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Sample records for thermographic imaging damage

  1. Super-resolution thermographic imaging using blind structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas; Gruber, Jürgen; Mayr, Günther

    2017-07-01

    Using an infrared camera for thermographic imaging allows the contactless temperature measurement of many surface pixels simultaneously. From the measured surface data, the structure below the surface, embedded inside a sample or tissue, can be reconstructed and imaged, if heated by an excitation light pulse. The main drawback in active thermographic imaging is the degradation of the spatial resolution with the imaging depth, which results in blurred images for deeper lying structures. We circumvent this degradation by using blind structured illumination combined with a non-linear joint sparsity reconstruction algorithm. We demonstrate imaging of a line pattern and a star-shaped structure through a 3 mm thick steel sheet with a resolution four times better than the width of the thermal point-spread-function. The structured illumination is realized by parallel slits cut in an aluminum foil, where the excitation coming from a flashlight can penetrate. This realization of super-resolution thermographic imaging demonstrates that blind structured illumination allows thermographic imaging without high degradation of the spatial resolution for deeper lying structures. The groundbreaking concept of super-resolution can be transferred from optics to diffusive imaging by defining a thermal point-spread-function, which gives the principle resolution limit for a certain signal-to-noise ratio, similar to the Abbe limit for a certain optical wavelength. In future work, the unknown illumination pattern could be the speckle pattern generated by a short laser pulse inside a light scattering sample or tissue.

  2. A review of thermographic techniques for damage investigation in composites

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    Laura Vergani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is a review of scientific results in the literature, related to the application of thermographic techniques to composite materials. Thermography is the analysis of the surface temperature of a body by infrared rays detection via a thermal-camera. The use of this technique is mainly based on the modification of the surface temperature of a material, when it is stimulated by means of a thermal or mechanical external source. The presence of defects, in fact, induces a localized variation in its temperature distribution and, then, the measured values of the surface temperature can be used to localize and evaluate the dimensions and the evolution of defects. In the past, many applications of thermography were proposed on homogeneous materials, but only recently this technique has also been extended to composites. In this work several applications of thermography to fibres reinforced plastics are presented. Thermographic measurements are performed on the surface of the specimens, while undergoing static and dynamic tensile loading. The joint analysis of thermal and mechanical data allows one to assess the damage evolution and to study the damage phenomenon from both mechanical and energetic viewpoints. In particular, one of the main issues is to obtain information about the fatigue behaviour of composite materials, by following an approach successfully applied to homogenous materials. This approach is based on the application of infrared thermography on specimens subjected to static or stepwise dynamic loadings and on the definition of a damage stress, D, that is correlated to the fatigue strength of the material. A wide series of experimental fatigue tests has been carried out to verify if the value of the damage stress, D, is correlated with the fatigue strength of the material. The agreement between the different values is good, showing the reliability of the presented thermographic techniques, to the study of composite

  3. Pilot Study on The Thermographic Change of Seven Acupoints by Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging

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    Lee Yun-kyu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was designed to find out the effect of seven acupoints of stroke in cerebrovascular hemiplegia patients. Methods : This study was performed on 6 patients with cerebrovascular hemiplegia (test group and 6 health persons(control group. We measured temperature of skin surface of test and control group using digital infrared thermographic imaging(D.I.T.I. after acupunture on seven acupoints of stroke. And we calculated difference of skin temperature between healthful and affected side for each groups. Results : There was significant difference in area 3 in both two groups between before and after acupuncture. But in general there was no significant difference between two groups on thermographic change. Conclusions : This is pilot study, so further studies are required to find out the effect of seven acupoints of stroke in cerebrovascular hemiplegia patients.

