WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermometry yielded temperatures

  1. Survey on Johnson noise thermometry for temperature instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Moon, B. S.

    2002-01-01

    Johnson Noise Thermometry is an drift-free temperature measurement method which is able to maintain the best accuracy without calibration for a long period. Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) and Thermocouples used widely in power plants have the drift problem which causes a measurement error. Despite the advantage of Johnson Noise thermometry, it has not been used because it is very sensitive to electromagnetic noise and environment. It also requires more complicated signal processing methods. This paper presents the characteristics of Johnson Noise thermometry and various implementation method proposed over the past decades time period. The key factor in development of a noise thermometer is how to extract the tiny noise signal from the sensor and discriminate out the unnecessary noise interference from the environments. The new digital technology of fast signal processing skill will useful to challenge the existing problems fir commercialization of noise thermometry

  2. Ultrasonic thermometry system for measuring very high temperatures in reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Sullivan, W.H.; Plein, H.G.; Kerley, T.M.

    1979-06-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry has many potential applications in reactor safety experiments, where extremely high temperatures and lack of visual access may preclude the use of conventional diagnostics. This report details ultrasonic thermometry requirements for one such experiment, the molten fuel pool experiment. Sensors, transducers, and signal processing electronics are described in detail. Axial heat transfer in the sensors is modelled and found acceptably small. Measurement errors, calculations of their effect, and ways to minimize them are given. A rotating sensor concept is discussed which holds promise of alleviating sticking problems at high temperature. Applications of ultrasonic thermometry to three in-core experiments are described. In them, five 10-mm-length sensor elements were used to measure axial temperatures in a UO 2 or UO 2 -steel system fission-heated to about 2860 0 C

  3. High-temperature measurement techniques for the application in photometry, radiometry and thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Juergen

    2009-01-01

    Well characterised sources of thermal radiation are essential for photometry, radiometry, and thermometry. They serve as reference radiators for the calibration of detectors and radiance sources. Thermal radiation sources are advantageous for this purpose compared to other radiance sources such as lamps or LEDs because they possess a continuous spectrum of the emitted spectral radiance, which, for blackbody sources, can be calculated analytically using Planck's law of radiation. For application in thermometry, blackbody sources starting from temperatures near absolute zero to temperatures up to 3000 deg. C are needed for the calibration of radiation thermometers. For application in photometry and radiometry high intensity sources of radiation in the visible and UV region of the optical spectrum were required. This latter requirement is met by blackbody sources at temperatures well above 2000 deg. C. An ideal reference source should always emit the same amount of radiation at any time of use. This is realised by fixed-point radiators. Such radiators are based on a phase transition of a substance, at high temperatures the melting and freezing points of metals. However, current metal fixed-points are limited to relatively low temperatures. In the present work innovative techniques necessary for research into high-temperature thermal radiation sources are developed and thoroughly described. Starting with variable temperature blackbody sources the techniques required are: Precise apertures determination and detailed characterisation of the applied optical detectors. The described techniques are then used to undertake research into the development of high-temperature fixed-points above the copper fixed-point for application in photometry, radiometry, and thermometry. Applying these sophisticated techniques it was shown that these new high-temperature fixed-points are reproducible and repeatable to better than 100 mK at temperatures up to nearly 3200 K. Finally, a forward

  4. New strategies invonving upconverting nanoparticles for determining moderate temperatures by luminescence thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchuk, Ol.A. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA) and EMaS, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), c/Marcellí Domingo s/n E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Carvajal, J.J., E-mail: joanjosep.carvajal@urv.cat [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA) and EMaS, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), c/Marcellí Domingo s/n E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Pujol, M.C.; Massons, J. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA) and EMaS, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), c/Marcellí Domingo s/n E-43007, Tarragona (Spain); Haro-González, P. [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, C/Francisco Tomás y Valiente 7, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Martínez, O.; Jiménez, J. [GdS-Optronlab, Departamento Física Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I+D, Paseo de Belén 11, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Aguiló, M.; Díaz, F. [Física i Cristallografia de Materials i Nanomaterials (FiCMA-FiCNA) and EMaS, Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV), c/Marcellí Domingo s/n E-43007, Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Here we analyze alternative luminescence thermometry techniques to FIR, such as intensity ratio luminescence thermometry between the emission arising from two electronic levels that are not necessarily thermally coupled, but that show different evolutions with temperature, and lifetime luminescence nanothermometry in (Ho,Tm,Yb):KLu(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (Er,Yb):NaY{sub 2}F{sub 5}O nanoparticles. (Ho,Tm,Yb):KLu(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} nanoparticles exhibited a maximum relative sensitivity of 0.61% K{sup −1}, similar to that achievable in Er-doped systems, which are the upconverting systems presenting the highest sensitivity. From another side, (Er,Yb):NaY{sub 2}F{sub 5}O nanocrystals show great potentiality as thermal sensors at the nanoscale for moderate temperatures due to the incorporation of additional non-radiative relaxation mechanisms that shorten the emission lifetime generated by the oxygen present in the structure when compared to (Er,Yb):NaYF{sub 4} nanoparticles exhibiting the highest upconversion efficiency. We used those nanoparticles for ex-vivo temperature determination by laser induced heating in chicken breast using lifetime-based thermometry. The results obtained indicate that these techniques might constitute alternatives to FIR with potential applications for the determination of moderate temperatures, with sensitivities comparable to those that can be achieved by FIR or even higher. - Highlights: • Other nanothermometry techniques than FIR proposed with upconversion nanoparticles. • Energy transfer between different lanthanide ions can be used for thermometry. • Lifetime measurements can constitute also a tool for temperature determination.

  5. Body temperature measurement in mice during acute illness: implantable temperature transponder versus surface infrared thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jie; Riedel, Nico; Grittner, Ulrike; Endres, Matthias; Banneke, Stefanie; Emmrich, Julius Valentin

    2018-02-23

    Body temperature is a valuable parameter in determining the wellbeing of laboratory animals. However, using body temperature to refine humane endpoints during acute illness generally lacks comprehensiveness and exposes to inter-observer bias. Here we compared two methods to assess body temperature in mice, namely implanted radio frequency identification (RFID) temperature transponders (method 1) to non-contact infrared thermometry (method 2) in 435 mice for up to 7 days during normothermia and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin-induced hypothermia. There was excellent agreement between core and surface temperature as determined by method 1 and 2, respectively, whereas the intra- and inter-subject variation was higher for method 2. Nevertheless, using machine learning algorithms to determine temperature-based endpoints both methods had excellent accuracy in predicting death as an outcome event. Therefore, less expensive and cumbersome non-contact infrared thermometry can serve as a reliable alternative for implantable transponder-based systems for hypothermic responses, although requiring standardization between experimenters.

  6. Survey, applications, and prospects of Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blalock, T.V.; Shepard, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Significant progress in the field of Johnson noise thermometry has occurred since the 1971 survey of Kamper. This paper will review the foundation work of Johnson noise thermometry, survey the basic methods which do not utilize quantum devices for noise thermometry for industrial temperatures, and present some applications of noise thermometry in temperature scale metrology and process temperature instrumentation. 35 references

  7. Noise thermometry - a new temperature measuring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Rittinghaus, K.F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal Johnson-Niquist noise is the basis of noise thermometry. This temperature measuring method is, e.g., of interest insofar as the noise thermometer gives absolute values as a primary thermometer and is in principle extensively independent of environmental influences and material properties. The resistance values of the measuring probe are about 10 Ohm to a few kOhm. The demands of electronics are high, the self-noise of the measuring apparatus must be as small as possible; a comparative measuring method is advantageous. 1 to 2,500 K are given as a possible temperature range. An accuracy of 0.1% could be achieved in laboratory measurements. Temperature measurements to be used in operation in a few nuclear reactors are mentioned. (HP/LH) [de

  8. Refractiry metal monocrystals in high temperature thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuritnyk, I.P.

    1988-01-01

    The regularities of changes in thermoelectric properties of refractory metals in a wide temperature range (300-2300 K) depending on their structural state and impurities, are generalized. It is found that the main reasons for changes in thermo-e.m.f. of refractory metals during their operation in various media are diffusion processes and local microvoltages appearing in nonhomogeneous thermoelectrodes. It is shown that microstructure formation and control of impurities in thermometric materials permit to improve considerably the metrologic parameters of thermal transformers. Tungsten and molybdenum with monocrystalline structure with their high stability of properties, easy to manufacture and opening new possibilities in high-temperature contact measurement are used in thermometry for the first time

  9. Measurement of body temperature in normothermic and febrile rats: Limitations of using rectal thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangarembizi, Rachael; Erlwanger, Kennedy H; Mitchell, Duncan; Hetem, Robyn S; Madziva, Michael T; Harden, Lois M

    2017-10-01

    Stress-induced hyperthermia following rectal thermometry is reported in normothermic rats, but appears to be muted or even absent in febrile rats. We therefore investigated whether the use of rectal thermometry affects the accuracy of temperature responses recorded in normothermic and febrile rats. Using intra-abdominally implanted temperature-sensitive radiotelemeters we measured the temperature response to rectal temperature measurement in male Sprague Dawley rats (~200g) injected subcutaneously with Brewer's yeast (20ml/kg of a 20% Brewer's yeast solution=4000mg/kg) or saline (20ml/kg of 0.9% saline). Rats had been pre-exposed to, or were naive to rectal temperature measurement before the injection. The first rectal temperature measurement was taken in the plateau phase of the fever (18h after injection) and at hourly intervals thereafter. In normothermic rats, rectal temperature measurement was associated with an increase in abdominal temperature (0.66±0.27°C) that had a rapid onset (5-10min), peaked at 15-20min and lasted for 35-50min. The hyperthermic response to rectal temperature measurement was absent in febrile rats. Exposure to rectal temperature measurement on two previous occasions did not reduce the hyperthermia. There was a significant positive linear association between temperatures recorded using the two methods, but the agreement interval identified that rectal temperature measured with a thermocouple probe could either be 0.7°C greater or 0.5°C lower than abdominal temperature measured with radiotelemeter. Thus, due to stress-induced hyperthermia, rectal thermometry does not ensure accurate recording of body temperature in short-spaced, intermittent intervals in normothermic and febrile rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparison of Surface Infrared with Rectal Thermometry in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omóbòwálé, T O; Ogunro, B N; Odigie, E A; Otuh, P I; Olugasa, B O

    2017-12-30

    Accurate determination of temperature is crucial in the diagnosis of febrile conditions. Although fewer techniques have proven as useful and reliable a predictor of core body temperature as the rectal thermometry, the process of obtaining the rectal temperature could be stressful in dogs. The infrared thermometry is a noncontact device used for measuring body temperature, with advantages which include speed, convenience, and reduced stress to the animals and reduced occupational risks to the animal handler. Therefore, there is the need to assess the consistency and agreement between non-contact infrared thermometry and traditional rectal thermometry in body temperature estimation. This study compared and assessed the sensitivity of non-contact infrared thermometer used on the forehead and nasal regions respectively with that of a rectal thermometer in dogs for body temperature estimation. One hundred and thirty (130) dogs presented for veterinary attention at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH), University of Ibadan, Nigeria were enrolled in this study during August to September 2014, irrespective of sex, age, breed or health status. Temperatures of dogs presented at the clinic were obtained using both multiple non-contact infrared thermometric measures obtained in the nasal and frontal head regions; and by rectal temperature. A multivariate cross-matrix analysis was used to assess the difference in measurements between the rectal thermometry and non-contact infrared thermometry. Descriptive statistics was used to compare variation and trend regularity of the nasal and fore-head infrared thermometry. A logistic regression of the difference in measurements was computed at 95% confidence interval and P<0.05. The mean difference revealed that the rectal temperature was 5.330C higher than the non-contact infrared forehead-based temperature and 7.570C higher than nasal-based temperature measurements respectively. The Bland-Altman (B-A) plot showed that the 95% limits

  11. Comparison of Microchip Transponder and Noncontact Infrared Thermometry with Rectal Thermometry in Domestic Swine (Sus scrofa domestica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Amanda L; Hanson, Jarod M; Gabbard, Jon D; Johnson, Scott K; Register, Emery T; He, Biao

    2016-01-01

    During disease outbreaks, core temperature is a useful health metric in swine, due to the presence of pyrexia especially during the acute phase of infection. Despite technologic advances in other facets of swine production and health management, rectal thermometry continues to be the ‘gold standard’ for measuring core body temperature. However, for various reasons, collecting rectal temperatures can be difficult and unsafe depending on the housing modality. In addition, the delay between insertion of the rectal thermometer and obtaining a reading can affect measurement accuracy, especially when the pig requires physical restraint. Clearly safer, faster, and more accurate and precise temperature acquisition methods that necessitate minimal or no handling of swine are needed. We therefore compared rectal thermometers, subcutaneous microchips, and an inexpensive handheld infrared thermometer by measuring the core body temperature of 24 male castrated piglets at random intervals over a 5-wk period. The core body temperature (mean ± 1 SD) was 39.3 ± 0.5 °C by rectal thermometry, 39.0 ± 0.7 °C by microchip transponder, and 34.3 ± 1.0 °C by infrared thermometry; these 3 values differed significantly. Although the readings obtain by using infrared thermometry were numerically lower than those from the other methods, it is arguably the safest method for assessing the core temperature of swine and showed strong relative correlation with rectal temperature. PMID:27657715

  12. Polymer coated fiber Bragg grating thermometry for microwave hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Indu Fiesler; Hui, Kaleo; Astrahan, Melvin

    2010-09-01

    Measuring tissue temperature distribution during electromagnetically induced hyperthermia (HT) is challenging. High resistance thermistors with nonmetallic leads have been used successfully in commercial HT systems for about three decades. The single 1 mm thick temperature sensing element is mechanically moved to measure tissue temperature distributions. By employing a single thermometry probe containing a fixed linear sensor array temperature, distributions during therapy can be measured with greater ease. While the first attempts to use fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology to obtain multiple temperature points along a single fiber have been reported, improvement in the detection system's stability were needed for clinical applications. The FBG temperature sensing system described here has a very high temporal stability detection system and an order of magnitude faster readout than commercial systems. It is shown to be suitable for multiple point fiber thermometry during microwave hyperthermia when compared to conventional mechanically scanning probe HT thermometry. A polymer coated fiber Bragg grating (PFBG) technology is described that provides a number of FBG thermometry locations along the length of a single optical fiber. The PFBG probe developed is tested under simulated microwave hyperthermia treatment to a tissue equivalent phantom. Two temperature probes, the multiple PFBG sensor and the Bowman probe, placed symmetrically with respect to a microwave antenna in a tissue phantom are subjected to microwave hyperthermia. Measurements are made at start of HT and 85 min later, when a 6 degrees C increase in temperature is registered by both probes, as is typical in clinical HT therapy. The optical fiber multipoint thermometry probe performs highly stable, real-time thermometry updating each multipoint thermometry scan over a 5 cm length every 2 s. Bowman probe measurements are acquired simultaneously for comparison. In addition, the PFBG sensor's detection

  13. High temperature measurement by noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.C.

    1982-06-01

    Noise thermometry has received a lot of attention for measurements of temperatures in the high range around 1000-2000 deg. K. For these measurements, laboratory type experiments have been mostly performed. These have shown the interest of the technique when long term stability, high precision and insensibility to external conditions are concerned. This is particularly true for measurements in nuclear reactors where important drifts due to irradiation effects are experienced with other measurement techniques, as thermocouple for instance. Industrial noise thermometer experiments have not been performed extensively up to now. The subject of the present study is the development of a 1800 deg. K noise thermometer for nuclear applications. The measurement method is based on a generalized noise power approach. The rms noise voltage (Vsub(s)) and noise current (Isub(s)) are successively measured on the resistive sensor. The same quantities are also measured on a dummy short circuited probe (Vsub(d) and Isub(d)). The temperature is then deduced from these measured values by the following formula: cTsub(s) = (Vsub(s) 2 - Vsub(d) 2 )(Vsub(s)/Isub(s) - Vsub(d)/Isub(d)) - 1 , where c is a constant and Tsub(s) the absolute temperature of the sensor. This approach has the particular advantage of greatly reducing the sensibility to environmental perturbations on the leads and to the influence of amplifier noise sources. It also eliminates the necessity of resistance measurement and keeps the electronic circuits as simple as possible

  14. Application of ultrasonic thermometry in LMFBR safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Sullivan, W.H.; Plein, H.G.

    1977-01-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry has many potential applications in reactor safety research, where extremely high temperatures and lack of visual access may preclude the use of conventional diagnostics. An application (the in-core molten fuel pool experiment) will be described in which thoriated tungsten ultrasonic thermometers were used to measure temperatures in UO 2 to incipient melt (2860 0 ). Each thermometer included five sensor elements 10 mm long, providing five temperatures within the UO 2 at various axial locations. The 10 mm spatial resolution is about five times better than previous applications of the technique. Temperature resolution of +-10 0 C was indicated by calibration data. Besides providing temperature data approximately 1000 0 C higher than were obtained with thermocouples, the thermometer yielded valuable axial temperature profile data. Details of the sensors, exciting coils, and signal conditioning electronics will be given

  15. Primary Tunnel Junction Thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.; Holmqvist, Tommy; Meschke, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We describe the concept and experimental demonstration of primary thermometry based on a four-probe measurement of a single tunnel junction embedded within four arrays of junctions. We show that in this configuration random sample specific and environment-related errors can be avoided. This method relates temperature directly to Boltzmann constant, which will form the basis of the definition of temperature and realization of official temperature scales in the future

  16. Microchip transponder thermometry for monitoring core body temperature of antelope during capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Fuller, Andrea; Hetem, Robyn S; Lease, Hilary M; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia is described as the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with capture, immobilization and restraint of wild animals. Therefore, accurately determining the core body temperature of wild animals during capture is crucial for monitoring hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. We investigated if microchip thermometry can accurately reflect core body temperature changes during capture and cooling interventions in the springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis), a medium-sized antelope. Subcutaneous temperature measured with a temperature-sensitive microchip was a weak predictor of core body temperature measured by temperature-sensitive data loggers in the abdominal cavity (R(2)=0.32, bias >2 °C). Temperature-sensitive microchips in the gluteus muscle, however, provided an accurate estimate of core body temperature (R(2)=0.76, bias=0.012 °C). Microchips inserted into muscle therefore provide a convenient and accurate method to measure body temperature continuously in captured antelope, allowing detection of hyperthermia and the efficacy of cooling procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiwavelength Thermometry at High Temperature: Why It is Advantageous to Work in the Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Florio, M.

    2014-07-01

    In principle, multiwavelength radiation thermometry allows one to correctly measure the temperature of surfaces of unknown and varying surface emissivity. Unfortunately, none of the practical realizations proposed in the past proved to be sufficiently reliable because of a strong influence of the errors arising from incorrect modeling of the emissivity and of the limited number of operating wavelengths. The use of array detectors allows a high degree of flexibility both in terms of number and spectral position of the working wavelength bands. In the case of applications at high temperatures, i.e., near 2000 C or above, an analysis of the theoretical measuring principles of multiwavelength thermometry, suggests the opportunity of investigating the possible advantages in extending the operating wavelengths toward the ultraviolet region. To this purpose, a simulation program was developed which allows investigation of the effect of different influencing parameters. This paper presents a brief theoretical introduction and practical analysis of the method. The best choices are derived in terms of the different influencing parameters and data relative to the simulation of both real materials and fictitious emissivity curves and have been studied and analyzed with different emissivity models to check the robustness of the method.

  18. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Mougenot, Charles; Grenier, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  19. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity

  20. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  1. A new technique for direct traceability of contact thermometry Co-C eutectic cells to the ITS-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Bourson, F.; Briaudeau, S.; Sadli, M. [Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-Cnam, 61 rue du Landy 93210 La Plaine Saint Denis (France)

    2013-09-11

    The eutectic Co-C melting point is a promising system to serve as a thermometric fixed-point in the temperature range above 1084.62 °C (copper freezing point). During the last decade, LNE-Cnam has developed and characterized some fixed-point devices, based on eutectic Co-C alloy, for applications to contact and radiation thermometry. Above 962 °C, the ITS-90 is realized by radiation thermometry by the extrapolation from a Ag, Au or Cu fixed point using the Planck law for radiation. So the only way for assigning a temperature in the scale to a Co-C cell (∼1324 °C) is by radiation thermometry. An indirect method is commonly used to assign a temperature to a high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) cell designed for contact thermometry is to fill a pyrometric cell with the same mixture as the contact thermometry cell. In this case, the temperature assigned to the pyrometric cell is attributed to the contact cell. This paper describes a direct method allowing the determination of the melting temperature realized by a 'contact thermometry' Co-C cell by comparison to a 'radiation thermometry' Co-C cell whose melting temperature was assigned in accordance to the scale by extrapolation from the Cu point. In addition, the same Co-C cell is studied with a standard Pt/Pd thermocouple.

  2. NRC Microwave Refractive Index Gas Thermometry Implementation Between 24.5 K and 84 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, P. M. C.

    2017-07-01

    The implementation of microwave refractive index gas thermometry at the National Research Council between 24.5 K and 84 K is reported. A new gas-handling system for accurate control and measurement of experimental gas pressure has been constructed, and primary thermometry measurements have been taken using a quasi-spherical copper resonator and helium gas at temperatures corresponding to three defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). These measurements indicate differences between the thermodynamic temperature T and ITS-90 temperature T_{90} of ( T - T_{90} ) = -0.60 ± 0.56 mK at T_{90} = 24.5561 K, ( T - T_{90} ) = -2.0 ± 1.3 mK at T_{90} = 54.3584 K, and ( T - T_{90} ) = -4.0 ± 2.9 mK at T_{90} = 83.8058 K. The present results at T_{90} = 24.5561 K and T_{90} = 83.8058 K agree with previously reported measurements from other primary thermometry techniques of acoustic gas thermometry and dielectric constant gas thermometry, and the result at T_{90} = 54.3584 K provides new information in a temperature region where there is a gap in other recent data sets.

  3. Radiation thermometry - non-contact temperature measurements; Strahlungsthermometrie - Temperaturen beruehrungslos messen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollandt, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich Hochtemperatur- und Vakuumphysik; Hartmann, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Hochtemperaturskala; Gutschwager, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Infrarot-Strahlungsthermometrie; Struss, O. [HEITRONICS Infrarot Messtechnik GmbH (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    The temperature is one of the measurands most frequently determined, as it decisively influences physical, chemical and biological processes. To be able to evaluate, optimize, repeat and compare industrial procedures, temperatures must be measured with sufficient accuracy and worldwide uniformity. This is done with the aid of the regulations and instructions of the international temperature scale. Today, non-contact measurements of surface temperatures can be performed without problems with radiation thermometers over a temperature range from -100 C up to 3000 C. Compared to contacting measurements, radiation-thermometric temperature measurement offers a series of advantages. Radiation thermometers react very fast and the measurement is not influenced by heat supply or dissipation. This allows objects to be measured which move very fast, are energized or may experience fast temperature changes. Consequently, radiation thermometry is increasingly used for the monitoring and control of thermal processes, for maintenance and in building services engineering. The present contribution shall inform of the fundamentals of radiation-thermometric temperature measurement as well as of the construction and popular types of radiation thermometers. It will be explained how exact and worldwide uniform temperature measurement is guaranteed via the international temperature scale and the calibration of radiation thermometers. The emissivity of surfaces which is important in practical temperature measurements and some examples of industrial applications of radiation thermometers will be described. (orig.)

  4. Radiation thermometry - non-contact temperature measurements; Strahlungsthermometrie - Temperaturen beruehrungslos messen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollandt, J.; Hartmann, J.; Gutschwager, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Struss, O. [HEITRONICS Infrarot Messtechnik GmbH, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The temperature is one of the measurands most frequently determined, as it decisively influences physical, chemical and biological processes. To be able to evaluate, optimize, repeat and compare industrial procedures, temperatures must be measured with sufficient accuracy and worldwide uniformity. This is done with the aid of the regulations and instructions of the international temperature scale. Today, non-contact measurements of surface temperatures can be performed without problems with radiation thermometers over a temperature range from -100 C up to 3000 C. Compared to contacting measurements, radiation-thermometric temperature measurement offers a series of advantages. Radiation thermometers react very fast and the measurement is not influenced by heat supply or dissipation. This allows objects to be measured which move very fast, are energized or may experience fast temperature changes. Consequently, radiation thermometry is increasingly used for the monitoring and control of thermal processes, for maintenance and in building services engineering. The present contribution shall inform of the fundamentals of radiation-thermometric temperature measurement as well as of the construction and popular types of radiation thermometers. It will be explained how exact and worldwide uniform temperature measurement is guaranteed via the international temperature scale and the calibration of radiation thermometers. The emissivity of surfaces which is important in practical temperature measurements and some examples of industrial applications of radiation thermometers will be described. (orig.)

  5. A self-reference PRF-shift MR thermometry method utilizing the phase gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langley, Jason; Potter, William; Phipps, Corey; Zhao Qun; Huang Feng

    2011-01-01

    In magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the most widely used and accurate method for measuring temperature is based on the shift in proton resonance frequency (PRF). However, inter-scan motion and bulk magnetic field shifts can lead to inaccurate temperature measurements in the PRF-shift MR thermometry method. The self-reference PRF-shift MR thermometry method was introduced to overcome such problems by deriving a reference image from the heated or treated image, and approximates the reference phase map with low-order polynomial functions. In this note, a new approach is presented to calculate the baseline phase map in self-reference PRF-shift MR thermometry. The proposed method utilizes the phase gradient to remove the phase unwrapping step inherent to other self-reference PRF-shift MR thermometry methods. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using numerical simulations with temperature distributions following a two-dimensional Gaussian function as well as phantom and in vivo experimental data sets. The results from both the numerical simulations and experimental data show that the proposed method is a promising technique for measuring temperature. (note)

  6. Estimates of Eastern Equatorial Pacific Sea Surface Temperatures During the Pliocene From Carbonate 'Clumped Isotope' Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, N.; Tripati, A.; Eiler, J.

    2007-12-01

    fine fraction of 5.6 Ma sediments show calcification temperatures of 20.4°C ± 2.3°C and seawater δ18O values of -1.4‰ ± 0.6‰. G. sacculifer (with sac) and mixed coccoliths from 1.4 Ma sediments yield calcification temperatures of 22.3°C ± 2.5°C and seawater δ18O values of 1.7‰ ± 0.7‰, and 19.4°C ± 1.8°C and seawater δ18O values of 0.4‰ ± 0.5‰, respectively. Our preliminary findings are consistent with the 'dynamical ocean thermostat' model. [1] Clement, A., et al., 1996, An Ocean Dynamical Thermostat, J. of Clim., 9, 2190-2196. [2] Cane, M., et al., 1997, Twentieth-Century Sea Surface Temperature Trends, Science, 957-960. [3] Fedorov, A., et al., 2006, The Pliocene Paradox (Mechanisms for a permanent El Nino), Science, 312, 1437-1443. [4] Rickaby, R. and Halloran, P., 2005, Cool La Nina during the warmth of the Pliocene?, Science, 307, 1948-1953. [5] Wara, M., et al. ,2005, Permanent El Nino-like conditions during the Pliocene Warm Period, Science, 309, 758-761. [6] Ghosh, P., et al., 2006, 13C-18O bonds in carbonate minerals: A new kind of paleothermometer, GCA, 70, 1439-1456. [7] Eiler, J. and Tripati, A., 2007, 'Clumped isotope' thermometry in benthic foraminifera and ostracods: A novel tool for reconstructing deep-ocean temperatures. Fall AGU. [8] Tripati, A., et al. 2007, 'Carbonate `clumped isotope' thermometry in planktonic foraminifera and coccoliths. Fall AGU.

  7. Low-temperature thermometry. Use of a gas thermometer as a calibration standard between 4 and 300 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combarieu, A. de

    1978-01-01

    A constant volume gas thermometer was built to calibrate the various secondary thermometers used at low temperature. This gas thermometer is placed in a cryostat where any stable temperature between 4 and 300 K may be obtained. After some words about low temperature thermometry, the gas thermometer and its auxiliary equipment are described briefly; the corrections to be applied to the results are given and the article ends with a table showing the values obtained [fr

  8. Single-cell photoacoustic thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liang; Wang, Lidai; Li, Chiye; Liu, Yan; Ke, Haixin; Zhang, Chi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. A novel photoacoustic thermometric method is presented for simultaneously imaging cells and sensing their temperature. With three-seconds-per-frame imaging speed, a temperature resolution of 0.2°C was achieved in a photo-thermal cell heating experiment. Compared to other approaches, the photoacoustic thermometric method has the advantage of not requiring custom-developed temperature-sensitive biosensors. This feature should facilitate the conversion of single-cell thermometry into a routine lab tool and make it accessible to a much broader biological research community. PMID:23377004

  9. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A.; Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P.; Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M.; Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L.

    2013-01-01

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin

  10. Investigation of uncertainty components in Coulomb blockade thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahtela, O. M.; Heinonen, M.; Manninen, A. [MIKES Centre for Metrology and Accreditation, Tekniikantie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Meschke, M.; Savin, A.; Pekola, J. P. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Aalto University, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Gunnarsson, D.; Prunnila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Penttilä, J. S.; Roschier, L. [Aivon Oy, Tietotie 3, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-09-11

    Coulomb blockade thermometry (CBT) has proven to be a feasible method for primary thermometry in every day laboratory use at cryogenic temperatures from ca. 10 mK to a few tens of kelvins. The operation of CBT is based on single electron charging effects in normal metal tunnel junctions. In this paper, we discuss the typical error sources and uncertainty components that limit the present absolute accuracy of the CBT measurements to the level of about 1 % in the optimum temperature range. Identifying the influence of different uncertainty sources is a good starting point for improving the measurement accuracy to the level that would allow the CBT to be more widely used in high-precision low temperature metrological applications and for realizing thermodynamic temperature in accordance to the upcoming new definition of kelvin.

  11. Luminescence thermometry with Eu{sup 3+} doped GdAlO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lojpur, Vesna, E-mail: vesna.lojpur@yahoo.com; Ćulubrk, Sanja; Medić, Mina; Dramicanin, Miroslav

    2016-02-15

    Eu{sup 3+} doped GdAlO{sub 3} powder synthesized by solid state reaction was investigated for application in luminescence thermometry. Phase composition of material was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The photoluminescence emission spectra were collected under excitation of 399 nm, while elevating the temperature of the sample from the room temperature to 793 K. Emissions from {sup 5}D{sub 1}→{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} characteristic transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions are selected for the temperature-dependence study using the fluorescence intensity ratio method. Emission decay curves measured at the strongest emission peak centered at 614 nm were recorded in a same temperature range. Data analysis showed that thermometry by fluorescence intensity ratio method can be used over the temperature region 293–793 K with the maximal relative sensitivity of 2.96% K{sup −1} (at 293 K). Temporal dependence of emission (lifetime) provides temperature sensing from 620 to 793 K with the maximal relative sensitivity of 2.28% K{sup −1}. - Highlights: • GdAlO{sub 3}: 4 at% of Eu{sup 3+} can be used for luminescence thermometry in the 293–793 K range. • Combined FIR and lifetime thermometry provide >0.5% K{sup −1} relative sensitivity. • Temperature dependence of lifetime is well described energy gap law model.

  12. Sub-picowatt/kelvin resistive thermometry for probing nanoscale thermal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Dechaumphai, Edward; Chen, Renkun

    2013-11-01

    Advanced instrumentation in thermometry holds the key for experimentally probing fundamental heat transfer physics. However, instrumentation with simultaneously high thermometry resolution and low parasitic heat conduction is still not available today. Here we report a resistive thermometry scheme with ~50 μK temperature resolution and ~0.25 pW/K thermal conductance resolution, which is achieved through schemes using both modulated heating and common mode noise rejection. The suspended devices used herein have been specifically designed to possess short thermal time constants and minimal attenuation effects associated with the modulated heating current. Furthermore, we have systematically characterized the parasitic background heat conductance, which is shown to be significantly reduced using the new device design and can be effectively eliminated using a "canceling" scheme. Our results pave the way for probing fundamental nanoscale thermal transport processes using a general scheme based on resistive thermometry.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence thermometry (LIF-T) as a non-invasive temperature measurement technique for thermal hydraulic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strack, J.; Leung, K.; Walker, A., E-mail: strackj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is an experimental technique whereby a scalar field in a fluid system is measured optically from the fluorescence intensity of a tracer dye following excitation by laser light. For laser induced fluorescence thermometry (LIF-T), a temperature sensitive dye is used. Through the use of a temperature sensitive tracer dye, sheet laser optics, optical filters, and photography, a 2D temperature field can be measured non-invasively. An experiment to test the viability of using LIF-T for macroscopic thermal hydraulic experiments was developed and tested. A reference calibration curve to relate fluorescence measurements to temperature is presented. (author)

  14. Thermometry of ultracold atoms by electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thorsten; Wittrock, Benjamin; Blatt, Frank; Halfmann, Thomas; Yatsenko, Leonid P.

    2012-06-01

    We report on systematic numerical and experimental investigations of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to determine temperatures in an ultracold atomic gas. The technique relies on the strong dependence of EIT on atomic motion (i.e., Doppler shifts), when the relevant atomic transitions are driven with counterpropagating probe and control laser beams. Electromagnetically induced transparency permits thermometry with satisfactory precision over a large temperature range, which can be addressed by the appropriate choice of Rabi frequency in the control beam. In contrast to time-of-flight techniques, thermometry by EIT is fast and nondestructive, i.e., essentially it does not affect the ultracold medium. In an experimental demonstration we apply both EIT and time-of-flight measurements to determine temperatures along different symmetry axes of an anisotropic ultracold gas. As an interesting feature we find that the temperatures in the anisotropic atom cloud vary in different directions.

  15. Application of structured illumination to gas phase thermometry using thermographic phosphor particles: a study for averaged imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Stephan, Michael; Berrocal, Edouard; Albert, Barbara; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) is combined with gas phase thermometry measurements using thermographic phosphor (TGP) particles. The technique is applied to a heated jet surrounded by a coflow which is operated at ambient temperature. The respective air flows are seeded with a powder of BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) which is used as temperature-sensitive gas phase tracer. Upon pulsed excitation in the ultraviolet spectral range, the temperature is extracted based on the two-color ratio method combined with SLIPI. The main advantage of applying the SLIPI approach to phosphor thermometry is the reduction of particle-to-particle multiple light scattering and diffuse wall reflections, yielding a more robust calibration procedure as well as improving the measurement accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. For demonstration, this paper focuses on sample-averaged measurements of temperature fields in a jet-in-coflow configuration. Using the conventional approach, which in contrast to SLIPI is based on imaging with an unmodulated laser light sheet, we show that for the present setup typically 40% of the recorded signal is affected by the contribution of multiply scattered photons. At locations close to walls even up to 75% of the apparent signal is due to diffuse reflection and wall luminescence of BAM sticking at the surface. Those contributions lead to erroneous temperature fields. Using SLIPI, an unbiased two-color ratio field is recovered allowing for two-dimensional mean temperature reconstructions which exhibit a more realistic physical behavior. This is in contrast to results deduced by the conventional approach. Furthermore, using the SLIPI approach it is shown that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of up to 2 at 270 °C. Finally, an outlook towards instantaneous SLIPI phosphorescence thermometry is provided.

  16. MR thermometry for laser-induced thermotherapy at 1.5 tesla; MR-Thermometrie bei 1,5 Tesla zur thermischen Ablation mittels laserinduzierter Thermotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, D.; Huebner, F.; Mack, M.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of thermometry with fast MR sequences for laser-induced interstitial laser therapy (LITT) and verification of the thermometric results with a fiber-optic thermometer. Method and Materials: In vitro experiments were conducted using an agarose gel mixture and pig liver lobes. MR-guided LITT was performed using a laser power between 3 and 15?watts. Thermometry was performed using longitudinal relaxation time T1 and proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) methods under acquisition of amplitude and phase shift images. PRF was measured with a fast spoiled GRE sequence. Four different sequences were used for T1 thermometry: gradient echo (GE), TrueFISP (TRUFI), Saturation Recovery Turbo-FLASH (SRTF) and Inversion Recovery Turbo-FLASH (IRTF) sequences. The temperature was controlled using a fiber-optic Luxtron device and correlated with the MR temperature. The range of applied and monitored temperatures exceeded 80 degrees Celsius. Results: The temperature dependence showed a good linear relationship up to 60 degrees Celsius. Calibration experiments for the T1 method delivered coefficients of determination from 0.977 to 0.997 for agarose and from 0.958 to 0.995 for the pig liver samples. The IRTF sequence had the highest temperature sensitivity (agarose 0.99, liver 1.19). During LITT the TRUE-FISP sequence exhibited a strong nonlinear relationship. R{sup 2} of this sequence was 0.809 in the agarose experiments. The average temperature errors when heated up to 80 degrees Celsius were 3.86 - 11.38 degrees Celsius for Agarose gel and 5.7 - 12.16 degrees Celsius for the liver tissue. SRTF and IRTF sequences exhibited the most linear relationship with temperature but were more dependent on tissue differences. (orig.)

  17. Method for analyzing passive silicon carbide thermometry with a continuous dilatometer to determine irradiation temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anne A.; Porter, Wallace D.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon carbide is used as a passive post-irradiation temperature monitor because the irradiation defects will anneal out above the irradiation temperature. The irradiation temperature is determined by measuring a property change after isochronal annealing, i.e., lattice spacing, dimensions, electrical resistivity, thermal diffusivity, or bulk density. However, such methods are time-consuming since the steps involved must be performed in a serial manner. This work presents the use of thermal expansion from continuous dilatometry to calculate the SiC irradiation temperature, which is an automated process requiring minimal setup time. Analysis software was written that performs the calculations to obtain the irradiation temperature and removes possible user-introduced error while standardizing the analysis. This method has been compared to an electrical resistivity and isochronal annealing investigation, and the results revealed agreement of the calculated temperatures. These results show that dilatometry is a reliable and less time-intensive process for determining irradiation temperature from passive SiC thermometry.

  18. Signal processing method for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. G.; Moon, B. S.; Kinser, Rpger

    2003-01-01

    The development of Johnson Noise Thermometry requires a high sensitive preamplifier circuit to pick up the temperature-related noise on the sensing element. However, the random noise generated in this amplification circuit causes a significant erroneous influence to the measurement. This paper describes signal processing mechanism of the Johnson Noise Thermometry system which is underway of development in collaboration between KAERI and ORNL. It adopts two identical amplifier channels and utilizes a digital signal processing technique to remove the independent noise of each channel. The CPSD(Cross Power Spectral Density) function is used to cancel the independent noise and the differentiation of narrow or single frequency peak from the CPSD data separates the common mode electromagnetic interference noise

  19. Live-cell thermometry with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Harishankar; Fedder, Helmut; Chen, Andrew; Yang, Liudi; Li, Chenghai; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Wang, Sihong; Meriles, Carlos

    The ability to measure temperature is typically affected by a tradeoff between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Good thermometers tend to be bulky systems and hence are ill-suited for thermal sensing with high spatial localization. Conversely, the signal resulting from nanoscale temperature probes is often impacted by noise to a level where the measurement precision becomes poor. Adding to the microscopist toolbox, the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has recently emerged as a promising platform for high-sensitivity nanoscale thermometry. Of particular interest are applications in living cells because diamond nanocrystals are biocompatible and can be chemically functionalized to target specific organelles. Here we report progress on the ability to probe and compare temperature within and between living cells using nanodiamond-hosted NV thermometry. We focus our study on cancerous cells, where atypical metabolic pathways arguably lead to changes in the way a cell generates heat, and thus on its temperature profile.

  20. Ultrasonic Thermometry for In-Pile Temperature Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daw, J.E.; Rempe, J.L.; Wilkins, S.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has recently initiated a new effort to evaluate the viability of using ultrasonic thermometry technology as an improved sensor for detecting temperature during irradiation testing. Ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) work on the principle that the speed at which sound travels through a material (acoustic velocity) is dependant on the temperature of the material. By introducing an acoustic pulse to the sensor and measuring the time delay of echoes, temperature may be derived. UTs have several advantages over other sensor types. UTs can be made very small, as the sensor consists only of a small diameter rod which may or may not require a sheath. Measurements may be made near the melting point of the sensor material, as no electrical insulation is required; and shunting effects are avoided. Most attractive, however, is the ability to introduce acoustic discontinuities to the sensor, as this enables temperature measurements at several points along the sensor length (allowing temperature profiling with a single sensor). A typical multi-sensor UT system, with key components identified, is shown in Figure 1. As indicated in this figure, a narrow ultrasonic pulse is generated in a magnetostrictive rod by an excitation coil. The ultrasonic pulse propagates to the sensor wire, where a fraction of the pulse energy is reflected at each discontinuity (notches or diameter change). Each reflected pulse is received by the excitation coil, transformed into an electrical signal, amplified and evaluated in a start/stop counter system. The time interval between two adjacent echoes is evaluated and compared to a calibration curve to give the average temperature in the corresponding sensor segment. When a number of notches are available on the wire sensor, the various measurements give access to a temperature profile along the probe. UTs have been used successfully for several applications; however, several problems have limited the success of these sensors. For

  1. Thermometry system development for thermoradiotherapy of deep-seated tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, A. M.; Ivanov, S. M.; Perelstein, E. A.; Polozov, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Therapeutic hyperthermia (including RF hyperthermia) in combination with radiotherapy (called thermoradiotherapy) is one of widely used contemporary cancer treatment methods. The independent electron linac and RF system or their combinations are necessary for effective therapy. Whole-body hyperthermia is used for treatment of metastatic cancer that was spread throughout the body, regional one is used for treatment of part of the body (for instance leg or abdominal cavity). Local hyperthermia with characteristic size of heating volume of 20-100 mm permits to heat tumour without overheating of healthy tissues. The thermometry of deep suited tissues during the hyperthermia process is an important and complex task. Invasive methods as thermistors, optical sensors or thermo-couples can not be widely used because all of them are able to transport tumor cells to the healthy region of the patient body. Distant methods of the temperature measurement such, as radiothermometry and acoustic thermometry can not be used for tissues seated deeper than 5-7 cm. One of possible ways to solve the problem of temperature measurement of the deep suited tissues is discussed in this article: it was proposed to use the same electrodes for RF hyperthermia and thermometry. As known electrodynamics characteristics of tissues are sufficiently depends on temperature. It was proposed to use this effect for active radiothermometry in local hyperthermia. Two opposite RF dipoles can be used as generator and receiver of pick-up signal.

  2. Oxygen isotope thermometry of quartz-Al2SiO5veins in high-grade metamorphic rocks on Naxos island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlitz, Benita; Valley, John; Matthews, Alan; Katzir, Yaron

    2002-04-01

    Diffusion models predict that peak metamorphic temperatures are best recorded by the oxygen isotope fractionation between minerals in a bi-mineralic rock in which a refractory accessory mineral with slow oxygen diffusion rate is modally minor to a mineral with a faster diffusion rate. This premise is demonstrated for high-grade metamorphism on the island of Naxos, Greece, where quartz-kyanite oxygen isotope thermometry from veins in high-grade metamorphic pelites gives temperatures of 635-690 °C. These temperatures are in excellent agreement with independent thermometry for the regional M2 peak metamorphic conditions and show that the vein minerals isotopically equilibrated at the peak of metamorphism. Quartz-sillimanite fractionations in the same veins give similar temperatures (680+/-35 °C) and suggest that the veins grew near to the kyanite-sillimanite boundary, corresponding to pressures of 6.5 to 7.5 kbar for temperatures of 635-685 °C. By contrast, quartz-kyanite and quartz-biotite pairs in the host rocks yield lower temperature estimates than the veins (590-600 and 350-550 °C, respectively). These lower apparent temperatures are also predicted from calculations of diffusional resetting in the polyphase host-rock system. The data demonstrate that bimineralic vein assemblages can be used as accurate thermometers in high-temperature rocks whereas retrograde exchange remains a major problem in many polymineralic rocks.

  3. Nanometer scale thermometry in a living cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucsko, G.; Maurer, P. C.; Yao, N. Y.; Kubo, M.; Noh, H. J.; Lo, P. K.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive probing of temperature variations on nanometer scales represents an outstanding challenge in many areas of modern science and technology1. In particular, a thermometer capable of sub-degree temperature resolution over a large range of temperatures as well as integration within a living system could provide a powerful new tool for many areas of biological, physical and chemical research; possibilities range from the temperature-induced control of gene expression2–5 and tumor metabolism6 to the cell-selective treatment of disease7,8 and the study of heat dissipation in integrated circuits1. By combining local light-induced heat sources with sensitive nanoscale thermometry, it may also be possible to engineer biological processes at the sub-cellular level2–5. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to nanoscale thermometry that utilizes coherent manipulation of the electronic spin associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond. We show the ability to detect temperature variations down to 1.8 mK (sensitivity of 9mK/Hz) in an ultra-pure bulk diamond sample. Using NV centers in diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs), we directly measure the local thermal environment at length scales down to 200 nm. Finally, by introducing both nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles into a single human embryonic fibroblast, we demonstrate temperature-gradient control and mapping at the sub-cellular level, enabling unique potential applications in life sciences. PMID:23903748

  4. Velocity navigator for motion compensated thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Florian; Krafft, Axel J; Yung, Joshua P; Stafford, R Jason; Elliott, Andrew; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bock, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift thermometry is sensitive to breathing motion that leads to incorrect phase differences. In this work, a novel velocity-sensitive navigator technique for triggering MR thermometry image acquisition is presented. A segmented echo planar imaging pulse sequence was modified for velocity-triggered temperature mapping. Trigger events were generated when the estimated velocity value was less than 0.2 cm/s during the slowdown phase in parallel to the velocity-encoding direction. To remove remaining high-frequency spikes from pulsation in real time, a Kalman filter was applied to the velocity navigator data. A phantom experiment with heating and an initial volunteer experiment without heating were performed to show the applicability of this technique. Additionally, a breath-hold experiment was conducted for comparison. A temperature rise of ΔT = +37.3°C was seen in the phantom experiment, and a root mean square error (RMSE) outside the heated region of 2.3°C could be obtained for periodic motion. In the volunteer experiment, a RMSE of 2.7°C/2.9°C (triggered vs. breath hold) was measured. A novel velocity navigator with Kalman filter postprocessing in real time significantly improves the temperature accuracy over non-triggered acquisitions and suggests being comparable to a breath-held acquisition. The proposed technique might be clinically applied for monitoring of thermal ablations in abdominal organs.

  5. Feasibility of computed tomography based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in bovine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandeya, G.D.; Klaessens, J.H.G.M.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Oudkerk, M.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.; Hillegersberg, R. van

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of computed tomography (CT) based thermometry during interstitial laser heating in the bovine liver. Four freshly exercised cylindrical blocks of bovine tissue were heated using a continuous laser of Nd:YAG (wavelength: 1064 nm, active length: 30 mm, power: 10-30 W). All tissues were imaged at least once before and 7 times during laser heating using CT and temperatures were simultaneously measured with 5 calibrated thermal sensors. The dependency of the average CT numbers as a function of temperature was analysed with regression analysis and a CT thermal sensitivity was derived. During laser heating, the growing hypodense area was observed around the laser source and that area showed an increase as a function of time. The formation of hypodense area was caused by declining in CT numbers at increasing temperatures. The regression analysis showed an inverse linear dependency between temperature and average CT number with -0.65 ± 0.048 HU/ C (R 2 = 0.75) for the range of 18-85 C in bovine liver. The non-invasive CT based thermometry during interstitial laser heating is feasible in the bovine liver. CT based thermometry could be further developed and may be of potential use during clinical LITT of the liver. (orig.)

  6. High Repetition Rate Thermometry System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin; Farooq, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    A system and method for rapid thermometry using intrapulse spectroscopy can include a laser for propagating pulses of electromagnetic radiation to a region. Each of the pulses can be chirped. The pulses from the region can be detected. An intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined from the pulses. An instantaneous temperature of the region based on the intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined.

  7. High Repetition Rate Thermometry System And Method

    KAUST Repository

    Chrystie, Robin

    2015-05-14

    A system and method for rapid thermometry using intrapulse spectroscopy can include a laser for propagating pulses of electromagnetic radiation to a region. Each of the pulses can be chirped. The pulses from the region can be detected. An intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined from the pulses. An instantaneous temperature of the region based on the intrapulse absorbance spectrum can be determined.

  8. A Determination of the Ratio of the Zinc Freezing Point to the Tin Freezing Point by Noise Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labenski, J. R.; Tew, W. L.; Benz, S. P.; Nam, S. W.; Dresselhaus, P.

    2008-02-01

    A Johnson-noise thermometer (JNT) has been used with a quantized voltage noise source (QVNS), as a calculable reference to determine the ratio of temperatures near the Zn freezing point to those near the Sn freezing point. The temperatures are derived in a series of separate measurements comparing the synthesized noise power from the QVNS with that of Johnson noise from a known resistance. The synthesized noise power is digitally programed to match the thermal noise powers at both temperatures and provides the principle means of scaling the temperatures. This produces a relatively flat spectrum for the ratio of spectral noise densities, which is close to unity in the low-frequency limit. The data are analyzed as relative spectral ratios over the 4.8 to 450 kHz range averaged over a 3.2 kHz bandwidth. A three-parameter model is used to account for differences in time constants that are inherently temperature dependent. A drift effect of approximately -6 μK·K-1 per day is observed in the results, and an empirical correction is applied to yield a relative difference in temperature ratios of -11.5 ± 43 μK·K-1 with respect to the ratio of temperatures assigned on the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). When these noise thermometry results are combined with results from acoustic gas thermometry at temperatures near the Sn freezing point, a value of T - T 90 = 7 ± 30 mK for the Zn freezing point is derived.

  9. Co-C and Pd-C Eutectic Fixed Points for Radiation Thermometry and Thermocouple Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.

    2017-12-01

    Two Co-C and Pd-C eutectic fixed point cells for both radiation thermometry and thermocouple thermometry were constructed at NMC. This paper describes details of the cell design, materials used, and fabrication of the cells. The melting curves of the Co-C and Pd-C cells were measured with a reference radiation thermometer realized in both a single-zone furnace and a three-zone furnace in order to investigate furnace effect. The transition temperatures in terms of ITS-90 were determined to be 1324.18 {°}C and 1491.61 {°}C with the corresponding combined standard uncertainty of 0.44 {°}C and 0.31 {°}C for Co-C and Pd-C, respectively, taking into account of the differences of two different types of furnaces used. The determined ITS-90 temperatures are also compared with that of INRIM cells obtained using the same reference radiation thermometer and the same furnaces with the same settings during a previous bilateral comparison exercise (Battuello et al. in Int J Thermophys 35:535-546, 2014). The agreements are within k=1 uncertainty for Co-C cell and k = 2 uncertainty for Pd-C cell. Shapes of the plateaus of NMC cells and INRIM cells are compared too and furnace effects are analyzed as well. The melting curves of the Co-C and Pd-C cells realized in the single-zone furnace are also measured by a Pt/Pd thermocouple, and the preliminary results are presented as well.

  10. Johnson Noise Thermometry in the range 505 K to 933 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Weston; Labenski, John; Nam, Sae Woo; Benz, Samuel; Dresselhaus, Paul; Martinis, John

    2006-03-01

    The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is an artifact-based temperature scale, T90, designed to approximate thermodynamic temperature T. The thermodynamic errors of the ITS-90, characterized as the value of T-T90, only recently have been quantified by primary thermodynamic methods. Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) is a primary method which can be applied over wide temperature ranges, and NIST is currently using JNT to determine T-T90 in the range 505 K to 933 K, overlapping both acoustic gas-based and radiation-based thermometry. Advances in digital electronics have now made the computationally intensive processing required for JNT viable using noise voltage correlation in the frequency domain. We have also optimized the design of the 5-wire JNT temperature probes to minimize electromagnetic interference and transmission line effects. Statistical uncertainties under 50 μK/K are achievable using relatively modest bandwidths of ˜100 kHz. The NIST JNT system will provide critical data for T-T90 linking together the highly accurate acoustic gas-based data at lower temperatures with the higher-temperature radiation-based data, forming the basis for a new International Temperature Scale with greatly improved thermodynamic accuracy.

  11. Design of an optical thermal sensor for proton exchange membrane fuel cell temperature measurement using phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Kristopher; Wang, Xia; Sangeorzan, Brian

    Internal temperatures in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell govern the ionic conductivities of the polymer electrolyte, influence the reaction rate at the electrodes, and control the water vapor pressure inside the cell. It is vital to fully understand thermal behavior in a PEM fuel cell if performance and durability are to be optimized. The objective of this research was to design, construct, and implement thermal sensors based on the principles of the lifetime-decay method of phosphor thermometry to measure temperatures inside a PEM fuel cell. Five sensors were designed and calibrated with a maximum uncertainty of ±0.6 °C. Using these sensors, surface temperatures were measured on the cathode gas diffusion layer of a 25 cm 2 PEM fuel cell. The test results demonstrate the utility of the optical temperature sensor design and provide insight into the thermal behavior found in a PEM fuel cell.

  12. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochergin, Vladimir [Microxact Inc.

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  13. Ratiometric luminescence thermometry with different combinations of emissions from Eu3+ doped Gd2Ti2O7 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lojpur, Vesna; Ćulubrk, Sanja; Dramićanin, Miroslav D.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, Eu 3+ doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanoparticles were tested for application in ratiometric luminescence thermometry. It is shown that two combinations of emissions: one that uses two emissions of Eu 3+ ions and one that uses one emission of Eu 3+ ions and trap emission of Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 provide thermometry over the 303–423 K temperature range with relative sensitivities between 0.14% K −1 and 0.95% K −1 . Thermometry based on two Eu 3+ emissions from 5 D 0 to 5 D 1 levels has a higher relative sensitivity, but lower absolute sensitivity than thermometry based on one Eu 3+ emission and trap emission of Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 . The tested material is prepared by Pechini-type polymerized complex route and is composed of agglomerated nanoparticles of ~30–50 nm in size with pure-phase cubic structure (space group Fd-3m) as evidenced from electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. - Highlights: • Eu 3+ doped Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 nanoparticles can serve as probes for luminescence thermometry. • Gd 2 Ti 2 O 7 trap emission is an excellent internal standard for luminescence thermometry. • Temperature is measured over 303–423 K range with sensitivity ranging 0.14–0.95% K −1 .

  14. Infrared thermometry of water-stressed crops - emerging methods and technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared thermometry has shown potential to quantify water stress in crop canopy. This presentation will outline the limited irrigation experiments by the USDA-ARS in northern Colorado, which is used for a framework to evaluate canopy temperature. Recent methods have been introduced that may be accu...

  15. Progress in Noise Thermometry at 505 K and 693 K Using Quantized Voltage Noise Ratio Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, W. L.; Benz, S. P.; Dresselhaus, P. D.; Coakley, K. J.; Rogalla, H.; White, D. R.; Labenski, J. R.

    2010-09-01

    Technical advances and new results in noise thermometry at temperatures near the tin freezing point and the zinc freezing point using a quantized voltage noise source (QVNS) are reported. The temperatures are derived by comparing the power spectral density of QVNS synthesized noise with that of Johnson noise from a known resistance at both 505 K and 693 K. Reference noise is digitally synthesized so that the average power spectra of the QVNS match those of the thermal noise, resulting in ratios of power spectra close to unity in the low-frequency limit. Three-parameter models are used to account for differences in impedance-related time constants in the spectra. Direct comparison of noise temperatures to the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is achieved in a comparison furnace with standard platinum resistance thermometers. The observed noise temperatures determined by operating the noise thermometer in both absolute and relative modes, and related statistics together with estimated uncertainties are reported. The relative noise thermometry results are combined with results from other thermodynamic determinations at temperatures near the tin freezing point to calculate a value of T - T 90 = +4(18) mK for temperatures near the zinc freezing point. These latest results achieve a lower uncertainty than that of our earlier efforts. The present value of T - T 90 is compared to other published determinations from noise thermometry and other methods.

  16. Zirconium metal-water oxidation kinetics. I. Thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathcart, J.V.; McElroy, D.L.; Pawel, R.E.; Perkins, R.A.; Williams, R.K.; Yurek, G.J.

    1976-02-01

    A description is given of the thermometry techniques used in the Zirconium Metal--Water Oxidation Kinetics Program. Temperature measurements in the range 900 to 1500 0 C are made in three experimental systems: two oxidation apparatuses and the annealing furnace used in a corollary study of the diffusion of oxygen in β-Zircaloy. Carefully calibrated Pt vs Pt--10 percent Rh thermocouples are employed in all three apparatuses, while a Pt--6 percent Rh vs Pt-- 30 percent Rh thermocouple and an optical pyrometer are used in addition in the annealing furnace. Features of the experimental systems pertaining to thermocouple installation, temperature control, emf measurements, etc. are described, and potential temperature-measurement error sources are discussed in detail. The accuracy of the temperature measurements is analyzed

  17. Single-contact tunneling thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-02-23

    A single-contact tunneling thermometry circuit includes a tunnel junction formed between two objects. Junction temperature gradient information is determined based on a mathematical relationship between a target alternating voltage applied across the junction and the junction temperature gradient. Total voltage measured across the junction indicates the magnitude of the target alternating voltage. A thermal gradient is induced across the junction. A reference thermovoltage is measured when zero alternating voltage is applied across the junction. An increasing alternating voltage is applied while measuring a thermovoltage component and a DC rectification voltage component created by the applied alternating voltage. The target alternating voltage is reached when the thermovoltage is nullified or doubled by the DC rectification voltage depending on the sign of the reference thermovoltage. Thermoelectric current and current measurements may be utilized in place of the thermovoltage and voltage measurements. The system may be automated with a feedback loop.

  18. Completion of Level 4 Milestone M4AT-15OR2301039 for the Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements Work Package AT-15OR230103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-14

    This memorandum constitutes our September 2015 level 4 milestone for the project entitled “Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements” and satisfies the Milestone/Activity (Conclude HFIR field demonstration of JNT prototype). The progress summary describes the work performed to complete the subject milestone.

  19. Digital particle image thermometry/velocimetry: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabiri, Dana [University of Washington, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Digital particle image thermometry/velocimetry (DPIT/V) is a relatively new methodology that allows for measurements of simultaneous temperature and velocity within a two-dimensional domain, using thermochromic liquid crystal tracer particles as the temperature and velocity sensors. Extensive research has been carried out over recent years that have allowed the methodology and its implementation to grow and evolve. While there have been several reviews on the topic of liquid crystal thermometry (Moffat in Exp Therm Fluid Sci 3:14-32, 1990; Baughn in Int J Heat Fluid Flow 16:365-375, 1995; Roberts and East in J Spacecr Rockets 33:761-768, 1996; Wozniak et al. in Appl Sci Res 56:145-156, 1996; Behle et al. in Appl Sci Res 56:113-143, 1996; Stasiek in Heat Mass Transf 33:27-39, 1997; Stasiek and Kowalewski in Opto Electron Rev 10:1-10, 2002; Stasiek et al. in Opt Laser Technol 38:243-256, 2006; Smith et al. in Exp Fluids 30:190-201, 2001; Kowalewski et al. in Springer handbook of experimental fluid mechanics, 1st edn. Springer, Berlin, pp 487-561, 2007), the focus of the present review is to provide a relevant discussion of liquid crystals pertinent to DPIT/V. This includes a background on liquid crystals and color theory, a discussion of experimental setup parameters, a description of the methodology's most recent advances and processing methods affecting temperature measurements, and finally an explanation of its various implementations and applications. (orig.)

