glass, the object of evaluation in this study, proved to have sufficient protective effect. The development and the spread of a thinner and lighter lead glass with the same effective dose transmission factor should be expected in the near future. (author)

  10. Comparison between Clinically Used Irregular Fields Shielded by Cerrobend and Standard Lead Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farajollahi A. R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In radiation therapy centers across Iran, protection of normal tissues is usually accomplished by either Cerrobend or lead block shielding. In this study, the influence of these two shielding methods on central axis dose distribution of photon beam a Cobalt unit was investigated in clinical conditions. Materials and Methods: All measurements were performed for 60Co γ-ray beams and the Cerrobend blocks were fabricated by commercial Cerrobend materials. Standard lead block shields belonged to Cobalt unit. Data was collected through a calibrated ionization chamber, relative dosimetry systems and a TLD dosimetery. Results: Results of the percent depth dose (PDD measurements at depths of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20 cm for 23 different field sizes of patients with head and neck cancer showed no significant differences between lead and Cerrobend shielding methods. Measurement results of absolute dosimetry in depths of 1.5, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 cm also showed no significant differences between these two shielding methods. The same results were obtained by TLD dosimetry on patient skin. Conclusion: Use of melt shielding methods is a very easy and fast shield-making technique with no differences in PDD, absolute and skin dose between lead and Cerrobend block shielding methods.

  11. Improved Monte Carlo modelling of multi-energy a-rays penetration through thick stratified shielding slabs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of Monte Carlo method for the calculation of dose build up factor of, mixed 1.37 and 2.75 MeV, a-rays penetration through stratified shielding slabs. Six double layer shielding slabs namely, 12 A l+Fe, 12 A l+Pb, 6 F e+Al, 6 F e+Pb, 4 P b+Al, 4 P b+Fe were examined. Furthermore, experimental and theoretical results are also presented. The experimental results were taken from the experimental facility installed at the Universities Research reactor Center (Risley, UK). Activated Na2SO3 solution provided a uniform Na-24 disc source of a-rays at both energies (1.37 and 2.75 MeV) with equal intensity. The theoretical results were calculated using the Bowman and Trubey formula. This formula takes into account an exponentially decaying function of the shield thickness (in mfp) to the end point of the multi-layer slab. The experimental and theoretical results were used to evaluate the simulation results produced from a Monte Carlo program (DUTMONCA code) which was developed in Democritus University of Thrace (Xanthi, Greece). The DUTMONCA code was written in Pascal language and run on an Intel PIII-800 microprocessor. The developed code (which is an improved version of an existing Monte Carlo program) has the ability to produce good results for thick shielding slabs overcoming the problems encountered in older version program. The simulation results are compared with experimental and theoretical results. Good agreement can be observed, even for thick layer shielding slabs, although there are some wayward experimental values which are due to sources of error associated with the experimental procedure

  12. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  13. Shielding Effect of Lead Glasses on Radiologists' Eye Lens Exposure in Interventional Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Panpan; Kong, Yan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Qianqian; Zhuo, Weihai; Liu, Haikuan

    2017-04-20

    To study the shielding effect of radiologists' eye lens with lead glasses of different equivalent thicknesses and sizes in interventional radiology procedures. Using the human voxel phantom with a more accurate model of the eye and MCNPX software, eye lens doses of the radiologists who wearing different kinds of lead glasses were simulated, different beam projections were taken into consideration during the simulation. Measurements were also performed with the physical model to verify simulation results. Simulation results showed that the eye lens doses were reduced by a factor from 3 to 9 when wearing a 20 cm2-sized lead glasses with the equivalent thickness ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mm Pb. The increase of dose reduction factor (DRF) was not significant whenever increase the lead equivalent of glasses of which larger than 0.35 mm. Furthermore, the DRF was proportional to the size of glass lens from 6 to 30 cm2 with the same lead equivalent. The simulation results were in well agreements with the measured ones. For more reasonable and effective protection of the eye lens of interventional radiologists, a pair of glasses with a lead equivalent of 0.5 mm Pb and large-sized (at least 27 cm2 per glass) lens are recommended. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Influence of lead apron shielding on absorbed doses from cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottke, Dennis; Andersson, Jonas; Ejima, Ken-Ichiro; Sawada, Kunihiko; Schulze, Dirk

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate absorbed and to calculate effective doses (EDs) in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study was conducted using examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. A full-body male RANDO® phantom was loaded with 110 GR200A thermoluminescence dosemeter chips at 55 different sites and set up in two different CBCT systems (CS 9500®, ProMax® 3D). Two different protocols were performed: the phantom was set up (1) with and (2) without a lead apron. No statistically significant differences in organ and absorbed doses from regions outside the primary beam could be found when comparing results from exposures with and without lead apron shielding. Consequently, calculating the ED showed no significant differences between the examination protocols with and without lead apron shielding. For the ProMax® 3D with shielding, the ED was 149 µSv, and for the examination protocol without shielding 148 µSv (SD = 0.31 µSv). For the CS 9500®, the ED was 88 and 86 µSv (SD = 0.95 µSv), respectively, with and without lead apron shielding. The results revealed no statistically significant differences in the absorbed doses between examination with and without lead apron shielding, especially in organs outside the primary beam. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the lead aprons and thyroid shields worn by cardiologists in angiography departments of two main general hospitals in Mashhad, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Zare, H.; Bayani, Sh.; Esmaili, S.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years coronary artery angiography and angioplasty procedures have become very popular. Consequently radiation protection of the cardiologists, their assistants and technicians working in the vicinity of the x-ray tube is essential. Although in recent years in developed countries, high dose x-ray examinations such as coronary angiography have attracted the attention of health physicists but in developing countries it may take some years before it would receive any attention. In Iran generally film badge is the most common personal radiation monitoring device used for this purpose; it is placed beneath the lead apron. The shielding effect of different lead aprons and thyroid shields have been evaluated. TL dosimeters, suitably calibrated, were placed over and under lead shields corresponding to the thyroid and gonad positions of the personnel. 223 angiography examinations by femoral route were included in this work. Four types of aprons and three types of thyroid shields were examined. They were different in shape and lead equivalent thickness. Our results have revealed that apron with 0.35 mmPb, one piece and front closed has maximum shielding effect. Also thyroid shield with 0.5 mmPb and very large edge provide a better protection against radiation than other types. (author)

  16. Requirement for radiation shields of transportation pipe for on line inhalation gases from compact cyclotron in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachiya, Takenori; Hagami, Eiichi; Shoji, Yasuaki; Aizawa, Yasuo; Kanno, Iwao; Uemura, Kazuo; Handa, Masahiko; Mori, Junichi; Fukagawa, Akihisa.

    1989-01-01

    In the unit housing of a compact cyclotron and positron emission CT (PET), positron emitting gas such as 15 O, 11 C, C 15 O 2 , C 15 O etc. is supplied from a cyclotron to a PET room through a transportation pipe with an appropriate shield to reduce positron annihilation radiation. This paper discribes the effect of lead and concrete shields with various thickness. Using lead or concrete shield blocks with various thicknesses, radiation leakage through the shield was measured by an ionization chamber type survey meter during continuous and constant supply of 15 O gas of 1.85 GBq/min concentration which is the maximum dose for clinical use. The leakage radiation measured was 213.7, 56.0, 15.3, 5.0 μSv/week for lead shield with 1, 2, 3, and 4 cm thickness, respectively, and 193.3, 30.5 and 5.1 μSv/week for concrete shields with thickness of 10, 20, and 30 cm, respectively. The present study shows that to keep less than 300 μSv/week, which is the permissible dose rate of the boundary zone around the radiation controlled area by Japan Science and Technology Agency, it is required to use more than 8 mm thick lead shield or 7 cm thick concrete for continuous supply of 1.85 GBq/min 15 O gas. (author)

  17. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  18. Gammatography of thick lead vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Sundaram, V.M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiography, scintillation and GM counting and dose measurements using ionisation chamber equipment are commonly used for detecting flaws/voids in materials. The first method is mostly used for steel vessels and to a lesser extent thin lead vessels also and is essentially qualitative. Dose measuring techniques are used for very thick and large lead vessels for which high strength radioactive sources are required, with its inherent handling problems. For vessels of intermediate thicknesses, it is ideal to use a small strength source and a GM or scintillation counter assembly. At the Reactor Research Centre, Kalpakkam, such a system was used for checking three lead vessels of thicknesses varying from 38mm to 65mm. The tolerances specified were +- 4% variation in lead thickness. The measurements also revealed the non concentricity of one vessel which had a thickness varying from 38mm to 44mm. The second vessel was patently non-concentric and the dimensional variation was truly reproduced in the measurements. A third vessel was fabricated with careful control of dimensions and the measurements exhibited good concentricity. Small deviations were observed, attributable to imperfect bondings between steel and lead. This technique has the following advantages: (a) weaker sources used result in less handling problems reducing the personnel exposures considerably; (b) the sensitivity of the instrument is quite good because of better statistics; (c) the time required for scanning a small vessel is more, but a judicious use of a scintillometer for initial fast scan will help in reducing the total scanning time; (d) this method can take advantage of the dimensional variations themselves to get the calibration and to estimate the deviations from specified tolerances. (auth.)

  19. Radiation Attenuation and Stability of ClearView Radiation Shielding TM-A Transparent Liquid High Radiation Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Jayeesh

    2018-04-01

    Radiation exposure is a limiting factor to work in sensitive environments seen in nuclear power and test reactors, medical isotope production facilities, spent fuel handling, etc. The established choice for high radiation shielding is lead (Pb), which is toxic, heavy, and abidance by RoHS. Concrete, leaded (Pb) bricks are used as construction materials in nuclear facilities, vaults, and hot cells for radioisotope production. Existing transparent shielding such as leaded glass provides minimal shielding attenuation in radiotherapy procedures, which in some cases is not sufficient. To make working in radioactive environments more practicable while resolving the lead (Pb) issue, a transparent, lightweight, liquid, and lead-free high radiation shield-ClearView Radiation Shielding-(Radium Incorporated, 463 Dinwiddie Ave, Waynesboro, VA). was developed. This paper presents the motivation for developing ClearView, characterization of certain aspects of its use and performance, and its specific attenuation testing. Gamma attenuation testing was done using a 1.11 × 10 Bq Co source and ANSI/HPS-N 13.11 standard. Transparency with increasing thickness, time stability of liquid state, measurements of physical properties, and performance in freezing temperatures are reported. This paper also presents a comparison of ClearView with existing radiation shields. Excerpts from LaSalle nuclear power plant are included, giving additional validation. Results demonstrated and strengthened the expected performance of ClearView as a radiation shield. Due to the proprietary nature of the work, some information is withheld.

  20. Characterization of a lead breast shielding for dose reduction in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Paula Duarte; Brochi, Marco Aurelio Corte; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de, E-mail: pauladuarte@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Granzotti, Cristiano Roberto Fabri; Santos, Yago da Silva [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/RSP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras

    2014-07-15

    Objective: several studies have been published regarding the use of bismuth shielding to protect the breast in computed tomography (CT) scans and, up to the writing of this article, only one publication about barium shielding was found. The present study was aimed at characterizing, for the first time, a lead breast shielding. Materials and methods: the percentage dose reduction and the influence of the shielding on quantitative imaging parameters were evaluated. Dose measurements were made on a CT equipment with the aid of specific phantoms and radiation detectors. A processing software assisted in the qualitative analysis evaluating variations in average CT number and noise on images. Results: the authors observed a reduction in entrance dose by 30% and in CTDIvol by 17%. In all measurements, in agreement with studies in the literature, the utilization of cotton fiber as spacer object reduced significantly the presence of artifacts on the images. All the measurements demonstrated increase in the average CT number and noise on the images with the presence of the shielding. Conclusion: as expected, the data observed with the use of lead shielding were of the same order as those found in the literature about bismuth shielding. (author)

  1. Development of a computer code for determining the thickness of shielding used in cardiac angiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of an effective shielding against the interaction of ionizing radiation in X-ray rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for specification of a primary and secondary shielding thickness of a X-ray room considers the following factors: use factor, occupational factor, distance between the source and the wall, workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the receptor. The program built from this data, has the objective of identifying and using variables in functions obtained through linear regressions of graphics offered by NCRP Report-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) for the shielding calculation of the room walls as wall dark room and adjacent areas. With the methodology constructed a program validation is done by comparison of results with a base case provided by that report. The values of the thicknesses obtained comprise various materials such as steel, wood and concrete. Once validated an application is made in a real case of X-ray room. His visual construction is done with the help of software used in modeling of interiors and exteriors. The construction of shielding calculating program has the goal of being an easy tool for planning of X-ray rooms in order to meet the established limits by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in September 2011

  2. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  3. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes

  4. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z{sub eff} of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes.

  5. A polynomial–based function approach to point isotropic gamma-ray buildup factor data in double layered spherical shield of water and lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Alamatsaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As the input of MCNP code (Monte Carlo N - Particle code system, a monoenergetic and isotropic point source with the energy rangeg from 0.3 to 10 MeV was placed at the center of a spherical material surrounded by another one. The first shielding material was water and the second one was lead. The total thickness of the shield varied between 2 to 10 mfp. Then, using the output of MCNCP, exposure build up factor was calculated. The MCNP computed data were analyzed by plotting the buildup factor as a function of each independent variable (energy, first material thickness and second material thickness and observing the trends. Based on the trends, we examined many different expressions with different number of constants. By MINUIT the FORTRAN program, the constants were calculated, which gave the best agreement between the MCNP-computed exposure buildup factors and those obtained by the formula. At last, we developed a polynomial formula with 11 constants that reproduced exposure buildup factor with a relative error below 2% (in comparison with the MCNP result.

  6. Program for photon shielding calculations. Examination of approximations on irradiation geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isozumi, Yasuhito; Ishizuka, Fumihiko; Miyatake, Hideo; Kato, Takahisa; Tosaki, Mitsuo

    2004-01-01

    Penetration factors and related numerical data in 'Manual of Practical Shield Calculation of Radiation Facilities (2000)', which correspond to the irradiation geometries of point isotropic source in infinite thick material (PI), point isotropic source in finite thick material (PF) and vertical incident to finite thick material (VF), have been carefully examined. The shield calculation based on the PI geometry is usually performed with effective dose penetration factors of radioisotopes given in the 'manual'. The present work cleary shows that such a calculation may lead to an overestimate more than twice larger, especially for thick shield of concrete and water. Employing the numerical data in the 'manual', we have fabricated a simple computer program for the estimation of penetration factors and effective doses of radioisotopes in the different irradiation geometries, i.e., PI, PF and VF. The program is also available to calculate the effective dose from a set of radioisotopes in the different positions, which is necessary for the γ-ray shielding of radioisotope facilities. (author)

  7. Use of lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans: Results of an international survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iball, Gareth R., E-mail: gri@medphysics.leeds.ac.u [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Brettle, David S. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Old Medical School, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds, W. Yorkshire LS1 3EX (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: An online survey has been used to assess the use of abdominal lead shielding on pregnant patients undergoing CT scans. The aim of the study was to identify potential geographical variations in the use of such shielding as well as the opinions of the users in terms of the weight, manoeuvrability and ergonomics of the lead shields. Materials and methods: The online questionnaire was distributed to CT Radiographers in the UK, Europe, North America and Australia and responses were gathered electronically over a six month period. All completed responses were downloaded and subsequently analysed for each geographical region. Results: In total, 390 completed questionnaires were received with over 100 from each of the UK, North America and Australia. The use of lead shielding was found to vary significantly across the globe with the highest usage in North America (94.5%) and the lowest usage in Europe (46.3%). Approximately 20% of all respondents said that they experienced occupationally related back pain and 25% of all respondents said that patients complained about the weight of the shielding. Conclusion: Significant geographical variations in both the use of lead shielding for foetal radiation protection and the users' opinions of the shielding devices that are used have been identified and it has become clear that existing shielding solutions are not optimised for this task.

  8. Mechanical design of the TIBER breeding shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathke, J.; Deutsch, L. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Space Systems Div.)

    1989-04-01

    TIBER features a segmented shield assembly that provides the nuclear shielding for the superconducting toroidal field coils. In addition to its primary function, the shield also provides tritium breeding through the use of water coolant that contains 16 wt% dissolved lithium nitrate. Because the TIBER reactor need not provide electrical power, the coolant is maintained at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and low temperature (75/sup 0/C). The shield is made in several segments to facilitate assembly and allow for replacement of high heat flux components (divertor blades). The segments are designated as inboard, outboard, upper, lower, and divertor modules. In total, there are 96 separate modules in the machine, consisting of six different types. The design features of the different modules vary primarily depending on the thickness of the shield in a given location. The very thick outboard shield has a breeding zone in the inboard portion of the module, with a shielding zone behind it. The breeding zone consists of a stainless steel casing filled with beryllium spheres. The shielding zone consists of the same casing filled with steel spheres. Both of these zones have lithiated water circulated throughout to provide cooling and breeding. In zones with minimal thickness, tungsten alloys are used to achieve the required shielding. These alloys are incoprorated in subassemblies utilizing stainless steel casings surrounding blocks of tungsten heavy metal alloy. These are infiltrated with lead on final assembly to form a thermally continuous panel. Several of these panels are then assembled into an outer stainless steel case to form an inboard module. These modules also use the lithiated coolant. The details of the design are presented and discussed. (orig.).

  9. Dose rate reduction using epoxy mixed lead shielding: experimental and theoretical determination of its shielding effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, R.K.B.; Prasad, S.K.; Babu, K.S.; Hardiya, M.R.; Ullas, O.P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: High background radiation field exists in Water Treatment Area (WTA) of Rod Cutting Building (RCB) in Cirus due to beta, gamma contamination on its floor. The high contamination on sides of wall and on floor is primarily due to deposition of activity generated during the regeneration of old mixed bed cartridges earlier (before year 1985) and presently due to deposition of contaminants by sump overflowing, wastes generated during maintenance/servicing of circulating pumps. RCB-WTA contribution to collective dose in present situation is up to 30% of the total collective dose of Cirus. Various options such as chipping of top layer of concrete floor of a sample area, in-situ placing of slab of cement and lead shot mixture were considered. In this case the man-rem consumption was high as radiation dose rate on concrete chip was 0.4 mGy/h and air activity generated was high, that too long lived with 137 Cs-as main constituent. The dose reduction factor was 1.7. In the second option the reduction in dose rate was insignificant and in-situ pouring of concrete consumed high collective dose. Hence above two options were not acceptable. Therefore the idea of tiling the contaminated floor with prefabricated epoxy mixed lead shots was accepted from ALARA point of view. It was concluded that pre-fabricated slabs of epoxy mixed lead slab of 25 mm thickness can be laid in RCB area to achieve a dose rate reduction factor of approximately five at a height of 30 cm above floor. This will result in a reduction of Person-mSv consumption in RCB by a factor of 5-10. These slabs of different thickness were fabricated outside RCB and were tested for shielding effectiveness experimentally by using radiation source and theoretically using MCNP code. Dose reduction factor of five for a point source, obtained experimentally for epoxy mixed lead shots was very near to value obtained by theoretical simulation. An extended calculation for an area source using this MCNP model gives a

  10. Evaluation of additional lead shielding in protecting the physician from radiation during cardiac interventional procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chida, Koichi; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Hiroo

    2005-01-01

    Since cardiac interventional procedures deliver high doses of radiation to the physician, radiation protection for the physician in cardiac catheterization laboratories is very important. One of the most important means of protecting the physician from scatter radiation is to use additional lead shielding devices, such as tableside lead drapes and ceiling-mounted lead acrylic protection. During cardiac interventional procedures (cardiac IVR), however, it is not clear how much lead shielding reduces the physician dose. This study compared the physician dose [effective dose equivalent (EDE) and dose equivalent (DE)] with and without additional shielding during cardiac IVR. Fluoroscopy scatter radiation was measured using a human phantom, with an ionization chamber survey meter, with and without additional shielding. With the additional shielding, fluoroscopy scatter radiation measured with the human phantom was reduced by up to 98%, as compared with that without. The mean EDE (whole body, mean±SD) dose to the operator, determined using a Luxel badge, was 2.55±1.65 and 4.65±1.21 mSv/year with and without the additional shielding, respectively (p=0.086). Similarly, the mean DE (lens of the eye) to the operator was 15.0±9.3 and 25.73±5.28 mSv/year, respectively (p=0.092). In conclusion, although tableside drapes and lead acrylic shields suspended from the ceiling provided extra protection to the physician during cardiac IVR, the reduction in the estimated physician dose (EDE and DE) during cardiac catheterization with additional shielding was lower than we expected. Therefore, there is a need to develop more ergonomically useful protection devices for cardiac IVR. (author)

  11. Radiation shielding cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yasuo; Fujinuma, Tadashi; Tamura, Shoji.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation shielding cloth having radiation shielding layers comprising a composition of inorganic powder of high specific gravity and rubber are excellentin flexibility and comfortable to put on. However, since they are heavy in the weight, operators are tired upon putting them for a long time. In view of the above, the radiation ray shielding layers are prepared by calendering sheets obtained by preliminary molding of the composition to set the variation of the thickness within a range of +15% to -0% of prescribed thickness. Since the composition of inorganic powder at high specific gravity and rubber used for radiation ray shielding comprises a great amount of inorganic powder at high specific gravity blended therein, it is generally poor in fabricability. Therefor, it is difficult to attain fine control for the sheet thickness by merely molding a composition block at once. Then, the composition is at first preliminarily molded into a sheet-like shape which is somewhat thickener than the final thickness and then finished by calendering, by which the thickness can be reduced in average as compared with conventional products while keeping the prescribed thickness and reducing the weight reduce by so much. (N.H.)

  12. RADSHI: shielding calculation program for different geometries sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelen, A.; Alvarez, I.; Lopez, H.; Manso, M.

    1996-01-01

    A computer code written in pascal language for IBM/Pc is described. The program calculates the optimum thickness of slab shield for different geometries sources. The Point Kernel Method is employed, which enables the obtention of the ionizing radiation flux density. The calculation takes into account the possibility of self-absorption in the source. The air kerma rate for gamma radiation is determined, and with the concept of attenuation length through the equivalent attenuation length the shield is obtained. The scattering and the exponential attenuation inside the shield material is considered in the program. The shield materials can be: concrete, water, iron or lead. It also calculates the shield for point isotropic neutron source, using as shield materials paraffin, concrete or water. (authors). 13 refs

  13. The construction of radiation shielding for baby ebm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rizal Md Chulan; Leo Kwee Wah; Lee Chee Huei; Muhamad Zahidee Taat; Fadzlie Nordin; Abu Bakar Mhd Ghazali; Mohd Yusof Ali; Mohd Rizal Mamat Ibrahim; Syed Nasaruddin Syed Idris; Mahmud Hamid; Mohd Khairi Mohd Said

    2005-01-01

    The construction of radiation shielding for electron beam machine, Baby EBM is necessary for prevention from x-ray (Bremstrahlung) that produced when electron bombarded the target material. The strength of produced x-ray is depending on electron energy and the atomic number of target material. In the construction process of radiation shielding, a few aspects need to be considered such as shielding material and its thickness to be used, mainframe for radiation shielding and the way fabrication to be done. In this project, the thickness of radiation shielding is calculated manually following the NCRP 51 guidelines whereas for frame design, shielding walls and fabrication is considered that the accelerator devices (accelerating tube, focusing device and neck) is vertically and the whole weight of Baby EBM. From the calculations, the thickness and the material for radiation shielding is to be used are 6mm lead. This radiation shielding has been tested (using the parameters that have been considered) to know the leak of radiation (at all surfaces) and direct radiation below 5 cm from the window. The value of high voltage that applied at accelerating tube is 80 kV and the voltage, current supply at electron gun is 3.0 V, 7.1 A respectively. The result of the testing found that dose rate under the window foil is more than 2000 mSv/hr and at all shielding surfaces are less than 0.5 mSv/hr, which is background reading and this is acceptable as compared to the theoretical calculation. The measurement was done using a survey meter typed Ludlum-model 3. (Author)

  14. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  15. The leaded apron revisited: does it reduce gonadal radiation dose in dental radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.E.; Harris, A.M.; van der Merwe, E.J.; Nortje, C.J. (Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic human phantom was used with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry system to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose to the ovarian and testicular region during dental radiologic procedures. Measurements were made with and without personal lead shielding devices consisting of thyroid collar and apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalence. The radiation absorbed dose with or without lead shielding did not differ significantly from control dosimeters in vertex occlusal and periapical views (p greater than 0.05). Personal lead shielding devices did reduce gonadal dose in the case of accidental exposure (p less than 0.05). A leaded apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalent was permeable to radiation in direct exposure testing.

  16. The leaded apron revisited: does it reduce gonadal radiation dose in dental radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.E.; Harris, A.M.; van der Merwe, E.J.; Nortje, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic human phantom was used with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimetry system to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose to the ovarian and testicular region during dental radiologic procedures. Measurements were made with and without personal lead shielding devices consisting of thyroid collar and apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalence. The radiation absorbed dose with or without lead shielding did not differ significantly from control dosimeters in vertex occlusal and periapical views (p greater than 0.05). Personal lead shielding devices did reduce gonadal dose in the case of accidental exposure (p less than 0.05). A leaded apron of 0.25 mm lead thickness equivalent was permeable to radiation in direct exposure testing

  17. Test of magnetic shielding cases for a 3'' phototube attached to a lead glass counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takasaki, F.

    1985-09-01

    Effect of a magnetic shielding for a phototube of 3'' diameter attached to a lead glass counter has been studied using permalloy shielding cases with two kinds of shapes. Both cases show sufficient shielding effect with magnetic field up to around 30 gauss. (author)

  18. Radiation dose reduction to the male gonads during MDCT: the effectiveness of a lead shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, Christian; Mahnken, Andreas H; Klotz, Ernst; Das, Marco; Stargardt, Achim; Mühlenbruch, Georg; Schmidt, Thorsten; Günther, Rolf W; Wildberger, Joachim E

    2005-01-01

    Our study was designed to quantify the effect of a standard gonad shield on the testicular radiation exposure due to scatter during routine abdominopelvic MDCT. Routine abdominopelvic MDCT was performed in 34 patients with gonadal lead shielding and 32 patients without this shielding; the testes were not exposed to the direct beam during the examination. We estimated the testicular dose administered with thermoluminescent dosimetry, taking into account each patient's body weight and body mass index (BMI). With a 1-mm lead shield, the mean testicular dose was reduced from 2.40 to 0.32 mSv, a reduction of 87%. The difference was found to be statistically significant (p Shielding the male gonads reduces the testicular radiation dose during abdominopelvic MDCT significantly and can be recommended for routine use.

  19. Optimization of multi-layered metallic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Dor, G.; Dubinsky, A.; Elperin, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated the problem of optimization of a multi-layered metallic shield. → The maximum ballistic limit velocity is a criterion of optimization. → The sequence of materials and the thicknesses of layers in the shield are varied. → The general problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming. → Analytical solutions are obtained for two- and three-layered shields. - Abstract: We investigate the problem of optimization of multi-layered metallic shield whereby the goal is to determine the sequence of materials and the thicknesses of the layers that provide the maximum ballistic limit velocity of the shield. Optimization is performed under the following constraints: fixed areal density of the shield, the upper bound on the total thickness of the shield and the bounds on the thicknesses of the plates manufactured from every material. The problem is reduced to the problem of Geometric Programming which can be solved numerically using known methods. For the most interesting in practice cases of two-layered and three-layered shields the solution is obtained in the explicit analytical form.

  20. Gamma-ray shielding effect of Gd3+ doped lead barium borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummathi, Harshitha; Naveen Kumar, P.; Vedavathi T., C.; Abhiram, J.; Rajaramakrishna, R.

    2018-05-01

    The glasses of the batch xPbO: 10BaO: (90-x)B2O3: 0.2Gd2O3 (x = 40,45,50 mol %) were prepared by melt-quench technique. The work emphasizes on gamma ray shielding effect on doped lead glasses. The role of Boron is significant as it acts as better neutron attenuator as compared with any other materials, as the thermal neutron cross-sections are high for Gadolinium, 0.2 mol% is chosen as the optimum concentration for this matrix, as higher the concentration may lead to further increase as it produces secondary γ rays due to inelastic neutron scattering. Shielding effects were studied using Sodium Iodide (NaI) - Scintillation Gamma ray spectrometer. It was found that at higher concentration of lead oxide (PbO) in the matrix, higher the attenuation which can be co-related with density. Infra-red (I.R.) spectra reveals that the conversion of Lose triangles to tight tetrahedral structure results in enhancement of shielding properties. The Differential Scanning Calorimeter (D.S.C.) study also reveals that the increase in glass forming range increases the stability which in-turn results in inter-conversion of BO3 to BO4 units such that the density of glass increases with increase in PbO content, resulting in much stable and efficient gamma ray shielding glasses.

  1. Radiation attenuation by lead and nonlead materials used in radiation shielding garments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaffrey, J. P.; Shen, H.; Downton, B.; Mainegra-Hing, E.

    2007-01-01

    The attenuating properties of several types of lead (Pb)-based and non-Pb radiation shielding materials were studied and a correlation was made of radiation attenuation, materials properties, calculated spectra and ambient dose equivalent. Utilizing the well-characterized x-ray and gamma ray beams at the National Research Council of Canada, air kerma measurements were used to compare a variety of commercial and pre-commercial radiation shielding materials over mean energy ranges from 39 to 205 keV. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code cavity.cpp was extended to provide computed spectra for a variety of elements that have been used as a replacement for Pb in radiation shielding garments. Computed air kerma values were compared with experimental values and with the SRS-30 catalogue of diagnostic spectra available through the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine Report 78. In addition to garment materials, measurements also included pure Pb sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standards of 0.25 and 0.5 mm 'lead equivalent'. The parameter 'lead equivalent' is misleading, since photon attenuation properties for all materials (including Pb) vary significantly over the energy spectrum, with the largest variations occurring in the diagnostic imaging range. Furthermore, air kerma measurements are typically made to determine attenuation properties without reference to the measures of biological damage such as ambient dose equivalent, which also vary significantly with air kerma over the diagnostic imaging energy range. A single material or combination cannot provide optimum shielding for all energy ranges. However, appropriate choice of materials for a particular energy range can offer significantly improved shielding per unit mass over traditional Pb-based materials

  2. Lead thickness in shielding in the protection of radiodiagnostic staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.G.B.; Hufton, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors indicate the principles which can be used to apply cost-benefit analysis to radiation protection of staff in an X-ray department. The cost of saving radiation exposure to staff by varying the lead equivalence of lead gowns and lead protective screens is calculated. The cost is compared with the financial values of the detriment as assessed by the National Radiological Protection Board. The expenditure required to avoid a man-Sv for staff protection in diagnostic departments is suggested. In the examples taken it is found that the larger staff dose reductions, and often the cheaper reductions, can be obtained by reducing the radiation dose to the patient. There are, of course, major additional advantages to the patient in reducing this dose. (author)

  3. Radiation exposure to foetus and breasts from dental X-ray examinations: effect of lead shields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelaranta, Anna; Ekholm, Marja; Toroi, Paula; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Dental radiography may involve situations where the patient is known to be pregnant or the pregnancy is noticed after the X-ray procedure. In such cases, the radiation dose to the foetus, though low, needs to be estimated. Uniform and widely used guidance on dental X-ray procedures during pregnancy are presently lacking, the usefulness of lead shields is unclear and practices vary. Upper estimates of radiation doses to the foetus and breasts of the pregnant patient were estimated with an anthropomorphic female phantom in intraoral, panoramic, cephalometric and CBCT dental modalities with and without lead shields. The upper estimates of foetal doses varied from 0.009 to 6.9 μGy, and doses at the breast level varied from 0.602 to 75.4 μGy. With lead shields, the foetal doses varied from 0.005 to 2.1 μGy, and breast doses varied from 0.002 to 10.4 μGy. The foetal dose levels without lead shielding were dental radiographic examination.

  4. Poster – 39: Using Optical Scanner and 3D Printer Technology to Create Lead Shielding for Radiotherapy of Facial Skin Cancer with Low Energy Photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickey, Daniel; Leylek, Ahmet; Dubey, Arbind; Sasaki, David; Harris, Chad; Butler, Jim; Sharma, Ankur; McCurdy, Boyd; Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of skin cancers of the face using orthovoltage radiotherapy often requires lead shielding. However, creating a lead shield can be difficult because the face has complex and intricate contours. The traditional process involved creating a plaster mould of the patient’s face can be difficult for patients. Our goal was to develop an improved process by using an optical scanner and 3D printer technology. Methods: The oncologist defined the treatment field by drawing on each patient’s skin. Three-dimensional images were acquired using a consumer-grade optical scanner. A 3D model of each patient’s face was processed with mesh editing software before being printed on a 3D printer. Using a hammer, a 3 mm thick layer of lead was formed to closely fit the contours of the model. A hole was then cut out to define the field. Results: The lead shields created were remarkably accurate and fit the contours of the patients. The hole defining the field exposed only a minimally sized site to be exposed to radiation, while the rest of the face was protected. It was easy to obtain perfect symmetry for the definition of parallel opposed beams. Conclusion: We are routinely using this technique to build lead shielding that wraps around the patient as an alternative to cut-outs. We also use it for treatment of the tip of the nose using a parallel opposed pair beams with a wax nose block. We found this technique allows more accurate delineation of the cut-out and a more reproducible set-up.

  5. Poster – 39: Using Optical Scanner and 3D Printer Technology to Create Lead Shielding for Radiotherapy of Facial Skin Cancer with Low Energy Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickey, Daniel; Leylek, Ahmet; Dubey, Arbind; Sasaki, David; Harris, Chad; Butler, Jim; Sharma, Ankur; McCurdy, Boyd; Alpuche Aviles, Jorge E. [CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba, CancerCare Manitoba (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Treatment of skin cancers of the face using orthovoltage radiotherapy often requires lead shielding. However, creating a lead shield can be difficult because the face has complex and intricate contours. The traditional process involved creating a plaster mould of the patient’s face can be difficult for patients. Our goal was to develop an improved process by using an optical scanner and 3D printer technology. Methods: The oncologist defined the treatment field by drawing on each patient’s skin. Three-dimensional images were acquired using a consumer-grade optical scanner. A 3D model of each patient’s face was processed with mesh editing software before being printed on a 3D printer. Using a hammer, a 3 mm thick layer of lead was formed to closely fit the contours of the model. A hole was then cut out to define the field. Results: The lead shields created were remarkably accurate and fit the contours of the patients. The hole defining the field exposed only a minimally sized site to be exposed to radiation, while the rest of the face was protected. It was easy to obtain perfect symmetry for the definition of parallel opposed beams. Conclusion: We are routinely using this technique to build lead shielding that wraps around the patient as an alternative to cut-outs. We also use it for treatment of the tip of the nose using a parallel opposed pair beams with a wax nose block. We found this technique allows more accurate delineation of the cut-out and a more reproducible set-up.

  6. Preliminary study for development of low dose radiation shielding material using liquid silicon and metallic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seo Goo; Lee, Sung Soo [Dept. of Medical Science, Graduate School of Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Jin [SoonChunHyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung Wook [Graduate school of SeJong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study measured and compared the protective clothing using Pb used for shielding in a diagnostic X-ray energy range, and the shielding rates of X-ray fusion shielding materials using Si and TiO{sub 2}. For the experiment, a pad type shielding with a thickness of 1 mm was prepared by mixing Si-TiO{sub 2}, and the X-ray shielding rate was compared with 0.5 mmPb plate of The shielding rate of shielding of 0.5 mmPb plate 95.92%, 85.26 % based on the case of no shielding under each 60kVp, 100kVp tube voltage condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 11 mm or more, and the shielding rate of 100% or more was confirmed at a thickness of 13 nn in 60kVp condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 17 mm or more, and a shielding rate of 0.5 mmPb plate was observed at a thickness of 23 mm in 100kVp condition. Through the results of this study, We could confirm the possibility of manufacturing radiation protective materials that does not contain lead hazard using various metallic compound and liquid Si. This study shows that possibility of liquid Si and other metallic compound can harmonize easily. Beside, It is flexible and strong to physical stress than Pb obtained radiation protective clothes. But additional studies are needed to increase the shielding rate and reduce the weight.

  7. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Chad L.; Scates, Wade W.; Taylor, J. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  8. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  9. A Shielding Analysis of Hot Cell for a 10 MW Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnajjar, Alaaddin; Park, Chang Je; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byunchul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a shielding analysis has been performed for the hot cell in a 10 MW research reactor. Two kinds of shielding analysis code systems are used such as MCNPX2.7 and M-Shield7. The first one is Monte Carlo stochastic code and the second one is a deterministic point kernel code. The results are compared in this study. In order to obtain source term, the ORIGEN-S code is used for different kinds of source. Four kinds of sources are taken into consideration. From the simulation, it is also proposed that the proper thickness of shielding material and the maximum source capacity in the hot cell. This study shows preliminary analysis results of hot cell shielding for 10MW research reactor. Total four different source terms are considered such as spent fuel assembly, Ir-192, Mo-99, and I-131. For shielding material, general concrete, heavy concrete, and lead are used. MCNPX code is mainly used for a simplified hot cell model and the result are nearly consistent when compared with M-Shield code. Required shielding thickness and the hot cell capacity are also obtained for various criterion of surface dose rates

  10. Estimating ISABELLE shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.J.; Thorndike, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates were made of the shielding thicknesses required at various points around the ISABELLE ring. Both hadron and muon requirements are considered. Radiation levels at the outside of the shield and at the BNL site boundary are kept at or below 1000 mrem per year and 5 mrem/year respectively. Muon requirements are based on the Wang formula for pion spectra, and the hadron requirements on the hadron cascade program CYLKAZ of Ranft. A muon shield thickness of 77 meters of sand is indicated outside the ring in one area, and hadron shields equivalent to from 2.7 to 5.6 meters in thickness of sand above the ring. The suggested safety allowance would increase these values to 86 meters and 4.0 to 7.2 meters respectively. There are many uncertainties in such estimates, but these last figures are considered to be rather conservative

  11. Method for calculating required shielding in medical x-ray rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karppinen, J.

    1997-10-01

    The new annual radiation dose limits - 20 mSv (previously 50 mSv) for radiation workers and 1 mSv (previously 5 mSv) for other persons - implies that the adequacy of existing radiation shielding must be re-evaluated. In principle, one could assume that the thicknesses of old radiation shields should be increased by about one or two half-value layers in order to comply with the new dose limits. However, the assumptions made in the earlier shielding calculations are highly conservative; the required shielding was often determined by applying the maximum high-voltage of the x-ray tube for the whole workload. A more realistic calculation shows that increased shielding is typically not necessary if more practical x-ray tube voltages are used in the evaluation. We have developed a PC-based calculation method for calculating the x-ray shielding which is more realistic than the highly conservative method formerly used. The method may be used to evaluate an existing shield for compliance with new regulations. As examples of these calculations, typical x-ray rooms are considered. The lead and concrete thickness requirements as a function of x-ray tube voltage and workload are also given in tables. (author)

  12. Comparison of different methods for shielding design in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Arandjic, D.; Kosutic, D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to compare different methods for shielding calculation in computed tomography (CT). The BIR-IPEM (British Inst. of Radiology and Inst. of Physics in Engineering in Medicine) and NCRP (National Council on Radiation Protection) method were used for shielding thickness calculation. Scattered dose levels and calculated barrier thickness were also compared with those obtained by scatter dose measurements in the vicinity of a dedicated CT unit. Minimal requirement for protective barriers based on BIR-IPEM method ranged between 1.1 and 1.4 mm of lead demonstrating underestimation of up to 20 % and overestimation of up to 30 % when compared with thicknesses based on measured dose levels. For NCRP method, calculated thicknesses were 33 % higher (27-42 %). BIR-IPEM methodology-based results were comparable with values based on scattered dose measurements, while results obtained using NCRP methodology demonstrated an overestimation of the minimal required barrier thickness. (authors)

  13. Fabrication of indigenous lead-free low cost bilayer radiation protective apron and dosimetric analysis for effective shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senthilkumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protective aprons play a key role in the radiation protection of personnel in radiology departments. They are worn in examination rooms during radiological examinations and their specific function is to provide shielding against secondary radiation. Practically, they are used for a variety of diagnostic imaging procedures including angiography, fluoroscopy, mobiles and theatre, and are designed to shield approximately 75% of radiosensitive red bone marrow. For many years, the protective aprons play a key role in the radiation protection of personnel in imaging departments was made of lead. However, lead garments must be treated as hazardous waste for disposal and are heavy, causing back strain and other orthopedic problems for those who must wear them for long periods of time. They are worn in examination rooms during radiological examinations and their specific function is to provide shielding against secondary radiation. Originally, protective aprons consisted of lead-impregnated vinyl or rubber with a shielding equivalent given in millimetres of lead. The main purpose of this study was to fabricate light weight low cost non lead based bilayered radiation protective aprons

  14. Induced Radioactivity in Lead Shielding at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Vinita J; Schaefer, Charles; Kahnhauser, Henry

    2017-06-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was shut down in September 2014. Lead bricks used as radiological shadow shielding within the accelerator were exposed to stray radiation fields during normal operations. The FLUKA code, a fully integrated Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of particles and nuclei in matter, was used to estimate induced radioactivity in this shielding and stainless steel beam pipe from known beam losses. The FLUKA output was processed using MICROSHIELD® to estimate on-contact exposure rates with individually exposed bricks to help design and optimize the radiological survey process. This entire process can be modeled using FLUKA, but use of MICROSHIELD® as a secondary method was chosen because of the project's resource constraints. Due to the compressed schedule and lack of shielding configuration data, simple FLUKA models were developed. FLUKA activity estimates for stainless steel were compared with sampling data to validate results, which show that simple FLUKA models and irradiation geometries can be used to predict radioactivity inventories accurately in exposed materials. During decommissioning 0.1% of the lead bricks were found to have measurable levels of induced radioactivity. Post-processing with MICROSHIELD® provides an acceptable secondary method of estimating residual exposure rates.

  15. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Heui [Dept. of Radiological Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gi Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I, {sup 123}I, and {sup 201}Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were {sup 99m}Tc 31.59%, {sup 201}Tl 68.42%, and {sup 123}I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of {sup 13}'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and {sup 18}F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 18}F, {sup 131}I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers.