  4. Temperature measurements on fast-rotating objects using a thermographic camera with an optomechanical image derotator

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    Altmann, Bettina; Pape, Christian; Reithmeier, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Increasing requirements concerning the quality and lifetime of machine components in industrial and automotive applications require comprehensive investigations of the components in conditions close to the application. Irregularities in heating of mechanical parts reveal regions with increased loading of pressure, draft or friction. In the long run this leads to damage and total failure of the machine. Thermographic measurements of rotating objects, e.g., rolling bearings, brakes, and clutches provide an approach to investigate those defects. However, it is challenging to measure fast-rotating objects accurately. Currently one contact-free approach is performing stroboscopic measurements using an infrared sensor. The data acquisition is triggered so that the image is taken once per revolution. This leads to a huge loss of information on the majority of the movement and to motion blur. The objective of this research is showing the potential of using an optomechanical image derotator together with a thermographic camera. The derotator follows the rotation of the measurement object so that quasi-stationary thermal images during motion can be acquired by the infrared sensor. Unlike conventional derotators which use a glass prism to achieve this effect, the derotator within this work is equipped with a sophisticated reflector assembly. These reflectors are made of aluminum to transfer infrared radiation emitted by the rotating object. Because of the resulting stationary thermal image, the operation can be monitored continuously even for fast-rotating objects. The field of view can also be set to a small off-axis region of interest which then can be investigated with higher resolution or frame rate. To depict the potential of this approach, thermographic measurements on a rolling bearings in different operating states are presented.

  5. Treatment of Reflex sympathetic dystrophy with Bee venom -Using Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging-

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    Myung-jang Lim

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this case is to report the patient with Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, who is improved by Bee venom. Method : We treated the patient with Bee venom who was suffering from Reflex sympathetic dystrophy, using Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging and Verbal Numerical Rating Scale(VNRS to evaluate the therapeutic effects. We compared the temperature of the patient body before and after treatment. Result and Conclusion : We found that Bee venom had excellent outcome to relieve pain, atrophy and ankle joint ROM, and that Bee venom also had clinical effect on hypothermia on the Digital Infrared Thermographic Imaging.

  6. Application of SVM classifier in thermographic image classification for early detection of breast cancer

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    Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the application of machine learning algorithms for early detection of breast cancer on the basis of thermographic images. Supervised learning model: Support vector machine (SVM) and Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm (SMO) for the training of SVM classifier were implemented. The SVM classifier was included in a client-server application which enables to create a training set of examinations and to apply classifiers (including SVM) for the diagnosis and early detection of the breast cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of SVM classifier were calculated based on the thermographic images from studies. Furthermore, the heuristic method for SVM's parameters tuning was proposed.

  7. Assessment of lower extremity ischemia using smartphone thermographic imaging

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    Peter H. Lin, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional diagnostic modalities for assessing arterial circulation or tissue perfusion include blood pressure measurement, ultrasound evaluation, and contrast-based angiographic assessment. An infrared thermal camera can detect infrared radiation energy from the human body, which generates a thermographic image to allow tissue perfusion analysis. We describe a smartphone-based miniature thermal imaging system that can be used as an adjunctive imaging modality to assess tissue perfusion. This smartphone-based camera device is noninvasive, simple to use, and cost-effective in assessing patients with lower extremity tissue perfusion. Assessment of patients with lower extremity arterial ischemia can be performed by a variety of diagnostic modalities, including ankle-brachial index, absolute systolic ankle or toe pressure, transcutaneous oximetry, arterial Doppler waveform, arterial duplex ultrasound, computed tomography scan, arterial angiography, and thermal imaging. We herein describe a noninvasive imaging modality using smartphone-based infrared thermography.

  8. Thermographic Imaging of the Superficial Temperature in Racing Greyhounds before and after the Race

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    Mari Vainionpää

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp. at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  9. Thermographic imaging of the superficial temperature in racing greyhounds before and after the race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainionpää, Mari; Tienhaara, Esa-Pekka; Raekallio, Marja; Junnila, Jouni; Snellman, Marjatta; Vainio, Outi

    2012-01-01

    A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp.) at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis) were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  10. Thermographic analysis of waveguide-irradiated insect pupae

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    Olsen, Richard G.; Hammer, Wayne C.

    1982-01-01

    Pupae of the insect Tenebrio molitor L. were thermographically imaged during waveguide irradiation through longitudinal slots. T. molitor pupae have been subjects of microwave-induced teratology for a number of years, but until now the smallness of the insect has prevented detailed dosimetry. High-resolution thermographic imaging equipment was used to obtain the magnitude and spatial distribution of absorbed microwave energy at three frequencies, 1.3, 5.95, and 10 GHz. The detail of the thermal images obtained is sufficient to show the differential heating of structures as small as a single insect leg. Results show that the electrical properties of the head, thorax, and abdomen are sufficiently different to seriously impair the usefulness of any theoretical dosimetric model of homogeneous composition. Some general features of correlation with a slab model in waveguide are given.