  20. Ultrasonic thermometry for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravana Kumar, S.; Arunraj, A.L.R.; Swaminathan, K.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic transducer provides a method of measurement of temperature in industrial tanks and boilers containing different liquids with varied salt content. This method is used to measure the average temperature continuously where other traditional methods available do not offer. Traditional methods used for temperature measurement like infrared thermometers, thermocouples, measures temperature at a single location. Numerous thermocouples are to be fixed at various part of the boiler in order to measure the temperature of the entire boiler, which incurs high cost. Reliability of the system decreases, with increasing number of thermocouples. When they fail at a point, the time incurred in finding the faulty part or faulty thermocouple is high. Ultrasonic transducer provides continuous measurement for all different characteristic liquids with higher accuracy and lesser response time. Fault location and clearance time is also less in ultrasonic measurement method, since only a couple of transducers used for the entire boiler structure. Additionally ultrasonic thermometry along support measuring electronic system can be built of low cost. (author)

  1. Two-dimensional thermometry by using neutron resonance absorption spectrometer DOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiyama, T.; Noda, H.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Ikeda, S.

    2001-01-01

    We applied the neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy to thermometry of a bulk object. The measurement was done by using the neutron resonance absorption spectrometer, DOG, installed at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization Neutron Source, which enables us to investigate effective temperature of a particular element by analyzing line width of resonance absorption spectrum. The effective temperature becomes consistence with the sample temperature above room temperature. For the analysis we applied the computed tomography method to reconstruct the temperature distribution on the object cross section. The results and the calculated distribution by the heat conducting equation are well agreed on the temperature difference inside the object. (author)

  2. Measurement of Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer Parameters using Infrared Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kommer, Eric; Dessiatoun, Serguei; Kim, Jungho

    2012-01-01

    A novel technique to measure heat transfer and liquid film thickness distributions over relatively large areas for two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena using infrared (IR)thermometry is described. IR thermometry is an established technology that can be used to measure temperatures when optical access to the surface is available in the wavelengths of interest. In this work, a midwave IR camera (3.6-5.1 microns) is used to determine the temperature distribution within a multilayer consisting of a silicon substrate coated with a thin insulator. Since silicon is largely transparent to IR radiation, the temperature of the inner and outer walls of the multilayer can be measured by coating selected areas with a thin, IR opaque film. If the fluid used is also partially transparent to IR, the flow can be visualized and the liquid film thickness can be measured. The theoretical basis for the technique is given along with a description of the test apparatus and data reduction procedure. The technique is demonstrated by determining the heat transfer coefficient distributions produced by droplet evaporation and flow boiling heat transfer.

  3. Thermometry, calorimetry, and mean body temperature during heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Glen P; Jay, Ollie

    2013-10-01

    Heat balance in humans is maintained at near constant levels through the adjustment of physiological mechanisms that attain a balance between the heat produced within the body and the heat lost to the environment. Heat balance is easily disturbed during changes in metabolic heat production due to physical activity and/or exposure to a warmer environment. Under such conditions, elevations of skin blood flow and sweating occur via a hypothalamic negative feedback loop to maintain an enhanced rate of dry and evaporative heat loss. Body heat storage and changes in core temperature are a direct result of a thermal imbalance between the rate of heat production and the rate of total heat dissipation to the surrounding environment. The derivation of the change in body heat content is of fundamental importance to the physiologist assessing the exposure of the human body to environmental conditions that result in thermal imbalance. It is generally accepted that the concurrent measurement of the total heat generated by the body and the total heat dissipated to the ambient environment is the most accurate means whereby the change in body heat content can be attained. However, in the absence of calorimetric methods, thermometry is often used to estimate the change in body heat content. This review examines heat exchange during challenges to heat balance associated with progressive elevations in environmental heat load and metabolic rate during exercise. Further, we evaluate the physiological responses associated with heat stress and discuss the thermal and nonthermal influences on the body's ability to dissipate heat from a heat balance perspective.

  4. Practical acoustic thermometry with twin-tube and single-tube sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Podesta, M.; Sutton, G.; Edwards, G.; Stanger, L.; Preece, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Accurate measurement of high temperatures in a nuclear environment presents unique challenges. All secondary techniques inevitably drift because the thermometric materials in thermocouples and resistance sensors are sensitive not just to temperature, but also their own chemical and physical composition. The solution is to use primary methods that rely on fundamental links between measurable physical properties and temperature. In the nuclear field the best known technique is the measurement of Johnson Noise in a resistor (See Paper 80 at this conference). In this paper we describe the measurement of temperature in terms of the speed of sound in a gas confined in a tube - an acoustic waveguide. Acoustic thermometry is the most accurate technique of primary thermometry ever devised with the best uncertainty of measurement below 0.001 C. In contrast, the acoustic technique described in this work has a much larger uncertainty, approximately 1 deg. C. But the cost and ease of use are improved by several orders of magnitude, making implementation eminently practical. We first describe the basic construction and method of operation of thermometers using twin-tubes and single tubes. We then present results using a twin-tube design showing that showing long term stability (i.e. no detectable drift) at 700 deg. C over periods of several weeks. We then outline how the technique may be developed for different nuclear applications. (authors)

  5. A new method of liquid crystal thermometry excluding human color sensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, Tomoaki; Akino, Norio; Ueda, Masaharu.

    1987-01-01

    Some choresteric liquid crystals can be used as a thermometer because of their color changes with varying temperatures. However, it is impossible to employ human color sensation for precise quantitative evaluation of temperature from their color. Therefore, a new method of liquid crystal thermometry is developed using narrow band optical filters and an image processor to exclude the employment of human color sensation. Relations between filter wavelength and temperature were determined by calibration tests. Two dimensional temperature distributions on a heated plate were successfully measured by the present method. (author)

  6. Robust adaptive extended Kalman filtering for real time MR-thermometry guided HIFU interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roujol, Sébastien; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Hey, Silke; Moonen, Chrit; Ries, Mario

    2012-03-01

    Real time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry is gaining clinical importance for monitoring and guiding high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablations of tumorous tissue. The temperature information can be employed to adjust the position and the power of the HIFU system in real time and to determine the therapy endpoint. The requirement to resolve both physiological motion of mobile organs and the rapid temperature variations induced by state-of-the-art high-power HIFU systems require fast MRI-acquisition schemes, which are generally hampered by low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). This directly limits the precision of real time MR-thermometry and thus in many cases the feasibility of sophisticated control algorithms. To overcome these limitations, temporal filtering of the temperature has been suggested in the past, which has generally an adverse impact on the accuracy and latency of the filtered data. Here, we propose a novel filter that aims to improve the precision of MR-thermometry while monitoring and adapting its impact on the accuracy. For this, an adaptive extended Kalman filter using a model describing the heat transfer for acoustic heating in biological tissues was employed together with an additional outlier rejection to address the problem of sparse artifacted temperature points. The filter was compared to an efficient matched FIR filter and outperformed the latter in all tested cases. The filter was first evaluated on simulated data and provided in the worst case (with an approximate configuration of the model) a substantial improvement of the accuracy by a factor 3 and 15 during heat up and cool down periods, respectively. The robustness of the filter was then evaluated during HIFU experiments on a phantom and in vivo in porcine kidney. The presence of strong temperature artifacts did not affect the thermal dose measurement using our filter whereas a high measurement variation of 70% was observed with the FIR filter.

  7. Kalman Filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Chen, Shuo; Deng, Kexin; Chen, Bingyao; Wei, Xing; Yang, Jiafei; Wang, Shi; Ying, Kui

    2017-01-01

    To develop a self-adaptive and fast thermometry method by combining the original hybrid magnetic resonance thermometry method and the bio heat transfer equation (BHTE) model. The proposed Kalman filtered Bio Heat Transfer Model Based Self-adaptive Hybrid Magnetic Resonance Thermometry, abbreviated as KalBHT hybrid method, introduced the BHTE model to synthesize a window on the regularization term of the hybrid algorithm, which leads to a self-adaptive regularization both spatially and temporally with change of temperature. Further, to decrease the sensitivity to accuracy of the BHTE model, Kalman filter is utilized to update the window at each iteration time. To investigate the effect of the proposed model, computer heating simulation, phantom microwave heating experiment and dynamic in-vivo model validation of liver and thoracic tumor were conducted in this study. The heating simulation indicates that the KalBHT hybrid algorithm achieves more accurate results without adjusting λ to a proper value in comparison to the hybrid algorithm. The results of the phantom heating experiment illustrate that the proposed model is able to follow temperature changes in the presence of motion and the temperature estimated also shows less noise in the background and surrounding the hot spot. The dynamic in-vivo model validation with heating simulation demonstrates that the proposed model has a higher convergence rate, more robustness to susceptibility problem surrounding the hot spot and more accuracy of temperature estimation. In the healthy liver experiment with heating simulation, the RMSE of the hot spot of the proposed model is reduced to about 50% compared to the RMSE of the original hybrid model and the convergence time becomes only about one fifth of the hybrid model. The proposed model is able to improve the accuracy of the original hybrid algorithm and accelerate the convergence rate of MR temperature estimation.

  8. Transrectal ultrasound applicator for prostate heating monitored using MRI thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Nadine Barrie; Buchanan, Mark T.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For potential localized hyperthermia treatment of tumors within the prostate, an ultrasound applicator consisting entirely of nonmagnetic materials for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been developed and tested on muscle tissue ex vivo and in vivo. Methods and Materials: A partial-cylindrical intracavitary transducer consisting of 16 elements in a 4 x 4 pattern was constructed. It produced a radially propagating acoustic pressure field. Each element of this array (1.5 x 0.75 cm), operating at 1.5 MHz, could be separately powered to produce a desired energy deposition pattern within a target volume. Spatial and temporal temperature elevations were determined using the temperature-dependent proton resonant frequency (PRF) shift and phase subtraction of MR images acquired during ultrasonic heating. Four rabbits were exposed to the ultrasound to raise the local tissue temperature to 45 deg. C for 25 minutes. Six experiments compared thermocouple temperature results to PRF shift temperature results. Results: The tests showed that the multi-element ultrasound applicator was MRI-compatible and allowed imaging during sonication. The induced temperature distribution could be controlled by monitoring the RF power to each transducer element. Therapeutic temperature elevations were easily achieved in vivo at power levels that were about 16% of the maximum system power. From the six thermocouple experiments, comparison between the thermocouple temperature and the PRF temperature yielded an average error of 0.34 ± 0.36 deg. C. Conclusions: The MRI-compatible intracavitary applicator and driving system was able to control the ultrasound field and temperature pattern in vivo. MRI thermometry using the PRF shift can provide adequate temperature accuracy and stability for controlling the temperature distribution

  9. Measurement and Analysis of the Temperature Gradient of Blackbody Cavities, for Use in Radiation Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucas, Javier; Segovia, José Juan

    2018-05-01

    Blackbody cavities are the standard radiation sources widely used in the fields of radiometry and radiation thermometry. Its effective emissivity and uncertainty depend to a large extent on the temperature gradient. An experimental procedure based on the radiometric method for measuring the gradient is followed. Results are applied to particular blackbody configurations where gradients can be thermometrically estimated by contact thermometers and where the relationship between both basic methods can be established. The proposed procedure may be applied to commercial blackbodies if they are modified allowing secondary contact temperature measurement. In addition, the established systematic may be incorporated as part of the actions for quality assurance in routine calibrations of radiation thermometers, by using the secondary contact temperature measurement for detecting departures from the real radiometrically obtained gradient and the effect on the uncertainty. On the other hand, a theoretical model is proposed to evaluate the effect of temperature variations on effective emissivity and associated uncertainty. This model is based on a gradient sample chosen following plausible criteria. The model is consistent with the Monte Carlo method for calculating the uncertainty of effective emissivity and complements others published in the literature where uncertainty is calculated taking into account only geometrical variables and intrinsic emissivity. The mathematical model and experimental procedure are applied and validated using a commercial type three-zone furnace, with a blackbody cavity modified to enable a secondary contact temperature measurement, in the range between 400 °C and 1000 °C.

  10. Temperature evolution and the oxygen isotope composition of Phanerozoic oceans from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkes, Gregory A.; Passey, Benjamin H.; Grossman, Ethan L.; Shenton, Brock J.; Yancey, Thomas E.; Pérez-Huerta, Alberto

    2018-05-01

    Surface temperature is among the most important parameters describing planetary climate and habitability, and yet there remains considerable debate about the temperature evolution of the Earth's oceans during the Phanerozoic Eon (541 million years ago to present), the time during which complex metazoan life radiated on Earth. Here we critically assess the emerging record of Phanerozoic ocean temperatures based on carbonate clumped isotope thermometry of fossil brachiopod and mollusk shells, and we present new data that fill important gaps in the Late Paleozoic record. We evaluate and reject the hypothesis that solid-state reordering of 13C-18O bonds has destroyed the primary clumped isotope temperature signal of most fossils during sedimentary burial at elevated temperatures. The resulting Phanerozoic record, which shows a general coupling between tropical seawater temperatures and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels since the Paleozoic, indicates that tropical temperatures during the icehouse climate of the Carboniferous period were broadly similar to present (∼25-30 °C), and suggests that benthic metazoans were able to thrive at temperatures of 35-40 °C during intervals of the early and possibly the latest Paleozoic when CO2 levels were likely 5-10× higher than present-day values. Equally important, there is no resolvable trend in seawater oxygen isotope ratios (δ18 O) over the past ∼500 million years, indicating that the average temperature of oxygen exchange between seawater and the oceanic crust has been high (∼270 °C) since at least the early Paleozoic, which points to mid-ocean ridges as the dominant locus of water-rock interaction over the past half-billion years.

  11. Combined tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and monochromatic radiation thermometry in ammonium dinitramide-based thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hui; Ou, Dongbin; Chen, Lianzhong; Li, Fei; Yu, Xilong

    2018-02-01

    Nonintrusive temperature measurements for a real ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based thruster by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and monochromatic radiation thermometry are proposed. The ADN-based thruster represents a promising future space propulsion employing green, nontoxic propellant. Temperature measurements in the chamber enable quantitative thermal analysis for the thruster, providing access to evaluate thermal properties of the thruster and optimize thruster design. A laser-based sensor measures temperature of combustion gas in the chamber, while a monochromatic thermometry system based on thermal radiation is utilized to monitor inner wall temperature in the chamber. Additional temperature measurements of the outer wall temperature are conducted on the injector, catalyst bed, and combustion chamber of the thruster by using thermocouple, respectively. An experimental ADN thruster is redesigned with optimizing catalyst bed length of 14 mm and steady-state firing tests are conducted under various feed pressures over the range from 5 to 12 bar at a typical ignition temperature of 200°C. A threshold of feed pressure higher than 8 bar is required for the thruster's normal operation and upstream movement of the heat release zone is revealed in the combustion chamber out of temperature evolution in the chamber.

  12. Vortex Thermometry for Turbulent Two-Dimensional Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszek, Andrew J; Davis, Matthew J; Paganin, David M; Helmerson, Kristian; Simula, Tapio P

    2018-01-19

    We introduce a new method of statistical analysis to characterize the dynamics of turbulent fluids in two dimensions. We establish that, in equilibrium, the vortex distributions can be uniquely connected to the temperature of the vortex gas, and we apply this vortex thermometry to characterize simulations of decaying superfluid turbulence. We confirm the hypothesis of vortex evaporative heating leading to Onsager vortices proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 165302 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.165302, and we find previously unidentified vortex power-law distributions that emerge from the dynamics.

  13. The Kelvin and Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, B. W.; Furukawa, G. T.; Kreider, K. G.; Meyer, C. W.; Ripple, D. C.; Strouse, G. F.; Tew, W. L.; Moldover, M. R.; Johnson, B. Carol; Yoon, H. W.; Gibson, C. E.; Saunders, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    The International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) is defined from 0.65 K upwards to the highest temperature measurable by spectral radiation thermometry, the radiation thermometry being based on the Planck radiation law. When it was developed, the ITS-90 represented thermodynamic temperatures as closely as possible. Part I of this paper describes the realization of contact thermometry up to 1234.93 K, the temperature range in which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of calibration of thermometers at 15 fixed points and vapor pressure/temperature relations which are phase equilibrium states of pure substances. The realization is accomplished by using fixed-point devices, containing samples of the highest available purity, and suitable temperature-controlled environments. All components are constructed to achieve the defining equilibrium states of the samples for the calibration of thermometers. The high quality of the temperature realization and measurements is well documented. Various research efforts are described, including research to improve the uncertainty in thermodynamic temperatures by measuring the velocity of sound in gas up to 800 K, research in applying noise thermometry techniques, and research on thermocouples. Thermometer calibration services and high-purity samples and devices suitable for “on-site” thermometer calibration that are available to the thermometry community are described. Part II of the paper describes the realization of temperature above 1234.93 K for which the ITS-90 is defined in terms of the calibration of spectroradiometers using reference blackbody sources that are at the temperature of the equilibrium liquid-solid phase transition of pure silver, gold, or copper. The realization of temperature from absolute spectral or total radiometry over the temperature range from about 60 K to 3000 K is also described. The dissemination of the temperature scale using radiation thermometry from NIST to the customer is achieved by

  14. Noninvasive MRI thermometry with the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method: in vivo results in human muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Poorter, J; De Wagter, C; De Deene, Y

    1995-01-01

    The noninvasive thermometry method is based on the temperature dependence of the proton resonance frequency (PRF). High-quality temperature images can be obtained from phase information of standard gradient-echo sequences with an accuracy of 0.2 degrees C in phantoms. This work was focused on the...

  15. Evidence of hemispheric specialization in marmosets (Callithrix penicillata using tympanic membrane thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tomaz

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have employed tympanic thermometry to assess lateralization of cognitive and emotional functions in primates. However, no studies using this technique have investigated the possibility of hemispheric specialization in New World monkeys. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate tympanic membrane (TM temperature asymmetries and their possible correlation with stress responses in marmosets (Callithrix penicillata. Infrared TM thermometry was completed bilaterally in 24 animals (14 males and 10 females during a stressful situation of capture and restraint. There were no significant differences between gender. A significant negative correlation was observed between TM temperature of the right ear and the number of captures (r = -0.633; P<0.001. Subjects with a more frequent previous history of captures (5 to 9 captures; N = 11 showed lower TM temperature when compared to those with fewer previous captures (1 to 4 captures; N = 13. No differences were observed for the left TM temperature. These results suggest that under intense emotional challenge (capture and restraint there is a stronger activation of the neural structures situated in the right brain hemisphere. Taken together, the data reveal for the first time evidence of hemispheric specialization in emotional physiological processing in a New World monkey.

  16. Effect of frost on phosphorescence for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed phosphorescence lifetime and its accuracy by growing frost for thermographic phosphor thermometry in a low-temperature environment. Mg4FGeO6:Mn particles were coated on an aluminum plate and excited with a UV-LED to obtain phosphorescence signals. The surface temperature was maintained at  -20, -15, -10 °C, and the phosphorescence signal was acquired as the frost grew for 3700 s. The lifetime was calculated and compared with the calibration curve under no-frost conditions. The error of the measured lifetime was within 0.7% of that in the no-frost conditions. A 2D surface temperature profile of the target plate was successfully obtained with the frost formation.

  17. Magnon and phonon thermometry with inelastic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Kevin S.; An, Kyongmo; Li, Xiaoqin

    2018-04-01

    Spin caloritronics investigates the interplay between the transport of spin and heat. In the spin Seebeck effect, a thermal gradient across a magnetic material generates a spin current. A temperature difference between the energy carriers of the spin and lattice subsystems, namely the magnons and phonons, is necessary for such thermal nonequilibrium generation of spin current. Inelastic light scattering is a powerful method that can resolve the individual temperatures of magnons and phonons. In this review, we discuss the thermometry capabilities of inelastic light scattering for measuring optical and acoustic phonons, as well as magnons. A scattering spectrum offers three temperature sensitive parameters: frequency shift, linewidth, and integrated intensity. We discuss the temperatures measured via each of these parameters for both phonon and magnons. Finally, we discuss inelastic light scattering experiments that have examined the magnon and phonon temperatures in thermal nonequilibrium which are particularly relevant to spin caloritronic phenomena.

  18. All-Optical Nanoscale Thermometry using Silicon-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christian; Evans, Ruffin; Sipahigil, Alp; Bhaskar, Mihir; Sukachev, Denis; Lukin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    Accurate thermometry at the nanoscale is a difficult challenge, but building such a thermometer would be a powerful tool for discovering and understanding new processes in biology, chemistry and physics. Applications include cell-selective treatment of disease, engineering of more efficient integrated circuits, or even the development of new chemical and biological reactions. In this work, we study how the bulk properties of the Silicon Vacancy center (SiV) in diamond depend on temperature, and use them to measure temperature with 100mK accuracy. Using SiVs in 200 nm nanodiamonds, we measure the temperature with 100 nm spatial resolution over a 10 μm area.

  19. Exploring the potential of clumped isotope thermometry on coccolith-rich sediments as a sea surface temperature proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Anna Joy; John, Cédric M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding past changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) is crucial; however, existing proxies for reconstructing past SSTs are hindered by unknown ancient seawater composition (foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O) or reflect subsurface temperatures (TEX86) or have a limited applicable temperature range (U37k'). We examine clumped isotope (Δ47) thermometry to fossil coccolith-rich material as an SST proxy, as clumped isotopes are independent of original seawater composition and applicable to a wide temperature range and coccolithophores are widespread and dissolution resistant. The Δ47-derived temperatures from 63 μm fraction removes most nonmixed layer components; however, the Δ47-derived temperatures display an unexpected slight decreasing trend with decreasing size fraction. This unexpected trend could partly arise because larger coccoliths (5-12 μm) are removed during the size fraction separation process. The c1 and <63 μm c2 Δ47-derived temperatures are comparable to concurrent U37k' SSTs. The <20, <10, and 2-5 μm c2 Δ47-derived temperatures are consistently cooler than expected. The Δ47-U37k' temperature offset is probably caused by abiotic/diagenetic calcite present in the c2 2-5 μm fraction (˜53% by area), which potentially precipitated at bottom water temperatures of ˜6°C. Our results indicate that clumped isotopes on coccolith-rich sediment fractions have potential as an SST proxy, particularly in tropical regions, providing that careful investigation of the appropriate size fraction for the region and time scale is undertaken.

  20. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, William; Staruch, Robert M.; Pichardo, Samuel; Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O.; Huang, Yuexi; Ylihautala, Mika; McGuffin, Merrylee; Czarnota, Gregory; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  1. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Hyperthermia for Recurrent Rectal Cancer: MR Thermometry Evaluation and Preclinical Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William, E-mail: William.Chu@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Staruch, Robert M. [Clinical Sites Research Program, Philips Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Pichardo, Samuel [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Physics and Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada); Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max O. [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); Huang, Yuexi [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ylihautala, Mika [MR Therapy, Philips Healthcare, Vantaa (Finland); McGuffin, Merrylee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hynynen, Kullervo [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) mild hyperthermia in deep tissue targets for enhancing radiation therapy and chemotherapy in the context of recurrent rectal cancer. A preclinical study was performed to evaluate the safety and performance of MR-HIFU mild hyperthermia. A prospective imaging study was performed in volunteers with rectal cancer to evaluate MR thermometry quality near the rectum and accessibility of rectal tumors using MR-HIFU. Methods and Materials: Mild hyperthermia was performed in pig thigh (9 sonications, 6 pigs) using a clinical MR-HIFU system. Targets near the rectal wall and deep thigh were evaluated. Thermal maps obtained in 6 planes every 3.2 seconds were used to control sonications in 18-mm diameter treatment regions at temperatures of 42°C to 42.5°C for 10 to 60 minutes. Volunteer imaging-only studies to assess the quality of MR thermometry (without heating) were approved by the institutional research ethics board. Anatomic and MR thermometry images were acquired in consenting volunteers with rectal cancer. In 3 of 6 study participants, rectal filling with saline was used to reduce motion-related MR thermometry artifacts near the tumor. Results: In pigs, mean target temperature matched the desired hyperthermia temperature within 0.2°C; temporal standard deviation ≤0.5°C. With optimized control thresholds, no undesired tissue damage was observed. In human volunteers, MR temperature measurements had adequate precision and stability, especially when rectal filling was used to reduce bowel motion. Conclusions: In pigs, MR-HIFU can safely deliver mild hyperthermia (41°C-43°C) to a targeted volume for 30 minutes. In humans, careful patient selection and preparation will enable adequate targeting for recurrent rectal cancers and sufficient MR temperature mapping stability to control mild hyperthermia. These results enable human trials of MR-HIFU hyperthermia.

  2. Observation and correction of transient cavitation-induced PRFS thermometry artifacts during radiofrequency ablation, using simultaneous ultrasound/MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallon, Magalie; Terraz, Sylvain; Roland, Joerg; Dumont, Erik; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2010-04-01

    MR thermometry based on the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) is the most commonly used method for the monitoring of thermal therapies. As the chemical shift of water protons is temperature dependent, the local temperature variation (relative to an initial baseline) may be calculated from time-dependent phase changes in gradient-echo (GRE) MR images. Dynamic phase shift in GRE images is also produced by time-dependent changes in the magnetic bulk susceptibility of tissue. Gas bubbles (known as "white cavitation") are frequently visualized near the RF electrode in ultrasonography-guided radio frequency ablation (RFA). This study aimed to investigate RFA-induced cavitation's effects by using simultaneous ultrasonography and MRI, to both visualize the cavitation and quantify the subsequent magnetic susceptibility-mediated errors in concurrent PRFS MR-thermometry (MRT) as well as to propose a first-order correction for the latter errors. RF heating in saline gels and in ex vivo tissues was performed with MR-compatible bipolar and monopolar electrodes inside a 1.5 T MR clinical scanner. Ultrasonography simultaneous to PRFS MRT was achieved using a MR-compatible phased-array ultrasonic transducer. PRFS MRT was performed interleaved in three orthogonal planes and compared to measurements from fluoroptic sensors, under low and, respectively, high RFA power levels. Control experiments were performed to isolate the main source of errors in standard PRFS thermometry. Ultrasonography, MRI and digital camera pictures clearly demonstrated generation of bubbles every time when operating the radio frequency equipment at therapeutic powers (> or = 30 W). Simultaneous bimodal (ultrasonography and MRI) monitoring of high power RF heating demonstrated a correlation between the onset of the PRFS-thermometry errors and the appearance of bubbles around the applicator. In an ex vivo study using a bipolar RF electrode under low power level (5 W), the MR measured temperature curves

  3. A high-resolution mK-calorimeter applying SQUID-thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifenberger, Andreas; Leps, Norman; Fleischmann, Andreas; Pies, Christian; Enss, Christian; Klingeler, Ruediger [Kirchhoff-Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, INF 227,69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    A new calorimeter for measuring single-crystalline samples of mg-size at ultra-low temperatures is described. Thermometry is done by means of a paramagnetic sensor material (Er-doped Au) in a low magnetic field. A temperature change results in a magnetization change which can be read out as change in magnetic flux by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). This enables measurements in a wide temperature range (theoretically from 1 mK-1 K) with very high sensitivities. The bolometric design exhibits low addenda heat capacity and allows measurements of heat capacities from nJ/K to {mu}J/K by means of a temperature-relaxation method. The performance of the device is compared to a commercially available Quantum Design calorimeter in elsewise unchanged experimental settings in the temperature range from 15 mK to 500 mK.

  4. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  5. Implementation of foot thermometry plus mHealth to prevent diabetic foot ulcers: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo-Porras, Maria; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Sacksteder, Katherine A; Gilman, Robert H; Malaga, German; Armstrong, David G; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-04-19

    Diabetic foot neuropathy (DFN) is one of the most important complications of diabetes mellitus; its early diagnosis and intervention can prevent foot ulcers and the need for amputation. Thermometry, measuring the temperature of the feet, is a promising emerging modality for diabetic foot ulcer prevention. However, patient compliance with at-home monitoring is concerning. Delivering messages to remind patients to perform thermometry and foot care might be helpful to guarantee regular foot monitoring. This trial was designed to compare the incidence of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) between participants who receive thermometry alone and those who receive thermometry as well as mHealth (SMS and voice messaging) over a year-long study period. This is an evaluator-blinded, randomized, 12-month trial. Individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged between 18-80 years, having a present dorsalis pedis pulse in both feet, are in risk group 2 or 3 using the diabetic foot risk classification system (as specified by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot), have an operating cell phone or a caregiver with an operating cell phone, and have the ability to provide informed consent will be eligible to participate in the study. Recruitment will be performed in diabetes outpatient clinics at two Ministry of Health tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. participants in both groups will receive education about foot care at the beginning of the study and they will be provided with a thermometry device (TempStat™). TempStat™ is a tool that captures a thermal image of the feet, which, depending on the temperature of the feet, shows different colors. In this study, if a participant notes a single yellow image or variance between one foot and the contralateral foot, they will be prompted to notify a nurse to evaluate their activity within the previous 2 weeks and make appropriate recommendations. In addition to thermometry, participants in the intervention arm

  6. A thermocouple thermometry system for ultrasound hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozarka, M.; Gharakhani, A.; Magin, R.; Cain, C.

    1984-01-01

    A thermometry system designed to be used in the treatment of cancer by ultrasound hyperthermia is described. The system monitors tumor temperatures using 16 type T (copper-constantan) thermocouples and is controlled by a 12 MHz Intel 8031 microcomputer. An analog circuit board contains the thermocouple amplifiers, an analog multiplexer, scaling circuitry, and an analog to digital converter. A digital board contains the Intel 8031, program memory, data memory, as well as circuitry for control and data communications. Communication with the hyperthermia system control computer is serially by RS-232 with selectable baud rate. Since the thermocouple amplifiers may have slight differences in gain and offset, a calibrated offset is added to a lookup table value to obtain the proper display temperature to within +- 0.1 0 C. The calibration routine, implemented in software, loads a nonvolatile random access memory chip with the proper offset values based on the outputs of each thermocouple channel at known temperatures which bracket a range of interest

  7. Reconstruction of limnology and microbialite formation conditions from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V A; Lim, D; Laval, B L; Brady, A; Slater, G; Tripati, A K

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative tools for deciphering the environment of microbialite formation are relatively limited. For example, the oxygen isotope carbonate-water geothermometer requires assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water of formation. We explored the utility of using 'clumped' isotope thermometry as a tool to study the temperatures of microbialite formation. We studied microbialites recovered from water depths of 10-55 m in Pavilion Lake, and 10-25 m in Kelly Lake, spanning the thermocline in both lakes. We determined the temperature of carbonate growth and the (18)O/(16)O ratio of the waters that microbialites grew in. Results were then compared to current limnological data from the lakes to reconstruct the history of microbialite formation. Modern microbialites collected at shallow depths (11.7 m) in both lakes yield clumped isotope-based temperatures of formation that are within error of summer water temperatures, suggesting that clumped isotope analyses may be used to reconstruct past climates and to probe the environments in which microbialites formed. The deepest microbialites (21.7-55 m) were recovered from below the present-day thermoclines in both lakes and yield radioisotope ages indicating they primarily formed earlier in the Holocene. During this time, pollen data and our reconstructed water (18)O/(16)O ratios indicate a period of aridity, with lower lake levels. At present, there is a close association between both photosynthetic and heterotrophic communities, and carbonate precipitation/microbialite formation, with biosignatures of photosynthetic influences on carbonate detected in microbialites from the photic zone and above the thermocline (i.e., depths of generally <20 m). Given the deeper microbialites are receiving <1% of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), it is likely these microbialites primarily formed when lower lake levels resulted in microbialites being located higher in the photic zone, in warm surface waters. © 2014 John

  8. Combined passive acoustic mapping and magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring phase-shift nanoemulsion enhanced focused ultrasound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crake, Calum; Meral, F. Can; Burgess, Mark T.; Papademetriou, Iason T.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2017-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has the potential to enable precise, image-guided noninvasive surgery for the treatment of cancer in which tumors are identified and destroyed in a single integrated procedure. However, success of the method in highly vascular organs has been limited due to heat losses to perfusion, requiring development of techniques to locally enhance energy absorption and heating. In addition, FUS procedures are conventionally monitored using MRI, which provides excellent anatomical images and can map temperature, but is not capable of capturing the full gamut of available data such as the acoustic emissions generated during this inherently acoustically-driven procedure. Here, we employed phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) embedded in tissue phantoms to promote cavitation and hence temperature rise induced by FUS. In addition, we incorporated passive acoustic mapping (PAM) alongside simultaneous MR thermometry in order to visualize both acoustic emissions and temperature rise, within the bore of a full scale clinical MRI scanner. Focal cavitation of PSNE could be resolved using PAM and resulted in accelerated heating and increased the maximum elevated temperature measured via MR thermometry compared to experiments without nanoemulsions. Over time, the simultaneously acquired acoustic and temperature maps show translation of the focus of activity towards the FUS transducer, and the magnitude of the increase in cavitation and focal shift both increased with nanoemulsion concentration. PAM results were well correlated with MRI thermometry and demonstrated greater sensitivity, with the ability to detect cavitation before enhanced heating was observed. The results suggest that PSNE could be beneficial for enhancement of thermal focused ultrasound therapies and that PAM could be a critical tool for monitoring this process.

  9. Operational methods of thermodynamics. Volume 1 - Temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, F. X.

    The principles of thermometry are examined, taking into account the concept of temperature, the Kelvin scale, the statistical theory of heat, negative absolute temperatures, the thermodynamic temperature scale, the thermodynamic temperature scale below 1 K, noise thermometry, temperature scales based on black-body radiation, acoustical thermometry, and the International Practical Temperature Scale 1968. Aspects of practical temperature measurement are discussed, giving attention to thermometers based on the expansion of a gas or a liquid, instruments utilizing the relative thermal expansion of two different metals, devices measuring the vapor pressure of a liquid, thermocouples, resistance thermometers, radiation pyrometers of various types, instruments utilizing the temperature dependence of a number of material characteristics, devices for temperature control, thermometer calibration, and aspects of thermometer installation and inertia. A description is presented of the approaches employed for the measurement of low temperatures.

  10. A fundamental numerical analysis for noninvasive thermometry integrated in a heating applicator based on the reentrant cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwada, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Yasutoshi

    2010-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of hyperthermia treatment, a novel method of noninvasive measurement of body temperature change is proposed. The proposed technology, thermometry, is based on changes in the electromagnetic field distribution inside the heating applicator with temperature changes and the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. In addition, an image of the temperature change distribution inside a body is reconstructed by applying a computed tomography (CT) algorithm. The proposed thermometry method can serve as a possible noninvasive method to monitor the temperature change distribution inside the body without the use of enormous thermometers such as in the case of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, this temperature monitoring method can be easily combined with a heating applicator based on a cavity resonator, and the novel integrated treatment system can possibly be used to treat cancer effectively while noninvasively monitoring the heating effect. In this paper, the phase change distributions of the electromagnetic field with temperature changes are simulated by numerical analysis using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Moreover, to estimate the phase change distributions inside a target body, the phase change distributions with temperature changes are reconstructed by a filtered back-projection. In addition, the reconstruction accuracy of the converted temperature change distribution from the phase change is evaluated. (author)

  11. Design, Construction, and Initial Test of High Spatial Resolution Thermometry Arrays for Detection of Surface Temperature Profiles on SRF Cavities in Super Fluid Helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ari Palczewski, Rongli Geng, Grigory Eremeev

    2011-07-01

    We designed and built two high resolution (0.6-0.55mm special resolution [1.1-1.2mm separation]) thermometry arrays prototypes out of the Allen Bradley 90-120 ohm 1/8 watt resistor to measure surface temperature profiles on SRF cavities. One array was designed to be physically flexible and conform to any location on a SRF cavity; the other was modeled after the common G-10/stycast 2850 thermometer and designed to fit on the equator of an ILC (Tesla 1.3GHz) SRF cavity. We will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each array and their construction. In addition we will present a case study of the arrays performance on a real SRF cavity TB9NR001. TB9NR001 presented a unique opportunity to test the performance of each array as it contained a dual (4mm separation) cat eye defect which conventional methods such as OST (Oscillating Superleak second-sound Transducers) and full coverage thermometry mapping were unable to distinguish between. We will discuss the new arrays ability to distinguish between the two defects and their preheating performance.

  12. Infrared thermometry: a remote sensing technique for predicting yield in water-stressed cotton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, P.J.; Fry, K.E.; Guinn, G.; Mauney, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A crop water stress index (CWSI) was derived from air temperatures, air vapor pressure deficits and the midday radiant leaf temperatures of cotton plants that were exposed to different early-season irrigation treatments at Phoenix, AZ, U.S.A. To calculate the CWSI, an infrared thermometer was used to measure leaf temperatures which were then scaled relative to minimum and maximum temperatures expected for no-stress (CWSI=0) and extreme drought-stress conditions (CWSI=1). Results showed the CWSI behaved as expected, dropping to low levels following an irrigation and increasing gradually as the cotton plants depleted soil moisture reserves. The final yield of seed cotton was significantly inversely correlated with the average CWSI observed over the interval from the appearance of the first square until two weeks following the final irrigation

  13. Noise thermometry with two weakly coupled Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gati, Rudolf; Hemmerling, Börge; Fölling, Jonas; Albiez, Michael; Oberthaler, Markus K

    2006-04-07

    Here we report on the experimental investigation of thermally induced fluctuations of the relative phase between two Bose-Einstein condensates which are coupled via tunneling. The experimental control over the coupling strength and the temperature of the thermal background allows for the quantitative analysis of the phase fluctuations. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of these measurements for thermometry in a regime where standard methods fail. With this we confirm that the heat capacity of an ideal Bose gas deviates from that of a classical gas as predicted by the third law of thermodynamics.

  14. Noise Thermometry with Two Weakly Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gati, Rudolf; Hemmerling, Boerge; Foelling, Jonas; Albiez, Michael; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2006-01-01

    Here we report on the experimental investigation of thermally induced fluctuations of the relative phase between two Bose-Einstein condensates which are coupled via tunneling. The experimental control over the coupling strength and the temperature of the thermal background allows for the quantitative analysis of the phase fluctuations. Furthermore, we demonstrate the application of these measurements for thermometry in a regime where standard methods fail. With this we confirm that the heat capacity of an ideal Bose gas deviates from that of a classical gas as predicted by the third law of thermodynamics

  15. Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossno, Jesse; Liu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Philip; Ohki, Thomas A.; Fong, Kin Chung

    2015-01-01

    We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at 2 GHz, auto- and cross-correlated Johnson noise measurements are performed in the temperature range of 3 to 300 K, achieving a sensitivity of 5.5 mK (110 ppm) in 1 s of integration time. This setup allows us to measure the thermal conductance of a boron nitride encapsulated monolayer graphene device over a wide temperature range. Our data show a high power law (T ∼ 4) deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law above T ∼ 100 K

  16. Hot spots of wheat yield decline with rising temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, Senthold; Cammarano, Davide; Basso, Bruno; Chung, Uran; Alderman, Phillip D; Sonder, Kai; Reynolds, Matthew; Lobell, David B

    2017-06-01

    Many of the irrigated spring wheat regions in the world are also regions with high poverty. The impacts of temperature increase on wheat yield in regions of high poverty are uncertain. A grain yield-temperature response function combined with a quantification of model uncertainty was constructed using a multimodel ensemble from two key irrigated spring wheat areas (India and Sudan) and applied to all irrigated spring wheat regions in the world. Southern Indian and southern Pakistani wheat-growing regions with large yield reductions from increasing temperatures coincided with high poverty headcounts, indicating these areas as future food security 'hot spots'. The multimodel simulations produced a linear absolute decline of yields with increasing temperature, with uncertainty varying with reference temperature at a location. As a consequence of the linear absolute yield decline, the relative yield reductions are larger in low-yielding environments (e.g., high reference temperature areas in southern India, southern Pakistan and all Sudan wheat-growing regions) and farmers in these regions will be hit hardest by increasing temperatures. However, as absolute yield declines are about the same in low- and high-yielding regions, the contributed deficit to national production caused by increasing temperatures is higher in high-yielding environments (e.g., northern India) because these environments contribute more to national wheat production. Although Sudan could potentially grow more wheat if irrigation is available, grain yields would be low due to high reference temperatures, with future increases in temperature further limiting production. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clumped Isotope Thermometry Reveals Variations in Soil Carbonate Seasonal Biases Over >4 km of Relief in the Semi-Arid Andes of Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgener, L. K.; Huntington, K. W.; Hoke, G. D.; Schauer, A. J.; Ringham, M. C.; Latorre Hidalgo, C.; Díaz, F.

    2015-12-01

    The application of carbonate clumped isotope thermometry to soil carbonates has the potential to shed new light on questions regarding terrestrial paleoclimate. In order to better utilize this paleoclimate tool, outstanding questions regarding seasonal biases in soil carbonate formation and the relationship between soil carbonate formation temperatures (T(Δ47)) and surface temperatures must be resolved. We address these questions by comparing C, O, and clumped isotope data from Holocene/modern soil carbonates to modern meteorological data. The data were collected along a 170 km transect with >4 km of relief in central Chile (~30°S). Previous studies have suggested that soil carbonates should record a warm season bias and form in isotopic equilibrium with soil water and soil CO2. We identify two discrete climate zones separated by the local winter snow line (~3200 m). Below this boundary, precipitation falls as rain and soil carbonate T(Δ47) values at depths >40 cm resemble summer soil temperatures; at higher elevations, precipitation falls as snow and T(Δ47) values resemble mean annual soil temperatures. Soil carbonates from the highest sample site (4700 m), which is devoid of vegetation and located near perennial snow fields, yield anomalous δ18O, δ13C, and T(Δ47) values, indicative of kinetic isotope effects that we attribute to cryogenic carbonate formation. Our results suggest that soil carbonates from depths temperature and precipitation, and should not be used as paleotemperature proxies. These findings (1) highlight the role of soil moisture in modulating soil carbonate formation and the resulting T(Δ47) values, (2) underscore the importance of understanding past soil moisture conditions when attempting to reconstruct paleotemperatures using carbonate clumped isotope thermometry, and (3) suggest that soil carbonates from high elevation or high latitude sites may form under non-equilibrium conditions.

  18. Feasibility Study on the Development of 2-channel Embedded Infrared Fiber-optic Sensor for Thermometry of Secondary Water System in Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Seo, J. K.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Lee, B.; Park, B. G.

    2011-01-01

    Any warm object by measuring the emitted infrared (IR) radiation. The radiometers using infrared optical fibers are based on the relationship between the temperature of a heat source and the quality and the quantity of an IR radiation. To measure physical properties including a temperature, optical fiber-based sensor has many advantages, such as small size, low cost, high resolution, remote sensing and immunity to electromagnetic radiation over conventional electrical sensors. In this study, we carried out the feasibility study on the development of an embedded IR fiber-optic sensor for thermometry of the secondary water system in a nuclear power plant. The 2-channel embedded fiberoptic temperature sensor was fabricated using two identical IR optical fibers for accurate thermometry without complicated calibration processes. To decide accurate temperature of the water, we measured the difference between the IR radiations emitted from the two temperature sensing probes according to the temperature variation of the water

  19. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatebe, Ken, E-mail: Ken.Tatebe@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Ramsay, Elizabeth; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Bronskill, Michael [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device

  20. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatebe, Ken; Ramsay, Elizabeth; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed; Mougenot, Charles; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device

  1. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  2. Global rainbow thermometry assessed by Airy and Lorenz-Mie theories and compared with phase Doppler anemometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beeck, Jeronimus Petrus Antonius Johannes; Grosges, Thomas; De Giorgi, Maria Grazia

    2003-07-01

    Global rainbow thermometry (GRT) measures the mean size and temperature of an ensemble of spray droplets. The domain of validity of the Airy theory for this technique is established through comparison with Lorenz-Mie theory. The temperature derivation from the inflection points of the Airy rainbow pattern appears to be independent of the type of spray dispersion. Measurements in a water spray are reported. The mean diameter obtained from the rainbow pattern lies between the arithmetic and the Sauter mean diameters measured by phase Doppler anemometry. The temperature measurement by GRT is shown to be accurate within a few degrees Celsius.

  3. Rayleigh-based, multi-element coral thermometry: A biomineralization approach to developing climate proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetani, G.A.; Cohen, A.L.; Wang, Z.; Crusius, John

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new approach to coral thermometry that deconvolves the influence of water temperature on skeleton composition from that of “vital effects”, and has the potential to provide estimates of growth temperatures that are accurate to within a few tenths of a degree Celsius from both tropical and cold-water corals. Our results provide support for a physico-chemical model of coral biomineralization, and imply that Mg2+ substitutes directly for Ca2+ in biogenic aragonite. Recent studies have identified Rayleigh fractionation as an important influence on the elemental composition of coral skeletons. Daily, seasonal and interannual variations in the amount of aragonite precipitated by corals from each “batch” of calcifying fluid can explain why the temperature dependencies of elemental ratios in coral skeleton differ from those of abiogenic aragonites, and are highly variable among individual corals. On the basis of this new insight into the origin of “vital effects” in coral skeleton, we developed a Rayleigh-based, multi-element approach to coral thermometry. Temperature is resolved from the Rayleigh fractionation signal by combining information from multiple element ratios (e.g., Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca) to produce a mathematically over-constrained system of Rayleigh equations. Unlike conventional coral thermometers, this approach does not rely on an initial calibration of coral skeletal composition to an instrumental temperature record. Rather, considering coral skeletogenesis as a biologically mediated, physico-chemical process provides a means to extract temperature information from the skeleton composition using the Rayleigh equation and a set of experimentally determined partition coefficients. Because this approach is based on a quantitative understanding of the mechanism that produces the “vital effect” it should be possible to apply it both across scleractinian species and to corals growing in vastly different environments. Where

  4. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, Martina; Toy, Virginia; Rooney, Jeremy S.; Giorgetti, Carolina; Gordon, Keith C.; Collettini, Cristiano; Takeshita, Toru

    2018-02-01

    Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25 megapascal (MPa) and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s-1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  5. User's Manual: Routines for Radiative Heat Transfer and Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the intensity and spectral distribution of radiation emanating from a heated surface has applications in many areas of science and engineering. Areas of research in which the quantification of spectral radiation is used routinely include thermal radiation heat transfer, infrared signature analysis, and radiation thermometry. In the analysis of radiation, it is helpful to be able to predict the radiative intensity and the spectral distribution of the emitted energy. Presented in this report is a set of routines written in Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) and incorporating functions specific to Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington) that are useful for predicting the radiative behavior of heated surfaces. These routines include functions for calculating quantities of primary importance to engineers and scientists. In addition, the routines also provide the capability to use such information to determine surface temperatures from spectral intensities and for calculating the sensitivity of the surface temperature measurements to unknowns in the input parameters.

  6. Real-time control of focused ultrasound heating based on rapid MR thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimeux, F C; De Zwart, J A; Palussiére, J; Fawaz, R; Delalande, C; Canioni, P; Grenier, N; Moonen, C T

    1999-03-01

    Real-time control of the heating procedure is essential for hyperthermia applications of focused ultrasound (FUS). The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI-controlled FUS. An automatic control system was developed using a dedicated interface between the MR system control computer and the FUS wave generator. Two algorithms were used to regulate FUS power to maintain the focal point temperature at a desired level. Automatic control of FUS power level was demonstrated ex vivo at three target temperature levels (increase of 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C, and 30 degrees C above room temperature) during 30-minute hyperthermic periods. Preliminary in vivo results on rat leg muscle confirm that necrosis estimate, calculated on-line during FUS sonication, allows prediction of tissue damage. CONCLUSIONS. The feasibility of fully automatic FUS control based on MRI thermometry has been demonstrated.

  7. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P. [DEN/DTN/STPA/LIET, CEA Cadarache, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G. [Aix-Marseille Univ, LMA UPR 7051 CNRS, site LCND, 13625 Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2013-01-25

    In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  8. Irrigation offsets wheat yield reductions from warming temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jesse; Barkley, Andrew; Hendricks, Nathan

    2017-11-01

    Temperature increases due to climate change are expected to cause substantial reductions in global wheat yields. However, uncertainty remains regarding the potential role for irrigation as an adaptation strategy to offset heat impacts. Here we utilize over 7000 observations spanning eleven Kansas field-trial locations, 180 varieties, and 29 years to show that irrigation significantly reduces the negative impact of warming temperatures on winter wheat yields. Dryland wheat yields are estimated to decrease about eight percent for every one-degree Celsius increase in temperature, yet irrigation completely offsets this negative impact in our sample. As in previous studies, we find that important interactions exist between heat stress and precipitation for dryland production. Here, uniquely, we observe both dryland and irrigated trials side-by-side at the same locations and find that precipitation does not provide the same reduction in heat stress as irrigation. This is likely to be because the timing, intensity, and volume of water applications influence wheat yields, so the ability to irrigate—rather than relying on rainfall alone—has a stronger influence on heat stress. We find evidence of extensive differences of water-deficit stress impacts across varieties. This provides some evidence of the potential for adapting to hotter and drier climate conditions using optimal variety selection. Overall, our results highlight the critical role of water management for future global food security. Water scarcity not only reduces crop yields through water-deficit stress, but also amplifies the negative effects of warming temperatures.

  9. Quantitative MR thermometry based on phase-drift correction PRF shift method at 0.35 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuping; Ge, Mengke; Ali, Rizwan; Jiang, Hejun; Huang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Bensheng

    2018-04-10

    Noninvasive magnetic resonance thermometry (MRT) at low-field using proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) is a promising technique for monitoring ablation temperature, since low-field MR scanners with open-configuration are more suitable for interventional procedures than closed systems. In this study, phase-drift correction PRFS with first-order polynomial fitting method was proposed to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of quantitative MR thermography during hyperthermia procedures in a 0.35 T open MR scanner. Unheated phantom and ex vivo porcine liver experiments were performed to evaluate the optimal polynomial order for phase-drift correction PRFS. The temperature estimation approach was tested in brain temperature experiments of three healthy volunteers at room temperature, and in ex vivo porcine liver microwave ablation experiments. The output power of the microwave generator was set at 40 W for 330 s. In the unheated experiments, the temperature root mean square error (RMSE) in the inner region of interest was calculated to assess the best-fitting order for polynomial fit. For ablation experiments, relative temperature difference profile measured by the phase-drift correction PRFS was compared with the temperature changes recorded by fiber optic temperature probe around the microwave ablation antenna within the target thermal region. The phase-drift correction PRFS using first-order polynomial fitting could achieve the smallest temperature RMSE in unheated phantom, ex vivo porcine liver and in vivo human brain experiments. In the ex vivo porcine liver microwave ablation procedure, the temperature error between MRT and fiber optic probe of all but six temperature points were less than 2 °C. Overall, the RMSE of all temperature points was 1.49 °C. Both in vivo and ex vivo experiments showed that MR thermometry based on the phase-drift correction PRFS with first-order polynomial fitting could be applied to monitor temperature changes during

  10. Body Temperature Measurements for Metabolic Phenotyping in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carola W.; Ootsuka, Youichirou; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2017-01-01

    Endothermic organisms rely on tightly balanced energy budgets to maintain a regulated body temperature and body mass. Metabolic phenotyping of mice, therefore, often includes the recording of body temperature. Thermometry in mice is conducted at various sites, using various devices and measurement practices, ranging from single-time probing to continuous temperature imaging. Whilst there is broad agreement that body temperature data is of value, procedural considerations of body temperature measurements in the context of metabolic phenotyping are missing. Here, we provide an overview of the various methods currently available for gathering body temperature data from mice. We explore the scope and limitations of thermometry in mice, with the hope of assisting researchers in the selection of appropriate approaches, and conditions, for comprehensive mouse phenotypic analyses. PMID:28824441

  11. Influence of temperature on products yield of Eucalyptus microcorys carbonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato da Silva Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During charcoal production different products are formed. These products are influenced primarily by the temperature of carbonization. Given that charcoal is the main input in the production of pig iron in Brazil, this study evaluated the influence of final temperature of carbonization of the products generated and also the influence of the radial and longitudinal sampling on the yield of each product. Samples were taken from internal and external position along the radius and also from three different heights from four Eucalyptus microcorys trees. The samples were carbonized in an electric furnace with an experimental water-cooled condenser and a collecting bottle of condensable volatile materials. The final temperatures of carbonization were 500, 600, 700, 800 and 900°C. The gravimetric yield, tar and non-condensable gases were calculated. The results showed no difference in the gravimetric yield in the longitudinal and radial positions studied, while the tar yield and non-condensable gases showed temperature variations of 700°C and 800°C and the variation of the gravimetric yield temperatures between 500°C to 900°C was 15%, the change of yield of tar from the radial direction of sampling was on average 8%, the variation of the yield of non-condensable gases in a radial sampling was on average 16%.

  12. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields

  13. A new experimental apparatus for emissivity measurements of steel and the application of multi-wavelength thermometry to continuous casting billets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Hu, Zhenwei; Xie, Zhi; Yan, Ming

    2018-05-01

    An experimental apparatus has been designed for measuring the emissivity of a steel surface in both vacuum and oxidation atmosphere. The sample is heated with the method of electromagnetic induction in order to ensure the temperature uniformity. The radiance emitted from a sample is measured using a fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. Using this unique apparatus, we investigated the spectral (2-6 μm) and directional (0°-86°) emissivity of stainless steel 304 with different degrees of surface oxidation at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1100 °C. The experimental results show that the emissivity increases slightly with increasing temperature, which accords with the Hagen-Rubens relation. The emissivity increases rapidly at the initial stage of oxidation, but gradually reaches to a constant value after 20 min. In addition, the directional emissivity has a maximum value at the measuring angle of about 75°. The maximum uncertainty of emissivity is only 3.0% over all the measuring ranges, indicating that this experimental apparatus has a high reliability. In order to measure the surface temperature of casting billets based on multi-wavelength thermometry, the bivariate emissivity function with the two variables, wavelength and temperature, is determined. Temperature measurement results based on our technique are compared with those from common dual-wavelength radiation thermometry. Our approach reduces the measured temperature fluctuation from ±20.7 °C to ±2.8 °C and reflects the temperature variation with the changes of production parameters in real time.

  14. Structural disorder of graphite and implications for graphite thermometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kirilova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Graphitization, or the progressive maturation of carbonaceous material, is considered an irreversible process. Thus, the degree of graphite crystallinity, or its structural order, has been calibrated as an indicator of the peak metamorphic temperatures experienced by the host rocks. However, discrepancies between temperatures indicated by graphite crystallinity versus other thermometers have been documented in deformed rocks. To examine the possibility of mechanical modifications of graphite structure and the potential impacts on graphite thermometry, we performed laboratory deformation experiments. We sheared highly crystalline graphite powder at normal stresses of 5 and 25  megapascal (MPa and aseismic velocities of 1, 10 and 100 µm s−1. The degree of structural order both in the starting and resulting materials was analyzed by Raman microspectroscopy. Our results demonstrate structural disorder of graphite, manifested as changes in the Raman spectra. Microstructural observations show that brittle processes caused the documented mechanical modifications of the aggregate graphite crystallinity. We conclude that the calibrated graphite thermometer is ambiguous in active tectonic settings.

  15. Energy dissipation mechanism revealed by spatially resolved Raman thermometry of graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehee; Kim, Hanul; Yun, Wan Soo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Rho, Heesuk; Bae, Myung-Ho

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the energy transport by charge carriers and phonons in two-dimensional (2D) van der Waals heterostructures is essential for the development of future energy-efficient 2D nanoelectronics. Here, we performed in situ spatially resolved Raman thermometry on an electrically biased graphene channel and its hBN substrate to study the energy dissipation mechanism in graphene/hBN heterostructures. By comparing the temperature profile along the biased graphene channel with that along the hBN substrate, we found that the thermal boundary resistance between the graphene and hBN was in the range of (1-2) ~ × 10-7 m2 K W-1 from ~100 °C to the onset of graphene break-down at ~600 °C in air. Consideration of an electro-thermal transport model together with the Raman thermometry conducted in air showed that a doping effect occurred under a strong electric field played a crucial role in the energy dissipation of the graphene/hBN device up to T ~ 600 °C.

  16. Low-temperature dependence of yielding in AISI 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobler, R.L.; Reed, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile tests at temperatures between 323 and 4 K were performed on one heat of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel having the composition Fe-17.34Cr-12.17Ni-1.55Mn-2.16Mo-0.051C. The temperature dependences of the yield and flow strengths at plastic strain increments from 0.2 to 3.65% are analyzed. At the yield strain (0.2%), no body-centered cubic (bcc) martensite phase transformation is detected. At higher strains (approx.3.2 +- 0.6%), bcc martensite forms from the parent austenite phase at test temperatures below 190 K, but there are no discontinuities in the temperature dependence of flow strength. A review of data available for three heats of AISI 316 at temperatures between 973 and 4 K reveals that deviations from thermally activated plastic flow theory occur at temperatures below 175 K, apparently depending on heat-to-heat compositional variations. Grain size and magnetic transition effects on the yield strength are discussed

  17. Pure rotational CARS thermometry studies of low-temperature oxidation kinetics in air and ethene-air nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuzeek, Yvette; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Adamovich, Igor V; Lempert, Walter R

    2010-01-01

    Pure rotational CARS thermometry is used to study low-temperature plasma assisted fuel oxidation kinetics in a repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge in ethene-air at stoichiometric and fuel lean conditions at 40 Torr pressure. Air and fuel-air mixtures are excited by a burst of high-voltage nanosecond pulses (peak voltage, 20 kV; pulse duration, ∼ 25 ns) at a 40 kHz pulse repetition rate and a burst repetition rate of 10 Hz. The number of pulses in the burst is varied from a few pulses to a few hundred pulses. The results are compared with the previously developed hydrocarbon-air plasma chemistry model, modified to incorporate non-empirical scaling of the nanosecond discharge pulse energy coupled to the plasma with number density, as well as one-dimensional conduction heat transfer. Experimental time-resolved temperature, determined as a function of the number of pulses in the burst, is found to agree well with the model predictions. The results demonstrate that the heating rate in fuel-air plasmas is much faster compared with air plasmas, primarily due to energy release in exothermic reactions of fuel with O atoms generated by the plasma. It is found that the initial heating rate in fuel-air plasmas is controlled by the rate of radical (primarily O atoms) generation and is nearly independent of the equivalence ratio. At long burst durations, the heating rate in lean fuel air-mixtures is significantly reduced when all fuel is oxidized.

  18. Historical effects of temperature and precipitation on California crop yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D.B. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cahill, K.N. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Field, C.B. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    For the 1980-2003 period, we analyzed the relationship between crop yield and three climatic variables (minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation) for 12 major Californian crops: wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios. The months and climatic variables of greatest importance to each crop were used to develop regressions relating yield to climatic conditions. For most crops, fairly simple equations using only 2-3 variables explained more than two-thirds of observed yield variance. The types of variables and months identified suggest that relatively poorly understood processes such as crop infection, pollination, and dormancy may be important mechanisms by which climate influences crop yield. Recent climatic trends have had mixed effects on crop yields, with orange and walnut yields aided, avocado yields hurt, and most crops little affected by recent climatic trends. Yield-climate relationships can provide a foundation for forecasting crop production within a year and for projecting the impact of future climate changes.