  16. Evaluation of eye shields made of tungsten and aluminum in high-energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Randi D.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To protect the lens and cornea of the eye when treating the eyelid with electrons, we designed a tungsten and aluminum eye shield that protected both the lens and cornea, and also limited the amount of backscatter to the overlying eyelid when using electron beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Custom curved tungsten eye shields, 2 mm and 3 mm thick, were placed on Kodak XV film on 8 cm polystyrene and irradiated to evaluate the transmission through the shields. To simulate the thickness of the eyelid and to hold the micro-TLDs, an aquaplast mold was made to match the curvature of the eye shields. Backscatter was measured by placing the micro-TLDs on the beam entrance side to check the dose to the underside of the eyelid. Measurements were done with no aluminum, 0.5, and 1.0 mm of aluminum on top of the tungsten eye shields. The measurements were repeated with 2- and 3-mm flat pieces of lead to determine both the transmission and the backscatter dose for this material. Results: Tungsten proved to be superior to lead for shielding the underlying structures and for reducing backscatter. At 6 MeV, a 3-mm flat slab of tungsten plus 0.5 mm of aluminum, resulted in .042 Gy under the shield when 1.00 Gy is delivered to d max . At 6 MeV for a 3-mm lead plus 0.5-mm aluminum, .046 Gy was measured beneath the shield, a 9.5% decrease with the tungsten. Backscatter was also decreased from 1.17 to 1.13 Gy, a 4% decrease, when using tungsten plus 0.5 mm of aluminum vs. the same thickness of lead. Measurements using 9 MeV were performed in the same manner. With 3 mm tungsten and 0.5 mm of aluminum, at 3 mm depth the dose was .048 Gy compared to .079 Gy with lead and aluminum (39% decrease). Additionally, the backscatter dose was 3% less using tungsten. Simulating the lens dose 3 mm beyond the shield for the 2-mm and 3-mm custom curved tungsten eye shields plus 0.5 mm of aluminum was .030 and .024 Gy, respectively, using 6 MeV (20% decrease). Using 9-MeV electrons, the dose

  17. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Sam Suk [Sam Yong Inspection Engineering Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the

  18. Calculation of concrete shielding wall thickness for 450kVp X-ray tube with MCNP simulation and result comparison with half value layer method calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Heon; Lee, Eun Joong; Kim, Chan Kyu; Cho, Gyu Seong; Hur, Sam Suk

    2016-01-01

    Radiation generating devices must be properly shielded for their safe application. Although institutes such as US National Bureau of Standards and National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have provided guidelines for shielding X-ray tube of various purposes, industry people tend to rely on 'Half Value Layer (HVL) method' which requires relatively simple calculation compared to the case of those guidelines. The method is based on the fact that the intensity, dose, and air kerma of narrow beam incident on shielding wall decreases by about half as the beam penetrates the HVL thickness of the wall. One can adjust shielding wall thickness to satisfy outside wall dose or air kerma requirements with this calculation. However, this may not always be the case because 1) The strict definition of HVL deals with only Intensity, 2) The situation is different when the beam is not 'narrow'; the beam quality inside the wall is distorted and related changes on outside wall dose or air kerma such as buildup effect occurs. Therefore, sometimes more careful research should be done in order to verify the effect of shielding specific radiation generating device. High energy X-ray tubes which is operated at the voltage above 400 kV that are used for 'heavy' nondestructive inspection is an example. People have less experience in running and shielding such device than in the case of widely-used low energy X-ray tubes operated at the voltage below 300 kV. In this study, Air Kerma value per week, outside concrete shielding wall of various thickness surrounding 450 kVp X-ray tube were calculated using MCNP simulation with the aid of Geometry Splitting method which is a famous Variance Reduction technique. The comparison between simulated result, HVL method result, and NCRP Report 147 safety goal 0.02 mGy wk-1 on Air Kerma for the place where the public are free to pass showed that concrete wall of thickness 80 cm is needed to achieve the safety goal

  19. Evaluation of neutron shielding properties of lead glass using bubble detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Vishwa Prasad, K.; Srinivasan, T.K.; Ponraju, D.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron shielding properties of lead glass had been studied using a 241 Am-Be neutron source. Indigenously developed bubble detector was used as neutron detector. Attenuation curves were determined experimentally for the lead glass under the conditions of broad beam geometry. Theoretical calculations were made using Monte Carlo code MCNP3. Measurements were made for polyethylene and concrete to serve as reference. The measured and calculated neutron removal cross sections of lead glass, polyethylene and concrete are reported in this paper. Good agreement is observed between the experimental results and theoretical calculations. (author)

  20. Evaluation of radiation shielding rate of lead aprons in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hyun; Han, Beom Heui; Lee, Sang Ho; Hong, Dong Heui; Kim, Gi Jin

    2017-01-01

    Considering that the X-ray apron used in the department of radiology is also used in the department of nuclear medicine, the study aimed to analyze the shielding rate of the apron according to types of radioisotopes, thus γ ray energy, to investigate the protective effects. The radioisotopes used in the experiment were the top 5 nuclides in usage statistics "9"9"mTc, "1"8F, "1"3"1I, "1"2"3I, and "2"0"1Tl, and the aprons were lead equivalent 0.35 mmPb aprons currently under use in the department of nuclear medicine. As a result of experiments, average shielding rates of aprons were "9"9"mTc 31.59%, "2"0"1Tl 68.42%, and "1"2"3I 76.63%. When using an apron, the shielding rate of "1"3'1I actually resulted in average dose rate increase of 33.72%, and "1"8F showed an average shielding rate of –0.315%, showing there was almost no shielding effect. As a result, the radioisotopes with higher shielding rate of apron was in the descending order of "1"2"3I, "2"0"1Tl, "9"9"mTc, "1"8F, "1"3"1I. Currently, aprons used in the nuclear medicine laboratory are general X-ray aprons, and it is thought that it is not appropriate for nuclear medicine environment that utilizes γ rays. Therefore, development of nuclear medicine exclusive aprons suitable for the characteristics of radioisotopes is required in consideration of effective radiation protection and work efficiency of radiation workers

  1. Evaluation of syringe shield effectiveness in handling radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Yong-In

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the radiation shield of radionuclide syringes and the personal dose equivalent by performing a simulation of radionuclides used in nuclear medicine diagnosis. In order to evaluate the dose depending on the distance between the radiation source and the ICRU sphere against the thickness of the shielding device, the distance at which a nuclear medicine worker may inadvertently come into contact with radiation from the radiation source was set at 0 cm to 30 cm according to the thickness of the shield, thus fixing the ICRU sphere. For a dose evaluation, Hp(10, Hp(3, and Hp(0.07 measurable in specific depth of the ICRU were evaluated. It was found that a dose measured on skin surface of nuclear medicine workers was relatively higher, that the dose varied in relation to the thickness of the radiation shield, and that the shielding effect decreased for some radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It proved necessary to increase thickness of shielding device to the radiation sources such as 67Ga and 111In. It is also considered that a study of proper shielding thickness will be needed in future.

  2. Low background gamma ray spectrometer using the anticoincidence shield technique at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Jong In; Choi, Yun Ho; Kwak, Seung Im; Hwang, Han Yull; Chung, Kun Ho; Choi, Geun Sik; Park, Doo Won; Lee, Chang Woo

    2002-01-01

    We develop a ultra-low background gamma ray spectrometer, using active and passive shielding technique at the same time. Cosmic ray induced background is suppressed by means of active shield devices consisting of plastic scintillating plates of 50 mm thick and anti-coincidence electronic system. The shield is made of 150 mm thick walls of very low activity lead, especially 20 mm with activity of -1 and 0.36 s -1 with and without active shield, respectively, on the regions from 50 keV to 3 MeV. The detection efficiency curve has been precisely measured for regions from 80 keV to 2 MeV with a 10 3 ml marinelli beaker sample, made with calibrated mixed-sources consists of 109 Cd, 57 Co, 139 Ce, 203 Hg, 113 Sn, 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 60 Co and 88 Y. The virtues of the method are demonstrated by applying on experiment that requires the lowest detection limit

  3. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Takamasa; Yamada, Fumiyuki; Nakazato, Kenjiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a material, which is used for printing a samples name and date on an X-ray photographic film at the same time an X-ray radiography. Constitution: A radiation shielding material of a large mass absorption coefficient such as lead oxide, barium oxide, barium sulfate, etc. is added to a solution of a radiation permeable substance capable of imparting cold plastic fluidity (such as microcrystalline wax, paraffin, low molecular polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc.). The resultant system is agitated and then cooled, and thereafter it is press fitted to or bonded to a base in the form of a film of a predetermined thickness. This radiation shielding layer is scraped off by using a writing tool to enter information to be printed in a photographic film, and then it is laid over the film and exposed to X-radiation to thereby print the information on the film. (Seki, T.)

  4. Radiation transmission data for radionuclides and materials relevant to brachytherapy facility shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannis, P; Baltas, D; Granero, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Gimeno, J; Ballester, F; Venselaar, J L M

    2008-11-01

    To address the limited availability of radiation shielding data for brachytherapy as well as some disparity in existing data, Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate radiation transmission data for 60Co, 137CS, 198Au, 192Ir 169Yb, 170Tm, 131Cs, 125I, and 103pd photons through concrete, stainless steel, lead, as well as lead glass and baryte concrete. Results accounting for the oblique incidence of radiation to the barrier, spectral variation with barrier thickness, and broad beam conditions in a realistic geometry are compared to corresponding data in the literature in terms of the half value layer (HVL) and tenth value layer (TVL) indices. It is also shown that radiation shielding calculations using HVL or TVL values could overestimate or underestimate the barrier thickness required to achieve a certain reduction in radiation transmission. This questions the use of HVL or TVL indices instead of the actual transmission data. Therefore, a three-parameter model is fitted to results of this work to facilitate accurate and simple radiation shielding calculations.

  5. EBT-P gamma-ray-shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1983-01-01

    First, a one-dimensional scoping study was performed for the gamma-ray shield of the ELMO Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle device to define appropriate shielding material and determine the required shielding thickness. The dose-equivalent results are analyzed as a function of the radiation-shield thickness for different shielding options. A sensitivity analysis for the pessimistic case is given. The recommended shielding option based on the performance and cost is discussed. Next, a three-dimensional scoping study for the coil shield was performed for four different shielding options to define the heat load for each component and check the compliance with the design criterion of 10 watts maximum heat load per coil from the gamma-ray sources. Also, a detailed biological-dose survey was performed which included: (a) the dose equivalent inside and outside the building, (b) the dose equivalent from the two mazes of the building, and (c) the skyshine contribution to the dose equivalent

  6. Shielding design of ITER pressure suppression system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Michinori; Sato, Satoshi; Nishitani, Takeo; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu

    2006-01-01

    The duct shield from streaming D-T neutrons has been designed for the ITER pressure suppression system. Streaming calculations are performed with the DUCT-III code for the region from the inlet of the pressure relief line to the rupture disk. Next, the neutron permeation through the shield is studied by Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNP code. It is found that 0.15 m thick iron shield is enough to suppress the permeating component from the outside. In addition, it is suggested that the volume of the shield can be reduced by about 30% if the optimized iron shield structure having localized thickness across intense permeation paths is employed to shield the pressure suppression line. (T.I.)

  7. Studies for calculations of the thicknesses of shielding necessary for implementation of a nuclear medicine service with PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Erika M.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Souza, Milena Thays B. de; Aragao Filho, Geraldo L.

    2013-01-01

    The thickness of shielding for controlled and surrounding areas must be considered in terms of the PET-CT equipment installation. However, for a project to install a PET-CT requires the participation of technologists, engineers and architects so that together we can meet the requirements of radiological protection at low cost, enabling its installation and maintenance in nuclear medical centers and hospitals. The objective of this paper is to describe the calculations needed to shield a nuclear medicine center that will install a PET-CT equipment and describe how the participation of other professionals can contribute to a lower cost

  8. Comparison between steel and lead shieldings for radiotherapy rooms regarding neutron doses to patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H *(10) n , within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5 x 5 cm 2 , 10 x 10 cm 2 , 20 x 20 cm 2 , 30 x 30 cm 2 and 40 x 40 cm 2 openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H *(10) n at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation. (author)

  9. Estimation of the shielding ability of a tungsten functional paper for diagnostic x-rays and gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzen, Hajime; Kanno, Ikuo; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    Tungsten functional paper (TFP) is a novel paper-based radiation-shielding material. We measured the shielding ability of TFP against x-rays and gamma rays. The TFP was supplied in 0.3-mm-thick sheets that contained 80% tungsten powder and 20% cellulose (C 6 H 10 O 5 ) by mass. In dose measurements for x-rays (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp), we measured doses after through 1, 2, 3, 5, 10, and 12 TFP sheets, as well as 0.3 and 0.5 mm of lead. In lead equivalence measurements, we measured doses after through 2 and 10 TFP sheets for x-rays (100 and 150 kVp), and 0, 7, 10, 20, and 30 TFP sheets for gamma rays from cesium-137 source (662 keV). And then, the lead equivalent thicknesses of TFP were determined by comparison with doses after through standard lead plates (purity >99.9%). Additionally, we evaluated uniformity of the transmitted dose by TFP with a computed radiography image plate for 50 kVp x-rays. A single TFP sheet was found to have a shielding ability of 65%, 53%, 48%, and 46% for x-rays (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp), respectively. The lead equivalent thicknesses of two TFP sheets were 0.10 ± 0.02, 0.09 ± 0.02 mmPb, and of ten TFP sheets were 0.48 ± 0.02 and 0.51 ± 0.02 mmPb for 100 and 150 kVp x-rays, respectively. The lead equivalent thicknesses of 7, 10, 20, and 30 sheets of TFP for gamma rays from cesium-137 source were estimated as 0.28, 0.43, 0.91, and 1.50 mmPb with an error of ± 0.01 mm. One TFP sheet had nonuniformity, however, seven TFP sheets provided complete shielding for 50 kVp x-rays. TFP has adequate radiation shielding ability for x-rays and gamma rays within the energy range used in diagnostic imaging field. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Shielding property of bismuth glass based on MCNP 5 and WINXCOM simulated calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhicheng; Zhang Jinzhao; Liu Ze; Lu Chunhai; Chen Min

    2013-01-01

    Background: Currently, lead glass is widely used as observation window, while lead is toxic heavy metal. Purpose: Non-toxic materials and their shielding effects are researched in order to find a new material to replace lead containing material. Methods: The mass attenuation coefficients of bismuth silicate glass were investigated with gamma-ray's energy at 0.662 MeV, 1.17 MeV and 1.33 MeV, respectively, by MCNP 5 (Monte Carlo) and WINXCOM program, and compared with those of the lead glass. Results: With attenuation factor K, shielding and mechanical properties taken into consideration bismuth glass containing 50% bismuth oxide might be selected as the right material. Dose rate distributions of water phantom were calculated with 2-cm and 10-cm thick glass, respectively, irradiated by 137 Cs and 60 Co in turn. Conclusion: Results show that the bismuth glass may replace lead glass for radiation shielding with appropriate energy. (authors)

  11. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  12. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  13. Radiation shielding plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Torakichi; Sugawara, Takeo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and stabilize the configuration of a radiation shielding plate which is used in close contact with an object to be irradiated with radiation rays. Constitution: The radiation shielding plate comprises a substrate made of lead glass and a metallic lead coating on the surface of the substrate by means of plating, vapor deposition or the like. Apertures for permeating radiation rays are formed to the radiation shielding plate. Since the shielding plate is based on a lead glass plate, a sufficient mechanical strength can be obtained with a thinner structure as compared with the conventional plate made of metallic lead. Accordingly, if the shielding plate is disposed on a soft object to be irradiated with radiation rays, the object and the plate itself less deform to obtain a radiation irradiation pattern with distinct edges. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Radiation shielding performance of some concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; Akyildirim, H.; Mavi, B.; Kilincarslan, S.; Basyigit, C.

    2007-01-01

    The energy consumption is increasing with the increased population of the world and thus new energy sources were discovered such as nuclear energy. Besides using nuclear energy, nuclear techniques are being used in a variety of fields such as medical hospital, industry, agriculture or military issue, the radiation protection becomes one of the important research fields. In radiation protection, the main rules are time, distance and shielding. The most effective radiation shields are materials which have a high density and high atomic number such as lead, tungsten which are expensive. Alternatively the concrete which produced using different aggregate can be used. The effectiveness of radiation shielding is frequently described in terms of the half value layer (HVL) or the tenth value layer (TVL). These are the thicknesses of an absorber that will reduce the radiation to half, and one tenth of its intensity respectively. In this study the radiation protection properties of different types of concrete will be discussed

  15. Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-08-01

    The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

  16. Efficient scanning of thick lead vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Meenakshisundaram, V.

    1978-01-01

    Lead containers fabricated for transport of radioactive materials need to be evaluated for their shielding integrity. The common method of locating a strong gamma source inside the vessel and scanning the external surface by conventional detectors suffers from high radiation dose and low sensitivity. A new method has been proposed and tried. It is found to be more efficient. In the new method, 60 Co source is loaded at the centre of the lead vessel and the outer surface is scanned by NaI(Tl) detector. The transmitted virgin flux is scanned under the 60 Co channel in a single channel analyser. An area of 25 cm 2 is scanned for 10 to 20 seconds each time. The source strength required is considerably reduced by a factor of 10 or more as compared to the common method and external dose rates do not exceed 50 mR/h (130 nC. kg -1 h -1 ) on the vessel surface. The advantages are improved sensitivity, no interference from scattered radiation and assurance in repeatability of measurements. (M.G.B.)

  17. Comparison between steel and lead shieldings for radiotherapy rooms regarding neutron doses to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H *(10){sub n}, within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} and 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H *(10){sub n} at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation. (author)

  18. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  19. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  20. Infinite slab-shield dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    I calculated neutron and gamma-ray equivalent doses leaking through a variety of infinite (laminate) slab-shields. In the shield computations, I used, as the incident neutron spectrum, the leakage spectrum (<20 MeV) calculated for the LANSCE tungsten production target at 90 degree to the target axis. The shield thickness was fixed at 60 cm. The results of the shield calculations show a minimum in the total leakage equivalent dose if the shield is 40-45 cm of iron followed by 20-15 cm of borated (5% B) polyethylene. High-performance shields can be attained by using multiple laminations. The calculated dose at the shield surface is very dependent on shield material. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Antireflectance coating on shielding window glasses using glacial acetic acid at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Wattal, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    High density lead glasses having thickness of several centimeters and large dimensions are used as shielding windows in hot cells. To improve visibility, the reflection of light from its optically polished surfaces needs to be minimized to improve transmission as absorption of light in the thick glasses can not be avoided. Antireflectance coating of a material having low refractive index is required for this purpose. Selective leaching of lead at ambient temperature in glacial acetic acid develops a silica rich leached layer on glass surface. Since silica has low refractive index, the leached layer serves as antireflectance coating. Two optically polished discs of shielding window glasses were leached in glacial acetic acid at ambient temperature for 2, 5 and 10 days and their reflectance and transmittance spectra were taken to find effect of leaching. For transparent glass transmittance could be improved from 78.76% to 85.31% after 10 days leaching. Reflectance from the glass could be decreased from 12.48 to 11.67%. For coloured glass transmittance improved from 87.77% to 88.24% after 5 days leaching while reflectance decreased from 12.28% to 5.6% during same period. Based on data generated, 10 days leaching time is recommended for developing anti reflectance coating on transparent shielding window glass and 5 days for coloured shielding window glass. The procedure can be used for shielding windows of any dimensions by fabrication a PVC tank of slightly high dimensions and filling with acetic acid (author)

  2. A history of radiation shielding of x-ray therapy rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Miner, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report the history of shielding for radiation treatment rooms is traced from the time of the discovery of x rays to the present. During the early part of the twentieth century the hazards from ionizing radiation were recognized and the use of lead and other materials became common place for shielding against x rays. Techniques for the calculation of the shield thickness needed for x ray protection were developed in the 1920's, and shielding materials were characterized in terms of the half value layer or simple exponential factors. At the same time, better knowledge of the interaction between radiation and matter was acquired. With the development of high energy medical accelerators after 1940, new and more complex shielding problems had to be addressed. Recently, shielding requirements have become more stringent as standards for exposure of personnel and the general public have been reduced. The art of shielding of radiation treatment facilities is still being developed, and the need for a revision of the reports on shielding of medical accelerators from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements is emphasized in this article. (author). 61 Refs., 3 Tabs

  3. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak-Beganovic, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beganovic, A.; Drljevic, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  4. Radiation safety aspects during nondestructive testing of reactor shielding components by gamma radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, effective shielding of radioactive components and structures are essential to ensure radiation protection to operating personnel. The shield structures are made of lead, steel and concrete with varying thickness of up to 1200 mm. It needs to be verified for shielding integrity, presence of voids, blowholes and defects to avoid exposure to workers and to public at large. Radiometry using gamma source serves as excellent tool for non-destructive examination of such structures and components. Gamma sources of high activity up to 50 Curies (gamma camera type) depending on the thickness of component have to be used. During the testing exposure to the operating personnel needs to be minimized, this requires certain safety procedures to be followed. This paper focuses the methodology to be adapted by means of selection of source, effective training of personnel, compliance with safety requirements and maintenance of source devices

  5. A novel comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag: As gamma ray shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mengge [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xue, Xiangxin, E-mail: xuexx@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, He; Liu, Dong [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Chao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Zhefu [Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel comprehensive utilization method for vanadium slag is proposed. • Shielding properties of vanadium slag are better than ordinary concrete. • HVL of vanadium slag is between Lead and concrete to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray. • HVL of composite is higher than concrete when adding amount of vanadium slag is 900. • Composite can be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in concrete shields. - Abstract: New exploration of vanadium slag as gamma ray shielding material was proposed, the shielding properties of vanadium slag was higher than concrete when the energy of photons was in 0.0001 MeV–100000 MeV. Vanadium slag/epoxy resin composites were prepared, shielding and material properties of materials were tested by {sup 60}Co gamma ray, simultaneous DSC-TGA, electronic universal testing machine and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that the shielding properties of composite would be better with the increase of vanadium slag addition amount. The HVL (half value layer thickness) of vanadium slag was between Lead and concrete while composite was higher than concrete when the addition amount of vanadium slag was 900 used as material to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray, also the resistance temperature of composite was about 215 °C and the bending strength was over 10 MPa. The composites could be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, coating for the floor of the nuclear facilities, and shielding materials by itself.

  6. Studying the shielding properties of lead glass composites using neutrons and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.M.; El-Sarraf, M.A.; Abdel-Monem, A.M.; El-Sayed Abdo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Samples of sodalime silica glass loaded with different ratios of PbO were prepared. • Leaded glass composites were investigated for radiation shielding. • Experimental and theoretical attenuation parameters were studied. • Experimental and theoretical (MCNP5) results were in good agreement. - Abstract: The present work deals with the shielding properties of lead glass composites to find out its integrity for practical shielding applications and radiological safety. Composites of different lead oxide ratios (x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 25 wt.%) have been prepared by the Nasser Glass and Crystal Company (Egypt). Attenuation measurements have been carried out using a collimated emitted beam from a fission 252 Cf (100 μg) neutron source, and the neutron–gamma spectrometer with stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating (P.S.D.) technique based on the zero cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Thermal neutron fluxes were measured using the BF3 detector and thermal neutron detection system. The attenuation relations were used to evaluate fast neutron macroscopic effective removal cross-section Σ R-Meas (cm −1 ), gamma rays total attenuation coefficient μ (cm −1 ) and thermal neutron macroscopic cross-section Σ Meas (cm −1 ). Theoretical calculations have been achieved using MCNP5 code to calculate the same two parameters. Also, MERCSF-N program was used to calculate fast neutron macroscopic removal cross-section Σ R-MER (cm −1 ). Measured and MCNP5 calculated results have been compared and were found to be in reasonable agreement

  7. Radiation Build-Up In Shielding Of Low Activity High Energia Gamma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helfi-Yuliati; Mukhlis-Akhadi

    2003-01-01

    Research to observe radiation build-up factor (b) in aluminium (Al), iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for shielding of gamma radiation of high energy from 137 cs (E γ : 662 keV) source and 60 Co (E γ : 1332 keV) of low activity sources has been carried out. Al with Z =13 represent metal of low atomic number, Fe with Z =26 represent metal of medium atomic number, and Pb with Z = 82 represent metal of high atomic number. Low activity source in this research is source which if its dose rate decrease to 3 % of its initial dose rate became safe for the workers. Research was conducted by counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI(TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are close to 1 (b ∼ 1) for all kinds of metals. No radiation build-up factor is required in estimating the shielding thickness from several kinds of metals for low activity of high energy gamma source. (author)

  8. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  9. Detection of shielded radionuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra using group positive RIVAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kump, Paul; Bai, Er-Wei; Chan, Kung-Sik; Eichinger, William

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra in the presence of unknown radiation shielding materials such as carbon, water, concrete and lead. Since a shield will attenuate lower energies more so than higher ones, isotope sub-spectra must be introduced into models and into detection algorithms. We propose a new algorithm for detection, called group positive RIVAL, that encourages the selection of groups of sub-spectra rather than the selection of individual sub-spectra that may be from the same parent isotope. Indeed, the proposed algorithm incorporates group positive LASSO, and, as such, we supply the consistency results of group positive LASSO and adaptive group positive LASSO. In an example employing various shielding materials and material thicknesses, group positive RIVAL is shown to perform well in all scenarios with the exception of ones in which the shielding material is lead. - Highlights: ► Identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra. ► Shielding materials such as carbon, water, concrete, and lead are considered. ► Isotope spectra are decomposed into their sub-spectra. ► A variable selection algorithm is proposed that encourages group selection. ► Simulations demonstrate the proposed method's performance when nuclides have been shielded

  10. Fabrication of Radiation Shielding Glasses Based on Lead-free High Refractive Index Glasses Prepared from Local Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dararutana, Pisutti; Dutchaneepet, Jirapan; Sirikulrat, Narin

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Lead glasses that show high refractive index are the best know and most popular for radiation shielding. Due to harmful effects of lead and considering the health as well as the environmental issues, lead-free glasses were developed. In this work, content of Chumphon sand was fixed at 40 % (by weight) as a main composition but concentrations of BaCO3 were varied from 6 to 30 % (by weight). It was found that the absorption coefficient of the glass samples containing 30 % BaCO3 was 0.233 cm-1 for Ba-133. The density was also measured. It can be concluded that the prepared lead free glasses offered adequate shielding to gamma radiation in comparison with the lead ones. These glasses were one of the environmental friendly materials

  11. CASKCODES, Program CAPSIZE Scope KWIKDOSE for Shipping Cask Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CAPSIZE is an interactive program to rapidly determine the likely impact that proposed design objectives might have on the size and capacity of spent fuel casks designed to meet those objectives. 2 - Method of solution: Given the burnup of the spent fuel, its cooling time, the thickness of the internal basket walls, the desired external dose rate, and the nominal weight limit of the load cask, the CAPSIZE program will determine the maximum number of PWR fuel assemblies that may be shipped in a lead-, steel-, or uranium- shielded cask meeting those objectives. Using optimal packing arrangements and shielding requirements input by the user, SCOPE will design a cask to carry a single fuel assembly and then continue incrementing the number of assemblies until one or more of the design limits can no longer be met. KWIKDOSE queries the user for the number of PWR fuel assemblies in a cask, the type of cask and thickness of the shield. Upon getting the necessary input, KWIKDOSE prints out the total dose rate, 10 feet from the centerline of the cask, as a function of the burnup and cooling time of the spent fuel. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The restrictions are subject to the shielding requirements of the shipping cask

  12. Elevated gamma-rays shielding property in lead-free bismuth tungstate by nanofabricating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Quan-Ping; Sun, Nan; Zhao, Yang; Shi, Rui; Zhou, Yuan-Lin; Zheng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    Radiation shielding materials have attracted much attention across academia and industry because of the increasing of nuclear activities. To achieve the materials with low toxicity but good protective capability is one of the most significant goals for personal protective articles. Here, bismuth tungstate nanostructures are controllably fabricated by a versatile hydrothermal treatment under various temperatures. The crystals structure and morphology of products are detailedly characterized with X-ray diffraction, electron microscope and specific surface area. It is noteworthy that desired Bi2WO6 nanosheets treated with 190 °C show the higher specific surface area (19.5 m2g-1) than that of the other two products. Importantly, it has a close attenuating property to lead based counterpart for low energy gamma-rays. Due to the less toxicity, Bi2WO6 nanosheets are more suitable than lead based materials to fabricate personal protective articles for shielding low energy radiations and have great application prospect as well as market potential.

  13. Lead oxide-decorated graphene oxide/epoxy composite towards X-Ray radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Alireza; Mousavi, Seyyed Mojtaba; Faghihi, Reza; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sina, Sedigheh; Amani, Ali Mohammad

    2018-05-01

    In this study, employing modified Hummers method coupled with a multi-stage manufacturing procedure, graphene oxide (GO) decorated with Pb3O4 (GO-Pb3O4) at different weight ratios was synthesized. Thereupon, via the vacuum shock technique, composites holding GO-Pb3O4 at different filler loadings (5 and 10 wt%) and thicknesses (4 and 6 mm) were fabricated. Successful decoration of GO with Pb3O4 was confirmed via FTIR analysis. Moreover, particle size distribution of the produced fillers was examined using particle size analyzer. X-ray attenuation examination revealed that reinforcement of epoxy-based composites with GO-Pb3O4 led to a significant improvement in the overall attenuation rate of X-ray beam. For instance, composites containing 10 wt% GO-Pb3O4 with 6 mm thickness showed 4.06, 4.83 and 3.91 mm equivalent aluminum thickness at 40, 60 and 80 kVp energies, denoting 124.3, 124.6 and 103.6% improvement in the X-ray attenuation rate compared to a sample holding neat epoxy resin, respectively. Simulation results revealed that the effect of GO-Pb3O4 loading on the X-ray shielding performance undermined with increase in the voltage of the applied X-ray beam.

  14. The use of Am-241 as Equivalence Thickness Measurement for Irradiation Room at National institute for Cancer and Malacca Hospital: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Matori; Azuhar Ripin; Husaini Salleh

    2013-01-01

    Lead equivalent thickness measurement of a shielding material in diagnostic radiology is very important to ensure that requirements for the purpose of radiation protection of patients, employees and the public are met. The Malaysian Ministry of Health (MOH) has established that the irradiation room must have sufficient shielding thickness, for example for general radiography it must be at least equal to 2.0 mm of Pb, for panoramic dental radiography at least equal to 1.5 mm of Pb and for mammography should be a minimum of 1.0 mm of Pb. This paper presents a technique using americium-241 source to test and verify the integrity of the shielding thickness in term of lead equivalent for irradiation room at National Institute for Cancer (IKN) and General Malacca Hospital. Results of measurement of 10 irradiation rooms conducted in 2012 were analyzed for this presentation. Technical comparison of the attenuation of gamma rays from Am-241 source through the walls of the irradiation room and pieces of lead were used to assess the lead equivalent thickness of the walls. Results showed that almost all the irradiation rooms tested meet the requirements of the Ministry of Health and is suitable for the installation of the intended diagnostic X-ray apparatus. Some specific positions such as door knobs and locks, electrical plug sockets were identified with potential to not met the required lead equivalent thickness hence may contribute to higher radiation exposure to workers and the public. (author)

  15. Shielding chalculations in x-rays installations for medical diagnosis. description of the method and computational solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borroto Valdes, M.; Saez, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Shielding requirements for x-rays diagnostic installations are investigated. The description of an entirely analytical method for calculation of thickness, based in the papers of Simpkin and NCRP49, is presented. Considerations described in specialized method to solving this problem. A program for microcomputer IBM and compatibles ones is available for estimation of minimum shielding requirements in lead, concrete and steel. Similar results were obtained from comparing with others authors

  16. Shielding effect of clinical x-ray protector and lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Kitabayashi, Keitarou; Koshida, Kichiro; Matsubara, Kousuke; Noto, Kimiya; Nakagawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Chikako

    2004-01-01

    Various pharmaceutical companies in Japan are making radioactive drugs available for positron emission tomography (PET) in hospitals without a cyclotron. With the distribution of these drugs to hospitals, medical check-ups and examinations using PET are expected to increase. However, the safety guidelines for radiation in the new deployment of PET have not been adequately improved. Therefore, we measured the shielding effect of a clinical X-ray protector and lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of 99m Tc. We then calculated the shielding effect of a 0.25 mm lead protector, 1 mm lead, and lead glass using the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower Version 4) code. The shielding effects of 22-mm lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of 99m Tc were approximately 31.5% and 93.3%, respectively. The clinical X-ray protector against annihilation radiation approximately doubled the skin-absorbed dose. (author)

  17. [Shielding effect of clinical X-ray protector and lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of 99mTc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Atsushi; Koshida, Kichiro; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Takahashi, Masaaki; Kitabayashi, Keitarou; Matsubara, Kousuke; Noto, Kimiya; Kawabata, Chikako; Nakagawa, Hiroto

    2004-12-01

    Various pharmaceutical companies in Japan are making radioactive drugs available for positron emission tomography (PET) in hospitals without a cyclotron. With the distribution of these drugs to hospitals, medical check-ups and examinations using PET are expected to increase. However, the safety guidelines for radiation in the new deployment of PET have not been adequately improved. Therefore, we measured the shielding effect of a clinical X-ray protector and lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of (99m)Tc. We then calculated the shielding effect of a 0.25 mm lead protector, 1 mm lead, and lead glass using the EGS4 (Electron Gamma Shower Version 4) code. The shielding effects of 22-mm lead glass against annihilation radiation and gamma rays of (99m)Tc were approximately 31.5% and 93.3%, respectively. The clinical X-ray protector against annihilation radiation approximately doubled the skin-absorbed dose.

  18. Shielding features of quarry stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez V, C.; Contreras S, H.; Hernandez A, L.; Baltazar R, A.; Escareno J, E.; Mares E, C. A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2010-10-01

    Quarry stone lineal attenuation coefficient for gamma-rays has been obtained. In Zacatecas, quarry stone is widely utilized as a decorative item in buildings, however its shielding features against gamma-rays unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the shielding properties of quarry stone against γ-rays using Monte Carlo calculations where a detailed model of a good geometry experimental setup was carried out. In the calculations 10 pieces 10 X 10 cm 2 of different thickness were utilized to evaluate the photons transmission as the quarry stone thickness is increased. It was noticed that transmitted photons decay away as the shield thickness is increased, these results were fitted to an exponential function were the linear attenuation coefficient was estimated. Also, using XCOM code the linear attenuation coefficient from several keV up to 100 MeV was estimated. From the comparison between Monte Carlo results and XCOM calculations a good agreement was found. For 0.662 MeV γ-rays the attenuation coefficient of quarry stone, whose density is 2.413 g-cm -3 , is 0.1798 cm -1 , this mean a X 1/2 = 3.9 cm, X 1/4 = 7.7 cm, X 1/10 = 12.8 cm, and X 1/100 = 25.6 cm. Having the information of quarry stone performance as shielding give the chance to use this material to shield X and γ-ray facilities. (Author)

  19. Development of neutron shielding concrete containing iron content materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    Concrete is one of the most important construction materials which widely used as a neutron shielding. Neutron shield is obtained of interaction with matter depends on neutron energy and the density of the shielding material. Shielding properties of concrete could be improved by changing its composition and density. High density materials such as iron or high atomic number elements are added to concrete to increase the radiation resistance property. In this study, shielding properties of concrete were investigated by adding iron, FeB, Fe2B, stainless - steel at different ratios into concrete. Neutron dose distributions and shield design was obtained by using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The determined shield thicknesses vary depending on the densities of the mixture formed by the additional material and ratio. It is seen that a combination of iron rich materials is enhanced the neutron shielding of capabilities of concrete. Also, the thicknesses of shield are reduced.

  20. Thermal Degradation of Lead Monoxide Filled Polymer Composite Radiation Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, V.; Nagaiah, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead monoxide filled Isophthalate resin particulate polymer composites were prepared with different filler concentrations and investigated for physical, thermal, mechanical and gamma radiation shielding characteristics. This paper discusses about the thermo gravimetric analysis of the composites done to understand their thermal properties especially the effect of filler concentration on the thermal stability and degradation rate of composites. Pristine polymer exhibits single stage degradation whereas filled composites exhibit two stage degradation processes. Further, the IDT values as well as degradation rates decrease with the increased filler content in the composite.

  1. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding...... solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. The same approach is used to study the efficiencies of the steel wall a flat cylinder pierced by the guide...... in the middle and the polyethylene layer. The final model presented here has a 3 cm thick steel shielding around the guide, 30 cm of polyethylene around the shielding, two 5 mm thick B4C layers and a steel wall at position Z = 38 m, being 1 m thick and 10 m in radius. The final model finally proves...

  2. Shielding and grounding in large detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radeka, V.

    1998-09-01

    Prevention of electromagnetic interference (EMI), or ''noise pickup,'' is an important design aspect in large detectors in accelerator environments. Shielding effectiveness as a function of shield thickness and conductivity vs the type and frequency of the interference field is described. Noise induced in transmission lines by ground loop driven currents in the shield is evaluated and the importance of low shield resistance is emphasized. Some measures for prevention of ground loops and isolation of detector-readout systems are discussed

  3. Hydramite II screening tests of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Hedemann, M.A.; Stark, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results of a brief test series aimed at screening a number of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials are reported. These tests were run on Sandia National Laboratories' Hydramite II accelerator using a diode configuration which produces a pinched electron beam. The materials tested include: (1) laminated Kevlar 49/polyester and E-glass/polyester composites, (2) a low density laminated Kevlar 49 composite, and (3) two types of through-the-thickness reinforced Kevlar 49 composites. As expected, tests using laminated Kevlar 49/polyester shields showed that shield permanent set (i.e., permanent deflection) increased with increasing tantalum conversion foil thickness and decreased with increasing shield thickness. The through-the-thickness reinforced composites developed localized, but severe, back surface damage. The laminated composites displayed little back surface damage, although extensive internal matrix cracking and ply delaminations were generated. Roughly the same degree of permanent set was produced in shields made from the low density Kevlar 49 composite and the Kevlar 49/polyester. The E-glass reinforced shields exhibited relatively low levels of permanent set

  4. Shield calculation of project for instrument calibration integrated laboratory of IPEN-Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Gustavo A.S.J.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2009-01-01

    This work performed the shield calculation of the future rooms walls of the five X-ray equipment of the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil, which will be constructed in project of laboratory enlargement. The obtained results by application of a calculation methodology from an international regulation have shown that the largest thickness of shielding (25.7 cm of concrete or 7.1 mm of lead) will be of the wall which will receive the primary beam of the equipment with a 320 kV voltage. The cost/benefit analysis indicated the concrete as the best material option for the shielding

  5. Shielding of the patient's gonads during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, L M; Johanson, P H; Zinar, D M; Lenihan, M R; Herman, M W

    1990-12-01

    Levels of exposure to radiation were recorded at sixty sites in fifteen patients during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing. Radiation film dosimeters were placed at four gonadal sites on each subject. A standard male-gonad cup or a pelvic drape of 0.5-millimeter-thick lead-equivalent was put in place to shield the gonads. A second set of four dosimeters was placed external to the shield to approximate unprotected exposure. The total duration of the fluoroscopy averaged five minutes (range, thirty seconds to fourteen minutes). The total exposure to radiation external to the shield was 35 +/- 34 millirems at the male gonadal sites and 17 +/- 11 millirems at the female gonadal sites. With use of the gonadal shield, exposure to radiation was not measurable in thirteen of the fifteen patients. The differences between the exposures of the shielded and unshielded sites to radiation were statistically significant (p less than 0.001). The highest level of gonadal exposure was found with the treatment of proximal femoral fractures and with the use of statically locked nails. Regardless of the conditions, and for all types of fractures and locations, our results demonstrated that gonadal shielding is justified.

  6. Shielding of the patient's gonads during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, L.M.; Johanson, P.H.; Zinar, D.M.; Lenihan, M.R.; Herman, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    Levels of exposure to radiation were recorded at sixty sites in fifteen patients during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing. Radiation film dosimeters were placed at four gonadal sites on each subject. A standard male-gonad cup or a pelvic drape of 0.5-millimeter-thick lead-equivalent was put in place to shield the gonads. A second set of four dosimeters was placed external to the shield to approximate unprotected exposure. The total duration of the fluoroscopy averaged five minutes (range, thirty seconds to fourteen minutes). The total exposure to radiation external to the shield was 35 +/- 34 millirems at the male gonadal sites and 17 +/- 11 millirems at the female gonadal sites. With use of the gonadal shield, exposure to radiation was not measurable in thirteen of the fifteen patients. The differences between the exposures of the shielded and unshielded sites to radiation were statistically significant (p less than 0.001). The highest level of gonadal exposure was found with the treatment of proximal femoral fractures and with the use of statically locked nails. Regardless of the conditions, and for all types of fractures and locations, our results demonstrated that gonadal shielding is justified

  7. Measurement of neutron energy spectra of PuO[sub 2]-UO[sub 2] mixed oxide fuel and penetrated through surrounding lead-acryl shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Noriaki; Tsujimura, Norio; Nakamura, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center); Momose, Takumaro; Ninomiya, Kazushige; Ishiguro; Hideharu

    1993-12-01

    The energy spectra of neutrons emitted from an aluminum can containing PuO[sub 2]-UO[sub 2] mixed oxide fuel and penetrated through a 35mm thick lead-acryl shield surrounding the can, were measured with the NE-213 organic liquid scintillator, the proton recoil proportional counter and the multi-moderator [sup 3]He spectrometer (Bonner Ball). The measured results were compared with the results calculated by the MORSE-CG Monte Carlo code on the basis of source neutron yields obtained by the ORIGEN-2 code and the source energy spectrum cited from the reference data. The agreement between these two was pretty good. The dose equivalents were then calculated from thus-obtained energy spectra and the flux-to-dose conversion factor and showed good agreement with the data measured with the neutron dose-equivalent counters (rem counters). Since the published data on energy spectrum of mixed oxide fuel are very scarce, these results can be useful as basic data for shielding design study and radiation control of nuclear fuel facilities. (author).