  11. Use of thermographic imaging in clinical diagnosis of small animal: preliminary notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Redaelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION. The authors, after a description of the physics of infrared thermographic technique (IRT, analyze the reading of images and the main applications in the veterinary field, compared to the existing literature on the subject and to their experimental researches. IRT lends itself to countless applications in biology, thanks to its characteristics of versatility, lack of invasiveness and high sensitivity. Probably the major limitation to its application in the animal lies in the ease of use and in its extreme sensitivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS. From September 2009 to October 2010, the experimental investigation with the thermo camera took into consideration 110 animals (92 dogs and 18 cats, without any selection criteria. All patients were brought to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine in Milan University by the owner, to be examined by a specialist, or to undergo one of the following diagnostic procedures: X-rays, computed tomography, or ultrasound examinations; finally some patients were brought in for surgical procedures. With the consent of the owner, 1 to 10 thermographic images were recorded from each clinical case. Results. In this first experimental investigation, thermography has shown a high sensitivity (100%, but a low specificity (44%. This figure excludes the use of thermal imaging technology to replace other imaging techniques such as radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, it does not show any ability to recognize the etiology of the disease, but only the thermal alteration, and this is restricting its use. However, this experimental study has demonstrated that thermography can be used in veterinary medicine, and specifically in dogs and cats. It is hoped that in the field of targeted diseases this technique will become an important tool for diagnostic purposes by using working protocols validated and repeatable.

  12. Thermographic image analysis for classification of ACL rupture disease, bone cancer, and feline hyperthyroid, with Gabor filters

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    Alvandipour, Mehrdad; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Mishra, Deependra K.; Dahal, Rohini; Lama, Norsang; Marino, Dominic J.; Sackman, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Thermography and pattern classification techniques are used to classify three different pathologies in veterinary images. Thermographic images of both normal and diseased animals were provided by the Long Island Veterinary Specialists (LIVS). The three pathologies are ACL rupture disease, bone cancer, and feline hyperthyroid. The diagnosis of these diseases usually involves radiology and laboratory tests while the method that we propose uses thermographic images and image analysis techniques and is intended for use as a prescreening tool. Images in each category of pathologies are first filtered by Gabor filters and then various features are extracted and used for classification into normal and abnormal classes. Gabor filters are linear filters that can be characterized by the two parameters wavelength λ and orientation θ. With two different wavelength and five different orientations, a total of ten different filters were studied. Different combinations of camera views, filters, feature vectors, normalization methods, and classification methods, produce different tests that were examined and the sensitivity, specificity and success rate for each test were produced. Using the Gabor features alone, sensitivity, specificity, and overall success rates of 85% for each of the pathologies was achieved.

  13. Thermographic Non-Destructive Evaluation for Natural Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

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    Hai Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, including mineral and plant fibers, are increasingly used for polymer composite materials due to their low environmental impact. In this paper, thermographic non-destructive inspection techniques were used to evaluate and characterize basalt, jute/hemp and bagasse fibers composite panels. Different defects were analyzed in terms of impact damage, delaminations and resin abnormalities. Of particular interest, homogeneous particleboards of sugarcane bagasse, a new plant fiber material, were studied. Pulsed phase thermography and principal component thermography were used as the post-processing methods. In addition, ultrasonic C-scan and continuous wave terahertz imaging were also carried out on the mineral fiber laminates for comparative purposes. Finally, an analytical comparison of different methods was given.

  14. Infrared-thermographic screening of the activity and enantioselectivity of enzymes.

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    Reetz, M T; Hermes, M; Becker, M H

    2001-05-01

    The infrared radiation caused by the heat of reaction of an enantioselective enzyme-catalyzed transformation can be detected by modern photovoltaic infrared (IR)-thermographic cameras equipped with focal-plane array detectors. Specifically, in the lipase-catalyzed enantioselective acylation of racemic 1-phenylethanol, the (R)- and (S)-substrates are allowed to react separately in the wells of microtiter plates, the (R)-alcohol showing hot spots in the IR-thermographic images. Thus, highly enantioselective enzymes can be identified at kinetic resolution.

  15. Thermographs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Thermograph data collection consists primary of weekly circular charts recording continuous temperature at a given station. The collection also includes...