  19. Elimination of noise peak for signal processing in Johnson noise thermometry development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, I. G.; Moon, B. S.; Jeong, J. E.; Jeo, Y. H.; Kisner, Roger A.

    2003-01-01

    The internal and external noise is the most considering obstacle in development of Johnson Noise Thermometry system. This paper addresses an external noise elimination issue of the Johnson Noise Thermometry system which is underway of development in collaboration between KAERI and ORNL. Although internal random noise is canceled by Cross Power Spectral Density function, a continuous wave penetrating into the electronic circuit is eliminated by the difference of peaks between Johnson signal and external noise. The elimination logic using standard deviation of CPSD and energy leakage problem in discrete CPSD function are discussed in this paper

  20. All Fiber-Coupled OH Planar Laser-Induced-Fluorescence (OH-PLIF)-Based Two-Dimensional Thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Patnaik, Anil K; Katta, Vish; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2018-04-01

    Two-color, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF)-based two-dimensional (2D) thermometry techniques for reacting flows, which are typically developed in the laboratory conditions, face a stiff challenge in their practical implementation in harsh environments such as combustion rigs. In addition to limited optical access, the critical experimental conditions (i.e., uncontrolled humidity, vibration, and large thermal gradients) often restrict sensitive laser system operation and cause difficulties maintaining beam-overlap. Thus, an all fiber-coupled, two-color OH-PLIF system has been developed, employing two long optical fibers allowing isolation of the laser and signal-collection systems. Two OH-excitation laser beams (∼283 nm and ∼286 nm) are delivered through a common 6 m long, 400 µm core, deep ultraviolet (UV)-enhanced multimode fiber. The fluorescence signal (∼310 nm) is collected by a 3 m long, UV-grade imaging fiber. Proof-of-principle temperature measurements are demonstrated in atmospheric pressure, near adiabatic, CH 4 /O 2 /N 2 jet flames. The effects of the excitation pulse interval on fiber transmission are investigated. The proof-of-principle measurements show significant promise for thermometry in harsh environments such as gas turbine engine tests.

  1. Primary Gas Thermometry by Means of Laser-Absorption Spectroscopy: Determination of the Boltzmann Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Galzerano, G.; Wehr, R.; Merlone, A.; Di Serafino, D.; Laporta, P.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a new optical implementation of primary gas thermometry based on laser-absorption spectrometry in the near infrared. The method consists in retrieving the Doppler broadening from highly accurate observations of the line shape of the R(12) ν 1 +2ν 2 0 +ν 3 transition in CO 2 gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Doppler width measurements as a function of gas temperature, ranging between the triple point of water and the gallium melting point, allowed for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant with a relative accuracy of ∼1.6x10 -4

  2. Primary Gas Thermometry by Means of Laser-Absorption Spectroscopy: Determination of the Boltzmann Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Galzerano, G.; Wehr, R.; Merlone, A.; di Serafino, D.; Laporta, P.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-05-01

    We report on a new optical implementation of primary gas thermometry based on laser-absorption spectrometry in the near infrared. The method consists in retrieving the Doppler broadening from highly accurate observations of the line shape of the R(12) ν1+2ν20+ν3 transition in CO2 gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Doppler width measurements as a function of gas temperature, ranging between the triple point of water and the gallium melting point, allowed for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant with a relative accuracy of ˜1.6×10-4.

  3. Some experiments in low-temperature thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogle, W.E.

    1982-11-01

    A powdered cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN) temperature scale has been developed in the 0.016 to 3.8 K region which represents an interpolation between the 3 He/ 4 He (T 62 /T 58 ) vapor pressure scale and absolute temperatures in the millikelvin region as determined with a 60 Co in hcp Co nuclear orientation thermometer (NOT). Both ac and dc susceptibility thermometers were used in these experiments. The ac susceptibility of a 13 mg CMN-oil slurry was measured with a mutual inductance bridge employing a SQUID null detector while the dc susceptibility of a 3 mg slurry was measured with a SQUID/flux transformer combination. To check the internal consistency of the NOT, γ-ray intensities were measured both parallel and perpendicular to the Co crystal c-axis. The independent temperatures determined in this fashion were found to agree to within experimental error. For the CMN thermometers employed in these experiments, the susceptibility was found to obey a Curie-Weiss law with a Weiss constant of Δ = 1.05 +- 0.1 mK. The powdered CMN scale in the 0.05 to 1.0 K region was transferred to two germanium resistance thermometers for use in low-temperature specific heat measurements. The integrity of the scale was checked by examining the temperature dependence of the specific heat of high purity copper in the 0.1 to 1 K region. In more recent experiments in this laboratory, the scale was also checked by a comparison with the National Bureau of Standards cryogenic temperature scale (NBS-CTS-1). The agreement between the two scales in the 99 to 206 mK region was found to be on the order of the stated accuracy of the NBS scale

  4. Separating heat stress from moisture stress: analyzing yield response to high temperature in irrigated maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Elizabeth K.; Melkonian, Jeff; Riha, Susan J.; Shaw, Stephen B.

    2016-09-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that high air temperatures are limiting maize (Zea mays L.) yields in the US Corn Belt and project significant yield losses with expected increases in growing season temperatures. Further work has suggested that high air temperatures are indicative of high evaporative demand, and that decreases in maize yields which correlate to high temperatures and vapor pressure deficits (VPD) likely reflect underlying soil moisture limitations. It remains unclear whether direct high temperature impacts on yields, independent of moisture stress, can be observed under current temperature regimes. Given that projected high temperature and moisture may not co-vary the same way as they have historically, quantitative analyzes of direct temperature impacts are critical for accurate yield projections and targeted mitigation strategies under shifting temperature regimes. To evaluate yield response to above optimum temperatures independent of soil moisture stress, we analyzed climate impacts on irrigated maize yields obtained from the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) corn yield contests for Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri. In irrigated maize, we found no evidence of a direct negative impact on yield by daytime air temperature, calculated canopy temperature, or VPD when analyzed seasonally. Solar radiation was the primary yield-limiting climate variable. Our analyses suggested that elevated night temperature impacted yield by increasing rates of phenological development. High temperatures during grain-fill significantly interacted with yields, but this effect was often beneficial and included evidence of acquired thermo-tolerance. Furthermore, genetics and management—information uniquely available in the NCGA contest data—explained more yield variability than climate, and significantly modified crop response to climate. Thermo-acclimation, improved genetics and changes to management practices have the potential to partially or completely

  5. Lowland rice yield estimates based on air temperature and solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedro Júnior, M.J.; Sentelhas, P.C.; Moraes, A.V.C.; Villela, O.V.

    1995-01-01

    Two regression equations were developed to estimate lowland rice yield as a function of air temperature and incoming solar radiation, during the crop yield production period in Pindamonhangaba, SP, Brazil. The following rice cultivars were used: IAC-242, IAC-100, IAC-101 and IAC-102. The value of optimum air temperature obtained was 25.0°C and of optimum global solar radiation was 475 cal.cm -2 , day -1 . The best agrometeorological model was the one that related least deviation of air temperature and solar radiation in relation to the optimum value obtained through a multiple linear regression. The yield values estimated by the model showed good fit to actual yields of lowland rice (less than 10%). (author) [pt

  6. Design of a high speed, high resolution thermometry system for 1.5 GHz superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Jens; Muller, Henry; Padamsee, Hasan

    1994-11-01

    Presented in this paper are the description and the test results of a new stationary thermometry system used to map the temperature of the outer surface of 1.5 GHz superconducting single-cell cavities during operation at 1.6 K. The system comprises 764 removable carbon thermometers whose signals are multiplexed and scanned by a Macintosh computer. A complete temperature map can be obtained in as little as 0.1 s at a temperature resolution of about 0.2 mK. Alternatively, it has been demonstrated that if the acquisition time is increased to several seconds, then a temperature resolution on the order of 30 μK is possible. To our knowledge, these are the fastest acquisition times so far achieved with L-band cavities at these resolutions.

  7. Strategy for thermometry via Tm³⁺-doped NaYF₄ core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaoshuai; Jiang, Guicheng; Li, Xinyue; Jiang, Sha; Wei, Xiantao; Chen, Yonghu; Yin, Min; Duan, Changkui

    2014-12-01

    Optical thermometers usually make use of the fluorescence intensity ratio of two thermally coupled energy levels, with the relative sensitivity constrained by the limited energy gap. Here we develop a strategy by using the upconversion (UC) emissions originating from two multiplets with opposite temperature dependences to achieve higher relative temperature sensitivity. We show that the intensity ratio of the two UC emissions, ³F(2,3) and ¹G₄, of Tm³⁺ in β-NaYF₄:20%Yb³⁺, 0.5%Tm³⁺/NaYF₄:1%Pr³⁺ core-shell nanoparticles under 980 nm laser excitation exhibits high relative temperature sensitivity between 350 and 510 K, with a maximum of 1.53%  K⁻¹ at 417 K. This demonstrates the validity of the strategy, and that the studied material has the potential for high-performance optical thermometry.

  8. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  9. Neglecting rice milling yield and quality underestimates economic losses from high-temperature stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel B Lyman

    Full Text Available Future increases in global surface temperature threaten those worldwide who depend on rice production for their livelihoods and food security. Past analyses of high-temperature stress on rice production have focused on paddy yield and have failed to account for the detrimental impact of high temperatures on milling quality outcomes, which ultimately determine edible (marketable rice yield and market value. Using genotype specific rice yield and milling quality data on six common rice varieties from Arkansas, USA, combined with on-site, half-hourly and daily temperature observations, we show a nonlinear effect of high-temperature stress exposure on yield and milling quality. A 1 °C increase in average growing season temperature reduces paddy yield by 6.2%, total milled rice yield by 7.1% to 8.0%, head rice yield by 9.0% to 13.8%, and total milling revenue by 8.1% to 11.0%, across genotypes. Our results indicate that failure to account for changes in milling quality leads to understatement of the impacts of high temperatures on rice production outcomes. These dramatic losses result from reduced paddy yield and increased percentages of chalky and broken kernels, which together decrease the quantity and market value of milled rice. Recently published estimates show paddy yield reductions of up to 10% across the major rice-producing regions of South and Southeast Asia due to rising temperatures. The results of our study suggest that the often-cited 10% figure underestimates the economic implications of climate change for rice producers, thus potentially threatening future food security for global rice producers and consumers.

  10. Synthesis of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF3 upconversion nanoparticles for use in optical thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Yu, Jae Su

    2018-03-23

    The authors describe an ethylene glycol assisted precipitation method for synthesis of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF 3 nanoparticles (NPs) at room temperature. Under 980-nm light irradiation, the NPs emit upconversion (UC) emission of Er(III) ions as a result of a two-photon absorption process. The temperature-dependent green emissions (peaking at 525 and 545 nm) are used to establish an unambiguous relationship between the ratio of fluorescence intensities and temperature. The NPs have a maximum sensitivity of 6.5 × 10 -3  K -1 at 619 K and can be applied over the 291-691 K temperature range. The results indicate that these NPs are a promising candidate for optical thermometry. Graphical abstract Schematic of the room-temperature preparation of Er(III)/Yb(III)-doped BiF 3 nanoparticles with strongly temperature-dependent upconversion emission.

  11. A spiral-based volumetric acquisition for MR temperature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Zhao, Li; Miller, G Wilson; Geeslin, Matthew; Dallapiazza, Robert F; Elias, W Jeffrey; Wintermark, Max; Butts Pauly, Kim; Meyer, Craig H

    2018-06-01

    To develop a rapid pulse sequence for volumetric MR thermometry. Simulations were carried out to assess temperature deviation, focal spot distortion/blurring, and focal spot shift across a range of readout durations and maximum temperatures for Cartesian, spiral-out, and retraced spiral-in/out (RIO) trajectories. The RIO trajectory was applied for stack-of-spirals 3D imaging on a real-time imaging platform and preliminary evaluation was carried out compared to a standard 2D sequence in vivo using a swine brain model, comparing maximum and mean temperatures measured between the two methods, as well as the temporal standard deviation measured by the two methods. In simulations, low-bandwidth Cartesian trajectories showed substantial shift of the focal spot, whereas both spiral trajectories showed no shift while maintaining focal spot geometry. In vivo, the 3D sequence achieved real-time 4D monitoring of thermometry, with an update time of 2.9-3.3 s. Spiral imaging, and RIO imaging in particular, is an effective way to speed up volumetric MR thermometry. Magn Reson Med 79:3122-3127, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Tensile properties and temperature-dependent yield strength prediction of GH4033 wrought superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jianzuo [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Li, Weiguo, E-mail: wgli@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Xianhe; Kou, Haibo; Shao, Jiaxing; Geng, Peiji; Deng, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control and College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Fang, Daining [LTCS and College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2016-10-31

    The tensile properties of superalloy GH4033 have been evaluated at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1000 °C. Fracture surfaces and precipitation were observed using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The alloy mainly consisted of γ’ precipitate particles homogeneously dispersed in the γ matrix interior. The effects of dynamic strain aging and precipitation on the strength were verified. A temperature-dependent yield strength model was developed to describe the temperature and precipitation effects on the alloy's yield behaviour. The model is able to consider the effect of precipitation strengthening on the yield strength. The yield behaviour of the precipitation-strengthened superalloy was demonstrated to be adequately predictable over a wide range of temperatures. Note that this model reflects the quantitative relationship between the yield strength of the precipitation-strengthened superalloy and the temperature, the elastic modulus, the specific heat capacity at constant pressure, Poisson's ratio, the precipitate particle size and the volume fraction of the particles.

  13. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.

    2015-03-30

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  14. Temperature measurement of plasma-assisted flames: comparison between optical emission spectroscopy and 2-color laser induced fluorescence techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Heitz, Sylvain A.; Moeck, Jonas P.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate thermometry of highly reactive environments, such as plasma-assisted combustion, is challenging. With the help of conical laminar premixed methane-air flames, this study compares two thermometry techniques for the temperature determination in a combustion front enhanced by nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) plasma discharges. Based on emission spectroscopic analysis, the results show that the rotational temperature of CH(A) gives a reasonable estimate for the adiabatic flame temperature, only for lean and stoichiometric conditions. The rotational temperature of N2(C) is found to significantly underestimate the flame temperature. The 2-color OH-PLIF technique gives correct values of the flame temperature.

  15. Planar measurements of spray-induced wall cooling using phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomirov, Plamen; Mendieta, Aldo; Abram, Christopher; Fond, Benoît; Beyrau, Frank

    2018-03-01

    The wall cooling induced by spray impingement is investigated using phosphor thermometry. Thin coatings of zinc oxide (ZnO) phosphor were applied with a transparent chemical binder onto a steel surface. Instantaneous spatially resolved temperatures were determined using the spectral intensity ratio method directly after the injection of UV-grade hexane onto the surface using a commercial gasoline injector. The investigations showed that 2D temperature measurements with high spatial and shot-to-shot precision of, respectively, 0.5 and 0.6 K can be achieved, allowing the accurate resolution of the cooling induced by the spray. The presence of a liquid film over the phosphor coating during measurements showed no noticeable influence on the measured temperatures. However, in some cases a change in the intensity ratio at the spray impingement area, in the form of a permanent "stain", could be observed after multiple injections. The formation of this stain was less likely with increasing annealing time of the coating as well as lower plate operating temperatures during the injection experiments. Finally, the experimental results indicate a noticeable influence of the thickness of the phosphor coating on the measured spray-induced wall cooling history. Hence, for quantitative analysis, a compromise between coating thickness and measurement accuracy needs to be considered for similar applications where the heat transfer rates are very high.

  16. Noncontact surface thermometry for microsystems: LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Mark (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Beecham, Thomas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Graham, Samuel (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2006-10-01

    We describe a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort to develop and apply laser-based thermometry diagnostics for obtaining spatially resolved temperature maps on working microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The goal of the effort was to cultivate diagnostic approaches that could adequately resolve the extremely fine MEMS device features, required no modifications to MEMS device design, and which did not perturb the delicate operation of these extremely small devices. Two optical diagnostics were used in this study: microscale Raman spectroscopy and microscale thermoreflectance. Both methods use a low-energy, nonperturbing probe laser beam, whose arbitrary wavelength can be selected for a diffraction-limited focus that meets the need for micron-scale spatial resolution. Raman is exploited most frequently, as this technique provides a simple and unambiguous measure of the absolute device temperature for most any MEMS semiconductor or insulator material under steady state operation. Temperatures are obtained from the spectral position and width of readily isolated peaks in the measured Raman spectra with a maximum uncertainty near {+-}10 K and a spatial resolution of about 1 micron. Application of the Raman technique is demonstrated for V-shaped and flexure-style polycrystalline silicon electrothermal actuators, and for a GaN high-electron-mobility transistor. The potential of the Raman technique for simultaneous measurement of temperature and in-plane stress in silicon MEMS is also demonstrated and future Raman-variant diagnostics for ultra spatio-temporal resolution probing are discussed. Microscale thermoreflectance has been developed as a complement for the primary Raman diagnostic. Thermoreflectance exploits the small-but-measurable temperature dependence of surface optical reflectivity for diagnostic purposes. The temperature-dependent reflectance behavior of bulk silicon, SUMMiT-V polycrystalline silicon films and metal surfaces is

  17. Radiometric temperature measurements fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhuomin M; Machin, Graham

    2009-01-01

    This book describes the theory of radiation thermometry, both at a primary level and for a variety of applications, such as in the materials processing industries and remote sensing. This book is written for those who will apply radiation thermometry in industrial practice; use radiation thermometers for scientific research; the radiation thermometry specialist in a national measurement institute; developers of radiation thermometers who are working to innovate products for instrument manufacturers, and developers of non-contact thermometry methods to address challenging thermometry problems.

  18. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  19. Temperature, Sowing and Harvest Dates, and Yield of Maize in the Southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, M.; Stack, D.; Myoung, B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Since sowing date of maize is sensitive to climate variability and changes, it is of a practical importance to examine how sowing dates affect maize yields in various temperature regimes in the southwestern US. A 21-year (1991-2011) simulation of maize yield using Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator (APSIM) with observed meteorological forcing, shows that earlier sowing dates are favorable for higher yields primarily by increasing the length of growing season in cold mountaineous regions. In these regions, warmer conditions in the sowing period tend to advance the sowing date and then enhance yield. Over low-elevation warm regions, yields are less correlated with sowing dates and the length of growing season, perhaps because growing season temperatures are high enough for fast growth. Instead, in the warm regions, maize yields are sensitive to temperature variations during the late growing season due to adverse effects of extreme high temperature events on maize development.

  20. Diagnostics and equipment for ion temperatures and implosion neutron yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiabin; Zheng Zhijian; Peng Hansheng; Wen Shuhuai; Zhang Baohan; Ding Yongkun; Qi Lanying; Chen Ming; Li Chaoguang

    2001-01-01

    Fuel ion temperature is of great importance in the ICF research field. A set of ultra-fast quenched plastic scintillation detector system was fabricated for low yield neutron diagnostic. The detection efficiency and the sensitivity to DT neutrons were scaled using a K-400 accelerator and a pulse neutron tube from Russia with a width 5 - 10 ns, respectively. Its time response functions were calibrated by cosmic ray and implosion neutron separately. Under the conditions of low laser energy so low neutron yield and very limited space, fuel ion temperatures (including implosion neutron yields at the same time) were obtained. The measured ion temperatures for exploding pusher capsules were between 4 keV and 5 keV with errors +-(15 - 25)%. The neutron yields were 5 x 10 8 - 3 x 10 9 for exploding pusher capsules and 1.6 x 10 7 - 3.9 x 10 8 for ablation ones with errors +- (7 - 10)%. Of the six shots of neutron yields calculated, five are in good agreement with authors' experimental results in the range of +- 20%. Not only the heat-conducting mechanism and the effects on implosion of the energy balance of each path of incidence laser, target design, fuel mixture as well as hot electron behavior have been investigated, but also the upgrade level of the laser facility Shengguang II has been tested

  1. Radiation detection at very low temperature. DRTBT 2002, Oleron - Course collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekola, J.; Charles, I.; Jin, Yong; Camus, Ph.; Juillard, A.; Chardin, G.; Leblanc, Elvire; Delabrouille, Jacques; Pigot, C.

    2002-01-01

    The contributions of this session addressed several themes: Tools (pumped helium-3 cryostats; dilution based cryostats; principle and application scope of demagnetisation devices; cooling by tunnel evaporation of electrons; very low temperatures without external cryogenic fluid), Very low temperature thermometry - resistive thermometry and its difficulties (temperature control, low temperature electronics), Bolometers (focussing, filtering and absorption; principle of a bolometer with resistive sensor, bolometer matrices, multiplexing; Anderson insulator; superconductors); Signal formation mechanism (high energy phonons, ballistic phonons and final thermalization), Signal acquisition and processing (reduction of noise due to the environment, from the cold pre-amplifier to the hard disk, signal processing and data analysis), and scientific culture (metrology, the microwave cosmological background, other astrophysical applications of cryogenic sensors). Contributions are printed in a different order than they listed in the table of contents

  2. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. II. Sampling procedures and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, B.R.; Nielsen, D.C.; Shock, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared thermometry can be a valuable research and production tool for detecting and quantifying water stress in plants, as shown by a large volume of published research. Users of infrared thermometers (IRT) should be aware of the many equipment, environmental, and plant factors influencing canopy temperature measured by an IRT. The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing measured plant temperature, outline sampling procedures that will produce reliable Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) values, and offer interpretations of CWSI and plant temperatures relative to crop production and other water stress parameters by reviewing previously conducted research. Factors that are considered are IRT condition, configuration, and position; psychrometer location; wind speed; solar radiation; time of day; leaf area and orientation; and appropriate non-water-stressed baseline equation. Standard sampling and CWSI calculation procedures are proposed. Use of CWSI with crops varying in type of response to water stress is described. Previously conducted research on plant temperatures or CWSI is tabulated by crop and water stress parameters measured. The paper provides valuable information to assist interested users of IRTs in making reliable water stress measurements. (author)

  3. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. II. Sampling procedures and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, B. R. [BP Research, Cleveland, OH (United States); Nielsen, D. C.; Shock, C. C.

    1992-10-15

    Infrared thermometry can be a valuable research and production tool for detecting and quantifying water stress in plants, as shown by a large volume of published research. Users of infrared thermometers (IRT) should be aware of the many equipment, environmental, and plant factors influencing canopy temperature measured by an IRT. The purpose of this paper is to describe factors influencing measured plant temperature, outline sampling procedures that will produce reliable Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) values, and offer interpretations of CWSI and plant temperatures relative to crop production and other water stress parameters by reviewing previously conducted research. Factors that are considered are IRT condition, configuration, and position; psychrometer location; wind speed; solar radiation; time of day; leaf area and orientation; and appropriate non-water-stressed baseline equation. Standard sampling and CWSI calculation procedures are proposed. Use of CWSI with crops varying in type of response to water stress is described. Previously conducted research on plant temperatures or CWSI is tabulated by crop and water stress parameters measured. The paper provides valuable information to assist interested users of IRTs in making reliable water stress measurements. (author)

  4. Feasibility of Johnson Noise Thermometry based on Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Yang Mo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an implementation strategy of noise thermometry based on a digital signal processing technique and demonstrates its feasibilities. A key factor in its development is how to extract the small thermal noise signal from other noises, for example, random noise from amplifiers and continuous electromagnetic interference from the environment. The proposed system consists of two identical amplifiers and uses a cross correlation function to cancel the random noise of the amplifiers. Then, the external interference noises are eliminated by discriminating the difference in the peaks between the thermal signal and external noise. The gain of the amplifiers is estimated by injecting an already known pilot signal. The experimental simulation results of signal processing methods have demonstrated that the proposed approach is an effective method in eliminating an external noise signal and performing gain correction for development of the thermometry

  5. Design and thermometry of an intracavitary microwave applicator suitable for treatment of some vaginal and rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.J.; Luk, K.H.; Jiang, H.B.; Chou, C.K.; Hwang, G.Z.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a modified coaxial cable as an intracavitary microwave applicator suitable for use in some vaginal and rectal cancers is presented. Thermometry is performed for microwave frequencies of 300, 400, 650, and 915 MHz. Temperature profiles in tissue phantoms were obtained with Vitek 101 temperature probes and thermography, and the data were compared with those obtained in dogs. The temperature profiles are dependent on the frequency of the microwaves and the insertion depth of the applicator. In addition, a lucite cylindrical spacer external to the applicator also altered the heating pattern. Therefore, with proper combinations of frequency, insertion depth, and spacer, the applicator can be used for heating tumors in some clinical situations. Two patients were treated with this intracavitary microwave applicator in conjunction with interstitial radiation therapy. Tolerance to such combined therapy was satisfactory in these preliminary trial treatments

  6. Flame thermometry using laser-induced-grating spectroscopy of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luers, Andrew; Salhlberg, Anna-Lena; Hochgreb, Simone; Ewart, Paul

    2018-03-01

    A systematic study of laser-induced thermal-grating scattering (LITGS) using nitric oxide as an absorbing species is presented as a means of thermometry in air-fed combustion. The relative contributions to the scattered signal from degenerate four-wave mixing, DFWM, and from laser-induced thermal-grating scattering, LITGS, are studied in the time domain for NO in N2 buffer gas up to 4 bar, using a pulsed laser system to excite the (0,0) γ-bands of NO at 226.21 nm. LITGS signals from combustion-generated NO in a laminar, pre-mixed CH4/O2/N2 flame on an in-house constructed slot burner were used to derive temperature values as a function of O2 concentration and position in the flame at 1 and 2.5 bar total pressure. Temperature values consistent with the calculated adiabatic flame temperature were derived from averaged LITGS signals over 50-100 single shots at 10 Hz repetition rate in the range 1600-2400 K with a pressure-dependent uncertainty of ± 1.8% at 1 bar to ± 1.4% at 2.5 bar. Based on observed signal-to-noise ratios, the minimum detectable concentration of NO in the flame is estimated to be 80 ppm for a 5 s measurement time at 10 Hz repetition rate.

  7. Similar estimates of temperature impacts on global wheat yield by three independent methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Müller, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global crop yield has recently been assessed with different methods. Here we show that grid-based and point-based simulations and statistical regressions (from historic records), without deliberate adaptation or CO2 fertilization effects, produ......-method ensemble, it was possible to quantify ‘method uncertainty’ in addition to model uncertainty. This significantly improves confidence in estimates of climate impacts on global food security.......The potential impact of global temperature change on global crop yield has recently been assessed with different methods. Here we show that grid-based and point-based simulations and statistical regressions (from historic records), without deliberate adaptation or CO2 fertilization effects, produce...... similar estimates of temperature impact on wheat yields at global and national scales. With a 1 °C global temperature increase, global wheat yield is projected to decline between 4.1% and 6.4%. Projected relative temperature impacts from different methods were similar for major wheat-producing countries...

  8. Similar Estimates of Temperature Impacts on Global Wheat Yield by Three Independent Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Muller, Christoph; Ewart, Frank; Elliott, Joshua; Lobell, David B.; Martre, Pierre; Ruane, Alex C.; Wallach, Daniel; Jones, James W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global crop yield has recently been assessed with different methods. Here we show that grid-based and point-based simulations and statistical regressions (from historic records), without deliberate adaptation or CO2 fertilization effects, produce similar estimates of temperature impact on wheat yields at global and national scales. With a 1 C global temperature increase, global wheat yield is projected to decline between 4.1% and 6.4%. Projected relative temperature impacts from different methods were similar for major wheat-producing countries China, India, USA and France, but less so for Russia. Point-based and grid-based simulations, and to some extent the statistical regressions, were consistent in projecting that warmer regions are likely to suffer more yield loss with increasing temperature than cooler regions. By forming a multi-method ensemble, it was possible to quantify 'method uncertainty' in addition to model uncertainty. This significantly improves confidence in estimates of climate impacts on global food security.

  9. Similar estimates of temperature impacts on global wheat yield by three independent methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Müller, Christoph; Ewert, Frank; Elliott, Joshua; Lobell, David B.; Martre, Pierre; Ruane, Alex C.; Wallach, Daniel; Jones, James W.; Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Aggarwal, Pramod K.; Alderman, Phillip D.; Anothai, Jakarat; Basso, Bruno; Biernath, Christian; Cammarano, Davide; Challinor, Andy; Deryng, Delphine; Sanctis, Giacomo De; Doltra, Jordi; Fereres, Elias; Folberth, Christian; Garcia-Vila, Margarita; Gayler, Sebastian; Hoogenboom, Gerrit; Hunt, Leslie A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Jabloun, Mohamed; Jones, Curtis D.; Kersebaum, Kurt C.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Koehler, Ann-Kristin; Kumar, Soora Naresh; Nendel, Claas; O'Leary, Garry J.; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Ottman, Michael J.; Palosuo, Taru; Prasad, P. V. Vara; Priesack, Eckart; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Reynolds, Matthew; Rezaei, Ehsan E.; Rötter, Reimund P.; Schmid, Erwin; Semenov, Mikhail A.; Shcherbak, Iurii; Stehfest, Elke; Stöckle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, Pierre; Streck, Thilo; Supit, Iwan; Tao, Fulu; Thorburn, Peter; Waha, Katharina; Wall, Gerard W.; Wang, Enli; White, Jeffrey W.; Wolf, Joost; Zhao, Zhigan; Zhu, Yan

    2016-12-01

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global crop yield has recently been assessed with different methods. Here we show that grid-based and point-based simulations and statistical regressions (from historic records), without deliberate adaptation or CO2 fertilization effects, produce similar estimates of temperature impact on wheat yields at global and national scales. With a 1 °C global temperature increase, global wheat yield is projected to decline between 4.1% and 6.4%. Projected relative temperature impacts from different methods were similar for major wheat-producing countries China, India, USA and France, but less so for Russia. Point-based and grid-based simulations, and to some extent the statistical regressions, were consistent in projecting that warmer regions are likely to suffer more yield loss with increasing temperature than cooler regions. By forming a multi-method ensemble, it was possible to quantify `method uncertainty’ in addition to model uncertainty. This significantly improves confidence in estimates of climate impacts on global food security.

  10. Fluorescent Molecular Rotor-in-Paraffin Waxes for Thermometry and Biometric Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young-Jae; Dogra, Rubal; Cheong, In Woo; Kwak, Giseop

    2015-07-08

    Novel thermoresponsive sensor systems consisting of a molecular rotor (MR) and paraffin wax (PW) were developed for various thermometric and biometric identification applications. Polydiphenylacetylenes (PDPAs) coupled with long alkyl chains were used as MRs, and PWs of hydrocarbons having 16-20 carbons were utilized as phase-change materials. The PDPAs were successfully dissolved in the molten PWs and did not act as an impurity that prevents phase transition of the PWs. These PDPA-in-PW hybrids had almost the same enthalpies and phase-transition temperatures as the corresponding pure PWs. The hybrids exhibited highly reversible fluorescence (FL) changes at the critical temperatures during phase transition of the PWs. These hybrids were impregnated into common filter paper in the molten state by absorption or were encapsulated into urea resin to enhance their mechanical integrity and cyclic stability during repeated use. The wax papers could be utilized in highly advanced applications including FL image writing/erasing, an array-type thermo-indicator, and fingerprint/palmprint identification. The present findings should facilitate the development of novel fluorescent sensor systems for biometric identification and are potentially applicable for biological and biomedical thermometry.

  11. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests; Mesures des tres hautes temperatures: Applications a des essais de surete des reacteurs nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-09-27

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  12. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M. [Charite, Humboldt-University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick [Charite, Humboldt-University, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Bretschneider, Tina [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  13. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.; Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick; Bretschneider, Tina

    2013-01-01

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  14. Infrared thermometry and the crop water stress index. I. History, theory, and baselines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, B.R.; Nielsen, D.C.; Shock, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Development of portable infrared thermometers and the definition of the Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) have led to widespread interest in infrared thermometry to monitor water stress and schedule irrigations. But the CWSI concept is still new and poorly understood by many. The purpose of this paper is to review the definition of CWSI, and the determination and interpretation of the non-water-stressed baselines used to compute CWSI. The non-water-stressed baseline equation normalizes the canopy minus air temperature differential for variations in vapor pressure deficit. Non-water-stressed baselines can be determined empirically from measurements of canopy and air temperatures and vapor pressure deficit, made diurnally on a single day, or at a single time of day over many days, on well-watered plants. The value of the maximum canopy minus air temperature differential under maximum water stress should also be determined empirically. Causes for CWSI values falling outside of the defined 0 to 10 unit range are reviewed. Non-water-stressed baselines may shift with plant growth stage. Effective use of CWSI is dependent on understanding the definition of CWSI, and the proper determination and use of non-water-stressed baselines. (author)

  15. Potential for improved radiation thermometry measurement uncertainty through implementing a primary scale in an industrial laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Jon R.; Lowe, David; Broughton, Mick; White, Ben S.; Machin, Graham

    2016-09-01

    A primary temperature scale requires realising a unit in terms of its definition. For high temperature radiation thermometry in terms of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 this means extrapolating from the signal measured at the freezing temperature of gold, silver or copper using Planck’s radiation law. The difficulty in doing this means that primary scales above 1000 °C require specialist equipment and careful characterisation in order to achieve the extrapolation with sufficient accuracy. As such, maintenance of the scale at high temperatures is usually only practicable for National Metrology Institutes, and calibration laboratories have to rely on a scale calibrated against transfer standards. At lower temperatures it is practicable for an industrial calibration laboratory to have its own primary temperature scale, which reduces the number of steps between the primary scale and end user. Proposed changes to the SI that will introduce internationally accepted high temperature reference standards might make it practicable to have a primary high temperature scale in a calibration laboratory. In this study such a scale was established by calibrating radiation thermometers directly to high temperature reference standards. The possible reduction in uncertainty to an end user as a result of the reduced calibration chain was evaluated.

  16. Fiber-Optic Magnetometry and Thermometry Using Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance With Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakley, Sean Michael

    Nitrogen--vacancy diamond (NVD) quantum sensors are an emerging technology that has shown great promise in areas like high-resolution thermometry and magnetometry. Optical fibers provide attractive new application paradigms for NVD technology. A detailed description of the fabrication processes associated with the development of novel fiber-optic NVD probes are presented in this work. The demonstrated probes are tested on paradigmatic model systems designed to ascertain their suitability for use in challenging biological environments. Methods employing optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) are used to accurately measure and map temperature distributions of small objects and to demonstrate emergent temperature-dependent phenomena in genetically modified living organisms. These methods are also used to create detailed high resolution spatial maps of both magnetic scalar and magnetic vector field distributions of spatially localized weak field features in the presence of a noisy, high-field background.

  17. Very high temperature measurements: Applications to nuclear reactor safety tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parga, Clemente-Jose

    2013-01-01

    This PhD dissertation focuses on the improvement of very high temperature thermometry (1100 deg. C to 2480 deg. C), with special emphasis on the application to the field of nuclear reactor safety and severe accident research. Two main projects were undertaken to achieve this objective: - The development, testing and transposition of high-temperature fixed point (HTFP) metal-carbon eutectic cells, from metrology laboratory precision (±0.001 deg. C) to applied research with a reasonable degradation of uncertainties (±3-5 deg. C). - The corrosion study and metallurgical characterization of Type-C thermocouple (service temp. 2300 deg. C) prospective sheath material was undertaken to extend the survivability of TCs used for molten metallic/oxide corium thermometry (below 2000 deg. C)

  18. Agreement between auricular and rectal measurements of body temperature in healthy cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marlos G; Carareto, Roberta; Pereira-Junior, Valdo A; Aquino, Monally C C

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of body temperature is a routine part of the clinical assessment of a patient. However, this procedure may be time-consuming and stressful to most animals because the standard site of temperature acquisition remains the rectal mucosa. Although an increasing number of clinicians have been using auricular temperature to estimate core body temperature, evidence is still lacking regarding agreement between these two methods in cats. In this investigation, we evaluated the agreement between temperatures measured in the rectum and ear in 29 healthy cats over a 2-week period. Temperatures were measured in the rectum (using digital and mercury-in-glass thermometers) and ear once a day for 14 consecutive days, producing 406 temperature readings for each thermometer. Mean temperature and confidence intervals were similar between methods, and Bland-Altman plots showed small biases and narrow limits of agreement acceptable for clinical purposes. The interobserver variability was also checked, which indicated a strong correlation between two near-simultaneous temperature readings. Results are consistent with auricular thermometry being a reliable alternative to rectal thermometry for assessing core body temperature in healthy cats.

  19. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna; Lacoste, Deanna; Damazo, Jason; Kwon, Eddie; Roberts, William L.

    2017-01-01

    -Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K

  20. Bivariate return periods of temperature and precipitation explain a large fraction of European crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zscheischler, Jakob; Orth, Rene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-07-01

    Crops are vital for human society. Crop yields vary with climate and it is important to understand how climate and crop yields are linked to ensure future food security. Temperature and precipitation are among the key driving factors of crop yield variability. Previous studies have investigated mostly linear relationships between temperature and precipitation and crop yield variability. Other research has highlighted the adverse impacts of climate extremes, such as drought and heat waves, on crop yields. Impacts are, however, often non-linearly related to multivariate climate conditions. Here we derive bivariate return periods of climate conditions as indicators for climate variability along different temperature-precipitation gradients. We show that in Europe, linear models based on bivariate return periods of specific climate conditions explain on average significantly more crop yield variability (42 %) than models relying directly on temperature and precipitation as predictors (36 %). Our results demonstrate that most often crop yields increase along a gradient from hot and dry to cold and wet conditions, with lower yields associated with hot and dry periods. The majority of crops are most sensitive to climate conditions in summer and to maximum temperatures. The use of bivariate return periods allows the integration of non-linear impacts into climate-crop yield analysis. This offers new avenues to study the link between climate and crop yield variability and suggests that they are possibly more strongly related than what is inferred from conventional linear models.

  1. The effects of digestion temperature and temperature shock on the biogas yields from the mesophilic anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, K J; Jang, Am; Yim, S K; Kim, In S

    2008-01-01

    In order to obtain basic design criteria for anaerobic digesters of swine manure, the effects of different digesting temperatures, temperature shocks and feed loads, on the biogas yields and methane content were evaluated. The digester temperatures were set at 25, 30 and 35 degrees C, with four feed loads of 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% (feed volume/digester volume). At a temperature of 30 degrees C, the methane yield was reduced by only 3% compared to 35 degrees C, while a 17.4% reduction was observed when the digestion was performed at 25 degrees C. Ultimate methane yields of 327, 389 and 403 mL CH(4)/g VS(added) were obtained at 25, 30 and 35 degrees C, respectively; with moderate feed loads from 5% to 20% (V/V). From the elemental analysis of swine manure, the theoretical biogas and methane yields at standard temperature and pressure were 1.12L biogas/g VS(destroyed) and 0.724 L CH(4)/g VS(destroyed), respectively. Also, the methane content increased with increasing digestion temperatures, but only to a small degree. Temperature shocks from 35 to 30 degrees C and again from 30 to 32 degrees C led to a decrease in the biogas production rate, but it rapidly resumed the value of the control reactor. In addition, no lasting damage was observed for the digestion performance, once it had recovered.

  2. Hydrogen yield from low temperature steam reforming of ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, N.K.; Dalai, A.K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering Laboratories; Ranganathan, R. [Saskatchewan Research Council, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    Interest in the use of ethanol for fuel cell hydrogen production was discussed with particular reference to a study in which the production of hydrogen was maximized through low temperature steam reforming of ethanol in the temperature range of 200 to 360 degrees C. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of Mn concentration on a Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for steam reforming of ethanol to produce hydrogen. The purpose was to maximize ethanol conversion and hydrogen selectivity in the lowest possible reaction temperature for the ideal catalyst activity. The optimum reaction conditions in the presence of a suitable catalyst can produce the desired products of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with six different concentrations ranging from 0 to 10 weight per cent Mn, were prepared, characterized and studied for the ethanol-steam reforming reaction. The effects of different process variables were studied, including water-to-ethanol feed ratio, space time and catalyst reduction temperatures on ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield. Maximum ethanol conversion of 60.7 per cent and hydrogen yield of 3.74 (mol of hydrogen per mol of ethanol converted) were observed at 360 degrees C for a catalyst with 2.5 weight per cent Mn loading. 29 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. A comparison of three different types of temperature measurement in HITU fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, J.; Jenderka, K.-V.; Seifert, F.; Klepsch, T.; Martin, E.; Shaw, A.; Durando, G.; Guglielmone, C.; Girard, F.

    2012-10-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of the temperature elevation caused by high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) in a tissue-mimicking material (TMM) has been determined with magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, infrared (IR) thermometry and a thermal test object with an integrated thin-film thermocouple at three different National Metrological Institutes (PTB/Germany, NPL/UK, INRIM/Italy). Results obtained from the different types of measurement are compared and some general aspects of the methods are discussed, particularly with regard to their suitability for the in vitro characterization of transducers for treatment planning.

  4. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odéen, Henrik; Todd, Nick; Diakite, Mahamadou; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled “truth.” For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65 °C, 0.49 °C, and 0.35 °C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05 °C and 1.31 °C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes

  5. Evaluation of phase sensitive detection method and Si avalanche photodiode for radiation thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, M J; Tan, C H; Willmott, J R

    2013-01-01

    We report the evaluation of Si avalanche photodiodes (APDs) for use in radiation thermometry as an alternative to Si photodiodes. We compared their performance when operated under phase sensitive detection (PSD), where the signal is modulated, and direct detection (DD) methods. A Si APD was compared with a Si photodiode with reference black body temperatures of 275 to 600°C, in terms of the mean output voltage and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), measured at different APD gain values. We found that using both PSD and DD methods, the high internal gain of the Si APD achieved a lower minimum detection temperature in order to satisfy a specific minimum output voltage of the detector-preamplifier combination employed. The use of PSD over DD for the Si APD allowed for improved performance of the thermometer, with a lower minimum measurable temperature, as well as improvement in the SNR. For instance we found that at 350°C, the Si APD biased at 150 V using PSD can provide ∼ 88 times enhancement in the system SNR over that of a Si photodiode using DD. A corresponding temperature error of ±0.05°C was achieved using the APD with PSD compared to an error of ±2.75°C measured using the Si photodiode with DD.

  6. Average Potential Temperature of the Upper Mantle and Excess Temperatures Beneath Regions of Active Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2006-05-01

    The question as to whether any particular oceanic island is the result of a thermal mantle plume, is a question of whether volcanism is the result of passive upwelling, as at mid-ocean ridges, or active upwelling, driven by thermally buoyant material. When upwelling is passive, mantle temperatures reflect average or ambient upper mantle values. In contrast, sites of thermally driven active upwellings will have elevated (or excess) mantle temperatures, driven by some source of excess heat. Skeptics of the plume hypothesis suggest that the maximum temperatures at ocean islands are similar to maximum temperatures at mid-ocean ridges (Anderson, 2000; Green et al., 2001). Olivine-liquid thermometry, when applied to Hawaii, Iceland, and global MORB, belie this hypothesis. Olivine-liquid equilibria provide the most accurate means of estimating mantle temperatures, which are highly sensitive to the forsterite (Fo) contents of olivines, and the FeO content of coexisting liquids. Their application shows that mantle temperatures in the MORB source region are less than temperatures at both Hawaii and Iceland. The Siqueiros Transform may provide the most precise estimate of TpMORB because high MgO glass compositions there have been affected only by olivine fractionation, so primitive FeOliq is known; olivine thermometry yields TpSiqueiros = 1430 ±59°C. A global database of 22,000 MORB show that most MORB have slightly higher FeOliq than at Siqueiros, which translates to higher calculated mantle potential temperatures. If the values for Fomax (= 91.5) and KD (Fe-Mg)ol-liq (= 0.29) at Siqueiros apply globally, then upper mantle Tp is closer to 1485 ± 59°C. Averaging this global estimate with that recovered at Siqueiros yields TpMORB = 1458 ± 78°C, which is used to calculate plume excess temperatures, Te. The estimate for TpMORB defines the convective mantle geotherm, and is consistent with estimates from sea floor bathymetry and heat flow (Stein and Stein, 1992), and

  7. MRI monitoring of focused ultrasound sonications near metallic hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Hans; Ghanouni, Pejman; Pascal-Tenorio, Aurea; Pauly, Kim Butts; Hargreaves, Brian A

    2018-07-01

    To explore the temperature-induced signal change in two-dimensional multi-spectral imaging (2DMSI) for fast thermometry near metallic hardware to enable MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) in patients with implanted metallic hardware. 2DMSI was optimized for temperature sensitivity and applied to monitor focus ultrasound surgery (FUS) sonications near metallic hardware in phantoms and ex vivo porcine muscle tissue. Further, we evaluated its temperature sensitivity for in vivo muscle in patients without metallic hardware. In addition, we performed a comparison of temperature sensitivity between 2DMSI and conventional proton-resonance-frequency-shift (PRFS) thermometry at different distances from metal devices and different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). 2DMSI thermometry enabled visualization of short ultrasound sonications near metallic hardware. Calibration using in vivo muscle yielded a constant temperature sensitivity for temperatures below 43 °C. For an off-resonance coverage of ± 6 kHz, we achieved a temperature sensitivity of 1.45%/K, resulting in a minimum detectable temperature change of ∼2.5 K for an SNR of 100 with a temporal resolution of 6 s per frame. The proposed 2DMSI thermometry has the potential to allow MR-guided FUS treatments of patients with metallic hardware and therefore expand its reach to a larger patient population. Magn Reson Med 80:259-271, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Examination of the suitability of noise thermometry for precise in situ calibration of thermocouples in technical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, H.

    1988-12-01

    The aim was to determine the achievable accuracy of the noise thermometer developed at the KFA in the range from 0 to 1000 0 C under laboratory conditions. Precision noise temperature measurements at fixed temperature points (triple point of water, freezing point of zinc and silver) were carried out. The fixed point technique and the conventional precision resistance thermometry, which is required to operate the fixed points, were established in accordance with the requirements of accurate (and thus longer lasting) noise temperature measurements. The analysis of all possible sources of error ensured that all systematic or random errors were in the range of a few 10 -5 . The further developed KFA noise thermometers, which can be used under industrial conditions, achieve under laboratory conditions a measuring error of about ±2.5 10 -4 - relative to the thermodynamic temperature scale - in the temperature range from 273.16 K (0.01 0 C) to 1234.894 K (961.744 0 C). Assuming that the individual measured values display a normal distribution, the noise measurements at the zinc and silver point are combined to a mean value, it becomes apparent that the average noise temperatures only deviate by +2 10 -5 (zinc) or +4 10 -5 (silver) from the respective thermodynamic temperature. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Primary gas thermometry by means of laser-absorption spectroscopy: Determination of the Boltzmann constant

    OpenAIRE

    Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Galzerano, G.; Wehr, R.; Merlone, A.; Di Serafino, D.; Laporta, P.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a new optical implementation of primary gas thermometry based on laser absorption spectrometry in the near infrared. The method consists in retrieving the Doppler broadening from highly accurate observations of the line shape of the R(12) $\

  10. Bivariate return periods of temperature and precipitation explain a large fraction of European crop yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zscheischler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Crops are vital for human society. Crop yields vary with climate and it is important to understand how climate and crop yields are linked to ensure future food security. Temperature and precipitation are among the key driving factors of crop yield variability. Previous studies have investigated mostly linear relationships between temperature and precipitation and crop yield variability. Other research has highlighted the adverse impacts of climate extremes, such as drought and heat waves, on crop yields. Impacts are, however, often non-linearly related to multivariate climate conditions. Here we derive bivariate return periods of climate conditions as indicators for climate variability along different temperature–precipitation gradients. We show that in Europe, linear models based on bivariate return periods of specific climate conditions explain on average significantly more crop yield variability (42 % than models relying directly on temperature and precipitation as predictors (36 %. Our results demonstrate that most often crop yields increase along a gradient from hot and dry to cold and wet conditions, with lower yields associated with hot and dry periods. The majority of crops are most sensitive to climate conditions in summer and to maximum temperatures. The use of bivariate return periods allows the integration of non-linear impacts into climate–crop yield analysis. This offers new avenues to study the link between climate and crop yield variability and suggests that they are possibly more strongly related than what is inferred from conventional linear models.

  11. Noise temperature measurements for the determination of the thermodynamic temperature of the melting point of palladium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, F.; Kuhne, M.; Tegeler, E. [Bundesanstalt Physikalisch-Technische, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    The thermodynamic temperature of the melting point of palladium in air was measured by noise thermometric methods. The temperature measurement was based on noise comparison using a two-channel arrangement to eliminate parasitic noises of electronic components by cross correlation. Three miniature fixed points filled with pure palladium (purity: {approx}99.99%, mass: {approx}90 g) were used to realize the melts of the fixed point metal. The measured melting temperature of palladium in air amounted to 1552.95 deg C {+-} 0.21 K (k = 2). This temperature is 0.45 K lower than the temperature of the melting point of palladium measured by radiation thermometry. (authors)

  12. Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Barrera, S.; Rodriguez-Puebla, C.; Challinor, A. J.

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to provide new insight on the wheat yield historical response to climate processes throughout Spain by using statistical methods. Our data includes observed wheat yield, pseudo-observations E-OBS for the period 1979 to 2014, and outputs of general circulation models in phase 5 of the Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for the period 1901 to 2099. In investigating the relationship between climate and wheat variability, we have applied the approach known as the partial least-square regression, which captures the relevant climate drivers accounting for variations in wheat yield. We found that drought occurring in autumn and spring and the diurnal range of temperature experienced during the winter are major processes to characterize the wheat yield variability in Spain. These observable climate processes are used for an empirical model that is utilized in assessing the wheat yield trends in Spain under different climate conditions. To isolate the trend within the wheat time series, we implemented the adaptive approach known as Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition. Wheat yields in the twenty-first century are experiencing a downward trend that we claim is a consequence of widespread drought over the Iberian Peninsula and an increase in the diurnal range of temperature. These results are important to inform about the wheat vulnerability in this region to coming changes and to develop adaptation strategies.

  13. Determination of the yield locus by means of temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banabic, D.; Huetink, Han

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical background of the thermo-graphical method of determining the yield locus. The analytical expression of the temperature variation of the specimen deformed in the elastic state is determined starting from the first law of thermodynamics. The experimental method for

  14. A Ratiometric Method for Johnson Noise Thermometry Using a Quantized Voltage Noise Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S. W.; Benz, S. P.; Martinis, J. M.; Dresselhaus, P.; Tew, W. L.; White, D. R.

    2003-09-01

    Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) involves the measurement of the statistical variance of a fluctuating voltage across a resistor in thermal equilibrium. Modern digital techniques make it now possible to perform many functions required for JNT in highly efficient and predictable ways. We describe the operational characteristics of a prototype JNT system which uses digital signal processing for filtering, real-time spectral cross-correlation for noise power measurement, and a digitally synthesized Quantized Voltage Noise Source (QVNS) as an AC voltage reference. The QVNS emulates noise with a constant spectral density that is stable, programmable, and calculable in terms of known parameters using digital synthesis techniques. Changes in analog gain are accounted for by alternating the inputs between the Johnson noise sensor and the QVNS. The Johnson noise power at a known temperature is first balanced with a synthesized noise power from the QVNS. The process is then repeated by balancing the noise power from the same resistor at an unknown temperature. When the two noise power ratios are combined, a thermodynamic temperature is derived using the ratio of the two QVNS spectral densities. We present preliminary results where the ratio between the gallium triple point and the water triple point is used to demonstrate the accuracy of the measurement system with a standard uncertainty of 0.04 %.

  15. Extended Kalman filtering for continuous volumetric MR-temperature imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis de Senneville, Baudouin; Roujol, Sébastien; Hey, Silke; Moonen, Chrit; Ries, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Real time magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry has evolved into the method of choice for the guidance of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) interventions. For this role, MR-thermometry should preferably have a high temporal and spatial resolution and allow observing the temperature over the entire targeted area and its vicinity with a high accuracy. In addition, the precision of real time MR-thermometry for therapy guidance is generally limited by the available signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the influence of physiological noise. MR-guided HIFU would benefit of the large coverage volumetric temperature maps, including characterization of volumetric heating trajectories as well as near- and far-field heating. In this paper, continuous volumetric MR-temperature monitoring was obtained as follows. The targeted area was continuously scanned during the heating process by a multi-slice sequence. Measured data and a priori knowledge of 3-D data derived from a forecast based on a physical model were combined using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The proposed reconstruction improved the temperature measurement resolution and precision while maintaining guaranteed output accuracy. The method was evaluated experimentally ex vivo on a phantom, and in vivo on a porcine kidney, using HIFU heating. On the in vivo experiment, it allowed the reconstruction from a spatio-temporally under-sampled data set (with an update rate for each voxel of 1.143 s) to a 3-D dataset covering a field of view of 142.5×285×54 mm(3) with a voxel size of 3×3×6 mm(3) and a temporal resolution of 0.127 s. The method also provided noise reduction, while having a minimal impact on accuracy and latency.

  16. Origin of the reversed yield asymmetry in Mg-rare earth alloys at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo-Manrique, P.; Herrera-Solaz, V.; Segurado, J.; Llorca, J.; Gálvez, F.; Ruano, O.A.; Yi, S.B.; Pérez-Prado, M.T.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour in tension and compression of an extruded Mg–1 wt.% Mn–1 wt.% Nd (MN11) alloy was studied along the extrusion direction in the temperature range −175 °C to 300 °C at both quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. Microstructural analysis revealed that the as-extruded bar presents a recrystallized microstructure and a weak texture that remain stable in the whole temperature range. A remarkable reversed yield stress asymmetry was observed above 150 °C, with the compressive yield stress being significantly higher than the tensile yield stress. The origin of this anomalous reversed yield stress asymmetry, which to date remains unknown, was investigated through the analysis of the macro and microtexture development during deformation, as well as by means of crystal plasticity finite element simulations of a representative volume element of the polycrystal. The critical resolved shear stresses of slip and twining for simulated single crystals were obtained as a function of the temperature by means of an inverse optimisation strategy. Experimental and simulation results suggest that the reversed yield asymmetry may be primarily attributed to the non-Schmid behaviour of pyramidal 〈c + a〉 slip, which is the dominant deformation mechanism at high temperatures. It is proposed, furthermore, that the asymmetry is enhanced at quasi-static strain rates by the stronger interaction of 〈c + a〉 dislocations with the diffusing solute atoms and particles in compression than in tension

  17. Metal Carbon Eutectics to Extend the Use of the Fixed-Point Technique in Precision IR Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battuello, M.; Girard, F.; Florio, M.

    2008-06-01

    The high-temperature extension of the fixed-point technique for primary calibration of precision infrared (IR) thermometers was investigated both through mathematical simulations and laboratory investigations. Simulations were performed with Co C (1,324°C) and Pd C (1, 492°C) eutectic fixed points, and a precision IR thermometer was calibrated from the In point (156.5985°C) up to the Co C point. Mathematical simulations suggested the possibility of directly deriving the transition temperature of the Co C and Pd C points by extrapolating the calibration derived from fixed-point measurements from In to the Cu point. Both temperatures, as a result of the low uncertainty associated with the In Cu calibration and the high number of fixed points involved in the calibration process, can be derived with an uncertainty of 0.11°C for Co C and 0.18°C for Pd C. A transition temperature of 1,324.3°C for Co C was determined from the experimental verification, a value higher than, but compatible with, the one proposed by the thermometry community for inclusion as a secondary reference point for ITS-90 dissemination, i.e., 1,324.0°C.

  18. Study of the functional state of peripheral vessels in fingers of rheumatological patients by means of laser Doppler flowmetry and cutaneous thermometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsova, Angelina I.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Podmasteryev, Konstantin V.; Pilipenko, Olga V.; Krupatkin, Alexander I.; Khakhicheva, Lyudmila S.; Muradyan, Vadim F.

    2016-04-01

    Vasospastic disorders are a common class of rheumatic disease. These include syndromes such as vegetative dystonia, Raynaud's syndrome, vibration disease and rheumatoid arthritis among others. The aim of this work is to develop an original method of diagnosing the functional state of peripheral vessels of the fingers, based on the simultaneous recording of LDF- and thermograms during the occlusion test, for determining vascular disorders of rheumatological patients. A diagnostic method was developed for assessing the functional state of the peripheral vessels of fingers, based on carrying out occlusion test in a thermally stabilized environment, with simultaneous recording of signals of laser Doppler flowmetry and skin thermometry. To verify the diagnostic value of the proposed method, a series of experiments were carried out on 41 rheumatological patients: 5 male and 36 females (average age 56.0+/-12.2 years). The most common diagnoses in the patient group were rheumatoid arthritis, arthrosis, gout and systemic lupus erythematosus. The laser analyser of blood microcirculation "LAKK-02" (SPE "LAZMA" Ltd, Russia) and a custom developed multi-channel thermometry device for low inertia thermometry were used for experimental measurements. The measurements of cutaneous temperature and the index of microcirculation were performed on the distal phalanx of the third finger of the right hand. Occlusion tests were performed with water baths at 25 and 42 °C and a tonometer cuff with a pressure of 200-220 mmHg for 3 min on the upper arm. The results of experimental studies are presented and interpreted. These data indicate a violation of the blood supply regulation in the form of a pronounced tendency towards microvascular vasoconstriction in the fingers. Thus, the response displaying a tendency toward angiospasm among patients in the rheumatological diseases profile group was observed mainly in the most severe cases (49 % of this group). The prospects of the developed

  19. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  20. Enhanced Furfural Yields from Xylose Dehydration in the gamma-Valerolactone/Water Solvent System at Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Canan; Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Alonso, David Martin; Dumesic, James

    2018-05-18

    High yields of furfural (>90%) were achieved from xylose dehydration in a sustainable solvent system composed of -valerolactone (GVL), a biomass derived solvent, and water. It is identified that high reaction temperatures (e.g., 498 K) are required to achieve high furfural yield. Additionally, it is shown that the furfural yield at these temperatures is independent of the initial xylose concentration, and high furfural yield is obtained for industrially relevant xylose concentrations (10 wt%). A reaction kinetics model is developed to describe the experimental data obtained with solvent system composed of 80 wt% GVL and 20 wt% water across the range of reaction conditions studied (473 - 523 K, 1-10 mM acid catalyst, 66 - 660 mM xylose concentration). The kinetic model demonstrates that furfural loss due to bimolecular condensation of xylose and furfural is minimized at elevated temperature, whereas carbon loss due to xylose degradation increases with increasing temperature. Accordingly, the optimal temperature range for xylose dehydration to furfural in the GVL/H2O solvent system is identified to be from 480 to 500 K. Under these reaction conditions, furfural yield of 93% is achieved at 97% xylan conversion from lignocellulosic biomass (maple wood). © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Digital signal processing for the Johnson noise thermometry: a time series analysis of the Johnson noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Byung Soo; Hwang, In Koo; Chung, Chong Eun; Kwon, Kee Choon; David, E. H.; Kisner, R.A.