  8. A comparison of dose savings of lead and lightweight aprons for shielding of 99m-Technetium radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren-Forward, H.; Cardew, P.; Smith, B.; Clack, L.; McWhirter, K.; Johnson, S.; Wessel, K.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear medicine technologists (NMTs) have the highest effective doses of radiation among medical workers. With increase in the use of lightweight materials in diagnostic radiography, the aim was to compare the effectiveness of lead and lightweight aprons in shielding from 99m-Technetium ( 99m Tc) gamma rays. The doses received from a scattering phantom to the entrance, 9 cm depth and exit of a phantom were measured with LiF:Mg, Cu, P thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). Doses and spectra were assessed without no shielding, with 0.5-mm lead and lightweight aprons. The lead and lightweight aprons decreased entrance surface doses by 76 and 59%, respectively. The spectral analysis showed that the lightweight apron provided better dose reduction at energies 99m Tc labelled radiopharmaceutical. (authors)

  9. Comparative study of lead borate and bismuth lead borate glass systems as gamma-radiation shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Narveer; Singh, Kanwar Jit; Singh, Kulwant; Singh, Harvinder

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficients have been measured experimentally and calculated theoretically for PbO-B 2 O 3 and Bi 2 O 3 -PbO-B 2 O 3 glass systems using narrow beam transmission method. These values have been used to calculate half value layer (HVL) parameter. These parameters have also been calculated theoretically for some standard radiation shielding concretes at same energies. Effect of replacing lead by bismuth has been analyzed in terms of density, molar volume and mass attenuation coefficient

  10. Hot-cell shielding system for high power transmission in DUPIC fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Yang, M.; Park, H.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a newly designed hot-cell shielding system for use in the development of DUPIC (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactors) fuel at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). This hot-cell shielding system that was designed to transmit high power to sintering furnace in-cell from the out-of-cell through a thick cell wall has three subsystems - a steel shield plug with embedded spiral cooling line, stepped copper bus bars, and a shielding lead block. The dose-equivalent rates of the hot-cell shielding system and of the apertures between this system and the hot-cell wall were calculated. Calculated results were compared with the allowable dose limit of the existing hot-cell. Experiments for examining the temperature changes of the shielding system developed during normal furnace operation were also carried out. Finally, gamma-ray radiation survey experiments were conducted by Co-60 source. It is demonstrated that, from both calculated and experimental results, the newly designed hot-cell shielding system meets all the shielding requirements of the existing hot-cell facility, enabling high power transmission to the in-cell sintering furnace. (author)

  11. Shielding experiments in different materials with 252Cf neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Marathe, P.K.; Pal, Rupali; Jayalakshmi, V.; Chourasiya, G.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Adequate shielding for neutron sources can be determined using analytical method or by actually measuring the attenuation for the target configuration. This paper describes the measurement of Half Value Thickness (HVT), Tenth Value Thickness (TVT), Σ values for four different shielding materials, using a standard 252 Cf neutron source and comparing with the values calculated using an empirical relationship. BF 3 based REM-counter is used for measurement of neutron dose equivalent, against different thickness of the shielding material. The experimental HVT and S values are in good agreement with the calculated values. From this study, it is concluded that, among the four materials studied, high density polyethylene (HDPE) is best suitable for the shielding of a 252 Cf neutron source. (author)

  12. SU-F-I-72: Evaluation of the Ancillary Lead Shielding for Optimizing Radiation Protection in the Interventional Radiology Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkopi, E; Lightfoot, C [Dalhousie University, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Ctr, Halifax, NS (Canada); LeBlanc, E [Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Ctr, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The rising complexity of interventional fluoroscopic procedures has resulted in an increase of occupational radiation exposures in the interventional radiology (IR) department. This study assessed the impact of ancillary shielding on optimizing radiation protection for the IR staff. Methods: Scattered radiation measurements were performed in two IR suites equipped with Axiom Artis systems (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) installed in 2006 and 2010. Both rooms had suspended ceiling-mounted lead-acrylic shields of 75×60 cm (Mavig, Munich, Germany) with lead equivalency of 0.5 mm, and under-table drapes of 70×116 cm and 65×70 cm in the newer and the older room respectively. The larger skirt can be wrapped around the table’s corner and in addition the newer suite had two upper shields of 25×55 cm and 25×35 cm. The patient was simulated by 30 cm of acrylic, air kerma rate (AKR) was measured with the 180cc ionization chamber (AccuPro Radcal Corporation, Monrovia, CA, USA) at different positions. The ancillary shields, x-ray tube, image detector, and table height were adjusted by the IR radiologist to simulate various clinical setups. The same exposure parameters were used for all acquisitions. AKR measurements were made at different positions relative to the operator. Results: The AKR measurements demonstrated 91–99% x-ray attenuation by the drapes in both suites. The smaller size of the under-table skirt and absence of the side-drapes in the older room resulted in a 20–50 fold increase of scattered radiation to the operator. The mobile suspended lead-acrylic shield reduced AKR by 90–94% measured at 150–170 cm height. The recommendations were made to replace the smaller under-table skirt and to use the ceiling-mounted shields for all IR procedures. Conclusion: The ancillary shielding may significantly affect radiation exposure to the IR staff. The use of suspended ceiling-mounted shields is especially important for reduction of

  13. Annotated references on shielding experiment and calculation of high energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1990-12-01

    The literature on shielding experiment and calculation of high energy particles above 20 MeV has been surveyed. The survey covers thirteen journals, from 1965 up to 1989. For each paper, applicable information is listed on type and energy of the projectile, the accelerator used, composition and thickness of the target and shielding materials, shielding geometry, the experimental and calculational methods, and the quantities obtained. The references on shielding experiment and on shielding calculation are accessed through two indices which list the projectile-target and shielding material combination, shielding geometry and the projectile energy range. The literature on neutron, photon and hadron production from thick target bombarded by charged particles has been surveyed mainly from 1984 as a complement of the previous work. (author)

  14. Development of high-performance shielding material by heat curing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Okuno, Koichi; Sato, Osamu [National Maritime Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A high-performance shielding material is developed by a heat curing method. It is mainly made of a thermosetting resin, lead powder, and a boron compound. To make the resin, a single functional monomer stearyl methacrylate (SMA) is used. To get good dispersion of lead and the boron compound in the resin, the viscosity of the SMA is increased by adding a small amount of a peroxide into the liquid monomer and heating up to the temperature of 100 .deg. C. Next, a peroxide, lead powder, a boron compound, a three functional monomer, and a curing accelerator are mixed into the viscous SMA. The mixture is cured in an atmosphere of nitrogen after removing bubbles using a vacuum pump. Measured properties of the cured material are as follows. The curing rate of SMA is 97 %. The density is kept 2.35 g/cm{sub 3} in the range from room temperature to 150 .deg. C. The weight-change measured by a thermogravimetry is 0.16 % in the range from room temperature to 200 .deg. C. Details of fragments in the gas released from the material is analyzed by a gas chromatography and a mass spectrometry. The hydrogen content of the material is 6.04x10 {sub 22} /cm{sub 3} . The shielding effect is calculated for a fission source by an Sn code ANISN. The shielding effect of the curing material is excellent. For example, concrete shield of a certain thickness can be replaced by the material having a thickness less than a half of concrete. Several samples of the material are irradiated at an irradiation equipment of the research reactor JRR-4 installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. At the 14{sub th} day after irradiating with the thermal neutron fluence of 6.6x10{sub 15} /cm{sub 2} , the radioactivity is less than one tenth of 75 Bq/g above which materials are regulated as the radioactive substance in Japan.

  15. Concrete shielding exterior to iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurista, P.; Cossairt, D.

    1983-08-01

    A rule of thumb at Fermilab has been to use 3 feet of concrete exterior to iron shielding. A recent design of a shield with a severe dimensional constraint has prompted a re-evaluation of this rule of thumb and has led to the following calculations of the concrete thickness required to nullify this problem. 4 references, 4 figures

  16. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 μGy compared with 18 μGy (parallelling) and 31 μGy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 μGy per single intraoral exposure. (Authors)

  17. Radiation Build-Up Of High Energy Gamma In Shielding Of High Atomic Number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuliati, Helfi; Akhadi, Mukhlis

    2000-01-01

    Research to observe effect of radiation build-up factor (b) in iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for high energy gamma shielding from exp.137 Cs (E gamma : 662 keV) and exp.60 Co (E gamma : 1332 keV) sources has been carried out. Research was conducted bt counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI (TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are near to 1 (b∼1) both for Fe and Pb. Without inserting b in calculation, from the experiment it was obtained HVT value of Fe for high gamma radiation of 662 and 1332 keV were : (12,94 n 0,03) mm and (17,33 n 0,01) mm with their deviation standards were 0,2% and 0,06% respectively. Value of HVT for Pb with the same energy were : (6,31 n 0,03) mm and (11,86 n 0,03) mm with their deviation standars were : 0,48% and 0,25% respectively. HVL concept could be applied directly to estimate shielding thickness of high atomic number of high energy gamma radiation, without inserting correction of radiation build-up factor

  18. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, D.

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design

  19. MARS14 deep-penetration calculation for the ISIS target station shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Noriaki; Nunomiya, Tomoya; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The calculation of neutron penetration through a thick shield was performed with a three-dimensional multi-layer technique using the MARS14(02) Monte Carlo code to compare with the experimental shielding data in 1998 at the ISIS spallation neutron source facility of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. In this calculation, secondary particles from a tantalum target bombarded by 800-MeV protons were transmitted through a bulk shield of approximately 3-m-thick iron and 1-m-thick concrete. To accomplish this deep-penetration calculation, a three-dimensional multi-layer technique and energy cut-off method were used considering a spatial statistical balance. Finally, the energy spectra of neutrons behind the very thick shield could be calculated down to the thermal energy with good statistics, and the calculated results typically agree well within a factor of two with the experimental data over a broad energy range. The 12 C(n,2n) 11 C reaction rates behind the bulk shield were also calculated, which agree with the experimental data typically within 60%. These results are quite impressive in calculation accuracy for deep-penetration problem

  20. Acoustic metacages for sound shielding with steady air flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Li, Junfei; Cummer, Steven A.; Jing, Yun

    2018-03-01

    Conventional sound shielding structures typically prevent fluid transport between the exterior and interior. A design of a two-dimensional acoustic metacage with subwavelength thickness which can shield acoustic waves from all directions while allowing steady fluid flow is presented in this paper. The structure is designed based on acoustic gradient-index metasurfaces composed of open channels and shunted Helmholtz resonators. In-plane sound at an arbitrary angle of incidence is reflected due to the strong parallel momentum on the metacage surface, which leads to low sound transmission through the metacage. The performance of the proposed metacage is verified by numerical simulations and measurements on a three-dimensional printed prototype. The acoustic metacage has potential applications in sound insulation where steady fluid flow is necessary or advantageous.

  1. Contribution of 210Pb bremsstrahlung to the background of lead shielded gamma spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrda, D.; Bikit, I.; Veskovic, M.; Forkapic, S.

    2007-01-01

    Lead, which is often used as a shielding material, contains 210 Pb (T 1/2 =22.3 y). The 46.54 keV γ-intensity of 210 Pb can be easily reduced by an inner lining, but the bremsstrahlung caused by the β-decay of its daughter, 210 Bi, with a maximal electron energy of 1.16 MeV, will contribute to the gamma detector background. The spectrum of this bremsstrahlung is calculated by numerically fitting the β-spectrum and integrating the Koch-Motz formula. The absorption of the bremsstrahlung in the lead and detection efficiencies for the HPGe detector are calculated by the effective solid angle algorithm, using corrections for the photopeak/Compton ratio of cross-sections in Ge. By comparison with the measured background spectrum, it is shown that, for the lead with 25 Bq/kg of 210 Pb up to 500 keV of gamma spectrum, the bremsstrahlung contribution to the background is about 20% for our surface-based detector system. Also, we compared our calculations with a Monte Carlo simulation of another detector system with a shield containing 1 Bq/kg of 210 Pb and found that our analytical method gives a value of roughly two times higher than the Monte Carlo one for the total bremsstrahlung contribution. The quality of the analytical semi-empirical method is proved by the reasonable agreement with the experimental results published

  2. [Trial manufacture of a plunger shield for a disposable plastic syringe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shigeki; Emoto, Takashi; Mori, Hiroshige; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Kubo, Naoki

    2008-08-20

    A syringe-type radiopharmaceutical being supplied by a manufacturer has a syringe shield and a plunger shield, whereas an in-hospital labeling radiopharmaceutical is administered by a disposable plastic syringe without the plunger shield. In cooperation with Nihon Medi-Physics Co. Ltd., we have produced a new experimental plunger shield for the disposable plastic syringe. In order to evaluate this shielding effect, we compared the leaked radiation doses of our plunger shield with those of the syringe-type radiopharmaceutical (Medi shield type). Our plunger shield has a lead plate of 21 mm in diameter and 3 mm thick. This shield is equipped with the plunger-end of a disposal plastic syringe. We sealed 99mTc solution into a plastic syringe (Terumo Co.) of 5 ml with our plunger shield and Medi shield type of 2 ml. We measured leaked radiation doses around syringes using fluorescent glass dosimeters (Dose Ace). The number of measure points was 18. The measured doses were converted to 70 microm dose equivalent at 740 MBq of radioactivity. The results of our plunger shield and the Medi shield type were as follows: 4-13 microSv/h and 3-14 microSv/h at shielding areas, 3-545 microSv/h and 6-97 microSv/h at non-shielding areas, 42-116 microSv/h and 88-165 microSv/h in the vicinity of the syringe shield, and 1071 microSv/h and 1243 microSv/h at the front of the needle. For dose rates of shielding areas around the syringe, the shielding effects were approximately the same as those of the Medi shield type. In conclusion, our plunger shield may be useful for reducing finger exposure during the injection of an in-hospital labeled radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Lead shielded cells for the spectrographic analysis of radioisotope solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Capdevila, C.; Cruz, F. de la

    1967-01-01

    Two lead shielded cells for the spectrochemical analysis of radioisotope samples are described. One of them is devoted to the evaporation of samples before excitation and the other one contains a suitable spectrographic excitation stand for the copper spark technique. A special device makes it possible the easy displacement of the excitation cell on wheels and rails for its accurate and reproducible position as well as its replacement by a glove box for plutonium analysis. In order to guarantee safety the room in which the spectrograph and the source are set up in separated from the active laboratory by a wall with a suitable window. (Author) 1 refs

  4. A study of gamma shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roogtanakait, N.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma rays have high penetration power and its attenuation depends upon the thickness and the attenuation coefficient of the shield, so it is necessary to use the high density shield to attenuate the gamma rays. Heavy concrete is considered to be used for high radiation laboratory and the testing of the shielding ability and compressibility of various types of heavy concrete composed of baryte, hematite, ilmenite and galena is carried out. The results of this study show that baryte-ilmenite concrete is the most suitable for high radiation laboratory in Thailand

  5. Experimental and simulation optimization analysis of the Whipple shields against shaped charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, G.; Hameed, A.; Horsfall, I.; Barton, P.; Malik, A. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Occasionally, the Whipple shields are used for the protection of a space station and a satellite against the meteoroids and orbital debris. In the Whipple shields each layer of the shield depletes part of high speed projectile energy either by breaking the projectile or absorbing its energy. Similarly, this investigation uses the Whipple shields against the shaped charge to protect the light armour such as infantry fighting vehicles with a little modification in their design. The unsteady multiple interactions of shaped charge jet with the Whipple shield package against the steady homogeneous target is scrutinized to optimize the shield thickness. Simulations indicate that the shield thickness of 0.75 mm offers an optimum configuration against the shaped charge. Experiments also support this evidence.

  6. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  7. A study on radiation shield design of storage facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, JJahirul Haque

    2005-02-01

    Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 58 cm thickness of Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for the floor of the proposed storage facility building, (II) 5 cm thickness of Iron + 36 cm thickness of IMC for the surrounding wall of this installation, (III) 10 cm thickness of Iron + 5 cm thickness of Lead for the door of this installation (IV) 23 cm thickness of IMC + 5 cm thickness of Iron + 2 cm Lead for the roof of the proposed storage facility building. In this study, the shielding efficiency results (by MCNP4C) of IMC vs. ORC at different locations of this installation show that Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) reduces the equivalent dose rate by a factors of at least 2.45, 3.39 and 1.80 times approximately at surrounding wall, floor and roof positions of this installation respectively compared to Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC). In addition, the objective of this study is to acquire the radiation shielding information that can assist in the detail design of storage facility for LILW in future by carrying out the radiation shielding analysis, which is an essential part of the radiation safety analysis of storage facility that Bangladesh had no experience in construction and operation

  8. Enhancement of thermal neutron self-shielding in materials surrounded by reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelia Chilian; Gregory Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Materials containing from 41 to 1124 mg chlorine and surrounded by polyethylene containers of various thicknesses, from 0.01 to 5.6 mm, were irradiated in a research reactor neutron spectrum and the 38 Cl activity produced was measured as a function of polyethylene reflector thickness. For the material containing the higher amount of chlorine, the 38 Cl specific activity decreased with increasing reflector thickness, indicating increased neutron self-shielding. It was found that the amount of neutron self-shielding increased by as much as 52% with increasing reflector thickness. This is explained by neutrons which have exited the material subsequently reflecting back into it and thus increasing the total mean path length in the material. All physical and empirical models currently used to predict neutron self-shielding have ignored this effect and need to be modified. A method is given for measuring the adjustable parameter of a self-shielding model for a particular sample size and combination of neutron reflectors. (author)

  9. Analysis of ferromagnetic shielding of the ITER NBI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roccella, M.; Lucca, F.; Roccella, R.; Cocilovo, V.; Ramogida, G.; Portone, A.; Tanga, A.; Formisano, A.; Martone, R.

    2006-01-01

    In ITER two heating and one diagnostic Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) are foreseen [P. L. Mondino et al., ''ITER neutral beam system '', Nucl. Fus., vol. 40, p. 501 (2000)]. Inside these components there are very stringent limits on the magnetic field (the flux density must be below some Gauss (G) along the ion path and below 20 G in the neutralizing region). To achieve these performances in an environment with high stray field due to the plasma and the poloidal field coils, both passive and active shielding systems are foreseen. The present design of the Magnetic Field Reduction System (MFRS) is made of seven active coils and of a box surrounding the NBI region, consisting of ferromagnetic plates 15 cm thick. The electromagnetic analysis of the effectiveness of these shields has been performed by a full 3D FEM model using the ANSYS code. To perform the FEM modeling of the component special care has been used to face the particular geometrical features of the component (a box of about 15 x 5 x 5 m vs. a ferromagnetic layer of only 15 cm thick). To insert an adequate number of FEM elements (at least 5) in the thickness of the ferromagnetic layer, without a prohibitive increase in the total FEM elements number, a particular modeling approach (a sort of '' Chinese boxes '' technique) has been developed. Due to this technique the FEM model enclosing the ferromagnetic box results completely independent on the fine FEM structure inside the shielding layer. It has been even possible, using this technique, introducing a thin (below 1 cm thick) slot all through the shielding plates, without perturbing the rest of the model. This slot has been used to analyze the effects of possible manufacturing lacks on the residual magnetic field inside the component. This technique has allowed the use of only structured meshes made by brick elements, much more accurate than the tetra elements, needed in the usual free meshing techniques. To have the possibility of changing the shielding

  10. Shielding of the patient's gonads during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwong, L.M.; Johanson, P.H.; Zinar, D.M.; Lenihan, M.R.; Herman, M.W. (Harbor/Univ. of California, Los Angeles Medical Center, Torrance (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Levels of exposure to radiation were recorded at sixty sites in fifteen patients during intramedullary interlocking femoral nailing. Radiation film dosimeters were placed at four gonadal sites on each subject. A standard male-gonad cup or a pelvic drape of 0.5-millimeter-thick lead-equivalent was put in place to shield the gonads. A second set of four dosimeters was placed external to the shield to approximate unprotected exposure. The total duration of the fluoroscopy averaged five minutes (range, thirty seconds to fourteen minutes). The total exposure to radiation external to the shield was 35 +/- 34 millirems at the male gonadal sites and 17 +/- 11 millirems at the female gonadal sites. With use of the gonadal shield, exposure to radiation was not measurable in thirteen of the fifteen patients. The differences between the exposures of the shielded and unshielded sites to radiation were statistically significant (p less than 0.001). The highest level of gonadal exposure was found with the treatment of proximal femoral fractures and with the use of statically locked nails. Regardless of the conditions, and for all types of fractures and locations, our results demonstrated that gonadal shielding is justified.

  11. Development of a computational code for calculations of shielding in dental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is prepared in order to address calculations of shielding to minimize the interaction of patients with ionizing radiation and / or personnel. The work includes the use of protection report Radiation in Dental Medicine (NCRP-145 or Radiation Protection in Dentistry), which establishes calculations and standards to be adopted to ensure safety to those who may be exposed to ionizing radiation in dental facilities, according to the dose limits established by CNEN-NN-3.1 standard published in September / 2011. The methodology comprises the use of computer language for processing data provided by that report, and a commercial application used for creating residential projects and decoration. The FORTRAN language was adopted as a method for application to a real case. The result is a programming capable of returning data related to the thickness of material, such as steel, lead, wood, glass, plaster, acrylic, acrylic and leaded glass, which can be used for effective shielding against single or continuous pulse beams. Several variables are used to calculate the thickness of the shield, as: number of films used in the week, film load, use factor, occupational factor, distance between the wall and the source, transmission factor, workload, area definition, beam intensity, intraoral and panoramic exam. Before the application of the methodology is made a validation of results with examples provided by NCRP-145. The calculations redone from the examples provide answers consistent with the report

  12. Comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for HDPE, BPE and concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    In the compact accelerator based DD neutron generator, the deuterium ions generated by the ion source are accelerated after the extraction and bombarded to a deuterated titanium target. The emitted neutrons have typical energy of ∼2.45MeV. Utilization of these compact accelerator based neutron generators of yield up to 10 9 neutron/second (DD) is under active consideration in many research laboratories for conducting active neutron interrogation experiments. Requirement of an adequately shielded laboratory is mandatory for the effective and safe utilization of these generators for intended applications. In this reference, we report the comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and Concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding. In shielding calculations, neutron induced scattering and absorption gamma dose has also been considered along with neutron dose. Contemporarily any material with higher hydrogenous concentration is best suited for neutron shielding. Choice of shielding material is also dominated by practical issues like economic viability and availability of space. Our computational analysis results reveal that utilization of BPE sheets results in minimum wall thickness requirement for attaining similar range of attenuation in neutron and gamma dose. The added advantage of using borated polyethylene is that it reduces the effect of both neutron and gamma dose by absorbing neutron and producing lithium and alpha particle. It has also been realized that for deciding upon optimum thickness determination of any shielding material, three important factors to be necessarily considered are: use factor, occupancy factor and work load factor. (author)

  13. Comparison of radiation shielding requirements for HDR brachytherapy using 169Yb and 192Ir sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lymperopoulou, G.; Papagiannis, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Georgiou, E.; Hourdakis, C. J.; Baltas, D.

    2006-01-01

    169 Yb has received a renewed focus lately as an alternative to 192 Ir sources for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following the results of a recent work by our group which proved 169 Yb to be a good candidate for HDR prostate brachytherapy, this work seeks to quantify the radiation shielding requirements for 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications in comparison to the corresponding requirements for the current 192 Ir HDR brachytherapy standard. Monte Carlo simulation (MC) is used to obtain 169 Yb and 192 Ir broad beam transmission data through lead and concrete. Results are fitted to an analytical equation which can be used to readily calculate the barrier thickness required to achieve a given dose rate reduction. Shielding requirements for a HDR brachytherapy treatment room facility are presented as a function of distance, occupancy, dose limit, and facility workload, using analytical calculations for both 169 Yb and 192 Ir HDR sources. The barrier thickness required for 169 Yb is lower than that for 192 Ir by a factor of 4-5 for lead and 1.5-2 for concrete. Regarding 169 Yb HDR brachytherapy applications, the lead shielding requirements do not exceed 15 mm, even in highly conservative case scenarios. This allows for the construction of a lead door in most cases, thus avoiding the construction of a space consuming, specially designed maze. The effects of source structure, attenuation by the patient, and scatter conditions within an actual treatment room on the above-noted findings are also discussed using corresponding MC simulation results

  14. A new design of a lead-acrylic shield for staff dose reduction in radial and femoral access coronary catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, H. [Deptartment of Radiation Protection (Germany); Seidenbusch, M.C.; Treitl, M. [Muenchen Univ. Clinical Center (Germany). Inst. for Clinical Radiology; Gilligan, P. [Mater Private Hospital, Dublin (Ireland). Medical Physics

    2015-10-15

    Today's standard radiation protection during coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions is the combined use of lead acrylic shields and table-mounted lower body protection. Ambient dose measurements, however, have shown that these protection devices need improvement. Using an anthropomorphic physical phantom, various scenarios were investigated with respect to personnel exposure: (a) enlarging the shield (b) adding a flexible protective curtain to the bottom side of the shield, and (c) application of radioprotective patient drapes. For visualization of the dose reduction effect, Monte Carlo simulations were performed. The flexible curtain in contact with the patient's body reduces the ambient dose rate at the operator's position by up to (87.5 % ± 7.1) compared to the situation with the bare shield. The use of both the flexible curtain and the patient drape reduces the ambient dose rate by up to (90.8 % ± 7). Similar results were achieved for the assisting personnel when they were positioned next to the operator. In addition, the enlarged shield provides better protection of the head region of tall operators. Adding a flexible protective curtain to the bottom side of the shield can protect operators from high doses, especially for body parts which are not protected by lead aprons, e.g. head, and eye lenses. This may be important with respect to lower dose limits for eye lenses in future. The protective effect in real-life working conditions is still being evaluated in an ongoing clinical study.

  15. Calculation and design for SSRF's bulk shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, K.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (China)]. E-mail: fangkm@sinap.ac.cn; Xu, X.J. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (China); Cai, J.H. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (China)

    2006-12-15

    Shielding design objectives for the SSRF are chosen, assumptions for beam loss rates are given, the methods used on the APS by Moe are summarized and introduced to make calculation and design on bulk shield, the factor of skyshine is also considered, design thicknesses for SSRF's bulk shield are presented.

  16. Shield support frame. Schildausbaugestell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, K.

    1981-09-17

    A powered shield support frame for coal sheds is described comprising of two bottom sliding shoes, a large area gob shield and a larg area roof assembly, all joined movable together. The sliding shoes and the gob shield are joined by a lemniscate guide. Two hydraulic props are arranged at the face-side at one third of the length of the sliding shoes and at the goaf-side at one third of the length of the roof assembly. A nearly horizontal lying pushing prop unit joins the bottom wall sliding shoes to the goaf-side lemniscate guide. This assembly can be applied to seams with a thickness down to 45 cm. (OGR).

  17. Shielding calculation for treatment rooms of high energy linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleithy, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    A review of German Institute of Standardization (DIN) scheme of the shielding calculation and the essential data required has been done for X-rays and electron beam in the energy range from 1 MeV to 50 MeV. Shielding calculation was done for primary and secondary radiations generated during X-ray operation of Linac. In addition, shielding was done against X-rays generated (Bremsstrahlung) by useful electron beams. The calculations also covered the neutrons generated from the interactions of useful X-rays (at energies above 8 MeV) with the surrounding. The present application involved the computation of shielding against the double scattered components of X-rays and neutrons in the maze area and the thickness of the paraffin wax of the room door. A new developed computer program was designed to assist shielding thickness calculations for a new Linac installation or in replacing an existing machine. The program used a combination of published tables and figures in computing the shielding thickness at different locations for all possible radiation situations. The DIN published data of 40 MeV accelerator room was compared with the program calculations. It was found that there is good agreement between both calculations. The developed program improved the accuracy and speed of calculation

  18. Calculations for Extra Well Shielding for 15 MV Clinical Linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, M.A.; Emran, M.M.; Ahmad, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    A radiological survey was conducted around the walls of a clinical linear accelerator (Siemens Mevatron) in South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University. Neutron measurements showed adequate results for all beam orientations. Photon measurements showed adequate results for all beam orientations except for beam orientation 270 degree, facing the control room. During operation, photon measurements were taken in order to calculate the additional shield thickness required to reduce measurements to accepted values. For convenience, lead was the material of choice for extra shielding. A value for the build up factor needed in the calculations of broad beam attenuation was estimated. Measurements inside the control room after adding the calculated lead thickness are much lower than the annual effective equivalent dose limits recommended by the ICRP-60 (International Commission on Radiation Protection) for occupational exposure. Also, measurements taken in the patients waiting hall recorded levels consistent with the six-hour daily occupancy for members of the public. The value of the build up factor was verified by calculations. Also the variation of build up factor distance from the field centre was calculated. Important and useful recommendations were reached from this experience which should be discussed to avoid facing similar situations in radiotherapy departments in Egypt

  19. HPGe detector shielding adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, L.; Rulik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Low-level background shielding of HPGe detectors is used mainly for environmental samples with very low content of radionuclides. National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO) in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. The detectors are placed in a room built from materials with low content of natural radionuclides and equipped with a double isolation of the floor against radon. Detectors themselves are placed in lead or steel shielding. Steel shielding with one of these detectors with relative efficiency of 100% was chosen to be rebuilt to achieve lower minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. The additional lead and copper shielding, consequent reduction of the inner volume and supply of evaporated nitrogen, caused a decrease of the background count and accordingly MDA values as well. The effect of nitrogen evaporation on the net areas of peaks belonging to radon daughters is significant. The enhanced shielding adjustment has the biggest influence in low energy range, what can be seen in collected data. MDA values in energy range from 30 keV to 400 keV decreased to 0.65-0.85 of original value, in energy range from 400 keV to 2 MeV they fell to 0.70-0.97 of original value. (authors)

  20. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  1. Optimization of Shielding- Collimator Parameters for ING-27 Neutron Generator Using MCNP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegazy Aya Hamdy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron generators are now used in various fields. They produce only fast neutrons; D-D neutron generator produces 2.45 MeV neutrons and D-T produces 14.1 MeV neutrons. In order to optimize shielding-collimator parameters to achieve higher neutron flux at the investigated sample (The signal with lower neutron and gamma rays flux at the area of the detectors, design iterations are widely used. This work was applied to ROMASHA setup, TANGRA project, FLNP, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The studied parameters were; (1 shielding-collimator material, (2 Distance between the shielding-collimator assembly first plate and center of the neutron beam, and (3 thickness of collimator sheets. MCNP5 was used to simulate ROMASHA setup after it was validated on the experimental results of irradiation of Carbon-12 sample for one hour to detect its 4.44 MeV characteristic gamma line. The ratio between the signal and total neutron flux that enters each detector was calculated and plotted, concluding that the optimum shielding-collimator assembly is Tungsten of 5 cm thickness for each plate, and a distance of 2.3 cm. Also, the ratio between the signal and total gamma rays flux was calculated and plotted for each detector, leading to the previous conclusion but the distance was 1 cm.

  2. Optimization of Shielding- Collimator Parameters for ING-27 Neutron Generator Using MCNP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Aya Hamdy; Skoy, V. R.; Hossny, K.

    2018-04-01

    Neutron generators are now used in various fields. They produce only fast neutrons; D-D neutron generator produces 2.45 MeV neutrons and D-T produces 14.1 MeV neutrons. In order to optimize shielding-collimator parameters to achieve higher neutron flux at the investigated sample (The signal) with lower neutron and gamma rays flux at the area of the detectors, design iterations are widely used. This work was applied to ROMASHA setup, TANGRA project, FLNP, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. The studied parameters were; (1) shielding-collimator material, (2) Distance between the shielding-collimator assembly first plate and center of the neutron beam, and (3) thickness of collimator sheets. MCNP5 was used to simulate ROMASHA setup after it was validated on the experimental results of irradiation of Carbon-12 sample for one hour to detect its 4.44 MeV characteristic gamma line. The ratio between the signal and total neutron flux that enters each detector was calculated and plotted, concluding that the optimum shielding-collimator assembly is Tungsten of 5 cm thickness for each plate, and a distance of 2.3 cm. Also, the ratio between the signal and total gamma rays flux was calculated and plotted for each detector, leading to the previous conclusion but the distance was 1 cm.

  3. Adjustable lead glass shielding device for use with a over-the-table x-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eubig, C.; Groves, B.M.; Davey, G.

    1978-01-01

    Sources of scattered radiation exposure to personnel from a ceiling-mounted x-ray tube were examined at the side of cardiac catheterization patients. A fully adjustable mounting for a lead glass shield was designed to afford maximum radiation protection to the attending physician's head and neck area, while minimizing interference with the procedure

  4. Adjustable lead glass shielding device for use with an over-the-table x-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubig, C; Groves, B M; Davey, G

    1978-12-01

    Sources of scattered radiation exposure to personnel from a ceiling-mounted x-ray tube were examined at the side of cardiac catheterization patients. A fully adjustable mounting for a lead glass shield was designed to afford maximum radiation protection to the attending physician's head and neck area, while minimizing interference with the procedure.

  5. SU-F-I-71: Fetal Protection During Fluoroscopy: To Shield Or Not to Shield?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S; Vanderhoek, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lead aprons are routinely used to shield the fetus from radiation during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) involving pregnant patients. When placed in the primary beam, lead aprons often reduce image quality and increase fluoroscopic radiation output, which can adversely affect fetal dose. The purpose of this work is to identify an effective and practical method to reduce fetal dose without affecting image quality. Methods: A pregnant patient equivalent abdominal phantom is set on the table along with an image quality test object (CIRS model 903) representing patient anatomy of interest. An ion chamber is positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom, which is used to estimate the relative fetal dose. For three protective methods, image quality and fetal dose measurements are compared to baseline (no protection):1. Lead apron shielding the entire abdomen; 2. Lead apron shielding part of the abdomen, including the fetus; 3. Narrow collimation such that fetus is excluded from the primary beam. Results: With lead shielding the entire abdomen, the dose is reduced by 80% relative to baseline along with a drastic deterioration of image quality. With lead shielding only the fetus, the dose is reduced by 65% along with complete preservation of image quality, since the image quality test object is not shielded. However, narrow collimation results in 90% dose reduction and a slight improvement of image quality relative to baseline. Conclusion: The use of narrow collimation to protect the fetus during FGI is a simple and highly effective method that simultaneously reduces fetal dose and maintains sufficient image quality. Lead aprons are not as effective at fetal dose reduction, and if placed improperly, they can severely degrade image quality. Future work aims to investigate a wider variety of fluoroscopy systems to confirm these results across many different system geometries.

  6. SU-F-I-71: Fetal Protection During Fluoroscopy: To Shield Or Not to Shield?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, S; Vanderhoek, M [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lead aprons are routinely used to shield the fetus from radiation during fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) involving pregnant patients. When placed in the primary beam, lead aprons often reduce image quality and increase fluoroscopic radiation output, which can adversely affect fetal dose. The purpose of this work is to identify an effective and practical method to reduce fetal dose without affecting image quality. Methods: A pregnant patient equivalent abdominal phantom is set on the table along with an image quality test object (CIRS model 903) representing patient anatomy of interest. An ion chamber is positioned at the x-ray beam entrance to the phantom, which is used to estimate the relative fetal dose. For three protective methods, image quality and fetal dose measurements are compared to baseline (no protection):1. Lead apron shielding the entire abdomen; 2. Lead apron shielding part of the abdomen, including the fetus; 3. Narrow collimation such that fetus is excluded from the primary beam. Results: With lead shielding the entire abdomen, the dose is reduced by 80% relative to baseline along with a drastic deterioration of image quality. With lead shielding only the fetus, the dose is reduced by 65% along with complete preservation of image quality, since the image quality test object is not shielded. However, narrow collimation results in 90% dose reduction and a slight improvement of image quality relative to baseline. Conclusion: The use of narrow collimation to protect the fetus during FGI is a simple and highly effective method that simultaneously reduces fetal dose and maintains sufficient image quality. Lead aprons are not as effective at fetal dose reduction, and if placed improperly, they can severely degrade image quality. Future work aims to investigate a wider variety of fluoroscopy systems to confirm these results across many different system geometries.

  7. Computer code for shielding calculations of x-rays rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, R.R.W.; Borges, D. da S.; Lava, D.D.; Moreira, M. de L.; Guimarães, A.C.F.

    2015-01-01

    The building an effective barrier against ionizing radiation present in radiographic rooms requires consideration of many variables. The methodology used for thickness specification of primary and secondary, barrier of a traditional radiographic room, considers the following factors: Use Factor, Occupational Factor, distance between the source and the wall, Workload, Kerma in the air and distance between the patient and the source. With these data it was possible to develop a computer code, which aims to identify and use variables in functions obtained through graphics regressions provided by NCRP-147 (Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities) report, for shielding calculation of room walls, and the walls of the dark room and adjacent areas. With the implemented methodology, it was made a code validation by comparison of results with a study case provided by the report. The obtained values for thickness comprise different materials such as concrete, lead and glass. After validation it was made a case study of an arbitrary radiographic room.The development of the code resulted in a user-friendly tool for planning radiographic rooms to comply with the limits established by CNEN-NN-3:01 published in september/2011. (authors)

  8. Validation of PHITS Spallation Models from the Perspective of the Shielding Design of Transmutation Experimental Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Hiroki; Meigo, Shin-ichiro

    2017-09-01

    The impact of different spallation models implemented in the particle transport code PHITS on the shielding design of Transmutation Experimental Facility is investigated. For 400-MeV proton incident on a lead-bismuth eutectic target, an effective dose rate at the end of a thick radiation shield (3-m-thick iron and 3-m-thick concrete) calculated by the Liège intranuclear cascade (INC) model version 4.6 (INCL4.6) coupled with the GEMcode (INCL4.6/GEM) yields about twice as high as the Bertini INC model (Bertini/GEM). A comparison with experimental data for 500-MeV proton incident on a thick lead target suggest that the prediction accuracy of INCL4.6/GEM would be better than that of Bertini/GEM. In contrast, it is found that the dose rates in beam ducts in front of targets calculated by the INCL4.6/GEMare lower than those by the Bertini/GEM. Since both models underestimate the experimental results for neutron-production doubledifferential cross sections at 180° for 140-MeV proton incident on carbon, iron, and gold targets, it is concluded that it is necessary to allow a margin for uncertainty caused by the spallation models, which is a factor of two, in estimating the dose rate induced by neutron streaming through a beam duct.

  9. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  10. X-ray shielding behaviour of kaolin derived mullite-barites ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripin, A.; Mohamed, F.; Choo, T. F.; Yusof, M. R.; Hashim, S.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    Mullite-barite ceramic (MBC) is an emergent material for effective shielding of redundant ionizing radiation exposure. The composition dependent mechanical, thermal, and microstructure properties of MBC that makes MBC a high performing novel radiation shielding candidate remained unexplored. This paper examines the possibility of exploiting Malaysian kaolin (AKIM-35) and barite (BaSO4) derived ceramic (MBC) system for X-ray shielding operation. Using conventional pressing and sintering method six ceramic samples are prepared by mixing AKIM-35 with barite at varying contents (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%). Synthesized pressed mixtures are calcined at 400 °C for 30 min and then sintered to 1300 °C for 120 min at a heating rate of 10 °C/min. Sintered samples are characterized via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), lead equivalent (LE), uniformity and dose reduction analyses. XRD pattern of prepared ceramics revealed the presence of monoclinic barium alumino-silicate (BAS) and orthorhombic mullite as major shielding phases together with other minor phase of barite and hexagonal quartz (SiO2) structures. Furthermore, FESEM images of ceramics (between 0 and 30 wt%) displayed the existence of compacted monoclinic plate of BAS and acicular mullite morphology (ceramics at 40 and 50 wt%). Radiation tests displayed the capacity of ceramics (at 0 and 10 wt%) to shield the X-ray radiation emanated at tube potential range of 50-120 kV. The highest radiation attenuation is ascertained at 70 kV where the dose is reduced remarkably between 99.11% and 97.42%. Ceramics at 0 and 10 wt% demonstrated the highest lead (Pb) equivalent thickness (LE) of 0.44 mm and 0.34 mm, respectively. It is established that such MBC may contribute towards the development of shielding material against ionizing radiation in diagnostic radiology (X-ray) dose range.

  11. Evaluation of the shielding integrity of end-shields in PHWR type NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, B.M.L.; Ramamirtham, B.; Kutty, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    In the new plants (Narora Atomic Power Plants (NAPP) onwards) relatively higher radiation fields exist on the north and south fuelling machine (FM) vault walls of the E1 100m accessible area passages. These fields were first noticed at NAPS-1 and subsequently at NAPS-2 and KAPS-1. Such surveys done at RAPS have indicated that the fields on these walls would come out to be quite low (only 1-2 mR/h) from sources other than that arising from 41 Ar contamination. RAPS/MAPS experience pointed to adequacy of shielding of the FM vault walls and sufficient overall shielding thickness of the end-shields. Further, radiometry tests of end-shields carried out at Kaiga and RAPP 3 and 4 indicated fairly satisfactory and uniform filling of balls. Hence, incomplete filling of water column of the end-shields due to any venting problem was suspected to be one possible reason for the observed high fields in NAPS and Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS). Since the presence of high radiation fields, both neutron and gamma, is of long-term concern, a special study/measurement of radiation levels on reactor face during high power operation was undertaken. In order to compare the shielding integrity of the older (RAPS/MAPS solid plate type shielding) and newer (NAPS/KAPS steel ball-filled type) end shields, these experiments were done at MAPS-2 and NAPS-2. (author). 2 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Biological shield design for a 10 MeV Rhodotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalafi, H.; Ghane, A.; Safaei Arshi, S.; Tabakh, F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate the produced radiations of the Rhodotron-TT200 and their attenuation to the permitted level. ► We apply analytical calculations to determine the shield material and thickness. ► We simulate the Rhodotron accelerator and its shielding using MCNPX code to make sure of results accuracy. -- Abstract: Radiation field of the Rhodotron-TT200 electron accelerator is determined in this study. Regarding the interactions of electron with matter, the produced radiations and their attenuation to the permitted level (i.e. 0.01 mrem/h) are evaluated and calculated. For this purpose analytical calculations are applied to determine the biological shield material and thickness. In order to make sure of results accuracy, Rhodotron accelerator and its shielding are simulated using MCNPX code and the results of analytical calculations and MCNPX code are compared with the experimental ones.

  13. The shielding performance of multilayer composite shielding structures to 14.8 MeV fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhiqiang; Kang Qing; Xu Jun; Wang Zhenggang; Lu Nan

    2014-01-01

    Cement-based round thin-layer samples mixed with 30% quality content of barite, and 20% quality content of carbide boron has Prepared, the same-diameter sliced samples of pure graphite and pure polyethylene has cut, then, samples combination and cross stack order has designed, formed four species Multilayer Composite shield structure, at last, neutron attenuation measurements has been done by experimental system of using 14.8 MeV neutrons from the 5SDH-2 accelerator and long counter composition, penetrating rate of samples and the shield structure to 14.8 MeV fast neutron has tested, and attenuation section has calculated. Results show that 14.8 MeV fast neutrons to higher penetration rates of thin layer samples, attenuation cross section of samples distinguish small between each other, must be increasing the thickness of the samples to reduce the experimental uncertainty; through composed of attenuation cross section and thickness parameters of composite structure, can more accurately predict the shielding ability of composite structures, error between calculation results and experimental results in 4%. (authors)

  14. Improvements in or relating to nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.J.; Riley, K.; Powell, C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear radiation shield comprises two pieces of steel held together edge to edge by a weld, the depth of which is less than the thickness of either of the edges. As the radiaion shielding effect of the weld will be less than the steel, an insert is bolted or welded over the weld. (U.K.)

  15. Preliminary shielding calculation for the system of CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toreti, Dalila; Xavier, Clarice; Moura, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The CyberKnife robotic system uses a manipulator with six grade of freedom for positioning a 6 MV Linac accelerator for treatment of lesions. This paper presents calculations for a standard room, with 200 cm of thickness walls primary, build for a CyberKnife system, and calculations for a room originally designed for a Linac conventional (with gantry), with secondary barriers of 107 cm thickness. After the realization of shielding for both rooms, the results shown that walls of standard room with 200 cm thickness are adequate for the secondary shield, and for a room with a conventional Linac, from all six evaluated points, two would require additional shielding of nine cm and four cm of concrete with 2.4 g/cubic cm. This shows that the CyberKnife system can be installed in a originally designed room for a conventional Linac with neither restrict nor any shielding, since no incidence of beams on the secondary barriers is existent

  16. Radiation shielding wall structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka; Oka, Shinji; Kan, Toshihiko; Misato, Takeshi.