  16. Evaluation of the udder health status in subclinical mastitis affected dairy cows through bacteriological culture, somatic cell count and thermographic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolami, A; Fiore, E; Gianesella, M; Corrò, M; Catania, S; Morgante, M

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis in dairy cows is a big economic loss for farmers. The monitoring of subclinical mastitis is usually performed through Somatic Cell Count (SCC) in farm but there is the need of new diagnostic systems able to quickly identify cows affected by subclinical infections of the udder. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential application of thermographic imaging compared to SCC and bacteriological culture for infection detection in cow affected by subclinical mastitis and possibly to discriminate between different pathogens. In this study we evaluated the udder health status of 98 Holstein Friesian dairy cows with high SCC in 4 farms. From each cow a sample of milk was collected from all the functional quarters and submitted to bacteriological culture, SCC and Mycoplasma spp. culture. A thermographic image was taken from each functional udder quarter and nipple. Pearson's correlations and Analysis of Variance were performed in order to evaluate the different diagnostic techniques. The most frequent pathogen isolated was Staphylococcus aureus followed by Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNS), Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus agalactiae and others. The Somatic Cell Score (SCS) was able to discriminate (pnegative at the bacteriological culture except for cows with infection caused by CNS. Infrared thermography was correlated to SCS (pnegative cows. Thermographic imaging seems to be promising in evaluating the inflammation status of cows affected by subclinical mastitis but seems to have a poor diagnostic value.

  17. Image processing and pattern recognition with CVIPtools MATLAB toolbox: automatic creation of masks for veterinary thermographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Deependra K.; Umbaugh, Scott E.; Lama, Norsang; Dahal, Rohini; Marino, Dominic J.; Sackman, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    CVIPtools is a software package for the exploration of computer vision and image processing developed in the Computer Vision and Image Processing Laboratory at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. CVIPtools is available in three variants - a) CVIPtools Graphical User Interface, b) CVIPtools C library and c) CVIPtools MATLAB toolbox, which makes it accessible to a variety of different users. It offers students, faculty, researchers and any user a free and easy way to explore computer vision and image processing techniques. Many functions have been implemented and are updated on a regular basis, the library has reached a level of sophistication that makes it suitable for both educational and research purposes. In this paper, the detail list of the functions available in the CVIPtools MATLAB toolbox are presented and how these functions can be used in image analysis and computer vision applications. The CVIPtools MATLAB toolbox allows the user to gain practical experience to better understand underlying theoretical problems in image processing and pattern recognition. As an example application, the algorithm for the automatic creation of masks for veterinary thermographic images is presented.

  18. Aerial thermography from low-cost UAV for the generation of thermographic digital terrain models

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    Lagüela, S.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Roca, D.; Lorenzo, H.

    2015-03-01

    Aerial thermography is performed from a low-cost aerial vehicle, copter type, for the acquisition of data of medium-size areas, such as neighbourhoods, districts or small villages. Thermographic images are registered in a mosaic subsequently used for the generation of a thermographic digital terrain model (DTM). The thermographic DTM can be used with several purposes, from classification of land uses according to their thermal response to the evaluation of the building prints as a function of their energy performance, land and water management. In the particular case of buildings, apart from their individual evaluation and roof inspection, the availability of thermographic information on a DTM allows for the spatial contextualization of the buildings themselves and the general study of the surrounding area for the detection of global effects such as heat islands.

  19. Multi-physics damage sensing in nano-engineered structural composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Villoria, Roberto Guzman; Yamamoto, Namiko; Miravete, Antonio; Wardle, Brian L

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive evaluation techniques can offer viable diagnostic and prognostic routes to mitigating failures in engineered structures such as bridges, buildings and vehicles. However, existing techniques have significant drawbacks, including poor spatial resolution and limited in situ capabilities. We report here a novel approach where structural advanced composites containing electrically conductive aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are ohmically heated via simple electrical contacts, and damage is visualized via thermographic imaging. Damage, in the form of cracks and other discontinuities, usefully increases resistance to both electrical and thermal transport in these materials, which enables tomographic full-field damage assessment in many cases. Characteristics of the technique include the ability for real-time measurement of the damage state during loading, low-power operation (e.g. 15 deg. C rise at 1 W), and beyond state-of-the-art spatial resolution for sensing damage in composites. The enhanced thermographic technique is a novel and practical approach for in situ monitoring to ascertain structural health and to prevent structural failures in engineered structures such as aerospace and automotive vehicles and wind turbine blades, among others.