    2004-06-01

    In this report, we first proved that a random signal obtained by taking the sum of a set of signal frequency signals generates a continuous Markov process. We used this random signal to simulate the Johnson noise and verified that the Johnson noise thermometry can be used to improve the measurements of the reactor coolant temperature within an accuracy of below 0.14%. Secondly, by using this random signal we determined the optimal sampling rate when the frequency band of the Johnson noise signal is given. Also the results of our examination on how good the linearity of the Johnson noise is and how large the relative error of the temperature could become when the temperature increases are described. Thirdly, the results of our analysis on a set of the Johnson noise signal blocks taken from a simple electric circuit are described. We showed that the properties of the continuous Markov process are satisfied even when some channel noises are present. Finally, we describe the algorithm we devised to handle the problem of the time lag in the long-term average or the moving average in a transient state. The algorithm is based on the Haar wavelet and is to estimate the transient temperature that has much smaller time delay. We have shown that the algorithm can track the transient temperature successfully

  2. Influences of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on warm season temperature and crop yields in the southwestern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, B.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.; Kafatos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Despite advancements in agricultural technology, agricultural productivity remains vulnerable to extreme meteorological conditions. This study has found significant impacts of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on extreme temperatures and in turn on crop yields in the Southwestern United States (SW US) region. Analyses of multi-year data of observed temperatures and simulated maize yields reveal that NAO affects positively the daily temperature maxima and minima in the green-up periods (March-June) and that the response of maize yields to NAO varies according to the climatological mean temperatures. In warmer regions, a combination of above-normal NAO in the planting periods and below-normal NAO in the growing periods is favorable for high maize yields by reducing extremely cold days during the planting periods and extremely hot days in the later periods, respectively. In colder regions, continuously above-normal NAO conditions favor higher yields via above normal thermal conditions. Results in this study suggest that NAO predictions can benefit agricultural planning in SW US.

  3. Evidence for a weakening strength of temperature-corn yield relation in the United States during 1980–2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, Guoyong

    2017-12-01

    Temperature is known to be correlated with crop yields, causing reduction of crop yield with climate warming without adaptations or CO2 fertilization effects. The historical temperature-crop yield relation has often been used for informing future changes. This relationship, however, may change over time following alternations in other environmental factors. Results show that the strength of the relationship between the interannual variability of growing season temperature and corn yield (RGST_CY) has declined in the United States between 1980 and 2010 with a loss in the statistical significance. The regression slope which represents the anomalies in corn yield that occur in association with 1 degree temperature anomaly has decreased significantly from -6.9%/K of the first half period to -2.4%/K~-3.5%/K of the second half period. This implies that projected corn yield reduction will be overestimated by a fact of 2 in a given warming scenario, if the corn-temperature relation is derived from the earlier historical period. Changes in RGST_CY are mainly observed in Midwest Corn Belt and central High Plains, and are well reproduced by 11 process-based crop models. In Midwest rain-fed systems, the decrease of negative temperature effects coincides with an increase in water availability by precipitation. In irrigated areas where water stress is minimized, the decline of beneficial temperature effects is significantly related to the increase in extreme hot days. The results indicate that an extrapolation of historical yield response to temperature may bias the assessment of agriculture vulnerability to climate change. Efforts to reduce climate impacts on agriculture should pay attention not only to climate change, but also to changes in climate-crop yield relations. There are some caveats that should be acknowledged as the analysis is restricted to the changes in the linear relation between growing season mean temperature and corn yield for the specific study period.

  4. Pulse radiolysis study on temperature and pressure dependence of the yield of solvated electron in methanol from room temperature to supercritical condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Zhenhui; He, Hui; Lin, Mingzhang; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2012-09-01

    A new concept of nuclear reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), has been proposed, which is based on the success of the use of supercritical water (SCW) in fossil fuel power plants for more than three decades. This new concept reactor has advantages of higher thermal conversion efficiency, simplicity in structure, safety, etc, and it has been selected as one of the reactor concepts for the next generation nuclear reactor systems. In these reactors, the same as in boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized water reactors (PWR), water is used not only as a coolant but also as a moderator. It is very important to understand the behavior of the radiolysis products of water under the supercritical condition, since the water is exposed to a strong radiation field under very high temperature condition. Usually, in order to predict the concentrations of water decomposition products with carrying out some kinds of computer simulations, knowledge of the temperature and/or pressure dependent G-values (denoting the experimentally measured radiolytic yields) as well as of the rate constants of a set of reactions becomes very important. Therefore, in recent years, two groups from Argonne National Laboratory and The University of Tokyo, simultaneously conducted two projects aimed at obtaining basic data on radiolysis of SCW. However, it is still lack of reliable radiolytic yields of water decomposition products in very high temperature region. As we known, the properties of solvated electrons in polar liquid are very helpful for our understanding how they play a central role in many processes, such as solvation and reducing reactions. The solvated electron can also be used as a probe to determine the dynamic nature of the polar liquid systems. Comparing to water, the primary alcohols have much milder critical points, for example, for water and methanol, the critical temperature and pressure are 374 deg. C and 22.1 MPa and 239.5 deg. C and 8.1 MPa, respectively

  5. Termometria infravermelha na fenotipagem para resistência à seca de linhagens inter e intraespecíficas de arroz Infrared thermometry for drought phenotyping of inter and intra specific upland rice lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber M. Guimarães

    2010-02-01

    grain yields under water stress produced taller plants with denser panicles and well-formed grains as well as lower spikelet sterility. A positive correlation between canopy temperature and spikelet sterility was observed; and a negative correlation existed between canopy temperature and 100-grain weight, plant height, tiller fertility, and grain yield. Except for tiller fertility, all components showed correlation with grain yield; in the case of spikelet sterility, the relationship was negative. It has been inferred that O. glaberrima confers to its lines higher rusticity where water stress is concerned, and that infrared thermometry is an important supporting tool for phenotyping drought tolerance.

  6. Determination of surface temperatures in combustion environments using thermographic phosphors; Wandtemperaturmessungen in Verbrennungsumgebungen mithilfe thermographischer Phosphore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruebach, J.; Kissel, T. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). FG Energie- und Kraftwerkstechnik; Dreizler, A. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). FG Reaktive Stroemungen und Messtechnik

    2009-07-01

    A phosphor thermometry system was characterised with regard to all sources of systematic errors. Exemplary, the point measurement of a surface temperature and the determination of wall-normal temperature gradients within an optically accessible combustion chamber are outlined. Furthermore, the temporal temperature characteristic at the quartz ring of an optically accessible engine is presented. (orig.)

  7. Chemical yields from low-temperature pyrolysis of CCA-treated wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qirong Fu; Dimitris Argyropolous; Lucian Lucia; David Tilotta; Stan Lebow

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature pyrolysis offers a feasible option for wood-waste management and the recovery of a variety of useful chemicals. The effect of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood preservative on the yield and composition of various pyrolysis products was investigated in the present research. A novel quantitative 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (...

  8. The Effects of Temperature and Precipitation on the Yield of Zea Mays L. I the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooksbury, David Emory

    Three families of straightforward maize (Zea mays L.) yield/climate models using monthly temperature and precipitation terms are produced. One family of models uses USDA's Crop Reporting Districts (CRD) as its scale of aggregation. The other two families of models use three different district aggregates based on climate or yield patterns. The climate and yield districts are determined by using a two-stage cluster analysis. The CRD-based family of models perform as well as the climate and yield based models. All models explain between 80% and 90% of the variance in maize yield. The most important climate term affecting maize yield in the South is the daily maximum temperature at pollination time. The higher the maximum temperature, the lower the yield. Above normal minimum temperature during pollination increases yield in the Middle South. Weather that favors early planting and rapid vegetative growth increases yield. Ideal maize yield weather includes a dry period during planting followed by a warm period during vegetative growth. Moisture variables are important only during the planting and harvest periods when above normal precipitation delays field work and thereby reduces yield. The model results indicate that the dire predictions about the fate of Southern agriculture in a trace gas warmed world may not be true. This is due to the overwhelming influence of the daily maximum temperature on yield. An optimum aggregate for climate impact studies was not found. I postulate that this is due to the dynamic nature of the American maize production system. For most climate impact studies on a dynamic agricultural system, there does not need to be a concern about the model aggregation.

  9. Nanometer-scale temperature measurements of phase change memory and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Kyle Lane

    This work investigates nanometer-scale thermometry and thermal transport in new electronic devices to mitigate future electronic energy consumption. Nanometer-scale thermal transport is integral to electronic energy consumption and limits current electronic performance. New electronic devices are required to improve future electronic performance and energy consumption, but heat generation is not well understood in these new technologies. Thermal transport deviates significantly at the nanometer-scale from macroscopic systems as low dimensional materials, grain structure, interfaces, and thermoelectric effects can dominate electronic performance. This work develops and implements an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanometer-scale thermometry technique, known as scanning Joule expansion microscopy (SJEM), to measure nanometer-scale heat generation in new graphene and phase change memory (PCM) devices, which have potential to improve performance and energy consumption of future electronics. Nanometer-scale thermometry of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene measured the heat generation at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs). Graphene is an atomically-thin, two dimensional (2D) carbon material with promising applications in new electronic devices. Comparing measurements and predictions of CVD graphene heating predicted the resistivity, voltage drop, and temperature rise across the one dimensional (1D) GB defects. This work measured the nanometer-scale temperature rise of thin film Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) based PCM due to Joule, thermoelectric, interface, and grain structure effects. PCM has potential to reduce energy consumption and improve performance of future electronic memory. A new nanometer-scale thermometry technique is developed for independent and direct observation of Joule and thermoelectric effects at the nanometer-scale, and the technique is demonstrated by SJEM measurements of GST devices. Uniform heating and GST properties are observed for

  10. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  11. Steam gasification of waste tyre: Influence of process temperature on yield and product composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portofino, Sabrina, E-mail: sabrina.portofino@enea.it [UTTP NANO – C.R. ENEA Portici, P.le E. Fermi, 1 Loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy); Donatelli, Antonio; Iovane, Pierpaolo; Innella, Carolina; Civita, Rocco; Martino, Maria; Matera, Domenico Antonio; Russo, Antonio; Cornacchia, Giacinto [UTTTRI RIF – C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS Jonica 106, km 419.5, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Galvagno, Sergio [UTTP NANO – C.R. ENEA Portici, P.le E. Fermi, 1 Loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Steam gasification of waste tyre as matter and energy recovery treatment. ► Process temperature affects products yield and gas composition. ► High temperature promotes hydrogen production. ► Char exploitation as activated carbon or carbon source. - Abstract: An experimental survey of waste tyre gasification with steam as oxidizing agent has been conducted in a continuous bench scale reactor, with the aim of studying the influence of the process temperature on the yield and the composition of the products; the tests have been performed at three different temperatures, in the range of 850–1000 °C, holding all the other operational parameters (pressure, carrier gas flow, solid residence time). The experimental results show that the process seems promising in view of obtaining a good quality syngas, indicating that a higher temperature results in a higher syngas production (86 wt%) and a lower char yield, due to an enhancement of the solid–gas phase reactions with the temperature. Higher temperatures clearly result in higher hydrogen concentrations: the hydrogen content rapidly increases, attaining values higher than 65% v/v, while methane and ethylene gradually decrease over the range of the temperatures; carbon monoxide and dioxide instead, after an initial increase, show a nearly constant concentration at 1000 °C. Furthermore, in regards to the elemental composition of the synthesis gas, as the temperature increases, the carbon content continuously decreases, while the oxygen content increases; the hydrogen, being the main component of the gas fraction and having a small atomic weight, is responsible for the progressive reduction of the gas density at higher temperature.

  12. Sensitivity Modulation of Upconverting Thermometry through Engineering Phonon Energy of a Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Hao; Guo, Chongfeng; Zheng, Jiming; Zhou, Bo; Ma, Chonggeng; Zhao, Xiaoqi; Li, Ting; Guo, Ping; Goldys, Ewa M

    2016-11-09

    Investigation of the unclear influential factors to thermal sensing capability is the only way to achieve highly sensitive thermometry, which is greatly needed to meet the growing demand for potential sensing applications. Here, the effect from the phonon energy of a matrix on the sensitivity of upconversion (UC) microthermometers is elaborately discussed using a controllable method. Uniform truncated octahedral YF 3 :Er 3+ /Yb 3+ microcrystals were prepared by a hydrothermal approach, and phase transformation from YF 3 to YOF and Y 2 O 3 with nearly unchanged morphology and size was successfully realized by controlling the annealing temperature. The phonon energies of blank matrixes were determined by FT-IR spectra and Raman scattering. Upon 980 nm excitation, phonon energy-dependent UC emitting color was finely tuned from green to yellow for three samples, and the mechanisms were proposed. Thermal sensing behaviors based on the TCLs ( 2 H 11/2 / 4 S 3/2 ) were evaluated, and the sensitivities gradually grew with the increase in the matrix's phonon energy. According to chemical bond theory and first-principle calculations, the most intrinsic factors associated with thermometric ability were qualitatively demonstrated through analyzing the inner relation between the phonon energy and bond covalency. The exciting results provide guiding insights into employing appropriate host materials with desired thermometric ability while offering the possibility of highly accurate measurement of temperature.

  13. Measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry using a superconducting integrated circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, C.; Yamazawa, K.; Kaneko, N.-H.

    2017-12-01

    We report on our measurement of the Boltzmann constant by Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) using an integrated quantum voltage noise source (IQVNS) that is fully implemented with superconducting integrated circuit technology. The IQVNS generates calculable pseudo white noise voltages to calibrate the JNT system. The thermal noise of a sensing resistor placed at the temperature of the triple point of water was measured precisely by the IQVNS-based JNT. We accumulated data of more than 429 200 s in total (over 6 d) and used the Akaike information criterion to estimate the fitting frequency range for the quadratic model to calculate the Boltzmann constant. Upon detailed evaluation of the uncertainty components, the experimentally obtained Boltzmann constant was k=1.380 6436× {{10}-23} J K-1 with a relative combined uncertainty of 10.22× {{10}-6} . The value of k is relatively -3.56× {{10}-6} lower than the CODATA 2014 value (Mohr et al 2016 Rev. Mod. Phys. 88 035009).

  14. Thermometry of levitated nanoparticles in a hybrid electro-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranas, E. B.; Fonseca, P. Z. G.; Barker, P. F.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2017-03-01

    There have been recent rapid developments in stable trapping of levitated nanoparticles in high vacuum. Cooling of nanoparticles, from phonon occupancies of 107 down to ≃ 100{--}1000 phonons, have already been achieved by several groups. Prospects for quantum ground-state cooling seem extremely promising. Cavity-cooling without added stabilisation by feedback cooling remains challenging, but trapping at high vacuum in a cavity is now possible through the addition of a Paul trap. However, the Paul trap has been found to qualitatively modify the cavity output spectrum, with the latter acquiring an atypical ‘split-sideband’ structure, of different form from the displacement spectrum, and which depends on N, the optical well at which the particle localises. In the present work we investigate the N-dependence of the dynamics, in particular with respect to thermometry: we show that in strong cooling regions N≳ 100, the temperature may still be reliably inferred from the cavity output spectra. We also explain the N-dependence of the mechanical frequencies and optomechanical coupling showing that these may be accurately estimated. We present a simple ‘fast-cavity’ model for the cavity output and test all our findings against full numerical solutions of the nonlinear stochastic equations of motion for the system.

  15. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  16. Effect of Polylactic Acid-Degradable Film Mulch on Soil Temperature and Cotton Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Ni

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Concern on biodegradable plastic film is increasing because of pollution problems caused by the plastic films currently used. The objective of this field experiment is to evaluate the effect of two thicknesses of polyactic acid-degradable film on soil temperature and cotton yield. The results showed that small holes appeared in the polyactic acid-degradable film at 17~22 d after it was installed. Burst period appeared about 60 d after installation. Splits were observed in the polyactic acid-degradable film at 130 d after installation. Soil temperatures rose slowly under polyactic acid-degradable film during the cotton seedling stage. Daytime soil temperatures were 0.8℃ and 6.2℃ lower under 18μm and 15μm thick polyactic acid-degradable film than non-degradable plastic film(CK, respectively. Nighttime soil temperatures under the polyactic acid-degradable film were about 1℃ warmer than CK. There was no significant difference in cotton yields between the 18μm polyactic acid degradable film treatment and CK. In contrast, yields in the 15μm degradable plastic film treatment were 8.9% less than that in CK. This study indicated that 18μm polyactic acid degradable plastic film had good degradability and no negative effect on cotton growth. The 18μm polyactic acid degradable plastic film can replace ordinary plastic film in agricultural production.

  17. The effect of air temperature on yield of Holstein dairy cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Šimková; Miloslav Šoch; Kateřina Švejdová; Kristýna Šimák-Líbalová; Luboš Smutný; Šárka Smutná; Bohuslav Čermák; Iveta Novotná

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out in the agricultural company Petrovice during the summer and winter seasons. The experiment included Holstein dairy cattle. Air temperature was measured using a data logger with sensors (Datalogger COMET 3120) in the stable. Data on average yield were taken from farm records and then processed using Microsoft Excel. The aim of the study was to determine how the values of ambient temperature affect the welfare of the animals with regard to the average performance. The ...

  18. The potential for using urinary bladder temperature in monitoring whole body hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.A.; Robins, H.I.; Dennis, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Urinary bladder, esophageal and rectal temperatures of patients were determined by thermistor thermometry during systemic hyperthermia treatments. When deep temperatures were raised from 37 0 to 41.8 0 , the esophageal temperature increases led those of the bladder and rectum. Throughout the heating phases the paired difference of esophageal and bladder temperatures was significantly greater than zero while the difference between bladder and rectal was less. In this system, urinary bladder temperature is a measure of deep tissue temperature and not a good estimate of arterial blood temperature

  19. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  20. The effect of air temperature on yield of Holstein dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Šimková

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in the agricultural company Petrovice during the summer and winter seasons. The experiment included Holstein dairy cattle. Air temperature was measured using a data logger with sensors (Datalogger COMET 3120 in the stable. Data on average yield were taken from farm records and then processed using Microsoft Excel. The aim of the study was to determine how the values of ambient temperature affect the welfare of the animals with regard to the average performance. The air temperature is very variable and its changes animals react immediately. Measured values of air temperature in the stable are important for optimal welfare. It affects the productivity of dairy cows, milk quality, reproduction and animal health.

  1. Responses of Yield Characteristics to High Temperature During Flowering Stage in Hybrid Rice Guodao 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-fu FU

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available By sowing at different dates during 2005 and 2006 both in paddy fields and greenhouse, a super hybrid rice combination Guodao 6 and a conventional hybrid rice combination Xieyou 46 (as control were used to analyze the differences in heat injury index, seed setting rate, grain yield and its components. Guodao 6 showed more stable yield and spikelet fertility, and lower heat injury index than Xieyou 46. Further studies indicated that the spikelet sterility is positively correlated with the average daily temperature and the maximum daily temperature, with the coefficients of 0.8604 and 0.9850 (P<0.05 respectively in Guodao 6. The effect of high temperature injury on seed setting caused by maximum daily temperature was lower than that by average daily temperature during the grain filling stage.

  2. Software tools for data modelling and processing of human body temperature circadian dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena S; Afanasova, Anastasia I

    2015-01-01

    This paper is presenting a software development for simulating and processing thermometry data. The motivation of this research is the miniaturization of actuators attached to human body which allow frequent temperature measurements and improve the medical diagnosis procedures related to circadian dynamics.

  3. Tungsten self-sputtering yield with different incidence angles and target temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandourko, V.; Nakamura, K.; Akiba, M.; Jimbou, R.

    1998-01-01

    The self-sputtering of different types of tungsten due to 1 keV W + bombardment at temperatures of 25 C and 600 C and incident angles in the range of 30-60 was studied by means of the weight loss method. The experimental data at room temperature agreed reasonably with the results of TRIM calculations. Enhanced self-sputtering yields due to beam-induced desorption of WO 2 were found at a temperature of 600 C. The weight loss of W-Cu composite is larger than that of the CVD-W and ps-W under the same irradiation conditions due to the selective removal of copper. (orig.)

  4. Radiation detection at very low temperature. DRTBT 1991 Aussois - Course collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salce, B.; Godfrin, H.; Dumoulin, L.; Garoche, Pierre; Pannetier, B.; Equer, B.; Hubert, PH.; Urbina, C.; Lamarre, J.M.; Brison, J.P.; Lesueur, D.; Bret, J.L.; Ayela, F.; Coron, N.; Gonzalez-Mestres, L.

    1991-12-01

    This publication gather several courses which propose or address: Thermal conduction, Kapitza resistance, Metal-insulator transition, Thermal properties and specific heat at low temperature, Thermometry, Low temperature superconductors, Defects due to irradiations in solids, Semiconducting detectors, Techniques of protection of a measurement assembly at low temperatures against perturbations, Noise reduction by impedance matching converter at low temperature, Low noise electronics and measurement, Low radio-activities, SQUID and electrometer, Results and expectations related to bolometers, Infrared and sub-millimetre radiation in astrophysics, Neutrinos, dark matter and heavy ions

  5. Application of phosphor thermometry to a Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, S.W.; Andrews, W.H.; Beshears, D.L.; Cates, M.R.; Childs, R.M.; Grann, E.B.; Manges, W.W.; McIntyre, T.J.; Scudiere, M.B.; Simpson, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Galvanneal Temperature Measurement System (GTMS) was developed for the American Iron and Steel Institute by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through a partnership with the National Steel Midwest Division in Portage, Indiana. The GTMS provides crucial on-line thermal process control information during the manufacturing of galvanneal steel. The system has been used with the induction furnaces to measure temperatures ranging from 450 to 700 degrees C with an accuracy of better than +/-5 Degrees C. The GTMS provides accurate, reliable temperature information thus ensuring a high quality product, reducing waste, and saving energy. The production of uniform, high-quality galvanneal steel is only possible through strict temperature control

  6. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Mingzhang; Mostafavi, M.; Lampre, I.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol -1 ·m 2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures. (authors)

  7. Seed yield of Cucurbita maxima Duch. depending on the presowing gamma irradiation and postradiational temperature treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, A.

    1977-01-01

    In field experiments the seed yield of Cucurbita maxima Duch. of the Big White 48/4 cultivar was determined after presowing gamma irradiation with 4000 R and 50000 R and postradiational temperature treatment with 80deg and 90deg in the course of 30 minutes. The presowing gamma irradiation was carried out at the IRI-200O nuclear reactor with dose capacity of 630 R/min (1968 and 1969) and 504 R/min (1970), and the postradiational heating of the seeds in a drying oven at the laboratory. It is established that the presowing gamma radiation with 4000 R stimulates the seed yield of the large-fruited pumpkin (137.06%), and the 50000 R inhibits them (25.50%). The presowing temperature treatment with 80deg and 90deg in the course of 30 minutes is stimulating or indicates tendency towards seed yield stimulation. The postradiational presowing temperature treatment with 80deg and 9Odeg C in the course of 30 minutes of the 4000 R stimulative variant decrease the seed yield stimulation, and with the 50000 R inhibitive variant - repairs or displays tendency towards seed yield reparation. (author)

  8. Exogenously applied plant growth regulators enhance the morpho-physiological growth and yield of rice under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT and high night temperature (HNT. Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc, alpha-tocopherol (Ve, brassinosteroids (Br, methyl jasmonates (MeJA and triazoles (Tr were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above- and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  9. The effect of heating temperature on cytotoxicity and α-mangostin yield: Mangosteen pericarp juice and mangosteen extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulia, Kamarza; Hasanah, Fitria; Krisanti, Elsa A.

    2018-03-01

    The pericarp of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) contains bioactive xanthones, with α-mangostin being the major component, has been known to possess antitumor, antiviral, and other pharmacological activities. In this study, the effect of elevated temperature during the preparation step of fresh mangosteen pericarp juice and mangosteen extract, on their α-mangostin yield and cytotoxicities was investigated. The cytotoxicity activity of fresh juice and mangosteen extract was investigated using the brine shrimp test. Heating the fresh pericarp mangosteen in water at 65°C for 30 minutes prior to blending produced a juice with higher α-mangostin yield and cytotoxicity compared to the traditional way of blending the juice at room temperature. Increasing α-mangostin yield of 9%-w/w due to heating was also observed when mangosteen extract was heated at 65°C, consistent with the increased cytotoxicity in terms of LC50 value. It is concluded that the effect of temperature on α-mangostin yield was in line with the temperature effect on cytotoxicity activity in all samples of pericarp juice and mangosteen extract in ethyl acetate fraction.

  10. A thermal monitoring sheet with low influence from adjacent waterbolus for tissue surface thermometry during clinical hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; Stauffer, Paul R

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a complete thermal analysis of a novel conformal surface thermometer design with directional sensitivity for real-time temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatments of large superficial cancer. The thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) discussed in this paper consists of a 2-D array of fiberoptic sensors embedded between two layers of flexible, low-loss, and thermally conductive printed circuit board (PCB) film. Heat transfer across all interfaces from the tissue surface through multiple layers of insulating dielectrics surrounding the small buried temperature sensor and into an adjacent temperature-regulated water coupling bolus was studied using 3-D thermal simulation software. Theoretical analyses were carried out to identify the most effective differential TMS probe configuration possible with commercially available flexible PCB materials and to compare their thermal responses with omnidirectional probes commonly used in clinical hyperthermia. A TMS sensor design that employs 0.0508-mm Kapton MTB and 0.2032-mm Kapton HN flexible polyimide films is proposed for tissue surface thermometry with low influence from the adjacent waterbolus. Comparison of the thermal simulations with clinical probes indicates the new differential TMS probe design to outperform in terms of both transient response and steady-state accuracy in selectively reading the tissue surface temperature, while decreasing the overall thermal barrier of the probe between the coupling waterbolus and tissue surface.

  11. Temperature dependence of acoustic harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation in ex vivo tissue and tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Kolios, Michael C; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a cancer treatment technique that could be delivered as a stand-alone modality or in conjunction with chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Noninvasive and real-time temperature monitoring of the heated tissue improves the efficacy and safety of the treatment. A temperature-sensitive acoustic parameter is required for ultrasound-based thermometry. In this paper the amplitude and the energy of the acoustic harmonics of the ultrasound backscattered signal are proposed as suitable parameters for noninvasive ultrasound thermometry. A commercial high frequency ultrasound imaging system was used to generate and detect acoustic harmonics in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine muscle tissues. The pressure amplitude and the energy content of the backscattered fundamental frequency (p1 and E1), the second (p2 and E2) and the third (p3 and E3) harmonics were detected in pulse-echo mode. Temperature was increased from 26° to 46 °C uniformly through both samples. The amplitude and the energy content of the harmonics and their ratio were measured and analysed as a function of temperature. The average p1, p2 and p3 increased by 69%, 100% and 283%, respectively as the temperature was elevated from 26° to 46 °C in tissue samples. In the same experiment the average E1, E2 and E3 increased by 163%, 281% and 2257%, respectively. A similar trend was observed in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. The findings suggest that the harmonics generated due to nonlinear ultrasound beam propagation are highly sensitive to temperature and could potentially be used for noninvasive ultrasound tissue thermometry.

  12. Impact of Sowing Date Induced Temperature and Management Practices on Development Events and Yield of Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSA Khan, MA Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted at the research field of the Agronomy Division, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI, Joydebpur, Gazipur, during rabi season of 2014-2015 to find out the relationship between different development events of mustard crop and sowing dates induced temperature as well as to minimize the yield reduction of the crop by adopting appropriate management practices. The mustard var. BARI Sarisha-15 was sown on 06, 25 November and 14 December 2014. Crop accumulated lower growing degree days (GDD i.e., 72.15, 521.10 and 1070 to 1154 °C were observed for the events of emergence, 50 % flowering and maturity on 14 December sowing. Late sown plants took minimum time from flowering to maturity (36 days due to increased temperature and high variability in both maximum and minimum temperature. The highest seed yield (1569 kg ha-1 was recorded from 06 November sowing with high management practices while the lowest seed yield (435 kg ha-1 from 14 December sowing with low management practices. At high management practices the crop yielded 1183 kg ha-1 at 14 December sowing. Yield reduction at late sowing condition was reduced to some extent with high management practices. The seed yield reductions at 14 December sowing as compared to high management practices at 06 November sowing were 72, 43 and 25% under low, medium and high management, respectively.

  13. On the nature of anomalies in temperature dependence of the OKh18N1OT steel yield strength after thermal cycling in the low temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedev, E.M.; Lavrent'ev, F.F.; Kurmanova, T.N.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated were structural transformations in 0Kh18N10T steel as a result of heating and cooling and of deformation within the range of temperatures between 300 and 77 K, the quantity relationships between the said transformations and the variation of the yield limit with the temperature. The studies were conducted by metallography and mechanical test methods. It was shown that an increase in the number of heating and cooling cycles correlates with a loss in strength of the steel while deformation at 77 K. This anomaly in the temperature relationship of the yield limit is related to the appearance in the course of deformation of α-martensite with a BCC lattice. Deformation at 300 K increases the amount ea of epsilon-martensite, a decrses the effectve size of grain and, in consequence, increases the yield limit. The relationship between the yield limit and the grain size at the temperature of 300 K is described adequately by the Hall-Petch equation

  14. Multi-gradient echo MR thermometry for monitoring of the near-field area during MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Mie K; de Greef, Martijn; Bouwman, Job G; Moonen, Chrit T W; Viergever, Max A; Bartels, Lambertus W

    2015-10-07

    The multi-gradient echo MR thermometry (MGE MRT) method is proposed to use at the interface of the muscle and fat layers found in the abdominal wall, to monitor MR-HIFU heating. As MGE MRT uses fat as a reference, it is field-drift corrected. Relative temperature maps were reconstructed by subtracting absolute temperature maps. Because the absolute temperature maps are reconstructed of individual scans, MGE MRT provides the flexibility of interleaved mapping of temperature changes between two arbitrary time points. The method's performance was assessed in an ex vivo water bath experiment. An ex vivo HIFU experiment was performed to show the method's ability to monitor heating of consecutive HIFU sonications and to estimate cooling time constants, in the presence of field drift. The interleaved use between scans of a clinical protocol was demonstrated in vivo in a patient during a clinical uterine fibroid treatment. The relative temperature measurements were accurate (mean absolute error 0.3 °C) and provided excellent visualization of the heating of consecutive HIFU sonications. Maps were reconstructed of estimated cooling time constants and mean ROI values could be well explained by the applied heating pattern. Heating upon HIFU sonication and subsequent cooling could be observed in the in vivo demonstration.

  15. Effect of Irrigation Timing on Root Zone Soil Temperature, Root Growth and Grain Yield and Chemical Composition in Corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Dong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High air temperatures during the crop growing season can reduce harvestable yields in major agronomic crops worldwide. Repeated and prolonged high night air temperature stress may compromise plant growth and yield. Crop varieties with improved heat tolerance traits as well as crop management strategies at the farm scale are thus needed for climate change mitigation. Crop yield is especially sensitive to night-time warming trends. Current studies are mostly directed to the elevated night-time air temperature and its impact on crop growth and yield, but less attention is given to the understanding of night-time soil temperature management. Delivering irrigation water through drip early evening may reduce soil temperature and thus improve plant growth. In addition, corn growers typically use high-stature varieties that inevitably incur excessive respiratory carbon loss from roots and transpiration water loss under high night temperature conditions. The main objective of this study was to see if root-zone soil temperature can be reduced through drip irrigation applied at night-time, vs. daytime, using three corn hybrids of different above-ground architecture in Uvalde, TX where day and night temperatures during corn growing season are above U.S. averages. The experiment was conducted in 2014. Our results suggested that delivering well-water at night-time through drip irrigation reduced root-zone soil temperature by 0.6 °C, increase root length five folds, plant height 2%, and marginally increased grain yield by 10%. However, irrigation timing did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll level and kernel crude protein, phosphorous, fat and starch concentrations. Different from our hypothesis, the shorter, more compact corn hybrid did not exhibit a higher yield and growth as compared with taller hybrids. As adjusting irrigation timing would not incur an extra cost for farmers, the finding reported here had immediate practical implications for farm

  16. Development of a quantum dot mediated thermometry for minimally invasive thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Willard L.

    Thermally-related, minimally invasive therapies are designed to treat tumors while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissues. Adjacent tissues become susceptible to thermal injury to ensure the cancer is completely destroyed. Destroying tumor cells, while minimizing collateral damage to the surrounding tissue, requires the capacity to control and monitor tissue temperatures both spatially and temporally. Current devices measure the tumor's tissue temperature at a specific location leaving the majority unmonitored. A point-wise application can not substantiate complete tumor destruction. This type of surgery would be more effective if volumetric tissue temperature measurement were available. On this premise, the feasibility of a quantum dot (QD) assembly to measure the tissue temperature volumetrically was tested in the experiments described in this dissertation. QDs are fluorescence semiconductor nanoparticles having various superior optical properties. This new QD-mediated thermometry is capable of monitoring the thermal features of tissues non-invasively by measuring the aggregate fluorescence intensity of the QDs accumulated at the target tissues prior to and during the surgical procedure. Thus, such a modality would allow evaluation of tissue destruction by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the QD as a function of temperature. The present study also quantified the photoluminescence intensity and attenuation of the QD as a function of depth and wavelength using a tissue phantom. A prototype system was developed to measure the illumination through a tissue phantom as a proof of concept of the feasibility of a noninvasive thermal therapy. This prototype includes experimental hardware, software and working methods to perform image acquisition, and data reduction strategic to quantify the intensity and transport characteristics of the QD. The significance of this work is that real-time volumetric temperature information will prove a more robust tool for use

  17. Non-contact temperature Raman measurement in YSZ and alumina ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Juddha; Chorpening, Benjamin T.; Buric, Michael P.

    2018-02-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ: ZrO2 + Y2O3) and alumina (Al2O3) are widely used in high-temperature applications due to their high-temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness. Alumina is used extensively in engineered ceramic applications such as furnace tubes and thermocouple protection tubes, while YSZ is commonly used in thermal barrier coatings on turbine blades. Because they are already often found in high temperature and combustion applications, these two substances have been compared as candidates for Raman thermometry in high-temperature energy-related applications. Both ceramics were used with as-received rough surfaces, i.e., without polishing or modification. This closely approximates surface conditions in practical high-temperature situations. A single-line argon ion laser at 488nm was used to excite the materials inside a cylindrical furnace while measuring Raman spectra with a fixed-grating spectrometer. The shift in the peak positions of the most intense A1g peak at 418cm-1 (room temperature position) of alumina ceramic and relatively more symmetric Eg peak at 470cm-1 (room temperature position) of YSZ were measured and reported along with a thermocouple-derived reference temperature up to about 1000°C. This study showed that alumina and YSZ ceramics can be used in high-temperature Raman thermometry with an accuracy of 4.54°C and 10.5°C average standard deviations respectively over the range of about 1000°C. We hope that this result will guide future researchers in selecting materials and utilizing Raman non-contact temperature measurements in harsh environments.

  18. Interpretation of biomass gasification yields regarding temperature intervals under nitrogen-steam atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Gasification of some agricultural waste biomass samples (sunflower shell, pine cone, cotton refuse, and olive refuse) and colza seed was performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer at temperatures up to 1273 K with a constant heating rate of 20 K/min under a dynamic nitrogen-steam atmosphere. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis profiles of the samples were derived from the non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis data. Gasification yields of the biomass samples at temperature intervals of 473-553 K, 553-653 K, 653-773 K, 773-973 K, and 973-1173 K were investigated considering the successive stages of ''evolution of carbon oxides'', ''start of hydrocarbon evolution'', ''evolution of hydrocarbons'', ''dissociation'', and ''evolution of hydrogen'', respectively. Although, there were some interactions between these stages, some evident relations were observed between the gasification yields in a given stage and the chemical properties of the parent biomass materials. (author)

  19. Thyroid hormones in donkey blood and milk: correlations with milk yield and environmental temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Todini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (TH are the primary endocrine stimulators of non-shivering thermogenesis and are known to stimulate lactation. Triiodothyronine (T3 is the bioactive form, mainly derived by deiodination of thyroxine (T4, and the free quote (unbound to plasma proteins is immediately bioavailable. This study aimed to evaluate potential relationships among TH in the blood, triiodothyronine in the milk (T3M, milk yield and environmental temperature in March to July for 8 lactating donkeys. Milk yield and blood TH concentrations changed significantly over time, whereas T3M was rather stable among individuals and not affected by time of sampling. Free T3 was not correlated with free T4 or with total TH in the blood, but it was weakly correlated with T3M. No relationship was found between blood TH and milk yield, which was negatively correlated with T3M. Thus, the absolute quantity of bioactive hormone in milk secretion is maintained. Milk yield was positively correlated with the free/total T3 and free T3/free T4 ratios, thus in turn with the relative quote of the circulating bioactive hormone. Circulating T3/T4 ratios were negatively correlated with environmental temperature. It is concluded that environmental temperature, in the range of the present study (-2 to 35°C, does not significantly entrain thyroid gland activity, which is affected more by other factors, such as inter-individual variations and physiological status (i.e., stage of lactation. However, increases in environmental temperature most likely induce decreases in deiodinase activity at the peripheral tissue level, as indicated by the decrease in the T3/T4 ratios in the blood.

  20. Milk yield and rectal temperature in West African Dwarf goats as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate milk yield and rectal temperature in West African Dwarf (WAD) goats as affected by wattle and litter size. A total of 28 lactating does were used for the experiment. 13 does had wattle (bilateral) while 15 had no wattle. 14 does had twin birth while the other 14 had single birth. The goats ...

  1. Temperature and humidity dependence of air fluorescence yield measured by AIRFLY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ave, M.; Bohacova, M.; Buonomo, B.; Busca, N.; Cazon, L.; Chemerisov, S.D.; Conde, M.E.; Crowell, R.A.; Di Carlo, P.; Di Giulio, C.; Doubrava, M.; Esposito, A.; Facal, P.; Franchini, F.J.; Hoerandel, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Iarlori, M.; Kasprzyk, T.E.; Keilhauer, B.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules over a wide range of atmospheric parameters, corresponding to altitudes typical of the cosmic ray shower development in the atmosphere. We have studied the temperature and humidity dependence of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in air. Results for the 313.6, 337.1, 353.7 and 391.4 nm bands are reported in this paper. We found that the temperature and humidity dependence of the quenching process changes the fluorescence yield by a sizeable amount (up to 20% for the temperature dependence in the 391.4 nm band) and its effect must be included for a precise estimation of the energy of ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  2. Reliability improvement methods for sapphire fiber temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietinger, C.; Adams, B.

    1991-08-01

    Mechanical, optical, electrical, and software design improvements can be brought to bear in the enhancement of fiber-optic sapphire-fiber temperature measurement tool reliability in harsh environments. The optical fiber thermometry (OFT) equipment discussed is used in numerous process industries and generally involves a sapphire sensor, an optical transmission cable, and a microprocessor-based signal analyzer. OFT technology incorporating sensors for corrosive environments, hybrid sensors, and two-wavelength measurements, are discussed.

  3. Effects of field high temperature on grain yield and quality of a subtropical type japonica rice—Pon-Lai rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical japonica type rice is sensitive to high temperature. Pon-Lai rice is a special japonica type with adaptation to the subtropical climate in Taiwan. Facing climate change, rising temperatures would damage the yield and quality of rice production. This research was conducted using Pon-Lai rice in the field of a subtropical climate. We conducted 2 experiments, including a year-round experiment and collection of samples from different districts for building different temperature conditions. We analyzed the correlation between rising temperature and rice yield or quality. In our results, the critical period of temperature effect is 0–15 days after heading (H15. The threshold of high temperature damage in yield and appearance quality was 25–27 °C. Grain weight decreased about 2–6%, while the temperature of H15 was raised 1 °C above the thresholds. Perfect grain ratio and chalky grain ratio decreased and increased, respectively, while the temperature of H15 was raised above the thresholds. However, the high temperature in H15 affected the physicochemical characteristics. In addition, we found positive correlation between grain length to width ratio and perfect grain ratio. Grain length to width ratio could be an index of temperature effects for grain quality. In our study, when the temperature was below 30 °C, a rising temperature of H15 could damage rice yield and appearance quality, and change grain shape. Our results could provide reference for dealing with the warming future in other temperate rice-cultivated countries.

  4. Methodology of hot nucleus calorimetry and thermometry produced by nuclear reactions around Fermi energies; Methodologie de la calorimetrie et de la thermometrie des noyaux chauds formes lors de collisions nucleaires aux energies de Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vient, E

    2006-12-15

    This work deals with the calorimetry and thermometry of hot nuclei produced in collisions Xe + Sn between 25 and 100 MeV/u. The apparatus for hot nucleus physical characterization is the 4{pi} detector array Indra. This study was made by using the event generators Gemini, Simon and Hipse and a data-processing filter simulating the complete operation of the multi-detector. The first chapter presents the different ways of producing hot nuclei. In the second and third chapters, the author presents a critical methodological study of calorimetry and thermometry applied to hot nuclei, different methods are reviewed, their accuracy and application range are assessed. All the calorimetry methods rely on the assumption that we are able to discriminate decay products of the hot nucleus from evaporated particles. In the fourth chapter, the author gives some ways of improving calorimetry characterization of the hot nucleus. An alternative method of calorimetry is proposed in the fifth chapter, this method is based on the experimental determination of an evaporation probability that is deduced from the physical characteristics of the particles present in a restricted domain of the space of velocities.

  5. Yield and cold storage of Trichoderma conidia is influenced by substrate pH and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Johanna M; Chomic, Anastasia; Nieto-Jacobo, Maria; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Hay, Amanda J; Braithwaite, Mark; Stewart, Alison

    2017-05-01

    In this study we examined the influence of the ambient pH during morphogenesis on conidial yield of Trichoderma sp. "atroviride B" LU132 and T. hamatum LU593 and storage at low temperatures. The ambient pH of the growth media had a dramatic influence on the level of Trichoderma conidiation and this was dependent on the strain and growth media. On malt-extract agar, LU593 yield decreased with increasing pH (3-6), whereas yield increased with increasing pH for LU132. During solid substrate production the reverse was true for LU132 whereby yield decreased with increasing pH. The germination potential of the conidia decreased significantly over time in cold storage and the rate of decline was a factor of the strain, pH during morphogenesis, growth media, and storage temperature. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  7. Towards the development of high temperature comparison artifacts for radiation thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, R. N. [Inmetro, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Machin, G. [NPL, Teddington (United Kingdom); Orlando, A. [PUC-Rio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-09-11

    This paper describes the methodology and first results of the development of high temperature fixed point artifacts of unknown temperature suitable for scale comparison purposes. This study is being undertaken at the Thermal Metrology Division of Inmetro, Brazil, as part of PhD studies. In this initial phase of the study two identical cobalt carbon eutectic cells were constructed and one doped with a known amount of copper. This was an attempt to achieve a controlled change in the transition temperature of the alloy during melting. Copper was chosen due to the relatively simple phase diagram it forms with carbon and cobalt. The cobalt, in powder form, was supplied by Alfa Aesar at 99.998 % purity, and was mixed with carbon powder (1,9 % by weight) of 99.9999 % purity. Complete filling of the crucible took 6 steps and was performed in a vertical furnace with graphite heating elements, in an inert gas atmosphere. The temperature measurements were performed using a KE LP3 radiation thermometer, which was previously evaluated for spectral responsivity, linearity and size-of-source effect (SSE). During these measurements, the thermometer stability was periodically checked using a silver fixed point blackbody maintained in a three zone furnace. The main purpose of the first part of this study is to dope a series of Co-C blackbody with differing amounts of copper, in order to alter their temperatures whilst still retaining good melting plateau performance. The long-term stability of the adjusted transition temperatures will also be investigated. Other dopants will be studied as the research progresses, and thermo chemical modeling will be performed in an attempt to understand the change in temperature with dopant concentration and so help select suitable dopants in the future. The overall objective is to construct comparison artifacts that have good performance, in terms of plateau shape and long-term temperature stability, but with unknown temperatures. These can then be

  8. Direct in situ thermometry: Variations in reciprocal-lattice vectors and challenges with the Debye–Waller effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Flannigan, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) enables the atomic-scale study of dynamic materials processes on millisecond time scales. Specimen holders capable of being heated to over 1000 °C have provided insight into myriad processes, including nanoscale thermal transport, structural phase transitions, and catalytic reactions. In order for such studies to be accurate and precise, direct determination of the specimen temperature – rather than the heating-element temperature – is critical. Further, such methods should be versatile in that any temperature across a wide range may be measured, irrespective of single-indicator properties specific to the specimen (e.g., first-order phase transition, melting point, etc.). Here, we describe a rigorous approach to direct, in situ thermometry of TEM specimens that exploits lattice thermal expansion and the resultant decrease in diffraction-vector magnitude in reciprocal space. Via sub-pixel measurement of reciprocal-lattice-vector magnitudes, picometer increases in lattice parameters are measured over a continuous temperature range and compared to those expected from the coefficient of thermal expansion. Statistical treatment of several experimental trials conducted on nanostructured aluminum thin films shows excellent agreement with both theory and (indirect) measurement of the in situ heating holder. Additionally, we illustrate how uncontrolled, thermally-induced variation in single-crystal orientation leads to modulation of the excitation error and, therefore, the Bragg-spot intensities resulting in a convolution of heating and tilting effects, thus complicating temperature determination via the Debye–Waller effect. - Highlights: • A method for direct in situ determination of specimen temperature is described. • Specimen temperature is determined via reciprocal-lattice-vector contraction. • Statistical treatment agrees with the in situ heating-holder thermocouple reading. • Thermally

  9. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  10. The uncertainty of crop yield projections is reduced by improved temperature response functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Enli; Martre, Pierre; Zhao, Zhigan

    2017-01-01

    , we show that variations in the mathematical functions currently used to simulate temperature responses of physiological processes in 29 wheat models account for >50% of uncertainty in simulated grain yields for mean growing season temperatures from 14 °C to 33 °C. We derived a set of new temperature......Quality) and analysing their results against the HSC data and an additional global dataset from the International Heat Stress Genotpye Experiment (IHSGE)8 carried out by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT). More importantly, we derive, based on newest knowledge and data, a set of new...

  11. Quality of MR thermometry during palliative MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) treatment of bone metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, Mie K; Huisman, Merel; Nijenhuis, Robbert J; van den Bosch, Maurice; Viergever, Max A; Moonen, Chrit Tw; Bartels, LW

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound has emerged as a clinical option for palliative treatment of painful bone metastases, with MR thermometry (MRT) used for treatment monitoring. In this study, the general image quality of the MRT was assessed in terms of

  12. Similar estimates of temperature impacts on global wheat yield by three independent methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Bing; Asseng, Senthold; Müller, Christoph; Ewert, Frank; Elliott, Joshua; Lobell, David B.; Martre, Pierre; Ruane, Alex C.; Wallach, Daniel; Jones, James W.; Supit, Iwan; Wolf, Joost

    2016-01-01

    The potential impact of global temperature change on global crop yield has recently been assessed with different methods. Here we show that grid-based and point-based simulations and statistical regressions (from historic records), without deliberate adaptation or CO 2 fertilization effects,

  13. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  14. Influence of dissolved gas and temperature on the light yield of new liquid scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Buontempo, S; Golovkin, S V; Martellotti, G; Medvedkov, A M; Penso, G; Soloviev, A S; Vasilchenko, V G

    1999-01-01

    Sixteen new liquid scintillators, emitting green light, were studied. They are based on four solvents combined with four dopants. The influence of different gas atmospheres was studied. In particular it was shown that by keeping these liquid scintillators in vacuum or in a neutral gas, the light yield increases up to 32~\\% at 20 $^{\\circ}$C and for the best solvent-dopant combinations. The dependance of the light yield on temperature was also studied for these scintillators. In the 20--60 $^{\\circ}$C interval, some exhibit a light yield variation of $\\sim$ 3 \\% which is smaller than that of the NE 102A plastic scintillator.

  15. Trade-off between information and disturbance in qubit thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seveso, Luigi; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2018-03-01

    We address the trade-off between information and disturbance in qubit thermometry from the perspective of quantum estimation theory. Given a quantum measurement, we quantify information via the Fisher information of the measurement and disturbance via four different figures of merit, which capture different aspects (statistical, thermodynamical, geometrical) of the trade-off. For each disturbance measure, the efficient measurements, i.e., the measurements that introduce a disturbance not greater than any other measurement extracting the same amount of information, are determined explicitly. The family of efficient measurements varies with the choice of the disturbance measure. On the other hand, commutativity between the elements of the probability operator-valued measure (POVM) and the equilibrium state of the thermometer is a necessary condition for efficiency with respect to any figure of disturbance.

  16. Effect of Sowing Quantity on Soil Temperature and Yield of Winter Wheat under Straw Strip Mulching in Arid Region of Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xuemei; Chai, Yuwei; Li, Rui; Li, Bowen; Cheng, Hongbo; Chang, Lei; Chai, Shouxi

    2018-01-01

    In order to explore the characteristics and relationship between soil temperature and yield of winter wheat, under different sowing quantities conditions of straw mulching conventional drilling in Northwest China, this study took Lantian 26 as material, under the whole corn mulching conventional drilling in Changhe town and Pingxiang town, setting up 3 different seeding quantities of 270 kg/ha (SSMC1), 324 kg/ha (SSMC2) and 405 kg/ha (SSMC3), to study the difference of soil temperature during the growth period of winter wheat and its correlation with yield components. Results showed: the average soil temperature of 0∼25cm in two ecological zones in the whole growth period have a significant change with the increase of sowing quantities; too much seeding had a sharp drop in soil temperature; the highest temperature of SSMC in Changhe town was the middle quantity of SSMC 2; the highest temperature of SSMC in Pingxiang town was the lowest sowing quantity of SSMC1. Diurnal variation of soil temperature at all growth stages showed: with the increase of SSMC, in the morning it increased with the increase of soil depth, noon and evening reducing with the depth of the soil. The average soil temperature of SSMC2 was higher than that of in all the two ecological zones in the whole growth period of SSMC.The maximum day temperature difference of each treatment was at noon. With the increase of SSMC, the yield increase varied with two ecological zones. SSMC of the local conventional sowing quantity of 270kg/ha SSMC1 yield was the highest in Changhe Town. SSMC of the middle sowing quantity SSMC2 of 324kg/ha yield was the highest in Pingxiang town. The difference of grain number per spike was the main cause of yield difference among these 3 treatments. Correlation analysis showed: the correlation among the yield and yield components, growth index and soil temperature varied with different ecological zones; thousand kernel weight and grain number per ear (.964** and.891**) had a

  17. Scour Monitoring System for Subsea Pipeline Based on Active Thermometry: Numerical and Experimental Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A scour monitoring system for subsea pipeline based on active thermometry is proposed in this paper. The temperature reading of the proposed system is based on a distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensing technique. A thermal cable acts as the main component of the system, which consists of a heating belt, armored optical fibers and heat-shrinkable tubes which run parallel to the pipeline. The scour-induced free span can be monitored through different heat transfer behaviors of in-water and in-sediment scenarios during heating and cooling processes. Two sets of experiments, including exposing different lengths of the upper surface of the pipeline to water and creating free spans of various lengths, were carried out in laboratory. In both cases, the scour condition was immediately detected by the proposed monitoring system, which confirmed the system is robust and very sensitive. Numerical study of the method was also investigated by using the finite element method (FEM with ANSYS, resulting in reasonable agreement with the test data. This brand new system provides a promising, low cost, highly precise and flexible approach for scour monitoring of subsea pipelines.

  18. Two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence thermometry in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G. Andrew; Lucht, Robert P.; Laurendeau, Normand M.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a two-color planar laser-induced fluorescence technique for obtaining two-dimensional temperature images in water. For this method, a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm excites a solution of temperature-sensitive rhodamine 560 and temperature-insensitive sulforhodamine 640. The resulting emissions are optically separated through filters and detected via a charged-couple device (CCD) camera system. A ratio of the two images yields temperature images independent of incident irradiance. An uncertainty in temperature of ±1.4 deg. C is established at the 95% confidence interval

  19. The Effect of Different Storage Temperatures on the Agronomic Characteristics and Yield of Two Varieties of Potatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H Jalali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp. is an autotetraploid (2n=4x=24 species and a key member of the Solanaceae family. Physiological age is usually be determined from potato tuber initiation and afterwards. Potato seed tubers physiological preparedness for growth is an important factor in determining the productive potential of the seed potatoes. Physiological age is considered as an internal biological clock that usually covers all aspects of the production while chronological age is determined only by the length of harvest and planting time (Gregory, 1985. In most cases, the current practice for storing potato tubers is to wound-heal seed-tubers at 10-15º C during the initial l0 days of storage (Curing and then reduce and maintain the temperature at a holding level of 4 ° C until planting while the technique of physiological aging of seed tubers, was not only one tuber storage temperature (4°C and then transferred to a higher temperature (similar natural germination conditions, but different thermal treatments during storage conditions is used in order to increase the physiological age. Some researchers argue that thermal storage is essential to obtain quantitative and qualitative performance which its value is higher than 250 GDD. The physiological age of seed tubers 900-600 GDD in some studies to increase performance by 90 percent and was associated uniformity producing tubers..In temperate regions with spring planting date, the short growing season and high summer temperature is considered as limiting factor for potato production. For this purpose the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of different storage temperatures on the physiological age of seed and its effect on yield and earliness of two potato cultivars. Materials and Methods The Effects of six different thermal treatments storage in a three-month period, including two treatments of 440 degree- day (T1 and T2, two treatments of 880 degree-day (T3 and T4

  20. Yield and nutrient composition of biochar produced from different feedstocks at varying pyrolytic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, M.A.; Khalid, M.; Arshad, M.; Ahmad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in pyrolytic temperatures and feedstocks affects the yield and nutrient composition of biochar. Selection of suitable feedstock and optimum pyrolytic temperature is crucial before using it for agricultural purposes. We compared biochars produced from two feedstocks (wheat straw and rice) at three temperatures (300, 400 and 500 degree C). Biochar yield decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing pyrolysis temperature, while ash contents were increased. The cation exchange capacity was significantly higher (119 cmolc kg/sup -1/) at temperature 400 degree C. The pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and carbon content of biochars increased significantly with increasing temperature and maximum pH (10.4) and EC (3.35 dS m/sup -1/) were observed in rice straw biochar (WSB) at 500 degree C and carbon content (662 g kg/sup -1/) in wheat straw biochar (RSB) at 500 degree C. Concentration of phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) increased significantly with increasing temperature, while of nitrogen (N) decreased. Overall, the maximum N (13.8 g kg/sup -1/at 300 degree C) and P (3.4 g kg/sup -1/at 500 degree C) concentrations were observed in WSB while, maximum K (48 g kg/sup -1/ at 500 degree C)in RSB. High pyrolysis temperature reduced AB-DTPA extractable nutrients (expect Mn). The highest AB-DTPA extractable nutrients such as P (113 mg kg/sup -1/) and Ca (1.07 g kg/sup -1/) were observed in WSB at 300 degree C while, K (18 g kg/sup -1/) and magnesium (Mg) (1.55 g kg/sup -1/) in RSB at 300 degree C. Selected feedstock and use of low pyrolysis temperature may produce nutrient-rich biochar, with high CEC and low pH and these could have positive effects on calcareous soils. (author)

  1. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-01

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha-1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha-1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results suggest

  2. Boron application improves yield of rice cultivars under high temperature stress during vegetative and reproductive stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Nayak, Amaresh Kumar; Tripathi, Rahul; Katara, Jawahar Lal; Bihari, Priyanka; Lal, Banwari; Gautam, Priyanka

    2018-04-12

    It is reported that high temperatures (HT) would cause a marked decrease in world rice production. In tropical regions, high temperatures are a constraint to rice production and the most damaging effect is on spikelet sterility. Boron (B) plays a very important role in the cell wall formation, sugar translocation, and reproduction of the rice crop and could play an important role in alleviating high temperature stress. A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effect of B application on high temperature tolerance of rice cultivars in B-deficient soil. The treatments comprised of four boron application treatments viz. control (B0), soil application of 1 kg B ha -1 (B1), soil application of 2 kg B ha -1 (B2), and foliar spray of 0.2% B (Bfs); three rice cultivars viz. Annapurna (HT stress tolerant), Naveen, and Shatabdi (both HT stress susceptible); and three temperature regimes viz. ambient (AT), HT at vegetative stage (HTV), and HT at reproductive stage (HTR). The results revealed that high temperature stress during vegetative or flowering stage reduced grain yield of rice cultivars mainly because of low pollen viability and spikelet fertility. The effects of high temperature on the spikelet fertility and grain filling varied among cultivars and the growth stages of plant when exposed to the high temperature stress. Under high temperature stress, the tolerant cultivar displays higher cell membrane stability, less accumulation of osmolytes, more antioxidant enzyme activities, and higher pollen viability and spikelet fertility than the susceptible cultivars. In the present work, soil application of boron was effective in reducing the negative effects of high temperature both at vegetative and reproductive stages. Application of B results into higher grain yield under both ambient and high temperature condition over control for all the three cultivars; however, more increase was observed for the susceptible cultivar over the tolerant one. The results

  3. New blackbody calibration source for low temperatures from -20 C to +350 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mester, Ulrich; Winter, Peter

    2001-03-01

    Calibration procedures for infrared thermometers and thermal imaging systems require radiation sources of precisely known radiation properties. In the physical absence of an ideal Planck's radiator, the German Committee VDI/VDE-GMA FA 2.51, 'Applied Radiation Thermometry', agreed upon desirable specifications and limiting parameters for a blackbody calibration source with a temperature range from -20 degree(s)C to +350 degree(s)C, a spectral range from 2 to 15 microns, an emissivity greater than 0.999 and a useful source aperture of 60 mm, among others. As a result of the subsequent design and development performed with the support of the laboratory '7.31 Thermometry' of the German national institute of natural and engineering sciences (PTB), the Mester ME20 Blackbody Calibration Source is presented. The ME20 meets or exceeds all of the specifications formulated by the VDI/VDE committee.