    1990-01-01

    A space between a pair of vertical steel plates laterally disposed in parallel at an optional distance has a structure of a plurality of vertically extending tranks partitioned laterally by vertically placed steel plates. Then, cements are grouted to the tranks. Strip-like steel plates each having a thickness greater than the gap between the each of the vertically placed steel plates and the cement are bonded each at the surface for each of the vertically placed steel plates opposing to the cements. A protrusion of a strip width having radiation shielding performance substantially identical with that by the thickness of the cement is disposed in the strip-like steel plates. With such a constitution, a safety radiation shielding wall structure with no worry of radiation intrusion to gaps, if formed, between the steel plates and the grouted cements due to shrinkage of the cements. (I.N.)

  17. Shielding assessment of the ETRR-1 Reactor Under power upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, E E [Reactor Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The assessment of existing shielding of the ETRR-1 reactor in case of power upgrading is presented and discussed. It was carried out using both the present EK-10 type fuel elements and some other types of fuel elements with different enrichments. The shielding requirements for the ETRR-1 when power is upgraded are also discussed. The optimization curves between the upgraded reactor power and the shield thickness are presented. The calculation have been made using the ANISN code with the DLC-75 data library. The results showed that the present shield necessitates an additional layer of steel with thickness of 10.20 and 25 cm. When its power is upgraded to 3, 6 and 10 MWt in order to cutoff all neutron energy groups to be adequately safe under normal operating conditions. 4 figs.

  18. Preparation and microwave shielding property of silver-coated carbonyl iron powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Xiao Guo; Ren, Hao; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is prepared by the electroless plating process. • The silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is a new kind of conductive filler. • The reflection and absorption dominate the shielding mechanism of the prepared powder. • Increasing the thickness of electroconductive adhesive will increase the SE. - Abstract: Electroless silver coating of carbonyl iron powder is demonstrated in the present investigation. The carbonyl iron powders are characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) before and after the coating process. The relatively uniform and continuous silver coating is obtained under the given coating conditions. In this paper, the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder is suggested. The reflection of silver coating and absorption of carbonyl iron powder dominate the shielding mechanism of the silver-coated carbonyl iron powder. The silver-coated carbonyl iron powders are used as conductive filler in electroconductive adhesive for electromagnetic interference shielding applications. The effect of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive on the shielding effectiveness (SE) is investigated. The results indicate that the SE increases obviously with the increase of the thickness of electroconductive adhesive. The SE of the electroconductive adhesive with 0.35 mm thickness is above 38 dB across the tested frequency range

  19. Monte Carlo computation of Bremsstrahlung intensity and energy spectrum from a 15 MV linear electron accelerator tungsten target to optimise LINAC head shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biju, K.; Sharma, Amiya; Yadav, R.K.; Kannan, R.; Bhatt, B.C.

    2003-01-01

    The knowledge of exact photon intensity and energy distributions from the target of an electron target is necessary while designing the shielding for the accelerator head from radiation safety point of view. The computations were carried out for the intensity and energy distribution of photon spectrum from a 0.4 cm thick tungsten target in different angular directions for 15 MeV electrons using a validated Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. Similar results were computed for 30 MeV electrons and found agreeing with the data available in literature. These graphs and the TVT values in lead help to suggest an optimum shielding thickness for 15 MV Linac head. (author)

  20. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5)

  1. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  2. Acoustic Metacages for Omnidirectional Sound Shielding

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Chen; Xie, Yangbo; Li, Junfei; Cummer, Steven A.; Jing, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Conventional sound shielding structures typically prevent fluid transport between the exterior and interior. A design of a two-dimensional acoustic metacage with subwavelength thickness which can shield acoustic waves from all directions while allowing steady fluid flow is presented in this paper. The structure is designed based on acoustic gradient-index metasurfaces composed of open channels and shunted Helmholtz resonators. The strong parallel momentum on the metacage surface rejects in-pl...

  3. Shielding research in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafore, P

    1964-10-01

    Shielding research as an independent subject in France dates from 1956. The importance of these studies has been reflected in the contribution which they have made to power reactor design and in the resultant savings in expenditure for civil engineering and machinery for the removal of mobile shields. The Reactor Shielding Research Division numbers approximately 60 persons and uses several experimental facilities. These include: NAIADE I, installed near the ZOE reactor and operating with a natural uranium slab 2 cm thick (an effective diameter of 60 cm is the one most commonly used); the TRITON pool-type reactor, mainly used in shielding studies, includes an active-water loop, by means of which the secondary shields required for light-water reactors can be studied; core, NEREIDE, which is situated near a 2 m x 2 m aluminium window enables a large neutron source to be placed in a compartment without water in which large-scale mock-ups can be mounted for the study, in particular, of neutron diffusion in large cavities, and of reactor shielding of greater thickness than that in NAIADE I; SAMES 600 keV accelerator is used for monoenergetic neutron studies. Instrumentation studies are an important part of the work, mainly in the measurement of fast neutrons and their spectra by activation detectors. Of late, attention has been directed towards the use of (n, n') (rhodium) reactions and of heavy detectors for low-flux measurements. The simultaneous use of a large number of detectors poses automation problems. With our installation we can count 16 detectors simultaneously. Neutron spectrum studies are conducted with nuclear emulsions and a lithium-6 semiconductor spectrometer. As to the materials used, the research carried out in France involves chiefly graphite, iron and concrete at various temperatures up to 800 deg C. Different compounds, borated and non-borated and of densities up to between 1 and 9 are under consideration. Problems connected with applications are

  4. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions. (authors)

  5. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  6. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions

  7. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► It is feasible to use recycled CRT glass in mortar as shield against X-ray radiation. ► Shielding properties of CRT mortar is strongly depended on CRT content. ► Linear attenuation coefficient was reduced by 142% upon 100% CRT glass in mortar. ► Effect of mortar thickness and irradiation energies on shielding was investigated. - Abstract: Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm 3 can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement–sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy.

  9. A new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assad, A.; Chiron, M.; Nimal, J.C.; Diop, C.M.; Ridoux, P.

    1999-01-01

    This study proposes a new approximating formula for calculating gamma-ray buildup factors in multilayer shields. The formula combines the buildup factors of single-layer shields with products and quotients. The feasibility of the formula for reproducing the buildup factors was tested by using point isotropic buildup factors calculated with the SN1D discrete ordinates code as reference data. The dose buildup factors of single-, double-, and multilayer shields composed of water, aluminum, iron, and lead were calculated for a spherical geometry in the energy range between 10 MeV and 40 keV and for total thicknesses of up to 30 mean free paths. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the bound electron effect of Compton scattering (incoherent scattering), the coherent scattering, the pair production, and the secondary sources of bremsstrahlung and fluorescence. The tests have shown that the approximating formula reproduces the reference data of double-layer shields very well for most cases. With the same parameters and with a new physical consideration that takes into account in a global way the degradation of the gamma-ray energy spectrum, the buildup factors of three- and five-layer shields were also very well reproduced

  10. Transparent Metal-Salt-Filled Polymeric Radiation Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David; Lennhoff, John; Harris, George

    2003-01-01

    "COR-RA" (colorless atomic oxygen resistant -- radiation shield) is the name of a transparent polymeric material filled with x-ray-absorbing salts of lead, bismuth, cesium, and thorium. COR-RA is suitable for use in shielding personnel against bremsstrahlung radiation from electron-beam welding and industrial and medical x-ray equipment. In comparison with lead-foil and leaded-glass shields that give equivalent protection against x-rays (see table), COR-RA shields are mechanically more durable. COR-RA absorbs not only x-rays but also neutrons and rays without adverse effects on optical or mechanical performance. The formulation of COR-RA with the most favorable mechanical-durability and optical properties contains 22 weight percent of bismuth to absorb x-rays, plus 45 atomic percent hydrogen for shielding against neutrons.

  11. Shielding Studies for Reducing the associated Radiological Risks Due To Irradiated Low Enriched Uranium Foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present work estimates the radiation dose rates corresponding to irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (20 wt % 235 U) foil as part of shielding studies for radiological risks reduction after irradiation inside TRIGA 14 MW Research Reactor in an investigation on 99 Mo production possibility. Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory's cell shielding calculations have been performed; radiation source was obtained by using ORIGEN-S code with specific cross-sections libraries. Different post-irradiation cooling times have been considered, gamma dose rates being estimated by using MAVRIC module from Scale 6 programs package, for following exposure situations (relative to Pie cell): i) front side, ii) lateral side and iii) back side. Three different calculations were performed: a) without any protection shield between operator and cell, except for the cell stainless steel wall; b) with a Lead protection shield between operator and cell and c) with a depleted Uranium shield, located inside the cell in between the radiation source and cell window. Radiation dose rates to cell external wall surface and for other eight fixed distances from cell wall were estimated. To obtain a consistent set of solutions, the study was done for various Uranium foil weights and different Lead and depleted Uranium shields thicknesses. Calculations were focused to assure that the dose rate to an operator positioned at 60 cm working distance from the cell will not exceed 0.02 mSv/h, maximum allowed dose rate for professionally exposed personnel according to Romanian regulations.

  12. A versatile program for the calculation of linear accelerator room shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Zeinab El-Taher; Farag, Nehad M; Elshemey, Wael M

    2018-03-22

    This work aims at designing a computer program to calculate the necessary amount of shielding for a given or proposed linear accelerator room design in radiotherapy. The program (Shield Calculation in Radiotherapy, SCR) has been developed using Microsoft Visual Basic. It applies the treatment room shielding calculations of NCRP report no. 151 to calculate proper shielding thicknesses for a given linear accelerator treatment room design. The program is composed of six main user-friendly interfaces. The first enables the user to upload their choice of treatment room design and to measure the distances required for shielding calculations. The second interface enables the user to calculate the primary barrier thickness in case of three-dimensional conventional radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and total body irradiation (TBI). The third interface calculates the required secondary barrier thickness due to both scattered and leakage radiation. The fourth and fifth interfaces provide a means to calculate the photon dose equivalent for low and high energy radiation, respectively, in door and maze areas. The sixth interface enables the user to calculate the skyshine radiation for photons and neutrons. The SCR program has been successfully validated, precisely reproducing all of the calculated examples presented in NCRP report no. 151 in a simple and fast manner. Moreover, it easily performed the same calculations for a test design that was also calculated manually, and produced the same results. The program includes a new and important feature that is the ability to calculate required treatment room thickness in case of IMRT and TBI. It is characterised by simplicity, precision, data saving, printing and retrieval, in addition to providing a means for uploading and testing any proposed treatment room shielding design. The SCR program provides comprehensive, simple, fast and accurate room shielding calculations in radiotherapy.

  13. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  14. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  15. Survey of shielding calculation parameters in radiotherapy rooms used in the country and its impact in the existing calculation methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japiassu, Fernando Parois

    2013-01-01

    When designing radiotherapy treatment rooms, the dimensions of barriers are established on the basis of American calculation methodologies specifically; NCRP Report N° 49, NCRP Report N° 51, and more recently, NCRP Report N° 151. Such barrier calculations are based on parameters reflecting predictions of treatments to be performed within the room; which, in tum, reftect a specific reality found in a country. There exists, however, a variety of modern radiotherapy techniques, such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT); Total Body Irradiation (TBl) and radiosurgery (SRS); where patierits are treated in a much different way than during more conventional treatrnents, which are not taken into account the traditional shielding calculation methodology. This may lead to a faulty design of treattnent rooms. In order to establish a comparison between the methodology used to calculate shielding design and the reality of treatments performed in Brazil, two radiotherapy facilitie were selected, both of them offering traditional and modern treatment techniqued as described above. Data in relation with reatments perfotmed over a period of six (6)months of operations in both institutions were collected. Based on tlis informaton, a new set of realistic parameters required for shielding design was estãblished, whicb in turn allowed for a nwe caculation of barrier thickness for both facilities. The barrier thickness resultaing from this calculation was then compared with the barrier thickness propose as part of the original shielding design, approved by the regulatory authority. First, concerning the public facility, the thickness of all primary barriers proposed in the shielding design was actually larger than the thickness resulting from calculations based on realistic parameters. Second, concerning the private facility, the new data show that the thickness of three out of the four primary barriers described in the project is larger than the thickness oresulting from

  16. The use of steel and lead shieldings in radiotherapy rooms and its comparison with respect to neutrons doses at patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G.; Santos, R.F.G.

    2015-01-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H*(10) n , within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5x5cm 2 , 10x10cm 2 , 20x20cm 2 , 30x30cm 2 and 40x40cm 2 openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H*(10) n at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation.

  17. Shielding Calculations for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) Fuel Transfer Cask with Micro shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Ariff Shah Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The shielding calculations for RTP fuel transfer cask was performed by using computer code Micro shield 7.02. Micro shield is a computer code designed to provide a model to be used for shielding calculations. The results of the calculations can be obtained fast but the code is not suitable for complex geometries with a shielding composed of more than one material. Nevertheless, the program is sufficient for As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) optimization calculations. In this calculation, a geometry based on the conceptual design of RTP fuel transfer cask was modeled. Shielding material used in the calculations were lead (Pb) and stainless steel 304 (SS304). The results obtained from these calculations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  18. Radiation shielding glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Hajime.

    1997-01-01

    It was found that a glass composition comprising, as essential ingredients, SiO 2 , PbO, Gd 2 O 3 and alkali metal oxides can provide a shielding performance against electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons. The present invention provides radiation shielding glass containing at least from 16 to 46wt% of SiO 2 , from 47 to 75wt% of PbO, from 1 to 10wt% of Gd 2 O 3 , from 0 to 3wt% of Li 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of Na 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of K 2 O provided that Li 2 O + Na 2 O + K 2 O is from 1 to 10wt%, B 2 O 3 is from 0 to 10wt%, CeO 2 is from 0 to 3wt%, As 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt% and Sb 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt%. Since the glass can shield electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons simultaneously, radiation shielding windows can be designed and manufactured at a reduced thickness and by less constitutional numbers in a circumstance where they are present altogether. (T.M.)

  19. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    . Rectangular wooden shields are allocated into a separate group. The lower edge of this shield was made oval. Wooden base of the shield had a thickness of 1 cm, and it was covered with cowhide. The shields covered with the leather of mountain goats, called Tarand in ancient sources, were of special value. The shield was held by means of two belt loops. One had passed through the forearm, and the other was held by the left hand. There are grounds to assume the presence of a pair of metal brackets on the back side of the shield used for holding the shield. The Scythians did not have centralized production of shields. This fact explains the diversity of forms.

  20. Reactor head shielding apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukei, G.E.; Roebelen, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor head shielding apparatus for mounting on spaced reactor head lifting members radially inwardly of the head bolts. It comprises a frame of sections for mounting on the lifting members and extending around the top central area of the head, mounting means for so mounting the frame sections, including downwardly projecting members on the frame sections and complementary upwardly open recessed members for fastening to the lifting members for receiving the downwardly projecting members when the frame sections are lowered thereto with lead shielding supported thereby on means for hanging lead shielding on the frame to minimize radiation exposure or personnel working with the head bolts or in the vicinity thereof

  1. Attenuation of a non-parallel beam of gamma radiation by thick shielding-application to the determination of the 235U enrichment with NaI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortreau, Patricia; Berndt, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    The traditional method used to determine the Uranium enrichment by nondestructive analysis is based on the 'enrichment meter principle' [1]. It involves measuring the intensity of the 186 keV net peak area of 235 U in 'quasi-infinite' samples. A prominent factor, which affects the peak intensity, is the presence of gamma absorbing material (e.g., container wall, detector cover) between the sample and the detector. Its effect is taken into consideration in a commonly called 'wall thickness' correction factor. Often calculated on the basis of approximations, its performance is adequate for small attenuation factors applicable to the case of narrow beams. However these approximations do not lead to precise results when wide non-parallel beams are attenuated through thick container walls. This paper is dedicated to the calculation by numerical integration of the geometrical correction factor (K wtc ) which describes the effective mean path length of the radiation through the absorbing layer. This factor was calculated as a function of various measurement parameters (types and dimensions of the detector, of the collimator and of the shielding) for the most commonly used collimator shapes and detectors. Both coherent scattering (Rayleigh) and incoherent scattering (Compton) are taken into account for the calculation of the radiation interaction within the detector

  2. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Miller, Cameron [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Umstadter, Donald, E-mail: donald.umstadter@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 10{sup 7} photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam’s inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  3. Mathematical modeling of the radiation dose received from photons passing over and through shielding walls in a PET/CT suite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Lotte S; Cormack, John

    2010-01-01

    Given that the financial cost of shielding PET/CT suites can be substantial, it has become increasingly important to be able to accurately assess the thickness of shielding required for barriers and whether it is necessary to extend such shielding all the way to the ceiling. The overall shielding...... requirement for a PET/CT installation must take into account both 511 keV gamma ray emissions from PET scans and lower energy x-ray scatter from CT scans. This paper deals with the overall impact of emissions from both modalities. Radiation exposure from both scatter over shielding barriers as well...... as transmission through these barriers is taken into account. A series of simulations of the dose received by a person positioned behind a shielding barrier in a typical PET/CT scanning suite were carried out using both Monte Carlo and analytical models. The transmission through lead barriers was found to be very...

  4. Neutron shield analysis and design for the PDX fusion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimesey, R.A.; Nigg, D.W.; Scott, A.J.; Wheeler, F.J.; Jassby, D.L.; Perry, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    The basic component of the biological shield for PDX is an existing 81 cm thick high-density concrete shielding wall surrounding the machine. The principal additional shielding requirement is a roof shield over the machine to reduce air-scattered skyshine dose into the PDX control room and to the site boundary. The roof shield is designed in removable sections on a steel support structure permitting overhead crane access to major PDX components. After analysis of a number of alternate concepts, a roof shield consisting of 50 cm of water in polyethylene tanks was selected to meet design objectives of effectiveness, weight, removability, and cost

  5. A practical neutron shielding design based on data-base interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.H.; Sheu, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron shielding design is an important part of the construction of nuclear reactors and high-energy accelerators. Neutron shielding design is also indispensable in the packaging and storage of isotopic neutron sources. Most efforts in the development of neutron shielding design have been concentrated on nuclear reactor shielding because of its huge mass and strict requirement of accuracy. Sophisticated computational tools, such as transport and Monte Carlo codes and detailed data libraries have been developed. In principle, now, neutron shielding, in spite of its complexity, can be designed in any detail and with fine accuracy. However, in most practical cases, neutron shielding design is accomplished with simplified methods. Unlike practical gamma-ray shielding design, where exponential attenuation coupled with buildup factors has been applied effectively and accurately, simplified neutron shielding design, either by using removal cross sections or by applying charts or tables of transmission factors such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 38 (Ref. 1) for general neutron protection or to NCRP 51 (Ref. 2) for accelerator neutron shielding, is still very primitive and not well established. The available data are limited in energy range, materials, and thicknesses, and the estimated results are only roughly accurate. It is the purpose of this work to establish a simple, convenient, and user-friendly general-purpose computational tool for practical preliminary neutron shielding design that is reasonably accurate. A wide-range (energy, material, and thickness) data base of dose transmission factors has been generated by applying one-dimensional transport calculations in slab geometry

  6. Shielding design of highly activated sample storage at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naim Syauqi Hamzah; Julia Abdul Karim; Mohamad Hairie Rabir; Muhd Husamuddin Abdul Khalil; Mohd Amin Sharifuldin Salleh

    2010-01-01

    Radiation protection has always been one of the most important things considered in Reaktor Triga PUSPATI (RTP) management. Currently, demands on sample activation were increased from variety of applicant in different research field area. Radiological hazard may occur if the samples evaluation done were misjudge or miscalculated. At present, there is no appropriate storage for highly activated samples. For that purpose, special irradiated samples storage box should be provided in order to segregate highly activated samples that produce high dose level and typical activated samples that produce lower dose level (1 - 2 mR/ hr). In this study, thickness required by common shielding material such as lead and concrete to reduce highly activated radiotracer sample (potassium bromide) with initial exposure dose of 5 R/ hr to background level (0.05 mR/ hr) were determined. Analyses were done using several methods including conventional shielding equation, half value layer calculation and Micro shield computer code. Design of new irradiated samples storage box for RTP that capable to contain high level gamma radioactivity were then proposed. (author)

  7. Several problems in accelerator shielding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ban, Shuichi.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the utilization of accelerators has increased rapidly, and the increase of accelerating energy and beam intensity is also remarkable. The studies on accelerator shielding have become important, because the amount of radiation emitted from accelerators increased, the regulation of the dose of environmental radiation was tightened, and the cost of constructing shielding rose. As the plans of constructing large accelerators have been made successively, the survey on the present state and the problems of the studies on accelerator shielding was carried out. Accelerators are classified into electron accelerators and proton accelerators in view of the studies on shielding. In order to start the studies on accelerator shielding, first, the preparation of the cross section data is indispensable. The cross sections for generating Bremsstrahlung, photonuclear reactions generating neutrons, generation of neutrons by hadrons, nuclear reaction of neutrons and generation of gamma-ray by hadrons are described. The generation of neutrons and gamma-ray as the problems of thick targets is explained. The shielding problems are complex and diversified, but in this paper, the studies on the shielding, by which basic data are obtainable, are taken up, such as beam damping and side wall shielding. As for residual radioactivity, main nuclides and the difference of residual radioactivity according to substances have been studied. (J.P.N.)

  8. The dose penumbra of a custom-made shield used in hemibody skin electron irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Charlotte I; AlDahlawi, Ismail; Wang, Iris Z; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-11-08

    We report our technique for hemibody skin electron irradiation with a custom-made plywood shield. The technique is similar to our clinical total skin electron irradiation (TSEI), performed with a six-pair dual field (Stanford technique) at an extended source-to-skin distance (SSD) of 377 cm, with the addition of a plywood shield placed at 50 cm from the patient. The shield is made of three layers of stan-dard 5/8'' thick plywood (total thickness of 4.75 cm) that are clamped securely on an adjustable-height stand. Gafchromic EBT3 films were used in assessing the shield's transmission factor and the extent of the dose penumbra region for two different shield-phantom gaps. The shield transmission factor was found to be about 10%. The width of the penumbra (80%-to-20% dose falloff) was measured to be 12 cm for a 50 cm shield-phantom gap, and reduced slightly to 10 cm for a 35 cm shield-phantom gap. In vivo dosimetry of a real case confirmed the expected shielded area dose. © 2016 The Authors.

  9. Monteray Mark-I: Computer program (PC-version) for shielding calculation with Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudjijanto, M.S.; Akhmad, Y.R.

    1998-01-01

    A computer program for gamma ray shielding calculation using Monte Carlo method has been developed. The program is written in WATFOR77 language. The MONTERAY MARH-1 is originally developed by James Wood. The program was modified by the authors that the modified version is easily executed. Applying Monte Carlo method the program observe photon gamma transport in an infinity planar shielding with various thick. A photon gamma is observed till escape from the shielding or when its energy less than the cut off energy. Pair production process is treated as pure absorption process that annihilation photons generated in the process are neglected in the calculation. The out put data calculated by the program are total albedo, build-up factor, and photon spectra. The calculation result for build-up factor of a slab lead and water media with 6 MeV parallel beam gamma source shows that they are in agreement with published data. Hence the program is adequate as a shielding design tool for observing gamma radiation transport in various media

  10. The evaluation of radiation dose to embryo/fetus and the design of shielding in the treatment of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Woong; Huh, Soon Nyung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Yang Gyun; Park, Jong Min [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Suk Won [Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Purpose : To estimate the dose to the embryo/fetus of a pregnant patient with brain tumors, and to design an shielding device to keep the embryo/fetus dose under acceptable levels. Materials and Methods : A shielding wall with the dimension of 1.55 m height, 0.9 m width, and 30 mm thickness is fabricated with 4 trolleys under the wall. It is placed between a patient and the treatment head of a linear accelerator to attenuate the leakage radiation effectively from the treatment head, and is placed 1 cm below the lower margin of the treatment field in order to minimize the dose to a patient from the treatment head. An anti-patient scattering neck supporters with 2 cm thick Cerrobend metal is designed to minimize the scattered radiation from the treatment fields and it is divided into 2 section. They are installed around the patient neck by attach from right and left sides. A shielding bridge for anti-room scattered radiation is utilized to place 2 sheets of 3 mm lead plates above the abdomen to setup three detectors under the lead sheets. Humanoid phantom is irradiated with the same treatment parameters, and with and without shielding devices using TLD, and ionization chambers with and without a build-up cap. Results : The dose to the embryo/fetus without shielding was 3.20, 3.21, 1.44, 0.90 cGy at off-field distances of 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm. With shielding, the dose to embryo/fetus was reduced to 0.88, 0.60, 0.35, 0.25, cGy, and the ratio of the shielding effect varied from 70% to 80%. TLD results were 1.8, 1.2, 0.8, 1.2, and 0.8 cGy. The dose measured by the survey meter was 10.9 mR/h at the patient's surface of abdomen. The dose to the embryo/fetus was estimated to be about 1 cGy during the entire treatment.

  11. Neutron and Gamma Shielding Evaluation for KN-12 Spent Nuclear Fuel Transport Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, I. J.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; You, G. S.; Yoon, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, G. H.; Jeong, Y. C.; Ko, Y. W. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD., Kori (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The CASTOR KN-12 is designed to transport 12 intact PWR spent fuel assemblies for dry and wet transportation conditions. The overall cask length is 480.1 cm with a wall thickness 37.5 cm. Shield for the KN-12 is maintained by the thick walled cask body and the lid. For neutron shielding, polyethylene rods (PE) are arranged in longitudinal boreholes in the vessel wall and PE-plates are inserted between the cask lid and lid side shock absorber and between the cask bottom and bottom steel plate. The shielding evaluation of the cask has been performed with MCNP to confirm the shielding integrity of cask for pre-service inspection of transport cask.

  12. Shield wall evaluation of hot cell facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, I. J.; Kuk, D. H.; Ko, J. H.; Jung, W. M.; Yoo, G. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    The future hot cell is located in the Irradiated Material Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). It is β-γ type hot cell that was constructed on the base floor in IMEF building for irradiated material testing. And this hot cell will be used for carrying out the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). The radiation shielding capability of hot cell should be sufficient to meet the radiation dose requirements in the related regulations. Because the radioactive sources of ACP are expected to be higher than radioactive sources of IMEF design criteria, the future hot cell in current status is unsatisfactory to hot test of ACP. So the shielding analysis of the future hot cell is performed to evaluate shielding ability of concrete shield wall. The shielding analysis included (a) identification of ACP source term; (b) photon source spectrum; (c) shielding analysis by QADS and MCNP-4C; and (d) enhancement of concrete shield wall. In this research, dose rates are obtained according to ACP source, geometry and hot cell shield wall thickness. And the evaluation and reinforcement thickness of the shield wall about future hot cell are concluded

  13. Radiation shielding design for DECY-13 cyclotron using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasito T; Bunawas; Taufik; Sunardi; Hari Suryanto

    2016-01-01

    DECY-13 is a 13 MeV proton cyclotron with target H_2"1"8O. The bombarding of 13 MeV protons on target H_2"1"8O produce large amounts of neutrons and gamma radiation. It needs the efficient radiation shielding to reduce the level of neutrons and gamma rays to ensure safety for workers and public. Modeling and calculations have been carried out using Monte Carlo method with MCNPX code to optimize the thickness for the radiation shielding. The calculations were done for radiation shielding of rectangular space room type with the size of 5.5 m x 5 m x 3 m and thickness of 170 cm made from lightweight concrete types of portland. It was shown that with this shielding the dose rate outside the wall was reduced to 1 μSv/h. (author)

  14. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  15. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, Lawrence B., E-mail: Lawrence_Rees@byu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Czirr, J. Bart, E-mail: czirr@juno.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The response of a {sup 3}He neutron detector is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the {sup 3}He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the {sup 3}He. In applications for portal or border monitors where {sup 3}He detectors are used to interdict illicit importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around {sup 3}He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of {sup 3}He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a point {sup 252}Cf source placed in the center of polyethylene spheres of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding is explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that incremental benefits are minimal if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the {sup 3}He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 4-5 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0.5-1 cm. Similar conclusions can be applied to polyethylene boxes employing two {sup 3}He tubes. Two-tube boxes with front moderators of non-uniform thickness may be useful for detecting neutrons over a wide energy range.

  16. Natural fibre high-density polyethylene and lead oxide composites for radiation shielding

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, A; Ismail, M R

    2003-01-01

    Study has been made of the radiation shielding provided by recycled agricultural fibre and industrial plastic wastes produced as composite materials. Fast neutron and gamma-ray spectra behind composites of fibre-plastic (rho = 1.373 g cm sup - sup 3) and fibre-plastic-lead (rho = 2.756 g cm sup - sup 3) have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and neutron-gamma spectrometer with a stilbene scintillator. The pulse shape discriminating technique based on the zero-cross-over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray pulses. Slow neutron fluxes have been measured using a collimated reactor beam and BF sub 3 counter, leading to determination of the macroscopic cross-section (SIGMA). The removal cross-sections (SIGMA sub R) of fast neutrons have been determined from measured results and elemental composition of the composites. For gamma-rays, total linear attenuation coefficients (mu) and total mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) have been determined from use of the XCOM code and me...

  17. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7–22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20–94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5–21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h. - Highlights: • The Brockhouse project will add 3 new beamlines at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). • The shielding design against synchrotron radiation was required for these beamlines. • We have completed the required shielding design. • Our design will reduce radiation leakage to <0.5 μSv/h; CLS requires 1.0 μSv/h

  18. Investigation of factors influencing the efficacy of electromagnetic shielding in X band frequency range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Zaroushani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to the importance of engineering controls for prevention of microwave exposure, this study was conducted to design and constract a novel electromagnetic shielding and also to examine the factors influencing shielding efficacy in X band frequency range. Material and Method: This study used Resin Epoxy as matrix and nano-Nickel Oxide as filler to prepare the composite plates with three different thicknesses (2,4, and 6 mm and four different weight percentages (5,7,9 and 11. The fabricated composites characterized using X-ray diffraction and Field Emission Scanning Electron microscopy. Shielding effectiveness, percolation depth, and percolation threshold were measured using Vector Network Analyzers. Thermal Gravimetric Analysis was conducted to study the temperature influence on weight loss for fabricated composites. Result: A maximum shielding effectiveness value of 84.18% was obtained for the 11%-6mm composite at 8.01 GHz and the 7%-4mm composite exhibits a higher average of shielding effectiveness of 66.72% at X- band frequency range. The 4mm thickness was optimum and critical diameter for composite plates; and percolation depth was obtained greater than thickness of composites. However, increasing the nickel oxide content did not show noticeable effect on the shielding effectiveness. Thermal Gravimetric Analysis showed that the study shields were resistant to temperature up to 150 °C without experiencing weight loss. What is more, the results indicated that Nickel oxide Nano particles had desirable distribution and dispersion in epoxy matrix and percolation threshold was appeared in low content of nickel oxide nanoparticles. Conclusion: A novel electromagnetic shield using low thickness and few content of nanoparticle with noticeable efficacy was properly designed and constructed in the field of occupational health. In addition, this shield has low cost, easy to manufacture, resistance to wet/corrosion, and low weight. Epoxy

  19. Transmission test of the polyethylene shield against 40 and 65 MeV quasi monochrome neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Makoto; Nakamura, Takashi; Sakuya, Yoshimasa; Nauchi, Yasushi; Nakao, Noriaki; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakane, Yoshihiro.

    1996-01-01

    Using 40 and 65 MeV quasi monochrome neutron of the AVF cyclotron installed at Takasaki Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron energy spectra were measured after transmitting the polyethylene shield. Results of the shielding experiments using concrete and iron recognized as main shielding material were proposed previously. As data obtained in the experiments were useful for a bench-mark experiment to investigate for shielding calculation and sectional data set, a shielding calculation simulated with new experiment to compare with and investigate for the previous experimental data. As a result, it was found that calculation result of neutron flux transmitting through the polyethylene shield showed difference with increase of the shield thickness. And, reducing distance of the peak neutron was also found to be over-estimated in its calculation value, such as three and five times on 43 MeV at 120 and 180 cm thick, respectively. (G.K.)

  20. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  1. Thermal shielding device in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness and earthquake proofness of mounting structures to a reactor vessel in a thermal shielding device comprising a plurality of tightly closed casings evacuated or shield with heat insulation gases, by reducing the wall thickness and weight of the casing. Constitution: the thermal shielding body comprises tightly closed casings and compressing core materials for preventing the deformation of the casings. The tightly closed casing is in the shape of a hollow vessel, completely sealed in gastight manner, and evacuated or sealed with heat insulation gases at a low pressure of about less than 0.5 kg/cm 2 G, such that the inner pressure is lower than the outer pressure. Compressing core materials made of porous metals or porous ceramics are contained to the inside of the casing. In this way, the wall thickness of the tightly closed casing can be reduced significantly as compared with the conventional case, whereby the mounting work on the site to the reactor container on the field can remarkably be improved and high reliability can be maintained at the mounting portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Analysis and Testing of a Composite Fuselage Shield for Open Rotor Engine Blade-Out Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2016-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the Aircraft. The NASA Glenn Research Center and The Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), China Lake, collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test lightweight composite shields for protection of the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. LS-DYNA® was used to predict the thickness of the composite shield required to prevent blade penetration. In the test, two composite blades were pyrotechnically released from a running engine, each impacting a composite shield with a different thickness. The thinner shield was penetrated by the blade and the thicker shield prevented penetration. This was consistent with pre-test LS-DYNA predictions. This paper documents the analysis conducted to predict the required thickness of a composite shield, the live fire test from the full scale rig at NAWC China Lake and describes the damage to the shields as well as instrumentation results.

  3. Calculation of a concrete shielding for an ILU-8 D electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helal, A.; Imam, A.

    1996-01-01

    A concrete shielding for an electron accelerator of 1 MeV is suggested to replace its structural steel shielding. The thickness of such a shield is calculated. The calculational model used is based on standard and transmission curves given in the literature. The calculated concrete shielding is generally adequate to attenuate the accelerator produced radiation to a level 1 μ Gy/h or less at any point outside of the vault enclosure. 5 figs

  4. Calculation of a concrete shielding for an ILU-8 D electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helal, A [Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo (Egypt); Imam, A [National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, AEA, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    A concrete shielding for an electron accelerator of 1 MeV is suggested to replace its structural steel shielding. The thickness of such a shield is calculated. The calculational model used is based on standard and transmission curves given in the literature. The calculated concrete shielding is generally adequate to attenuate the accelerator produced radiation to a level 1 {mu} Gy/h or less at any point outside of the vault enclosure. 5 figs.

  5. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  6. Passive magnetic shielding in MRI-Linac systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Brendan; Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Brad M.; Keall, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Passive magnetic shielding refers to the use of ferromagnetic materials to redirect magnetic field lines away from vulnerable regions. An application of particular interest to the medical physics community is shielding in MRI systems, especially integrated MRI-linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) systems. In these systems, the goal is not only to minimize the magnetic field in some volume, but also to minimize the impact of the shield on the magnetic fields within the imaging volume of the MRI scanner. In this work, finite element modelling was used to assess the shielding of a side coupled 6 MV linac and resultant heterogeneity induced within the 30 cm diameter of spherical volume (DSV) of a novel 1 Tesla split bore MRI magnet. A number of different shield parameters were investigated; distance between shield and magnet, shield shape, shield thickness, shield length, openings in the shield, number of concentric layers, spacing between each layer, and shield material. Both the in-line and perpendicular MRI-Linac configurations were studied. By modifying the shield shape around the linac from the starting design of an open ended cylinder, the shielding effect was boosted by approximately 70% whilst the impact on the magnet was simultaneously reduced by approximately 10%. Openings in the shield for the RF port and beam exit were substantial sources of field leakage; however it was demonstrated that shielding could be added around these openings to compensate for this leakage. Layering multiple concentric shield shells was highly effective in the perpendicular configuration, but less so for the in-line configuration. Cautious use of high permeability materials such as Mu-metal can greatly increase the shielding performance in some scenarios. In the perpendicular configuration, magnetic shielding was more effective and the impact on the magnet lower compared with the in-line configuration.

  7. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  8. Study on preparation of ultrafine lead tungstate for radiation protection and γ-ray shielding of the gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Licheng; He Ping; Zhou Yuanlin; Song Kaiping; Yang Kuihua

    2012-01-01

    Lead tungstate combines the radiation shielding properties of tungsten and lead, and it is quite distinctive to manufacture lead tungstate with ultra-fine granularity to enhance its capacity of radiation shielding. The grain size of lead tungstate has direct impact on the ability of its protection from radioactive materials. the smaller the grain size and more uniform dispersion of lead tungstate, the better protective ability it is going to be. In this paper, soft-template synthesis was introduced to prepare ultra-fine PbWO 4 . Rigorous experiment conditions are settled to ensure the access to obtain ultra-fine, homogeneous lead tungstate product, and it is better than other physical and chemical preparation methods. The surface-active agent for the soft template, with S-60 for the water system W/O microemulsion zone, was used to synthesize successfully ultra-fine PbWO 4 . It was shown that dispersing agent S-60 in the soft template method produced ultra-fine PbWO 4 with uniform granularity distribution. By using orthogonal experimental method, the best experimental conditions were obtained as follows: S-60 as surfactant dispersant with diluted 30 times concentration, solutions with pH9, 0.01 mol/L concentration of reactant, 1300 rpm of stirring speed and slowly adding drops of Na 2 WO 4 solution into Pb (Ac) 2 solution. Based on the optimal experimental conditions, the product of ultra-fine product for the anti-radiation protection filler has been made. The fine packing for the preparation of tungsten the gamma rays on the gloves is an average capacity of 5% or so. (authors)

  9. Validation of calculated self-shielding factors for Rh foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaćimović, R.; Trkov, A.; Žerovnik, G.; Snoj, L.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2010-10-01

    Rhodium foils of about 5 mm diameter were obtained from IRMM. One foil had thickness of 0.006 mm and three were 0.112 mm thick. They were irradiated in the pneumatic transfer system and in the carousel facility of the TRIGA reactor at the Jožef Stefan Institute. The foils were irradiated bare and enclosed in small cadmium boxes (about 2 g weight) of 1 mm thickness to minimise the perturbation of the local neutron flux. They were co-irradiated with 5 mm diameter and 0.2 mm thick Al-Au (0.1%) alloy monitor foils. The resonance self-shielding corrections for the 0.006 and 0.112 mm thick samples were calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation and amount to about 10% and 60%, respectively. The consistency of measurements confirmed the validity of self-shielding factors. Trial estimates of Q0 and k0 factors for the 555.8 keV gamma line of 104Rh were made and amount to 6.65±0.18 and (6.61±0.12)×10 -2, respectively.

  10. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    Shields for equipment in which ionising radiation is associated with high electrical gradients, for example X-ray tubes and particle accelerators, incorporate a radiation-absorbing metal, as such or as a compound, and are electrically non-conducting and can be placed in the high electrical gradient region of the equipment. Substances disclosed include dispersions of lead, tungsten, uranium or oxides of these in acrylics polyesters, PVC, ABS, polyamides, PTFE, epoxy resins, glass or ceramics. The material used may constitute an evacuable enclosure of the equipment or may be an external shield thereof. (U.K.)

  11. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jank, Julia; Kragl, Gabriele; Georg, Dietmar; Medical University of Vienna

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. Material and Methods: We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise trademark linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard OeNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. Results: We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. Conclusions: For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the

  12. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Julia; Kragl, Gabriele; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise™ linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard ÖNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the accommodated linac operates with or without a flattening filter. The

  13. Impact of a flattening filter free linear accelerator on structural shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jank, Julia [Klinikum - Klagenfurt am Woerthersee (Austria). Inst. fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kragl, Gabriele [Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. Medical Radiation Physics; Georg, Dietmar [Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Div. Medical Radiation Physics; Medical University of Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to assess the effects of a flattening filter free medical accelerator on structural shielding demands of a treatment vault of a medical linear accelerator. We tried to answer the question, to what extent the required thickness of the shielding barriers can be reduced if instead of the standard flattened photon beams unflattened ones are used. Material and Methods: We chose both an experimental as well as a theoretical approach. On the one hand we measured photon dose rates at protected places outside the treatment room and compared the obtained results for flattened and unflattened beams. On the other hand we complied with international guidelines for adequate treatment vault design and calculated the shielding barriers according to the therein given specifications. Measurements were performed with an Elekta Precise trademark linac providing nominal photon energies of 6 and 10 MV. This machine underwent already earlier some modifications in order to be able to operate both with and without a flattening filter. Photon dose rates were measured with a LB133-1 dose rate meter manufactured by Berthold. To calculate the thickness of shielding barriers we referred to the Austrian standard OeNORM S 5216 and to the US American NCRP Report No. 151. Results: We determined a substantial photon dose rate reduction for all measurement points and photon energies. For unflattened 6 MV beams a reduction factor ranging from 1.4 to 1.8 was identified. The corresponding values for unflattened 10 MV beams were 2.1 and 3.2. The performed shielding calculations indicated the same tendency: For all relevant radiation components we found a reduction in shielding thickness when unflattened beams were used. The required thickness of primary barriers was reduced up to 8.0%, the thickness of secondary barriers up to 11.4%, respectively. Conclusions: For an adequate dimensioning of treatment vault shielding barriers it is by no means irrelevant if the

  14. High ionization radiation field remote visualization device - shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Antonio P. Rodrigues; Omi, Nelson M.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Calvo, Wilson A. Pajero

    2011-01-01

    The high activity sources manipulation hot-cells use special and very thick leaded glass windows. This window provides a single sight of what is being manipulated inside the hot-cell. The use of surveillance cameras would replace the leaded glass window, provide other sights and show more details of the manipulated pieces, using the zoom capacity. Online distant manipulation may be implemented, too. The limitation is their low ionizing radiation resistance. This low resistance also limited the useful time of robots made to explore or even fix problematic nuclear reactor core, industrial gamma irradiators and high radioactive leaks. This work is a part of the development of a high gamma field remote visualization device using commercial surveillance cameras. These cameras are cheap enough to be discarded after the use for some hours of use in an emergency application, some days or some months in routine applications. A radiation shield can be used but it cannot block the camera sight which is the shield weakness. Estimates of the camera and its electronics resistance may be made knowing each component behavior. This knowledge is also used to determine the optical sensor type and the lens material, too. A better approach will be obtained with the commercial cameras working inside a high gamma field, like the one inside of the IPEN Multipurpose Irradiator. The goal of this work is to establish the radiation shielding needed to extend the camera's useful time to hours, days or months, depending on the application needs. (author)

  15. Tungsten-based composite materials for fusion reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Karni, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Composite tungsten-based materials were recently proposed for the heavy constituent of compact fusion reactor shields. These composite materials will enable the incorporation of tungsten - the most efficient nonfissionable inelastic scattering (as well as good neutron absorbing and very good photon attenuating) material - in the shield in a relatively cheap way and without introducing voids (so as to enable minimizing the shield thickness). It is proposed that these goals be achieved by bonding tungsten powder, which is significantly cheaper than high-density tungsten, with a material having the following properties: good shielding ability and relatively low cost and ease of fabrication. The purpose of this work is to study the effectiveness of the composite materials as a function of their composition, and to estimate the economic benefit that might be gained by the use of these materials. Two materials are being considered for the binder: copper, second to tungsten in its shielding ability, and iron (or stainless steel), the common fusion reactor shield heavy constituent

  16. Experimental studies of dynamic impact response with scale models of lead shielded radioactive material shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.; Hadden, J.A.; Basham, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary experimental studies of dynamic impact response of scale models of lead-shielded radioactive material shipping containers are presented. The objective of these studies is to provide DOE/ECT with a data base to allow the prediction of a rational margin of confidence in overviewing and assessing the adequacy of the safety and environmental control provided by these shipping containers. Replica scale modeling techniques were employed to predict full scale response with 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models of shipping containers that are used in the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes. Free fall impact experiments are described for scale models of plain cylindrical stainless steel shells, stainless steel shells filled with lead, and replica scale models of radioactive material shipping containers. Dynamic induced strain and acceleration measurements were obtained at several critical locations on the models. The models were dropped from various heights, attitudes to the impact surface, with and without impact limiters and at uniform temperatures between -40 and 175 0 C. In addition, thermal expansion and thermal gradient induced strains were measured at -40 and 175 0 C. The frequency content of the strain signals and the effect of different drop pad compositions and stiffness were examined. Appropriate scale modeling laws were developed and scaling techniques were substantiated for predicting full scale response by comparison of dynamic strain data for 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models with stainless steel shells and lead shielding

  17. Shielding evaluation of moving bed onion irradiator by radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, R.; Sangurdekar, P.R.; Sarangapani, R.; Raipurkar, D.R.; Mehta, S.K.; Shastri, S.P.; Patil, K.B.; Bongirwar, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    A moving bed onion irradiator made from m.s. cladded lead slab shields designed to hold 20 kCi of 60 Co source was evaluated by radiometry with an 8 Ci 60 Co source from CRC-2 radiography camera. Some shielding losses in the irradiator noted by radiometry could be visualized by a thermocole model of the complex shielding assembly. These were rectified by appropriate lead filling. Significant shielding losses noted at cladding layer positions of slabs were attributed to lack of interlocking features in the slabs. These had to be rectified by provision of 3 TVL of additional all round shielding supplemented by local shielding at some positions. (author). 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the GHz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suchea, M. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Chemistry and Physics, “Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Iasi (Romania); Tudose, I.V. [Chemistry and Physics, “Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, Iasi (Romania); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Tzagkarakis, G. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Kenanakis, G. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure & Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology (FORTH) Hellas, Heraklion (Greece); Katharakis, M. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Drakakis, E. [Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Koudoumas, E., E-mail: koudoumas@staff.teicrete.gr [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, PANI:HCl and PEDOT:PSS present very effective attenuation of electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range 4–20 GHz. • The shielding performance is based mostly on the graphene nanoplatelets and supported by PANI:HCl. In contrast, PEDOT:PSS plays mainly the role of the binder. • Increasing resistivity was observed to reduce the shielding effect, while increasing thickness to favor it. - Abstract: We report on preliminary results regarding the applicability of nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range of 4–20 GHz. Various combinations of materials were employed including poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), polyaniline, graphene nanoplatelets, carbon nanotubes, Cu nanoparticles and Poly(vinyl alcohol). As shown, paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline PEDOT:PSS and Poly(vinyl alcohol) can offer quite effective electromagnetic shielding, similar or even better than that of commercial products, the response strongly depending on their thickness and resistivity.