  20. Advances in thermographic signal reconstruction

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    Shepard, Steven M.; Frendberg Beemer, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Since its introduction in 2001, the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method has emerged as one of the most widely used methods for enhancement and analysis of thermographic sequences, with applications extending beyond industrial NDT into biomedical research, art restoration and botany. The basic TSR process, in which a noise reduced replica of each pixel time history is created, yields improvement over unprocessed image data that is sufficient for many applications. However, examination of the resulting logarithmic time derivatives of each TSR pixel replica provides significant insight into the physical mechanisms underlying the active thermography process. The deterministic and invariant properties of the derivatives have enabled the successful implementation of automated defect recognition and measurement systems. Unlike most approaches to analysis of thermography data, TSR does not depend on flawbackground contrast, so that it can also be applied to characterization and measurement of thermal properties of flaw-free samples. We present a summary of recent advances in TSR, a review of the underlying theory and examples of its implementation.

  1. "Eyeball test" of thermographic patterns for predicting a successful lateral infraclavicular block.

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    Andreasen, Asger M; Linnet, Karen E; Asghar, Semera; Rothe, Christian; Rosenstock, Charlotte V; Lange, Kai H W; Lundstrøm, Lars H

    2017-11-01

    Increased distal skin temperature can be used to predict the success of lateral infraclavicular (LIC) block. We hypothesized that an "eyeball test" of specific infrared thermographic patterns after LIC block could be used to determine block success. In this observational study, five observers trained in four distinct thermographic patterns independently evaluated thermographic images of the hands of 40 patients at baseline and at one-minute intervals for 30 min after a LIC block. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of a positive and a negative test were estimated to evaluate the validity of specific thermographic patterns for predicting a successful block. Sensory and motor block of the musculocutaneous, radial, ulnar, and median nerves defined block success. Fleiss' kappa statistics of multiple interobserver agreements were used to evaluate reliability. As a diagnostic test, the defined specific thermographic patterns of the hand predicted a successful block with increasing accuracy over the 30-min observation period. Block success was predicted with a sensitivity of 92.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.8 to 96.2) and with a specificity of 84.0% (95% CI, 70.3 to 92.4) at min 30. The Fleiss' kappa for the five observers was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.96). We conclude that visual evaluation by an eyeball test of specific thermographic patterns of the blocked hands may be useful as a valid and reliable diagnostic test for predicting a successful LIC block.

  2. Laser Doppler imaging, thermographic imaging, and tissue oxygen saturation measurements detect early skin reactions during breast radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David K.; Harrison, Eileen M.; Newton, David J.; Windsor, Phyllis M.

    2001-05-01

    A range of acute skin reactions, ranging from mild erythema to moist desquamation, can be seen in patients receiving standard fractionated radiotherapy to the breast for conservation therapy of breast carcinoma. In a number of cases these reactions can cause considerable discomfort and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. In previous studies we have used the techniques of laser Doppler imaging, digital thermographic imaging and lightguide spectrophotometry to study oxygen supply and blood flow in inflammatory reactions induced experimentally in forearm skin. The present study is an attempt to use the same techniques to investigate whether any or all of them can detect changes in breast skin very early on in the course of radiotherapy treatment. A further aim of the longer term study is to investigate to what extent these early changes may be able to predict the occurrence later of severe acute or delayed reactions.

  3. Thermographic and microscopic evaluation of LARS knee ligament tearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pătraşcu, Jenel Marian; Amarandei, Mihaela; Kun, Karla Noemy; Borugă, Ovidiu; Totorean, Alina; Andor, Bogdan; Florescu, Sorin

    2014-01-01

    Damage to knee articular ligaments causes important functional problems and adversely affects particularly the stability of the knee joint. Several methods were developed in order to repair damage to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which employ autografts, allografts, as well as synthetic ligaments. One such synthetic scaffold, the ligament advanced reinforcement system (LARS) synthetic ligament is made of non-absorbing polyethylene terephthalate fibers whose structure allow tissue ingrowths in the intra-articular part, improving the stability of the joint. The LARS ligament is nowadays widely used in modern knee surgery in the Europe, Canada, China or Japan. This paper evaluates LARS ligament from two perspectives. The first regards a study done by the Orthopedics Clinic II, Timisoara, Romania, which compared results obtained by employing two techniques of ACL repair - the Bone-Tendon-Bone (BTB) or LARS arthroscopic, intra-articular techniques. This study found that patients treated with the BTB technique presented with an IKDC score of 45.82±1.14 units preoperative, with increasing values in the first nine months after each implant post-surgical ligament restoration, reaching an average value of 75.92 ± 2.88 units postoperative. Patients treated with the LARS technique presented with an IKDC score of 43.64 ± 1.11 units preoperative, and a score of 77.32 ± 2.71 units postoperative. The second perspective describes the thermographic and microscopic analysis of an artificial knee ligament tearing or loosening. The objective of the study was to obtain information regarding the design of artificial ligaments in order to expand their lifespan and avoid complications such as recurring synovitis, osteoarthritis and trauma of the knee joint. Thermographic data has shown that tearing begins from the inside out, thus improving the inner design of the ligament would probably enhance its durability. An optical microscope was employed to obtain images of structural