  4. Temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kagayaki; Iwabuchi, Taku; Saito, Kensuke; Obara, Makoto; Honda, Masatoshi; Imai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We examined the temperature dependence of relaxation times in proton components of fatty acids in various samples in vitro at 11 tesla as a standard calibration data for quantitative temperature imaging of fat. The spin-lattice relaxation time, T 1 , of both the methylene (CH 2 ) chain and terminal methyl (CH 3 ) was linearly related to temperature (r>0.98, P 2 signal for calibration and observed the signal with 18% of CH 3 to estimate temperature. These findings suggested that separating the fatty acid components would significantly improve accuracy in quantitative thermometry for fat. Use of the T 1 of CH 2 seems promising in terms of reliability and reproducibility in measuring temperature of fat. (author)

  5. Detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry from the Dabie orogen: Implications for source-sediment links in a UHPM terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xiao, Yilin; Wörner, G.; Kronz, A.; Simon, K.; Hou, Zhenhui

    2014-08-01

    This study explores the potential of detrital rutile geochemistry and thermometry as a provenance tracer in rocks from the Central Dabie ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) zone in east-central China that formed during Triassic continental collision. Trace element data of 176 detrital rutile grains selected from local river sediments and 91 rutile grains from distinct bedrocks in the Shuanghe and Bixiling areas, obtained by both electron microprobe (EMP) and in situ LA-ICP-MS analyses, suggest that geochemical compositions and thermometry of detrital rutiles are comparable to those from their potential source rocks. After certification of the Cr-Nb discrimination method for the Central Dabie UHPM zone, we show that 29% of the detrital rutiles in the Shuanghe area were derived from metamafic sources whereas in the Bixiling area that it is up to 76%. Furthermore, the proportion of distinct types of detrital rutiles combined with modal abundances of rutile in metapelites and metamafic bedrocks can be used to estimate the proportion of different source lithologies. Based on this method the proportion of mafic source rocks was estimated to ∼10% at Shuanghe and >60% at Bixiling, respectively, which is consistent with the proportions of eclogite (the major rutile-bearing metamafic rock) distribution in the field. Therefore, the investigation of detrital rutiles is a potential way to evaluate the proportion of metamafic rocks and even to prospect for metamafic bodies in UHPM terranes. Zr-in-rutile temperatures were calculated at different pressures and compared with temperatures derived from rock-in rutiles and garnet-clinopyroxene Fe-Mg thermometers. Temperatures calculated for detrital rutiles range from 606 °C to 707 °C and 566 °C to 752 °C in Shuanghe and Bixiling, respectively, at P = 3 GPa with an average temperatures of ca. 630 °C for both areas. These temperature averages and ranges are similar to those calculated for rutiles from surrounding source rocks

  6. Indirect Determination of the Thermodynamic Temperature of a Gold Fixed-Point Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battuello, M.; Girard, F.; Florio, M.

    2010-09-01

    Since the value T 90(Au) was fixed on the ITS-90, some determinations of the thermodynamic temperature of the gold point have been performed which form, with other renormalized results of previous measurements by radiation thermometry, the basis for the current best estimates of ( T - T 90)Au = 39.9 mK as elaborated by the CCT-WG4. Such a value, even if consistent with the behavior of T - T 90 differences at lower temperatures, is quite influenced by the low values of T Au as determined with few radiometric measurements. At INRIM, an independent indirect determination of the thermodynamic temperature of gold was performed by means of a radiation thermometry approach. A fixed-point technique was used to realize approximated thermodynamic scales from the Zn point up to the Cu point. A Si-based standard radiation thermometer working at 900 nm and 950 nm was used. The low uncertainty presently associated to the thermodynamic temperature of fixed points and the accuracy of INRIM realizations, allowed scales with an uncertainty lower than 0.03 K in terms of the thermodynamic temperature to be realized. A fixed-point cell filled with gold, 99.999 % in purity, was measured, and its freezing temperature was determined by both interpolation and extrapolation. An average T Au = 1337.395 K was found with a combined standard uncertainty of 23 mK. Such a value is 25 mK higher than the presently available value as derived by the CCT-WG4 value of ( T - T 90)Au = 39.9 mK.

  7. [Multispectral Radiation Algorithm Based on Emissivity Model Constraints for True Temperature Measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei; Sun, Xiao-gang; Luan, Mei-sheng

    2015-10-01

    Temperature measurement is one of the important factors for ensuring product quality, reducing production cost and ensuring experiment safety in industrial manufacture and scientific experiment. Radiation thermometry is the main method for non-contact temperature measurement. The second measurement (SM) method is one of the common methods in the multispectral radiation thermometry. However, the SM method cannot be applied to on-line data processing. To solve the problems, a rapid inversion method for multispectral radiation true temperature measurement is proposed and constraint conditions of emissivity model are introduced based on the multispectral brightness temperature model. For non-blackbody, it can be drawn that emissivity is an increasing function in the interval if the brightness temperature is an increasing function or a constant function in a range and emissivity satisfies an inequality of emissivity and wavelength in that interval if the brightness temperature is a decreasing function in a range, according to the relationship of brightness temperatures at different wavelengths. The construction of emissivity assumption values is reduced from multiclass to one class and avoiding the unnecessary emissivity construction with emissivity model constraint conditions on the basis of brightness temperature information. Simulation experiments and comparisons for two different temperature points are carried out based on five measured targets with five representative variation trends of real emissivity. decreasing monotonically, increasing monotonically, first decreasing with wavelength and then increasing, first increasing and then decreasing and fluctuating with wavelength randomly. The simulation results show that compared with the SM method, for the same target under the same initial temperature and emissivity search range, the processing speed of the proposed algorithm is increased by 19.16%-43.45% with the same precision and the same calculation results.

  8. Evaluation of yield and identifying potential regions for Saffron (Crocus sativus L. cultivation in Khorasan Razavi province according to temperature parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Tosan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Saffron is cultivated in most part of Iran, because of low water requirement and well adaptation to diverse environmental condition. In recent years, for many reasons such as low water requirement, saffron cultivation areas has been increased especially in Khorasan Razavi province. Temperature is one of the most important factors in saffron flowering phenomena. The aim of this research was to evaluate the response of saffron to temperature in Khorasan Razavi province counties (Torbat-e-Heydarieh, Gonabad, Nishabour, Sabzevar and Ghoochan. Climatic data (monthly minimum, average, maximum temperatures and diurnal temperature range and saffron yield data were collected for past 20 years period. The stepwise regression methods were used to remove extra parameters and only keep the most important ones. By using these equations and ArcGIS software zoning, Spline method was find the best for saffron crop zoning. The results of linear regression in Gonabad showed that minimum, maximum and average temperature and also diurnal temperature range in March and April months had the greatest impact on saffron yield. For each of the four indices (the minimum, maximum and average temperature and also diurnal temperature range the best area for saffron cultivation was the southern part of the province (particularly Gonabad; so by increasing distance from this area to north areas (such as Kashmar, Torbat-e-Heydarieh, Sabzevar, Nishabour, Mashhad and finally Ghoochan saffron yield reduced by 30 to 50 percent. Therefore, the northern areas of the province had relatively low saffron yield. According to result of this research, saffron yield in Khorasan Razavi province was significantly influenced by temperature parameters. Flowering which basically is the most important stage of plant growth, is directly setting up with temperature.

  9. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, H. M. M.; Bošnački, D.; Elevelt, A.; Donato, K.; Di Tullio, A.; Breuer, B. J. T.; van Wijk, J. H.; van Dijk, E. V. M.; Modena, D.; Yeo, S. Y.; Grüll, H.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  10. Classifying Multi-Model Wheat Yield Impact Response Surfaces Showing Sensitivity to Temperature and Precipitation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronzek, Stefan; Pirttioja, Nina; Carter, Timothy R.; Bindi, Marco; Hoffmann, Holger; Palosuo, Taru; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Tao, Fulu; Trnka, Miroslav; Acutis, Marco; hide

    2017-01-01

    Crop growth simulation models can differ greatly in their treatment of key processes and hence in their response to environmental conditions. Here, we used an ensemble of 26 process-based wheat models applied at sites across a European transect to compare their sensitivity to changes in temperature (minus 2 to plus 9 degrees Centigrade) and precipitation (minus 50 to plus 50 percent). Model results were analysed by plotting them as impact response surfaces (IRSs), classifying the IRS patterns of individual model simulations, describing these classes and analysing factors that may explain the major differences in model responses. The model ensemble was used to simulate yields of winter and spring wheat at four sites in Finland, Germany and Spain. Results were plotted as IRSs that show changes in yields relative to the baseline with respect to temperature and precipitation. IRSs of 30-year means and selected extreme years were classified using two approaches describing their pattern. The expert diagnostic approach (EDA) combines two aspects of IRS patterns: location of the maximum yield (nine classes) and strength of the yield response with respect to climate (four classes), resulting in a total of 36 combined classes defined using criteria pre-specified by experts. The statistical diagnostic approach (SDA) groups IRSs by comparing their pattern and magnitude, without attempting to interpret these features. It applies a hierarchical clustering method, grouping response patterns using a distance metric that combines the spatial correlation and Euclidian distance between IRS pairs. The two approaches were used to investigate whether different patterns of yield response could be related to different properties of the crop models, specifically their genealogy, calibration and process description. Although no single model property across a large model ensemble was found to explain the integrated yield response to temperature and precipitation perturbations, the

  11. The interactive effects of elevated CO2, temperature and N supply on rice yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysa, Marieta C.; Tremmel, David C.; Reynolds, James F.; Rivero, Gilda C.; Tabbada, Reynaldo A.

    2001-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR 72)was grown in growth chambers under combinations of two CO 2 (375 and 750 μL L -1 ), temperature(29/21 and 34/26 degrees centigrade day/night) and N (40 and 80 mg L -1 ) regimes from sowing until grain maturity. Panicle production was significantly enhanced by elevated CO 2 with more pronounced effects at high temperature and N. CO 2 -enriched plants grown at high temperatures had lower harvest indices due to reductions in the number of grains per panicle and grain mass. Any potential benefit of increased atmospheric CO 2 on rice grain yield and grain N content under optimal N supply may therefore be dampened by higher temperatures associated with possible future global warming conditions. (Author)

  12. Raman Thermometry Measurements of Free Evaporation from Liquid Water Droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jared D.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of evaporation have suggested that on average, molecules in the higher-energy tail of the Boltzmann distribution are more readily transferred into the vapor during evaporation. To test these conclusions, the evaporative cooling rates of a droplet train of liquid water injected into vacuum have been studied via Raman thermometry. The resulting cooling rates are fit to an evaporative cooling model based on Knudsen's maximum rate of evaporation, in which we explicitly account for surface cooling. We have determined that the value of the evaporation coefficient (γ e ) of liquid water is 0.62 ± 0.09, confirming that a rate-limiting barrier impedes the evaporation rate. Such insight will facilitate the formulation of a microscopic mechanism for the evaporation of liquid water

  13. Effect of temperature on sulphate reduction, growth rate and growth yield in five psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria from Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    1999-01-01

    Five psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria (strains ASv26, LSv21, PSv29, LSv54 and LSv514) isolated from Arctic sediments were examined for their adaptation to permanently low temperatures, All strains grew at -1.8 degrees C, the freezing point of sea water, but their optimum temperature...... and T(opt). For strains LSv21 and LSv514, however, growth yields were highest at the lowest temperatures, around 0 degrees C. The results indicate that psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria are specially adapted to permanently low temperatures by high relative growth rates and high growth yields...... at in site conditions....

  14. The effects of liquid-coating mulch spray on growth, yield and undersoil temperature in komatsuna greens (Brassica rapa L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Shiobara, Y.; Omori, A.; Yoshino, M.; Kuba, K.; Takada, K.; Ikeda, Y.; Motoki, S.; Ogura, S.; Kudo, M.

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was intended to examine the effects of a black liquid-coating mulch on the growth and yield of komatsuna greens. Four treatments (1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0 L/square m) of spray amount were tested in combination with seeding date (Sep. 21sup(st), Oct. 5sup(th), Oct. 20sup(th) in an open field and the Jan. 22sup(nd) in a plastic film house). As a result, we found this liquid-coating mulch increased yields of komatsuna greens, unrelated to the spray amount. Generally, the daily highest soil temperature (-5 cm) under the mulching exceeded the control in every treatment however the daily lowest temperature was less than control except in the case of seeding at Sep. 21sup(st). These phenomena were remarkable in the early stage of growing and the differences in temperature between the control and mulch treatments were reduced during the growth. There was no significant difference in the hourly-integrated temperature during the first 10 days between the 4 treatments on same seeding date. These findings suggest that the expansion of the daily soil temperature range contributed the increased yields of komatsuna greens

  15. Yield and strength properties of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy over a wide strain rate and temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, L.; Kanel, G.I.; Razorenov, S.V.; Bezrouchko, G.S.; Meyer, L.

    2002-01-01

    A mechanical behavior of the Ti-6-22-22S alloy was studied under uniaxial strain conditions at shock-wave loading and under uniaxial compressive stress conditions over a strain rate range of 10-4 s-1 to 103 s-1. The test temperature was varied from -175 deg. C to 620 deg. C. The strain-rate and the temperature dependencies of the yield stress obtained from the uniaxial stress tests and from the shock-wave experiments are in a good agreement and demonstrate a significant decrease in the yield strength as the temperature increases. This indicates the thermal activation mechanism of plastic deformation of the alloy is maintained at strain rates up to 106 s-1. Variation of sample thickness from 2.24 to 10 mm results in relatively small variations in the dynamic yield strength and the spall strength over the whole temperature range

  16. Thermal decomposition of expanded polystyrene in a pebble bed reactor to get higher liquid fraction yield at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.S.; Gopinath, S.; Razdan, P.; Delattre, C.; Nirmala, G.S.; Natarajan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Expanded polystyrene is one of the polymers produced in large quantities due to its versatile application in different fields. This polymer is one of the most intractable components in municipal solid waste. Disposal of polymeric material by pyrolysis or catalytic cracking yields valuable hydrocarbon fuels or monomers. Literature reports different types of reactors and arrangements that have uniform temperatures during pyrolysis and catalytic cracking. The present study focuses on reducing the temperature to maximize the quantity of styrene monomer in the liquid product. A bench scale reactor has been developed to recover the styrene monomer and other valuable chemicals. Experiments were carried under partial oxidation and vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 300-500 deg. C. In the pyrolysis optimization studies, the best atmospheric condition was determined to be vacuum, the pyrolysis temperature should be 500 deg. C, yield of liquid product obtained was 91.7% and yield of styrene obtained was 85.5%. In the characterization studies, distillation and IR spectroscopy experiments were carried out. The remaining of the liquid product comprises of benzene, ethyl benzene, and styrene dimers and trimers

  17. Monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion processes via ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, N.; Raptis, A. C.; Mulcahey, T. P.

    1980-02-01

    The state of the art of instrumentation for monitoring temperatures in coal conversion and combustion systems is examined. The instrumentation types studied include thermocouples, radiation pyrometers, and acoustical thermometers. The capabilities and limitations of each type are reviewed. A feasibility study of the ultrasonic thermometry is described. A mathematical model of a pulse-echo ultrasonic temperature measurement system is developed using linear system theory. The mathematical model lends itself to the adaptation of generalized correlation techniques for the estimation of propagation delays. Computer simulations are made to test the efficacy of the signal processing techniques for noise-free as well as noisy signals. Based on the theoretical study, acoustic techniques to measure temperature in reactors and combustors are feasible.

  18. Comparison of tympanic and rectal temperature in febrile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Arvind; Dubey, N K; Jyothi, M C; Jain, Shilpa

    2002-04-01

    To compare tympanic membrane temperature and rectal temperature in febrile pediatric patients. Sixty febrile children were enrolled as continuous enrollment at initial triage. Two readings of ear temperature were taken in each child with Thermoscan infrared thermometer. Rectal temperature was recorded by a digital electronic thermometer. Comparison of both the techniques was done and co-relation co-efficients calculated. Parental preference for both techniques was assessed. It was observed that mean ear temperature was 38.9+/-0.90 C and that for rectal temperature was 38.8+/-0.80 degrees C. The correlation coefficient between the two was 0.994 (p rays emitted from the surface of tympanic membrane. Ear temperatures correlates well with rectal temperatures which have long been considered as "core" temperatures. Parents prefer the technique of ear thermometry which is quick (2 sec), safe and non-invasive and patient resistance for this is also less. A non-invasive, non-mucous device which is accurate over a wide range of temperature could be very useful.

  19. Effects of Lignocellulosic Compounds on the Yield, Nanostructure and Reactivity of Soot from Fast Pyrolysis at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Broström, Markus; Kling, Jens

    reactor. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) obtain knowledge about lignocellulosic compounds and monolignols influence on the yield, nanostructure, composition, and reactivity of soot during high-temperature gasification, (2) understand the influence of Soxhlet extraction on the soot......Gasification offers the utilization of biomass to a wide variety of applications such as heat, electricity, chemicals and transport fuels in an efficient and sustainable manner. High soot yields in the high-temperature entrained flow gasification lead to intensive gas cleaning and can cause...... primary, secondary and teriary pyrolysis products such as organic acids, aldehydes and phenolics [1]. In this study, therefore, the impacts of lignocellulosic compounds and monolignols (syringol, guaiacol, p-hydroxyphenol) on the yield and characteristics of soot were investigated at 1250°C in a drop tube...

  20. Microstructural effects on the yield strength and its temperature dependence in a bainitic precipitation hardened Cr-Mo-V steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Kotilainen, H.; Nenonen, P.

    1980-03-01

    The plastic deformation behaviour of a precipitation hardened bainitic Cr-Mo-V steel is analyzed at ambient and low temperatures. The temperature dependent component of the yield strength is composed of the Peierls-Nabarro force and also partly of the strengthening contribution of the lath- and cell boundaries or the solid solution hardening. The temperature dependence below 230 K is in accordance with the models presented by Yanoshevich and Ryvkina as well as Dorn and Rajnak. The temperature independent component can be calculated merely from the dislocation density, which is stabilized by the vanadium-rich carbides. The linear additivity cannot be used for the superposition of the strengthening effects of various strengthening parameters, By using the phenomenological approach starting from the dislocation movement mechanisms upon yielding the laws for the superposition are discussed. (author)

  1. Novel Zero-Heat-Flux Deep Body Temperature Measurement in Lower Extremity Vascular and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Marja-Tellervo; Pesonen, Anne; Jousela, Irma; Päivärinta, Janne; Poikajärvi, Satu; Albäck, Anders; Salminen, Ulla-Stina; Pesonen, Eero

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare deep body temperature obtained using a novel noninvasive continuous zero-heat-flux temperature measurement system with core temperatures obtained using conventional methods. A prospective, observational study. Operating room of a university hospital. The study comprised 15 patients undergoing vascular surgery of the lower extremities and 15 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Zero-heat-flux thermometry on the forehead and standard core temperature measurements. Body temperature was measured using a new thermometry system (SpotOn; 3M, St. Paul, MN) on the forehead and with conventional methods in the esophagus during vascular surgery (n = 15), and in the nasopharynx and pulmonary artery during cardiac surgery (n = 15). The agreement between SpotOn and the conventional methods was assessed using the Bland-Altman random-effects approach for repeated measures. The mean difference between SpotOn and the esophageal temperature during vascular surgery was+0.08°C (95% limit of agreement -0.25 to+0.40°C). During cardiac surgery, during off CPB, the mean difference between SpotOn and the pulmonary arterial temperature was -0.05°C (95% limits of agreement -0.56 to+0.47°C). Throughout cardiac surgery (on and off CPB), the mean difference between SpotOn and the nasopharyngeal temperature was -0.12°C (95% limits of agreement -0.94 to+0.71°C). Poor agreement between the SpotOn and nasopharyngeal temperatures was detected in hypothermia below approximately 32°C. According to this preliminary study, the deep body temperature measured using the zero-heat-flux system was in good agreement with standard core temperatures during lower extremity vascular and cardiac surgery. However, agreement was questionable during hypothermia below 32°C. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Holter monitoring of central and peripheral temperature: possible uses and feasibility study in outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Manuel; Cuesta, David; Madrid, Juan Antonio; Churruca, Juan; Miro, Pau; Ruiz, Raul; Martinez, Carlos

    2009-08-01

    Conventional clinical thermometry has important limitations. A continuous monitoring of temperature may offer significant advantages, including the use of chronobiological and complexity analysis of temperature profile and eventually the identification of a "pre-febrile" pattern. We present a clinical model designed to measure, store and/or transmit in real time a central and a peripheral temperature reading. The results of its use in a healthy, free-living population is reported. Thirty subjects (15 women, 15 men, 20-70 years old), were monitored for 24 h while following their normal life. Temperatures were recorded every minute at the external auditory channel (EAC) and on the skin, at the intersection of the 5th intercostal space and the anterior axillary line. A Cosinor analysis and Approximate Entropy (ApEn) (m = 2, r = 0.15*SD, N = 180) were calculated for both temperatures. Median temperature was 35.55 degrees C [interquartile range (IR) 0.77 degrees C] in the external auditory channel (EAC) and 34.62 degrees C (IR 1.61) in the specified skin location. Median gradient between AEC and skin was 0.93 (IR 1.57). A circadian rhythm was present both in EAC and skin temperature, with a mean amplitude of 0.44 degrees C and an acrophase at 21:02 for the EAC and 0.70 degrees C and 00:42 for the skin. During the night there was a sizable increase in peripheral temperature, with a decrease in gradient and a loss of complexity in the temperature profile, most significantly in the peripheral temperature. Continuous monitoring of central and peripheral temperature may be a helpful tool in both ambulatory and admitted patients and may offer new approaches in clinical thermometry.

  3. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  4. Metabolic efficiency in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to temperature dependent growth and biomass yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhartsev, Maksim; Yang, Xuelian; Reuss, Matthias; Pörtner, Hans Otto

    2015-08-01

    Canonized view on temperature effects on growth rate of microorganisms is based on assumption of protein denaturation, which is not confirmed experimentally so far. We develop an alternative concept, which is based on view that limits of thermal tolerance are based on imbalance of cellular energy allocation. Therefore, we investigated growth suppression of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the supraoptimal temperature range (30-40°C), i.e. above optimal temperature (Topt). The maximal specific growth rate (μmax) of biomass, its concentration and yield on glucose (Yx/glc) were measured across the whole thermal window (5-40°C) of the yeast in batch anaerobic growth on glucose. Specific rate of glucose consumption, specific rate of glucose consumption for maintenance (mglc), true biomass yield on glucose (Yx/glc(true)), fractional conservation of substrate carbon in product and ATP yield on glucose (Yatp/glc) were estimated from the experimental data. There was a negative linear relationship between ATP, ADP and AMP concentrations and specific growth rate at any growth conditions, whilst the energy charge was always high (~0.83). There were two temperature regions where mglc differed 12-fold, which points to the existence of a 'low' (within 5-31°C) and a 'high' (within 33-40°C) metabolic mode regarding maintenance requirements. The rise from the low to high mode occurred at 31-32°C in step-wise manner and it was accompanied with onset of suppression of μmax. High mglc at supraoptimal temperatures indicates a significant reduction of scope for growth, due to high maintenance cost. Analysis of temperature dependencies of product formation efficiency and Yatp/glc revealed that the efficiency of energy metabolism approaches its lower limit at 26-31°C. This limit is reflected in the predetermined combination of Yx/glc(true), elemental biomass composition and degree of reduction of the growth substrate. Approaching the limit implies a reduction of the safety margin

  5. Assessment of broiler surface temperature variation when exposed to different air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Nascimento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of the air temperature variation on the mean surface temperature (MST of 7- to 35-day-old broiler chickens using infrared thermometry to estimate MST, and to study surface temperature variation of the wings, head, legs, back and comb as affected by air temperature and broiler age. One hundred Cobb® broilers were used in the experiment. Starting on day 7, 10 birds were weekly selected at random, housed in an environmental chamber and reared under three distinct temperatures (18, 25 and 32 ºC to record their thermal profile using an infrared thermal camera. The recorded images were processed to estimate MST by selecting the whole area of the bird within the picture and comparing it with the values obtained using selected equations in literature, and to record the surface temperatures of the body parts. The MST estimated by infrared images were not statistically different (p > 0.05 from the values obtained by the equations. MST values significantly increased (p < 0.05 when the air temperature increased, but were not affected by bird age. However, age influenced the difference between MST and air temperature, which was highest on day 14. The technique of infrared thermal image analysis was useful to estimate the mean surface temperature of broiler chickens.

  6. Development of a 2D temperature measurement technique for combustion diagnostics using 2-line atomic fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engstroem, Johan

    2001-01-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the development and application of a novel planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for temperature measurements in a variety of combusting flows. Accurate measurement of temperature is an essential task in combustion diagnostics, since temperature is one of the most fundamental quantities for the characterization of combustion processes. The technique is based on two-line atomic fluorescence (TLAF) from small quantities of atomic indium (In) seeded into the fuel. It has been developed from small-scale experiments in laboratory flames to the point where practical combustion systems can be studied. The technique is conceptually simple and reveals temperature information in the post-flame regions. The viability of the technique has been tested in three extreme measurement situations: in spark ignition engine combustion, in ultra-lean combustion situations such as lean burning aero-engine concepts and, finally, in fuel-rich combustion. TLAF was successfully applied in an optical Sl engine using isooctane as fuel. The wide temperature sensitivity, 700 - 3000 K, of the technique using indium atoms allowed measurements over the entire combustion cycle in the engine to be performed. In applications in lean combustion a potential problem caused by the strong oxidation processes of indium atoms was encountered. This limits measurement times due to deposits of absorbing indium oxide on measurement windows. The seeding requirement is a disadvantage of the technique and can be a limitation in some applications. The results from experiments performed in sooting flames are very promising for thermometry measurements in such environments. Absorption by hydrocarbons and other native species was found to be negligible. Since low laser energies and low seeding concentrations could be used, the technique did not, unlike most other incoherent optical thermometry techniques, suffer interferences from LII of soot particles or LIF from PAH

  7. The investigation for attaining the optimal yield of oil shale by integrating high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, A.T.

    1984-03-01

    This work presents a systemanalytical investigation and shows how far a high temperature reactor can be integrated for achieving the optimal yield of kerogen from oil shale. About 1/3 of the produced components must be burnt out in order to have the required high temperature process heat. The works of IGT show that the hydrogen gasification of oil shale enables not only to reach oil shale of higher quality but also allows to achieve a higher extraction quantity. For this reason a hydro-gasification process has been calculated in this work in which not only hydrogen is used as the gasification medium but also two high temperature reactors are integrated as the source of high temperature heat. (orig.) [de

  8. Effect of temperature, time, and milling process on yield, flavonoid, and total phenolic content of Zingiber officinale water extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyani, R.; Kosasih, W.; Ningrum, D. R.; Pudjiraharti, S.

    2017-03-01

    Several parameters such as temperature, time of extraction, and size of simplicia play significant role in medicinal herb extraction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of those parameters on yield extract, flavonoid, and total phenolic content in water extract of Zingiber officinale. The temperatures used were 50, 70 and 90°C and the extraction times were 30, 60 and 90 min. Z. officinale in the form of powder and chips were used to study the effect of milling treatment. The correlation among those variables was analysed using ANOVA two-way factors without replication. The result showed that time and temperature did not influence the yield of extract of Powder simplicia. However, time of extraction influenced the extract of simplicia treated without milling process. On the other hand, flavonoid and total phenolic content were not influenced by temperature, time, and milling treatment.

  9. The effects of heating temperatures and time on deformation energy and oil yield of sunflower bulk seeds in compression loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabutey, A.; Herak, D.; Sigalingging, R.; Demirel, C.

    2018-02-01

    The deformation energy (J) and percentage oil yield (%) of sunflower bulk seeds under the influence of heat treatment temperatures and heating time were examined in compression test using the universal compression testing machine and vessel diameter of 60 mm with a plunger. The heat treatment temperatures were between 40 and 100 °C and the heating time at specific temperatures of 40 and 100 °C ranged from 15 to 75 minutes. The bulk sunflower seeds were measured at a pressing height of 60 mm and pressed at a maximum force of 100 kN and speed of 5 mm/min. Based on the compression results, the deformation energy and oil yield increased along with increasing heat treatment temperatures. The results were statistically significant (p 0.05).

  10. Noncontact thermometry via laser pumped, thermographic phosphors: Characterization of systematic errors and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillies, G.T.; Dowell, L.J.; Lutz, W.N.; Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Noel, B.W.; Franks, L.A.; Borella, H.M.

    1987-10-01

    There are a growing number of industrial measurement situations that call for a high precision, noncontact method of thermometry. Our collaboration has been successful in developing one such method based on the laser-induced fluorescence of rare-earth-doped ceramic phosphors like Y 2 O 3 :Eu. In this paper, we summarize the results of characterization studies aimed at identifying the sources of systematic error in a laboratory-grade version of the method. We then go on to present data from measurements made in the afterburner plume of a jet turbine and inside an operating permanent magnet motor. 12 refs., 6 figs

  11. Comparison of Conventional, Trace Element, and Pseudosection Thermobarometry in UHP Eclogite, North Qaidam Terrane, Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinson, C. G.; Regel, M. E.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the southeastern North Qaidam terrane, near Dulan, felsic host gneisses enclose minor eclogite lenses. A small (~3°C/km) increase in temperatures to the west based on Zr-in-Rt thermometry is supported by a textural trend of zoned garnet with prograde mineral inclusions in the west to unzoned garnet with only peak-stage inclusions in the east. A western eclogite sample contains minor Ep and trace Phe in addition to Grt-Omp-Qtz-Rt; a strong foliation is defined by banding of Grt and Omp. Garnet Ca falls significantly from core (Alm44Prp23Grs32) to rim (Alm48Prp27Grs23). Phengite contains 3.34-3.36 Si pfu. Conventional Grt-Omp-Phe thermobarometry yields 23-27 kbar, 660-730°C, and Zr-in-Rt thermometry yields 671 ± 9°C (n = 37). An isochemical phase diagram (pseudosection) for the system NCKFMASHO calculated with PerpleX indicates that garnet Xgrs decreases with increasing P and T, suggesting that observed garnet zoning reflects prograde growth. Garnet rim compositional isopleths intersect at 23-27 kbar, 580-620°C, depending on choice of effective bulk composition and assumed Fe3+/Fetotal. Garnet rims help define the foliation, suggesting that these P-T conditions apply to this deformation. An eastern eclogite sample contains minor Ep and abundant, coarse-grained Phe in addition to Grt-Omp-Qtz-Rt; foliation is weak. Garnet zoning is weak; compositions are Alm41-43Prp26-28Grs29-32. Phengite cores contain 3.48-3.56 Si pfu. Conventional Grt-Omp-Phe thermobarometry yields 32-36 kbar, 700-750°C, and Zr-in-Rt thermometry yields 691 ± 12°C (n = 34). Conventional thermobarometry and pseudosections yield similar peak P-T conditions, but from different mineral compositions: thermobarometry yields peak P from high-Ca Grt, but the pseudosection yields peak P from intermediate-Ca Grt; maximum Ca in Grt is predicted at lower P and T. Pseudosection-based peak Ts are significantly lower than those from Zr-in-Rt and conventional thermometry. Wide isopleth spacing in the

  12. On the yield of cold and ultracold neutrons for liquid hydrogen at low temperatures near the melting point

    CERN Document Server

    Morishima, N

    1999-01-01

    The neutron scattering cross sections for liquid hydrogen in the temperature range from the melting point to the boiling point are calculated. It is shown that lowering the temperature results in a significant increase in the yield of cold neutrons: for instance, a 44% increase for an incident neutron energy of 19.4 meV. The major cause of this increment is the para-to-ortho transition of a hydrogen molecule though accompanied by an appreciable increase in the density. The results of the cold- and ultracold-neutron yields are discussed in connection with the experimental results of Altarev et al. at the WWR-M reactor.

  13. Effect of a phase I Coxiella burnetii inactivated vaccine on body temperature and milk yield in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, L S-Ch; Borchardt, S; Ouellet, V; Heuwieser, W

    2016-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. The pathogen is prevalent in ruminants (goats, sheep, cows), which are the main sources of human infection. In the cattle industry around the world, animal (15 to 20%) and herd (38 to 72%) level prevalences of C. burnetii are high. Vaccination of ruminants against Q fever is considered important to prevent spreading of the disease and risk of infection in humans. However, published information on side effects of the Q fever vaccination under field conditions is limited for cows. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the phase I C. burnetii inactivated vaccine Coxevac on body temperature and milk yield in dairy cows. In 2 experiments, a total of 508 cows were randomly divided into 2 groups to determine the effect of first vaccination on body temperature and milk yield. The C. burnetii serostatus of all cows was tested before vaccination with an indirect ELISA. The first experiment took place in the teaching and research barn of the Clinic of Animal Reproduction at the Freie Universität Berlin. Temperature was measured vaginally in 10 cows in a crossover design. The second experiment was conducted on a commercial dairy farm. Milk yield of 498 cows was measured 1 wk before and 1 wk after vaccination. In a subset of 41 cows, temperature was measured rectally. In both experiments, body temperature increased significantly after vaccination (1.0 ± 0.9°C and 0.7 ± 0.8°C). A significant difference was also found in body temperature between vaccinated and control cows. Thirty percent of the vaccinated animals in experiment 1 showed reversible swelling at the injection site as a reaction to the vaccination. The results indicate that vaccination against Q fever causes a transient increase of body temperature that peaks in the first 12 to 24h and declines after that. In experiment 2, vaccinated cows (26.8 ± 0.39 kg/d) produced significantly less milk than did control cows (28.2 ± 0.44 kg

  14. Control of Emission Color of High Quantum Yield CH3NH3PbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots by Precipitation Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Susha, Andrei S; Kershaw, Stephen V; Hung, Tak Fu; Rogach, Andrey L

    2015-09-01

    Emission color controlled, high quantum yield CH 3 NH 3 PbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots are obtained by changing the temperature of a bad solvent during synthesis. The products for temperatures between 0 and 60 °C have good spectral purity with narrow emission line widths of 28-36 nm, high absolute emission quantum yields of 74% to 93%, and short radiative lifetimes of 13-27 ns.

  15. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Eikelder, H M M; Bošnački, D; Breuer, B J T; Van Wijk, J H; Van Dijk, E V M; Modena, D; Yeo, S Y; Grüll, H; Elevelt, A; Donato, K; Di Tullio, A

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  16. Irrigation scheduling of spring wheat using infrared thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegman, E.C.; Soderlund, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    Irrigation scheduling for spring wheat requires information on different irrigation timing methods. Irrigation timing based on allowable root zone available water depletion and selected crop water stress index (CWSI) thresholds were evaluated in terms of their effect on spring wheat yield. A field study was conducted at Oakes, North Dakota in 1987 and 1988 on a Maddock sandy loam soil with two varieties of spring wheat (Marshall and Wheaton) using a split plot randomized block design. Irrigation was metered to each plot using trickle irrigation tubing. Neutron soil water measurements along with a water balance model were used to time irrigations that were based on different allowed root zone depletions. Infrared thermometer sensors (IRT) were used to measure in situ canopy temperatures and along with measured climatic information were used to time irrigations using the CWSI approach. Additionally, crop phenological stages and final grain yield were measured. The non-water-stressed baselines necessary for the CWSI differed between the two seasons but were similar to those from previous studies. The CWSI methods were feasible from the Feekes scale S4 (beginning pseudo-stem) to S11.2 (mealy ripe). Minimal yield reductions were observed using the CWSI method for thresholds less than 0.4-0.5 during this period. Minimal yield reductions were observed by maintaining the root zone allowable depletion below 50%. The grain yield-evapotranspiration (ET) relationship was linear in both years but with different slopes and intercepts. When analyzed on a relative basis to maximum ET (ETm), a single relationship fit both years’ data with a yield sensitivity factor of 1.58. Irrigations timed at CWSI = 0.5 reduced seasonal water application by 18% relative to treatments irrigated at CWSI = 0.2. (author)

  17. Thermometric determination of cartilage matrix temperatures during thermal chondroplasty: comparison of bipolar and monopolar radiofrequency devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Ryland B; Lu, Yan; Rodriguez, Edwin; Markel, Mark D

    2002-04-01

    To compare cartilage matrix temperatures between monopolar radiofrequency energy (mRFE) and bipolar RFE (bRFE) at 3 depths under the articular surface during thermal chondroplasty. We hypothesized that cartilage temperatures would be higher at all cartilage depths for the bRFE device than for the mRFE device. Randomized trial using bovine cartilage. Sixty osteochondral sections from the femoropatellar joint of 15 adult cattle were used for this study. Using a custom jig, fluoroptic thermometry probes were placed at one of the following depths under the articular surface: 200 microm, 500 microm, or 2,000 microm. RF treatment was performed either with fluid flow (F) (120 mL/min) or without fluid flow (NF) (n = 5/depth/RFE device/flow; total specimens, 60). Irrigation fluid temperature was room temperature (22 degrees C). Thermometry data were acquired at 4 Hz for 5 seconds with the RF probe off, for 20 seconds with the RF probe on, and then for 15 seconds with the RF probe off. During RF treatment, a 0.79-cm2 area (1.0-cm diameter) of the articular surface centered over the thermometry probe was treated in a paintbrush manner in noncontact (bRFE) or light contact (mRFE). Thermal chondroplasty with bRFE resulted in higher cartilage matrix temperatures compared with mRFE for all depths and regardless of fluid flow. Bipolar RFE resulted in temperatures of 95 degrees C to 100 degrees C at 200 microm and 500 microm under the surface, with temperatures of 75 degrees C to 78 degrees C at 2,000 microm. Fluid flow during bRFE application had no effect at 200 microm. Monopolar RFE resulted in temperatures of 61 degrees C to 68 degrees C at 200 microm, 54 degrees C to 70 degrees C at 500 microm under the surface, and 28 degrees C to 30 degrees C at 2,000 microm below the surface. A significant effect of fluid flow during mRFE application occurred at 200 microm (NF, 61 degrees C; F, 63 degrees C) and 500 microm (NF, 53 degrees C; F, 68 degrees C). In this study, we found

  18. Temperature measurement in the adult emergency department: oral, tympanic membrane and temporal artery temperatures versus rectal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijur, Polly E; Shah, Purvi D; Esses, David

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to compare agreement between three non-invasive measures of temperature and rectal temperatures and to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of these measures to detect a rectal temperature of 38°C or higher. We conducted a study of the diagnostic accuracy of oral, tympanic membrane (TM) and temporal artery (TA) thermometry to measure fever in an urban emergency department (ED). Data were collected from adult patients who received rectal temperature measurement. Bland-Altman analysis was performed; sensitivity, specificity and 95% CIs were calculated. 987 patients were enrolled. 36% of the TM and TA readings differed by 0.5°C or more from rectal temperatures, 50% of oral temperatures. TM measures were most precise-the SD of the difference from rectal was 0.4°C TM, and 0.6°C for oral and TA (ptemperature of 38°C or higher were: 37.0%, 68.3% and 71.1%, respectively (oral vs TM and TA pmethods (pmethods met benchmarks for diagnostic accuracy using the criterion of 38°C to detect rectal temperature of 38°C. A TM cutpoint of 37.5°C provides maximum diagnostic accuracy of the three non-invasive measures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Seasonal temperatures have more influence than nitrogen fertilizer rates on cucumber yield and nitrogen uptake in a double cropping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Ruiying; Li Xiaolin [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China); Christie, Peter [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China); Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Chen Qing [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China)], E-mail: qchen@cau.edu.cn; Zhang Fusuo [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, No. 2 Yuanmingyuan Xilu, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2008-02-15

    Two-year greenhouse cucumber experiments were conducted to investigate seasonal effects on fruit yield, dry matter allocation, and N uptake in a double-cropping system with different fertilizer management. Seasonal effects were much greater than fertilizer effects, and winter-spring (WS) cucumber attained higher fruit yields and N uptake than autumn-winter (AW) cucumber due to lower cumulative air temperatures during fruit maturation in the AW season. Fertilizer N application and apparent N loss under recommended N management (Nmr) decreased by 40-78% and 33-48% without yield loss compared to conventional N management (Nmt) over four growing seasons. However, there were no seasonal differences in N recommendations, taking into consideration seasonal differences in crop N demand, critical nutrient supply in the root zone and N mineralization rate. - Nitrogen inputs can be reduced to minimize N losses to the environment while maintaining yields but N recommendations must reflect seasonal temperature effects.

  20. Seasonal temperatures have more influence than nitrogen fertilizer rates on cucumber yield and nitrogen uptake in a double cropping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ruiying; Li Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Chen Qing; Zhang Fusuo

    2008-01-01

    Two-year greenhouse cucumber experiments were conducted to investigate seasonal effects on fruit yield, dry matter allocation, and N uptake in a double-cropping system with different fertilizer management. Seasonal effects were much greater than fertilizer effects, and winter-spring (WS) cucumber attained higher fruit yields and N uptake than autumn-winter (AW) cucumber due to lower cumulative air temperatures during fruit maturation in the AW season. Fertilizer N application and apparent N loss under recommended N management (Nmr) decreased by 40-78% and 33-48% without yield loss compared to conventional N management (Nmt) over four growing seasons. However, there were no seasonal differences in N recommendations, taking into consideration seasonal differences in crop N demand, critical nutrient supply in the root zone and N mineralization rate. - Nitrogen inputs can be reduced to minimize N losses to the environment while maintaining yields but N recommendations must reflect seasonal temperature effects

  1. Effect of Temperature and Mole Ratio on the Synthesis Yield of Rhenium-Tetrofosmin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyastuti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Technetium-99m (99mTc tetrofosmin is widely used in nuclear medicine as a diagnostic agent for myocardial perfusion and as a tumor imaging agent. As a parenteral preparation it requires an evaluation of its pharmacokinetics and stability in-vivo. Since 99mTc has a short half-life and is only available in very low concentrations, it is impossible to characterize its chemical properties and presence in the body. Due to this reason, only technetium-99 (T1/2 = 5 × 105 years, which is available in macro quantities, or natural rhenium can be used for this purpose. In this study rhenium-188 (188Re tetrofosmin will be synthesized and applied, because non-radioactive Re can be easily obtained. Synthesis and radiochemical purity analysis of carrier-added 188Re-tetrofosmin were carried out as a model to study the in-vivo stability of technetium-99m tetrofosmin. Rhenium-188 was used as a tracer to identify the formation of rhenium tetrofosmin. Rhenium gluconate was synthesized first prior to the formation of rhenium tetrofosmin. The quality of labeling for both rhenium gluconate and rhenium tetrofosmin was analyzed using paper- and thin-layer chromatography, respectively. Rhenium gluconate can be synthesized with high labeling yield within 1 hour, whereas rhenium tetrofosmin was synthesized both in room temperature and in an elevated temperature with various tetrofosmin-to-rhenium mole ratios.The results showed that heating at 95oC led to a higher yield of more than 90% within 30 minutes. Rhenium tetrofosmin could be produced in high radiochemical purity using an excess of tetrofosmin with mole ratio of 2000. It is concluded that rhenium tetrofosmin could be synthesized through the formation of rhenium gluconate, and a higher yield could be obtained in a shorter time by heating process.

  2. Mineralogy and geothermometry of high-temperature rhyolites from the central and western Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, N.; Bonnichsen, B.; Leeman, W.P.; Stormer, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Voluminous mid-Miocene rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and lava flows are exposed along the northern and southern margins of the central and western Snake River Plain. These rhyolites are essentially anhydrous with the general mineral assemblage of plagioclase ??sanidine ?? quartz + augite + pigeonite ?? hypersthene ?? fayalitic olivine + Fe-Ti oxides + apatite + zircon which provides an opportunity to compare feldspar, pyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxide equilibration temperatures for the same rocks. Estimated pyroxene equilibration temperatures (based on the geothermometers of Lindsley and coworkers) range from 850 to 1000??C, and these are well correlated with whole-rock compositions. With the exception of one sample, agreement between the two-pyroxene thermometers tested is well within 50??C. Fe-Ti oxide geothermometers applied to fresh magnetite and ilmenite generally yield temperatures about 50 to 100??C lower than the pyroxene temperatures, and erratic results are obtained if these minerals exhibit effects of subsolidus oxidation and exsolution. Results of feldspar thermometry are more complicated, and reflect uncertainties in the thermometer calibrations as well as in the degree of attainment of equilibrium between plagioclase and sanidine. In general, temperatures obtained using the Ghiorso (1984) and Green and Usdansky (1986) feldspar thermometers agree with the pyroxene temperatures within the respective uncertainties. However, uncertainties in the feldspar temperatures are the larger of the two (and exceed ??60??C for many samples). The feldspar thermometer of Fuhrman and Lindsley (1988) produces systematically lower temperatures for many of the samples studied. The estimated pyroxene temperatures are considered most representative of actual magmatic temperatures for these rhyolites. This range of temperatures is significantly higher than those for rhyolites from many other suites, and is consistent with the hypothesis that the Snake River Plain rhyolitic magmas formed

  3. Effects of increased CO[sub 2] concentration and temperature on growth and yield of winter wheat at two levels of nitrogen application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.A.C.; Mitchell, V.J.; Driscoll, S.P.; Franklin, J.; Lawlor, D.W. (Institute of Arable Crops Research, Harpenden (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Physiology)

    1993-06-01

    Winter wheat was grown in chambers under light and temperature conditions similar to the UK field environment for the 1990/1991 growing season at two levels each of atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration (seasonal means: 361 nd 692 [mu]mol mol[sup -1]), temperature (tracking ambient and ambient +4[degree]C) and nitrogen application (equivalent to 87 and 489 kg ha[sub -1] total N applied). Total dry matter productivity through the season, the maximum number of shoots and final ear number were stimulated by CO[sub 2] enrichment at both levels of the temperature and N treatments. At high N, there was a CO[sub 2]-induced stimulation of grain yield (+15%) similar to that for total crop dry mass (+12%), and there was no significant interaction with temperature. Temperature had a direct, negative effect on yield at both levels of the N and CO[sub 2] treatments. This could be explained by the temperature-dependent shortening of the phenological stages, and therefore, the time available for accumulating resources for grain formation. At high N, there was also a reduction in grain set at ambient +4[degree]C temperature, but the overall negative effect of warmer temperature was greater on the number of grains (-37%) than on yield (-18%), due to a compensating increase in average grain mass. At low N, despite increasing total crop dry mass and the number of ears, elevated CO[sub 2] did not increase grain yield and caused a significant decrease under ambient temperature conditions. This can be explained in terms of a stimulation of early vegetative growth by CO[sub 2] enrichment leading to a reduction in the amount of N available later for the formation and filling of grain.

  4. Improved calibration technique for in vivo proton MRS thermometry for brain temperature measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M; Bashir, A; Ackerman, J J; Yablonskiy, D A

    2008-09-01

    The most common MR-based approach to noninvasively measure brain temperature relies on the linear relationship between the (1)H MR resonance frequency of tissue water and the tissue's temperature. Herein we provide the most accurate in vivo assessment existing thus far of such a relationship. It was derived by acquiring in vivo MR spectra from a rat brain using a high field (11.74 Tesla [T]) MRI scanner and a single-voxel MR spectroscopy technique based on a LASER pulse sequence. Data were analyzed using three different methods to estimate the (1)H resonance frequencies of water and the metabolites NAA, Cho, and Cr, which are used as temperature-independent internal (frequency) references. Standard modeling of frequency-domain data as composed of resonances characterized by Lorentzian line shapes gave the tightest resonance-frequency versus temperature correlation. An analysis of the uncertainty in temperature estimation has shown that the major limiting factor is an error in estimating the metabolite frequency. For example, for a metabolite resonance linewidth of 8 Hz, signal sampling rate of 2 Hz and SNR of 5, an accuracy of approximately 0.5 degrees C can be achieved at a magnetic field of 3T. For comparison, in the current study conducted at 11.74T, the temperature estimation error was approximately 0.1 degrees C.

  5. Effect of temperature on sulphate reduction, growth rate and growth yield in five psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria from Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    1999-01-01

    and T(opt). For strains LSv21 and LSv514, however, growth yields were highest at the lowest temperatures, around 0 degrees C. The results indicate that psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria are specially adapted to permanently low temperatures by high relative growth rates and high growth yields......Five psychrophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria (strains ASv26, LSv21, PSv29, LSv54 and LSv514) isolated from Arctic sediments were examined for their adaptation to permanently low temperatures, All strains grew at -1.8 degrees C, the freezing point of sea water, but their optimum temperature...... for growth (T(opt)) were 7 degrees C (PSv29), 10 degrees C (ASv26, LSv54) and 18 degrees C (LSv21, LSv514), Although T(opt) was considerably above the in situ temperatures of their habitats (-1.7 degrees C and 2.6 degrees C), relative growth rates were still high at 0 degrees C, accounting for 25...

  6. Temperature measurement error due to the effects of time varying magnetic fields on thermocouples with ferromagnetic thermoelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermocouples with ferromagnetic thermoelements (iron, Alumel, Nisil) are used extensively in industry. We have observed the generation of voltage spikes within ferromagnetic wires when the wires are placed in an alternating magnetic field. This effect has implications for thermocouple thermometry, where it was first observed. For example, the voltage generated by this phenomenon will contaminate the thermocouple thermal emf, resulting in temperature measurement error

  7. The effect of clear sky radiation on crop surface temperature determined by thermal thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svendsen, H.; Jensen, H.E.; Jensen, S.E.; Mogensen, V.O.

    1990-01-01

    By numerical integration of Planck's radiation function, a relationship between emitted radiation from a black body in the wavelength band 8–14 μm and the corresponding surface temperature was obtained. Using this relationship, an equation was developed relating the temperature error at different temperatures to the crop surface emissivity and clear sky radiation. It is concluded that the temperature error to be expected from neglect of clear sky radiation in the wavelength band 8–14μm in radiometric crop surface temperature determination is < 0.2 and 0.1 °C for crops with an emissivity > 0.96 and 0.98, respectively, for a leaf temperature range from 0 to 30°C

  8. RDF gasification with water vapour: influence of process temperature on yield and products composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvagno, S.; Casciaro, G.; Russo, A.; Casu, S.; Martino, M.; Portofino, S.

    2005-01-01

    The opportunity of using RDF (Refused Derived Fuel) to produce fuel gas seems to be promising and particular attention has been focused on alternative process technologies such as pyrolysis and gasification. Within this frame, present work relates to experimental tests and obtained results of a series of experimental surveys on RDF gasification with water vapour, carried out by means of a bench scale rotary kiln plant at different process temperature, using thermogravimetry (TG) and infrared spectrometry (FTIR), in order to characterize the incoming material, and online gas chromatography to qualify the gaseous stream. Experimental data show that gas yield rise with temperature and, with respect to the gas composition, hydrogen content grows up mainly at the expense of the other gaseous compound, pointing out the major extension of secondary cracking reactions into the gaseous fraction at higher temperature. Syngas obtained at process temperature of 950 o C or higher seems to be suitable for fuel cells applications; at lower process temperature, gas composition suggest a final utilisation for feedstock recycling. The low organic content of solid residue does not suggest any other exploitation of the char apart from the land filling [it

  9. Effects of cryogenic irradiation on temperature sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courts, S.S.; Holmes, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    Several types of commercially available cryogenic temperature sensors were calibrated, irradiated at 4.2 K by a gamma or neutron source, and recalibrated in-situ to determine their suitability for thermometry in radiation environments. Comparisons were made between pre- and post-irradiation calibrations with the equivalent temperature shift calculated for each sensor at various temperature in the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Four post-irradiation calibrations were performed with annealing steps performed at 20 K, 80 K, and 330 K. Temperature sensors which were gamma irradiated were given a total dose of 10,000 Gy. Temperature sensors which were neutron irradiated were irradiated to a total fluence of 2 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . In general, for gamma radiation environments, diodes are unsuitable for use. Both carbon glass and germanium resistance sensors performed well at lower temperature, while platinum resistance sensors performed best above 30 K. Thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance sensors both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range. Only thin-film rhodium and Cernox trademark resistance temperature sensors were neutron irradiated and they both performed well over the 4.2 K to 330 K range

  10. A Delay Time Measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) for a High Temperature Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Sang Baik

    2010-01-01

    The temperature measurement of very high temperature core melt is of importance in a high temperature as the molten pool experiment in which gap formation between core melt and the reactor lower head, and the effect of the gap on thermal behavior are to be measured. The existing temperature measurement techniques have some problems, which the thermocouple, one of the contact methods, is restricted to under 2000 .deg. C, and the infrared thermometry, one of the non-contact methods, is unable to measure an internal temperature and very sensitive to the interference from reacted gases. In order to solve these problems, the delay time technique of ultrasonic wavelets due to high temperature has two sorts of stage. As a first stage, a delay time measurement of ULTRAS (Ultra-high Temperature Ultrasonic Response Analysis System) is suggested. As a second stage, a molten material temperature was measured up to 2300 .deg. C. Also, the optimization design of the UTS (ultrasonic temperature sensor) with persistence at the high temperature was suggested in this paper. And the utilization of the theory suggested in this paper and the efficiency of the developed system are performed by special equipment and some experiments supported by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science)

  11. Effects of moderate pump and Stokes chirp on chirped-probe pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Gu, Mingming

    2018-01-08

    The effects of moderate levels of chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses on chirped-probe-pulse femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CPP fs CARS) were investigated. The frequency chirp in the pump and Stokes pulses was introduced by placing SF11 glass disks with thicknesses of 10 mm or 20 mm in the optical path for these beams. The magnitude of the chirp in the probe beam was much greater and was induced by placing a 30-cm rod of SF10 glass in the beam path. The temperature measurements were performed in hydrogen/air non-premixed flames stabilized on a Hencken burner at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0. We performed measurements with no disks in pump and Stokes beam paths, and then with disks of 10 mm and 20 mm placed in both beam paths. The spectrum of the nonresonant background four-wave mixing signal narrowed considerably with increasing pump and Stokes chirp, while the resonant CARS signal was relatively unaffected. Consequently, the interference of the nonresonant background with the resonant CARS signal in the frequency-spread dephasing region of the spectrum was minimized. The increased rate of decay of the resonant CARS signal with increasing temperature was thus readily apparent. We have started to analyze the CPP fs CARS thermometry data and initial results indicate improved accuracy and precision are obtained due to moderate chirp in the pump and Stokes laser pulses.

  12. Energy balance of droplets impinging onto a wall heated above the Leidenfrost temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunand, P.; Castanet, G.; Gradeck, M.; Maillet, D.; Lemoine, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Measurement techniques are combined to characterize the heat lost due to liquid vaporization. • The wall heat flux is estimated by infrared thermography associated with inverse heat conduction. • The liquid heating is characterized by the two-color Laser-Induced Fluorescence thermometry. • Results reveal how the heat fluxes vary with the droplet sizes and the Weber number. -- Abstract: This work is an experimental study aiming at characterizing the heat transfers induced by the impingement of water droplets (diameter 80–180 μm) on a thin nickel plate heated by electromagnetic induction. The temperature of the rear face of the nickel sample is measured by means of an infrared camera and the heat removed from the wall due to the presence of the droplets is estimated using a semi-analytical inverse heat conduction model. In parallel, the temperature of the droplets is measured using the two-color Laser-Induced Fluorescence thermometry (2cLIF) which has been extended to imagery for the purpose of these experiments. The measurements of the variation in the droplet temperature occurring during an impact allow determining the sensible heat removed by the liquid. Measurements are performed at wall conditions well above the Leidenfrost temperature. Different values of the Weber numbers corresponding to the bouncing and splashing regimes are tested. Comparisons between the heat flux removed from the wall and the sensible heat gained by the liquid allows estimating the heat flux related to liquid evaporation. Results reveal that the respective level of the droplet sensible heat and the heat lost due to liquid vaporization can vary significantly with the droplet sizes and the Weber number

  13. Optimising the Number of Replicate- Versus Standard Measurements for Carbonate Clumped Isotope Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocken, I.; Ziegler, M.

    2017-12-01

    Clumped isotope measurements on carbonates are a quickly developing and promising palaeothermometry proxy1-3. Developments in the field have brought down the necessary sample amount and improved the precision and accuracy of the measurements. The developments have included inter-laboratory comparison and the introduction of an absolute reference frame4, determination of acid fractionation effects5, correction for the pressure baseline6, as well as improved temperature calibrations2, and most recently new approaches to improve efficiency in terms of sample gas usage7. However, a large-scale application of clumped isotope thermometry is still hampered by required large sample amounts, but also the time-consuming analysis. In general, a lot of time is goes into the measurement of standards. Here we present a study on the optimal ratio between standard- and sample measurements using the Kiel Carbonate Device method. We also consider the optimal initial signal intensity. We analyse ETH-standard measurements from several months to determine the measurement regime with the highest precision and optimised measurement time management.References 1. Eiler, J. M. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 262, 309-327 (2007).2. Kelson, J. R., et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 197, 104-131 (2017).3. Kele, S. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 168, 172-192 (2015).4. Dennis, K. J. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 7117-7131 (2011).5. Müller, I. A. et al. Chem. Geol. 449, 1-14 (2017).6. Meckler, A. N. et al. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 28, 1705-1715 (2014).7. Hu, B. et al. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 28, 1413-1425 (2014).

  14. High-purity metal-carbon eutectic systems as thermometric fixed points in the range from 1000 K to 3500 K; Des systemes eutectiques metal-carbone de grande purete comme points fixes de temperature dans l'intervalle 1000-3500 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloembergen, P.; Yamada, Y.; Sasajima, N.; Yamamoto, N. [National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), AIST, Tsukuba (Japan); Torizuka, S.; Yoshida, N. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    A survey will be given of metal-carbon (M-C) and metal carbide-carbon (MC-C) systems presently in development for applications in thermometry in the range from 1000 K to about 3500 K. The advantages of these systems as fixed points at high temperatures as compared to systems relying on pure metals will be elucidated. Purification of the components making up the M-C or MC-C systems is a prerequisite to their implementation as reference fixed points in thermometry, requiring a high level of reproducibility of the eutectic temperature. To set an example a study on the effect of impurities on the eutectic transition of Fe-C is included in the survey. Experimentally obtained melting curves are compared with the curves calculated on the basis of a thermodynamic model, which includes the impurities in question as components. The calculations of the melting curves are based upon: (1) the Equilibrium solidification model and (2) the Scheil-Gulliver solidification model, which handle the effects of the impurities on the transition process in such a way that they may be assumed to set lower and upper boundaries to the associated melting ranges, respectively. We will conclude pointing out fields of common interest to materials science and thermometry within the realm of ultra-pure materials. (authors)

  15. Effects of temperature sum on vitamin C concentration and yield of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides fruit: optimal time of fruit harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmou Yao

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of temperature sum on vitamin C concentration (Vc, yield and maturity of sea buckthorn fruit (Hippophae rhamnoides L. and to predict the optimal harvest time, berries were collected from eight genotypes at an interval of about one week from August 16 to December 2. Maturity was visually observed, berry weight measured and Vc determined. Berries matured at 1165-1316 degree-days (d.d.. Vc reached maximum at about 1229 d.d., while fruit size and yield reached maximum at 1380 d.d.. Mathematical models of polynomial equations were highly significant for predicting the effects of temperature sum on Vc, maturity and fruit yield. Optimal harvest time for maximizing Vc, yield or economic income could be determined according to differential equations. Great variations in Vc, fruit maturity and fruit size suggested good opportunities for selection and breeding. Low rank correlations in vitamin C concentration during fruit maturity, however, call for special attention in selection and breeding.