  19. Nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the GHz frequency range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchea, M.; Tudose, I.V.; Tzagkarakis, G.; Kenanakis, G.; Katharakis, M.; Drakakis, E.; Koudoumas, E.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, PANI:HCl and PEDOT:PSS present very effective attenuation of electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range 4–20 GHz. • The shielding performance is based mostly on the graphene nanoplatelets and supported by PANI:HCl. In contrast, PEDOT:PSS plays mainly the role of the binder. • Increasing resistivity was observed to reduce the shielding effect, while increasing thickness to favor it. - Abstract: We report on preliminary results regarding the applicability of nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range of 4–20 GHz. Various combinations of materials were employed including poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), polyaniline, graphene nanoplatelets, carbon nanotubes, Cu nanoparticles and Poly(vinyl alcohol). As shown, paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline PEDOT:PSS and Poly(vinyl alcohol) can offer quite effective electromagnetic shielding, similar or even better than that of commercial products, the response strongly depending on their thickness and resistivity.

  20. Design and analysis of magnetic shield for 650 MHz SCRF cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Vanshree; Jain, Vikas; Das, S.; Shinde, R.S.; Joshi, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Five-cell, 650 MHz Superconducting RF (SCRF) cavity is being developed at RRCAT for the Injector Linac of proposed ISNS project. The SCRF cavity needs to be shielded effectively from earth magnetic field. The external magnetic field can cause magnetic field trapping that limits the performance of SCRF cavity. The allowable limit of earth magnetic field in the cavity surface is < 10 mG. The magnetic shielding analysis carried out for 650 MHz dressed SCRF cavity is presented in this paper. For axial magnetic field shielding analysis, 2-D code PANDIRA has been used. A 2-D axisymmetric geometry (cylinder of Cryoperm10 sheet with 460 mm diameter of various thickness and 1100 mm length) has been modelled and analyzed in the presence of 240 mG external axial magnetic field. The influence of partial opening of 120 mm diameter at both ends of the cylinder on magnetic field pattern inside the shielded region has been evaluated. The transverse magnetic shielding analysis in the presence of 500 mG transverse external field has been carried out using OPERA 3D code. The flux leakage through the major openings for cavity supports, ports on the shield is investigated and accordingly the openings are designed to minimize the leakage. Inference of material thickness on the magnetic shielding for reducing magnetic field below specified limit has been investigated. Details of design and analysis of magnetic shield for SCRF cavity will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  2. The angular gamma flux in an iron shield due to a thin slab source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkuhn, H.

    1977-04-01

    The angular spectra of the gamma energy fluxes and dose rates in iron shields due to thin and thick sources are compared. The anisotropicity increases with increasing source thickness. But the changes can be ignored near the forward direction (shield axis) and moreover for all directions at deep penetrations. At low source energies the changes are smaller than at higher ones (at equal penetrations in cm)

  3. An investigation of dose changes for therapeutic kilovoltage x-ray beams with underlying lead shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robin; Healy, Brendan; Holloway, Lois; Baldock, Clive

    2007-01-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray beams are used to treat cancer on or close to the skin surface. Many clinical cases use high atomic number materials as shielding to reduce dose to underlying healthy tissues. In this work, we have investigated the effect on both the surface dose and depth doses in a water phantom with lead shielding at depth in the phantom. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the water phantom and to calculate the surface doses and depth doses using primary x-ray beam spectra derived from an analytical model. The x-ray beams were in the energy range of 75-135 kVp with field sizes of 2, 5 and 8 cm diameter. The lead sheet was located beneath the water surface at depths ranging from 0.5-7.5 cm. The surface dose decreased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface and as the field size was increased. The variation in surface dose as a function of x-ray beam energy was only small but the maximum reduction occurred for the 100 kVp x-ray beam. For the 8 cm diameter field with the lead at 1 cm depth and using the 100 kVp x-ray beam, the surface dose was reduced to 0.898 of the surface dose in the water phantom only. Measured surface dose changes, using a Farmer-type ionization chamber, agreed with the Monte Carlo calculated doses. Calculated depth doses in water with a lead sheet positioned below the surface showed that the dose fall-off increased as the lead was positioned closer to the water surface as compared to the depth dose in the water phantom only. Monte Carlo calculations of the total x-ray beam spectrum at the water surface showed that the total fluence decreased due to a reduction in backscatter from within the water and very little backscatter from the lead. The mean energy of the x-ray spectrum varied less than 1 keV, with the lead at 1 cm beneath the water phantom surface. As the Monte Carlo calculations showed good agreement with the measured results, this method can be used to verify surface dose changes in clinical situations

  4. EMI Shielding Performance For Varies Frequency by Metal Plating on Mold Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Fee Tai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conformal metalization on mold compound offers new possibility for IC package design to improve features such as rigidization of the flexible core, heat sink capability, 3D-circuit patterning and the electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding. With the unique processes, the fabrication technology had enabled to achieve the high reliable performance and had passed the electrical test. Following research after the reliability concern, this paper further study the shielding effectiveness of varying coating thickness with respect to laboratory simulated EMI condition, using radio frequency from 10MHz to 5.8 GHz. Different metal namely pure nickel, nickel-phosphorous and pure plated copper are studied for their effectiveness of EMI sheilding. Our first result showed over 35-40dB of shielding effectiveness is achievable on high frequency 868-5800MHz. Nevertheless on low frequency of 10MHz, the shielding effectiveness achievement is below than 25dB. To overcome the shielding need for lower frequency, we further expanded our test by choosing ferromagentic material Nicke/Ironl-alloy in combination with thick copper plating. With this new metal combination, EMI shielding effectiveness for lower frequency is improved to 40dB.

  5. Benchmark analysis and evaluations of materials for shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, E.R.; Gersey, B.B.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.; Shavers, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to provide a benchmark set of heavy ion beam measurements behind ''standard'' targets made using radiation detectors routinely used for astronaut dosimetry and to test the radiation shielding properties of candidate multifunctional spacecraft materials. These measurements are used in testing and validating space radiation transport codes currently being developed by NASA and in selecting promising materials for further development. The radiation dosimetry instruments being used include CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD), Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), the Liulin Mobile Dosimetry Unit (MDU) and thermoluminescent detector (TLD). Each set of measurements include LET/y spectra, and dose and dose equivalent as functions of shield thickness. Measurements are being conducted at the NIRS HIMAC, using heavy-ion beams of energy commonly encountered in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and that have been identified as being of particular concern to the radiation protection of space crews. Measurements are being made behind a set of standard'' targets including Al, Cu, polyethylene (HDPE) and graphite that vary in thickness from 0.5 to > 30 g/cm 2 . In addition, we are measuring the shielding properties of novel shielding materials being developed by and for NASA, including carbon and polymer composites. (author)

  6. Simple shielding reduces dose to the contralateral breast during prone breast cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Uma, E-mail: uma.goyal@gmail.com; Locke, Angela; Smith-Raymond, Lexie; Georgiev, Georgi N.

    2016-07-01

    Our goal was to design a prone breast shield for the contralateral breast and study its efficacy in decreasing scatter radiation to the contralateral breast in a prone breast phantom setup receiving radiation therapy designed for breast cancer. We constructed a prone breast phantom setup consisting of (1) A thermoplastic mask with a left-sided depression created by a water balloon for a breast shape; (2) 2 plastic bags to hold water in the thermoplastic mask depression; (3) 2000 mL of water to fill the thermoplastic mask depression to create a water-based false breast; (4) 1-cm thick bolus placed in the contralateral breast holder; (5) 2 lead (Pb) sheets, each 0.1-cm thick for blocking scatter radiation in the contralateral bolus-based false breast; (6) a prone breast board to hold the thermoplastic mask, water, bolus, and lead; (7) 9 cm solid water on top of the breast board to simulate body; (8) a diode was used to verify dose for each treatment field of the treated water-based breast; (9) metal–oxide–semiconductor-field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters to measure dose to the contralateral bolus-based breast. The phantom prone breast setup was CT simulated and treatment was designed with 95% isodose line covering the treated breast. The maximum dose was 107.1%. Megavoltage (MV) port images ensured accurate setup. Measurements were done using diodes on the treated water-based breast and MOSFET dosimeters at the medial and lateral sides of the contralateral bolus-based breast without and with the Pb shield. Five treatments were done for each of the 3 data sets and recorded individually for statistical purposes. All treatments were completed with 6 MV photons at 200 cGy per treatment. The dose contributions from each of the 3 data sets including 15 treatments total without and with the prone lead shield to the medial and lateral portions of contralateral bolus-based breast were averaged individually. Unshielded dose means were 37.11 and 2.94 cGy, and

  7. Reduction of entrance surface dose depending on shielding methods for panoramagraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Hyun; Han, DongKyoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, The Graduate School, Eulji University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Chul [Dept. of Radiological, Science Gachon, University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Panoramagraphy was the second most used intraoral radiography utilized in Korea, resulting in 17.8% in university dental hospitals, 24.8% in dental hospitals, and 31.4% in dental clinics. Depending on increased demand like orthodontics and implant, panoromagraphy tends to consistently increase. This study were used lead glasses and lead shielding to reduce unnecessary radiation to the eyeballs and thyroid. ESD was 41.4% when radiation was shielded with the lead glasses while reducing 47.3% of ESD by shielding the X-ray tube area with shielding lead. There was no statistically significant difference. The lead glasses is appropriated to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to the eyeballs.

  8. Reduction of entrance surface dose depending on shielding methods for panoramagraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Hyun; Han, DongKyoon; Kim, Sung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Panoramagraphy was the second most used intraoral radiography utilized in Korea, resulting in 17.8% in university dental hospitals, 24.8% in dental hospitals, and 31.4% in dental clinics. Depending on increased demand like orthodontics and implant, panoromagraphy tends to consistently increase. This study were used lead glasses and lead shielding to reduce unnecessary radiation to the eyeballs and thyroid. ESD was 41.4% when radiation was shielded with the lead glasses while reducing 47.3% of ESD by shielding the X-ray tube area with shielding lead. There was no statistically significant difference. The lead glasses is appropriated to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to the eyeballs

  9. Pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection system for in-situ nondestructive inspection of Space Shuttle RCC heat shields.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Walkington, Phillip D.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    The reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) heat shield components on the Space Shuttle's wings must withstand harsh atmospheric reentry environments where the wing leading edge can reach temperatures of 3,000 F. Potential damage includes impact damage, micro cracks, oxidation in the silicon carbide-to-carbon-carbon layers, and interlaminar disbonds. Since accumulated damage in the thick, carbon-carbon and silicon-carbide layers of the heat shields can lead to catastrophic failure of the Shuttle's heat protection system, it was essential for NASA to institute an accurate health monitoring program. NASA's goal was to obtain turnkey inspection systems that could certify the integrity of the Shuttle heat shields prior to each mission. Because of the possibility of damaging the heat shields during removal, the NDI devices must be deployed without removing the leading edge panels from the wing. Recently, NASA selected a multi-method approach for inspecting the wing leading edge which includes eddy current, thermography, and ultrasonics. The complementary superposition of these three inspection techniques produces a rigorous Orbiter certification process that can reliably detect the array of flaws expected in the Shuttle's heat shields. Sandia Labs produced an in-situ ultrasonic inspection method while NASA Langley developed the eddy current and thermographic techniques. An extensive validation process, including blind inspections monitored by NASA officials, demonstrated the ability of these inspection systems to meet the accuracy, sensitivity, and reliability requirements. This report presents the ultrasonic NDI development process and the final hardware configuration. The work included the use of flight hardware and scrap heat shield panels to discover and overcome the obstacles associated with damage detection in the RCC material. Optimum combinations of custom ultrasonic probes and data analyses were merged with the inspection procedures needed to

  10. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X.K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A.B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  11. Radiation shielding material characterization by non-destructive neutron radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizal Yazid; Azali Muhammad; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Rafhayudi Jamro; Hishamuddin Husain

    2007-01-01

    Shielding property of boronated rubber was characterized easily by the use of neutron radiography technique. For 10 phr of boron carbide in the natural rubber composite, the ability to completely shield against neutron was found to have 8mm thickness and above for the neutron flux of 1.04 x 10 5 n/cm 2 s (author)

  12. Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Estimation from CryoSat-2 Satellite Data Using Machine Learning-Based Lead Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanggyun Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Satellite altimeters have been used to monitor Arctic sea ice thickness since the early 2000s. In order to estimate sea ice thickness from satellite altimeter data, leads (i.e., cracks between ice floes should first be identified for the calculation of sea ice freeboard. In this study, we proposed novel approaches for lead detection using two machine learning algorithms: decision trees and random forest. CryoSat-2 satellite data collected in March and April of 2011–2014 over the Arctic region were used to extract waveform parameters that show the characteristics of leads, ice floes and ocean, including stack standard deviation, stack skewness, stack kurtosis, pulse peakiness and backscatter sigma-0. The parameters were used to identify leads in the machine learning models. Results show that the proposed approaches, with overall accuracy >90%, produced much better performance than existing lead detection methods based on simple thresholding approaches. Sea ice thickness estimated based on the machine learning-detected leads was compared to the averaged Airborne Electromagnetic (AEM-bird data collected over two days during the CryoSat Validation experiment (CryoVex field campaign in April 2011. This comparison showed that the proposed machine learning methods had better performance (up to r = 0.83 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE = 0.29 m compared to thickness estimation based on existing lead detection methods (RMSE = 0.86–0.93 m. Sea ice thickness based on the machine learning approaches showed a consistent decline from 2011–2013 and rebounded in 2014.

  13. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  14. Shielding walls against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    Hot-cell shielding walls consist of building blocks made of lead according to DIN 25407 part 1, and of special elements according to DIN 25407 part 2. Alpha-gamma cells can be built using elements for protective contamination boxes according to DIN 25480 part 1. This standards document intends to provide planning engineers, manufacturers, future users and the competent authorities and experts with a basis for the design of hot cells with lead shielding walls and the design of hot-cell equipment. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Attenuation of a non-parallel beam of gamma radiation by thick shielding-application to the determination of the {sup 235}U enrichment with NaI detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortreau, Patricia [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, TP 800 Via Fermi, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,) (Italy)]. E-mail: patricia.mortreau@jrc.it; Berndt, Reinhard [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, TP 800 Via Fermi, Ispra (VA) (Italy)

    2005-09-21

    The traditional method used to determine the Uranium enrichment by nondestructive analysis is based on the 'enrichment meter principle' [1]. It involves measuring the intensity of the 186 keV net peak area of {sup 235}U in 'quasi-infinite' samples. A prominent factor, which affects the peak intensity, is the presence of gamma absorbing material (e.g., container wall, detector cover) between the sample and the detector. Its effect is taken into consideration in a commonly called 'wall thickness' correction factor. Often calculated on the basis of approximations, its performance is adequate for small attenuation factors applicable to the case of narrow beams. However these approximations do not lead to precise results when wide non-parallel beams are attenuated through thick container walls. This paper is dedicated to the calculation by numerical integration of the geometrical correction factor (K {sub wtc}) which describes the effective mean path length of the radiation through the absorbing layer. This factor was calculated as a function of various measurement parameters (types and dimensions of the detector, of the collimator and of the shielding) for the most commonly used collimator shapes and detectors. Both coherent scattering (Rayleigh) and incoherent scattering (Compton) are taken into account for the calculation of the radiation interaction within the detector.

  16. Design report for shielded glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, J. H.; Lee, J. C.; Seo, K. S.; Bang, K. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Min, D. K.; Park, S. W.

    1999-05-01

    For the examination of spent fuels and high radioactive specimens using a specially equipped scanning electron microscope, a shielded glove box was designed and constructed at PIE facility of KAERI. This glove box consisted of shielding walls, containment box, lead glasses, manipulators, gloves, ventilation systems, doors, hot-cell specimen cask adapter, etc. It was emphasized that both the easy operation and radiation safety are important factors in the shielded glove box were installed also considered as a important factor to build the basic concept of the assembling. Two sliding doors and one hinge-type door were installed for the easy installation, operation and maintenance of scanning electron microscope. Containment box which confines the radioactive material into the box consisted of reinforced transparent glasses, aluminum frames and stainless steel plate liner. Therefore everything beyond the containment box can be seen through the lead glass which installed at the front shielding wall. All shielding walls and doors were introduced separately into the room and assembled by bolting. (author). 3 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs

  17. Neutron shielding properties of a new high-density concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorente, A.; Gallego, E.; Vega Carrillo, H.R.; Mendez, R.

    2008-01-01

    The neutron shielding properties of a new high-density concrete (commercially available under the name Hormirad TM , developed in Spain by the company CT-RAD) have been characterized both experimentally and by Monte Carlo calculations. The shielding properties of this concrete against photons were previously studied and the material is being used to build bunkers, mazes and doors in medical accelerator facilities with good overall results. In this work, the objective was to characterize the material behaviour against neutrons, as well as to test alternative mixings including boron compounds in an effort to improve neutron shielding efficiency. With that purpose, Hormirad TM slabs of different thicknesses were exposed to an 241 Am-Be neutron source under controlled conditions in the neutron measurements laboratory of the Nuclear Engineering Department at UPM. The original mix, which includes a high fraction of magnetite, was then modified by adding different proportions of anhydrous borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ). In order to have a reference against common concrete used to shield medical accelerator facilities, the same experiment was repeated with ordinary (HA-25) concrete slabs. In parallel to the experiments, Monte Carlo calculations of the experiments were performed with MCNP5. The experimental results agree reasonably well with the Monte Carlo calculations. Therefore, the first and equilibrium tenth-value layers have been determined for the different types of concrete tested. The results show an advantageous behaviour of the Hormirad TM concrete, in terms of neutron attenuation against real thickness of the shielding. Borated concretes seem less practical since they did not show better neutron attenuation with respect to real thickness and their structural properties are worse. The neutron attenuation properties of Hormirad TM for typical neutron spectra in clinical LINAC accelerators rooms have been also characterized by Monte Carlo calculation. (author)

  18. Nuclear shielding of openings in ITER Tokamak building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Arumugam, A.P.; Beaudoin, V.; Beltran, D.; Benchikhoune, M.; Berruyer, F.; Cortes, P.; Gandini, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Ghirelli, N. [ASSYSTEM E.O.S, ZAC Saint Martin, 23, rue Benjamin Franklin, 84120 Pertuis (France); Gray, A.; Hurzlmeier, H.; Le Page, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Lemée, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue René Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Lentini, G.; Loughlin, M.; Mita, Y.; Patisson, L.; Rigoni, G.; Rathi, D.; Song, I. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Establishment of a methodology to design shielded opening in external wall of the Tokamak building. ► Analysis of the shielding requirement, case by case, depending on the localization and the context. ► Implementation of an integrated solution for shielded opening. -- Abstract: The external walls of the Tokamak building, made of thick concrete, provide the nuclear shielding for operators working in adjacent buildings and for the environment. There are a series of openings to these external walls, devoted to ducts or pipes for ventilation, waveguides and transmission lines for heating systems and diagnostics, cooling pipes, cable trays or busbars. The shielding properties of the wall shall be preserved by adequate design of the openings in order not to affect the radiological zoning in adjacent areas. For some of them, shielding properties of the wall are not affected because the size of the network is quite small or the source is far from the opening. But for most of the openings, specific features shall be considered. Even if the approach is the same and the ways to shield can be standardized, specific analysis is requested in any case because the constraints are different.

  19. Design of auxiliary shield for remote controlled metallographic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hiroki; Okamoto, Hisato

    2014-06-01

    The remote controlled optical microscope installed in the lead cell at the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been upgraded to a higher performance unit to study the effect of the microstructural evolution in clad material on the high burn-up fuel behavior under the accident condition. The optical pass of the new microscope requires a new through hole in the shielding lead wall of the cell. To meet safety regulations, auxiliary lead shieldings were designed to cover the lost shielding function of the cell wall. Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) was used to calculate and determine the shape and setting positions of the shielding unit. Seismic assessments of the unit were also performed. (author)

  20. Radiation shielding bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, G.J.W.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation shielding brick for use in building dry walls to form radiation proof enclosures and other structures is described. It is square in shape and comprises a sandwich of an inner layer of lead or similar shielding material between outer layers of plastics material, for structural stability. The ability to mechanically interlock adjacent bricks is provided by shaping the edges as cooperating external and internal V-sections. Relatively leak-free joints are ensured by enlarging the width of the inner layer in the edge region. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the performance of peridotite aggregates for radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinjun; Li, Guofeng; Meng, Dechuan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using peridotite rich in crystal water as aggregates of radiation-shielding concrete. • Performance of peridotite concrete is simulated and compared with ordinary concrete. • Performance of concrete samples is tested. • Neutron shielding performance can be significantly enhanced by peridotite aggregates. - Abstract: Peridotite is a kind of material that is rich in crystal water. In this paper, peridotite is used as fine and coarse aggregates for radiation shielding concrete. The transmission data of different concrete thickness and different energy neutron are calculated using Monte-Carlo method. The neutron shielding performance of the peridotite concrete samples are tested using 241 Am-Be neutron source. The results show that the peridotite is an excellent neutron shielding material

  2. Radiation shielding considerations for the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Y.; Mori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation shielding relevant to the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor is considered. The dose rate during the reactor operation can be made low enough for personnel access into the reactor room if a 2m thick water layer is installed above the magnet cryostat. The dose rate 24 h after shutdown is such that the human access is allowed above the magnet cryostat. Sufficient water layer thickness is provided in the inboard space for the operation of automatic welder/cutter while retaining the magnet shielding capability. Some forced cooling is required for the decay heat removal in the first wall. The penetration shield thickness around the neutral beam injector port is estimated to be barely sufficient in terms of the magnet radiation damage. (orig.)

  3. A study on radiation shielding design in MACSTOR-400(CANDU spent fuel storage facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Hee

    2006-02-01

    Since the spent fuel pool will be saturated in the near future, spent fuel storage facilities are urgently needed. Because of high radiation and decay heat, spent fuel management is difficult and important. In this study, the shielding thickness of MACSTOR-400 that satisfies the general surface dose rate limit has been investigated. And the radiation shielding safety at site boundary has also been evaluated. IAEA recommends the safety series as a guideline and the U.S. follows the NUREG guide for spent fuel storage facility design. In Japan, the regulation for internal transfer is applied to the spent fuel storage. In Korea, the ACT notification for radiation protection is considered. As a shielding design requirement, it is stated that the occupational exposure dose rate must not exceed 1 mSv/week. From this value, it is assumed that the surface dose rate limit is 25 μSv/hr. And for multi unit operation in same site, the dose rate limit at the controlled area boundary is 0.25 mSv/yr. MCNP code and Microshield program were used for calculating the surface dose rate and the dose rate at site boundary respectively. The shielding should be at least 90 cm thick except the air inlet to follow the surface dose rate limit. Additional shielding is needed on air inlet because the dose rate on air inlet is higher than the dose rate on concrete surface. Without the shielding structure, the shielding thickness should be at least 127 cm. In order to satisfy the surface dose rate limit with maintaining the same concrete thickness on air inlet, shielding structure is required on air inlet. The optimum shielding structure has been proposed in this study. The allowable number of MACSTORs with considering other nuclear facilities in Wolsung site is calculated at 60. It is expected that the required number of MACSTORs are 28 in order to store the total amount of spent fuel generated during NPP operation in Wolsung. Therefore, it seems to be safe in radiation point at site boundary

  4. A study on radiation shielding design in MACSTOR-400(CANDU spent fuel storage facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hee

    2006-02-15

    Since the spent fuel pool will be saturated in the near future, spent fuel storage facilities are urgently needed. Because of high radiation and decay heat, spent fuel management is difficult and important. In this study, the shielding thickness of MACSTOR-400 that satisfies the general surface dose rate limit has been investigated. And the radiation shielding safety at site boundary has also been evaluated. IAEA recommends the safety series as a guideline and the U.S. follows the NUREG guide for spent fuel storage facility design. In Japan, the regulation for internal transfer is applied to the spent fuel storage. In Korea, the ACT notification for radiation protection is considered. As a shielding design requirement, it is stated that the occupational exposure dose rate must not exceed 1 mSv/week. From this value, it is assumed that the surface dose rate limit is 25 μSv/hr. And for multi unit operation in same site, the dose rate limit at the controlled area boundary is 0.25 mSv/yr. MCNP code and Microshield program were used for calculating the surface dose rate and the dose rate at site boundary respectively. The shielding should be at least 90 cm thick except the air inlet to follow the surface dose rate limit. Additional shielding is needed on air inlet because the dose rate on air inlet is higher than the dose rate on concrete surface. Without the shielding structure, the shielding thickness should be at least 127 cm. In order to satisfy the surface dose rate limit with maintaining the same concrete thickness on air inlet, shielding structure is required on air inlet. The optimum shielding structure has been proposed in this study. The allowable number of MACSTORs with considering other nuclear facilities in Wolsung site is calculated at 60. It is expected that the required number of MACSTORs are 28 in order to store the total amount of spent fuel generated during NPP operation in Wolsung. Therefore, it seems to be safe in radiation point at site boundary

  5. Neutron Buildup Factors Calculation for Support Vector Regression Application in Shielding Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckic, P.; Matijevic, M.; Grgic, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper initial set of data for neutron buildup factors determination using Support Vector Regression (SVR) method is prepared. The performance of SVR technique strongly depends on the quality of information used for model training. Thus it is very important to provide representable data to the SVR. SVR is a supervised type of learning so it demands data in the input/output form. In the case of neutron buildup factors estimation, the input parameters are the incident neutron energy, shielding thickness and shielding material and the output parameter is the neutron buildup factor value. So far the initial sets of data for different shielding configurations have been obtained using SCALE4.4 sequence SAS3. However, this results were obtained using group constants, thus the incident neutron energy was determined as the average value for each energy group. Obtained this way, the data provided to the SVR are fewer and therefore insufficient. More valuable information is obtained using SCALE6.2beta5 sequence MAVRIC which can perform calculations for the explicit incident neutron energy, which leads to greater maneuvering possibilities when active learning measures are employed, and consequently improves the quality of the developed SVR model.(author).

  6. Two-dimensional shielding benchmarks for iron at YAYOI, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; An, Shigehiro; Kasai, Shigeru; Miyasaka, Shun-ichi; Koyama, Kinji.

    The aim of this work is to assess the collapsed neutron and gamma multigroup cross sections for two dimensional discrete ordinate transport code. Two dimensional distributions of neutron flux and gamma ray dose through a 70cm thick and 94cm square iron shield were measured at the fast neutron source reactor ''YAYOI''. The iron shield was placed over the lead reflector in the vertical experimental column surrounded by heavy concrete wall. The detectors used in this experiment were threshold detectors In, Ni, Al, Mg, Fe and Zn, sandwitch resonance detectors Au, W and Co, activation foils Au for neutrons and thermoluminescence detectors for gamma ray dose. The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by the discrete ordinate transport code ANISN and TWOTRAN. The region-wise, coupled neutron-gamma multigroup cross-sections (100n+20gamma, EURLIB structure) were generated from ENDF/B-IV library for neutrons and POPOP4 library for gamma-ray production cross-sections by using the code system RADHEAT. The effective microscopic neutron cross sections were obtained from the infinite dilution values applying ABBN type self-shielding factors. The gamma ray production multigroup cross-sections were calculated from these effective microscopic neutron cross-sections. For two-dimensional calculations the group constants were collapsed into 10 neutron groups and 3 gamma groups by using ANISN. (auth.)

  7. Gonad shielding in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockstroh, G.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of gonadal dose by shielding of the gonads was investigated for a Somatom 2 using an anthropomorphic phantom. For small distances from the slice examined the gonadal dose results from intracorporal secondary radiation and is only insignificantly reduced by shielding. For greater distances shielding is relatively more effective, the gonadal dose however is small because of the approximately exponential decay. Shielding of the gonads therefore does not seem adequate for the reduction of gonadal dose. From dose measurements in cylinder phantoms of several diameters it appears that no different results would be obtained for children and young adults. An effective reduction of gonadal dose is only possible with lead capsules for males. (author)

  8. Shield design of concrete wall between decay tank room and primary pump room in TRIGA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. J. H.; Rahman, M.; Haque, A.; Zulquarnain, A.; Ahmed, F. U.; Bhuiyan, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to recommend the radiation protection design parameters from the shielding point of view for concrete wall between the decay tank room and the primary pump room in TRIGA Mark-II research reactor facility. The shield design for this concrete wall has been performed with the help of Point-kernel Shielding Code Micro-Shield 5.05 and this design was also validated based on the measured dose rate values with Radiation Survey Meter (G-M Counter) considering the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendations for occupational dose rate limit (10 μSv/hr). The recommended shield design parameters are: (i) thickness of 114.3 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 129.54 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall A (ii) thickness of 66.04 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 78.74 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall B and (iii) door thickness of 3.175 cm Mild Steel (MS) on the entrance of decay tank room. In shielding efficiency analysis, the use of I-M concrete in the design of this concrete wall shows that it reduced the dose rate by a factor of at least 3.52 times approximately compared to ordinary reinforced concrete

  9. Computational methods for high-energy source shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.W.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.

    1983-01-01

    The computational methods for high-energy radiation transport related to shielding of the SNQ-spallation source are outlined. The basic approach is to couple radiation-transport computer codes which use Monte Carlo methods and discrete ordinates methods. A code system is suggested that incorporates state-of-the-art radiation-transport techniques. The stepwise verification of that system is briefly summarized. The complexity of the resulting code system suggests a more straightforward code specially tailored for thick shield calculations. A short guide line to future development of such a Monte Carlo code is given

  10. Synthesis of mullite (3Al2O32SiO2) from local kaolin for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripin, Azuhar; Mohamed, Faizal; Aman, Asyraf

    2018-04-01

    Raw kaolin from Kota Tinggi, Johor was used in this study to produce ceramic mullite (3Al2O22SiO2) for radiation shielding materials. In this work, an attempt was made to study the potential of local minerals to be used as a shielding barrier for diagnostic radiology radiation facilities in hospitals and medical centers throughout Malaysia. The conventional ceramic processing route was employed in the study using different pressing strength and sintering time. The obtained samples were characterized using X-ray diffractometer (XRD) for phase identification of each of the samples. The lead equivalent (LE) test was carried out using 15.05 mCi Cobalt-57 with gamma energy of 122 keV to compute the abilities of the mullite ceramic samples to attenuate the radiation. XRD patterns of prepared ceramics revealed the presence of orthorhombic mullite, hexagonal quartz and orthorhombic sillimanite structures. Furthermore, the radiation test displayed the ability of ceramics to shield of 70 % of gamma radiation at the distance of 60 cm from the radiation source. The highest lead equivalent thickness is 1.0 mm Pb and the lowest is about 0.06 mm Pb. From the result, it is shown that the ceramic has the potential to use as a shielding barrier in diagnostic radiology facilities due to the ability of reducing the radiation dose up to 70 % from its initial value.

  11. Development and application of high performance liquid shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Omata, Sadao; Otano, Naoteru; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Kanai, Yasuji

    1998-01-01

    Development of liquid shielding material with good performance for neutron and γ-ray was investigated. Lead, hydrogen and boron were selected as the elements of shielding materials which were made by the ultraviolet curing method. Good performance shielding materials with about 1 mm width to neutron and gamma ray were produced by mixing lead, boron compound and ultraviolet curing monomer with many hydrogens. The shielding performance was the same as a concrete with two times width. The activation was very small such as 1/10 6 -1/10 8 of the standard concrete. The weight and the external appearance did not charged from room temperature to 100degC. Polyfunctional monomer had good thermal resistance. This shielding material was applied to double bending cylindrical duct and annulus ring duct. The results proved the shielding materials developed had good performance. (S.Y.)

  12. Shielded scanning electron microscope for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, R.S.; Parsley, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A small commercial SEM had been successfully shielded for examining radioactive materials transferred directly from a remote handling facility. Relatively minor mechanical modifications were required to achieve excellent operation. Two inches of steel provide adequate shielding for most samples encountered. However, samples reading 75 rad/hr γ have been examined by adding extra shielding in the form of tungsten sample holders and external lead shadow shields. Some degradation of secondary electron imaging was seen but was adequately compensated for by changing operating conditions

  13. Testing of massive lead containers by gamma densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janardhanan, S.; Dabhadkar, S.B.; Subbaratnam, T.

    1977-01-01

    A non-destructive method of testing the shielding adequacy of transport and hold-up containers for radioactive sources and waste is described. The method involves measurement of the gamma intensity transmitted through the shield by a radioactive gamma source located inside. The data obtained is used to correlate the intensity with the lead thickness and thereby detect, locate and assess the extent of damage or faults if any so that corrective action can be taken in time. Factors influencing the choice of the gamma source, its strength and means of detection are described. Methods of checking the results of measurement with calculated values are outlined. The advantages of the method, its reliability and expediency with which the method can be adopted to varying applications make it an unique application in reactor and isotopes technology. (author)

  14. Evaluation of backscatter dose from internal lead shielding in clinical electron beams using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Rowen J; Marsh, Steven

    2015-11-08

    Internal lead shielding is utilized during superficial electron beam treatments of the head and neck, such as lip carcinoma. Methods for predicting backscattered dose include the use of empirical equations or performing physical measurements. The accuracy of these empirical equations required verification for the local electron beams. In this study, a Monte Carlo model of a Siemens Artiste linac was developed for 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beams using the EGSnrc MC package. The model was verified against physical measurements to an accuracy of better than 2% and 2mm. Multiple MC simulations of lead interfaces at different depths, corresponding to mean electron energies in the range of 0.2-14 MeV at the interfaces, were performed to calculate electron backscatter values. The simulated electron backscatter was compared with current empirical equations to ascertain their accuracy. The major finding was that the current set of backscatter equations does not accurately predict electron backscatter, particularly in the lower energies region. A new equation was derived which enables estimation of electron backscatter factor at any depth upstream from the interface for the local treatment machines. The derived equation agreed to within 1.5% of the MC simulated electron backscatter at the lead interface and upstream positions. Verification of the equation was performed by comparing to measurements of the electron backscatter factor using Gafchromic EBT2 film. These results show a mean value of 0.997 ± 0.022 to 1σ of the predicted values of electron backscatter. The new empirical equation presented can accurately estimate electron backscatter factor from lead shielding in the range of 0.2 to 14 MeV for the local linacs.

  15. Attenuation of Gamma Rays by Concrete . Lead Slag Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, I.M.; Sweelam, M.H.; Zaghloul, Y.R.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Using of wastes and industrial by-products as concrete aggregate to be used as structural and radiation shielded material has increased in the recent years. Concrete was mixed with different amounts of lead slag extracted from recycling of the spent automotive batteries as fine aggregates. The lead slag was used as partial replacement of sand in the studied composites. The concrete composites obtained were characterized in terms of density, water absorption, porosity, compressive strength and attenuation of γ- rays with different energies. The attenuation coefficient and the half value thickness of the different matrices were calculated and discussed

  16. Measurements and calculations of neutron fluxes through a simulation of the CRBR upper axial shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerker, R.E.; Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements, using a 4-in. Bonner Ball, have been made of the neutron fluxes penetrating a simulation of CRBR upper axial biological shielding at the Tower Shielding Facility. The simulation consisted of a 45.7 cm thick slab of SS-304 followed by a series of sodium tanks having a total thickness of 457 cm followed by slabs of carbon steel up to 61.0 cm thick. Measurements were made behind the stainless steel, behind intermediate thicknesses of 152 cm, 305 cm, and 457 cm of sodium (with the stainless steel in place), and behind various thicknesses of the carbon steel following both 305 cm and 457 cm of sodium (also with the stainless steel in place). Calculated and measured data are presented and compared

  17. Beam transport radiation shielding for branch lines 2-ID-B and 2-ID-C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.P.; Lai, B.; McNulty, I.; Dejus, R.J.; Randall, K.J.; Yun, W.

    1995-01-01

    The x-ray radiation shielding requirements beyond the first optics enclosure have been considered for the beam transport of the 2-ID-B and 2-ID-C branch lines of Sector 2 (SRI-CAT) of the APS. The first three optical components (mirrors) of the 2-ID-B branch are contained within the shielded first optics enclosure. Calculations indicate that scattering of the primary synchrotron beam by beamline components outside the enclosure, such as apertures and monochromators, or by gas particles in case of vacuum failure is within safe limits for this branch. A standard 2.5-inch-diameter stainless steel pipe with 1/16-inch-thick walls provides adequate shielding to reduce the radiation dose equivalent rate to human tissue to below the maximum permissible limit of 0.25 mrem/hr. The 2-ID-C branch requires, between the first optics enclosure where only two mirrors are used and the housing for the third mirror, additional lead shielding (0.75 mm) and a minimum approach distance of 2.6 cm. A direct beam stop consisting of at least 4.5 mm of lead is also required immediately downstream of the third mirror for 2-ID-C. Finally, to stop the direct beam from escaping the experimental station, a beam stop consisting of at least 4-mm or 2.5-mm steel is required for the 2-ID-B or 2-ID-C branches, respectively. This final requirement can be met by the vacuum chambers used to house the experiments for both branch lines

  18. Testicular shield for para-aortic radiotherapy and estimation of gonad doses

    OpenAIRE

    Ravichandran, R.; Binukumar, J. P.; Kannadhasan, S.; Shariff, M. H.; Ghamrawy, Kamal El

    2008-01-01

    For radiotherapy of para-aortic and abdominal regions in male patients, gonads are to be protected to receive less than 2% of the prescribed dose. A testicular shield was fabricated for abdominal radiotherapy with 15 MV X-rays ((Clinac 2300 CD, Varian AG) with low melting point alloy (Cerroband). The dimensions of the testicular shield were 6.5 cm diameter and 3.5 cm depth with 1.5 cm wall thickness. During treatment, this shield was held in position by a rectangular sponge and Styrofo...

  19. Studies of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of silica-based commercial glasses used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Yasmin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the rapid growing economy, the Bangladeshi dwellers are replacing their traditional (mud-, bamboo-, and wood-based houses to modern multistoried buildings, where different types of glasses are being used as decorative as well as structural materials due to their various advantageous properties. In this study, we inquire the protective and dosimetric capability of commercial glasses for ionizing radiation. Four branded glass samples (PHP-Bangladesh, Osmania-Bangladesh, Nasir-Bangladesh, and Rider-China of same thickness and color but different elemental weight fractions were analyzed for shielding and dosimetric properties. The chemical composition of the studied material was evaluated by EDX technique. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for 59 keV, 661 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV photon energies. A number of shielding parameters- half value layer (HVL, radiation protection efficiency (RPE and effective atomic number (Zeff were also evaluated. The data were compared with the available literature (where applicable to understand its shielding capability relative to the standard materials such as lead. Among the studied brands, Rider (China shows relatively better indices to be used as ionizing radiation shielding material. The obtained, Zeff of the studied glass samples showed comparable values to the TLD-200 dosimeter, thus considered suitable for environmental radiation monitoring purposes. Keywords: Silica-based commercial glass, HPGe γ-ray spectrometry, EDX analyses, Shielding effectiveness, Dosimetric properties

  20. Growth retardation of paramecium and mouse cells by shielding them from background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Masanobu; Okuyama, Katsuyuki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Matsuda, Yatsuka; Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Yonezawa, Morio; Yagi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Planel et al. reported that the growth of paramecia was decreased by shielding them from background radiation. In the 1990s, Takizawa et al. found that mouse cells displayed a decreased growth rate under shielded conditions. The purpose of the present study was to confirm that growth is impaired in organisms that have been shielded from background radiation. Radioprotection was produced with a shielding chamber surrounded by a 15 cm thick iron wall and a 10 cm thick paraffin wall that reduced the γ ray and neutron levels in the chamber to 2% and 25% of the background levels, respectively. Although the growth of Paramecium tetraurelia was not impaired by short-term radioprotection (around 10 days), which disagreed with the findings of Planel et al., decreased growth was observed after long-term (40-50 days) radiation shielding. When mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were incubated inside or outside of the shielding chamber for 7 days, the number of cells present on the 6th and 7th days under the shielding conditions was significantly lower than that present under the non-shielding conditions. These inhibitory effects on cell growth were abrogated by the addition of a 137 Cs γ-ray source disk to the chamber. Furthermore, no growth retardation was observed in XRCC4-deficient mouse M10 cells, which display impaired DNA double strand break repair. (author)

  1. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung; Ahn, Mu Young

    2016-01-01

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model

  2. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu Young [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model.