  16. Application of an infrared thermometer to the determination of the timing of irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, T.; Yano, T.; Nakano, Y.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that leaf temperature rises with increased crop water stress. This phenomenon is recognized as having the potential to yield information on irrigation scheduling. In this study, infrared thermometry was used to measure crop temperature remotely. The errors in measurements derived from incoming long-wave radiation and leaf emissivity were experimentally evaluated in relation to the reliability of three types of water stress indices using leaf temperature as the parameter. From consecutive measurements of the crop-air temperature difference, obvious changes in daily pattern could be detected as soil water became limited. This result showed that the crop-air temperature difference, although a simple index, can be used in irrigation timing

  17. Steam Distillation with Induction Heating System: Analysis of Kaffir Lime Oil Compound and Production Yield at Various Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuraida Muhammad; Zakiah Mohd Yusoff; Mohd Noor Nasriq Nordin

    2013-01-01

    The steam temperature during the extraction process has a great influence on the essential oil quality. .This study was conducted to analyze the compound of kaffir-lime oil during extracting at different steam temperature using GC-MS analysis. The extraction was carried out by using steam distillation based on induction heating system at different extraction temperature such as 90, 95 and 100 degree Celsius, the power of the induction heating system is fixed at 1.6 kW. Increment of the steam temperature will increase the oil yield. In terms of oil composition, extraction at lower temperature resulted high concentration for four marker compounds of kaffir-lime oil which are α-pinene, sabinene, limonene, β-pinene. (author)

  18. Ultimate methane yield from beef cattle manure: effect of temperature, ration constituents, antibiotics and manure age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, A G; Varel, V H; Chen, Y R

    1981-10-01

    The effects of temperature, ration constituents, antibiotics and manure age on the ultimate methane yield (Bo, litre CH4/g volatile solids fed (VSf)) were investigated using 4-litre batch fermenters. The average Bo for fermenters maintained at 30-60 degrees Celcius (at 5 degrees Celcius intervals) was 0.328 litre CH4/g VSf. The Bo at 65 degrees Celcius averaged 0.118 litre CH4g VSf, but this low yield was attributed to unstable fermentation rather than decreased substrate availability at that temperature. These results agreed well with Bo values estimated from daily-fed fermenters. Chlortetracycline and monensin did not affect Bo; however, monensin did delay the start of active fermentation in batch fermenters. The average Bo of manure from cattle fed 91.5, 40 and 7% corn silage were 0.173, 0.232 and 0.290 litre CH4/g VSf, respectively. The average Bo for 6-8 week old manure from a dirt feedlot was 0.210 litre CH4/g VSf. (Refs. 14).

  19. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna

    2017-01-05

    Flame quenching by heat loss to a surface continues to be an active area of combustion research. Close wall temperature measurements in an isothermal wall-stabilized flame are reported in this work. Conventional N-vibrational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K). Methane/air and ethylene/air stoichiometric flames for various global strain rates based on exit bulk velocities are plotted and compared. CH* chemiluminescence is employed to determine the flame location relative to the wall. Flame locations are shown to move closer to the wall with increasing strain rates in addition to higher near-wall temperatures. Peak temperatures for ethylene are considerably higher (~250-300K) than peak temperatures for methane. Preheat zone profiles are similar for different strain rates across fuels. This work demonstrates close wall precise temperature measurments using CARS.

  20. Effects of Biomass Feedstock on the Yield and Reactivity of Soot from Fast Pyrolysis at High Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter A.; Glarborg, Peter

    This study investigated the effect of feedstock on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Woody and herbaceous biomass were pyrolyzed at high heating rates and temperatures of 1250 and 1400°C in a drop tube furnace. The collected solid residues were structurally characterized by electro...

  1. Clumped-isotope geochemistry of carbonates: A new tool for the reconstruction of temperature and oxygen isotope composition of seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernasconi, Stefano M., E-mail: Stefano.bernasconi@erdw.ethz.ch [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Schmid, Thomas W.; Grauel, Anna-Lena [Geological Institute, ETH Zuerich, Sonneggstrasse 5, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Mutterlose, Joerg [Institut fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Clumped-isotope thermometry of carbonates is discussed. > Clumped isotopes of Belemnites show higher sea surface temperatures than commonly assumed for the lower Cretaceous. > The potential of clumped-isotope measurement on foraminifera is discussed. - Abstract: Clumped-isotope geochemistry deals with State of ordering of rare isotopes in molecules, in particular with their tendency to form bonds with other rare isotopes rather than with the most abundant ones. Among its possible applications, carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry is the one that has gained most attention because of the wide potential of applications in many disciplines of the earth sciences. In particular, it allows reconstructing the temperature of formation of carbonate minerals without knowledge of the isotopic composition of the water from which they were formed. In addition, the O isotope composition of the waters from which they were formed can be calculated using the {delta}{sup 18}O of the same carbonate sample. This feature offers new approaches in paleoclimatology for reconstructing past global geochemical cycles. In this contribution two applications of this method are presented. First the potential of a new analytical method of measurement of clumped isotopes on small samples of foraminifera, for high-resolution SST and seawater {delta}{sup 18}O reconstructions from marine sediments is shown. Furthermore the potential of clumped isotope analysis of belemnites, for reconstructing seawater {delta}{sup 18}O and temperatures in the Cretaceous is shown.

  2. Detection of fever in children emergency care: comparisons of tactile and rectal temperatures in Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okafor Olubukola O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical thermometry is the objective method for temperature measurements but tactile assessment of fever at home is usually the basis for seeking medical attention especially where the cost and level of literacy preclude the use of thermometers. This study was carried out to determine the reliability of tactile perception of fever by caregivers, nurses and house physicians in comparison to rectal thermometry and also the use of commonly practiced surface of the hand in the care of ill children. All caregivers of children aged 6 to 59 months who presented to the emergency department were approached consecutively at the triage stage but 182 children participated. Each child had tactile assessment of fever using palmar and dorsal surfaces of the hand by the caregivers, House Physicians and Nursing Officers. Rectal temperature was also measured and read independently by nurses and house physicians. Comparisons were made between tactile assessments and thermometer readings using a cut-off for fever, 38.0°C and above. Findings The caregivers' perception of fever had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 95%, 23%, 66% and 73%, respectively compared with 93%, 26%, 67% and 69%, respectively for nursing officers. Irrespective of the groups studied, 77.1% of 336 assessors opined that the dorsal surface of the hand was more sensitive in tactile assessment of temperature and the frequently used site for assessment of fever were the head (35.6% and neck (33.3%. Tactile assessment of temperature over-detected fever in ≥ 24% of cases among the three groups of assessors. Conclusions The present study suggests that tactile assessment of temperature may over estimate the prevalence of fever, it does not detect some cases and the need for objective measurement of temperature is emphasised in paediatric emergency care.

  3. Parsing multiple processes of high temperature impacts on corn/soybean yield using a newly developed CLM-APSIM modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, B.; Guan, K.; Chen, M.

    2016-12-01

    Future agricultural production faces a grand challenge of higher temperature under climate change. There are multiple physiological or metabolic processes of how high temperature affects crop yield. Specifically, we consider the following major processes: (1) direct temperature effects on photosynthesis and respiration; (2) speed-up growth rate and the shortening of growing season; (3) heat stress during reproductive stage (flowering and grain-filling); (4) high-temperature induced increase of atmospheric water demands. In this work, we use a newly developed modeling framework (CLM-APSIM) to simulate the corn and soybean growth and explicitly parse the above four processes. By combining the strength of CLM in modeling surface biophysical (e.g., hydrology and energy balance) and biogeochemical (e.g., photosynthesis and carbon-nitrogen interactions), as well as that of APSIM in modeling crop phenology and reproductive stress, the newly developed CLM-APSIM modeling framework enables us to diagnose the impacts of high temperature stress through different processes at various crop phenology stages. Ground measurements from the advanced SoyFACE facility at University of Illinois is used here to calibrate, validate, and improve the CLM-APSIM modeling framework at the site level. We finally use the CLM-APSIM modeling framework to project crop yield for the whole US Corn Belt under different climate scenarios.

  4. Molybdenum-gold proximity bilayers as transition edge sensors for microcalorimeters and bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.C.; Bier, A.; DiCamillo, B.; Finkbeiner, F. M.

    1999-01-01

    Mo/Au proximity bilayers as transition edge sensors (TESs) are promising candidates for low-temperature thermometry. The transition temperature of the bilayers can be easily tuned between 50 and 600 mK, yielding sensors which can be used in a variety of calorimetric and bolometric applications. With phase transition widths of less than 1 mK, Mo/Au TESs show very high temperature sensitivity (d(logR)/d(logT)∼2500). Also, Mo/Au TESs show improved thermal and chemical stability compared to most other bilayer configurations. Fabrication issues and detector performance of Mo/Au TESs on Si 3 N 4 membranes are discussed. (author)

  5. Sequential Path Analysis for Determination of Relationship Between Yield and Yield Components in Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum.L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohtasham MOHAMMADI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to evaluate 295 wheat genotypes in Alpha-Lattice design with two replications. The arithmetic mean and standard deviation of grain yield was 2706 and 950 (kg/ha,respectively. The results of correlation coefficients indicated that grain yield had significant and positive association with plant height, spike length, early growth vigor and agronomic score. Whereas there were negative correlation coefficients between grain yield and days to physiological maturity and canopy temperature before and during anthesis. Path analysis indicated agronomic score and plant height had high positive direct effects on grain yield, while canopy temperature before and during anthesis, and days to maturity, wes another trait having negative direct effect on grain yield. The results of sequential path analysis showed the traits that accounted as a criteria variable for high grain yield were agronomic score, plant height, canopy temperature, spike length, chlorophyll content and early growth vigor, which were determined as first, second and third order variables and had strong effects on grain yield via one or more paths. More important, as canopy temperature, agronomic score and early growth vigor can be evaluated quickly and easily, these traits may be used for evaluation of large populations.

  6. "Simultaneous measurement of flame impingement and piston surface temperatures in an optically accessible spark ignition engine"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Carl-Philipp; Honza, Rene; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    This paper shows the results of spatially resolved temperature measurements of the piston surface of an optically accessible direct injection spark ignition engine during flame impingement. High-speed thermographic phosphor thermometry (TPT), using Gd3Ga5O12:Cr,Ce, and planar laser-induced fluorescence of the hydroxyl radical (OH-PLIF) were used to investigate the temperature increase and the time and position of flame impingement at the piston surface. Measurements were conducted at two operating cases and showed heating rates of up to 16,000 K/s. The OH-PLIF measurements were used to localize flame impingement and calculate conditioned statistics of the temperature profiles. The TPT coating was characterized and its influence on the temperature measurements evaluated.

  7. Correlation study of actual temperature profile and in-line metrology measurements for within-wafer uniformity improvement and wafer edge yield enhancement (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Vaid, Alok; Vinslava, Alina; Casselberry, Richard; Mishra, Shailendra; Dixit, Dhairya; Timoney, Padraig; Chu, Dinh; Porter, Candice; Song, Da; Ren, Zhou

    2018-03-01

    It is getting more important to monitor all aspects of influencing parameters in critical etch steps and utilize them as tuning knobs for within-wafer uniformity improvement and wafer edge yield enhancement. Meanwhile, we took a dive in pursuing "measuring what matters" and challenged ourselves for more aspects of signals acquired in actual process conditions. Among these factors which are considered subtle previously, we identified Temperature, especially electrostatic chuck (ESC) Temperature measurement in real etch process conditions have direct correlation to in-line measurements. In this work, we used SensArray technique (EtchTemp-SE wafer) to measure ESC temperature profile on a 300mm wafer with plasma turning on to reproduce actual temperature pattern on wafers in real production process conditions. In field applications, we observed substantial correlation between ESC temperature and in-line optical metrology measurements and since temperature is a process factor that can be tuning through set-temperature modulations, we have identified process knobs with known impact on physical profile variations. Furthermore, ESC temperature profile on a 300mm wafer is configured as multiple zones upon radius and SensArray measurements mechanism could catch such zonal distribution as well, which enables detailed temperature modulations targeting edge ring only where most of chips can be harvested and critical zone for yield enhancement. Last but not least, compared with control reference (ESC Temperature in static plasma-off status), we also get additional factors to investigate in chamber-to-chamber matching study and make process tool fleet match on the basis really matters in production. KLA-Tencor EtchTemp-SE wafer enables Plasma On wafer temperature monitoring of silicon etch process. This wafer is wireless and has 65 sensors with measurement range from 20 to 140°C. the wafer is designed to run in real production recipe plasma on condition with maximum RF power up

  8. PdMn and PdFe: New Materials for Temperature Measurement Near 2K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriaans, M.J.; Aselage, T.L.; Day, P.K.; Duncan, R.V.; Klemme, B.J.; Sergatskov, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Interest in the critical dynamics of superfluid 4 He in microgravity conditions has motivated the development of new high resolution thermometry technol- ogy for use in space experiments near 2K. The current material commonly used as the temperature sensing element for high resolution thermometers (HRTs) is copper ammonium bromide [Cu(NH 4 ) 2 Br 4 2H 2 0) or ''CAB'', which undergoes a ferromagnetic phase transition at 1.8K1. HRTs made from CAB have demonstrated low drift ( -13 K/s

  9. Comments on the Dutton-Puls model: Temperature and yield stress dependences of crack growth rate in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young S.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This study shows first that temperature and yield stress dependences of crack growth rate in zirconium alloys can analytically be understood not by the Dutton-Puls model but by Kim's new DHC model. → It is demonstrated that the driving force for DHC is ΔC, not the stress gradient, which is the core of Kim's DHC model. → The Dutton-Puls model reveals the invalidity of Puls' claim that the crack tip solubility would increase to the cooling solvus. - Abstract: This work was prompted by the publication of Puls's recent papers claiming that the Dutton-Puls model is valid enough to explain the stress and temperature dependences of the crack growth rate (CGR) in zirconium alloys. The first version of the Dutton-Puls model shows that the CGR has positive dependences on the concentration difference ΔC, hydrogen diffusivity D H , and the yield strength, and a negative dependence on the applied stress intensity factor K I , which is one of its critical defects. Thus, the Dutton-Puls model claiming that the temperature dependence of CGR is determined by D H C H turns out to be incorrect. Given that ΔC is independent of the stress, it is evident that the driving force for DHC is ΔC, not the stress gradient, corroborating the validity of Kim's model. Furthermore, the predicted activation energy for CGR in a cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb tube disagrees with the measured one for the Zr-2.5Nb tube, showing that the Dutton-Puls model is too defective to explain the temperature dependence of CGR. It is demonstrated that the revised Dutton-Puls model also cannot explain the yield stress dependence of CGR.

  10. The effects of prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures and elevated CO2 levels on the growth, yield and dry matter partitioning of field-sown meadow fescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaija Hakala

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available Field-sown meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis, cv. Kalevi stands were exposed to elevated temperatures (+3°C and elevated CO2, (700 ppm levels in two experiments conducted in 1992-1993 (experiment 1 and in 1994-1995 (experiment 2. Total aboveground yield was, on average, 38% higher at elevated than at ambient temperatures. At ambient temperatures elevated CO2 increased the number of tillers by 63% in 1992, 24% in 1993, 90% in 1994 and 14% in 1995. At elevated temperatures, the increase in tiller number in elevated CO2 was seen only in the first growing seasons after sowing. The total yield in a growing season was about 10% higher in elevated CO2 in experiment 1. In experiment 2 the yield was more than 20% higher in elevated CO2 at elevated temperatures, whereas at ambient temperatures the rise in CO2 level had no effect on the yield; the root biomass, however, increased by more than 30%. In elevated CO2 at ambient temperatures the root biomass also increased in experiment I, but at elevated temperatures there was no consistent change. The soluble carbohydrate content of above-ground biomass was 5-48% higher in elevated CO2 at most of the measuring times during the growing season, but the nitrogen content did not show a clear decrease. The reasons for the lack of a marked increase in biomass in elevated CO2 despite a 40-60% increase in photosynthesis are discussed.

  11. Long wavelength infrared radiation thermometry for non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, J.; Zipf, M.; Stark, T.; Arduini, M.; Ebert, H.-P.; Tutschke, A.; Hallam, A.; Hanspal, J.; Langley, M.; Hodge, D.; Hartmann, J.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the EU project "Sensors Towards Advanced Monitoring and Control of Gas Turbine Engines (acronym STARGATE)" is the development of a suite of advanced sensors, instrumentation and related systems in order to contribute to the developing of the next generation of green and efficient gas turbine engines. One work package of the project deals with the design and development of a long wavelength infrared (LWIR) radiation thermometer for the non-contact measurement of the surface temperature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) during the operation of gas turbine engines. For opaque surfaces (e.g. metals or superalloys) radiation thermometers which are sensitive in the near or short wavelength infrared are used as state-of-the-art method for non-contact temperature measurements. But this is not suitable for oxide ceramic based TBCs (e.g. partially yttria stabilized zirconia) as oxide ceramics are semi-transparent in the near and short wavelength infrared spectral region. Fortunately the applied ceramic materials are non-transparent in the long wavelength infrared and additionally exhibit a high emittance in this wavelength region. Therefore, a LWIR pyrometer can be used for non-contact temperature measurements of the surfaces of TBCs as such pyrometers overcome the described limitation of existing techniques. For performing non-contact temperature measurements in gas turbines one has to know the infrared-optical properties of the applied TBCs as well as of the hot combustion gas in order to properly analyse the measurement data. For reaching a low uncertainty on the one hand the emittance of the TBC should be high (>0.9) in order to reduce reflections from the hot surrounding and on the other hand the absorbance of the hot combustion gas should be low (<0.1) in order to decrease the influence of the gas on the measured signal. This paper presents the results of the work performed by the authors with focus on the implementation of the LWIR pyrometer and the

  12. Book Review:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    The International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 (the IPTS-68) has been in existence for over 16 years, during which time great advances have been made in thermometry at all levels. The author of this monograph has had an almost unique opportunity to observe and to contribute to these advances, and, hence, to describe the status of thermometry today. While he was at the National Physical Laboratory in England, he saw the introduction of the IPTS-68, and, as head of the thermometry group there, he participated in or was peripherally associated with many of the experiments which established the limitations of this scale and which will form the bases for a new international scale. His direct personal involvement was primarily with radiation thermometry, using both optical pyrometry at high temperatures and total radiation thermometry from the ice point to above 100 °C. He also initiated an acoustic interferometric determination of the gas constant, a project which was closely related to the low temperature acoustic thermometry done by one of his collaborators. Other NPL colleagues performed a definitive low temperature gas thermometer experiment, produced new helium vapor pressure scales, and developed the rhodium-iron resistance thermometer which is a standard for low temperature measurements. In addition, the NPL thermometry group obtained on loan platinum resistance thermometers from ten national standards laboratories and carried out a direct comparison of their calibrations below 0 °C, and hence, of the corresponding realizations of the IPTS-68. His position at the NPL and his early training in engineering also made him quite aware of the practical problems of thermometer users. During this period, he was the UK representative on the Comité Consultatif de Thermometrie (the CCT) of the Comité International des Poids et Measures (the CIPM). In recent years he has been Deputy Director of the Bureau International des Poids et Measures (the BIPM) and has

  13. Thermographic Phosphors for High Temperature Measurements: Principles, Current State of the Art and Recent Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontis

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of phosphor thermometry, focusing on developments in the past 15 years. The fundamental principles and theory are presented, and the various spectral and temporal modes, including the lifetime decay, rise time and intensity ratio, are discussed. The entire phosphor measurement system, including relative advantages to conventional methods, choice of phosphors, bonding techniques, excitation sources and emission detection, is reviewed. Special attention is given to issues that may arise at high temperatures. A number of recent developments and applications are surveyed, with examples including: measurements in engines, hypersonic wind tunnel experiments, pyrolysis studies and droplet/spray/gas temperature determination. They show the technique is flexible and successful in measuring temperatures where conventional methods may prove to be unsuitable.

  14. Water and temperature stresses impact canola (Brassica napus L.) fatty acid, protein and yield over nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactive effects of weather and soil nutrient status often control crop productivity. An experiment was conducted to determine effects of N and S fertilizer rate, soil water, and atmospheric temperature on canola fatty acid (FA), total oil, protein and grain yield. Nitrogen and S were assessed in...

  15. Canopy temperature depression at grain filling correlates to winter wheat yield in the U.S. southern high plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat breeding has improved drought tolerance over the years. However, our knowledge on drought tolerance in relation to the canopy temperature (CT) and grain yield is limited. A three-season wheat field study ending 2012, 2015, and 2016 was conducted at Bushland, Texas to investigate the relationsh...

  16. Pyrolysis of Lantana camara and Mimosa pigra: Influences of temperature, other process parameters and incondensable gas evolution on char yield and higher heating value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2017-11-01

    Pyrolysis of invasive non-indigenous plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP) was conducted at milligram-scale for optimisation of temperature, heating rate and hold time on char yield and higher heating value (HHV). The impact of scaling-up to gram-scale was also studied, with chromatography used to correlate gas composition with HHV evolution. Statistically significant effects of temperature on char yield and HHV were obtained, while heating rate and hold time effects were insignificant. Milligram-scale maximised HHVs were 30.03MJkg -1 (525°C) and 31.01MJkg -1 (580°C) for LC and MP, respectively. Higher char yields and HHVs for MP were attributed to increased lignin content. Scaling-up promoted secondary char formation thereby increasing HHVs, 30.82MJkg -1 for LC and 31.61MJkg -1 for MP. Incondensable gas analysis showed that temperature increase beyond preferred values caused dehydrogenation that decreased HHV. Similarly, CO evolution profile explained differences in optimal HHV temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An inexpensive high-temperature optical fiber thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Travis J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Tree, Dale R.; Allred, David D.

    2017-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose tip is coated with a highly conductive, opaque material. When heated, this sensing tip becomes an isothermal cavity that emits like a blackbody. This emission is used to predict the sensing tip temperature. In this work, analytical and experimental research has been conducted to further advance the development of optical fiber thermometry. An inexpensive optical fiber thermometer is developed by applying a thin coating of a high-temperature cement onto the tip of a silica optical fiber. An FTIR spectrometer is used to detect the spectral radiance exiting the fiber. A rigorous mathematical model of the irradiation incident on the detection system is developed. The optical fiber thermometer is calibrated using a blackbody radiator and inverse methods are used to predict the sensing tip temperature when exposed to various heat sources. - Highlights: • An inexpensive coating for an optical fiber thermometer sensing tip is tested. • Inverse heat transfer methods are used to estimate the sensing tip temperature. • An FTIR spectrometer is used as the detector to test the optical fiber thermometer using various heat sources.

  18. An Investigation of the Relation Between Contact Thermometry and Dew-Point Temperature Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyon, R.; Böse, N.; Mitter, H.; Mutter, D.; Vicente, T.

    2012-09-01

    Precision optical dew-point hygrometers are the most commonly used transfer standards for the comparison of dew-point temperature realizations at National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and for disseminating traceability to calibration laboratories. These instruments have been shown to be highly reproducible when properly used. In order to obtain the best performance, the resistance of the platinum resistance thermometer (PRT) embedded in the mirror is usually measured with an external, traceable resistance bridge or digital multimeter. The relation between the conventional calibration of miniature PRTs, prior to their assembly in the mirrors of state-of-the-art optical dew-point hygrometers and their subsequent calibration as dew-point temperature measurement devices, has been investigated. Standard humidity generators of three NMIs were used to calibrate hygrometers of different designs, covering the dew-point temperature range from -75 °C to + 95 °C. The results span more than a decade, during which time successive improvements and modifications were implemented by the manufacturer. The findings are presented and discussed in the context of enabling the optimum use of these transfer standards and as a basis for determining contributions to the uncertainty in their calibration.

  19. Locational variation in green fodder yield, dry matter yield, and forage quality of sorghum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Khan, S.; Mohammad, D.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to find out the variations in for- age yield and quality of sorghum as affected by different environments. The three agroecological zones viz., Agricultural Research Institute (ARI), Sariab, Quetta, Ayub Agricultural Research Institute (AARI), Faisalabad and National Agricultural Research Centre (NARC), Islamabad were selected on the basis of different physiography, geology, temperature, and climate and water availability. Crude protein contents, varied from 6.98 to 8.02 percent, crude fibre contents from 30.84 to 31.68 percent, green fodder yield from 38.91 to 50.64 t/ha and dry matter yield from 8.92 to 10.17 t/ha at the three diverse locations. Maximum crude protein and crude fibre contents were obtained at NARC, Islamabad and AARI, Faisalabad. Maximum green fodder and dry matter yields were also observed at NARC, Islamabad and AARI, Faisalabad. It was also noted that the same genotypes showed differential response when planted under the diverse environments for green fodder yield, dry matter yield, crude protein and crude fibre contents. Therefore, it was concluded that these differences in forage yield and quality traits under diverse environments were due to differences in soil types, soil fertility, temperature, rain- fall and other climatic conditions. (author)

  20. Temperature control in interstitial laser cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Holmes, Kyland; Burnett, Corinthius; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2003-07-01

    Positive results of Laser-Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) have been reported previously in the irradiation of superficial tumors. This paper reports the effect of LACI using laser interstitial therapy approach. We hypothesize that the maximum immuno response depends on laser induced tumor temperature. The measurement of tumor temperature is crucial to ensure necrosis by thermal damage and immuno response. Wister Furth female rats in this study were inoculated with 13762 MAT B III rat mammary adinocarcinoma. LACI started seven to ten days following inoculation. Contrary to surface irradation, we applied laser interstitial irradiation of tumor volume to maximize the energy deposition. A diode laser with a wavelength of 805 nm was used for tumor irradiation. The laser energy was delivered inside the tumor through a quartz fiber. Tumor temperature was measured with a micro thermocouple (interstitial), while the tumor surface temperature was controlled with an IR detector. The temperature feedback demonstrates that it is possible to maintain the average tumor temperature at the same level with reasonable accuracy in the desired range from 65°C-85°C. In some experiments we used microwave thermometry to control average temperature in deep tissue for considerable period of time, to cause maximum thermal damage to the tumor. The experimental set-up and the different temperature measurement techniques are reported in detail, including the advantages and disadvantages for each method.

  1. Yield surface evolution for columnar ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Ma, Wei; Zhang, Shujuan; Mu, Yanhu; Zhao, Shunpin; Li, Guoyu

    A series of triaxial compression tests, which has capable of measuring the volumetric strain of the sample, were conducted on columnar ice. A new testing approach of probing the experimental yield surface was performed from a single sample in order to investigate yield and hardening behaviors of the columnar ice under complex stress states. Based on the characteristic of the volumetric strain, a new method of defined the multiaxial yield strengths of the columnar ice is proposed. The experimental yield surface remains elliptical shape in the stress space of effective stress versus mean stress. The effect of temperature, loading rate and loading path in the initial yield surface and deformation properties of the columnar ice were also studied. Subsequent yield surfaces of the columnar ice have been explored by using uniaxial and hydrostatic paths. The evolution of the subsequent yield surface exhibits significant path-dependent characteristics. The multiaxial hardening law of the columnar ice was established experimentally. A phenomenological yield criterion was presented for multiaxial yield and hardening behaviors of the columnar ice. The comparisons between the theoretical and measured results indicate that this current model is capable of giving a reasonable prediction for the multiaxial yield and post-yield properties of the columnar ice subjected to different temperature, loading rate and path conditions.

  2. Low ambient temperature elevates plasma triiodothyronine concentrations while reducing digesta mean retention time and methane yield in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M C; McFarlane, J R; Hegarty, R S

    2015-06-01

    Ruminant methane yield (MY) is positively correlated with mean retention time (MRT) of digesta. The hormone triiodothyronine (T3 ), which is negatively correlated with ambient temperature, is known to influence MRT. It was hypothesised that exposing sheep to low ambient temperatures would increase plasma T3 concentration and decrease MRT of digesta within the rumen of sheep, resulting in a reduction of MY. To test this hypothesis, six Merino sheep were exposed to two different ambient temperatures (cold treatment, 9 ± 1 °C; warm control 26 ± 1 °C). The effects on MY, digesta MRT, plasma T3 concentration, CO2 production, DM intake, DM digestibility, change in body weight (BW), rumen volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, estimated microbial protein output, protozoa abundance, wool growth, water intake, urine output and rectal temperature were studied. Cold treatment resulted in a reduction in MY (p < 0.01); digesta MRT in rumen (p < 0.01), hindgut (p = 0.01) and total digestive tract (p < 0.01); protozoa abundance (p < 0.05); and water intake (p < 0.001). Exposure to cold temperature increased plasma T3 concentration (p < 0.05), CO2 production (p = 0.01), total VFA concentrations (p = 0.03) and estimated microbial output from the rumen (p = 0.03). The rate of wool growth increased (p < 0.01) due to cold treatment, but DM intake, DM digestibility and BW change were not affected. The results suggest that exposure of sheep to cold ambient temperatures reduces digesta retention time in the gastrointestinal tract, leading to a reduction in enteric methane yield. Further research is warranted to determine whether T3 could be used as an indirect selection tool for genetic selection of low enteric methane-producing ruminants. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury as assessed by DWI-thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazoe, Jun; Yamada, Kei; Akazawa, Kentaro; Sakai, Koji; Mineura, Katsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using a noninvasive temperature measurement technique based on the diffusion coefficient of the cerebrospinal fluid. This retrospective study used the data collected from April 2008 to June 2011. The patient group comprised 20 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or 15 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days after head trauma. The normal control group comprised 14 subjects who volunteered for a brain checkup (known in Japan as ''brain dock''). We compared lateral ventricular (LV) temperature between patient and control groups. Follow-up studies were performed for four patients. LV temperature measurements were successfully performed for both patients and controls. Mean (±standard deviation) measured LV temperature was 36.9 ± 1.5 C in patients, 38.7 ± 1.8 C in follow-ups, and 37.9 ± 1.2 C in controls, showing a significant difference between patients and controls (P = 0.017). However, no significant difference was evident between patients and follow-ups (P = 0.595) or between follow-ups and controls (P = 0.465). A reduction in brain core temperature was observed in patients with mTBI, possibly due to a global decrease in metabolism. (orig.)

  4. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-11-01

    We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80-120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  5. Relationship between body temperature, weight, and hematological parameters of black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lucas Cardoso; Barros, Marilia

    2016-06-01

    Basal thermal values of captive adult black tufted-ear marmosets (Callithrix penicillata) in a thermoneutral environment were measured via different methods, along with body weight and hematological parameters. Body temperatures were recorded with rectal (RC), subcutaneous (SC) microchip transponder and infrared (left and right) tympanic membrane (TM) thermometries. Thermal values were correlated with body mass and some hematological data. Similar RC and SC temperatures were observed, these being significantly higher than the left and right TM values. SC temperature was positively correlated and in close agreement with RC measurements. Although body temperatures were not influenced by gender, capture time, or body weight, they were correlated with hematological parameters. Thus, body temperatures in this species seem to reflect some of the characteristics of the assessments' location, with SC microchip transponders being a less invasive method to assess body temperature in these small-bodied non-human primates. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Thermometry using 1/8 W carbon resistors in a temperature region around 10 mK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, S.; Shinohara, M.; Ono, K.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance-temperature characteristics of 1/8 W carbon resistors of grade ERC-18SG, manufactured by Matsushita, with the nominal values of 48, 82, 100, 220 and 330 Ω have been measured in the region 4.2 K to 25 mK and their application as thermometers in this region is confirmed. For the 82 Ω resistor, measurements were taken at temperatures below 10mK. The temperature dependence of the resistance was found to be linear on the log-log plot over a wide range below 50 mK. The sensitivity remains finite even at 6 mK, but below 10 mK rapid measurements were prevented by a considerable increase in the thermal relaxation time. Measurement of the characteristics of several 100 Ω resistors from two different sets showed that resistors from the same set separate into two groups with different characteristics. This become appreciable at temperatures below 4.2 K, so it is difficult to predict the behaviour of Matsushite resistors below 4.2 K from the characteristics at higher temperatures. (author)

  7. Simulation of the maximum yield of sugar cane at different altitudes: effect of temperature on the conversion of radiation into biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, J.F.; Siband, P.; Bonhomme, R.

    1999-01-01

    To minimize the production costs of sugar cane, for the diverse sites of production found in La Réunion, an improved understanding of the influence of temperature on the dry matter radiation quotient is required. Existing models simulate poorly the temperature-radiation interaction. A model of sugar cane growth has been fitted to the results from two contrasting sites (mean temperatures: 14-30 °C; total radiation: 10-25 MJ·m -2 ·d -1 ), on a ratoon crop of cv R570, under conditions of non-limiting resources. Radiation interception, aerial biomass, the fraction of millable stems, and their moisture content, were measured. The time-courses of the efficiency of radiation interception differed between sites. As a function of the sum of day-degrees, they were similar. The dry matter radiation quotient was related to temperature. The moisture content of millable stems depended on the day-degree sum. On the other hand, the leaf/stem ratio was independent of temperature. The relationships established enabled the construction of a simple model of yield potential. Applied to a set of sites representing the sugar cane growing area of La Réunion, it gave a good prediction of maximum yields. (author) [fr

  8. Brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury as assessed by DWI-thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazoe, Jun; Yamada, Kei; Akazawa, Kentaro [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan); Sakai, Koji [Kyoto University, Department of Human Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mineura, Katsuyoshi [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using a noninvasive temperature measurement technique based on the diffusion coefficient of the cerebrospinal fluid. This retrospective study used the data collected from April 2008 to June 2011. The patient group comprised 20 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or 15 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days after head trauma. The normal control group comprised 14 subjects who volunteered for a brain checkup (known in Japan as ''brain dock''). We compared lateral ventricular (LV) temperature between patient and control groups. Follow-up studies were performed for four patients. LV temperature measurements were successfully performed for both patients and controls. Mean (±standard deviation) measured LV temperature was 36.9 ± 1.5 C in patients, 38.7 ± 1.8 C in follow-ups, and 37.9 ± 1.2 C in controls, showing a significant difference between patients and controls (P = 0.017). However, no significant difference was evident between patients and follow-ups (P = 0.595) or between follow-ups and controls (P = 0.465). A reduction in brain core temperature was observed in patients with mTBI, possibly due to a global decrease in metabolism. (orig.)

  9. Thermometry in dielectrophoresis chips for contact-free cell handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, M S; Mueller, T; Schnelle, T

    2007-01-01

    Cell biology applications, protocols in immunology and stem cell research, require that individual cells are handled under strict control of their contacts to other cells or synthetic surfaces. Dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic chips is an established technique to investigate, group, wash, cultivate and sort cells contact-free under physiological conditions: microelectrode octode cages, versatile dielectrophoretic elements energized with radio frequency electric fields, stably trap single cells or cellular aggregates. For medical applications and cell cultivation, possible side effects of the dielectrophoretic manipulation, such as membrane polarization and Joule heating, have to be quantified. Therefore, we characterized the electric field-induced warming in dielectrophoretic cages using ohmic resistance measurements, fluorometry, liquid crystal beads, infra-red thermography and bubble size thermometry. We compare the results of these techniques with respect to the influences of voltage, electric conductivity of buffer, frequency, cage size and electrode surface. We conclude that in the culture medium thermal effects may be neglected if low voltages and an electric field-reducing phase pattern are used. Our experimental results provide explicit values for estimating the thermal effect on dielectrophoretically caged cells and show that Joule heating is best minimized by optimizing the cage geometry and reducing the buffer conductivity. The results may additionally serve to evaluate and improve theoretical predictions on field-induced effects. Based on present-day chip processing possibilities, DEP is well suited for the manipulation of cells

  10. P-T-t metamorphic evolution of highly deformed metapelites from the Pinkie unit of western Svalbard using quartz-in-garnet barometry, trace element thermometry, P-T-X-M diagrams and monazite in-situ dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kośmińska, Karolina; Spear, Frank; Majka, Jarosław

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of quartz-in-garnet (QuiG) Raman barometry coupled with P-T-X-M diagrams, trace element thermometry, and monazite dating from metapelites of the Pinkie unit on Prins Karls Forland, western Svalbard. This unconventional approach, which combines traditional and novel thermobarometry techniques as well as dating results, provides the opportunity to decipher the pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) metamorphic evolution of these highly deformed rocks, for which the P-T conditions could not have been obtained using traditional techniques. The Pinkie unit is comprised of Barrovian-type zones expressed by the following three mineral assemblages: Grt+St+Ms+Bt+Pl+Q, Grt+St+Ky+Ms+Bt+Pl+Q and Grt+Ky+Ms+Bt+Pl+Q. The metamorphic assemblages have been strongly affected by pervasive mylonitization. Two generations of garnet are present. Early garnet-I forms large (up to 2 mm) anhedral and inclusion-rich porphyroblasts that are strongly deformed with resorbed rims. Its composition varies from Alm81Grs5Prp11Sps3 in the core to Alm84Grs4Prp10Sps2 in the rim for a St-bearing sample. St-Ky bearing metapelites contain garnet-I, which is characterized by Alm88Grs2Prp8Sps2 in the core and Alm89Grs2Prp8Sps1 in the rim. In the Ky-bearing sample garnet-I composition is varying from Alm77Grs4Prp11Sps8 in the core to Alm83Grs4Prp9Sps4 in the rim. Garnet-II is characterized by small (up to 0.5 mm) euhedral grains that locally overgrows garnet-I. It contains very scarce inclusions, mostly quartz. Grt-II composition is very similar in all Pinkie unit samples and is characterized by Alm80Grs11Prp8Sps1(0). The measured maximum shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman band for quartz in garnet-I is 1.05 cm-1 for St-bearing samples, 1.80 cm-1 for St-Ky bearing rocks, and 2.10 cm-1 for Ky-bearing samples, respectively. The highest shift obtained for inclusions in garnet-II is 2.7 cm-1. Monazite-in-garnet thermometry combined with the QuiG yielded P-T conditions of garnet-I nucleation as

  11. Temperature dependence in magnetic particle imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James; Paysen, Hendrik; Kosch, Olaf; Trahms, Lutz; Wiekhorst, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Experimental results are presented demonstrating how temperature can influence the dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in liquid suspension, when exposed to alternating magnetic fields in the kilohertz frequency range. The measurements used to probe the nanoparticle systems are directly linked to both the emerging biomedical technique of magnetic particle imaging (MPI), and to the recently proposed concept of remote nanoscale thermometry using MNPs under AC field excitation. Here, we report measurements on three common types of MNPs, two of which are currently leading candidates for use as tracers in MPI. Using highly-sensitive magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS), we demonstrate significant and divergent thermal dependences in several key measures used in the evaluation of MNP dynamics for use in MPI and other applications. The temperature range studied was between 296 and 318 Kelvin, making our findings of particular importance for MPI and other biomedical technologies. Furthermore, we report the detection of the same temperature dependences in measurements conducted using the detection coils within an operational preclinical MPI scanner. This clearly shows the importance of considering temperature during MPI development, and the potential for temperature-resolved MPI using this system. We propose possible physical explanations for the differences in the behaviors observed between the different particle types, and discuss our results in terms of the opportunities and concerns they raise for MPI and other MNP based technologies.

  12. Selected contribution: ambient temperature for experiments in rats: a new method for determining the zone of thermal neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Shimansky, Yury P

    2002-06-01

    There is a misbelief that the same animal has the same thermoneutral zone (TNZ) in different experimental setups. In reality, TNZ strongly depends on the physical environment and varies widely across setups. Current methods for determining TNZ require elaborate equipment and can be applied only to a limited set of experimental conditions. A new, broadly applicable approach that rapidly determines whether given conditions are neutral for a given animal is needed. Consistent with the definition of TNZ [the range of ambient temperature (T(a)) at which body core temperature (T(c)) regulation is achieved only by control of sensible heat loss], we propose three criteria of thermoneutrality: 1) the presence of high-magnitude fluctuations in skin temperature (T(sk)) of body parts serving as specialized heat exchangers with the environment (e.g., rat tail), 2) the closeness of T(sk) to the median of its operational range, and 3) a strong negative correlation between T(sk) and T(c). Thermocouple thermometry and liquid crystal thermography were performed in five rat strains at 13 T(a). Under the conditions tested (no bedding or filter tops, no group thermoregulation), the T(a) range of 29.5-30.5 degrees C satisfied all three TNZ criteria in Wistar, BDIX, Long-Evans, and Zucker lean rats; Zucker fatty rats had a slightly lower TNZ (28.0-29.0 degrees C). Skin thermometry or thermography is a definition-based, simple, and inexpensive technique to determine whether experimental or housing conditions are neutral, subneutral, or supraneutral for a given animal.

  13. Infrared thermometry to schedule irrigation of common bean Termometria ao infravermelho na programação da irrigação de feijoeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Almeida Lobo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the critical irrigation time for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Carioca using infrared thermometry. Five treatments were analyzed. Canopy temperature differences between plants and a well-watered control about 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5±0.5ºC were tested. Physiological variables and plant growth were analyzed to establish the best time to irrigate. There was a significant linear correlation between the index and stomatal resistance, transpiration rate, and leaf water potential. Although significant linear correlation between the index and mean values of total dry matter, absolute growth rate, and leaf area index was found, no correlation was found with other growth index like relative growth rate, net assimilation rate, and leaf area ratio. Plants irrigated when their canopy temperature was 3±0.5ºC above the control had their relative growth rate mean value increased up to 59.7%, yielding 2,260.2 kg ha-1, with a reduction of 38.0% in the amount of water used. Plants irrigated when their canopy temperature was 4±0.5ºC yielded 1,907.6 kg ha-1, although their relative growth rate mean value was 4.0% below the control. These results show that the best moment to irrigate common bean is when their canopy temperature is between 3ºC and 4±0.5ºC above the control.O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o momento crítico para efetuar a irrigação do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Carioca utilizando a termometria ao infravermelho. Foram analisados cinco tratamentos. As diferenças entre a temperatura foliar das plantas e a de um controle mantido bem irrigado testadas foram de 1, 2, 3, 4 e 5±0,5ºC. Foram analisadas variáveis fisiológicas e de crescimento para identificar o melhor momento de irrigação. Encontrou-se uma correlação linear significativa entre o índice empregado e a resistência estomática, a taxa transpiratória e o potencial hídrico foliar. Embora tenha-se verificado uma

  14. Phosphor thermometry: On the synthesis and characterisation of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Eu (YAG:Eu) and YAlO{sub 3}:Eu (YAP:Eu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kissel, T. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Strömungen und Messtechnik (RSM), Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstraße 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Brübach, J., E-mail: bruebach@ekt.tu-darmstadt.de [Fachgebiet Reaktive Strömungen und Messtechnik (RSM), Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstraße 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Euler, M. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Strömungen und Messtechnik (RSM), Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstraße 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Frotscher, M.; Litterscheid, C.; Albert, B. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstraße 18, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Dreizler, A. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Strömungen und Messtechnik (RSM), Center of Smart Interfaces (CSI), Technische Universität Darmstadt, Petersenstraße 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    With regard to phosphor thermometry, the materials Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Eu (YAG:Eu) and YAlO{sub 3}:Eu (YAP:Eu) were synthesised and characterised in order to substitute the commonly used thermographic phosphor Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, whose temperature sensitive luminescence lifetime exhibits a strong and most often undesirable cross-sensitivity to the oxygen concentration of the surrounding gas phase. The synthesis is outlined in detail and the crystallographic structure was characterised by X-ray diffraction. In a second step, the luminescence properties following pulsed UV laser excitation were determined. In this context, the emission spectra and the temperature lifetime characteristics were monitored. For Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Eu and YAlO{sub 3}:Eu, temperature sensitive ranges of 1000 K–1470 K and 850 K–1300 K were identified. Contrary to Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu, both materials do show much lower cross-sensitivities to the oxygen concentration of the surrounding gas phase. - Highlights: ► Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Eu and YAlO{sub 3}:Eu were synthesised and characterised. ► The synthesis is outlined and the crystallographic structure was characterised. ► Emission spectra and the temperature lifetime characteristics were monitored. ► Compared to Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu lower sensitivities to the oxyg. conc. of the gas phase emerged.

  15. Use of Aquacrop Model to predict Maize Yields under Varying Rainfall and Temperature in a Semi-Arid Environment in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamari, O. J.; Sijali, V. I; Heng, N. K; Joseph Mutwiri Miriti, M. J; Esilaba, O A

    2012-01-01

    There has been increasing concern that drier and hotter seasons are becoming more frequent due to climate change especially in semi-arid environments causing adverse effects on agricultural production. Analysis of long-term (1980-2010) trends of rainfall in the first growing season (i.e. March and July) at Katumani, Kenya showed that about 55% of the seasons were below the long-term average, with an all time low occurring in the year 2000. Although the wettest years (1998 and 1985 ) had relatively higher percentages above the long-term average (143.9% and 138.4% ) compared to lower percentages ( 61.7% and 59.7%) of the driest years ( 2000 and 1987), the latter were relatively less in numbers (i.e. 45%). Mean seasonal temperatures however did not show high variation from the long term mean implying that rainfall was the main cause of yield variation in this area. The AquaCrop model (Ver. 3.1) evaluated using three years (i.e. 1999, 2000 and 2001) of experimental results at Katumani, gave reasonable estimates of above ground biomass and grain yield of Katumani composite maize variety. The model was then used to predict Katumani maize yields under 20% depletion of rainfall and 3°C temperature elevation scenarios. Biomass and grain yields simulated respectively ranged between 2.971 to 6.558 and 0.910 to 2.564 T Ha-1 with probabilities of obtaining 3-5 T Ha-1 biomass and 1-2 T Ha-1 grain yields each dropping from 98 to 25%. Adaptation measures are given as management recommendations in line with the changed climatic scenario. (author)

  16. Imaging technique for real-time temperature monitoring during cryotherapy of lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena; Liopo, Anton; Nadvoretskiy, Vyacheslav; Ermilov, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Noninvasive real-time temperature imaging during thermal therapies is able to significantly improve clinical outcomes. An optoacoustic (OA) temperature monitoring method is proposed for noninvasive real-time thermometry of vascularized tissue during cryotherapy. The universal temperature-dependent optoacoustic response (ThOR) of red blood cells (RBCs) is employed to convert reconstructed OA images to temperature maps. To obtain the temperature calibration curve for intensity-normalized OA images, we measured ThOR of 10 porcine blood samples in the range of temperatures from 40°C to -16°C and analyzed the data for single measurement variations. The nonlinearity (ΔTmax) and the temperature of zero OA response (T0) of the calibration curve were found equal to 11.4±0.1°C and -13.8±0.1°C, respectively. The morphology of RBCs was examined before and after the data collection confirming cellular integrity and intracellular compartmentalization of hemoglobin. For temperatures below 0°C, which are of particular interest for cryotherapy, the accuracy of a single temperature measurement was ±1°C, which is consistent with the clinical requirements. Validation of the proposed OA temperature imaging technique was performed for slow and fast cooling of blood samples embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms.

  17. Influence of temperature on yield value of highly flowable micromortars made with sulfonate-based superplasticizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Jean-Yves; Wirquin, Eric; Duthoit, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    Self-consolidating concretes (SCC) were proved to be very dependant on concreting temperature and the elapsed time. To enhance the concreting conditions of these flowable concretes, it is important to have a better knowledge of their rheological behavior, depending on the kind of superplasticizer used. The variation of the plastic viscosity and the yield value with the elapsed time and temperature must be accurately quantified. However, the methods of measuring these parameters are expensive and unsuitable with a good forecast of the material behavior due to numerous parameters that interact with each other. A simplest method to study the variation of these rheological parameters, depending on the mixture design, is proposed, using the micromortar, which derivates from the studied SCC. Moreover, to forecast the concrete behavior on the site, a simple thermodynamical approach of the cementitious matrix behavior through the study of the hydration kinetics is described

  18. Direct investigations of deformation and yield induced structure transitions in polyamide 6 below glass transition temperature with WAXS and SAXS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Huilong; Wang, Jiayi; Zhou, Chengbo

    2015-01-01

    Deformation and yield induced structure transitions of polyamide 6 (PA6) were detected with the combination of the wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS) at 30 degrees C below glass transition temperature (T-g) of PA6. During deformation, gamma-alpha phase transition was found...... at elastic stage. The concentrated stress in crystals at elastic stage provided adequate energy for the direct gamma-alpha phase transition under T-g. The force to promote the gamma-phase into a phase directly is insufficient at the yield stage and a transient phase as a compromise was formed. The transient...... phase was confirmed by DSC measurements and assisted the gamma-alpha phase transition indirectly. The gamma-phase slips into incomplete fragments at yield point, and the parts along tensile direction are responsible for the formation of transient phase. The gamma-fragments after yield is oriented...

  19. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  20. Climate Variability and Sugarcane Yield in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, David

    2005-11-01

    This paper seeks to understand the role that climate variability has on annual yield of sugarcane in Louisiana. Unique features of sugarcane growth in Louisiana and nonclimatic, yield-influencing factors make this goal an interesting and challenging one. Several methods of seeking and establishing the relations between yield and climate variables are employed. First, yield climate relations were investigated at a single research station where crop variety and growing conditions could be held constant and yield relations could be established between a predominant older crop variety and a newer one. Interviews with crop experts and a literature survey were used to identify potential climatic factors that control yield. A statistical analysis was performed using statewide yield data from the American Sugar Cane League from 1963 to 2002 and a climate database. Yield values for later years were adjusted downward to form an adjusted yield dataset. The climate database was principally constructed from daily and monthly values of maximum and minimum temperature and daily and monthly total precipitation for six cooperative weather-reporting stations representative of the area of sugarcane production. The influence of 74 different, though not independent, climate-related variables on sugarcane yield was investigated. The fact that a climate signal exists is demonstrated by comparing mean values of the climate variables corresponding to the upper and lower third of adjusted yield values. Most of these mean-value differences show an intuitively plausible difference between the high- and low-yield years. The difference between means of the climate variables for years corresponding to the upper and lower third of annual yield values for 13 of the variables is statistically significant at or above the 90% level. A correlation matrix was used to identify the variables that had the largest influence on annual yield. Four variables [called here critical climatic variables (CCV

  1. Effect of high temperature on grain filling period, yield, amylose content and activity of starch biosynthesis enzymes in endosperm of basmati rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nisar; Tetlow, Ian J; Nawaz, Sehar; Iqbal, Ahsan; Mubin, Muhammad; Nawaz ul Rehman, Muhammad Shah; Butt, Aisha; Lightfoot, David A; Maekawa, Masahiko

    2015-08-30

    High temperature during grain filling affects yield, starch amylose content and activity of starch biosynthesis enzymes in basmati rice. To investigate the physiological mechanisms underpinning the effects of high temperature on rice grain, basmati rice was grown under two temperature conditions - 32 and 22 °C - during grain filling. High temperature decreased the grain filling period from 32 to 26 days, reducing yield by 6%, and caused a reduction in total starch (3.1%) and amylose content (22%). Measurable activities of key enzymes involved in sucrose to starch conversion, sucrose synthase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch phosphorylase and soluble starch synthase in endosperms developed at 32 °C were lower than those at 22 °C compared with similar ripening stage on an endosperm basis. In particular, granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) activity was significantly lower than corresponding activity in endosperms developing at 22 °C during all developmental stages analyzed. Results suggest changes in amylose/amylopectin ratio observed in plants grown at 32 °C was attributable to a reduction in activity of GBSS, the sole enzyme responsible for amylose biosynthesis. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Influence of Climate Factors on Rice Yields in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dek Vimean Pheakdey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and precipitation have been known as the key determinant factors to affect rice production in climate change. In this study, the relationship between climate variables and rice yields during 1993–2012 in Cambodia was analyzed and evaluated. The Ordinary Least Squares analysis was applied to examine the relationship of three climate variables (TCV including maximum temperature, minimum temperature and rainfall against seasonal rice yields. By this period, a remarkable increasing trend of annual temperature was observed whilst rainfall was not significantly changed. The TCV explains approximately 63% and 56% of the variability of rice yields in wet and dry seasons, respectively. It is found that in Cambodia, non-climate factors such as fertilizers, water, cultivars, and soil fertility cause 40% variation to rice yields, whereas the remaining 60% can be influenced by climate variability. The levels of temperature difference (LTD between maximum and minimum temperatures of the wet season (WS and dry season (DS were 7.0 and 8.6 oC, respectively. The lower value of LTD may cause the reduction of rice in WS (2.2 tons/ha as compared to that of DS (3.0 tons/ha. Rice yield has increased 50.5% and 33.8% in DS and WS, respectively, may due to the improvement of rice cultivation practices in Cambodia such as the better use of fertilizers, pest and weed control, and irrigation, and more effective rice cultivated protocol, as the increased trend of temperature may detrimentally affect rice yield. The breeding of heat and drought tolerance rice varieties and development of irrigation system are effective to reduce the negative influence from climate change to rice production in Cambodia.

  3. Temperature metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J.; Fellmuth, B.

    2005-05-01

    units. For the base unit kelvin, this procedure is described in the sections on practical temperature scales, practical thermometry and reference standards. Testing experimentally the fundamental laws of physics means in practice the precise determination of the fundamental constants appearing in the laws. The essence of current activities is that prototypes, which may vary uncontrollably with time and location, are replaced by abstract experimental prescriptions that relate the units to the constants. This approach is shown for the definition of the kelvin and the Boltzmann constant. Dedicated to the occasion of the 60th birthday of Wolfgang Buck.

  4. Temperature metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J; Fellmuth, B

    2005-01-01

    units. For the base unit kelvin, this procedure is described in the sections on practical temperature scales, practical thermometry and reference standards. Testing experimentally the fundamental laws of physics means in practice the precise determination of the fundamental constants appearing in the laws. The essence of current activities is that prototypes, which may vary uncontrollably with time and location, are replaced by abstract experimental prescriptions that relate the units to the constants. This approach is shown for the definition of the kelvin and the Boltzmann constant

  5. A mid-infrared laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderover, Jeremy

    A mid-infrared (mid-IR) absorption sensor based on quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology has been developed and demonstrated for high-temperature thermometry and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements in combustion environments. The sensor probes the high-intensity fundamental CO ro-vibrational band at 4.6 mum enabling sensitive measurement of CO and temperature at kHz acquisition rates. Because the sensor operates in the mid-IR CO fundamental band it is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than most of the previously developed CO combustion sensors which utilized absorption in the near-IR overtone bands and mature traditional telecommunications-based diode lasers. The sensor has been demonstrated and validated under operation in both scanned-wavelength absorption and wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS) modes in room-temperature gas cell and high-temperature shock tube experiments with known and specified gas conditions. The sensor has also been demonstrated for CO and temperature measurements in an atmospheric premixed ethylene/air McKenna burner flat flame for a range of equivalence ratios (phi = 0.7-1.4). Demonstration of the sensor under scanned-wavelength direct absorption operation was performed in a room-temperature gas cell (297 K and 0.001-1 atm) allowing validation of the line strengths and line shapes predicted by the HITRAN 2004 spectroscopic database. Application of the sensor in scanned-wavelength mode, at 1-2 kHz acquisition bandwidths, to specified high-temperature shock-heated gases (950-3400 K, 1 atm) provided validation of the sensor for measurements under the high-temperature conditions found in combustion devices. The scanned-wavelength shock tube measurements yielded temperature determinations that deviated by only +/-1.2% (1-sigma deviation) with the reflected shock temperatures and CO mole fraction determinations that deviated by that specified CO mole fraction by only +/-1.5% (1-sigma deviation). These deviations are in fact smaller

  6. Yielding behavior and temperature-induced on-field oscillatory rheological studies in a novel MR suspension containing polymer-capped Fe{sub 3}Ni alloy microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arief, Injamamul, E-mail: arif.inji.chem1986@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Mukhopadhyay, P.K. [LCMP, Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 106 (India)

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic Bimetallic alloy nanoparticles of 3d elements are known for their tunable shape, size and magnetic anisotropy and find extensive applications ranging from magneto-mechanical to biomedical devices. This paper reports the polyol-mediated synthesis of Fe-rich polyacrylic acid (PAA)-Fe{sub 3}Ni alloyed microspheres and its morphological and structural characterizations with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Magnetorheological fluid was prepared by dispersing the 10 vol% microparticles in silicone oil. The room temperature viscoelastic characterization of the fluid was performed under different magnetic fields. The field-dependent yield stresses were scaled using Klingenberg model and found that static yield stress was more accurately described by an ~M{sup 3} dependence, where M is particle magnetization. We proposed a multipolar contribution and ascertained the fact that simple dipolar description was insufficient to describe the trend in a complex rheological fluid. Temperature-dependent oscillatory rheological studies under various fields were also investigated. This demonstrated a strong temperature-induced thinning effect. The temperature-thinning in complex moduli and viscosity were more pronounced for the samples at higher magnetic field owing to quasi-solid behavior. - Highlights: • Novel one-pot chemical synthesis of Fe-rich PAA-Fe{sub 3}Ni microspheres. • Room temperature steady shear magnetorheology revealed viscoelastic behavior. • Rheometer magnetic fields can be replaced by powder particle magnetization (M) for better stress scaling. • Higher order scaling relations (~M{sup 3}) to particle magnetization (M) were observed for static yield stress. • Temperature-induced, field-dependent oscillatory rheology indicated pronounced thinning behavior, owing to predominantly quasi-solid behavior at high field density.

  7. Time, Temperature and Amount of Distilled Water Effects on the Purity and Yield of Bis(2-hydroxyethyl Terephthalate Purification System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.W. Goh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET bottle is one of the common plastic wastes existed in the municipal solid waste in Malaysia. One alternative to solve the abundant of PET wastes is chemical recycling of the wastes to produce a value added product. This technology not only can decrease the PET wastes in landfill sites but also can produce many useful recycled PET products. Bis(2-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET obtained from glycolysis reaction of PET waste was purified using crystallization process. The hot distilled water was added to glycolysis product followed by cooling and filtration to extract BHET in white solid form from the product. The effect of three operating conditions namely crystallization time, crystallization temperatures and amount of distilled water used to the yield of crystallization process were investigated. The purity of crystallization products were analyzed using HPLC and DSC. The optimum conditions of 3 hours crystallization time, 2 °C crystallization temperature and 5:1 mass ratio of distilled water used to glycolize solid gave the highest yield and purity of the crystallization process. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 12nd August 2014; Revised: 4th February 2015; Accepted: 5th February 2015How to Cite: Goh, H.W., Salmiaton, A., Abdullah, N., Idris, A. (2015. Time, Temperature and Amount of Distilled Water Effects on the Purity and Yield of Bis(2-hydroxyethyl Terephthalate Purification System. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 143-154. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7195.143-154 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7195.143-154  

  8. Effect of intergranular stress on yielding of 316H during room temperature cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mamun, Abdullah; Moat, Richard; Bouchard, John; Kelleher, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cyclic deformation is an integral part of nuclear power plant life assessment code, as many of the components in plant go through scheduled and unscheduled cyclic deformation owing to varying thermal and mechanical stresses. In polycrystalline material like 316H, a type of micro stress known as intergranular stress is generated due to elastic and plastic anisotropies during such cyclic loading. In tension-compression loading cycles, these stresses remain in the material as a residual stress upon unloading to zero stress from the tensile/compressive peak or intermediates stresses. The magnitude of these stresses vary depending on the point in the cycle from which it was unloaded from. When the material is re-loaded either in the same or reverse loading direction these residual stresses increase or decrease the effective stress acting in the material and as such the macroscopic yield stress of the material in subsequent cycle is changed significantly. The magnitude of intergranular stresses in many differently oriented grain families can be measured simultaneously using time of flight (ToF) neutron diffraction technique. In this paper, we have used this technique to experimentally study, how these intergranular stresses affect the yield (proof) stress of 316H at room temperature. (author)

  9. Improving Agricultural Water Resources Management Using Ground-based Infrared Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvaeian, S.