  3. Studies of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of silica-based commercial glasses used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Sabina; Barua, Bijoy Sonker; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Chowdhury, Faruque-Uz-Zaman; Rashid, Md. Abdur; Bradley, David A.; Olatunji, Michael Adekunle; Kamal, Masud

    2018-06-01

    Following the rapid growing economy, the Bangladeshi dwellers are replacing their traditional (mud-, bamboo-, and wood-based) houses to modern multistoried buildings, where different types of glasses are being used as decorative as well as structural materials due to their various advantageous properties. In this study, we inquire the protective and dosimetric capability of commercial glasses for ionizing radiation. Four branded glass samples (PHP-Bangladesh, Osmania-Bangladesh, Nasir-Bangladesh, and Rider-China) of same thickness and color but different elemental weight fractions were analyzed for shielding and dosimetric properties. The chemical composition of the studied material was evaluated by EDX technique. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for 59 keV, 661 keV, 1173 keV and 1332 keV photon energies. A number of shielding parameters- half value layer (HVL), radiation protection efficiency (RPE) and effective atomic number (Zeff) were also evaluated. The data were compared with the available literature (where applicable) to understand its shielding capability relative to the standard materials such as lead. Among the studied brands, Rider (China) shows relatively better indices to be used as ionizing radiation shielding material. The obtained, Zeff of the studied glass samples showed comparable values to the TLD-200 dosimeter, thus considered suitable for environmental radiation monitoring purposes.

  4. Prediction of melanoma metastasis by the Shields index based on lymphatic vessel density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metcalfe Chris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma usually presents as an initial skin lesion without evidence of metastasis. A significant proportion of patients develop subsequent local, regional or distant metastasis, sometimes many years after the initial lesion was removed. The current most effective staging method to identify early regional metastasis is sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB, which is invasive, not without morbidity and, while improving staging, may not improve overall survival. Lymphatic density, Breslow's thickness and the presence or absence of lymphatic invasion combined has been proposed to be a prognostic index of metastasis, by Shields et al in a patient group. Methods Here we undertook a retrospective analysis of 102 malignant melanomas from patients with more than five years follow-up to evaluate the Shields' index and compare with existing indicators. Results The Shields' index accurately predicted outcome in 90% of patients with metastases and 84% without metastases. For these, the Shields index was more predictive than thickness or lymphatic density. Alternate lymphatic measurement (hot spot analysis was also effective when combined into the Shields index in a cohort of 24 patients. Conclusions These results show the Shields index, a non-invasive analysis based on immunohistochemistry of lymphatics surrounding primary lesions that can accurately predict outcome, is a simple, useful prognostic tool in malignant melanoma.

  5. Quality control in high thickness concrete walls for shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcama, J.A.; San Pedro, Marcelo; Cannistracci, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    After evaluating different methods of non-destructive testing, of fast execution and quick results, with low operative cost, and suitable to verify the homogeneity and the shielding power of the walls of process cells for radiochemical use, under construction in the Centro Atomico Ezeiza, it was decided to employ the ultrasound method over the whole surface to be examined, with subsequent verification of the results on isolated zones by means of radiometry and gammagraphy. This procedure proved to be satisfactory. The cell's characteristics, the tests performed and their results, which were statistically evaluated by means of a computer program, implemented to his effect, are described. (C.A.K.) [es

  6. Shielding of manned space stations against Van Allen Belt protons: a preliminary scoping study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Corbin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Calculated results are presented to aid in the design of the shielding required to protect astronauts in a space station that is orbiting through the Van Allen proton belt. The geometry considered - a spherical shell shield with a spherical tissue phantom at its center - is only a very approximate representation of an actual space station, but this simple geometry makes it possible to consider a wide range of possible shield materials. Both homogeneous and laminated shields are considered. Also, an approximation procedure - the equivalent thickness approximation - that allows dose rates to be estimated for any shield material or materials from the dose rates for an aluminum shield is presented and discussed

  7. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Lefmann, K.; Klinkby, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometerat ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. T...

  8. A study of the electromagnetic shielding mechanisms in the GHz frequency range of graphene based composite layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drakakis, E. [Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Kymakis, E. [Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Tzagkarakis, G.; Louloudakis, D.; Katharakis, M. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Kenanakis, G. [Institute of Electronic Structure & Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology (FORTH) Hellas, Heraklion (Greece); Suchea, M.; Tudose, V. [Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Chemistry Faculty, “Al.I.Cuza” University of Iasi, Iasi (Romania); Koudoumas, E., E-mail: koudoumas@staff.teicrete.gr [Electrical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Center of Materials Technology and Photonics, School of Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Optimum paint contents should be chosen so that homogeneous and uniform nanocomposite layers exist exhibiting effective electromagnetic shielding. • The electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range studied comes mainly from absorption and increases with frequency. • Reflection reduces with increasing frequency, the decrease rate being smaller than that of the increase in absorption. • The shielding efficiency depends on both conductivity and thickness, the first dependence being more pronounced. - Abstract: We report on the mechanisms of the electromagnetic interference shielding effect of graphene based paint like composite layers. In particular, we studied the absorption and reflection of electromagnetic radiation in the 4–20 GHz frequency of various dispersions employing different amounts of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate), special attention given on the relative contribution of each process in the shielding effect. Moreover, the influence of the composition, the thickness and the conductivity of the composite layers on the electromagnetic shielding was also examined.

  9. A study of the electromagnetic shielding mechanisms in the GHz frequency range of graphene based composite layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakakis, E.; Kymakis, E.; Tzagkarakis, G.; Louloudakis, D.; Katharakis, M.; Kenanakis, G.; Suchea, M.; Tudose, V.; Koudoumas, E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimum paint contents should be chosen so that homogeneous and uniform nanocomposite layers exist exhibiting effective electromagnetic shielding. • The electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range studied comes mainly from absorption and increases with frequency. • Reflection reduces with increasing frequency, the decrease rate being smaller than that of the increase in absorption. • The shielding efficiency depends on both conductivity and thickness, the first dependence being more pronounced. - Abstract: We report on the mechanisms of the electromagnetic interference shielding effect of graphene based paint like composite layers. In particular, we studied the absorption and reflection of electromagnetic radiation in the 4–20 GHz frequency of various dispersions employing different amounts of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate), special attention given on the relative contribution of each process in the shielding effect. Moreover, the influence of the composition, the thickness and the conductivity of the composite layers on the electromagnetic shielding was also examined.

  10. FLUKA shielding calculations for the FAIR project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fehrenbacher, Georg; Kozlova, Ekaterina; Radon, Torsten; Sokolov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    FAIR is an international accelerator project being in construction at GSI Helmholtz center for heavy ion research in Darmstadt. The Monte Carlo program FLUKA is used to study radiation protection problems. The contribution deals with general application possibilities of FLUKA and for FAIR with respect the radiation protection planning. The necessity to simulate the radiation transport through shielding of several meters thickness and to determine the equivalent doses outside the shielding with sufficient accuracy is demonstrated using two examples under consideration of the variance reduction. Results of simulation calculations for activation estimation in accelerator facilities are presented.

  11. Radiation-shielding transparent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumeki, Asao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain radiation-shielding transparent material having a high resistivity to the radioactive rays or light irradiation which is greater at least by two digits as compared with lead glass. Constitution : The shielding material is composed of a saturated aqueous solution zinc iodide. Zinc iodide (specific gravity of 4.2) is dissolved by 430 g into 100 cc of water at a temperature of 20 0 C and forms a heavy liquid with a specific gravity of 2.80. The radiation length of the heavy liquid is 3.8 cm which is 1.5 times as large as lead glass. The light transmission is greater than 95% in average. Furthermore, by adding hypophosphorous acid as a reducing agent to the aqueous solution of the lead iodide, the material is stabilized against the irradiation of light or radioactive rays and causes no discoloration for a long time. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  13. The status of shielding research at Tajoura research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakkoush, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives a description to the shielding research activities which have been carried-out at the radiation shielding group ,Tajoura Research Center. This includes the design of different types of concrete shields made from local aggregates which have suitable radiation attenuation properties. These include, Ordinary Concrete(with density p = 2.3 ton/m3) heavy weight concrete (with density p =3.6 ton/m3) and heat resistant concrete with aggregates having bound- in water. Investigation have been carried -out by measuring the neutron and gamma-rays spectra which have been transmitted through barriers having different thickness. These were performed using a collimated beam of reactor neutrons and gamma-ray transmitted from the horizontal channel no 1 of Tajoura-Research reactor with 10 MW Max ape rating power. The transmitted fast neutron and gamma spectra were measured by neutron-gamma spectrometer employing NE-213 liquid organic scintillater. Discrimination of against undesired pulses of neutrons or gamma-ray was achieved by a pulse shape discrimination method based on differences in the shape of the decay part of the emitted pulses. The obtained results are presented in the form of displayed neutron and gamma spectra measured behind different thickness of the investigated concrete shield. These spectra were used to derive the macroscopic cross section for at different energy for material under investigation

  14. Structural shielding at irradiation tests with x-rays up to 400 kV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabitsch, H.; Schachinger, E.

    1979-12-01

    Tables worked out in accordance to the dimensioning method following DIN 54113 are given for the determination protective barriers thicknesses against effective and stray radiation in practical operation conditions. The tables comprise irradiation operation with directional and non-directional radiation sources radiators beams collimated and are restricted to steel as dispersive material for the barrier thicknesses against stray radiation. The calculations of protective barriers against stray radiation show that operation with properly chosen primary beam limiting orifice yields in considerable savings in protective shield thickness when compared to operation without or with mismatched orifice to film size. It further shows a relative indifference against changes of the stray area (film size) or the focus - film sheet distance. The protective shield thickness for the most common exposure conditions calculated according to the Austrian Regulations for Radiation Protection are on the safe side when compared to protective barriere thicknesses calculated according to DIN 54113. (V.M.)

  15. Decontamination and coating of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.; Bush, S.P.; Lyon, C.E.; Walker, V.

    1988-01-01

    Technology is being developed to decontaminate lead used in shielding applications in contaminated environments for recycle as shieldings. Technology is also being developed to coat either decontaminated lead or new lead before it is used in contaminated environments. The surface of the coating is expected to be much easier to decontaminate than the original lead surface. If contamination becomes severely embedded in the coating and cannot be removed, it can be easily cut with a knife and removed from the lead. The used coating can be disposed of as radioactive (hot hazardous) waste. The lead can then be recoated for further use as a shielding material

  16. Study of lead free ferroelectrics using overlay technique on thick film microstrip ring resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridhar N. Mathad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The lead free ferroelectrics, strontium barium niobates, were synthesized via the low cost solid state reaction method and their fritless thick films were fabricated by screen printing technique on alumina substrate. The X band response (complex permittivity at very high frequencies of Ag thick film microstrip ring resonator perturbed with strontium barium niobates (SrxBa1-xNb2O6 in form of bulk and thick film was measured. A new approach for determination of complex permittivity (ε′ and ε′′ in the frequency range 8–12 GHz, using perturbation of Ag thick film microstrip ring resonator (MSRR, was applied for both bulk and thick film of strontium barium niobates (SrxBa1-xNb2O6. The microwave conductivity of the bulk and thick film lie in the range from 1.779 S/cm to 2.874 S/cm and 1.364 S/cm to 2.296 S/cm, respectively. The penetration depth of microwave in strontium barium niobates is also reported.

  17. Bulk Shielding Calculation for 90 .deg. Bending Section of RISP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, J. H.; Jung, N. S.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Oranj, L. Mokhtari [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Ko, S. K. [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The charge state of {sup 238}U beams with maximum intensity was 79+ among multi-charge states of 70+ to 89+, which were estimated by using LISE++ code. The bending section consists of twenty four quadrupoles, two dipoles, two two-cell type superconducting RF cavities and eleven slits. The complicated radiation environment is caused by the beam losses occurred normally during the stripping process and when the produced {sup 238}U beams are transported along the beam line. Secondary radiations generated by {sup 238}U beams irradiation are very important for predicting the prompt and residual doses and the radiation damage at the component. The production characteristics of neutron and photon from thin carbon and thick iron were studied to set up the shielding strategy. The dose estimation was done to the pre-designed the tunnel structure. In these calculations, major Monte Carlo codes, PHITS and FLUKA, were used. The present study provided information of shielding analysis for the 90 .deg. bending section of RISP facility. The source term was evaluated to determine fundamental parameter of the shielding analysis using PHITS and FLUKA codes. And the distribution of the dose rate at the outside of thick shielding wall was presented.

  18. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  19. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Gabriela [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica; Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear. Lab. de Dosimetria das Radiacoes e Fisica Medica

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  20. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  1. Evaluation of rubber composites as shielding materials against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atia, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene rubber/lead oxide composites were prepared as γ-radiation shields.The composites were prepared with different concentration of red lead oxide (Pb 3 O 4 ) .The assessment of the linear attenuation coefficient of the SBR/lead oxide composites for γ -rays from 137 Cs 137 γ-radiation point source was studied . The factors affecting the mechanical properties and shielding capacity of the composites were also studied. These factors include the lead oxide concentration, the type of monomers added and the irradiation dose. The styrene-butadiene rubber/lead oxide composites can attain up to about 43% of the shielding capacity of pure lead. The incorporation of high concentrations of lead oxide and the effect of accumulative irradiation doses up to 3000 kGy on the physico-mechanical properties of the composites were studied . These led to hardening of the SBR rubber/lead oxide composites.

  2. Shielding calculations for the TFTR neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.

    1979-07-01

    Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations have been performed to determine the location and thickness of concrete shielding around the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) neutral beam injectors. Two sets of calculations were performed: one to determine the dose equivalent rate on the roof and walls of the test cell building when no injectors are present, and one to determine the contribution to the dose equivalent rate at these locations from radiation streaming through the injection duct. Shielding the side and rear of the neutral beam injector with 0.305 and 0.61 m of concrete, respectively, and lining the inside of the test cell wall with an additional layer of concrete having a thickness of 0.305 m and a height above the axis of deuteron injection of 3.10 m are sufficient to maintain the biological dose equivalent rate outside the test cell to approx. 1 mrem/DT pulse

  3. High performance inboard shield design for the compact TIBER-II test reactor: Appendix A-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1987-01-01

    The compactness of the TIBER-II reactor has placed a premium on the design of a high performance inboard shield to protect the inner legs of the toroidal field (TF) coils. The available space for shield is constrained to 48 cm and the use of tungsten is mandatory to protect the magnet against the 1.53 MW/m 2 neutron wall loading. The primary requirement for the shield is to limit the fast neutron fluence to 10 19 n/cm 2 . In an optimization study, the performance of various candidate materials for protecting the magnet was examined. The optimum shield consists of a 40 cm thick W layer, followed by an 8 cm thick H 2 O/LiNO 3 layer. The mechanical design of the shield calls for tungsten blocks within SS stiffened panels. All the coolant channels are vertical with more of them in the front where there is a high heat load. The coolant pressure is 0.2 MPa and the maximum structural surface temperature is 0 C. The effects of the detailed mechanical design of the shield and the assembly gaps between the shield sectors on the damage in the magnet were analyzed and peaking factors of ∼2 were found at the hot spots. 2 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Ford motor company NDE facility shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, R. L.; Van Riper, K. A.; Jones, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Ford Motor Company proposed the construction of a large non-destructive evaluation laboratory for radiography of automotive power train components. The authors were commissioned to design the shielding and to survey the completed facility for compliance with radiation doses for occupationally and non-occupationally exposed personnel. The two X-ray sources are Varian Linatron 3000 accelerators operating at 9-11 MV. One performs computed tomography of automotive transmissions, while the other does real-time radiography of operating engines and transmissions. The shield thickness for the primary barrier and all secondary barriers were determined by point-kernel techniques. Point-kernel techniques did not work well for skyshine calculations and locations where multiple sources (e.g. tube head leakage and various scatter fields) impacted doses. Shielding for these areas was determined using transport calculations. A number of MCNP [Briesmeister, J. F. MCNPCA general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4B. Los Alamos National Laboratory Manual (1997)] calculations focused on skyshine estimates and the office areas. Measurements on the operational facility confirmed the shielding calculations. (authors)

  5. Ford Motor Company NDE facility shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Robert L; Van Riper, Kenneth A; Jones, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Ford Motor Company proposed the construction of a large non-destructive evaluation laboratory for radiography of automotive power train components. The authors were commissioned to design the shielding and to survey the completed facility for compliance with radiation doses for occupationally and non-occupationally exposed personnel. The two X-ray sources are Varian Linatron 3000 accelerators operating at 9-11 MV. One performs computed tomography of automotive transmissions, while the other does real-time radiography of operating engines and transmissions. The shield thickness for the primary barrier and all secondary barriers were determined by point-kernel techniques. Point-kernel techniques did not work well for skyshine calculations and locations where multiple sources (e.g. tube head leakage and various scatter fields) impacted doses. Shielding for these areas was determined using transport calculations. A number of MCNP [Briesmeister, J. F. MCNPCA general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4B. Los Alamos National Laboratory Manual (1997)] calculations focused on skyshine estimates and the office areas. Measurements on the operational facility confirmed the shielding calculations.

  6. Superconductor shields test chamber from ambient magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.

    1965-01-01

    Shielding a test chamber for magnetic components enables it to maintain a constant, low magnetic field. The chamber is shielded from ambient magnetic fields by a lead foil cylinder maintained in a superconducting state by liquid helium.

  7. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2002-01-01

    transected into transverse 36 slices of 2.5cm thickness. Photon dose was measured using a Capintec PR-06C ionization chamber with Capintec 192 electrometer (Capintec Inc., Ramsey, NJ), TLD(VICTOREEN 5000. LiF) and film dosimetry V-Omat, Kodak). In case of fetus, the dosimeter was placed at a depth of 10cm in this phantom at 100cm source to axis distance and located centrally 15cm from the inferior edge of the 30cm x 30cm 2 x-ray beam irradiating the Rando phantom chest wall. A acryl bridge of size 40 cm x 40 cm 2 and a clear space of about 20 cm was fabricated and placed on top of the rectangular polystyrene phantom representing the abdomen of the patient. The lead pot for testicle shielding was made as various shape, sizes, thickness and supporting stand. The scattered photon with and without shielding were measured at the representative position of the fetus and testicle. Measurement of radiation scattered dose outside fields and critical organs, like fetus position and testicle region, from chest or pelvic irradiation by large field of high energy radiation beam was performed using an ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The scattered doses outside field were measured 5 - 10% of maximum doses in fields and exponentially decrease from field margins. The scattered photon dose received the fetus and testicle from thorax field irradiation was measured about 1 mGy/Gy of photon treatment dose. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using lead sheet and blocks. Lead pot shield for testicle reduced the scatter dose under 10 mGy when photon beam of 60 Gy was irradiated in abdomen region. The scattered photon dose is reduced when the lead shield was used while the no significant reduction of scattered photon dose was observed and 2-3 mm lead sheets reduced the skin dose under 80% and almost electron contamination. The results indicate that it was possible to improve shielding to reduce scattered photon for fetus and testicle when a young patients

  8. Shielding for Critical Organs and Radiation Exposure Dose Distribution in Patients with High Energy Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    transected into transverse 36 slices of 2.5cm thickness. Photon dose was measured using a Capintec PR-06C ionization chamber with Capintec 192 electrometer (Capintec Inc., Ramsey, NJ), TLD(VICTOREEN 5000. LiF) and film dosimetry V-Omat, Kodak). In case of fetus, the dosimeter was placed at a depth of 10cm in this phantom at 100cm source to axis distance and located centrally 15cm from the inferior edge of the 30cm x 30cm{sup 2} x-ray beam irradiating the Rando phantom chest wall. A acryl bridge of size 40 cm x 40 cm{sup 2} and a clear space of about 20 cm was fabricated and placed on top of the rectangular polystyrene phantom representing the abdomen of the patient. The lead pot for testicle shielding was made as various shape, sizes, thickness and supporting stand. The scattered photon with and without shielding were measured at the representative position of the fetus and testicle. Measurement of radiation scattered dose outside fields and critical organs, like fetus position and testicle region, from chest or pelvic irradiation by large field of high energy radiation beam was performed using an ionization chamber and film dosimetry. The scattered doses outside field were measured 5 - 10% of maximum doses in fields and exponentially decrease from field margins. The scattered photon dose received the fetus and testicle from thorax field irradiation was measured about 1 mGy/Gy of photon treatment dose. Shielding construction to reduce this scattered dose was investigated using lead sheet and blocks. Lead pot shield for testicle reduced the scatter dose under 10 mGy when photon beam of 60 Gy was irradiated in abdomen region. The scattered photon dose is reduced when the lead shield was used while the no significant reduction of scattered photon dose was observed and 2-3 mm lead sheets reduced the skin dose under 80% and almost electron contamination. The results indicate that it was possible to improve shielding to reduce scattered photon for fetus and testicle when a young

  9. The influence of Shelter's FCM on the shield efficiency at there of containing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbachev, B.I.

    2000-01-01

    The reasonable detailed quantitative estimations of the influence of the γ-radiation capture and scattering processes in the Shelter's FCM material on the shield precautions efficiency at there of containing for the further shelf purpose. The Monte-Carlo calculations was carry out by the software Micro Shield 4.00 serial 4.00-00283, which make it possible correctly to account for the radiation shielding geometry, the radiation sources geometry, the radiation sources spectrums and the processes of the gamma-rays multi scattering in 'thick' shielding. Results presented in the tables, which is convenient to use. 3 refs., 18 tab

  10. Reassessment of shielding calculations for a room housing a Cesium-137 irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Leticia S.; Barbosa, Rugles C., E-mail: leticia.fmufg@gmail.com, E-mail: rbarbosa@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Centro Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goiás, GO (Brazil); Rezende, Ana C.B., E-mail: anacbrz@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-07-01

    This aim of this work is to reassess the shielding calculations for a room that houses an irradiator with cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) source with activity of 444GBq (12Ci). Shielding or barriers have the function of reducing the intensity of the radiation emitted by a radioactive source, are constituted by materials of high atomic number and guarantee the radiological protection in areas occupied by occupationally exposed individuals or by individuals of the public. The barriers located in the direction of the direct beam of radiation are called primary barriers and are thicker. Already the barriers that attenuate the radiation scattered by the radiated surface are called secondary barriers. In the new calculations, the thickness of the primary barrier was determined by model of the point nucleus model and for the secondary barriers, the differential albedo dose model was used. The results obtained show that all secondary barriers were constructed with overestimated thicknesses and that the radiological protection of individuals from the public and occupationally exposed individuals in the areas outside these barriers is guaranteed. The primary barrier was constructed with a thickness 8% smaller than the thickness obtained in the new calculations. In addition to shielding calculations, classification and signaling of adjacent areas were performed, including necessary emergency procedures. The necessary instrumentation for monitoring these areas was also determined. (author)

  11. Reassessment of shielding calculations for a room housing a Cesium-137 irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Leticia S.; Barbosa, Rugles C.; Rezende, Ana C.B.

    2017-01-01

    This aim of this work is to reassess the shielding calculations for a room that houses an irradiator with cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) source with activity of 444GBq (12Ci). Shielding or barriers have the function of reducing the intensity of the radiation emitted by a radioactive source, are constituted by materials of high atomic number and guarantee the radiological protection in areas occupied by occupationally exposed individuals or by individuals of the public. The barriers located in the direction of the direct beam of radiation are called primary barriers and are thicker. Already the barriers that attenuate the radiation scattered by the radiated surface are called secondary barriers. In the new calculations, the thickness of the primary barrier was determined by model of the point nucleus model and for the secondary barriers, the differential albedo dose model was used. The results obtained show that all secondary barriers were constructed with overestimated thicknesses and that the radiological protection of individuals from the public and occupationally exposed individuals in the areas outside these barriers is guaranteed. The primary barrier was constructed with a thickness 8% smaller than the thickness obtained in the new calculations. In addition to shielding calculations, classification and signaling of adjacent areas were performed, including necessary emergency procedures. The necessary instrumentation for monitoring these areas was also determined. (author)

  12. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Kozak, Kevin; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Ramasubramanian, V.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Welsh, James S.; Rong, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each “planning scan” to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  13. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Poonam; Kozak, Kevin; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Ramasubramanian, V.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Welsh, James S.; Rong, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each “planning scan” to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields. PMID:21925866

  14. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Poonam [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Kozak, Kevin [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Tolakanahalli, Ranjini [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Ramasubramanian, V. [School of Advance Sciences, Vellore Institue of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India); Paliwal, Bhudatt R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States); Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: rong@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin, Riverview Cancer Centre, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  15. Nigella sativa EXTRACT IMPROVES SEMINIFEROUS TUBULE EPITHELIAL THICKNESS IN LEAD ACETATE-EXPOSED BALB/C MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Diana, Alis Nur; I’tishom, Reny; Sudjarwo, Sri Agus

    2017-01-01

    Lead that enters the body may lead to increased production of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) that may affect reproductive system. Black cumin (Nigella sativa) extract contains high antioxidant, tymoquinone, that may be used to suppress oxidative stress induced by lead in animal experiments. This study aimed to prove that black cumin (Nigella sativa) extract improves the thickness of seminiferous tubular epithelium in Balb/c mice exposed to lead (Pb) acetate. This study used post-test only cont...

  16. Collection shield for ion separation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, K.L.; Pugh, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The ion separation electrodes in isotope separation apparatus are provided with removable collection shields to collect neutral particles which would normally pass through the ionization region. A preferred collection shield comprises a u-shaped section for clipping onto the leading edge of an electrode and a pair of flanges projecting substantially perpendicular to the clipping section for collecting neutral particles

  17. Shield calculation of project for instrument calibration integrated laboratory of IPEN-Sao Paulo, Brazil; Calculo das blindagens do projeto de um laboratorio integrado de calibracao de instrumentos no IPEN - Sao Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Gustavo A.S.J.; Caldas, Linda V.E., E-mail: gustavaobarros@gmail.co, E-mail: lcaldas@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This work performed the shield calculation of the future rooms walls of the five X-ray equipment of the Instrument Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, Sao Paulo, Brazil, which will be constructed in project of laboratory enlargement. The obtained results by application of a calculation methodology from an international regulation have shown that the largest thickness of shielding (25.7 cm of concrete or 7.1 mm of lead) will be of the wall which will receive the primary beam of the equipment with a 320 kV voltage. The cost/benefit analysis indicated the concrete as the best material option for the shielding

  18. The Fabrication of Internal Shielding using Provil and Cerrobend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Jong Hwa; Lee, Kang Hyun; Son, Jeong Hye

    1996-01-01

    The skin cancer is a highly curable disease which frequently occurs in the head and neck region exposed to the sun. When the eyelid is treated usually eye shield made of lead is used to protect the eyeball as a internal shield. For the same reason on internal shield should be used when the nose is treated when electron to protect the nasal mucosa. Our hospital made an internal shield for the treatment of the skin cancer on the nose using provil and cerrobend. The characteristics of the internal shield were examined.

  19. Comparison of eye shields in radiotherapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, B.E.; Wellington Hospital, Wellington; Johnson, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Both MeV electrons and kV photons are used in the treatment of superficial cancers. The advantages and disadvantages for each of these modalities have been widely reported in the literature (See for example [1-2]). Of particular note in the literature is the use of lead and tungsten eye shields to protect ocular structures during radiotherapy. An investigation addressing issues raised in the literature that are relevant to the Wellington Cancer Centre method of treatment of lesions near the eye shall be summarised. Various small sized fields were irradiated to determine depth dose and profile curves in a water phantom shielded by various commercially available eye shields. Transmission factors relevant to critical ocular structures and particle distribution theories are used to further elucidate the comparison between the use of MeV electrons and kV photons in the treatment of superficial cancers. Superficial X-rays from a Pantak Therapax unit SXT 150 model of HVL 4.90mm Al were used for the lead eye shield measurements and electrons from a Varian Clinac 2100C nominal energies 6MeV and 9MeV (R p 3.00cm and 4.34cm respectively) were used for the tungsten eye shield measurements. For the photon measurements circular applicators of 3cm, 4cm and 5cm diameter were used and for the electrons standard 6x6cm and 10x 10cm applicators were used, with no custom inserts. A Scanditronix RFA-300 water phantom and Scanditronix RFAplus version 5.3 software application were used to collect and collate all data. The eye shields were the Radiation Products Design Inc. medium lead eye shield (item 934-014) and the MED-TEC tungsten eye shields MT-T-45 M and MT-T-45 S. It is demonstrated that electron fields have appreciably greater scatter into the area directly under the eye shields than the photon fields. Similarly at the region of d max for the electron fields the relative dose is appreciably greater than the photon fields at similar depth. The relative merits for

  20. Neutron yield from thick lead target by the action of high-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noga, V.I.; Ranyuk, Yu.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Sorokin, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of studying the complete neutron yield from a lead target bombarded by high-energy electrons. Neutrons were recorded by the method of radio-active indicators. The dependence of the neutron yield on the target thickness varying from 0.2 to 8 cm was obtained at the energies of electrons of 230 and 1200 MeV. The neutron yield for the given energies with the target of 6 cm in thickness is in the range of saturation and is 0.1 +-0.03 and 0.65+-0.22 (neutr./MeV.el.), respectively. The neutron angular distributions were measured for different thicknesses of targets at the 201, 230 and 1200 MeV electrons. Within the error limits the angular distributions are isotropic. The dependence of neutron yield on the electron energy was examined for a 3 cm thick target. In the energy range of 100-1200 MeV these values are related by a linear dependence with the proportionality coefficient C=3x10 -4 (neutr./MeV.el.)

  1. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 3. Analysis of Photon Streaming Through and Around Shield Doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Marvin; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; White, Travis

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the shield doors. The RHB has six shield doors that needed to be studied with respect to photon streaming. Several aspects had to be examined to ensure that the design meets the radiation dose levels. Both the thickness and streaming issues around the door edges were designed and examined. Photon streaming through and around a shield door is a complicated problem, creating a reliance on computer modeling to perform the analyses. The computer code typically used by the Westinghouse SMS in the evaluation of photon transport through complex geometries is the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code. The complexity of the geometry within the problem can cause problems even with the Monte Carlo codes. Striking a balance between how the code handles transport through the shield door with transport through the streaming paths, particularly with the use of typical variance reduction methods, is difficult when trying to ensure that all important regions of the model are sampled appropriately. The thickness determination used a simple variance reduction technique. In construction, the shield door will not be flush against the wall, so a solid rectangular slab leaves streaming paths around the edges. Administrative controls could be used to control dose to workers; however, 10 CFR 835.1001 states

  2. Research on shielding neutron efficiency of some boron-bearing fabric and transparent resin materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Liu Jinhua; Su Jingling; Wang Zheng

    1995-01-01

    The shielding neutron efficiency of boron-bearing materials developed recently is introduced. The thermal neutron shield ratios for two kinds of non-woven cloth with thickness of 58 mg/cm 2 and 153 mg/cm 2 are 51% and 79% respectively. Their mass attenuation coefficient for 0.186, 24.4 and 144 keV neutron are 1.56, 1.29 and 0.9 cm 2 /g respectively. The thermal neutron shield ratio is 85% for the natural boron-bearing transparent resin plate with the thickness of 0.59 g/cm 2 , and 97% for enriched boron or gadolinium bearing resin plate. The shield ratios of all three materials for 24.4 keV neutrons are 38%. The transparence of natural light for enriched boron-bearing resin plates shows no considerable change after they were exposed to thermal neutrons up to 6 Sv. After they were exposed up to 20 Sv, the transparence decreases to 50% but thermal neutron shield ratio does not change. The gadolinium-bearing plate has a very strong thermal neutron-capture gamma radiation and its dose-equivalent is greater than that of incident thermal neutrons

  3. Development of Neutron Shielding Material for Cask and Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Young; Seo, Ki Seog; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Chang Jae; Kim, Ho Dong

    2008-01-01

    The neutron shielding materials are used as a neutron shield for spent fuel shipping cask, beam accelerators and neutron generators. At early stage, the neutron attenuations of materials were evaluated with the cross sections. After that, benchmark or mock-up experiments on the multi-layer problem to confirm the shielding characteristics or to evaluate analysis accuracy were reported. Recently, the need to transport spent nuclear fuels is increasing due to the current limited storage capacity. The on-site storage capacity at some of nuclear power plants is expected to be full in near future. With a growing inventory of spent fuels at power plants, these spent fuels need to be transported to other storage facilities. Shipping casks have been developed to safely transport spent fuels that emit high neutrons and gamma-ray radiation. The external radiation level of the shipping cask from the spent fuel must be limited to meet the standards specified by the IAEA radioactive material package regulation, so it is important to develop a proper neutron shielding material for a shipping cask. Neutron shielding experiments and analyses on the shielding effects of materials have been conducted, and some experiments have been performed to examine the shielding effects of selected materials. The shielding experiments consist of evaluating not only the shielding effects of a material alone but also the effects of the material thickness. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by using the MCNP-5c code

  4. Geological nature of early Precambrian formations (considering the example of the Anabar shield)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.

    The primordial nature of the catarchean-early Proterozoic crystalline formations making up the Anabar shield is analyzed on the basis of a variety of data, including Landsat observations. The shield is found to have a layered structure and a massively stratified rhythmic texture, consisting of geometrically regular layer-horizons, from several centimeters to several dozens of meters thick.

  5. New possibility of magnetic ripple shielding for specific heat measurements in hybrid magnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarnawski, Z.; Meulen, der, H. van; Franse, J.J.M.; Kadowaki, K.; Veenhuizen, P.A.; Klaasse, J.

    1988-01-01

    A test of the new high Tc superconducting materials for magnetic ripple shielding has been carried out. It was found that magnetic ripples of 0.0009 T (peak-to-peak) in the frequency range below 20 kHz can be completely shielded in high static fields by a 2 mm thick Y-Ba-Cu-O screen.

  6. Investigation of the use of Galena concrete in electromagnetic radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egwuonwu, G. N.; Bukar, P. H.; Avaa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Galena samples, collected from Ishiagu, south-eastern Nigeria, were used to make high density concretes for experimental radiation shielding. The concretes were molded into cylindrical tablets of various densities and volumes in order to ascertain their attenuation capability to some electromagnetic radiations. Blue visible light and gamma-ray sourced from cobalt-60, were transmitted through the concretes and detected with the aid of Op-Amp and digital Geiger-Muller Counter respectively. The absorption coefficients of the samples of thicknesses in the range of 1.00 - 5.00 cm were determined. Results show that for a typical galena concrete of average density 2.33gcm -3 , the absorption coefficient is about 1.186 cm -1 for the blue light and 0.495cm -1 for gamma-ray. For this density, 4.45cm of the galena concrete reduces the gamma-ray intensity by 90% and its half value layer thickness is 1.40cm. The investigation however, suggests the shielding properties of the galena sourced from Ishiagu. A database of shielding strength for the in situ galena was established hence, can serve as suitable platform for quality and quantity control in radiation shielding technology in radiotherapy treatment rooms and nuclear reactors.

  7. Estimation of the heat generation in vitrified waste product and shield thickness of the cask for the transportation of vitrified waste product using Monte Carlo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, A.K.; Jakhete, A.P.; Mehta, D.; Kaushik, C.P.

    2011-01-01

    High Level Liquid waste (HLW) generated during reprocessing of spent fuel contains most of the radioactivity present in the spent fuel resulting in the need for isolation and surveillance for extended period of time. Major components in HLW are the corrosion products, fission products such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 106 Ru, 144 Ce, 125 Sb etc, actinides and various chemicals used during reprocessing of spent fuel. Fresh HLW having an activity concentration of around 100Ci/l is to be vitrified into borosilicate glass and packed in canisters which are placed in S.S overpacks for better confinement. These overpacks contain around 0.7 Million Curies of activity. Characterisation of activity in HLW and activity profile of radionuclides for various cooling periods sets the base for the study. For transporting the vitrified waste product (VWP), two most important parameters is the shield thickness of the transportation cask and the heat generation in the waste product. This paper describes the methodology used in the estimation of lead thickness for the transportation cask using the Monte Carlo Technique. Heat generation due to decay of fission products results in the increase in temperature of the vitrified waste product during interim storage and disposal. Glass being the material, not having very high thermal conductivity, temperature difference between the canister and surrounding bears significance in view of the possibility of temperature based devitrification of VWP. The heat generation in the canister and the overpack containing vitrified glass is also estimated using MCNP. (author)

  8. Numerical Simulation and Monitoring of Surface Environment Influence of Waterless Sand Layer Shield Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanliang; Han, Tongyin; Shi, Wenjun; Du, Shouji; Qin, Zhichao

    2017-10-01

    The development of urban subway is becoming more and more rapid and plays an increasingly important role. The shield tunneling method has become the first choice for the construction of urban subway tunnel in the construction of urban subway. The paper takes the interval of Shijiazhuang Metro Line 3 Administrative Center Station and Garden Park Station as the engineering background. The establishment of double shield finite difference model by considering the thickness of covering soil, tunnel excavation and excavation at the same time, distance and other factors, the surface deformation, and soil thickness. The ground deformation law is obtained, the surface settlement is inversely proportional to the overburden thickness and the double line spacing, and the gradual excavation is smaller than the synchronous excavation.

  9. Development of a computational code for calculations of shielding in dental facilities; Desenvolvimento de um codigo computacional para calculos de blindagem em instalacoes odontologicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de L., E-mail: deise_dy@hotmail.com, E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is prepared in order to address calculations of shielding to minimize the interaction of patients with ionizing radiation and / or personnel. The work includes the use of protection report Radiation in Dental Medicine (NCRP-145 or Radiation Protection in Dentistry), which establishes calculations and standards to be adopted to ensure safety to those who may be exposed to ionizing radiation in dental facilities, according to the dose limits established by CNEN-NN-3.1 standard published in September / 2011. The methodology comprises the use of computer language for processing data provided by that report, and a commercial application used for creating residential projects and decoration. The FORTRAN language was adopted as a method for application to a real case. The result is a programming capable of returning data related to the thickness of material, such as steel, lead, wood, glass, plaster, acrylic, acrylic and leaded glass, which can be used for effective shielding against single or continuous pulse beams. Several variables are used to calculate the thickness of the shield, as: number of films used in the week, film load, use factor, occupational factor, distance between the wall and the source, transmission factor, workload, area definition, beam intensity, intraoral and panoramic exam. Before the application of the methodology is made a validation of results with examples provided by NCRP-145. The calculations redone from the examples provide answers consistent with the report.

  10. Castor and Pollux - shielded cells for studying fuel treatment processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudot, G.; Bathellier, A.

    1969-01-01

    CASTOR and POLLUX, two alpha, beta, gamma cells are described in the present paper. They are located in the CEN at Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). They are designed for improvement studies of the various aqueous separation processes used in irradiated fuels reprocessing plants. Located in the same air-tight steel encasement, they arc inter-connected by a pneumatic transfer. These two cells have a similar in-line conception and they include: a gamma shielding in lead of 10 cm of thickness; an inner air-tight box, made with stainless steel and plexiglas, is maintained in lowering in comparison to room pressure. Eleven Hobson model seven master-slave manipulators allow inner manipulations. Then the inner equipment is described briefly. (author) [fr

  11. Examples of processing problematic waste and material. A-3. Processing of lead by mechanical decontamination at UKAEA Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The UKAEA and its contractor (NNC) have decontaminated lead blocks arising from the decommissioning of a metallurgical site that comprised three concrete shielded remote handling cells and 36 lead shielded enclosures. The primary decommissioning and dismantling work entailed the dismantling of the 36 lead enclosures, which were expected to yield over 1000 t of lead shielding bricks as waste. During the initial dismantling of the lead shielded enclosures, all the lead bricks were monitored for radioactive contamination; clean items were segregated and set aside for detailed clearance and assurance checks. The contaminated blocks were sent for assessment and decontamination treatment, as necessary. The decontamination process utilized a purpose built partitioned containment tent, ventilated with a HEPA filtration system, so that the receipt, decontamination and radiological monitoring of individual items could be segregated in order to minimize any cross-contamination. The dismantled lead blocks comprised a range of standard thicknesses (2, 4, 9 and 10 in, or 3, 8, 13 and 15 cm) and incorporated a variety of chevron, concave and convex shapes, which are utilized to avoid weaknesses within the assembled shielding. The primary technical issues for the mechanical processing of the contaminated lead blocks were consideration of the individual lead brick shapes (i.e. the bricks were contoured) and the individual weight of the bricks, which had a range of 10-75 kg. The preferred option was a manual dry cutting technique using a handheld rotary industrial planer (the selected planer is normally associated with the joinery trade). The dry cutting option considered the malleability of the lead, which under certain circumstances during dry cutting could give rise to localized heating effects, leading to melted lead over the cutting surface, resulting in limited effectiveness in the removal of the contaminated layer. To mitigate this effect the planer was set to take cuts

  12. Simulation of transport critical current of Bi2223/Ag tape with ferromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, C.; Alamgir, A.K.M.; Qu, T.M.; Han, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shielding (FS) was coated onto the surface of the Bi2223/Ag multi-filamentary tape. Transport critical current of the Bi2223/Ag multi-filamentary tape with a FS was systematically studied by numerical simulation. In the help of a finite element analysis (FEA) tool, we are able to understand how the FS alters the flux inside the superconductor region and thus increases and decreases the critical current density locally. The results show the open FS function both positively and negatively to the performance of the tape. An optimization process was proposed, aiming to reach a tradeoff between I c increasing and less usage of the ferromagnetic material. Three important shielding parameters, shielding width, shielding thickness, and shielding material were taken into account

  13. Simulation of transport critical current of Bi2223/Ag tape with ferromagnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: guchen@tsinghua.edu.cn; Alamgir, A.K.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 75-9 Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, ku, Yokohama (Japan); Qu, T.M. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Han, Z. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-09-15

    Ferromagnetic shielding (FS) was coated onto the surface of the Bi2223/Ag multi-filamentary tape. Transport critical current of the Bi2223/Ag multi-filamentary tape with a FS was systematically studied by numerical simulation. In the help of a finite element analysis (FEA) tool, we are able to understand how the FS alters the flux inside the superconductor region and thus increases and decreases the critical current density locally. The results show the open FS function both positively and negatively to the performance of the tape. An optimization process was proposed, aiming to reach a tradeoff between I{sub c} increasing and less usage of the ferromagnetic material. Three important shielding parameters, shielding width, shielding thickness, and shielding material were taken into account.

  14. MOSFET Dosimetry for Evaluation of Gonad Shielding during Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwi Young; Choi, Yun Seok; Park, So Yeon; Park, Yang Kyun; Ye, Sung Joon

    2011-01-01

    In order to confirm feasibility of MOSFET modality in use of in vivo dosimetry, evaluation of gonad shielding in order to minimize gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy by using MOSFET modality was performed. Gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the department of radiation oncology of Seoul National University Hospital since 2009 was measured. 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams emitted from Varian 21EX LINAC were used for radiotherapy. In order to minimize exposed dose caused by the scattered ray not only from collimator of LINAC but also from treatment region inside radiation field, we used box.shaped lead shielding material. The shielding material was made of the lead block and consists of 7.5 cm x 9.5 cm x 5.5 cm sized case and 9 cm x 9.5 cm x 1 cm sized cover. Dosimetry for evaluation of gonad shielding was done with MOSFET modality. By protecting with gonad shielding material, average gonadal dose of patients was decreased by 23.07% compared with reference dose outside of the shielding material. Average delivered gonadal dose inside the shielding material was 0.01 Gy. By the result of MOSFET dosimetry, we verified that gonadal dose was decreased by using gonad shielding material. In compare with TLD dosimetry, we could measure the exposed dose easily and precisely with MOSFET modality

  15. MOSFET Dosimetry for Evaluation of Gonad Shielding during Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwi Young; Choi, Yun Seok; Park, So Yeon; Park, Yang Kyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung Joon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    In order to confirm feasibility of MOSFET modality in use of in vivo dosimetry, evaluation of gonad shielding in order to minimize gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy by using MOSFET modality was performed. Gonadal dose of patients undergoing radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the department of radiation oncology of Seoul National University Hospital since 2009 was measured. 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams emitted from Varian 21EX LINAC were used for radiotherapy. In order to minimize exposed dose caused by the scattered ray not only from collimator of LINAC but also from treatment region inside radiation field, we used box.shaped lead shielding material. The shielding material was made of the lead block and consists of 7.5 cm x 9.5 cm x 5.5 cm sized case and 9 cm x 9.5 cm x 1 cm sized cover. Dosimetry for evaluation of gonad shielding was done with MOSFET modality. By protecting with gonad shielding material, average gonadal dose of patients was decreased by 23.07% compared with reference dose outside of the shielding material. Average delivered gonadal dose inside the shielding material was 0.01 Gy. By the result of MOSFET dosimetry, we verified that gonadal dose was decreased by using gonad shielding material. In compare with TLD dosimetry, we could measure the exposed dose easily and precisely with MOSFET modality.

  16. Detailed mechanical design of the LIPAc beam dump radiological shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomen, Oriol, E-mail: onomen@irec.cat [IREC, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); CDEI-UPC, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Martínez, José I.; Arranz, Fernando; Iglesias, Daniel; Barrera, Germán; Brañas, Beatriz [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ogando, Francisco [UNED, Madrid (Spain); Molla, Joaquín [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Sanmartí, Manel [IREC, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Mechanical design of the IFMIF LIPAc beam dump shielding has been performed. ► Lead shutter design performed to shield radiation from beam dump when LIPAc is off. ► External loads, working and dismantling conditions, included as design constraints. -- Abstract: The LIPAc is a 9 MeV, D{sup +} linear prototype accelerator for the validation of the IFMIF accelerator design. The high intensity, 125 mA CW beam is stopped in a copper cone involving a high production of neutrons and gamma radiation and activation of its surface. The beam stopper is surrounded by a shielding to attenuate the resulting radiation so that dose rate values comply with the limits at the different zones of the installation. The shielding includes for that purpose polyethylene rings, water tanks and gray cast iron rings. A lead shutter has also been designed to shield the gamma radiation that comes through the beam tube when the linear accelerator is not in operation, in order to allow access inside the building for maintenance tasks. The present work summarizes the detailed mechanical design of the beam dump shielding and the lead shutter taking into account the design constraints, such as working conditions and other external loads, as well as including provisions for dismantling.

  17. Soil biological shield exposed to high energy neutrons; Zemlja kao bioloski stit od neutrona visokih energija

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simovic, R; Marinkovic, N [Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1993-04-15

    Shielding efficiency of soil biological shield exposed to high energy neutrons was investigated. Dose rate equivalents for neutrons, secondary gamma and gamma radiation were computed on the surface of soil slabs having different thicknesses. Yields of primary and secondary nuclear radiation in the total dose were evaluated. Influence of the incident neutron spectrum, water content and chemical composition of the material on its shielding efficiency was examined. It was found that the soil density and the water content determine the quality of biological shield, the influence of other factors being less important. Comparison of shielding efficiencies for soil with sand, brick and ordinary concrete shields was done.

  18. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm; Calculos de blindajes, optimizacion vs. paradigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47 Playa C.P. 11300 LaHabana (Cuba)]. e-mail: nestor@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}, independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  19. Radiation shielding properties of high performance concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with natural and enriched boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorla, Eyüp; Ipbüker, Cagatay [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Biland, Alex [US Basalt Corp., Houston (United States); Kiisk, Madis [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Kovaljov, Sergei [OÜ Basaltest, Tartu (Estonia); Tkaczyk, Alan H. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Gulik, Volodymyr, E-mail: volodymyr.gulik@gmail.com [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, Lysogirska 12, of. 201, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Basalt fiber infused with natural and enriched boron in varying proportions. • Gamma-ray attenuation remains stable with addition of basalt-boron fiber. • Improvement in neutron shielding for nuclear facilities producing fast fission spectrum. • Basalt-boron fiber could decrease the shielding thickness in thermal spectrum reactors. - Abstract: The importance of radiation shielding is increasing in parallel with the expansion of the application areas of nuclear technologies. This study investigates the radiation shielding properties of two types of high strength concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with 12–20% boron oxide, containing varying fractions of natural and enriched boron. The gamma-ray shielding characteristics are analyzed with the help of the WinXCom, whereas the neutron shielding characteristics are modeled and computed by Monte Carlo Serpent code. For gamma-ray shielding, the attenuation coefficients of the studied samples do not display any significant variation due to the addition of basalt-boron fibers at any mixing proportion. For neutron shielding, the addition of basalt-boron fiber has negligible effects in the case of very fast neutrons (14 MeV), but it could considerably improve the neutron shielding of concrete for nuclear facilities producing a fast fission spectrum (e.g. with reactors as BN-800, FBTR) and thermal neutron spectrum (Light Water Reactors (LWR)). It was also found that basalt-boron fiber could decrease the thickness of radiation shielding material in thermal spectrum reactors.

  20. Radiation shielding properties of high performance concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with natural and enriched boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorla, Eyüp; Ipbüker, Cagatay; Biland, Alex; Kiisk, Madis; Kovaljov, Sergei; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Gulik, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Basalt fiber infused with natural and enriched boron in varying proportions. • Gamma-ray attenuation remains stable with addition of basalt-boron fiber. • Improvement in neutron shielding for nuclear facilities producing fast fission spectrum. • Basalt-boron fiber could decrease the shielding thickness in thermal spectrum reactors. - Abstract: The importance of radiation shielding is increasing in parallel with the expansion of the application areas of nuclear technologies. This study investigates the radiation shielding properties of two types of high strength concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with 12–20% boron oxide, containing varying fractions of natural and enriched boron. The gamma-ray shielding characteristics are analyzed with the help of the WinXCom, whereas the neutron shielding characteristics are modeled and computed by Monte Carlo Serpent code. For gamma-ray shielding, the attenuation coefficients of the studied samples do not display any significant variation due to the addition of basalt-boron fibers at any mixing proportion. For neutron shielding, the addition of basalt-boron fiber has negligible effects in the case of very fast neutrons (14 MeV), but it could considerably improve the neutron shielding of concrete for nuclear facilities producing a fast fission spectrum (e.g. with reactors as BN-800, FBTR) and thermal neutron spectrum (Light Water Reactors (LWR)). It was also found that basalt-boron fiber could decrease the thickness of radiation shielding material in thermal spectrum reactors.

  1. Estimation of temperature distribution in a reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, R.A.; Goverdhan, P.; Gupta, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Shielding is provided in a nuclear reactor to absorb the radiations emanating from the core. The energy of these radiations appear in the form of heat. Concrete which is commonly used as a shielding material in nuclear power plants must be able to withstand the temperatures and temperature gradients appearing in the shield due to this heat. High temperatures lead to dehydration of the concrete and in turn reduce the shielding effectiveness of the material. Adequate cooling needs to be provided in these shields in order to limit the maximum temperature. This paper describes a method to estimate steady state and transient temperature distribution in reactor shields. The results due to loss of coolant in the coolant tubes have been studied and presented in the paper. (author). 5 figs

  2. Pressurizer /Auxiliary Spray Piping Stress Analysis For Determination Of Lead Shielding Maximum Allow Able Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setjo, Renaningsih

    2000-01-01

    Piping stress analysis for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines Nuclear Power Plant AV Unit I(PWR Type) has been carried out. The purpose of this analysis is to establish a maximum allowable load that is permitted at the time of need by placing lead shielding on the piping system on class 1 pipe, Pressurizer/Auxiliary Spray Lines (PZR/Aux.) Reactor Coolant Loop 1 and 4 for NPP AV Unit one in the mode 5 and 6 during outage. This analysis is intended to reduce the maximum amount of radiation dose for the operator during ISI ( In service Inspection) period.The result shown that the maximum allowable loads for 4 inches lines for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines is 123 lbs/feet

  3. Radioprotection to the Gonads in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography: Effectiveness of Developed Bismuth Shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use and effectiveness of traditional lead gonad shields in pediatric pelvic radiography has been challenged by several literatures over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to develop a new radioprotective gonad shields to be use in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods: The commercially available 0.06 mm lead equivalent bismuth garment has cropped squarely and used as ovarian shield to cover the entire region of pelvis. In order to prevent deterioration of image quality due to beam hardening artifacts, a 1-cm foam as spacer was located between the shield and patients pelvis. Moreover, we added a lead piece at the cranial position of the bismuth garment to absorb the scatter radiations to the radiosensitive organs. In girls, 49 radiographs with shield and 46 radiographs without shield was taken. The radiation dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs. Image quality assessments were performed using the European guidelines. For boys, the lead testicular shields was developed using 2 cm bismuth garment, added to the sides. The prevalence and efficacy of testicular shields was assessed in clinical practice fromFebruary 2016 to June 2016. Results: Without increasing the dose to the breast, thyroid and the lens of the eyes, the use of bismuth shield has reduced the entrance skin dose(ESD of the pelvis and radiation dose to the ovaries by 62.2% and 61.7%, respectively (P

  4. Second generation ultralow background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer using super clean materials and improved multilayered cosmic ray anticoincidence and passive shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, J.H.; Hensley, W.K.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Our current paper describes the development of a low cost shielding system using liquid scintillator for the cosmic ray detector-neutron moderator which accounts for a tenfold reduction in the cosmic continuum. Our primary objective was to develop a low cost anticoincidence shield for laboratory use which would substantially reduce the background from cosmic ray interactions. The minimum thickness of scintillator which would provide the necessary moderation of neutrons as well as furnish detectable quantities of light generated from cosmic ray interactions was determined experimentally. Tanks holding the liquid scintillator were constructed from stainless steel and were partitioned in such a manner that 10, 20, 30, or 40 cm thicknesses could be selected for background measurements. Lucite was used for construction of a tank which would allow the comparison of light output relative to stainless steel for a 10 cm thickness of liquid scintillator. Plastic scintillator was used for the bottom layer in all cases, however, liquid scintillator could be used with proper internal support. A 20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm plastic scintillator was machined to completely surround the detector and fit inside 15 cm thick walls of lead which in turn, fit inside the stainless steel scintilllator tanks. Background measurements were taken with this inner scintillator both active and inactive. Measurements were also made using copper as well as iron as replacements for the inner scintillator

  5. Development of HANARO ST3 shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. N.; Lee, J. S.; Shim, H. S.

    2004-12-01

    This report contains the design, fabrication and accurate installation of ST3 shield, which would be installed at ST3 beam port of HANARO. At first, we designed and fabricated ST3 shield casemate composed of 14 blocks. We filled it with heavy concrete, lead ingot and polyethylene that mixed B 4 C powder and epoxy. The average filling density of total shield casemate was 4.7g/cm 3 . The developed ST3 shield was installed at the ST3 beam port and the accuracy of installation for each beam path and channel was evaluated. We found that the extraction of neutron beam to meet the requirement of neutron spectrometer is possible. Also, we developed ancillary equipment such as BGU, quick shutter and exterior shield door for the effective opening and closing of neutron beam. As a result of this study, it was found that neutron spectrometer such as neutron reflectometer and high intensity powder diffractomater can be installed at the ST3 beam port

  6. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  7. Neutron and gamma-ray spectra measurement on the model of the KS-150 reactor radial shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, M.; Hogel, J.; Marik, J.; Kovarik, K.; Franc, L.; Vespalec, R.

    1977-01-01

    A shortened model of the peripheral region of the KS-150 reactor core consisting of two rows of fuel elements and a reflector was constructed from the peripheral fuel elements of the KS-150 reactor core in an experiment on the TR-0 reactor. The mockup of the thermal shield (10 cm of steel), the pressure vessel (15 cm of steel) and the inner wall of the water biological shielding (2 cm of steel) of the KS-150 reactor were erected outside the TR-0 vessel. Fast neutron and gamma spectra were measured with a stilbene crystal scintillation spectrometer. The resonance neutron spectra were measured with 197 Au, 63 Cu and 23 Na resonance activation detectors. Fast neutron spectra inside the reactor were measured with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer, outside the reactor with a 10 mm diameter by 10 mm thick and a 20 mm diameter by 20 mm thick stilbene crystal spectrometer. Neutron spectra in the energy regions of 1 eV to 3 keV and 0.6 MeV to 0.8 MeV were obtained on the core periphery, on the reflector half-thickness and in front of and behind the reactor thermal shield. Gamma spectra were obtained in front of and behind the thermal shield. It was found that the attenuation of neutron fluxes by the reflector and the thermal shield increased with increasing energy while gamma radiation attenuation decreased with increasing energy. It was not possible to obtain the neutron spectrum in the 10 to 600 keV energy range because suitable detection instrumentation was not available. (J.P.)

  8. Shielding of a neutron irradiator with {sup 241}Am-Be source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, K.A.M. de; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, A.X., E-mail: koliveira@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Fonseca, E.S., E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The equivalent dose rates at 1.0 cm from the outer surface of the shielding of a neutron irradiation system that uses {sup 241}Am-Be source with activity of 185 GBq (5 Ci) were determined. A theoretical-experimental approach including case studies, through computer simulations with MCNP code was employed to calculate the best shielding thickness. Following the construction of the neutron irradiator, dose measurements were conducted in order to validate data obtained from simulation. The neutron irradiator shielding was designed in such a way to allow transport of the neutron radiography system for in loco inspections ensuring workers' radiologic safety. (author)

  9. A Ballistic Limit Analysis Program for Shielding Against Micrometeoroids and Orbital Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Erie

    2010-01-01

    A software program has been developed that enables the user to quickly and simply perform ballistic limit calculations for common spacecraft structures that are subject to hypervelocity impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) projectiles. This analysis program consists of two core modules: design, and; performance. The design module enables a user to calculate preliminary dimensions of a shield configuration (e.g., thicknesses/areal densities, spacing, etc.) for a ?design? particle (diameter, density, impact velocity, incidence). The performance module enables a more detailed shielding analysis, providing the performance of a user-defined shielding configuration over the range of relevant in-orbit impact conditions.

  10. Shielding analysis of high level waste water storage facilities using MCNP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabuta, Naohiro [Mitsubishi Research Inst., Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The neutron and gamma-ray transport analysis for the facility as a reprocessing facility with large buildings having thick shielding was made. Radiation shielding analysis consists of a deep transmission calculation for the concrete wall and a skyshine calculation for the space out of the buildings. An efficient analysis with a short running time and high accuracy needs a variance reduction technique suitable for all the calculation regions and structures. In this report, the shielding analysis using MCNP and a discrete ordinate transport code is explained and the idea and procedure of decision of variance reduction parameter is completed. (J.P.N.)

  11. Use of polyethylene pellets in the design and construction of a storage safe, a transport vessel and a portable shield for californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.

    1986-01-01

    A storage and shielding facility for 300 μg of Californium-252 sources was designed and constructed. Though the safe was in a permanent location, the fact that it consisted of a lead bucket surrounded by polyethylene pellets made it simple, movable and inexpensive. If need be, more quantities of Cf-252 could be added without altering the basic design and sacrificing the radiation protection guidelines. The measured radiation levels from 300 μg of stored Cf-252 in and around the storage vault were lower than the expected dose rates by a factor of 5. The measured radiation levels around the occupied environs of the facility were below the maximum permissible yearly dose of 500mrem for non-occupational workers. A transport vessel was designed and constructed to carry up to 50 μg of Californium-252 sources. It consisted of a standard 55 gallon steel drum on casters containing cylindrical lead shield surrounded by polyethylene pellets. The measured maximum surface dose rates on the drum and at one meter away were within the radiation protection guidelines and were less than the expected dose rates. A portable shield was designed and constructed to protect the body in afterloading operations and handling of the sources. It consisted of polyethylene pellets in an aluminum box and an attached 10 cm thick plexiglass eye shield. The simple design, with the ease of using polyethylene pellets can be extended to construct bedside shields

  12. Shielding calculation techniques used in the design of storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.S.; Massey, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The shielding design and analysis of a concrete modular spent fuel storage system are discussed. Particular attention is given to comparing various computation techniques in determining bulk shielding thickness, and also in dealing with the radiation streaming effect through the air exist penetration openings in the module. Three computer codes QADMOD, ANISN, and DOT-IV were used to solve the same problem. In addition, hand albedo calculation were done to augment the result of the QADMOD calculation to properly deal with the surface scattering

  13. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, N.; Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Fugger, M.; Hofmann, P.

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of the gamma radiation shielding parameters of bismuth modified quaternary glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parminder; Singh, K. J.; Thakur, Sonika

    2018-05-01

    Glasses modified with heavy metal oxides (HMO) are an interesting area of research in the field of gamma-ray shielding. Bismuth modified lithium-zinc-borate glasses have been studied whereby bismuth oxide is added from 0 to 50 mol%. The gamma ray shielding properties of the glasses were evaluated at photon energy 662 keV with the help of XMuDat computer program by using the Hubbell and Seltzer database. Various gamma ray shielding parameters such as attenuation coefficient, shield thickness in terms of half and tenth value layer, effective atomic number have been studied in this work. A useful comparison of this glass system has been made with standard radiation shielding concretes viz. ordinary, barite and iron concrete. The glass samples containing 20 to 50 mol% bismuth oxide have shown better gamma ray shielding properties and hence have the potential to become good radiation absorbers.

  15. Assessment of the integrity of structural shielding of four computed tomography facilities in the greater Accra region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkansah, A.; Schandorf, C.; Boadu, M.; Fletcher, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    The structural shielding thicknesses of the walls of four computed tomography (CT) facilities in Ghana were re-evaluated to verify the shielding integrity using the new shielding design methods recommended by the National Council on Radiological Protection and Measurements (NCRP). The shielding thickness obtained ranged from 120 to 155 mm using default DLP values proposed by the European Commission and 110 to 168 mm using derived DLP values from the four CT manufacturers. These values are within the accepted standard concrete wall thickness ranging from 102 to 152 mm prescribed by the NCRP. The ultrasonic pulse testing of all walls indicated that these are of good quality and free of voids since pulse velocities estimated were within the range of 3.496±0.005 km s -1 . An average dose equivalent rate estimated for supervised areas is 3.4±0.27 μSv week -1 and that for the controlled area is 18.0±0.15 μSv week -1 , which are within acceptable values. (authors)

  16. A study on the shielding element using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Goo [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this research, we simulated the elementary star shielding ability using Monte Carlo simulation to apply medical radiation shielding sheet which can replace existing lead. In the selection of elements, mainly elements and metal elements having a large atomic number, which are known to have high shielding performance, recently, various composite materials have improved shielding performance, so that weight reduction, processability, In consideration of activity etc., 21 elements were selected. The simulation tools were utilized Monte Carlo method. As a result of simulating the shielding performance by each element, it was estimated that the shielding ratio is the highest at 98.82% and 98.44% for tungsten and gold.

  17. Pre-evaluation of fusion shielding benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Handa, H.; Konno, C.

    1994-01-01

    Shielding benchmark experiment is very useful to test the design code and nuclear data for fusion devices. There are many types of benchmark experiments that should be done in fusion shielding problems, but time and budget are limited. Therefore it will be important to select and determine the effective experimental configurations by precalculation before the experiment. The authors did three types of pre-evaluation to determine the experimental assembly configurations of shielding benchmark experiments planned in FNS, JAERI. (1) Void Effect Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure the local increase of dose and nuclear heating behind small void(s) in shield material. Dimension of the voids and its arrangements were decided as follows. Dose and nuclear heating were calculated both for with and without void(s). Minimum size of the void was determined so that the ratio of these two results may be larger than error of the measurement system. (2) Auxiliary Shield Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure shielding properties of B 4 C, Pb, W, and dose around superconducting magnet (SCM). Thickness of B 4 C, Pb, W and their arrangement including multilayer configuration were determined. (3) SCM Nuclear Heating Experiment - The purpose of this experiment is to measure nuclear heating and dose distribution in SCM material. Because it is difficult to use liquid helium as a part of SCM mock up material, material composition of SCM mock up are surveyed to have similar nuclear heating property of real SCM composition

  18. The SWAN/NPSOL code system for multivariable multiconstraint shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.

    1995-01-01

    SWAN is a useful code for optimization of source-driven systems, i.e., systems for which the neutron and photon distribution is the solution of the inhomogeneous transport equation. Over the years, SWAN has been applied to the optimization of a variety of nuclear systems, such as minimizing the thickness of fusion reactor blankets and shields, the weight of space reactor shields, the cost for an ICF target chamber shield, and the background radiation for explosive detection systems and maximizing the beam quality for boron neutron capture therapy applications. However, SWAN's optimization module can handle up to a single constraint and was inefficient in handling problems with many variables. The purpose of this work is to upgrade SWAN's optimization capability

  19. Equipment for shielding the gonad region while performing radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starp, F.

    1979-01-01

    The shield consists of a fixed square central lead plate and, associated to it, lead sheets arranged linear displaceable and/or rotatable, by means of which the superficial extent may be variated. For protection from damaging and contamination this shield itself is enclosed by a casing in the form of two cup-shaped discs e.g. from plexiglas put one above the other at the edge. (DG) 891 HP/DG 892 MKO [de

  20. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    Details are given of a cylindrical electric penetration assembly for carrying instrumentation leads, used in monitoring the performance of a nuclear reactor, through the containment wall of the reactor. Effective yet economical shielding protection against both fast neutron and high-energy gamma radiation is provided. Adequate spacing within the assembly allows excessive heat to be efficiently dissipated and means of monitoring all potential radiation and gas leakage paths are provided. (UK)

  1. Measurements and Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Llamas-Jansa, I.; Kazi, S.; Bentley, P. M.

    2018-06-01

    A combined measurement and Monte-Carlo simulation study was carried out in order to characterize the particle self-shielding effect of B4C grains in neutron shielding concrete. Several batches of a specialized neutron shielding concrete, with varying B4C grain sizes, were exposed to a 2 Å neutron beam at the R2D2 test beamline at the Institute for Energy Technology located in Kjeller, Norway. The direct and scattered neutrons were detected with a neutron detector placed behind the concrete blocks and the results were compared to Geant4 simulations. The particle self-shielding effect was included in the Geant4 simulations by calculating effective neutron cross-sections during the Monte-Carlo simulation process. It is shown that this method well reproduces the measured results. Our results show that shielding calculations for low-energy neutrons using such materials would lead to an underestimate of the shielding required for a certain design scenario if the particle self-shielding effect is not included in the calculations.

  2. Shielding calculation for bremsstrahlung from β-emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu

    1990-01-01

    Accompanying the revision of radiation injury prevention law, the shielding calculation method for photon corresponding to the dose equivalent was shown. However, regarding the electron from β decay nuclide and bremsstrahlung caused by shielding material, the shielding calculation method corresponding to the 1 cm dose equivalent has not been reported, hence, in this report, the spectrum of β-ray is calculated and the 1 cm dose equivalent transmission rate of the bremsstrahlung was calculated for three kinds of shielding materials (iron, lead, concrete). As the result of consideration, it is sufficient to think about the bremsstrahlung due to negative electron emission accompanying β-decay. In β-decay, electrons which constitute the continuous spectrum with maximum energy are emitted. The shape of the spectrum differs with nuclides. The maximum energy of β-ray of generally used nuclides is mostly below 3MeV and, besides, the electron ray itself is easily shielded, while the strength of bremsstrahlung depends on the atomic number of shielding materials and its generating mechanism is complicated. In this report, the actual shielding calculation method for bremsstrahlung is shown with regard to the most frequently used β-decay nuclides. (M.T.)

  3. Discussions for the shielding materials of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Many synchrotron radiation facilities are now under operation such as E.S.R.F., APS, and S.P.ring-8. New facilities with intermediated stored electron energy are also under construction and designing such as D.I.A.M.O.N.D., S.O.L.E.I.L., and S.S.R.F.. At these third generation synchrotron radiation facilities, the beamline shielding as well as the bulk shield is very important for designing radiation safety because of intense and high energy synchrotron radiation beam. Some reasons employ lead shield wall for the synchrotron radiation beamlines. One is narrow space for the construction of many beamlines at the experimental hall, and the other is the necessary of many movable mechanisms at the beamlines, for examples. Some cases are required to shield high energy neutrons due to stored electron beam loss and photoneutrons due to gas Bremsstrahlung. Ordinary concrete and heavy concrete are coming up to shield material of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches. However, few discussions have been performed so far for the shielding materials of the hutches. In this presentation, therefore, we will discuss the characteristics of the shielding conditions including build up effect for the beamline hutches by using the ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, and lead for shielding materials with 3 GeV and 8 GeV class synchrotron radiation source. (author)

  4. A study on opening displacement of lid and decrease in shielding thickness of a type IP-2 transport package in drop events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hak; Seo, Ki Seog; Kim, Jae Yong; Lee, Ju Chan; Yoon, Jeong Hyoun; Lee, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Heung Young

    2005-01-01

    Radioactive waste generated from nuclear power plants shall be transported in accordance with designated regulations, which is to protect radiation workers and the public against potential radiation exposure caused by the transportations. Each transport package of radioactive waste is to be designed to have enough safety to fulfill with the regulations and technical standards in domestic and foreign regulations. In accordance with IAEA safety standard series TS-R-1 which is widely accepted by most of its member states, industrial package can be divided into IP-1, IP-2 and IP-3 along with other Type A and Type B packages, a conventional clarification. IP-2 package shall be designed to meet the designated requirements in addition to those for type IP-1 package. IP-2 package is subject to the free drop and stacking tests under normal conditions of transport as regulated in the regulation. In this paper, opening displacement of lid and body and decrease in shielding thickness of an IP-2 package are analytically evaluated, which is proposed for on-site transportation in domestic nuclear power plants. The results of the analysis is compared with design requirements of the package that loss or dispersal of the radioactive contents should be prevented and total loss of shielding effect from free drop shall be less than 20%

  5. A Sensitivity Study on the Radiation Shield of KSPR Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerba, S.; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hong Sik; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    -layer design combining 5 cm thick LiH and 3 cm thick W layers. It can be also concluded that the shielding mass is strongly dependent on the reactor thermal power, thus the highest efficiency in terms of shielding mass per unit of thermal power can be achieved in case of high reactor power.

  6. Comparison of some lead and non-lead based glass systems, standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of shielding parameters in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Ozdemir, Yueksel; Simsek, Onder; Durak, Ridvan

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some glass systems with and without Pb have been calculated in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV including the K absorption edges of high Z elements present in the glass. Also, these glass systems have been compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of mean free paths and total mass attenuation coefficients in the continuous energy range. Comparisons with experiments were also provided wherever possible for glasses. It has been observed that the glass systems without Pb have higher values of Z eff than that of Pb based glasses at some high energy regions even if they have lower mean atomic numbers than Pb based glasses. When compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses, generally it has been shown that the given glass systems have superior properties than concretes and window glasses with respect to the radiation-shielding properties, thus confirming the availability of using these glasses as substitutes for some shielding concretes and commercial window glasses to improve radiation-shielding properties in the continuous energy region.

  7. Shielding analysis of the advanced voloxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je; Park, J. J.; Lee, J. W.; Shin, J. M.; Park, G. I.; Song, K. C

    2008-09-15

    This report deals describes how much a shielding benefit can be obtained by the Advanced Voloxidation process. The calculation was performed with the MCNPX code and a simple problem was modeled with a spent fuel source which was surrounded by a concrete wall. The source terms were estimated with the ORIGEN-ARP code and the gamma spectrum and the neutron spectrum were also obtained. The thickness of the concrete wall was estimated before and after the voloxidation process. From the results, the gamma spectrum after the voloxidation process was estimated as a 67% reduction compared with that of before the voloxidation process due to the removal of several gamma emission elements such as cesium and rubidium. The MCNPX calculations provided that the thickness of the general concrete wall could be reduced by 12% after the voloxidation process. And the heavy concrete wall provided a 28% reduction in the shielding of the source term after the voloxidation process. This can be explained in that there lots of gamma emission isotopes still exist after the advanced voloxidation process such as Pu-241, Y-90, and Sr-90 which are independent of the voloxidation process.

  8. Monte Carlo-based development of a shield and total background estimation for the COBRA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2014-11-01

    The COBRA experiment aims for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay and thus for the determination the effective Majorana mass of the neutrino. To be competitive with other next-generation experiments the background rate has to be in the order of 10 -3 counts/kg/keV/yr, which is a challenging criterion. This thesis deals with the development of a shield design and the calculation of the expected total background rate for the large scale COBRA experiment containing 13824 6 cm 3 CdZnTe detectors. For the development of a shield single-layer and multi-layer shields were investigated and a shield design was optimized concerning high-energy muon-induced neutrons. As the best design the combination of 10 cm boron doped polyethylene as outermost layer, 20 cm lead and 10 cm copper as innermost layer were determined. It showed the best performance regarding neutron attenuation as well as (n, γ) self-shielding effects leading to a negligible background rate of less than 2.10 -6 counts/kg/keV/yr. Additionally. the shield with a thickness of 40 cm is compact and costeffective. In the next step the expected total background rate was computed taking into account individual setup parts and various background sources including natural and man-made radioactivity, cosmic ray-induced background and thermal neutrons. Furthermore, a comparison of measured data from the COBRA demonstrator setup with Monte Carlo data was used to calculate reliable contamination levels of the single setup parts. The calculation was performed conservatively to prevent an underestimation. In addition, the contribution to the total background rate regarding the individual detector parts and background sources was investigated. The main portion arise from the Delrin support structure, the Glyptal lacquer followed by the circuit board of the high voltage supply. Most background events originate from particles with a quantity of 99 % in total. Regarding surface events a contribution of 26

  9. Monte Carlo-based development of a shield and total background estimation for the COBRA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich, Nadine

    2014-11-15

    The COBRA experiment aims for the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay and thus for the determination the effective Majorana mass of the neutrino. To be competitive with other next-generation experiments the background rate has to be in the order of 10{sup -3} counts/kg/keV/yr, which is a challenging criterion. This thesis deals with the development of a shield design and the calculation of the expected total background rate for the large scale COBRA experiment containing 13824 6 cm{sup 3} CdZnTe detectors. For the development of a shield single-layer and multi-layer shields were investigated and a shield design was optimized concerning high-energy muon-induced neutrons. As the best design the combination of 10 cm boron doped polyethylene as outermost layer, 20 cm lead and 10 cm copper as innermost layer were determined. It showed the best performance regarding neutron attenuation as well as (n, γ) self-shielding effects leading to a negligible background rate of less than 2.10{sup -6} counts/kg/keV/yr. Additionally. the shield with a thickness of 40 cm is compact and costeffective. In the next step the expected total background rate was computed taking into account individual setup parts and various background sources including natural and man-made radioactivity, cosmic ray-induced background and thermal neutrons. Furthermore, a comparison of measured data from the COBRA demonstrator setup with Monte Carlo data was used to calculate reliable contamination levels of the single setup parts. The calculation was performed conservatively to prevent an underestimation. In addition, the contribution to the total background rate regarding the individual detector parts and background sources was investigated. The main portion arise from the Delrin support structure, the Glyptal lacquer followed by the circuit board of the high voltage supply. Most background events originate from particles with a quantity of 99 % in total. Regarding surface events a

  10. Study on Basic Characteristics for the Development of Radiation Shielding High-Weight Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Young Bum; Lee, Jea Hyung; Choi, Hyun Kook [Sungshin Cement CO., Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jeong Hwan; Choi, Soo Seok [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is planned to build a power plant more than 6 units. Although the demand of a nuclear power plant is going to increase, the attention for radiation shielding is relatively in a low level. Concrete is one of the excellent and widely used shielding materials. Since the radiation shielding of a given material is proportional to density and thickness, a high-weight concrete with high-weight aggregate which is higher than normal concrete is used for radiation shielding. However, there are a few studies and references about radiation shielding concrete. Therefore, it is required to find a high-weight aggregate. The purpose of this paper is the development of a highweight concrete to improve radiation shielding capability. The radiation shielding rate of high-weight concrete is higher than that of reference concrete. It is confirmed that the density of aggregate and the unit weight of concreate is proportional to the radiation shielding rate. In addition, the chemical composition of aggregate has also has an important effect on γ-ray shielding. Therefore, high weight aggregates of higher density are essentially required to improve radiation shielding capability. The compressive strength of a high weight concrete is better than that of reference concrete. Slump and air contents, however, are slightly increased with by-product aggregates.

  11. Analytic Ballistic Performance Model of Whipple Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Bjorkman, M. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Ryan, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The dual-wall, Whipple shield is the shield of choice for lightweight, long-duration flight. The shield uses an initial sacrificial wall to initiate fragmentation and melt an impacting threat that expands over a void before hitting a subsequent shield wall of a critical component. The key parameters to this type of shield are the rear wall and its mass which stops the debris, as well as the minimum shock wave strength generated by the threat particle impact of the sacrificial wall and the amount of room that is available for expansion. Ensuring the shock wave strength is sufficiently high to achieve large scale fragmentation/melt of the threat particle enables the expansion of the threat and reduces the momentum flux of the debris on the rear wall. Three key factors in the shock wave strength achieved are the thickness of the sacrificial wall relative to the characteristic dimension of the impacting particle, the density and material cohesion contrast of the sacrificial wall relative to the threat particle and the impact speed. The mass of the rear wall and the sacrificial wall are desirable to minimize for launch costs making it important to have an understanding of the effects of density contrast and impact speed. An analytic model is developed here, to describe the influence of these three key factors. In addition this paper develops a description of a fourth key parameter related to fragmentation and its role in establishing the onset of projectile expansion.

  12. The assembly of the disk shielding is finished.

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Hedberg

    At the end of March, the shielding project engineer, Jan Palla, could draw a sigh of relief when the fourth and final rotation of the disk shielding was carried out without incident. The two 80-ton heavy shielding assemblies were built in a horizontal position and they had to be first turned upside-down and then rotated to a vertical position during the assembly. The relatively thin disk plate with a diameter of 9 meters, made this operation quite delicate and a lot of calculation work and strengthening of the shielding was carried out before the rotations could take place. The disk shielding is being turned upside-down. The stainless steel cylinder in the centre supports the shielding as well as the small muon wheel. The two disk shielding assemblies consist of different materials such as bronze, gray steel, cast iron, stainless steel, boron doped polyethylene and lead. The project is multinational with the major pieces having been made by companies in Armenia, Serbia, Spain, Bulgaria, Italy, Slovaki...

  13. Airborne concentrations of toxic metals resulting from the use of low melting point lead alloys to construct radiotherapy shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, E.C.; Senjem, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Determinations of airborne concentrations of lead, cadmium, bismuth, and tin were made above vessels containing a fusible lead alloy (158 0 F melting point) commonly used for construction of radiotherapy blocks. Fume concentrations were determined by collection on a membrane filter and analysis by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Samples were obtained for alloy temperatures of 200 0 , 400 0 , and 600 0 F. In all instances, concentrations were much lower than the applicable occupational limits for continuous exposure. The results of this study indicate that the use of a vented hood as a means of reducing air concentrations of toxic metals above and near vessels containing low temperature melting point lead allows commonly used in construction of radiotherapy shields appears unjustifiable. However, proper handling procedures should be observed to avoid entry into the body via alternate pathways (e.g., ingestion or skin absorption). Transmission data of a non-cadmium containing lead alloy with a melting point of 203 0 F was ascertained and is reported on

  14. Evaluation of bulk shield for the JHP facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwamino, Yoshitomo; Shibata, Tokushi

    1991-01-01

    In the Japanese Hadron Project (JHP), a 1-GeV 200-μA proton beam will be handled, and the radiation shield of the facility will be very massive concrete and iron lump. Since the constructing cost is strongly affected by the shielding design, the design must be severely performed. The neutron yield in thin targets and a copper beam dump was calculated by the HETC-KFA-2 Monte Carlo code. For the evaluation of the calculational accuracy, the calculational results were compared with the experimental data by Cierjacks and Raupp. The calculated result of heavy element agreed well with the experiment at a low energy region, E n n >100 MeV) of 90 deg close to the calculated one of about 60 deg in the absolute value. The high energy neutron transport in a 5-m-thick iron slab and in an 8-m-thick ordinary concrete slab was calculated with the HETC code and also with the discrete ordinates transport code, ANISN. In the ANISN calculation, the DLC-87/HILO and the DLC-128/LAHIMAC group cross sections were used. The ANISN calculation with the LAHIMAC cross sections gave strong underestimation compared with the HETC calculation. The difference of the shielding lengths calculated by the HETC code and by the ANISN code used with the HILO cross sections was smaller than 6% for the both iron and concrete cases. (author)

  15. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  16. Shielding calculation techniques used in the design of fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.S.; Massey, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper addresses the shielding design and analysis of a concrete modular spent fuel storage system. Particular attention is given to comparing various computation techniques in determining bulk shielding thickness, and also in dealing with the radiation streaming effect through the air exit penetration openings in the module. Three computer codes QADMOD, ANISN, and DOT-IV were used to solve the same problem. In addition, hand albedo calculation were done to augment the result of the QADMOD calculation to properly deal with the surface scattering

  17. A Novel UV-Shielding and Transparent Polymer Film: When Bioinspired Dopamine-Melanin Hollow Nanoparticles Join Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Su, Jing; Li, Ting; Ma, Piming; Bai, Huiyu; Xie, Yi; Chen, Mingqing; Dong, Weifu

    2017-10-18

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is known to be harmful to human health and cause organic materials to undergo photodegradation. In this Research Article, bioinspired dopamine-melanin solid nanoparticles (Dpa-s NPs) and hollow nanoparticles (Dpa-h NPs) as UV-absorbers were introduced to enhance the UV-shielding performance of polymer. First, Dpa-s NPs were synthesized through autoxidation of dopamine in alkaline aqueous solution. Dpa-h NPs were prepared by the spontaneous oxidative polymerization of dopamine solution onto polystyrene (PS) nanospheres template, followed by removal of the template. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)/Dpa nanocomposite films were subsequently fabricated by a simple casting solvent. UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of Dpa-s versus Dpa-h NPs. In contrast to PVA/Dpa-s films, PVA/Dpa-h films exhibit stronger UV-shielding capabilities and can almost block the complete UV region (200-400 nm). The excellent UV-shielding performance of the PVA/Dpa-h films mainly arises from multiple absorption because of the hollow structure and large specific area of Dpa-h NPs. Moreover, the wall thickness of Dpa-h NPs can be simply controlled from 28 to 8 nm, depending on the ratio between PS and dopamine. The resulting films with Dpa-h NPs (wall thickness = ∼8 nm) maintained relatively high transparency to visible light because of the thinner wall thickness. The results indicate that the prepared Dpa-h NPs can be used as a novel UV absorber for next-generation transparent UV-shielding materials.

  18. Design and Fabrication of Radiation Shielded Micro X-Ray Diffraction System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Kyeong Yeong; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2006-12-01

    It has been observed that microstructure changes occur at the radial edge of pellet(rim) of the fuel at a high burn-up and extended fuel cycle. The thickness of a rim is some hundreds of micrometers. Despite its narrow range, a rim would affect the behaviour of nuclear fuel. To determine lattice parameter with micro-XRD at intervals as small as 30 - 50 μm in radial direction of irradiated fuel samples, a radiation shielded micro-XRD system was designed and fabricated. This report describes the concept, shielding analysis, the structural design and the fabrication of a radiation shielded glove box for micro-XRD system. This radiation shielded micro-XRD system will be used for analysis of lattice parameter change and the phase distribution at intervals as small as 30 - 50 μm in radial direction of the rim of an irradiated fuel sample and a fuel cladding

  19. Design and Fabrication of Radiation Shielded Micro X-Ray Diffraction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Ha, Kyeong Yeong; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2006-12-15

    It has been observed that microstructure changes occur at the radial edge of pellet(rim) of the fuel at a high burn-up and extended fuel cycle. The thickness of a rim is some hundreds of micrometers. Despite its narrow range, a rim would affect the behaviour of nuclear fuel. To determine lattice parameter with micro-XRD at intervals as small as 30 - 50 {mu}m in radial direction of irradiated fuel samples, a radiation shielded micro-XRD system was designed and fabricated. This report describes the concept, shielding analysis, the structural design and the fabrication of a radiation shielded glove box for micro-XRD system. This radiation shielded micro-XRD system will be used for analysis of lattice parameter change and the phase distribution at intervals as small as 30 - 50 {mu}m in radial direction of the rim of an irradiated fuel sample and a fuel cladding.

  20. A Reliability Comparison of Classical and Stochastic Thickness Margin Approaches to Address Material Property Uncertainties for the Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steve; Vander Kam, Jeremy; McGuire, Kathy

    2018-01-01

    The Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) margin process uses a root-sum-square approach with branches addressing trajectory, aerothermodynamics, and material response uncertainties in ablator thickness design. The material response branch applies a bond line temperature reduction between the Avcoat ablator and EA9394 adhesive by 60 C (108 F) from its peak allowed value of 260 C (500 F). This process is known as the Bond Line Temperature Material Margin (BTMM) and is intended to cover material property and performance uncertainties. The value of 60 C (108 F) is a constant, applied at any spacecraft body location and for any trajectory. By varying only material properties in a random (monte carlo) manner, the perl-based script mcCHAR is used to investigate the confidence interval provided by the BTMM. In particular, this study will look at various locations on the Orion heat shield forebody for a guided and an abort (ballistic) trajectory.

  1. Organ dose assessment of nuclear medicine practitioners using L-block shielding device for handing diagnostic radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dep. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong In [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In the case of nuclear medicine practitioners in medical institutions, a wide range of exposure dose to individual workers can be found, depending on the type of source, the amount of radioactivity, and the use of shielding devices in handling radioactive isotopes. In this regard, this study evaluated the organ dose on practitioners as well as the dose reduction effect of the L-block shielding device in handling the diagnostic radiation source through the simulation based on the Monte Carlo method. As a result, the distribution of organ dose was found to be higher as the position of the radiation source was closer to the handling position of a practitioner, and the effective dose distribution was different according to the ICRP tissue weight. Furthermore, the dose reduction effect according to the L-block thickness tended to decrease, which showed the exponential distribution, as the shielding thickness increased. The dose reduction effect according to each radiation source showed a low shielding effect in proportion to the emitted gamma ray energy level.