    2014-12-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the largest user of freshwater resources in arid/semi-arid parts of the world. Meeting rapidly growing demands in food, feed, fiber, and fuel while minimizing environmental pollution under a changing climate requires significant improvements in agricultural water management and irrigation scheduling. Although recent advances in remote sensing techniques and hydrological modeling has provided valuable information on agricultural water resources and their management, real improvements will only occur if farmers, the decision makers on the ground, are provided with simple, affordable, and practical tools to schedule irrigation events. This presentation reviews efforts in developing methods based on ground-based infrared thermometry and thermography for day-to-day management of irrigation systems. The results of research studies conducted in Colorado and Oklahoma show that ground-based remote sensing methods can be used effectively in quantifying water stress and consequently triggering irrigation events. Crop water use estimates based on stress indices have also showed to be in good agreement with estimates based on other methods (e.g. surface energy balance, root zone soil water balance, etc.). Major challenges toward the adoption of this approach by agricultural producers include the reduced accuracy under cloudy and humid conditions and its inability to forecast irrigation date, which is a critical knowledge since many irrigators need to decide about irrigations a few days in advance.

  10. I. Construction of an ultralow temperature laboratory. II. Thermal relaxation in superfluid helium-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    The first part of this thesis describes the construction of an ultralow temperature laboratory capable of reaching temperatures below 0.002 K. Continuous refrigeration to 0.012 K is provided by a cold plate/dilution refrigerator system. Single-cycle cooling to 0.002 K is accomplished by adiabatic demagnetization of cerous magnesium nitrate (CMN), a paramagnetic salt. Thermometry is done by measuring the resistance of carbon and germanium sensors, the magnetic susceptibility of lanthanum-diluted CMN, and the anisotropy of gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 nuclear orientation thermometer. Systems have been developed to allow precise control of the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium-3 sample. Measurements of thermal relaxation of liquid helium-3 in the ultralow temperature cell following sudden magnetic cooling of the CMN refrigerant are described. Analysis of the transient response of a thermal model of the cell indicates that the ratio of the time constants immediately below and above the superfluid-to-normal transition temperature provides a close estimate of the ratio of the corresponding helium-3 heat capacities, at least in the superfluid A-phase

  11. Coral Sr-U Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, T. M.; Gaetani, G. A.; Cohen, A. L.; Foster, G. L.; Alpert, A.; Stewart, J.

    2016-12-01

    Coral skeletons archive the past two millennia of climate variability in the oceans with unrivaled temporal resolution. However, extracting accurate temperature information from coral skeletons is confounded by "vital effects", which often override the temperature dependence of geochemical proxies. Here, we present a new approach to coral paleothermometry based on results of abiogenic precipitation experiments interpreted within a framework provided by a quantitative model of the coral biomineralization process. We conducted laboratory experiments to test the temperature and carbonate chemistry controls on abiogenic partitioning of Sr/Ca and U/Ca between aragonite and seawater, and we modeled the sensitivity of skeletal composition to processes occurring at the site of calcification. The model predicts that temperature can be accurately reconstructed from coral skeleton by combining Sr/Ca and U/Ca ratios into a new proxy, Sr-U. We tested the model predictions with measured Sr/Ca and U/Ca ratios of fourteen Porites sp. corals collected from the tropical Pacific Ocean and the Red Sea, with a subset also analyzed using the boron isotope (δ11B) pH proxy. Observed relationships among Sr/Ca, U/Ca, and δ11B agree with model predictions, indicating that the model accounts for the key features of the coral biomineralization process. We calibrated Sr-U to instrumental temperature records and found that it captures 93% of mean annual variability (26-30 °C) and predicts temperature within 0.5 °C (1 σ). Conversely, Sr/Ca alone has an error of prediction of 1 °C and often diverges from observed temperature by 3 °C or more. Many of the problems afflicting Sr/Ca - including offsets among neighboring corals and decouplings from temperature during coral stress events - are reconciled by Sr-U. By accounting for the influence of the coral biomineralization process, the Sr-U thermometer may offer significantly improved reliability for reconstructing ocean temperatures from coral

  12. Estimation of wetland evapotranspiration in northern New York using infrared thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.; Chandler, D. G.

    2016-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the water budget and often regarded as a major water loss. In freshwater wetlands, cumulative annual ET can equal precipitation under well-watered conditions. Wetland ET is therefore an important control on contaminant and nutrient transport. Yet, quantification of wetland ET is challenged by complex surface characteristics, diverse plant species and density, and variations in wetland shape and size. As handheld infrared (IR) cameras have become available, studies exploiting the new technology have increased, especially in agriculture and hydrology. The benefits of IR cameras include (1) high spatial resolution, (2) high sample rates, (3) real-time imaging, (4) a constant viewing geometry, and (5) no need for atmosphere and cloud corrections. Compared with traditional methods, infrared thermometer is capable of monitoring at the scale of a small pond or localized plant community. This enables finer scale survey of heterogeneous land surfaces rather than strict dependence on atmospheric variables. Despite this potential, there has been a limited number of studies of ET and drought stress with IR cameras. In this study, the infrared thermometry-based method was applied to estimate ET over wetland plant species in St. Lawrence River Valley, NY. The results are evaluated with traditional methods to test applicability over multiple vegetation species in a same area.

  13. Slope Controls Grain Yield and Climatic Yield in Mountainous Yunnan province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, X.; Rong, L.; Gu, Z.; Feng, D.

    2017-12-01

    Mountainous regions are increasingly vulnerable to food insecurity because of limited arable land, growing population pressure, and climate change. Development of sustainable mountain agriculture will require an increased understanding of the effects of environmental factors on grain and climatic yields. The objective of this study was to explore the relationships between actual grain yield, climatic yield, and environmental factors in a mountainous region in China. We collected data on the average grain yield per unit area in 119 counties in Yunnan province from 1985 to 2012, and chose 17 environmental factors for the same period. Our results showed that actual grain yield ranged from 1.43 to 6.92 t·ha-1, and the climatic yield ranged from -0.15 to -0.01 t·ha-1. Lower climatic yield but higher grain yield was generally found in central areas and at lower slopes and elevations in the western and southwestern counties of Yunnan province. Higher climatic yield but lower grain yield were found in northwestern parts of Yunnan province on steep slopes. Annual precipation and temperature had a weak influence on the climatic yield. Slope explained 44.62 and 26.29% of the variation in grain yield and climatic yield. The effects of topography on grain and climatic yields were greater than climatic factors. Slope was the most important environmental variable for the variability in climatic and grain yields in the mountainous Yunnan province due to the highly heterogeneous topographic conditions. Conversion of slopes to terraces in areas with higher climatic yields is an effective way to maintain grain production in response to climate variability. Additionally, soil amendments and soil and water conservation measures should be considered to maintain soil fertility and aid in sustainable development in central areas, and in counties at lower slopes and elevations in western and southwestern Yunnan province.

  14. Alumina Yield in the Bayer Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den Hond, R.

    The alumina industry has historically been able to reduce alumina production costs, by increasing the liquor alumina yield. To know the potential for further yield increases, the phase diagram of the ternary system Na2O-Al2O -H2O at various temperature levels was analysed. It was found that the maximum theorical precipitation alumina yield is 160 g/l, while that for digestion was calculated to be 675 g/l.

  15. The effect of pigment matrix, temperature and amount of carrier on the yield and final color properties of spray dried purple corn (Zea mays L.) cob anthocyanin powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Fei; Giusti, M Monica

    2017-07-15

    Spray drying is an economic technique to produce anthocyanin-based colorants. High pigments yields with minimum color degradation are desirable to maximize quality and profits. This study evaluated the impacts of purple corncob (PCC) anthocyanin extraction matrices (hot water, 40% ethanol, C18 purified), drying inlet temperature (130, 150, 170°C) and amount of carrier (2%, 5%, 10% maltodextrin) on the yields and quality of PCC anthocyanin powders. Monomeric and polymeric anthocyanins, color properties (CIELch, haze), and pigments composition before and after spray drying were determined. The yield and final color quality of spray dried PCC anthocyanins were affected (p<0.05) by all parameters evaluated. The pigment matrix, inlet temperature, and carrier amount had biggest impacts on product water solubility, pigments degradation and yield, respectively. The optimal combination of hot water extracts spray dried with 5% maltodextrin at 150°C gave the highest pigment yield (∼90%) with good solubility with the least color loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Precise measurements of neutral gas temperature using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor in Argon capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daoman; Liu, Zigeng; Liu, Yongxin; Peng, Wei; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    Neutral gas temperature was measured using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor (FBGs) in capacitively coupled argon plasmas. Thermometry is based on the thermal equilibrium between the sensor and neutral gases, which is found to become faster with increasing pressure. It is also observed that the neutral gas temperature is higher than the room temperature by 10 120 °depending on the experiental conditions, and gas temperature shows significant non-uniformity in space. In addition, radial profiles of neutral temperature at different pressures, resemble these of ion density, obtained by a floating double probe. Specifically, at low pressure, neutral gas temperature and ion density peak at the center of the reactor, while the peak appears at the edge of the electrode at higher pressure. The neutral gas heating is mainly caused by the elastic collisions of Ar + with neutral gas atoms in the sheath region after Ar + gaining a certain energy. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Grants No. 11335004, 11405018, and 61137005).

  17. Is Oral Temperature an Accurate Measurement of Deep Body Temperature? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Ganio, Matthew S.; Casa, Douglas J.; Vingren, Jakob; Klau, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Context: Oral temperature might not be a valid method to assess core body temperature. However, many clinicians, including athletic trainers, use it rather than criterion standard methods, such as rectal thermometry. Objective: To critically evaluate original research addressing the validity of using oral temperature as a measurement of core body temperature during periods of rest and changing core temperature. Data Sources: In July 2010, we searched the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTDiscus, Academic Search Premier, and the Cochrane Library for the following concepts: core body temperature, oral, and thermometers. Controlled vocabulary was used, when available, as well as key words and variations of those key words. The search was limited to articles focusing on temperature readings and studies involving human participants. Data Synthesis: Original research was reviewed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro). Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria and subsequently were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers. All 16 were included in the review because they met the minimal PEDro score of 4 points (of 10 possible points), with all but 2 scoring 5 points. A critical review of these studies indicated a disparity between oral and criterion standard temperature methods (eg, rectal and esophageal) specifically as the temperature increased. The difference was −0.50°C ± 0.31°C at rest and −0.58°C ± 0.75°C during a nonsteady state. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that, regardless of whether the assessment is recorded at rest or during periods of changing core temperature, oral temperature is an unsuitable diagnostic tool for determining body temperature because many measures demonstrated differences greater than the predetermined validity threshold of 0.27°C (0.5°F). In addition, the differences were greatest at the highest rectal temperatures. Oral temperature cannot

  18. Carbonate clumped isotopes and in situ temperature monitoring for Holocene soils in the San Luis Valley, USA indicate springtime carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A. M.; Paces, J. B.; Ruleman, C.

    2017-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonate horizons are abundant in semi-arid and arid regions worldwide and within the geologic record. They present a widely distributed archive of past environmental conditions, driven by global climate or tectonically-controlled elevation changes. Oxygen and carbon isotopes in calcite-rich nodules and clast rinds are widely-applied indicators of past soil water and CO2 composition linked to changing precipitation and plant communities. The temperature of carbonate formation, however, provides key constraint on past water/CO2 values and elucidate why they may have changed in the past. Clumped isotope thermometry can provide this constraint and additional climate information, given the carbonate forming system is well understood. We present preliminary clumped isotope (Δ47) temperatures for Holocene soil carbonates, constrained by 14C and U-Th disequilibrium dating, compared with two years of in situ soil temperature data to better understand the mechanism and seasonality of carbonate formation in the San Luis Valley region of the southern Rocky Mountains. Five temperature-monitoring sites ranging in elevation (1940-2450 m) and latitude (36.2-37.9°N) were installed in a variety of settings (range front, valley center, and canyon). The resulting records show indistinguishable seasonal temperature variations at >60 cm depth. This suggests Δ47 temperatures should be comparable at sites across the region. Temperatures based on Δ47 measurements of Holocene (>1.8 to 11.0 ka BP) carbonates at these sites yield consistent inter-site temperatures of 10±4°C, which are similar to modern springtime soil temperatures at depth. This seasonality matches previous results of isotopic modeling at sites further south along the Rio Grande corridor. Temperatures during March to May show multiple, abrupt warming and cooling cycles on weekly timescales caused by wetting and drying of the soil during spring precipitation events. This may drive carbonate precipitation

  19. Climatically driven yield variability of major crops in Khakassia (South Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushkina, Elena A.; Belokopytova, Liliana V.; Zhirnova, Dina F.; Shah, Santosh K.; Kostyakova, Tatiana V.

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the variability of yield of the three main crop cultures in the Khakassia Republic: spring wheat, spring barley, and oats. In terms of yield values, variability characteristics, and climatic response, the agricultural territory of Khakassia can be divided into three zones: (1) the Northern Zone, where crops yield has a high positive response to the amount of precipitation, May-July, and a moderately negative one to the temperatures of the same period; (2) the Central Zone, where crops yield depends mainly on temperatures; and (3) the Southern Zone, where climate has the least expressed impact on yield. The dominant pattern in the crops yield is caused by water stress during periods of high temperatures and low moisture supply with heat stress as additional reason. Differences between zones are due to combinations of temperature latitudinal gradient, precipitation altitudinal gradient, and the presence of a well-developed hydrological network and the irrigational system as moisture sources in the Central Zone. More detailed analysis shows differences in the climatic sensitivity of crops during phases of their vegetative growth and grain development and, to a lesser extent, during harvesting period. Multifactor linear regression models were constructed to estimate climate- and autocorrelation-induced variability of the crops yield. These models allowed prediction of the possibility of yield decreasing by at least 2-11% in the next decade due to increasing of the regional summer temperatures.

  20. [Monitoring radiofrequency ablation by ultrasound temperature imaging and elastography under different power intensities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaonan; Li, Qiang; Tsui, Pohsiang; Wang, Chiaoyin; Liu, Haoli

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability of diagnostic ultrasound-based temperature and elasticity imaging during radiofrequency ablation (RFA) through ex vivo experiments. Procine liver samples (n=7) were employed for RFA experiments with exposures of different power intensities (10 and 50w). The RFA process was monitored by a diagnostic ultrasound imager and the information were postoperatively captured for further temperature and elasticity image analysis. Infrared thermometry was concurrently applied to provide temperature change calibration during the RFA process. Results from this study demonstrated that temperature imaging was valid under 10 W RF exposure (r=0.95), but the ablation zone was no longer consistent with the reference infrared temperature distribution under high RF exposures. The elasticity change could well reflect the ablation zone under a 50 W exposure, whereas under low exposures, the thermal lesion could not be well detected due to the limited range of temperature elevation and incomplete tissue necrosis. Diagnostic ultrasound-based temperature and elastography is valid for monitoring thr RFA process. Temperature estimation can well reflect mild-power RF ablation dynamics, whereas the elastic-change estimation can can well predict the tissue necrosis. This study provide advances toward using diagnostic ultrasound to monitor RFA or other thermal-based interventions.

  1. Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby Galaxies (SWAN): Resolved Ammonia Thermometry and Water and Methanol Masers in IC 342, NGC 6946, and NGC 2146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Mark; Ott, Jürgen; Rand, Richard; Meier, David S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Schinnerer, Eva

    2018-04-01

    The Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies (SWAN) studies atomic and molecular species across the nuclei of four star-forming galaxies: NGC 253, IC 342, NGC 6946, and NGC 2146. As part of this survey, we present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array molecular line observations of three galaxies: IC 342, NGC 6946, and NGC 2146. NGC 253 is covered in a previous paper. These galaxies were chosen to span an order of magnitude in star formation rates and to select a variety of galaxy types. We target the metastable transitions of ammonia NH3(1, 1) to (5, 5), the 22 GHz water (H2O) (616–523) transition, and the 36.1 GHz methanol (CH3OH) (4‑1–30) transition. We use the NH3 metastable lines to perform thermometry of the dense molecular gas. We show evidence for uniform heating across the central kiloparsec of IC 342 with two temperature components for the molecular gas, similar to NGC 253, of 27 and 308 K, and that the dense molecular gas in NGC 2146 has a temperature 36 GHz CH3OH masers in IC 342 and NGC 6946. For the four external galaxies the total CH3OH luminosity in each galaxy suggests a correlation with galactic star formation rate, whereas the morphology of the emission is similar to that of HNCO, a weak shock tracer.

  2. Effects of several types of biomass fuels on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot from fast pyrolysis at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trubetskaya, Anna; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of biomass origin on the yield, nanostructure and reactivity of soot. Soot was produced from wood and herbaceous biomass pyrolysis at high heating rates and at temperatures of 1250 and 1400 °C in a drop tube furnace. The structure of solid residues was characterized...

  3. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  4. Climate variability: Possible changes with climate change and impacts on crop yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mearns, L.O.

    1991-01-01

    A pilot study was carried out of the sensitivity of the CERES wheat model, a deterministic crop-climate model, to changes in the interannual variability of temperature and precipitation. The study was designed to determine the effect of changed temperature variance on the mean and variance of the simulated yields, to compare the effect with the effect of mean temperature changes, and to determine the interacting effects of changes in mean and variance of temperature. The CERES model was applied to 29 cropping years (1952-1980), using three different soil types and two different management practices (fully irrigated and dryland). The coefficients of variation of the yields for irrigated and dryland conditions are plotted against variance change. It was found that in both management systems, the yield response is usually greater to increases rather than decreases in variance. The combined effect of mean and variance temperature changes are most striking under irrigated conditions, with a dramatic decrease in yield variability in the high mean climate change scenario with decreased temperature variance. This suggests that the variability decrease might mitigate the effect of a mean increase in temperature. This result is not found with the dryland case, where decreased temperature variability has little impact on yield variability. 12 refs., 4 figs

  5. Thermometry for the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhler, S.; Junquera, T.; Thermeau, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The LHC project will use about 8000 thermometers to control the temperature of magnets. These thermometers will be operated at a temperature ranging from 1.6 K to 300 K and their calibration should be better than 0.25%. A small cryogenic thermometer calibration facility has been designed and tested. To select the cryogenic temperature sensors, an irradiation program is being performed to expose at high neutron fluences (>10 15 n/cm 2 ) the following thermometers: carbon resistors, Ge, thin film, RhFe and Pt. The resistance shifts under radiation of the different sensors at liquid helium are presented. (authors)

  6. Temporal changes in climatic variables and their impact on crop yields in southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Bin; Gou, Yu; Wang, Hong-Ye; Li, Hong-Mei; Wu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Knowledge of variability in climatic variables changes and its impact on crop yields is important for farmers and policy makers, especially in southwestern China where rainfed agriculture is dominant. In the current study, six climatic parameters (mean temperature, rainfall, relative humidity, sunshine hours, temperature difference, and rainy days) and aggregated yields of three main crops (rice: Oryza sativa L., oilseed rape: Brassica napus L., and tobacco: Nicotiana tabacum L.) during 1985-2010 were collected and analyzed for Chongqing-a large agricultural municipality of China. Climatic variables changes were detected by Mann-Kendall test. Increased mean temperature and temperature difference and decreased relative humidity were found in annual and oilseed rape growth time series (Pchanges in climatic variables in this region. Yield of rice increased with rainfall (Pclimatic variables to crop yields. Temperature difference and sunshine hours had higher direct and indirect effects via other climatic variables on yields of rice and tobacco. Mean temperature, relative humidity, rainy days, and temperature difference had higher direct and indirect effects via others on yield of oilseed rape.

  7. Experimental study of air-cooled water condensation in slightly inclined circular tube using infrared temperature measurement technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyungdae [Nuclear Engineering Department, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Tae-Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Eok, E-mail: dekim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Sangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Air-cooled condensation experiments in an inclined Pyrex glass tube were performed. • High-resolution wall temperature data and flow regime formations could be obtained. • The local heat flux was strongly dependent on the air-side heat transfer. • A CFD analysis was conducted for calculating the local heat flux distribution. - Abstract: This study presents the results of an investigation of the air-cooled water condensation heat transfer characteristics inside a slightly inclined circular tube made of transparent Pyrex glass. The high-resolution wall temperature data and stratified film formations could be obtained with the assistance of an infrared (IR) thermometry technique and side-view visualization using a CCD camera. In all experimental cases, the condensation flow patterns were in the fully-stratified flow region. In addition, the experimentally measured void fraction corresponded well with the logarithmic mean void fraction model. The local temperature differences in the cooling air flow across the condenser tube and high-resolution temperature profiles on the tube’s outer wall were obtained in the experimental measurements. Under the experimental conditions of this study, the local heat flux distributions in the longitudinal direction of the test tube were strongly dependent on the cooling air velocity. And, with the help of IR thermometry, the tube outer wall temperature data at 45 local points could be measured. From the data, the asymmetry distribution of the local wall temperatures and the accurate location of the transition from two-phase mixture to single phase liquid inside the tube could be obtained. Also, the analysis of the thermal resistances by condensation, wall conduction and air convection showed that the air convective heat transfer behavior can play a dominant role to the local heat transfer characteristics. Finally, in order to obtain the local heat flux distribution along the tube’s outer wall, a two

  8. High temperature spectral emissivity measurement using integral blackbody method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Spectral emissivity is a critical material's thermos-physical property for heat design and radiation thermometry. A prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method was developed to measure material's spectral emissivity above 1000 °. The system was implemented with an optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, the sample was pushed to the end opening of the tube by a graphite rod which was actuated through a pneumatic cylinder. A linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface through the measurement. The corresponding opto-converted voltage signal was fed and recorded by a digital multi-meter. A physical model was proposed to numerically evaluate the temperature drop along the process. Tube was discretized as several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature profile of the tube was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were calculated and updated along the whole pushing process. The actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage profile and the calculated true temperature, spectral emissivity under this temperature point was calculated.

  9. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi2Ta2O9:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Dengfeng; Wang Xusheng; Yao Xi; Xu Chaonan; Lin Jian; Sun Tiantuo

    2012-01-01

    Er 3+ doped CaBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er 3+ doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er 3+ concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from 4 S 3/2 and 4 F 9/2 to 4 I 15/2 , respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  10. Low-temperature wafer-level gold thermocompression bonding: modeling of flatness deviations and associated process optimization for high yield and tough bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Tsau, Christine H.; Spearing, S. Mark

    2005-01-01

    Wafer-level, thermocompression bonding is a promising technique for MEMS packaging. The quality of the bond is critically dependent on the interaction between flatness deviations, the gold film properties and the process parameters and tooling used to achieve the bonds. The effect of flatness deviations on the resulting bond is investigated in the current work. The strain energy release rate associated with the elastic deformation required to overcome wafer bow is calculated. A contact yield criterion is used to examine the pressure and temperature conditions required to flatten surface roughness asperities in order to achieve bonding over the full apparent area. The results are compared to experimental data of bond yield and toughness obtained from four-point bend delamination testing and microscopic observations of the fractured surfaces. Conclusions from the modeling and experiments indicate that wafer bow has negligible effect on determining the variability of bond quality and that the well-bonded area is increased with increasing bonding pressure. The enhanced understanding of the underlying deformation mechanisms allows for a better controlled trade-off between the bonding pressure and temperature.

  11. Thermometry in 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the methods used in measuring the temperatures of the transitions in 3 He are reviewed. Although noise thermometers, γ-ray anisotropy thermometers and even Pt NMR thermometers are satisfactory for furnishing temperature standards, they are not satisfactory secondary thermometers. The susceptibility of CMN and various 3 He properties make more precise and quicker thermometric indications. (Auth.)

  12. Natural convection in Bingham plastic fluids from an isothermal spheroid: Effects of fluid yield stress, viscous dissipation and temperature-dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anoop Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay; Chhabra, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the buoyancy-induced convection from an isothermal spheroid is studied in a Bingham plastic fluid. Extensive results on the morphology of approximate yield surfaces, temperature profiles, and the local and average Nusselt numbers are reported to elucidate the effects of the pertinent dimensionless parameters: Rayleigh number, 102 ≤ Ra ≤ 106; Prandtl number, 20 ≤ Pr ≤ 100; Bingham number, 0 ≤ Bn ≤ 103, and aspect ratio, 0.2 ≤ e ≤ 5. Due to the fluid yield stress, fluid-like (yielded) and solid-like (unyielded) regions coexist in the flow domain depending upon the prevailing stress levels vis-a-vis the value of the fluid yield stress. The yielded parts progressively grow in size with the rising Rayleigh number while this tendency is countered by the increasing Bingham and Prandtl numbers. Due to these two competing effects, a limiting value of the Bingham number ( Bn max) is observed beyond which heat transfer occurs solely by conduction due to the solid-like behaviour of the fluid everywhere in the domain. Such limiting values bear a positive dependence on the Rayleigh number ( Ra) and aspect ratio ( e). In addition to this, oblate shapes ( e 1) impede it. Finally, simple predictive expressions for the maximum Bingham number and the average Nusselt number are developed which can be used to predict a priori the overall heat transfer coefficient in a new application. Also, a criterion is developed in terms of the composite parameter Bn• Gr-1/2 which predicts the onset of convection in such fluids. Similarly, another criterion is developed which delineates the conditions for the onset of settling due to buoyancy effects. The paper is concluded by presenting limited results to delineate the effects of viscous dissipation and the temperature-dependent viscosity on the Nusselt number. Both these effects are seen to be rather small in Bingham plastic fluids.

  13. Comparison of three methods of temperature measurement in hypothermic, euthermic, and hyperthermic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Rebecca J; Cohn, Leah A; Dodam, John R; Wagner-Mann, Colette C; Mann, F A

    2007-06-15

    To assess the reliability and accuracy of a predictive rectal thermometer, an infrared auricular thermometer designed for veterinary use, and a subcutaneous temperature-sensing microchip for measurement of core body temperature over various temperature conditions in dogs. Prospective study. 8 purpose-bred dogs. A minimum of 7 days prior to study commencement, a subcutaneous temperature-sensing microchip was implanted in 1 of 3 locations (interscapular, lateral aspect of shoulder, or sacral region) in each dog. For comparison with temperatures measured via rectal thermometer, infrared auricular thermometer, and microchip, core body temperature was measured via a thermistor-tipped pulmonary artery (TTPA) catheter. Hypothermia was induced during anesthesia at the time of TTPA catheter placement; on 3 occasions after placement of the catheter, hyperthermia was induced via administration of a low dose of endotoxin. Near-simultaneous duplicate temperature measurements were recorded from the TTPA catheter, the rectal thermometer, auricular thermometer, and subcutaneous microchips during hypothermia, euthermia, and hyperthermia. Reliability (variability) of temperature measurement for each device and agreement between each device measurement and core body temperature were assessed. Variability between duplicate near-simultaneous temperature measurements was greatest for the auricular thermometer and least for the TTPA catheter. Measurements obtained by use of the rectal thermometer were in closest agreement with core body temperature; for all other devices, temperature readings typically underestimated core body temperature. Among the 3 methods of temperature measurement, rectal thermometry provided the most accurate estimation of core body temperature in dogs.

  14. Radiation and temperature influence on forage grasses yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadell, J.; Medrano, H.

    1986-01-01

    Biomass production has been studied in forage plants, as well as the temperature and radiation effects on plant growth. Four cultivars of grasses: Lolium multiflorum var westerwoldicum cv Promenade, Lolium perenne cvs Combi and Compas and Bromus inermis were growing as microswards in a growth chamber with constant temperature and outdoors. A field assay was done also with the same cultivars. L. multiflorum was the highest productive genotype anywhere showing also more active growth at low temperatures. Total production showed significant differences among genotypes. It was also a clear correspondence among microswards and field productions. Highest efficiency values (in % of PAR accumulated as dry matter) was obtained in 6th cut (April) achieving to 5.18 % in L. multiflorum. Biomass production variations through the growth period show a low correlation with <> and very high correlation with total irradiation received by the sward between consecutive cuts [es

  15. Increased [CO2] does not compensate for negative effects on yield caused by higher temperature and [O3] in Brassica napus L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon Gareth; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    in existing genotypes is vital. In this study, the responses in yield and biomass production of four different cultivars of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) were tested under five different combinations of increased [CO2] (700 ppm), temperature (+5 °C) and [O3] (+40 ppb). Especially the multifactor treatments...

  16. Optimization of Temperature Sensing with Polymer-Embedded Luminescent Ru(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelia Bustamante

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature is a key parameter in many fields and luminescence-based temperature sensing is a solution for those applications in which traditional (mechanical, electrical, or IR-based thermometers struggle. Amongst the indicator dyes for luminescence thermometry, Ru(II polyazaheteroaromatic complexes are an appealing option to profit from the widespread commercial technologies for oxygen optosensing based on them. Six ruthenium dyes have been studied, engineering their structure for both photostability and highest temperature sensitivity of their luminescence. The most apt Ru(II complex turned out to be bis(1,10-phenanthroline(4-chloro-1,10-phenanthrolineruthenium(II, due to the combination of two strong-field chelating ligands (phen and a substituent with electron withdrawing effect on a conjugated position of the third ligand (4-Clphen. In order to produce functional sensors, the dye has been best embedded into poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate, due to its low permeability to O2, high temperature sensitivity of the indicator dye incorporated into this polymer, ease of fabrication, and excellent optical quality. Thermosensitive elements have been fabricated thereof as optical fiber tips for macroscopic applications (water courses monitoring and thin spots for microscopic uses (temperature measurements in cell culture-on-a-chip. With such dye/polymer combination, temperature sensing based on luminescence lifetime measurements allows 0.05 °C resolution with linear response in the range of interest (0–40 °C.

  17. Negative impacts of climate change on cereal yields: statistical evidence from France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammans, Matthew; Mérel, Pierre; Ortiz-Bobea, Ariel

    2017-05-01

    In several world regions, climate change is predicted to negatively affect crop productivity. The recent statistical yield literature emphasizes the importance of flexibly accounting for the distribution of growing-season temperature to better represent the effects of warming on crop yields. We estimate a flexible statistical yield model using a long panel from France to investigate the impacts of temperature and precipitation changes on wheat and barley yields. Winter varieties appear sensitive to extreme cold after planting. All yields respond negatively to an increase in spring-summer temperatures and are a decreasing function of precipitation about historical precipitation levels. Crop yields are predicted to be negatively affected by climate change under a wide range of climate models and emissions scenarios. Under warming scenario RCP8.5 and holding growing areas and technology constant, our model ensemble predicts a 21.0% decline in winter wheat yield, a 17.3% decline in winter barley yield, and a 33.6% decline in spring barley yield by the end of the century. Uncertainty from climate projections dominates uncertainty from the statistical model. Finally, our model predicts that continuing technology trends would counterbalance most of the effects of climate change.

  18. Climate change impacts on crop yield: evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Taoyuan; Cherry, Todd L; Glomrød, Solveig; Zhang, Tianyi

    2014-11-15

    When estimating climate change impact on crop yield, a typical assumption is constant elasticity of yield with respect to a climate variable even though the elasticity may be inconstant. After estimating both constant and inconstant elasticities with respect to temperature and precipitation based on provincial panel data in China 1980-2008, our results show that during that period, the temperature change contributes positively to total yield growth by 1.3% and 0.4% for wheat and rice, respectively, but negatively by 12% for maize. The impacts of precipitation change are marginal. We also compare our estimates with other studies and highlight the implications of the inconstant elasticities for crop yield, harvest and food security. We conclude that climate change impact on crop yield would not be an issue in China if positive impacts of other socio-economic factors continue in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Accuracy of different temperature reading techniques and associated stress response in hospitalized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomart, Samantha B; Allerton, Fergus J W; Gommeren, Kris

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and associated induced stress response of axillary, auricular, and rectal thermometry in hospitalized dogs. Prospective observational study from October 2011 to February 2012. University veterinary teaching hospital. Two hundred fifty hospitalized dogs. All hospitalized dogs were considered eligible unless their condition precluded measurement at one of the designated sites. A veterinary auricular infrared device for auricular temperature (OT) and an electronic predictive thermometer for rectal temperature (RT) and axillary temperature (AT) were used for temperature measurements. All recordings were obtained by the same investigator in a randomized fashion. Heart rate was noted before and immediately after each measurement. Stress behaviors (eg, vocalization, lip licking, shaking, panting, defensive behavior) were also recorded and graded from 0 (lowest) to 4 (highest). Signalment, analgesic therapy, and length of hospitalization were recorded. RT measurements were associated with greatest increase in heart rate (P 0.05). AT and to a lesser extent OT are reliable, less stressful alternatives to estimate RT in dogs. Further studies are needed to evaluate these techniques in hyperthermic dogs, and to evaluate the use of AT and OT as monitoring tools in intensive care patients. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  20. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures....... The crystallinity increases with increasing annealing temperature and a' form crystal is formed when the annealing temperature is higher than 100 oC. The stretched samples with low crystallinity show the first yield at draw temperatures below the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the second yield above Tg....... For the samples annealed between 80 and 120 oC, a peculiar double yield appears when stretched within 50–60 oC and only the first or the second yield can be found at the lower and higher draw temperatures. The yield strain and yield stress together with Young's modulus were obtained and discussed in terms...

  1. Decreased TK activity alters growth, yield and tolerance to low temperature and low light intensity in transgenic cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Huangai; Dong, Xubing; Wu, Guoxiu; Wang, Meiling; Ai, Xizhen

    2015-02-01

    Four CsTK antisense transgenic cucumber plants were obtained. Decreased TK activity decreased the photosynthetic rate, seed germination rate, growth yield, and the tolerance to low temperature and weak light stress. Transketolase (TK, EC 2.2.1.1) is a key enzyme in the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (Calvin cycle). A cDNA fragment (526 bp) encoding transketolase was cloned from cucumber plants (Cucumis sativa L. cv 'Jinyou 3') by RT-PCR. The antisense expression [(PBI-CsTK(-)] vector containing the CsTK gene fragment was constructed. The resulting plasmid was introduced into the cucumber inbred lines '08-1' using the agrobacterium-mediated method, and four antisense transgenic cucumber plants were obtained. Decreased CsTK expression either unaltered or slightly increased the mRNA abundance and activities of the other main enzymes in the Calvin cycle, however, it decreased the TK activity and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) in antisense transgenic cucumber leaves. Antisense plants showed decreases in the growth, ratio of female flowers and yield compared with the wild-type (WT) plants. The decrease in Pn, stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) and actual photochemical efficiency of PSII (ΦPSII) and the increase in electrolyte leakage (EL) were greater in antisense transgenic plants than in WT plants under low temperature (5 °C) and low light intensity (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)).

  2. A survey of phosphors novel for thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruebach, J., E-mail: bruebach@ekt.tu-darmstadt.d [Fachgebiet Reaktive Stroemungen und Messtechnik, Center of Smart Interfaces Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Kissel, T. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Stroemungen und Messtechnik, Center of Smart Interfaces Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Frotscher, M. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 18, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Euler, M. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Stroemungen und Messtechnik, Center of Smart Interfaces Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Albert, B. [Eduard-Zintl-Institut fuer Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 18, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Dreizler, A. [Fachgebiet Reaktive Stroemungen und Messtechnik, Center of Smart Interfaces Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    With regard to phosphor thermometry, seven luminescent ceramic materials were synthesised and characterised, namely CaMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}, CaTiO{sub 3}:Pr{sup 3+}, LaPO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}, LaVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+}, LiAl{sub 5}O{sub 8}:Fe{sup 3+}, TiMg{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Mn{sup 4+} and ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Mn{sup 2+}. In this context, emission spectra and temperature lifetime characteristics are presented. Thus, a survey of phosphors novel for thermography is given in order to encourage further studies and more detailed characterisations of the respective materials. - Research Highlights: Seven phosphor materials novel for thermometry were synthesised. These materials were characterised diffractometrically as well as concerning their emission spectra and lifetime temperature characteristics. The number of phosphor materials characterised for thermometry purposes was extended by seven materials.

  3. Comparison of estimated core body temperature measured with the BioHarness and rectal temperature under several heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; DiLeo, Travis; Powell, Jeffrey B; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Roberge, Raymond J; Coca, Aitor

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring and measuring core body temperature is important to prevent or minimize physiological strain and cognitive dysfunction for workers such as first responders (e.g., firefighters) and military personnel. The purpose of this study is to compare estimated core body temperature (Tco-est), determined by heart rate (HR) data from a wearable chest strap physiology monitor, to standard rectal thermometry (Tre) under different conditions.  Tco-est and Tre measurements were obtained in thermoneutral and heat stress conditions (high temperature and relative humidity) during four different experiments including treadmill exercise, cycling exercise, passive heat stress, and treadmill exercise while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE).  Overall, the mean Tco-est did not differ significantly from Tre across the four conditions. During exercise at low-moderate work rates under heat stress conditions, Tco-est was consistently higher than Tre at all-time points. Tco-est underestimated temperature compared to Tre at rest in heat stress conditions and at a low work rate under heat stress while wearing PPE. The mean differences between the two measurements ranged from -0.1 ± 0.4 to 0.3 ± 0.4°C and Tco-est correlated well with HR (r = 0.795 - 0.849) and mean body temperature (r = 0.637 - 0.861).  These results indicate that, the comparison of Tco-est to Tre may result in over- or underestimation which could possibly lead to heat-related illness during monitoring in certain conditions. Modifications to the current algorithm should be considered to address such issues.

  4. Temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirttioja, N; Carter, T.; Fronzek, S

    2015-01-01

    his study explored the utility of the impact response surface (IRS) approach for investigating model ensemble crop yield responses under a large range of changes in climate. IRSs of spring and winter wheat Triticum aestivum yields were constructed from a 26-member ensemble of process-based crop s...... additional insights into sensitivities to inter-model and inter-annual variability. Taken together, these sensitivities may help to pinpoint processes such as heat stress, vernalisation or drought effects requiring refinement in future model development....

  5. Yield and Failure Behavior Investigated for Cross-Linked Phenolic Resins Using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Joshua D.; Lawson, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to fundamentally evaluate the yield and failure behavior of cross-linked phenolic resins at temperatures below the glass transition. Yield stress was investigated at various temperatures, strain rates, and degrees of cross-linking. The onset of non-linear behavior in the cross-linked phenolic structures was caused by localized irreversible molecular rearrangements through the rotation of methylene linkers followed by the formation or annihilation of neighboring hydrogen bonds. The yield stress results, with respect to temperature and strain rate, could be fit by existing models used to describe yield behavior of amorphous glasses. The degree of cross-linking only indirectly influences the maximum yield stress through its influence on glass transition temperature (Tg), however there is a strong relationship between the degree of cross-linking and the failure mechanism. Low cross-linked samples were able to separate through void formation, whereas the highly cross-linked structures exhibited bond scission.

  6. Electron beam physical vapor deposition of thin ruby films for remote temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Greg Walker, D.; Valentine, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors (TGPs) possessing temperature-dependent photoluminescence properties have a wide range of uses in thermometry due to their remote access and large temperature sensitivity range. However, in most cases, phosphors are synthesized in powder form, which prevents their use in high resolution micro and nanoscale thermal microscopy. In the present study, we investigate the use of electron beam physical vapor deposition to fabricate thin films of chromium-doped aluminum oxide (Cr-Al 2 O 3 , ruby) thermographic phosphors. Although as-deposited films were amorphous and exhibited weak photoluminescence, the films regained the stoichiometry and α-Al 2 O 3 crystal structure of the combustion synthesized source powder after thermal annealing. As a consequence, the annealed films exhibit both strong photoluminescence and a temperature-dependent lifetime that decreases from 2.9 ms at 298 K to 2.1 ms at 370 K. Ruby films were also deposited on multiple substrates. To ensure a continuous film with smooth surface morphology and strong photoluminescence, we use a sapphire substrate, which is thermal expansion coefficient and lattice matched to the film. These thin ruby films can potentially be used as remote temperature sensors for probing the local temperatures of micro and nanoscale structures.

  7. Low temperature lignocellulose pretreatment: effects and interactions of pretreatment pH are critical for maximizing enzymatic monosaccharide yields from wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Johansen, Katja S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The recent development of improved enzymes and pentose-using yeast for cellulosic ethanol processes calls for new attention to the lignocellulose pretreatment step. This study assessed the influence of pretreatment pH, temperature, and time, and their interactions on the enzymatic...... alkaline pretreatments. Alkaline pretreatments also solubilized most of the lignin. Conclusions: Pretreatment pH exerted significant effects and factor interactions on the enzymatic glucose and xylose releases. Quite extreme pH values were necessary with mild thermal pretreatment strategies (T...... glucose and xylose yields from mildly pretreated wheat straw in multivariate experimental designs of acid and alkaline pretreatments. Results: The pretreatment pH was the most significant factor affecting both the enzymatic glucose and xylose yields after mild thermal pretreatments at maximum 140 degrees...

  8. Measurement of high-temperature spectral emissivity using integral blackbody approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yijie; Dong, Wei; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Zundong; Bloembergen, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emissivity is one of the most critical thermophysical properties of a material for heat design and analysis. Especially in the traditional radiation thermometry, normal spectral emissivity is very important. We developed a prototype instrument based upon an integral blackbody method to measure material's spectral emissivity at elevated temperatures. An optimized commercial variable-high-temperature blackbody, a high speed linear actuator, a linear pyrometer, and an in-house designed synchronization circuit was used to implemented the system. A sample was placed in a crucible at the bottom of the blackbody furnace, by which the sample and the tube formed a simulated reference blackbody which had an effective total emissivity greater than 0.985. During the measurement, a pneumatic cylinder pushed a graphite rode and then the sample crucible to the cold opening within hundreds of microseconds. The linear pyrometer was used to monitor the brightness temperature of the sample surface, and the corresponding opto-converted voltage was fed and recorded by a digital multimeter. To evaluate the temperature drop of the sample along the pushing process, a physical model was proposed. The tube was discretized into several isothermal cylindrical rings, and the temperature of each ring was measurement. View factors between sample and rings were utilized. Then, the actual surface temperature of the sample at the end opening was obtained. Taking advantages of the above measured voltage signal and the calculated actual temperature, normal spectral emissivity under the that temperature point was obtained. Graphite sample at 1300°C was measured to prove the validity of the method.

  9. Mass loss controlled thermal pretreatment system to assess the effects of pretreatment temperature on organic matter solubilization and methane yield from food waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Minale Yeshanew

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal pretreatment (TP on the main characteristics of food waste (FW and its biochemical methane potential (BMP and distribution of volatile fatty acids (VFAs under mesophilic condition (35 ⁰C were investigated. The TP experiments were carried out at 80 °C, 100 °C, 120 °C for 2 hour and 140 °C for 1 hour. The designed TP set-up was able to minimize the organic matter loss during the course of the pretreatments. Soluble organic fractions evaluated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD and soluble protein increased linearly with pretreatment temperature. In contrast, the carbohydrate solubilization was more enhanced (30 % higher solubilization by the TP at lower temperature (80 °C. A slight increment of soluble phenols was found, particularly for temperatures exceeding 100 °C. Thermally pretreated FW under all conditions exhibited an improved methane yield than the untreated FW, due to the increased organic matter solubilization. The highest cumulative methane yield of 442 (± 8.6 mL/gVSadded, corresponding to a 28.1 % enhancement compared to the untreated FW, was obtained with a TP at 80 °C. No significant variation in the VFAs trends were observed during the BMP tests under all investigated conditions.

  10. INFLUENCE OF WEATHER CONDITIONS ON GRAIN YIELD, OIL CONTENT AND OIL YIELD OF NEW OS SUNFLOWER HYBRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Mijić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose of determining the influence of weather conditions on the yield components of sunflower, the results of three-year field trials are analysed in the paper. In the trials sown in Osijek in 2013, 2014 and 2015, there were 15 sunflower hybrids: two foreign hybrids and 13 hybrid combinations of the Agricultural Institute Osijek. In the period before sowing (January – March, the highest amount of precipitation was in 2013 (213.1 mm, then in 2015 (167.9 mm, and the lowest in 2014 (109.5 mm. In the growing period (April – September, the highest amount of precipitation (487.3 mm was in 2014, 475.7 mm in 2013, and in 2015 it was the lowest (251.6 mm. In 2013, during the growing period, the mean monthly air temperature was 19.1°C, in 2015 19.9°C, and in 2014 18.6°C. Of these years, statistically significant at the P=0.05, the highest value of the analysed traits was recorded in 2013: grain yield of 6.47 t ha-1, oil content 51.69% and oil yield 3.05 t ha-1. Grain yield, oil content and oil yield were lower in 2015, and the lowest in 2014. Matej, a newly recognized sunflower hybrid of the Agricultural Institute Osijek had the highest values of grain and oil yield (6.95 and 3.39 t ha-1, and by its oil content of 53.44%, it was in the third place. For high grain and oil yields of sunflower, in addition to the optimal air temperature, the amount and distribution of precipitation before and also during the growing season are very important.

  11. Measurements of beryllium sputtering yields at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jet-Efda Contributors Stamp, M. F.; Krieger, K.; Brezinsek, S.

    2011-08-01

    The lifetime of the beryllium first wall in ITER will depend on erosion and redeposition processes. The physical sputtering yields for beryllium (both deuterium on beryllium (Be) and Be on Be) are of crucial importance since they drive the erosion process. Literature values of experimental sputtering yields show an order of magnitude variation so predictive modelling of ITER wall lifetimes has large uncertainty. We have reviewed the old beryllium yield experiments on JET and used current beryllium atomic data to produce revised beryllium sputtering yields. These experimental measurements have been compared with a simple physical sputtering model based on TRIM.SP beryllium yield data. Fair agreement is seen for beryllium yields from a clean beryllium limiter. However the yield on a beryllium divertor tile (with C/Be co-deposits) shows poor agreement at low electron temperatures indicating that the effect of the higher sputtering threshold for beryllium carbide is important.

  12. Low-temperature nuclear orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, N.J.; Postma, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book comprehensively surveys the many aspects of the low temperature nuclear orientation method. The angular distribution of radioactive emissions from nuclei oriented by hyperfine interactions in solids, is treated experimentally and theoretically. A general introductory chapter is followed by formal development of the theory of the orientation process and the anisotropic emission of decay products from oriented nuclei, applied to radioactive decay and to reactions. Five chapters on applications to nuclear physics cover experimental studies of alpha, beta and gamma emission, nuclear moment measurement and level structure information. Nuclear orientation studies of parity non-conservation and time reversal asymmetry are fully described. Seven chapters cover aspects of hyperfine interactions, magnetic and electric, in metals, alloys and insulating crystals, including ordered systems. Relaxation phenomena and the combined technique of NMR detection using oriented nuclei are treated at length. Chapters on the major recent development of on-line facilities, giving access to short lived nuclei far from stability, on the use of nuclear orientation for thermometry below 1 Kelvin and on technical aspects of the method complete the main text. Extensive appendices, table of relevant parameters and over 1000 references are included to assist the design of future experiments. (Auth.)

  13. Significance of Zr-in-Rutile Thermometry for Deducing the Decompression P–T Path of a Garnet–Clinopyroxene Granulite in the Moldanubian Zone of the Bohemian Massif

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Usuki, T.; Iizuka, Y.; Hirajima, T.; Svojtka, Martin; Lee, H.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2017), s. 1173-1198 ISSN 0022-3530 Grant - others:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100131203 Program:Program interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * P–T path * Zr-in-rutile thermometry * high-pressure granulite * continental collision * garnet–clinopyroxene barometry Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2016

  14. Low-temperature, high yield synthesis, and convenient isolation of the high-electron-density cluster compound Ta6Br14.8H2O for use in biomacromolecular crystallographic phase determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Daniel N T; Messerle, Louis

    2002-09-01

    Reduction of TaBr(5) with Ga in the presence of KBr in a sealed borosilicate ampule at 400 degrees, followed by aqueous Soxhlet extraction and addition of stannous bromide and hydrobromic acid to the extract, yielded Ta(6)Br(14).8H(2)O in 80-84% yield. The new procedure provides a convenient, low temperature, high yield route to the synthesis of the title compound from inexpensive precursors.

  15. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  16. Fusion Yield Enhancement in Magnetized Laser-Driven Implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Fiksel, G.; Hohenberger, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Betti, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Enhancement of the ion temperature and fusion yield has been observed in magnetized laser-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the OMEGA Laser Facility. A spherical CH target with a 10 atm D 2 gas fill was imploded in a polar-drive configuration. A magnetic field of 80 kG was embedded in the target and was subsequently trapped and compressed by the imploding conductive plasma. As a result of the hot-spot magnetization, the electron radial heat losses were suppressed and the observed ion temperature and neutron yield were enhanced by 15% and 30%, respectively.

  17. Sensitivity of CERES-Maize yield simulation to the selected weather data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalud, Z.; Stastna, M.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of selected weather data runs after successful parametrization and validation of the CERES-Maize simulation model. Estimation of the potential yield has been carried out during the long term experiment (1980-1997) as well as the estimation of influence of meteorological parameters on the simulation results for the water-limited yield. 10 % under and over stimulation of global radiation and precipitation as well as increasing and decreasing temperature by 1 deg C on simulated potential and water-limited yield have been done. In most of the years, air temperature underestimation resulted in a higher simulated grain yield and overstimulation shown a lower yield for water limited level. Overestimation of precipitation during wet days in growing period of the maize leads to an increase of amount of water available for the plant and to increase the yield. Underestimation of global radiation by 10 % resulted in a decline in simulated grain yield from -8.8 to -9.9 %. The overestimation caused increase of the yield from 7.8 to 10 %. Overestimation by 10 % resulted in a slight underestimation of the yield in low yielding years and underestimation of global radiation by 10 % in overestimation of the yield. The effect was opposite in high yielding years

  18. Temperature measurement: Development work on noise thermometry and improvement of conventional thermocouples for applications in nuclear process heat (PNP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Hecker, R.; Oehmen, J.; Barbonus, P.; Hans, R.

    1982-06-01

    The behaviour was studied of NiCr-Ni sheathed thermocouples (sheath Inconel 600 or Incoloy 800, insulation MgO) in a helium and carbon atmosphere at temperatures of 950-1150 deg. C. All the thermocouples used retained their functional performance. The insulation resistance tended towards a limit value which is dependent on the temperature and quality of the thermocouple. Temperature measurements were loaded with great uncertainty in the temperature range of 950-1150 deg. C. Recalibrations at the temperature of 950 deg. C showed errors of up to 6%. Measuring sensors were developed which consist of a sheathed double thermocouple with a noise resistor positioned between the two hot junctions. Using the noise thermometer it is possible to recalibrate the thermocouple at any time in situ. A helium system with a high temperature experimental area was developed to test the thermocouples and the combined thermocouple-noise thermometer sensors under true experimental conditions

  19. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, Anna M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  20. A paired apatite and calcite clumped isotope thermometry approach to estimating Cambro-Ordovician seawater temperatures and isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Kristin D.; Finnegan, Seth; Creel, Roger; Eiler, John M.; Hughes, Nigel C.; Popov, Leonid E.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2018-03-01

    The secular increase in δ18O values of both calcitic and phosphatic marine fossils through early Phanerozoic time suggests either that (1) early Paleozoic surface temperatures were high, in excess of 40 °C (tropical MAT), (2) the δ18O value of seawater has increased by 7-8‰ VSMOW through Paleozoic time, or (3) diagenesis has altered secular trends in early Paleozoic samples. Carbonate clumped isotope analysis, in combination with petrographic and elemental analysis, can deconvolve fluid composition from temperature effects and therefore determine which of these hypotheses best explain the secular δ18O increase. Clumped isotope measurements of a suite of calcitic and phosphatic marine fossils from late Cambrian- to Middle-late Ordovician-aged strata-the first paired fossil study of its kind-document tropical sea surface temperatures near modern temperatures (26-38 °C) and seawater oxygen isotope ratios similar to today's ratios.

  1. High temperature microscope (1961); Microscopie a haute temperature (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-06-15

    The purpose of this work is the realization of an apparatus for observation of radioactive metallic samples at high temperature and low pressure. The operating conditions are as follows: to limit oxidation of the metal, pressure of about 10{sup -6} mm of Hg is maintained in the furnace. In case the oxidation of the sample would be too important, on ultra vacuum. device could be used; working temperatures range between room temperature and 1200 deg. C; furnace temperature is regulated; observation is done ever in polarized light or interference contrast; to insure protection of the operator, the apparatus is placed in a glove-box. With that apparatus, we have observed the {alpha}{yields}{beta}, {beta}{yields}{gamma} transformations of uranium. A movie has been done. (author) [French] Le but de ce travail est la realisation d'une appareillage permettant l'observation a chaud et sous vide d'echantillons metalliques radioactifs. Cet appareillage fonctionne dans les conditions suivantes: l'echantillon est chauffe sous une pression de l'ordre de 10{sup -6} mm de mercure afin de limiter l'oxydation du materiau examine. L'utilisation eventuelle d'un groupe de pompage pour ultra vide est prevue; l'echantillon peut etre porte a une temperature comprise entre quelques degres et 1200 deg. C; la temperature du four est regulee; l'observation s'effectue soit en lumiere polarisee soit en contraste interferentiel; l'appareil est dipose dans une boite a gants afin d'assurer la protection de l'operateur contre les poussieres radioactives; Les transformations {alpha}{yields}{beta}, {beta}{yields}{gamma} de l'uranium ont ete observees. Un film a ete realise. (auteur)

  2. An internal reference model-based PRF temperature mapping method with Cramer-Rao lower bound noise performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Pan, Xinyi; Ying, Kui; Zhang, Qiang; An, Jing; Weng, Dehe; Qin, Wen; Li, Kuncheng

    2009-11-01

    The conventional phase difference method for MR thermometry suffers from disturbances caused by the presence of lipid protons, motion-induced error, and field drift. A signal model is presented with multi-echo gradient echo (GRE) sequence using a fat signal as an internal reference to overcome these problems. The internal reference signal model is fit to the water and fat signals by the extended Prony algorithm and the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to estimate the chemical shifts between water and fat which contain temperature information. A noise analysis of the signal model was conducted using the Cramer-Rao lower bound to evaluate the noise performance of various algorithms, the effects of imaging parameters, and the influence of the water:fat signal ratio in a sample on the temperature estimate. Comparison of the calculated temperature map and thermocouple temperature measurements shows that the maximum temperature estimation error is 0.614 degrees C, with a standard deviation of 0.06 degrees C, confirming the feasibility of this model-based temperature mapping method. The influence of sample water:fat signal ratio on the accuracy of the temperature estimate is evaluated in a water-fat mixed phantom experiment with an optimal ratio of approximately 0.66:1. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Global evaluation of a semiempirical model for yield anomalies and application to within-season yield forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Bernhard; Gornott, Christoph; Wechsung, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying the influence of weather on yield variability is decisive for agricultural management under current and future climate anomalies. We extended an existing semiempirical modeling scheme that allows for such quantification. Yield anomalies, measured as interannual differences, were modeled for maize, soybeans, and wheat in the United States and 32 other main producer countries. We used two yield data sets, one derived from reported yields and the other from a global yield data set deduced from remote sensing. We assessed the capacity of the model to forecast yields within the growing season. In the United States, our model can explain at least two-thirds (63%-81%) of observed yield anomalies. Its out-of-sample performance (34%-55%) suggests a robust yield projection capacity when applied to unknown weather. Out-of-sample performance is lower when using remote sensing-derived yield data. The share of weather-driven yield fluctuation varies spatially, and estimated coefficients agree with expectations. Globally, the explained variance in yield anomalies based on the remote sensing data set is similar to the United States (71%-84%). But the out-of-sample performance is lower (15%-42%). The performance discrepancy is likely due to shortcomings of the remote sensing yield data as it diminishes when using reported yield anomalies instead. Our model allows for robust forecasting of yields up to 2 months before harvest for several main producer countries. An additional experiment suggests moderate yield losses under mean warming, assuming no major changes in temperature extremes. We conclude that our model can detect weather influences on yield anomalies and project yields with unknown weather. It requires only monthly input data and has a low computational demand. Its within-season yield forecasting capacity provides a basis for practical applications like local adaptation planning. Our study underlines high-quality yield monitoring and statistics as critical

  4. Post-heading heat stress and yield impact in winter wheat of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Liu, Leilei; Tian, Liying; Cao, Weixing; Zhu, Yan; Asseng, Senthold

    2014-02-01

    Wheat is sensitive to high temperatures, but the spatial and temporal variability of high temperature and its impact on yield are often not known. An analysis of historical climate and yield data was undertaken to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of heat stress between heading and maturity and its impact on wheat grain yield in China. Several heat stress indices were developed to quantify heat intensity, frequency, and duration between heading and maturity based on measured maximum temperature records of the last 50 years from 166 stations in the main wheat-growing region of China. Surprisingly, heat stress between heading and maturity was more severe in the generally cooler northern wheat-growing regions than the generally warmer southern regions of China, because of the delayed time of heading with low temperatures during the earlier growing season and the exposure of the post-heading phase into the warmer part of the year. Heat stress between heading and maturity has increased in the last decades in most of the main winter wheat production areas of China, but the rate was higher in the south than in the north. The correlation between measured grain yields and post-heading heat stress and average temperature were statistically significant in the entire wheat-producing region, and explained about 29% of the observed spatial and temporal yield variability. A heat stress index considering the duration and intensity of heat between heading and maturity was required to describe the correlation of heat stress and yield variability. Because heat stress is a major cause of yield loss and the number of heat events is projected to increase in the future, quantifying the future impact of heat stress on wheat production and developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies are critical for developing food security policies in China and elsewhere. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to moniter high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendrantherma grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janka, Eshetu; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    and quantum yield of PSII remaining low until the temperature reaches 28 °C and 2) the integration of online measurements to monitor photosynthesis and PSII operating efficiency may be used to optimise dynamic greenhouse control regimes by detecting plant stress caused by extreme microclimatic conditions.......Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...

  6. Impacts of drought on grape yields in Western Cape, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Julio A.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.; Crespo, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Droughts remain a threat to grape yields in South Africa. Previous studies on the impacts of climate on grape yield in the country have focussed on the impact of rainfall and temperature separately; meanwhile, grape yields are affected by drought, which is a combination of rainfall and temperature influences. The present study investigates the impacts of drought on grape yields in the Western Cape (South Africa) at district and farm scales. The study used a new drought index that is based on simple water balance (Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index; hereafter, SPEI) to identify drought events and used a correlation analysis to identify the relationship between drought and grape yields. A crop simulation model (Agricultural Production Systems sIMulator, APSIM) was applied at the farm scale to investigate the role of irrigation in mitigating the impacts of drought on grape yield. The model gives a realistic simulation of grape yields. The Western Cape has experienced a series of severe droughts in the past few decades. The severe droughts occurred when a decrease in rainfall occurred simultaneously with an increase in temperature. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) appears to be an important driver of drought severity in the Western Cape, because most of the severe droughts occurred in El Niño years. At the district scale, the correlation between drought index and grape yield is weak ( r≈-0.5), but at the farm scale, it is strong ( r≈-0.9). This suggests that many farmers are able to mitigate the impacts of drought on grape yields through irrigation management. At the farm scale, where the impact of drought on grape yields is high, poor yield years coincide with moderate or severe drought periods. The APSIM simulation, which gives a realistic simulation of grape yields at the farm scale, suggests that grape yields become more sensitive to spring and summer droughts in the absence of irrigation. Results of this study may guide decision-making on

  7. The recommended Threshold Limit Values for heat exposure fail to maintain body core temperature within safe limits in older working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Meade, Robert D; D'Souza, Andrew W; Flouris, Andreas D; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-09-01

    The American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) Threshold Limit Values (TLV® guidelines) for work in the heat consist of work-rest (WR) allocations designed to ensure a stable core temperature that does not exceed 38°C. However, the TLV® guidelines have not been validated in older workers. This is an important shortcoming given that adults as young as 40 years demonstrate impairments in their ability to dissipate heat. We therefore evaluated body temperature responses in older adults during work performed in accordance to the TLV® recommended guidelines. On three occasions, 9 healthy older (58 ± 5 years) males performed a 120-min work-simulated protocol in accordance with the TLV® guidelines for moderate-to-heavy intensity work (360 W fixed rate of heat production) in different wet-bulb globe temperatures (WBGT). The first was 120 min of continuous (CON) cycling at 28.0°C WBGT (CON[28°C]). The other two protocols were 15-min intermittent work bouts performed with different WR cycles and WBGT: (i) WR of 3:1 at 29.0°C (WR3:1[29°C]) and (ii) WR of 1:1 at 30.0°C (WR1:1[30°C]). Rectal temperature was measured continuously. The rate of change in mean body temperature was determined via thermometry (weighting coefficients: rectal, 0.9; mean skin temperature, 0.1) and direct calorimetry. Rectal temperature exceeded 38°C in all participants in CON[28°C] and WR3:1[29°C] whereas a statistically similar proportion of workers exceeded 38°C in WR1:1[30°C] (χ 2 ; P = 0.32). The average time for rectal temperature to reach 38°C was: CON[28°C], 53 ± 7; WR3:1[29°C], 79 ± 11; and WR1:1[30°C], 100 ± 29 min. Finally, while a stable mean body temperature was not achieved in any work condition as measured by thermometry (i.e., >0°C·min -1 ; all Pheat balance as determined by direct calorimetry was achieved in WR3:1[29°C] and WR1:1[30°C] (both P ≥ 0.08). Our findings indicate that the TLV® guidelines do not prevent body core

  8. Noise thermometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Brixy, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Kakuta, Tsunemi

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs.

  9. Noise thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Brixy, H.; Kakuta, Tsunemi.

    1996-03-01

    The noise thermometry (NT) is a temperature measuring method by which the absolute temperature measurement can be performed with a very high accuracy and without any influence of ambient environments and of the thermal history of its NT sensor (electric resistor). Hence it is quite suitable for application as a standard thermometry to the in-situ temperature calibration of incore thermocouples. The KFA Juelich had played a pioneering role in the development of NT and applied the results successfully to the AVR for testing its feasibility. In this report, all about the NT including its principle, sensor elements and system configurations are presented together with the experiences in the AVR and the results of investigation to apply it to high temperature measurement. The NT can be adopted as a standard method for incore temperature measurement and in situ temperature calibration in the HTTR. (author). 85 refs

  10. Impacts of climate change on rice production in Africa and causes of simulated yield changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, Pepijn A J; Zwart, Sander J

    2018-03-01

    This study is the first of its kind to quantify possible effects of climate change on rice production in Africa. We simulated impacts on rice in irrigated systems (dry season and wet season) and rainfed systems (upland and lowland). We simulated the use of rice varieties with a higher temperature sum as adaptation option. We simulated rice yields for 4 RCP climate change scenarios and identified causes of yield declines. Without adaptation, shortening of the growing period due to higher temperatures had a negative impact on yields (-24% in RCP 8.5 in 2070 compared with the baseline year 2000). With varieties that have a high temperature sum, the length of the growing period would remain the same as under the baseline conditions. With this adaptation option rainfed rice yields would increase slightly (+8%) but they remain subject to water availability constraints. Irrigated rice yields in East Africa would increase (+25%) due to more favourable temperatures and due to CO2 fertilization. Wet season irrigated rice yields in West Africa were projected to change by -21% or +7% (without/with adaptation). Without adaptation irrigated rice yields in West Africa in the dry season would decrease by -45% with adaptation they would decrease significantly less (-15%). The main cause of this decline was reduced photosynthesis at extremely high temperatures. Simulated heat sterility hardly increased and was not found a major cause for yield decline. The implications for these findings are as follows. For East Africa to benefit from climate change, improved water and nutrient management will be needed to benefit fully from the more favourable temperatures and increased CO2 concentrations. For West Africa, more research is needed on photosynthesis processes at extreme temperatures and on adaptation options such as shifting sowing dates. © 2017 The Authors. Global Change Biology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Experimental evolution across different thermal regimes yields genetic divergence in recombination fraction but no divergence in temperature associated plastic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kathryn P; Singh, Nadia D

    2018-04-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is pervasive in nature. One mechanism underlying the evolution and maintenance of such plasticity is environmental heterogeneity. Indeed, theory indicates that both spatial and temporal variation in the environment should favor the evolution of phenotypic plasticity under a variety of conditions. Cyclical environmental conditions have also been shown to yield evolved increases in recombination frequency. Here, we use a panel of replicated experimental evolution populations of D. melanogaster to test whether variable environments favor enhanced plasticity in recombination rate and/or increased recombination rate in response to temperature. In contrast to expectation, we find no evidence for either enhanced plasticity in recombination or increased rates of recombination in the variable environment lines. Our data confirm a role of temperature in mediating recombination fraction in D. melanogaster, and indicate that recombination is genetically and plastically depressed under lower temperatures. Our data further suggest that the genetic architectures underlying plastic recombination and population-level variation in recombination rate are likely to be distinct. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  12. Influence of reaction conditions and type of alcohol on biodiesel yields and process economics of supercritical transesterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micic, Radoslav D.; Tomić, Milan D.; Kiss, Ferenc E.; Nikolić-Djorić, Emilija B.; Simikić, Mirko Ð.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Transesterification in supercritical methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol investigated. • Effect of alcohol, reaction temperature, pressure and time on yields analyzed. • Temperature has the highest impact on yield, followed by time and pressure. • Direct material and energy costs for each of the production alternatives estimated. • Lowest costs are achieved at highest yields even at very low oil prices. - Abstract: Experiments with transesterification of rapeseed oil in supercritical alcohols (methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol) were carried out in a batch reactor at various reaction temperatures (250–350 °C), working pressure (8–12 MPa), reaction time, and constant 42:1 alcohol to oil molar ratio. Influence of different alcohols and reaction conditions on biodiesel yield was investigated using linear multiple regression models. Temperature had the highest impact on yields, followed by reaction time and pressure. With increased molecular weight of alcohols, relative importance of temperature for explanation of yields decreased and relative importance of time and pressure increased. Economic assessment has revealed that transesterification in supercritical methanol has the lowest direct material and energy costs. Yield has crucial impact on process economics. Direct costs decrease with increase in biodiesel yields. Even at very low prices of oil feedstock the lowest cost is achieved at the highest yield

  13. Pressure and temperature-dependent quantum yields for the photodissociation of acetone between 279 and 327.5 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, M. A.; Heard, D. E.; Pilling, M. J.; Arnold, S. R.; Chipperfield, M. P.

    2004-03-01

    The photodissociation of acetone has been studied over the wavelength (λ) range 279-327.5 nm as a function of temperature (T) and pressure (p) using a spectroscopic method to monitor the acetyl (CH3CO) radical fragment. Above 310 nm the quantum yield (QY) is substantially smaller than previous measurements, and decreases with T. The QYs for production of CH3CO + CH3 and CH3 + CH3 + CO have been parameterised as a function of λ, p and T and used to calculate the altitude dependence of the photolysis frequency. In the upper troposphere (UT) the acetone photolysis lifetime is a factor of 2.5-10 longer, dependent upon latitude and season, than if the previously recommended QYs are used.

  14. High Resolution Thermometry for EXACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, J. S.; Nash, A. E.; Larson, M.; Mulders, N.

    2000-01-01

    High Resolution Thermometers (HRTs) based on SQUID detection of the magnetization of a paramagnetic salt or a metal alloy has been commonly used for sub-nano Kelvin temperature resolution in low temperature physics experiments. The main applications to date have been for temperature ranges near the lambda point of He-4 (2.177 K). These thermometers made use of materials such as Cu(NH4)2Br4 *2H2O, GdCl3, or PdFe. None of these materials are suitable for EXACT, which will explore the region of the He-3/He-4 tricritical point at 0.87 K. The experiment requirements and properties of several candidate paramagnetic materials will be presented, as well as preliminary test results.

  15. Increasing influence of heat stress on French maize yields from the 1960s to the 2030s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ed; Fricker, Thomas E; Challinor, Andrew J; Ferro, Christopher A T; Kit Ho, Chun; Osborne, Tom M

    2013-01-01

    Improved crop yield forecasts could enable more effective adaptation to climate variability and change. Here, we explore how to combine historical observations of crop yields and weather with climate model simulations to produce crop yield projections for decision relevant timescales. Firstly, the effects on historical crop yields of improved technology, precipitation and daily maximum temperatures are modelled empirically, accounting for a nonlinear technology trend and interactions between temperature and precipitation, and applied specifically for a case study of maize in France. The relative importance of precipitation variability for maize yields in France has decreased significantly since the 1960s, likely due to increased irrigation. In addition, heat stress is found to be as important for yield as precipitation since around 2000. A significant reduction in maize yield is found for each day with a maximum temperature above 32 °C, in broad agreement with previous estimates. The recent increase in such hot days has likely contributed to the observed yield stagnation. Furthermore, a general method for producing near-term crop yield projections, based on climate model simulations, is developed and utilized. We use projections of future daily maximum temperatures to assess the likely change in yields due to variations in climate. Importantly, we calibrate the climate model projections using observed data to ensure both reliable temperature mean and daily variability characteristics, and demonstrate that these methods work using retrospective predictions. We conclude that, to offset the projected increased daily maximum temperatures over France, improved technology will need to increase base level yields by 12% to be confident about maintaining current levels of yield for the period 2016–2035; the current rate of yield technology increase is not sufficient to meet this target. PMID:23504849

  16. Blackbody-radiation correction to the polarizability of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchalski, M.; Jentschura, U. D.; Mohr, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    The correction to the polarizability of helium due to blackbody radiation is calculated near room temperature. A precise theoretical determination of the blackbody radiation correction to the polarizability of helium is essential for dielectric gas thermometry and for the determination of the Boltzmann constant. We find that the correction, for not too high temperature, is roughly proportional to a modified hyperpolarizability (two-color hyperpolarizability), which is different from the ordinary hyperpolarizability of helium. Our explicit calculations provide a definite numerical result for the effect and indicate that the effect of blackbody radiation can be excluded as a limiting factor for dielectric gas thermometry using helium or argon.

  17. A Combined Precipitation, Yield Stress, and Work Hardening Model for Al-Mg-Si Alloys Incorporating the Effects of Strain Rate and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhr, Ole Runar; Hopperstad, Odd Sture; Børvik, Tore

    2018-05-01

    In this study, a combined precipitation, yield strength, and work hardening model for Al-Mg-Si alloys known as NaMo has been further developed to include the effects of strain rate and temperature on the resulting stress-strain behavior. The extension of the model is based on a comprehensive experimental database, where thermomechanical data for three different Al-Mg-Si alloys are available. In the tests, the temperature was varied between 20 °C and 350 °C with strain rates ranging from 10-6 to 750 s-1 using ordinary tension tests for low strain rates and a split-Hopkinson tension bar system for high strain rates, respectively. This large span in temperatures and strain rates covers a broad range of industrial relevant problems from creep to impact loading. Based on the experimental data, a procedure for calibrating the different physical parameters of the model has been developed, starting with the simplest case of a stable precipitate structure and small plastic strains, from which basic kinetic data for obstacle limited dislocation glide were extracted. For larger strains, when work hardening becomes significant, the dynamic recovery was linked to the Zener-Hollomon parameter, again using a stable precipitate structure as a basis for calibration. Finally, the complex situation of concurrent work hardening and dynamic evolution of the precipitate structure was analyzed using a stepwise numerical solution algorithm where parameters representing the instantaneous state of the structure were used to calculate the corresponding instantaneous yield strength and work hardening rate. The model was demonstrated to exhibit a high degree of predictive power as documented by a good agreement between predictions and measurements, and it is deemed well suited for simulations of thermomechanical processing of Al-Mg-Si alloys where plastic deformation is carried out at various strain rates and temperatures.

  18. Intensive up-conversion photoluminescence of Er3+-doped Bi7Ti4NbO21 ferroelectric ceramics and its temperature sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The intensive up-conversion (UC photoluminescence and temperature sensing behavior of Er3+-doped Bi7Ti4NbO21(BTN ferroelectric ceramics prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction technique have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope analyses demonstrated that the Er3+-doped BTN ceramics are single phase and uniform flake-like structure. With the Er3+ ions doping, the intensive UC emission was observed without obviously changing the properties of ferroelectric. The optimal emission intensity was obtained when Er doping level was 15 mol.%. The temperature sensing behavior was studied by fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR technique of two green UC emission bands, and the experimental data fitted very well with the function of temperature in a range of 133–573 K. It suggested that the Er3+-doped BTN ferroelectric ceramics are very good candidates for applications such as optical thermometry, electro-optical devices and bio-imaging ceramics.

  19. Climatic and technological ceilings for Chinese rice stagnation based on yield gaps and yield trend pattern analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Yang, Xiaoguang; Wang, Hesong; Li, Yong; Ye, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Climatic or technological ceilings could cause yield stagnation. Thus, identifying the principal reasons for yield stagnation within the context of the local climate and socio-economic conditions are essential for informing regional agricultural policies. In this study, we identified the climatic and technological ceilings for seven rice-production regions in China based on yield gaps and on a yield trend pattern analysis for the period 1980-2010. The results indicate that 54.9% of the counties sampled experienced yield stagnation since the 1980. The potential yield ceilings in northern and eastern China decreased to a greater extent than in other regions due to the accompanying climate effects of increases in temperature and decreases in radiation. This may be associated with yield stagnation and halt occurring in approximately 49.8-57.0% of the sampled counties in these areas. South-western China exhibited a promising scope for yield improvement, showing the greatest yield gap (30.6%), whereas the yields were stagnant in 58.4% of the sampled counties. This finding suggests that efforts to overcome the technological ceiling must be given priority so that the available exploitable yield gap can be achieved. North-eastern China, however, represents a noteworthy exception. In the north-central area of this region, climate change has increased the yield potential ceiling, and this increase has been accompanied by the most rapid increase in actual yield: 1.02 ton ha(-1) per decade. Therefore, north-eastern China shows a great potential for rice production, which is favoured by the current climate conditions and available technology level. Additional environmentally friendly economic incentives might be considered in this region. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  1. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A [Structure and Activity of Normal and Pathological Biomolecules-INSERM/UEVE U829, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf [3.Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Aubert, Pascal [Nanometric Media Laboratory, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain [Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris, ParisTech, BP 87, F-91000 Evry (France); Gaffet, Eric [Nanomaterials Research Group-UMR 5060, CNRS, UTBM, Site de Sevenans, F-90010 Belfort (France)], E-mail: jpb.cnrs@free.fr, E-mail: pcurmi@univ-evry.fr, E-mail: f.jelezko@physik.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-06-10

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  2. Effects of kernel weight and source-limitation on wheat grain yield ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRmohammadi

    2012-02-09

    Feb 9, 2012 ... Many regions need wheat cultivars that are capable of high yields when the weather is beneficial but produce stable yields when conditions are adverse. These geno- types should have high yield potential in both favorable and high temperature environments (Yang et al., 2002a;. Ahmed et al., 2011a, b).

  3. Nuclear magnetism of liquid 3He: new determination of the Landau parameter F0a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudon, V.

    2006-10-01

    He 3 is a liquid Fermi model, isotropic, with an attainable Fermi temperature and the interaction between atoms can be controlled by changing the pressure of the liquid. In this document, we present accurate NMR measurements of the nuclear magnetic susceptibility of liquid He 3 as a function of temperature and pressure. The emphasis has been placed on reliable thermometry and on He 3 pressure measurements directly in the cell to increase the measuring range until solidification, and an accurate characterization of the NMR spectrometer. Our measurements give an effective Fermi temperature 5% lower than former results. The Landau parameter F 0 a depends on the effective mass, which is determined by specific heat measurements, and consequently on the temperature scale. The re-analysis of the specific heat measurements with the PLTS-2000 temperature scale yields an effective mass increase of 4.5%. In this document, F 0 a is determined for 2 temperature scales (PLTS-2000 and Greywall). Contrarily to former measurements, the F 0 a density dependence does not show any saturation at high pressures. (author)

  4. Bright upconversion luminescence and increased Tc in CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}:Er high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Dengfeng [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Kyushu, 807-1 Shuku, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Wang Xusheng; Yao Xi [Functional Materials Research Laboratory, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xu Chaonan [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Kyushu, 807-1 Shuku, Tosu, Saga 841-0052 (Japan); Lin Jian; Sun Tiantuo [College of Material Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Cao' an Highway, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2012-05-15

    Er{sup 3+} doped CaBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBT) bismuth layered-structure high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were synthesized by the traditional solid state method. The upconversion (UC) emission properties of Er{sup 3+} doped CBT ceramics were investigated as a function of Er{sup 3+} concentration and incident pump power. A bright green upconverted emission was obtained under excitation 980 nm at room temperature. The observed strong green and weak red emission bands corresponded to the transitions from {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} to {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, respectively. The dependence of UC emission intensity on pumping power indicated that a three-photon process was involved in UC emissions. Studies of dielectric with temperature have also been carried out. Introduction of Er increased the Curie temperature of CBT, thus, making this ceramic suitable for sensor applications at higher temperatures. Because of its strong up-converted emission and increased Tc, the multifunctional high temperature piezoelectric ceramic may be useful in high temperature sensor, fluorescence thermometry, and optical-electro integration applications.

  5. High Temperature Strength of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clauer, A.H.; Hansen, Niels

    1984-01-01

    constant (except for the material with the lowest oxide content). The high temperature values of the modulus-corrected yield stresses are approximately two-thirds of the low temperature value. During high temperature creep, there is a definite indication of a threshold stress. This threshold stress......The tensile flow stress of coarse-grained dispersion strengthened Al-Al2O3 materials were measured as a function of temperature (77–873 K) and volume fraction (0.19-0.92 vol.%) of aluminium oxide. For the same material, the creep strength was determined as a function of temperature in the range 573......–873 K. The modulus-corrected yield stress (0.01 offset) is found to be temperature independent at low temperature (195–472 K). Between 473 and 573 K, the yield stress starts to decrease with increasing temperature. At high temperatures (573–873 K), the modulus-corrected yield stress is approximately...

  6. Estimation of effects of photosynthesis response functions on rice yields and seasonal variation of CO2 fixation using a photosynthesis-sterility type of crop yield model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, D.; Moriwaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a crop production model improvement: the previously adopted Michaelis-Menten (MM) type photosynthesis response function (fsub(rad-MM)) was replaced with a Prioul-Chartier (PC) type function (fsub(rad-PC)). The authors' analysis reflects concerns regarding the background effect of global warming, under simultaneous conditions of high air temperature and strong solar radiation. The MM type function fsub(rad-MM) can give excessive values leading to an overestimate of photosynthesis rate (PSN) and grain yield for paddy-rice. The MM model is applicable to many plants whose (PSN) increases concomitant with increased insolation: wheat, maize, soybean, etc. For paddy rice, the PSN apparently shows a maximum PSN. This paper proves that the MM model overestimated the PSN for paddy rice for sufficient solar radiation: the PSN using the PC model yields 10% lower values. However, the unit crop production index (CPIsub(U)) is almost independent of the MM and PC models because of respective standardization of both PSN and crop production index using average PSNsub(0) and CPIsub(0). The authors improved the estimation method using a photosynthesis-and-sterility based crop situation index (CSIsub(E)) to produce a crop yield index (CYIsub(E)), which is used to estimate rice yields in place of the crop situation index (CSI); the CSI gives a percentage of rice yields compared to normal annual production. The model calculates PSN including biomass effects, low-temperature sterility, and high-temperature injury by incorporating insolation, effective air temperature, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and effects of temperature on photosynthesis. Based on routine observation data, the method enables automated crop-production monitoring in remote regions without special observations. This method can quantify grain production early to raise an alarm in Southeast Asian countries, which must confront climate fluctuation through this era of global

  7. Titanite chronology, thermometry, and speedometry of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) calc-silicates from south Madagascar: U-Pb dates, Zr temperatures, and lengthscales of trace-element diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, R. M.; Hacker, B. R.

    2017-12-01

    Calc-silicate rocks are often overlooked as sources of pressure-temperature-time data in granulite-UHT metamorphic terranes due to the strong dependence of calc-silicate mineral assemblages on complex fluid compositions and a lack of thermodynamic data on common high-temperature calc-silicate minerals such as scapolite. In the Ediacaran-Cambrian UHT rocks of southern Madagascar, clinopyroxene-scapolite-feldspar-quartz-zircon-titanite calc-silicate rocks are wide-spread. U-Pb dates of 540-520 Ma from unaltered portions of titanite correspond to cooling of the rocks through upper-amphibolite facies and indicate UHT metamorphism occurred before 540 Ma. Zr concentrations in these domains preserve growth temperatures of 900-950 °C, consistent with peak temperatures calculated by pseudosection modeling of nearby osumilite-bearing gneisses. Younger U-Pb dates (510-490 Ma) correspond to fluid-mediated Pb loss from titanite grains, which occurred below their diffusive Pb-closure temperature, along fractures. The extent of fluid alteration is seen clearly in back-scattered electron images and Zr-, Al-, Fe-, Ce-, and Nb-concentration maps. Laser-ablation depth profiling of idioblastic titanite grains shows preserved Pb diffusion profiles at grain rims, but there is no evidence for Zr diffusion, indicating that it was effectively immobile even at UHT.

  8. Variation in the sugar yield in response to drying-off of sugarcane before harvest and the occurrence of low air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The need to irrigate sugarcane in the Brazilian Savanna is due to the lack of rain from April to September. For efficient sugar accumulation, the crop needs water stress or heat stress at the maturation stage. However, when the water deficit is intense at this stage, it occurs the reduction in crop production. The objective of this study was: (i to assess the quality of the raw material of sugarcane in different drying-off seasons before harvest; (ii to evaluate the influence of heat stress on the culture. The experiment was conducted in Santo Antônio de Goiás (GO, Brazil, in Oxisol, with CTC4 variety in cane-plant cycle. A randomized block design in a split-plot array in time was used. The treatments of the plots were five drying-off times (90, 60, 30, 15 and 0 days before harvest and, in the subplots, five seasons of the yield evaluation. Irrigation was carried out by surface drip method, which provided 50% of crop water requirement. The best results for sugar yield occurred 30 days before harvest, period in which the crop irrigation could be interrupted. The water deficit of 37.76 mm appears to be the critical limit of water shortage in the soil, from which the sugarcane yield starts to be reduced. The sugar concentration in the stalk was more influenced by low air temperatures than sugarcane yield.

  9. Comparison of winter wheat yield sensitivity to climate variables under irrigated and rain-fed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dengpan; Shen, Yanjun; Zhang, He; Moiwo, Juana P.; Qi, Yongqing; Wang, Rende; Pei, Hongwei; Zhang, Yucui; Shen, Huitao

    2016-09-01

    Crop simulation models provide alternative, less time-consuming, and cost-effective means of determining the sensitivity of crop yield to climate change. In this study, two dynamic mechanistic models, CERES (Crop Environment Resource Synthesis) and APSIM (Agricultural Production Systems Simulator), were used to simulate the yield of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) under well irrigated (CFG) and rain-fed (YY) conditions in relation to different climate variables in the North China Plain (NCP). The study tested winter wheat yield sensitivity to different levels of temperature, radiation, precipitation, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration under CFG and YY conditions at Luancheng Agro-ecosystem Experimental Stations in the NCP. The results from the CERES and APSIM wheat crop models were largely consistent and suggested that changes in climate variables influenced wheat grain yield in the NCP. There was also significant variation in the sensitivity of winter wheat yield to climate variables under different water (CFG and YY) conditions. While a temperature increase of 2°C was the threshold beyond which temperature negatively influenced wheat yield under CFG, a temperature rise exceeding 1°C decreased winter wheat grain yield under YY. A decrease in solar radiation decreased wheat grain yield under both CFG and YY conditions. Although the sensitivity of winter wheat yield to precipitation was small under the CFG, yield decreased significantly with decreasing precipitation under the rainfed YY treatment. The results also suggest that wheat yield under CFG linearly increased by ≈3.5% per 60 ppm (parts per million) increase in CO2 concentration from 380 to 560 ppm, and yield under YY increased linearly by ≈7.0% for the same increase in CO2 concentration.

  10. Climate-based statistical regression models for crop yield forecasting of coffee in humid tropical Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, M.; Rajavel, M.; Surendran, U.

    2016-12-01

    A study on the variability of coffee yield of both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora as influenced by climate parameters (rainfall (RF), maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), and mean relative humidity (RH)) was undertaken at Regional Coffee Research Station, Chundale, Wayanad, Kerala State, India. The result on the coffee yield data of 30 years (1980 to 2009) revealed that the yield of coffee is fluctuating with the variations in climatic parameters. Among the species, productivity was higher for C. canephora coffee than C. arabica in most of the years. Maximum yield of C. canephora (2040 kg ha-1) was recorded in 2003-2004 and there was declining trend of yield noticed in the recent years. Similarly, the maximum yield of C. arabica (1745 kg ha-1) was recorded in 1988-1989 and decreased yield was noticed in the subsequent years till 1997-1998 due to year to year variability in climate. The highest correlation coefficient was found between the yield of C. arabica coffee and maximum temperature during January (0.7) and between C. arabica coffee yield and RH during July (0.4). Yield of C. canephora coffee had highest correlation with maximum temperature, RH and rainfall during February. Statistical regression model between selected climatic parameters and yield of C. arabica and C. canephora coffee was developed to forecast the yield of coffee in Wayanad district in Kerala. The model was validated for years 2010, 2011, and 2012 with the coffee yield data obtained during the years and the prediction was found to be good.

  11. The influence of aging stress on the yield point phenomenon in the zirconium alloy, ozhennite 0.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, J.I.; Sayar, A.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of aging stress on the occurrence of yield points during interrupted tensile tests was studied in the temperature range 423 to 623 K for aging times of 2 to 10 min. The results indicate that at the lower temperatures the yield points are produced by dislocation rearrangements, with a minimum yield drop resulting from an aging close to the internal stress estimated by an unloading to zero stress relaxation technique. Above approximately 458 K, solute atoms can play an important role in the formation of the yield points. When this solute strain-aging occurs strongly, a maximum yield drop is at times obtained by aging at a stress close to the measured internal stress. At the higher deformation temperatures, the yield drop decreases more rapidly with increasing plastic strain, which result appears related to the greater amount of tangling of dislocations produced at the higher temperatures. (Auth.)

  12. The scaling of stress distribution under small scale yielding by T-scaling method and application to prediction of the temperature dependence on fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kenichi; Hamada, Takeshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for scaling the crack tip stress distribution under small scale yielding condition was proposed and named as T-scaling method. This method enables to identify the different stress distributions for materials with different tensile properties but identical load in terms of K or J. Then by assuming that the temperature dependence of a material is represented as the stress-strain relationship temperature dependence, a method to predict the fracture load at an arbitrary temperature from the already known fracture load at a reference temperature was proposed. This method combined the T-scaling method and the knowledge “fracture stress for slip induced cleavage fracture is temperature independent.” Once the fracture load is predicted, fracture toughness J c at the temperature under consideration can be evaluated by running elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Finally, the above-mentioned framework to predict the J c temperature dependency of a material in the ductile-to-brittle temperature distribution was validated for 0.55% carbon steel JIS S55C. The proposed framework seems to have a possibility to solve the problem the master curve is facing in the relatively higher temperature region, by requiring only tensile tests. (author)

  13. Estimating Past Temperature Change in Antarctica Based on Ice Core Stable Water Isotope Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, E. C.; Markle, B. R.; Holme, C.; Jones, T. R.; Steig, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    The magnitude of the last glacial-interglacial transition is a key target for constraining climate sensitivity on long timescales. Ice core proxy records and general circulation models (GCMs) both provide insight on the magnitude of climate change through the last glacial-interglacial transition, but appear to provide different answers. In particular, the magnitude of the glacial-interglacial temperature change reconstructed from East Antarctic ice-core water-isotope records is greater ( 9 degrees C) than that from most GCM simulations ( 6 degrees C). A possible source of this difference is error in the linear-scaling of water isotopes to temperature. We employ a novel, nonlinear temperature-reconstruction technique using the physics of water-isotope diffusion to infer past temperature. Based on new, ice-core data from the South Pole, this diffusion technique suggests East Antarctic temperature change was smaller than previously thought. We are able to confirm this result using a simple, water-isotope fractionation model to nonlinearly reconstruct temperature change at ice core locations across Antarctica based on combined oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios. Both methods produce a temperature change of 6 degrees C for South Pole, agreeing with GCM results for East Antarctica. Furthermore, both produce much larger changes in West Antarctica, also in agreement with GCM results and independent borehole thermometry. These results support the fidelity of GCMs in simulating last glacial maximum climate, and contradict the idea, based on previous work, that the climate sensitivity of current GCMs is too low.

  14. Changes in yields and their variability at different levels of global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Katelin

    2015-04-01

    An assessment of climate change impacts at different levels of global warming is crucial to inform the political discussion about mitigation targets as well as for the inclusion of climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) that generally only provide global mean temperature change as an indicator of climate change. While there is a well-established framework for the scalability of regional temperature and precipitation changes with global mean temperature change we provide an assessment of the extent to which impacts such as crop yield changes can also be described in terms of global mean temperature changes without accounting for the specific underlying emissions scenario. Based on multi-crop-model simulations of the four major cereal crops (maize, rice, soy, and wheat) on a 0.5 x 0.5 degree global grid generated within ISI-MIP, we show the average spatial patterns of projected crop yield changes at one half degree warming steps. We find that emissions scenario dependence is a minor component of the overall variance of projected yield changes at different levels of global warming. Furthermore, scenario dependence can be reduced by accounting for the direct effects of CO2 fertilization in each global climate model (GCM)/impact model combination through an inclusion of the global atmospheric CO2 concentration as a second predictor. The choice of GCM output used to force the crop model simulations accounts for a slightly larger portion of the total yield variance, but the greatest contributor to variance in both global and regional crop yields and at all levels of warming, is the inter-crop-model spread. The unique multi impact model ensemble available with ISI-MIP data also indicates that the overall variability of crop yields is projected to increase in conjunction with increasing global mean temperature. This result is consistent throughout the ensemble of impact models and across many world regions. Such a hike in yield volatility could have

  15. Time-resolved temperature measurements in a rapid compression machine using quantum cascade laser absorption in the intrapulse mode

    KAUST Repository

    Nasir, Ehson Fawad

    2016-07-16

    A temperature sensor based on the intrapulse absorption spectroscopy technique has been developed to measure in situ temperature time-histories in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Two quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) emitting near 4.55μm and 4.89μm were operated in pulsed mode, causing a frequency "down-chirp" across two ro-vibrational transitions of carbon monoxide. The down-chirp phenomenon resulted in large spectral tuning (δν ∼2.8cm-1) within a single pulse of each laser at a high pulse repetition frequency (100kHz). The wide tuning range allowed the application of the two-line thermometry technique, thus making the sensor quantitative and calibration-free. The sensor was first tested in non-reactive CO-N2 gas mixtures in the RCM and then applied to cases of n-pentane oxidation. Experiments were carried out for end of compression (EOC) pressures and temperatures ranging 9.21-15.32bar and 745-827K, respectively. Measured EOC temperatures agreed with isentropic calculations within 5%. Temperature rise measured during the first-stage ignition of n-pentane is over-predicted by zero-dimensional kinetic simulations. This work presents, for the first time, highly time-resolved temperature measurements in reactive and non-reactive rapid compression machine experiments. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Using microencapsulated fluorescent dyes for simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J; Stephan, P

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a novel particle image thermometry method based on microcapsules filled with a fluorescent dye solution is described. The microcapsules consist of a liquid core of hexadecane in which the dye is dissolved and a solid polymer shell. The combination of a temperature-sensitive dye (Pyrromethene 597-8C9) and a dye showing a relatively smaller temperature sensitivity (Pyrromethene 567) in hexadecane makes application of the ratiometric LIF possible. This is necessary to compensate for fluctuations of the illuminating pulsed Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) as well as the different particle sizes. The applicability of this measurement technique is demonstrated for a cubic test cell (10 × 10 × 10 mm 3 ) with flow and temperature fields driven by natural convection and a capillary tube (1.16 mm inner diameter) inducing a temperature gradient and a Hagen–Poiseuille velocity profile. For the first case, a light sheet illumination is used making two optical accesses necessary. In the second case an inverted microscope is used, so only one optical access is needed and a volume illumination is applied. The technique facilitates high-resolution measurements (first case: 79 × 79 μm 2 ; second case: 8 × 8 μm 2 ). Although the measurement uncertainty is high compared to LIF measurements with dissolved dyes, temperature fields can be reproduced very well, and the experimental results are in good agreement with numerical computations. (paper)

  17. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  18. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takahiro, E-mail: yamada-takahiro@aist.go.jp [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Maezawa, Masaaki [Nanoelectronics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 2, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Urano, Chiharu [National Metrology Institute of Japan, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 3, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8563 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrated RSFQ digital components of a new quantum voltage noise source. • A pseudo-random number generator and variable pulse number multiplier are designed. • Fabrication process is based on four Nb wiring layers and Nb/AlOx/Nb junctions. • The circuits successfully operated with wide dc bias current margins, 80–120%. - Abstract: We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80–120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  19. Assessment of axillary temperature for the evaluation of normal body temperature of healthy young adults at rest in a thermoneutral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marui, Shuri; Misawa, Ayaka; Tanaka, Yuki; Nagashima, Kei

    2017-02-22

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate whether recently introduced methods of measuring axillary temperature are reliable, (2) examine if individuals know their baseline body temperature based on an actual measurement, and (3) assess the factors affecting axillary temperature and reevaluate the meaning of the axillary temperature. Subjects were healthy young men and women (n = 76 and n = 65, respectively). Three measurements were obtained: (1) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a predictive mode requiring 10 s (T ax-10 s ), (2) axillary temperature using a digital thermometer in a standard mode requiring 10 min (T ax-10 min ), and (3) tympanic membrane temperature continuously measured by infrared thermometry (T ty ). The subjects answered questions about eating and exercise habits, sleep and menstrual cycles, and thermoregulation and reported what they believed their regular body temperature to be (T reg ). T reg , T ax-10 s , T ax-10 min , and T ty were 36.2 ± 0.4, 36.4 ± 0.5, 36.5 ± 0.4, and 36.8 ± 0.3 °C (mean ± SD), respectively. There were correlations between T ty and T ax-10 min , T ty and T ax-10 s , and T ax-10 min and T ax-10 s (r = .62, r = .46, and r = .59, respectively, P body mass indices and irregular menstrual cycles. Modern devices for measuring axillary temperature may have changed the range of body temperature that is recognized as normal. Core body temperature variations estimated by tympanic measurements were smaller than those estimated by axillary measurements. This variation of axillary temperature may be due to changes in the measurement methods introduced by modern devices and techniques. However, axillary temperature values correlated well with those of tympanic measurements, suggesting that the technique may reliably report an individual's state of health. It is important for individuals to know their baseline axillary temperature to evaluate subsequent

  20. Soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Faria, Rogério Teixeira; Junior, Ruy Casão; Werner, Simone Silmara; Junior, Luiz Antônio Zanão; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2016-07-01

    Crops close to small water bodies may exhibit changes in yield if the water mass causes significant changes in the microclimate of areas near the reservoir shoreline. The scientific literature describes this effect as occurring gradually, with higher intensity in the sites near the shoreline and decreasing intensity with distance from the reservoir. Experiments with two soybean cultivars were conducted during four crop seasons to evaluate soybean yield in relation to distance from the Itaipu reservoir and determine the effect of air temperature and water availability on soybean crop yield. Fifteen experimental sites were distributed in three transects perpendicular to the Itaipu reservoir, covering an area at approximately 10 km from the shoreline. The yield gradient between the site closest to the reservoir and the sites farther away in each transect did not show a consistent trend, but varied as a function of distance, crop season, and cultivar. This finding indicates that the Itaipu reservoir does not affect the yield of soybean plants grown within approximately 10 km from the shoreline. In addition, the variation in yield among the experimental sites was not attributed to thermal conditions because the temperature was similar within transects. However, the crop water availability was responsible for higher differences in yield among the neighboring experimental sites related to water stress caused by spatial variability in rainfall, especially during the soybean reproductive period in January and February.

  1. Oxygen isotope study of the Long Valley magma system, California: isotope thermometry and convection in large silicic magma bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, Ilya; Valley, John

    2002-07-01

    Products of voluminous pyroclastic eruptions with eruptive draw-down of several kilometers provide a snap-shot view of batholith-scale magma chambers, and quench pre-eruptive isotopic fractionations (i.e., temperatures) between minerals. We report analyses of oxygen isotope ratio in individual quartz phenocrysts and concentrates of magnetite, pyroxene, and zircon from individual pumice clasts of ignimbrite and fall units of caldera-forming 0.76 Ma Bishop Tuff (BT), pre-caldera Glass Mountain (2.1-0.78 Ma), and post-caldera rhyolites (0.65-0.04 Ma) to characterize the long-lived, batholith-scale magma chamber beneath Long Valley Caldera in California. Values of δ18O show a subtle 1‰ decrease from the oldest Glass Mountain lavas to the youngest post-caldera rhyolites. Older Glass Mountain lavas exhibit larger ( 1‰) variability of δ18O(quartz). The youngest domes of Glass Mountain are similar to BT in δ18O(quartz) values and reflect convective homogenization during formation of BT magma chamber surrounded by extremely heterogeneous country rocks (ranging from 2 to +29‰). Oxygen isotope thermometry of BT confirms a temperature gradient between "Late" (815 °C) and "Early" (715 °C) BT. The δ18O(quartz) values of "Early" and "Late" BT are +8.33 and 8.21‰, consistent with a constant δ18O(melt)=7.8+/-0.1‰ and 100 °C temperature difference. Zircon-melt saturation equilibria gives a similar temperature range. Values of δ18O(quartz) for different stratigraphic units of BT, and in pumice clasts ranging in pre-eruptive depths from 6 to 11 km (based on melt inclusions), and document vertical and lateral homogeneity of δ18O(melt). Worldwide, five other large-volume rhyolites, Lava Creek, Lower Bandelier, Fish Canyon, Cerro Galan, and Toba, exhibit equal δ18O(melt) values of earlier and later erupted portions in each of the these climactic caldera-forming eruptions. We interpret the large-scale δ18O homogeneity of BT and other large magma chambers as evidence

  2. Anomalous yielding in the complex metallic alloy Al13Co4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.; Wheeler, J.M.; Barnard, J.S.; Raghavan, R.; Korte-Kerzel, S.; Gille, P.; Michler, J.; Clegg, W.J.

    2013-01-01

    The single crystal deformation behaviour of orthorhombic Al 13 Co 4 has been studied below the brittle-ductile transition temperature observed in bulk material from room temperature to 600 °C, using indentation, microcompression and transmission electron microscopy. At room temperature, slip occurred most easily by dislocation motion on the (0 0 1)[0 1 0] slip system, as observed in the ductile regime at high temperatures. However, as the temperature was increased towards 600 °C, the slip pattern changed to one consisting of linear defects running perpendicular to the loading axis. Serrated flow was observed at all temperatures, although at 600 °C the magnitude of the serrations decreased. Anomalous yielding behaviour was also observed above 226 °C, where both the yield and the 2% flow stress increased with temperature, almost doubling between 226 and 600 °C. It has been suggested that this might arise due to the increasing stability of orthorhombic Al 13 Co 4 with respect to the monoclinic form with increasing temperature. This is shown to be consistent with the theoretical predictions that exist

  3. Determination of the compressive yield strength for nano-grained YAG transparent ceramic by XRD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.M.; Jiang, J.S.; Huang, Z.Y.; Chen, Y.; Liu, K.; Lu, Z.W.; Qi, J.Q.; Li, F.; He, D.W.; Lu, T.C.; Wang, Q.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Nano-grained ceramics have their unique mechanical characteristics that are not commonly found in their coarse-grained counterparts. In this study, nano-grained YAG transparent ceramics (NG-YAG) were prepared by low-temperature high-pressure technique (LTHP). The peak profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the compressive yield strength of NG-YAG. During the temperature at 450 °C, the residual micro-strain (RMS) increased with increasing loading pressure. However when the loading pressure was exceeded to 4.0 GPa the RMS exhibited a severe negative slop. The temperature effects on the compressive yield strength were also studied. It shows that the compressive yield strength of NG-YAG is 4.0 GPa and 5.0 GPa respectively at 450 °C and 350 °C. More importantly according to this investigation, a feasible technique to study the nano-grained ceramics is provided. - Graphical abstract: Fig. 2 shows the significant slope changes of calculated residual micro-strain (RMS) associated with five selected pressure-temperature conditions. Another the grain size estimated from Scherrer's formula, especially when it changes with the pressure-temperature condition is also plotted in Fig. 2. - Highlights: • Prepared the nano-grained YAG transparent ceramic by high pressure technique. • Obtained the compressive yield with different temperature. • Obtained the compressive yield of nano-grained YAG transparent ceramic.

  4. Multiscale simulation of yield strength in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen Chong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhao, Ji Jun [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China)

    2017-04-15

    One of the important requirements for the application of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel is to retain proper mechanical properties under irradiation and high-temperature conditions. To simulate the yield strength and stress-strain curve of steels during high-temperature and irradiation conditions, a multiscale simulation method consisting of both microstructure and strengthening simulations was established. The simulation results of microstructure parameters were added to a superposition strengthening model, which consisted of constitutive models of different strengthening methods. Based on the simulation results, the strength contribution for different strengthening methods at both room temperature and high-temperature conditions was analyzed. The simulation results of the yield strength in irradiation and high-temperature conditions were mainly consistent with the experimental results. The optimal application field of this multiscale model was 9Cr series (7–9 wt.%Cr) RAFM steels in a condition characterized by 0.1–5 dpa (or 0 dpa) and a temperature range of 25–500°C.

  5. Possible changes to arable crop yields by 2050.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggard, Keith W; Qi, Aiming; Ober, Eric S

    2010-09-27

    By 2050, the world population is likely to be 9.1 billion, the CO(2) concentration 550 ppm, the ozone concentration 60 ppb and the climate warmer by ca 2 degrees C. In these conditions, what contribution can increased crop yield make to feeding the world? CO(2) enrichment is likely to increase yields of most crops by approximately 13 per cent but leave yields of C4 crops unchanged. It will tend to reduce water consumption by all crops, but this effect will be approximately cancelled out by the effect of the increased temperature on evaporation rates. In many places increased temperature will provide opportunities to manipulate agronomy to improve crop performance. Ozone concentration increases will decrease yields by 5 per cent or more. Plant breeders will probably be able to increase yields considerably in the CO(2)-enriched environment of the future, and most weeds and airborne pests and diseases should remain controllable, so long as policy changes do not remove too many types of crop-protection chemicals. However, soil-borne pathogens are likely to be an increasing problem when warmer weather will increase their multiplication rates; control is likely to need a transgenic approach to breeding for resistance. There is a large gap between achievable yields and those delivered by farmers, even in the most efficient agricultural systems. A gap is inevitable, but there are large differences between farmers, even between those who have used the same resources. If this gap is closed and accompanied by improvements in potential yields then there is a good prospect that crop production will increase by approximately 50 per cent or more by 2050 without extra land. However, the demands for land to produce bio-energy have not been factored into these calculations.

  6. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature on Product Yields and Energy Recovery from Co-Feeding of Cotton Gin Trash, Cow Manure, and Microalgae: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanif, Muhammad Usman; Capareda, Sergio C.; Iqbal, Hamid; Arazo, Renato Ortiz; Baig, Muhammad Anwar

    2016-01-01

    The intensive search of new and cleaner energy catches interest in recent years due to huge consumption of fossil fuels coupled with the challenge of energy and environmental sustainability. Production of renewable and environmentally benign energy from locally available raw materials is coming in the frontline. In this work, conversion of the combined biomass (cotton gin trash, cow manure, and Microalgae [Nannochloropsis oculata]) through batch pyrolysis has been investigated. The effect of temperature to the production of energy fuels such as bio-oil, char, and biogas have been simulated considering the yield and energy content as responses. Result of the investigation generally revealed that the proportions of the different biomass did not significantly affect the product yield and energy recovery. Significant effect of temperature is evident in the simulation result of energy recovery whereby maximum conversion was achieved at 400°C for char (91 wt%), 600°C for syngas (22 wt%), and 551°C for bio-oil (48 wt%). Overall energy conversion efficiency of 75.5% was obtained at 589°C in which 15.6 MJ/kg of mixed biomass will be elevated to pyrolysis products. PMID:27043929

  7. Future Warming Increases Global Maize Yield Variability with Implications for Food Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigchelaar, M.; Battisti, D. S.; Naylor, R. L.; Ray, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    If current trends in population growth and dietary shifts continue, the world will need to produce about 70% more food by 2050, while earth's climate is rapidly changing. Rising temperatures in particular are projected to negatively impact agricultural production, as the world's staple crops perform poorly in extreme heat. Theoretical models suggest that as temperatures rise above plants' optimal temperature for performance, not only will mean yields decline rapidly, but the variability of yields will increase, even as interannual variations in climate remain unchanged. Here we use global datasets of maize production and climate variability combined with CMIP5 temperature projections to quantify how yield variability will change in major maize producing countries under 2°C and 4°C of global warming. Maize is the world's most produced crop, and is linked to other staple crops through substitution in consumption and production. We find that in warmer climates - absent any breeding gains in heat tolerance - the Coefficient of Variation (CV) of maize yields increases almost everywhere, to values much larger than present-day. This increase in CV is due both to an increase in the standard deviation of yields, and a decrease in mean yields. In locations where crop failures become the norm under high (4°C) warming (mostly in tropical, low-yield environments), the standard deviation of yields ultimately decreases. The probability that in any given year the most productive areas in the top three maize producing countries (United States, China, Brazil) have simultaneous production losses greater than 10% is virtually zero under present-day climate conditions, but increases to 12% under 2°C warming, and 89% under 4°C warming. This has major implications for global food markets and staple crop prices, affecting especially the 2.5 billion people that comprise the world's poor, who already spend the majority of their disposable income on food and are particularly vulnerable

  8. Feasibility of Noninvasive Temperature Assessment During Radiofrequency Liver Ablation on Computed Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandeya, Ganga D.; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; de Jong, Koert P.; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of noninvasive thermometry using high-resolution computer tomography (CT) for the monitoring of bovine liver during radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Methods: Radiofrequency probes were used to ablate bovine livers from 20 degrees C to 98

  9. Temperature and concentration quenching of Tb3+ emissions in Y4Al2O9 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boruc, Z.; Fetlinski, B.; Kaczkan, M.; Turczynski, S.; Pawlak, D.; Malinowski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spectroscopic properties of Tb 3+ :Y 4 Al 2 O 9 crystals are studied. ► Concentration and temperature dependencies of fluorescence are investigated. ► The cross-relaxation transfer rates are experimentally determined. ► Strong influence of cross relaxation process on 5 D 3 emission quenching is observed. ► Decays are modelled using Inokuti–Hirayama approach. - Abstract: Spectroscopic properties of trivalent terbium (Tb 3+ ) activated Y 4 Al 2 O 9 (abbreviated YAM) crystals were studied. Concentration and temperature dependent emission spectra and fluorescence dynamics profiles have been investigated in YAM:Tb 3+ in order to understand better processes responsible for quenching of the terbium 5 D 3 and 5 D 4 emissions. Decays were modelled using Inokuti–Hirayama approach to obtain information on the energy transfer mechanism. The cross-relaxation transfer rates were experimentally determined as a function of temperature and Tb 3+ concentration. The investigation revealed strong influence of cross-relaxation process on 5 D 3 emission quenching. The two different processes responsible for the increase of fluorescence quenching with growing temperature were observed, both related to thermal activation energy. For temperatures above 700 K, the temperature dependence of the emission intensity ratio ( 5 D 3 / 5 D 4 ) becomes linear and the decay times are rapidly decreasing monotonously with increasing temperature, what is confirming the potential of Y 4 Al 2 O 9 :Tb 3+ material in high temperature luminescence thermometry.

  10. Relative quantum yield of I-asterisk(2P1/2) in the tunable laser UV photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I - Effect of temperature and exciplex emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, J. E.; Leone, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength-specific relative quantum yields of metastable I from pulsed laser photodissociation of i-C3F7I and n-C3F7I in the range 265-336 nm are determined by measuring the time-resolved infrared emission from the atomic I(P-2(1/2) P-2(3/2) transition. It is shown that although this yield appears to be unity from 265 to 298 nm, it decreases dramatically at longer wavelengths. Values are also reported for the enhancement of emission from metastable I due to exciplex formation at several temperatures. The exciplex formation emission increases linearly with parent gas pressure, but decreases with increasing temperature. Absorption spectra of i- and n-C3F7I between 303 and 497 K are presented, and the effect of temperature on the quantum yields at selected wavelengths greater than 300 nm, where increasing the temperature enhances the absorption considerably, are given. The results are discussed in regard to the development of solar-pumped iodine lasers.

  11. Temperatures of exploding nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serfling, V.; Schwarz, C.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fritz, S.; Gross, C.; Kleinevoss, U.; Kunze, W.D; Lynen, U.; Mahi, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Odeh, T.; Schnittker, M.; Trautmann, W.; Woerner, A.; Xi, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Bassini, R.; Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Petruzzelli, F. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Fisiche]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Gaff, S.J.; Kunde, G.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy]|[Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab.; Imme, G.; Maddalena, V.; Nociforo, C.; Raciti, G.; Riccobene, G.; Romano, F.P.; Saija, A.; Sfienti, C.; Verde, G. [Catania Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Moehlenkamp, T.; Seidel, W. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany); Ocker, B.; Schuettauf, A. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Pochodzalla, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Trzcinski, A.; Zwieglinski, B. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland)

    1998-01-01

    Breakup temperatures in central collisions of {sup 197}Au+{sup 197}Au at bombarding energies E/A=50 to 200 MeV were determined with two methods. Isotope temperatures, deduced from double ratios of hydrogen, helium, and lithium isotopic yields, increase monotonically with bombarding energy from 5 MeV to 12 MeV, in qualitative agreement with a scenario of chemical freeze-out after adiabatic expansion. Excited-state temperatures, derived from yield ratios of states in {sup 4}He, {sup 5,6}Li, and {sup 8}Be, are about 5 MeV, independent of the projectile energy, and seem to reflect the internal temperature of fragments at their final separation from the system. (orig.)

  12. Simulation of corn yields and parameters uncertainties analysis in Hebei and Sichuang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, A.; Xue, Y.; Hartman, M. D.; Chandran, A.; Qiu, B.; Liu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Corn is one of most important agricultural production in China. Research on the impacts of climate change and human activities on corn yields is important in understanding and mitigating the negative effects of environmental factors on corn yields and maintaining the stable corn production. Using climatic data, including daily temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation from 1948 to 2010, soil properties, observed corn yields, and farmland management information, corn yields in Sichuang and Hebei Provinces of China in the past 63 years were simulated using the Daycent model, and the results was evaluated using Root mean square errors, bias, simulation efficiency, and standard deviation. The primary climatic factors influencing corn yields were examined, the uncertainties of climatic factors was analyzed, and the uncertainties of human activity parameters were also studied by changing fertilization levels and cultivated ways. The results showed that: (1) Daycent model is capable to simulate corn yields in Sichuang and Hebei provinces of China. Observed and simulated corn yields have the similar increasing trend with time. (2) The minimum daily temperature is the primary factor influencing corn yields in Sichuang. In Hebei Province, daily temperature, precipitation and wind speed significantly affect corn yields.(3) When the global warming trend of original data was removed, simulated corn yields were lower than before, decreased by about 687 kg/hm2 from 1992 to 2010; When the fertilization levels, cultivated ways were increased and decreased by 50% and 75%, respectively in the Schedule file in Daycent model, the simulated corn yields increased by 1206 kg/hm2 and 776 kg/hm2, respectively, with the enhancement of fertilization level and the improvement of cultivated way. This study provides a scientific base for selecting a suitable fertilization level and cultivated way in corn fields in China.

  13. Homemade thermometry instruments in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Mathieu; Rousson, Valentin; Zen Ruffinen, Grégoire; Hugli, Olivier

    2012-03-01

    Esophageal temperature is the gold standard for in-the-field temperature monitoring in hypothermic victims with cardiac arrest. For practical reasons, some mountain rescue teams use homemade esophageal thermometers to measure esophageal temperature; these consist of nonmedical inside/outside temperature monitoring instruments that have been modified to allow for esophageal insertion. We planned a study to determine the accuracy of such thermometers. Two of the same model of digital cabled indoor/outdoor thermometer were modified and tested in comparison with a reference thermometer. The thermometers were tested in a water bath at different temperatures between 10°C and 35.2°C. Three hundred measurements were taken with each thermometer. Our experimental study showed that both homemade thermometers provided a good correlation and a clinically acceptable agreement in comparison with the reference thermometer. Measurements were within 0.5°C in comparison with the reference thermometer 97.5% of the time. The homemade thermometers performed well in vitro, in comparison with a reference thermometer. However, because these devices in their original form are not designed for clinical use, their use should be restricted to situations when the use of a conventional esophageal thermometer is impossible. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATIC VARIABLES AND CROP AREA ON MAIZE YIELD AND VARIABILITY IN GHANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry De-Graft Acquah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change tends to have negative effects on crop yield through its influence on crop production. Understanding the relationship between climatic variables and crop area on the mean and variance of crop yield will facilitate development of appropriate policies to cope with climate change. This paper examines the effects of climatic variables and crop area on the mean and variance of maize yield in Ghana. The Just and Pope stochastic production function using the Cobb-Douglas functional form was employed. The results show that average maize yield is positively related to crop area and negatively related to rainfall and temperature. Furthermore, increase in crop area and temperature will enlarge maize yield variability while rainfall increase will decrease the variability in maize yield.

  15. Rising Temperatures Reduce Global Wheat Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Martre, P.; Rötter, R. P.; Lobell, D. B.; Cammarano, D.; Kimball, B. A.; Ottman, M. J.; Wall, G. W.; White, J. W.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Crop models are essential tools for assessing the threat of climate change to local and global food production. Present models used to predict wheat grain yield are highly uncertain when simulating how crops respond to temperature. Here we systematically tested 30 different wheat crop models of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project against field experiments in which growing season mean temperatures ranged from 15 degrees C to 32? degrees C, including experiments with artificial heating. Many models simulated yields well, but were less accurate at higher temperatures. The model ensemble median was consistently more accurate in simulating the crop temperature response than any single model, regardless of the input information used. Extrapolating the model ensemble temperature response indicates that warming is already slowing yield gains at a majority of wheat-growing locations. Global wheat production is estimated to fall by 6% for each degree C of further temperature increase and become more variable over space and time.

  16. Assessing the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfang; Pu, Feiyu; Li, Yunpeng; Xu, Jingwen; Li, Ning; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Jianping; Pan, Zhihua

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the regional relationships between climate change and crop production will benefit strategic decisions for future agricultural adaptation in China. In this study, the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield over the past three decades in Inner Mongolia, China, were explored based on the daily climate variables from 1981-2014 and detailed observed data of spring wheat from 1981-2014. Inner Mongolia was divided into three different climate type regions, the eastern, central and western regions. The data were gathered from 10 representative agricultural meteorological experimental stations in Inner Mongolia and analysed with the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM) model. First, the performance of the APSIM model in the spring wheat planting areas of Inner Mongolia was tested. Then, the key climatic factors limiting the phenophases and yield of spring wheat were identified. Finally, the responses of spring wheat phenophases and yield to climate change were further explored regionally. Our results revealed a general yield reduction of spring wheat in response to the pronounced climate warming from 1981 to 2014, with an average of 3564 kg·ha-1. The regional differences in yields were significant. The maximum potential yield of spring wheat was found in the western region. However, the minimum potential yield was found in the middle region. The air temperature and soil surface temperature were the optimum climatic factors that affected the key phenophases of spring wheat in Inner Mongolia. The influence of the average maximum temperature on the key phenophases of spring wheat was greater than the average minimum temperature, followed by the relative humidity and solar radiation. The most insensitive climatic factors were precipitation, wind speed and reference crop evapotranspiration. As for the yield of spring wheat, temperature, solar radiation and air relative humidity were major meteorological

  17. Assessing the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield in Inner Mongolia, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Zhao

    Full Text Available Understanding the regional relationships between climate change and crop production will benefit strategic decisions for future agricultural adaptation in China. In this study, the combined effects of climatic factors on spring wheat phenophase and grain yield over the past three decades in Inner Mongolia, China, were explored based on the daily climate variables from 1981-2014 and detailed observed data of spring wheat from 1981-2014. Inner Mongolia was divided into three different climate type regions, the eastern, central and western regions. The data were gathered from 10 representative agricultural meteorological experimental stations in Inner Mongolia and analysed with the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM model. First, the performance of the APSIM model in the spring wheat planting areas of Inner Mongolia was tested. Then, the key climatic factors limiting the phenophases and yield of spring wheat were identified. Finally, the responses of spring wheat phenophases and yield to climate change were further explored regionally. Our results revealed a general yield reduction of spring wheat in response to the pronounced climate warming from 1981 to 2014, with an average of 3564 kg·ha-1. The regional differences in yields were significant. The maximum potential yield of spring wheat was found in the western region. However, the minimum potential yield was found in the middle region. The air temperature and soil surface temperature were the optimum climatic factors that affected the key phenophases of spring wheat in Inner Mongolia. The influence of the average maximum temperature on the key phenophases of spring wheat was greater than the average minimum temperature, followed by the relative humidity and solar radiation. The most insensitive climatic factors were precipitation, wind speed and reference crop evapotranspiration. As for the yield of spring wheat, temperature, solar radiation and air relative humidity were major

  18. Climate Variability and Yields of Major Staple Food Crops in Northern Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amikuzuno, J.

    2012-12-01

    Climate variability, the short-term fluctuations in average weather conditions, and agriculture affect each other. Climate variability affects the agroecological and growing conditions of crops and livestock, and is recently believed to be the greatest impediment to the realisation of the first Millennium Development Goal of reducing poverty and food insecurity in arid and semi-arid regions of developing countries. Conversely, agriculture is a major contributor to climate variability and change by emitting greenhouse gases and reducing the agroecology's potential for carbon sequestration. What however, is the empirical evidence of this inter-dependence of climate variability and agriculture in Sub-Sahara Africa? In this paper, we provide some insight into the long run relationship between inter-annual variations in temperature