  2. Assessment of engine noise shielding by the wings of current turbofan aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Vieira, A.E.; Snellen, M.; Simons, D.G.; Gibbs, B.

    2017-01-01

    The shielding of engine noise by the aircraft wings and fuselage can lead to a significant reduction on perceived noise on ground. Most research on noise shielding is focused on BlendedWing Body (BWB) configurations because of the large dimension of the fuselage. However, noise shielding is also

  3. Design lead shielded casks for shipment and spent fuel from power reactors to reprocessing plant at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharamaiah, P.

    1975-01-01

    Spent fuels from the Tarapur and Rajasthan Atomic Power Stations (TAPS and RAPS) are shipped to Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur in heavily lead shielded casks weighing about 65 tonnes as they are highly radioactive. The design of the casks has to meet stringemt requirements of safety and the integrity should be ensured to contain activity under credible accidents during handling and transportation. The paper presents the design of two casks for TAPS and RAPS spent fuel transportation particularly with reference to stress analysis considerations. The analysis also includes the handling gadgets and tie down attachments on the rail wagon and road trailer. (author)

  4. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  5. Preliminary shielding calculation for the system of CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery; Calculo de blindagem preliminar para o sistema de radiocirurgia robotica CyberKnife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toreti, Dalila; Xavier, Clarice; Moura, Fabio, E-mail: clarice.xavier@rem.ind.b, E-mail: fabio.moura@rem.ind.b [REM Industria e Comercio Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The CyberKnife robotic system uses a manipulator with six grade of freedom for positioning a 6 MV Linac accelerator for treatment of lesions. This paper presents calculations for a standard room, with 200 cm of thickness walls primary, build for a CyberKnife system, and calculations for a room originally designed for a Linac conventional (with gantry), with secondary barriers of 107 cm thickness. After the realization of shielding for both rooms, the results shown that walls of standard room with 200 cm thickness are adequate for the secondary shield, and for a room with a conventional Linac, from all six evaluated points, two would require additional shielding of nine cm and four cm of concrete with 2.4 g/cubic cm. This shows that the CyberKnife system can be installed in a originally designed room for a conventional Linac with neither restrict nor any shielding, since no incidence of beams on the secondary barriers is existent

  6. Radioprotection to the Gonads in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography: Effectiveness of Developed Bismuth Shield

    OpenAIRE

    Vahid Karami; Mansour Zabihzadeh; Nasim Shams; Mehrdad Golami

    2017-01-01

    Background: The use and effectiveness of traditional lead gonad shields in pediatric pelvic radiography has been challenged by several literatures over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to develop a new radioprotective gonad shields to be use in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods: The commercially available 0.06 mm lead equivalent bismuth garment has cropped squarely and used as ovarian shield to cover the entire region of pelvis. In order to prevent deteriorati...

  7. γ-ray shielding behaviors of some nuclear engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2017-01-01

    The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ)-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM). The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB) of six glass samples (transparent NEM) were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV) and optical thickness (OT). The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP) such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well

  8. γ-ray shielding behaviors of some nuclear engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh [Dept. of Physics, D.A.V. College, Punjab (India)

    2017-06-15

    The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ)-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM). The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB) of six glass samples (transparent NEM) were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV) and optical thickness (OT). The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP) such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well.

  9. γ-Ray Shielding Behaviors of Some Nuclear Engineering Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwinder Singh Mann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM. The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB of six glass samples (transparent NEM were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV and optical thickness (OT. The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well.

  10. Shielding data for hadron-therapy ion accelerators: Attenuation of secondary radiation in concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Agosteo, S; Sagia, E; Silari, M

    2014-01-01

    The secondary radiation field produced by seven different ion species (from hydrogen to nitrogen), impinging onto thick targets made of either iron or ICRU tissue, was simulated with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code, and transported through thick concrete shields: the ambient dose equivalent was estimated and shielding parameters evaluated. The energy for each ion beam was set in order to reach a maximum penetration in ICRU tissue of 290 mm (equivalent to the therapeutic range of 430 MeV/amu carbon ions). Source terms and attenuation lengths are given as a function of emission angle and ion species, along with fits to the Monte Carlo data, for shallow depth and deep penetration in the shield. Trends of source terms and attenuation lengths as a function of neutron emission angle and ion species impinging on tar- get are discussed. A comparison of double differential distributions of neutrons with results from similar simulation works reported in the literature is also included. The aim of this work is to provide shi...

  11. Fabrication, characterization and gamma rays shielding properties of nano and micro lead oxide-dispersed-high density polyethylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Badawi, Mohamed S.; Rashad, Amal R.; El-Sharkawy, Rehab M.; Thabet, Abouzeid A.

    2018-04-01

    Polymer composites of high-density polyethylene (HD-PE) filled with powdered lead oxide nanoparticles (PbO NPs) and bulk lead oxide (PbO Blk) were prepared with filler weight fraction [10% and 50%]. These polymer composites were investigated for radiation-shielding of gamma-rays emitted from radioactive point sources [241Am, 133Ba, 137Cs, and 60Co]. The polymer was found to decrease the heaviness of the shielding material and increase the flexibility while the metal oxide fillers acted as principle radiation attenuators in the polymer composite. The prepared composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area (BET) and field emission transmission electron microscope (FE-TEM). The morphological analysis of the assembled composites showed that, PbO NPs and PbO Blk materials exhibited homogenous dispersion in the polymer-matrix. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) demonstrated that the thermal-stability of HD-PE was enhanced in the presence of both PbO Blk and PbO NPs. The results declared that, the density of polymer composites was increase with the percentage of filler contents. The highest density value was identified as 1.652 g cm-3 for 50 wt% of PbO NPs. Linear attenuation coefficients (μ) have been estimated from the use of XCOM code and measured results. Reasonable agreement was attended between theoretical and experimental results. These composites were also found to display excellent percentage of heaviness with respect to other conventional materials.

  12. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  13. Nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the GHz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchea, M.; Tudose, I. V.; Tzagkarakis, G.; Kenanakis, G.; Katharakis, M.; Drakakis, E.; Koudoumas, E.

    2015-10-01

    We report on preliminary results regarding the applicability of nanostructured composite layers for electromagnetic shielding in the frequency range of 4-20 GHz. Various combinations of materials were employed including poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), polyaniline, graphene nanoplatelets, carbon nanotubes, Cu nanoparticles and Poly(vinyl alcohol). As shown, paint-like nanocomposite layers consisting of graphene nanoplatelets, polyaniline PEDOT:PSS and Poly(vinyl alcohol) can offer quite effective electromagnetic shielding, similar or even better than that of commercial products, the response strongly depending on their thickness and resistivity.

  14. Minimizing exposure in nuclear medicine through optimum use of shielding devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, B.L.; King, S.H.; Erdman, M.C.; Miller, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to radiation from nuclear medicine nuclides can be minimized through the use of various shielding devices. This paper reviews the dose reductions achieved through use of various syringe shields, lead aprons, leaded gloves, and several types of eyeglass lenses for 67 Ga, 99m Tc, 131 I and 201 Tl. The authors have found that combination of devices can best provide for minimizing doses

  15. Evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of the composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.I.; Chekashina, N.I.; Yastrebinskij, R.N.; Sokolenko, I.V.; Noskov, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of composite materials with respect to gamma-radiation. As a binder for the synthesis of radiation-shielding composites we used lead boronsilicate glass matrix. As filler we used nanotubular chrysotile filled with lead tungstate PbWO4. It is shown that all the developed composites have good physical-mechanical characteristics, such as compressive strength, thermal stability and can be used as structural materials. On the basis of theoretical calculation we described the graphs of the gamma-quanta linear attenuation coefficient depending on the emitted energy for all investigated composites. We founded high radiation-shielding properties of all the composites on the basis of theoretical and experimental data compared to materials conventionally used in the nuclear industry - iron, concrete, etc

  16. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of high loading MWCNT–epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B. P.; Prasanta; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Pande, Shailaja; Singh, V. N.; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Dispersion of high loading of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in epoxy resin is a challenging task for the development of efficient and thin electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. Up to 20 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loading in the composite was achieved by forming CNT prepreg in the epoxy resin as a first step. These prepreg laminates were then compression molded to form composites which resulted in EMI shielding effectiveness of −19 dB for 0.35 mm thick film and −60 dB at for 1.75 mm thick composites in the X-band (8.2–12.4 GHz). One of the reasons for such high shielding is attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the order of 9 S cm −1 achieved in these composites which is at least an order of magnitude higher than previously reported results at this loading. In addition, an improvement of 40 % in the tensile strength over the neat resin value is observed. Thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs–epoxy composite reached 2.18 W/mK as compared to only 0.14 W/mK for cured epoxy.

  17. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of high loading MWCNT-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B. P.; Prasanta; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Pande, Shailaja; Singh, V. N.; Mathur, R. B.

    2013-04-01

    Dispersion of high loading of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in epoxy resin is a challenging task for the development of efficient and thin electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials. Up to 20 wt% of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) loading in the composite was achieved by forming CNT prepreg in the epoxy resin as a first step. These prepreg laminates were then compression molded to form composites which resulted in EMI shielding effectiveness of -19 dB for 0.35 mm thick film and -60 dB at for 1.75 mm thick composites in the X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). One of the reasons for such high shielding is attributed to the high electrical conductivity of the order of 9 S cm-1 achieved in these composites which is at least an order of magnitude higher than previously reported results at this loading. In addition, an improvement of 40 % in the tensile strength over the neat resin value is observed. Thermal conductivity of the MWCNTs-epoxy composite reached 2.18 W/mK as compared to only 0.14 W/mK for cured epoxy.

  18. Efficacy of Breast Shielding During CT of the Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Vekic, B.; Hebrang, A.; Anic, P.

    2003-01-01

    The use of computerized tomography (CT) is rapidly increasing in last two decades, and this method has become the major non-natural source of radiation exposure to the population. CT examinations delivers to the patients more radiation than all other imaging techniques, and contribute disproportionately to the collective dose; in Britain it has been estimated that 4% of diagnostic radiology procedures are CT examinations, being responsible for approximately 40% of the total annual collective dose. Breast doses are high in CT examinations with breasts in scanning planes, being not insignificant also when breasts are exposed only to scatter radiation. Breast doses received through scatter radiation during head CT may account for up to one-fifth of an average mammographic dose per one view. Whilst the possibilities of reduction of radiation load to organs lying in CT scanning planes are limited, the tissues outside the primary beam should be protected against scatter whenever it does not sacrifice image quality. Lead shielding results in significant reduction of external scatter to radiosensitive superficial organs in many diagnostic procedures. The published studies of breast shielding against scatter radiation in diagnostic radiology are scanty, only the later one dealing particularly with breast shielding during head CT examination. The aims of this study were to investigate in vivo the levels of breast exposure to scatter radiation in head CT examination and the dependence of breast exposure upon body constitution. We tried to estimate the efficacy of external lead shielding as a mean of breast dose reduction, and to determine how much radiation reaches the organ from outside, in comparison to radiation load caused through internal scatter. We conclude that, although the level of breast radiation exposure during head CT examinations is generally low, shielding of the breasts with lead apron will further reduce the doses. However is the effect of shielding limited

  19. Shielding plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Kenji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: In shielding plugs of an LMFBR type reactor, to restrain natural convection of heat in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell, to prevent the lowering of heat-insulation performance, and to alleviate a thermal stress in a reactor container and the shield shell. Constitution: A ring-like leaf spring split in the direction of height is disposed in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell. In consequence, the space is partitioned in the direction of height and, therefore, if axial temperature conditions and space width are the same and the space is low, the natural convection is hard to occur. Thus the rise of upper surface temperature of the shielding plugs can prevent the lowering of the heat insulation performance which will result in the increment of shielding plug cooling capacity, thereby improving reliability. In the meantime, since there is mounted an earthquake-resisting support, the thermal shield layer will move for a slight gap in case of an earthquake, being supported by the earthquake-resisting support, and the movement of the thermal shield layer is restricted, thereby maintaining integrity without increasing the stroke of the ring-like spring. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Electrically nonconductive shield for electric equipment generating ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    As a radiation protection shield there is proposed a nonconductive shield fabricated from epoxides or other plastics material and containing finely dispersed radiation absorbing metal. It is to be designed in such a way that it lies in the range of a high electric gradient in the equipment, close to the radiation-producing component. As suitable metals there are mentioned tin, tungsten, and lead resp. their oxides. As an example there is used an X-ray shielding. (RW) 891 RW/RW 892 MKO [de

  1. Monte Carlo simulations and measurements for efficiency determination of lead shielded plastic scintillator detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Zafar; Negoita, Florin; Tabbassum, Sana; Borcea, Ruxandra; Kisyov, Stanimir

    2017-12-01

    The plastic scintillators are used in different areas of science and technology. One of the use of these scintillator detectors is as beam loss monitors (BLM) for new generation of high intensity heavy ion in superconducting linear accelerators. Operated in pulse counting mode with rather high thresholds and shielded by few centimeters of lead in order to cope with radiofrequency noise and X-ray background emitted by accelerator cavities, they preserve high efficiency for high energy gamma ray and neutrons produced in the nuclear reactions of lost beam particles with accelerator components. Efficiency calculation and calibration of detectors is very important before their practical usage. In the present work, the efficiency of plastic scintillator detectors is simulated using FLUKA for different gamma and neutron sources like, 60Co, 137Cs and 238Pu-Be. The sources are placed at different positions around the detector. Calculated values are compared with the measured values and a reasonable agreement is observed.

  2. Designing shields for KeV photons with genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, Stephen; Holloway, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Shielding of x-ray sources and low energy gamma rays is often accomplished with lead aprons, comprising a thin layer (0.5 mm to 1 mm) of lead or similar high-Z material. In previous work the authors used Genetic Algorithms to explore the design of a shadow shield for space applications. Now those techniques have been applied to the problem of shielding humans from low energy gamma radiation. This paper uses a simple geometry to explore layering various materials as a method to reduce mass and dose for thin gamma shields. The genetic algorithms discover layers of materials with various Z is in fact more effective than an equivalent mass of Pb alone for lower energy gammas, but as the incident radiation energy increases the efficacy of such layering diminishes. The utility of varying Z for lower energy gammas is in part due to their complementary K-edges, where one material compensates for the transmission that would occur just below the K-edge in another material. (author)

  3. Determination of point isotropic buildup factors of gamma rays including incoherent and coherent scattering for aluminum, iron, lead, and water by discrete ordinates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsos, S.; Assad, A.; Diop, C.M.; Nimal, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure and energy absorption buildup factors for aluminum, iron, lead, and water are calculated by the SNID discrete ordinates code for an isotropic point source in a homogeneous medium. The calculation of the buildup factors takes into account the effects of both bound-electron Compton (incoherent) and coherent (Rayleigh) scattering. A comparison with buildup factors from the literature shows that these two effects greatly increase the buildup factors for energies below a few hundred kilo-electron-volts, and thus the new results are improved relative to the experiment. This greater accuracy is due to the increase in the linear attenuation coefficient, which leads to the calculation of the buildup factors for a mean free path with a smaller shield thickness. On the other hand, for the same shield thickness, exposure increases when only incoherent scattering is included and decreases when only coherent scattering is included, so that the exposure finally decreases when both effects are included. Great care must also be taken when checking the approximations for gamma-ray deep-penetration transport calculations, as well as for the cross-section treatment and origin

  4. Fabrication and characterization of thick-film piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate ceramic resonators by tape-casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lifeng; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhong, Youliang; Ou, Ming; Jiang, Zhishui; Tian, Wei

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, thick-film piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic resonators with thicknesses down to tens of micrometers have been fabricated by tape-casting processing. PZT ceramic resonators with composition near the morphotropic phase boundary and with different dopants added were prepared for piezoelectric transducer applications. Material property characterization for these thick-film PZT resonators is essential for device design and applications. For the property characterization, a recently developed normalized electrical impedance spectrum method was used to determine the electromechanical coefficient and the complex piezoelectric, elastic, and dielectric coefficients from the electrical measurement of resonators using thick films. In this work, nine PZT thick-film resonators have been fabricated and characterized, and two different types of resonators, namely thickness longitudinal and transverse modes, were used for material property characterization. The results were compared with those determined by the IEEE standard method, and they agreed well. It was found that depending on the PZT formulation and dopants, the relative permittivities ε(T)(33)/ε(0) measured at 2 kHz for these thick-films are in the range of 1527 to 4829, piezoelectric stress constants (e(33) in the range of 15 to 26 C/m(2), piezoelectric strain constants (d(31)) in the range of -169 × 10(-12) C/N to -314 × 10(-12) C/N, electromechanical coupling coefficients (k(t)) in the range of 0.48 to 0.53, and k(31) in the range of 0.35 to 0.38. The characterization results shows tape-casting processing can be used to fabricate high-quality PZT thick-film resonators, and the extracted material constants can be used to for device design and application.

  5. Radiation Exposure Analyses Supporting the Development of Solar Particle Event Shielding Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Abston, H. Lee; Simon, Hatthew A.; Gallegos, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA has plans for long duration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Outside of LEO, large solar particle events (SPEs), which occur sporadically, can deliver a very large dose in a short amount of time. The relatively low proton energies make SPE shielding practical, and the possibility of the occurrence of a large event drives the need for SPE shielding for all deep space missions. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) RadWorks Storm Shelter Team was charged with developing minimal mass SPE storm shelter concepts for missions beyond LEO. The concepts developed included "wearable" shields, shelters that could be deployed at the onset of an event, and augmentations to the crew quarters. The radiation transport codes, human body models, and vehicle geometry tools contained in the On-Line Tool for the Assessment of Radiation In Space (OLTARIS) were used to evaluate the protection provided by each concept within a realistic space habitat and provide the concept designers with shield thickness requirements. Several different SPE models were utilized to examine the dependence of the shield requirements on the event spectrum. This paper describes the radiation analysis methods and the results of these analyses for several of the shielding concepts.

  6. Equivalent-spherical-shield neutron dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.

    1988-01-01

    Neutron doses through 162-cm-thick spherical shields were calculated to be 1090 and 448 mrem/h for regular and magnetite concrete, respectively. These results bracket the measured data, for reinforced regular concrete, of /approximately/600 mrem/h. The calculated fraction of the high-energy (>20 MeV) dose component also bracketed the experimental data. The measured and calculated doses were for a graphite beam stop bombarded with 100 nA of 800-MeV protons. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  7. Survey of shielding calculation parameters in radiotherapy rooms used in the country and its impact in the existing calculation methodologies; Levantamento de parametros de calculos de blindagem de salas de radioterapia utilizados no pais e seu impacto nas metodologias de calculo existentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Japiassu, Fernando Parois

    2013-07-01

    When designing radiotherapy treatment rooms, the dimensions of barriers are established on the basis of American calculation methodologies specifically; NCRP Report N° 49, NCRP Report N° 51, and more recently, NCRP Report N° 151. Such barrier calculations are based on parameters reflecting predictions of treatments to be performed within the room; which, in tum, reftect a specific reality found in a country. There exists, however, a variety of modern radiotherapy techniques, such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT); Total Body Irradiation (TBl) and radiosurgery (SRS); where patierits are treated in a much different way than during more conventional treatrnents, which are not taken into account the traditional shielding calculation methodology. This may lead to a faulty design of treattnent rooms. In order to establish a comparison between the methodology used to calculate shielding design and the reality of treatments performed in Brazil, two radiotherapy facilitie were selected, both of them offering traditional and modern treatment techniqued as described above. Data in relation with reatments perfotmed over a period of six (6)months of operations in both institutions were collected. Based on tlis informaton, a new set of realistic parameters required for shielding design was estãblished, whicb in turn allowed for a nwe caculation of barrier thickness for both facilities. The barrier thickness resultaing from this calculation was then compared with the barrier thickness propose as part of the original shielding design, approved by the regulatory authority. First, concerning the public facility, the thickness of all primary barriers proposed in the shielding design was actually larger than the thickness resulting from calculations based on realistic parameters. Second, concerning the private facility, the new data show that the thickness of three out of the four primary barriers described in the project is larger than the thickness oresulting from

  8. Radiation dose reduction at a price: the effectiveness of a thyroid shield during head CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Qiang; Lu Tao; Zhang Ling

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess radiation dose to the thyroid in patients undergoing head CT scanning and to evaluate dose reduction to the thyroid by load shielding. Methods: A post-morterm was scanned by different model and study was undertaken to evaluate the dose reduction by thyroid lead shields and assess their practicality in a clinical setting. (a)No thyroid shields and (b) thyroid shield. One thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs)were placed over the thyroid gland center, A thyroid lead shield (Pb eq 0.5mm)was placed around the neck of post-morterm. Scan parameter, CTDIw and DLP were recorded. Results: (a) 0.207mSv; (b) 0.085mSv. A mean effective radiation dose reduction of 58% was seen in the shielded versus the unshielded. Conclusion: Thyroid exposure to scattered radiation from head CT scanning only once is associated with a low but not negligible risk of cancer, but accumulatived doses to the thyroid are serious, highlighting the need for increased awareness of patient radiation protection. Thyroid lead shielding yields significant radiation protection, which should be used routinely during head CT scan. (authors)

  9. Design of a PET/CT facility considering the shielding calculation in accordance with AAPM TG-108

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara R, V. Y.; Romero C, N.; Berrocal T, M.

    2014-08-01

    A Positron Emission Tomography / Computed Tomography facility may require protection barriers on floor, ceiling and walls, because the patient becomes a radioactive source that emits photons of 0.511 MeV, after having received a radiopharmaceutical, usually F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG). This work has as objective to propose the design of a PET/CT facility, taking into account technical and radiation protection considerations applied internationally, and also develop the necessary shielding for such installation by applying as published by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report 108. A shielding spreadsheet in Excel program was developed with reference to the recommendations of the AAPM TG - 08, to determine the shielding required for the walls, floor and ceiling. For fixing the radiation levels in the shielding calculation has been considered the actual restrictions for the occupationally exposed personnel (100 μSv/week) as well as the people in general (20 μSv/ week). The radiopharmaceutical used as a reference for the shielding calculation was the F-18 FDG. With the assistance of an architectural plan were determined distances from potential sources of radiation in facility (uptake and image acquisition living rooms) to points of interest around them. Finally the thickness of the protective barriers in lead and concrete necessary to achieve the established radiation levels were calculated and these results were stored in a table. This paper shows that technical aspects considered in the design of the installation and environments distribution can improve work processes within the PET/CT facility, consequently resulting in a reduction of the dose levels for people in general. (author)

  10. Preparation of small group constants for calculation of shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, V.F.; Shejno, I.N.; Tkachev, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    Studied is the effect of the shielding calculation error connected with neglect of the angular and spatial neutron flux dependences while determining the small-group constants on the basis of the many-group ones. The economical method allowing for dependences is proposed. The spatial dependence is substituted by the average value according to the zones singled out in the limits of the zones of the same content; the angular cross section dependence is substituted by the average values in the half-ranges of the angular variable. To solve the transfer equation the ALGOL-ROSA-M program using the method of characteristic interpolation and trial run method is developed. The program regards correctly for nonscattered and single scattered radiations. Compared are the calculation results of neutron transmission (10.5 MeV-0.01 eV) in the 21-group approximation with the 3-group calculations for water (the layer thickness is 30 cm) and 5-group calculations for heterogeneous shielding of alternating stainless steel layers (3 layers, each of the 16 cm thickness) and graphite layers (2 layers, each of the 20 cm thickness). The analysis shows that the method proposed permits to obtain rather accurate results in the course of preparation of the small-group cross sections, decreasing considerably the number of the groups (from 21 to 3-5) and saving the machine time

  11. Structural considerations for the practical development of primary shielding of X-ray rooms of megavoltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the necessity of the use of accelerators with voltages above 10 MV in medical facilities, becomes necessary to evaluate the efficiency of the thickness of shielding materials used in rooms that contain these devices. This work presents the development of an algorithm able to provide data in a practical way, regarding the thickness of materials that can be used for an effective shielding against primary beams from these equipment. The use of the computer language C ++ allowed developing a practical tool for determining the thickness of materials required to protect the public and Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOEs) against major powers beams. Furthermore, it was considered by calculations Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Technique (IMRT). The construction of this tool was based to ensure the dose limits established in the CNEN-NN-3.01. The dose limiting is done through the use of loops able to validate the efficiency of thickness determined by the algorithm itself, and ensure if the radiation dose exceeds the limits set by the standard, it will be the inclusion of sufficient Half-Reducer Layers in so that the dose is within the parameters established by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The code validation is performed by comparing results obtained in the examples p recalculated in the NCRP Report-151 (Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for megavoltage X and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities) with the results generated by the code. The results are satisfactory and consistent with that report

  12. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  13. Guidance on the use of protective lead aprons in medical radiology protection efficiency and correction factors for personal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Workers in clinical radiology wear lead aprons when standing in the vicinity of a patient being exposed to x-rays. A lead apron protects the person's trunk against radiation scattered rom the patient. Our research is focused on two main issues: 1. How much protection does a lead apron provide, and what are the main factors that determine the protection efficiency 2. How can measured badge dose be translated into a realistic estimate of the effective dose, and how does this depend on dosemeter placement Using a model for x-ray shielding and dosimetry we calculated equivalent organ doses and personal depth dose HP(10) for various exposure conditions, x-ray energies and types of aprons that occur in clinical practice. We concluded that apron model and fit are often more important than lead thickness. In others, increasing lead thickness of a badly chosen apron will not provide better protection. For many fluoroscopy applications an apron of good model and fit need not be thicker than 0.5 mm of lead (equivalent). In case of intensive and frequent interventional work lead we advise higher lead thickness (0.35 mm), and preferably additional neck shielding for protection of the oesophagus and thyroid. A well chosen lead apron reduces effective dose by 75%up to 90%. We also concluded that the dosemeter badge should always be worn outside the apron, at mid front of collar or chest. In our view this dosemeter position enables reliable evaluation of effective dose from badge readings. As a standard practice we recommend translating measured badge dose to effective dose by dividing by a factor of five, provide that the worker wears a suitable lead apron. Finally, some research was done on the subject of the protective effect of lead aprons for the uterus, and the relation of uterus dose and badge dose. Use of a lead apron is found to reduce uterus dose by a factor of 5 to 10. Our study shows that in case of worker pregnancy, exposure of the unborn child may de adequately

  14. Ductile iron cask with encapsulated uranium, tungsten or other dense metal shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, V.J.; Anderson, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    In a cask for the transportation and storage of radioactive materials, an improvement in the shielding means which achieves significant savings in weight and increases in payload by the use of pipes of depleted uranium, tungsten or other dense metal, encapsulating polyethylene cores, dispersed in two to four rows of concentric boreholes around the periphery of the cask body which is preferably made of ductile iron. Alternatively, rods or small balls of these same shielding materials, alone or in combination, are placed in these bore holes. The thickness, number and arrangement of these shielding pipes or rods is varied to provide optimum protection against the neutrons and gamma radiation emitted by the particular radioactive material being transported or stored. (author) 4 figs

  15. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  16. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of built-up, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  17. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth's surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth's surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  18. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  19. Flexible shielding material sheet for radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokan, Susumu; Fukuoka, Masasuke.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a soft sheet of shielding material for radioactive rays without involving no problem such as environmental contamination, without generating intense second radioactive rays such as conventional cadmium. Structure: 100 weight parts of boron compound (boron carbide, boric acid anhydride) and 5 to 60 weight parts of low molecular-weight polyethylene resin, of which average molecular weight is less than 8000, are agitated in a mixer and during agitation are increased in temperature to a level above a softening temperature of the polyethylene resin to obtain a mixture in which the boron compound is coated with the low molecular-weight polyethylene. Next, 3 to 200 weight parts of the resultant mixture and 100 weight parts of olefin group resin (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, styrene-butadiene random copolymer) are evenly mixed within an agitator such as a tumbler to form a sheet having the desired thickness and dimension. The thus obtained shielding material generates no capture gamma radiation. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Radiation protection of staff in 111In radionuclide therapy--is the lead apron shielding effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, M; Charalambatou, P; Sotiropoulos, M; Diamantopoulos, S

    2011-09-01

    (111)In (Eγ = 171-245 keV, t1/2 = 2.83 d) is used for targeted therapies of endocrine tumours. An average activity of 6.3 GBq is injected into the liver by catheterisation of the hepatic artery. This procedure is time-consuming (4-5 min) and as a result, both the physicians and the technical staff involved are subjected to radiation exposure. In this research, the efficiency of the use of lead apron has been studied as far as the radiation protection of the working staff is concerned. A solution of (111)In in a cylindrical scattering phantom was used as a source. Close to the scattering phantom, an anthropomorphic male Alderson RANDO phantom was positioned. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were located in triplets on the front surface, in the exit and in various depths in the 26th slice of the RANDO phantom. The experiment was repeated by covering the RANDO phantom by a lead apron 0.25 mm Pb equivalent. The unshielded dose rates and the shielded photon dose rates were measured. Calculations of dose rates by Monte Carlo N-particle transport code were compared with this study's measurements. A significant reduction of 65 % on surface dose was observed when using lead apron. A decrease of 30 % in the mean absorbed dose among the different depths of the 26th slice of the RANDO phantom has also been noticed. An accurate correlation of the experimental results with Monte Carlo simulation has been achieved.

  1. Radiation protection of staff in 111In radionuclide therapy-Is the lead apron shielding effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, M.; Charalambatou, P.; Sotiropoulos, M.; Diamantopoulos, S.

    2011-01-01

    111 In (Eγ=171-245 keV, t1/2=2.83 d) is used for targeted therapies of endocrine tumours. An average activity of 6.3 GBq is injected into the liver by catheterisation of the hepatic artery. This procedure is time-consuming (4-5 min) and as a result, both the physicians and the technical staff involved are subjected to radiation exposure. In this research, the efficiency of the use of lead apron has been studied as far as the radiation protection of the working staff is concerned. A solution of 111 In in a cylindrical scattering phantom was used as a source. Close to the scattering phantom, an anthropomorphic male Alderson RANDO phantom was positioned. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were located in triplets on the front surface, in the exit and in various depths in the 26. slice of the RANDO phantom. The experiment was repeated by covering the RANDO phantom by a lead apron 0.25 mm Pb equivalent. The unshielded dose rates and the shielded photon dose rates were measured. Calculations of dose rates by Monte Carlo N-particle transport code were compared with this study's measurements. A significant reduction of 65 % on surface dose was observed when using lead apron. A decrease of 30 % in the mean absorbed dose among the different depths of the 26. slice of the RANDO phantom has also been noticed. An accurate correlation of the experimental results with Monte Carlo simulation has been achieved. (authors)

  2. Significant reduction of radiation exposure to operator and staff during cardiac interventions by analysis of radiation leakage and improved lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuon, Eberhard; Schmitt, Moritz; Dahm, Johannes B

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to disclose and to reduce occupational radiation leakage in invasive cardiology. Prospectively, we analyzed various dose parameters for 330 coronary procedures. We used a Rando phantom to measure scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator (S-ESAK-O) during fluoroscopy for all standard tube angulations, and to plot isodose lines for 0 degrees /0 degrees -posterior anterior angulation. The patient's measured dose area product due to diagnostic catheterization and elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was 6.2 and 10.4 Gycm(2), which represents 11% and 13% of currently typical values, respectively. With use of 0.5- and 1.0-mm overcouch and undercouch shielding, it was possible to reduce the mean of 4,686 nSv/Gycm(2) to 677 and 277 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. Closure of radiation leakage up to 897 microSv/hour at the operator's gonadal height (80 to 105 cm), not heretofore described, was achieved by an additional 1.0-mm, lead-equivalent undercouch-top and overcouch-flap adjacent to the table, down to a S-ESAK-O/dose area product level of 47.5 nSv/Gycm(2). With use of a 0.5-mm lead apron, collar, glasses, foot-switch shield and 1.0-mm lead cover around the patient's thighs, the operator received a mean S-ESAK-O of 8.5, while his forehead, eyes, thyroid, chest, gonads, and hands were exposed to 68.2, 1.2, 1.2, 1.2, 0.8, and 58.2 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. In conclusion, radiation-attenuating intervention techniques and improved lead protection can effectively contribute to a new state of the art in invasive cardiology, with reduction of operator radiation exposure to 0.8% of typical S-ESAK-O levels in advanced catheterization laboratories.

  3. Electromagnetic interference shielding properties and mechanisms of chemically reduced graphene aerogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Shuguang; Zhang, Liying; Mu, Chenzhong; Liu, Ming; Hu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electromagnetic interference shielding behavior and proposed mechanisms of ultralight free-standing 3D graphene aerogels. - Highlights: • The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties and mechanisms of ultralight 3D graphene aerogels (GAs) were systematically studied with respect to both the unique porous network and the intrinsic properties of the graphene sheets. • Thickness of the shielding material played a critical role on EMI SE. • By compressing the porous GAs into compact film didnt increase the EMI SE despite the increased electrical conductivity and connectivity. EMI SE is highly dependent on the effective amounts of the materials response to the EM waves. - Abstract: Graphene was recently demonstrated to exhibit excellent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. In this work, ultralight (∼5.5 mg/cm"3) graphene aerogels (GAs) were fabricated through assembling graphene oxide (GO) using freeze-drying followed by a chemical reduction method. The EMI shielding properties and mechanisms of GAs were systematically studied with respect to the intrinsic properties of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets and the unique porous network. The EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of GAs was increased from 20.4 to 27.6 dB when the GO was reduced by high concentration of hydrazine vapor. The presence of more sp"2 graphitic lattice and free electrons from nitrogen atoms resulted in the enhanced EMI SE. Absorption was the dominant shielding mechanism of GAs. Compressing the highly porous GAs into compact thin films did not change the EMI SE, but shifted the dominant shielding mechanism from absorption to reflection.

  4. Electromagnetic interference shielding properties and mechanisms of chemically reduced graphene aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Shuguang [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Zhang, Liying, E-mail: LY.Zhang@ntu.edu.sg [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Mu, Chenzhong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Liu, Ming, E-mail: LIUMING@ntu.edu.sg [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); Hu, Xiao [Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Drive, 637553 (Singapore); School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: The electromagnetic interference shielding behavior and proposed mechanisms of ultralight free-standing 3D graphene aerogels. - Highlights: • The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding properties and mechanisms of ultralight 3D graphene aerogels (GAs) were systematically studied with respect to both the unique porous network and the intrinsic properties of the graphene sheets. • Thickness of the shielding material played a critical role on EMI SE. • By compressing the porous GAs into compact film didnt increase the EMI SE despite the increased electrical conductivity and connectivity. EMI SE is highly dependent on the effective amounts of the materials response to the EM waves. - Abstract: Graphene was recently demonstrated to exhibit excellent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance. In this work, ultralight (∼5.5 mg/cm{sup 3}) graphene aerogels (GAs) were fabricated through assembling graphene oxide (GO) using freeze-drying followed by a chemical reduction method. The EMI shielding properties and mechanisms of GAs were systematically studied with respect to the intrinsic properties of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets and the unique porous network. The EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of GAs was increased from 20.4 to 27.6 dB when the GO was reduced by high concentration of hydrazine vapor. The presence of more sp{sup 2} graphitic lattice and free electrons from nitrogen atoms resulted in the enhanced EMI SE. Absorption was the dominant shielding mechanism of GAs. Compressing the highly porous GAs into compact thin films did not change the EMI SE, but shifted the dominant shielding mechanism from absorption to reflection.

  5. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N.

    2009-03-01

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m3 less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m3 less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  6. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org

    2009-03-07

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m{sup 3} less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m{sup 3} less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  7. Treatment vault shielding for a flattening filter-free medical linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Polf, Jerimy; Mohan, Radhe; Vassiliev, Oleg N

    2009-01-01

    The requirements for shielding a treatment vault with a Varian Clinac 2100 medical linear accelerator operated both with and without the flattening filter were assessed. Basic shielding parameters, such as primary beam tenth-value layers (TVLs), patient scatter fractions, and wall scatter fractions, were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of 6, 10 and 18 MV beams. Relative integral target current requirements were determined from treatment planning studies of several disease sites with, and without, the flattening filter. The flattened beam shielding data were compared to data published in NCRP Report No. 151, and the unflattened beam shielding data were presented relative to the NCRP data. Finally, the shielding requirements for a typical treatment vault were determined for a single-energy (6 MV) linac and a dual-energy (6 MV/18 MV) linac. With the exception of large-angle patient scatter fractions and wall scatter fractions, the vault shielding parameters were reduced when the flattening filter was removed. Much of this reduction was consistent with the reduced average energy of the FFF beams. Primary beam TVLs were reduced by 12%, on average, and small-angle scatter fractions were reduced by up to 30%. Head leakage was markedly reduced because less integral target current was required to deliver the target dose. For the treatment vault examined in the current study, removal of the flattening filter reduced the required thickness of the primary and secondary barriers by 10-20%, corresponding to 18 m 3 less concrete to shield the single-energy linac and 36 m 3 less concrete to shield the dual-energy linac. Thus, a shielding advantage was found when the linac was operated without the flattening filter. This translates into a reduction in occupational exposure and/or the cost and space of shielding.

  8. Detector Background Reduction by Passive and Active Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikit, I.; Bikit, K.; Forkapic, S.; Mrda, D.; Nikolov, J.; Slivka, J.; Todorovic, N.

    2013-01-01

    The operational problems of the gamma ray spectrometer shielded passively with 12 cm of lead and actively by five 0.5 m × 0.5 m × 0.05 m plastic veto shields are described. The active shielding effect from both environmental gamma ray, cosmic muons and neutrons was investigated. For anticoincidence gating wide range of scintillator pulses, corresponding to the energy range of 150 keV-75 MeV, were used. With the optimal set up the integral background, for the energy region of 50 - 3000 keV, of 0.31 c/s was achieved. The detector mass related background was 0.345 c/(kg s). The 511 keV annihilation line was reduced by the factor of 7 by the anticoincidence gate. It is shown that the plastic shields increase the neutron capture gamma line intensities due to neutron termalization.(author)

  9. Re-evaluation of structural shielding designs of X-ray and CO-60 gamma-ray scanners at the Port of Tema, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofori, K.

    2011-07-01

    This research work was conducted to re-evaluate the shielding designs of the 6 MeV x-ray and the 1.253 MeV Co-60 gamma ray scanners used for cargo-containerized scanning at the Port of Tema. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation, therefore adequate shielding must be provided to reduce the radiation exposure of persons in and around the facilities to acceptable levels. The purpose of radiation shielding is to protect workers and the general public from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Investigations on the facilities indicated that after commissioning, no work had been carried out to re-evaluate the shielding designs. However, workloads have increased over time neccessitating review of the installed shielding. There has been introduction of scanner units with higher radiation energy (as in the case of the x-ray scanner) posibily increasing dose rates at various location requiring review of the shielding. New structures have been dotted around the facilities without particular attention to their distances and locations with respect to the radiation source. Measurements of distances from the source axes to the points of concern for primary and leakage barrier shielding; source to container and container to the points of concern for scattered radiation shielding were taken. The primary and secondary thicknesses required for both scanners were determined based on current operational parameters and compared with the thickness constituted during the construction of the facilities. Calculated and measured dose rate beyond the shielding barriers were used to established the adequacy or otherwise of the shielding employed by the shielding designers. Values obtained fell below the 20 µSv/hr specified by NCRP 151 (2005) which showed that the primary and secondary shields of both facilities were adequate requiring no additional shielding. (author)

  10. Optimal selection for shielding materials by fuzzy linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Y.; Miura, N.; Sugasawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    An application of fuzzy linear programming methods to optimization of a radiation shield is presented. The main purpose of the present study is the choice of materials and the search of the ratio of mixture-component as the first stage of the methodology on optimum shielding design according to individual requirements of nuclear reactor, reprocessing facility, shipping cask installing spent fuel, ect. The characteristic values for the shield optimization may be considered their cost, spatial space, weight and some shielding qualities such as activation rate and total dose rate for neutron and gamma ray (includes secondary gamma ray). This new approach can reduce huge combination calculations for conventional two-valued logic approaches to representative single shielding calculation by group-wised optimization parameters determined in advance. Using the fuzzy linear programming method, possibilities for reducing radiation effects attainable in optimal compositions hydrated, lead- and boron-contained materials are investigated

  11. A rectum shield for the circular applicator system of a selectron unit (HDR and LDR afterloading)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetzel, H.; McCoy, M.; Kamleitner, H.; Frommhold, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to decrease the morbidity rate after combined radiotherapy of the cervix carcinoma, a tungsten shield 3 and 5 mm thick for the rectum has been developed by the authors which is applied with the ring and pin applicator of the selectron unit (LDR and HDR afterloading). The isodose curves were measured in a plexiglas phantom, and the radiation dose at the reference points was determined by means of a ionization dosemeter. The phantom measurements were performed with the same arrangement of sources as applied in radiotherapy. The measurements showed a dose reduction at point Rmax of 33% (HDR) and 44% (LDR) with the tungsten shield 5 mm thick. (orig.) [de

  12. A conceptual gamma shield design using the DRP model computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, E E [Reactor Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Rahman, F A [National Center of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this investigation is to assess basic areas of concern in the development of reactor shielding conceptual design calculations. A spherical shield model composed of low carbon steel and lead have been constructed to surround a Co-60 gamma point source. two alternative configurations have been considered in the model computation. The numerical calculations have been performed using both the ANISN code and DRP model computation together with the DLC 75-Bugle 80 data library. A resume of results for deep penetration in different shield materials with different packing densities is presented and analysed. The results showed that the gamma fluxes attenuation is increased with increasing distribution the packing density of the shield material which reflects its importance of considering it as a safety parameter in shielding design. 3 figs.

  13. Safety and Health Topics: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ammunition, pipes, cable covering, building material, solder, radiation shielding, collapsible tubes, and fishing weights. Lead is also ... lead linings in tanks and radiation protection, leaded glass, work involving soldering, and other work involving lead ...

  14. Activation and Shielding Analyses in Support of the GUINEVERE Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Mercatali, L.; Baeten, P.; Vittiglio, G.

    2008-01-01

    The GUINEVERE facility (Generator of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) must satisfy the nuclear safety criteria required by the Belgian safety authority to be licensed. The radiation dose and activation analyses for the nuclear safety assessment of the GUINEVERE project were performed at FZK. The concerted efforts of several European institutions were concentrated on the development and construction of a subcritical fast lead core based on the Venus water moderated reactor at the SCK-CEN site in Mol, Belgium. A Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP5 model was developed in accordance with the current design of the GUINEVERE fast lead core. The analytical MC method does not work for shielding analysis of the GUINEVERE building because of the large size of the rooms and thick concrete walls and floors. MC variance reduction techniques, such as particles splitting, Russian roulette, and point detectors were therefore applied. The JEFF-3.1 nuclear data library was used for radiation transport calculations. The activation analyses for the lead core and building materials were performed with the FISPACT-2005 inventory code and the EAF-2005 library. The neutron and photon dose rate maps were produced using MCNP track-length estimations, point detectors, and a mesh tally superimposed over the GUINEVERE geometry. The effects of D-D and D-T fusion neutron sources were estimated. (authors)

  15. Activation and Shielding Analyses in Support of the GUINEVERE Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Mercatali, L. [Association FZK-EURATOM, KIT, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P