  4. Quantitative thermographic imagery in the evaluation of antenna heating patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, J.A.; Baughman, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    In quantitative thermographic imaging the temperature distribution of a surface is inferred from measurement of the radiant energy leaving the surface. Digital image processing and calibration methods allow the subtraction of preexisting temperature gradients so that precise heating patterns can be obtained. The primary limitation of quantitative thermography is that noise in the photodetector limits minimum resolvable temperature difference to around 0.5 0 C since frame integration cannot be used on the transient temperature distributions expected. The authors have developed and evaluated nonlinear smoothing operators which reduce the noise variance so that temperature differences of 0.1 0 C can be measured. They have applied digital thermographic imaging in the measurement of heating patterns obtained from two roughly orthogonal microwave antennas: a spiral antenna and a bow-tie antenna. These two antenna types are orthogonal in that the spiral has an H-field essentially normal to the phantom surface and the bow-tie has an E-field essentially normal to the surface. The resulting heating patterns clearly show the effect of non-uniform phantom electrical properties on the heating profiles obtained

  5. Thermographic Inspection of Fatigue Crack by Using Contact Thermal Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Hyu [Korean University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Fatigue crack was detected from a temperature change around surface crack using the thermographic technique. Thermal gradient across the crack decreased very much due to thermal resistance of contact surface in the crack. Heat diffusion flow passing through the discontinuity was visualized in temperature by infrared camera to find and locate the crack. A fatigue crack specimen(SM-45C), which was prepared according to KS specification and notched in its center to initiate fatigue crack from the notch tip, was heated by halogen lamp at the end of one side to generate a heat diffusion flow in lateral direction. A abrupt jump in temperature across the fatigue crack was observed in thermographic image, by which the crack could be located and sized from temperature distribution.

  6. Thermographic Inspection of Fatigue Crack by Using Contact Thermal Resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Yong; Kim, No Hyu

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue crack was detected from a temperature change around surface crack using the thermographic technique. Thermal gradient across the crack decreased very much due to thermal resistance of contact surface in the crack. Heat diffusion flow passing through the discontinuity was visualized in temperature by infrared camera to find and locate the crack. A fatigue crack specimen(SM-45C), which was prepared according to KS specification and notched in its center to initiate fatigue crack from the notch tip, was heated by halogen lamp at the end of one side to generate a heat diffusion flow in lateral direction. A abrupt jump in temperature across the fatigue crack was observed in thermographic image, by which the crack could be located and sized from temperature distribution.

  7. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Onkologicheskij Nauchnyj Tsentr)

    1983-10-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using /sup 67/Ga-citrate and /sup 111/In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors.

  8. Radionuclide and thermographic diagnosis of head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdasarov, Yu.B.; Lenskaya, O.P.; Polyakov, B.I.; Belkina, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide and thermographic studies using 67 Ga-citrate and 111 In-bleomycin were performed in 129 patients with laryngeal cancer, chemodectoma of the neck, retinoblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma of the orbital and facial soft tissues and cancer of the tongue. Elevated amounts of the radiopharmaceuticals were found in patients with tumors. In thermographic studies higher temperature activity corresponding to the tumor was noted. Radio-nuclide thermographic studies extend diagnostic opportunities for head and neck tumors

  9. Implementation of thermographers' certification in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Laerte; Alves, Luiz M.; da Costa Bortoni, Edson

    2011-05-01

    In recent years Brazil has experienced extraordinary growth despite the recent economic global crisis. The demand for infrared thermography products and services has accompanied this growth. Like other non-destructive testing and inspection, the results obtained by thermography are highly dependent on the skills of thermographer. Therefore, it is very important to establish a serious and recognized process of certification to assess thermographers' qualifications and help services suppliers to establish credibility with their customers and increase the confidence of these costumers on the quality of these services. The Brazilian Society of Non-Destructive Testing and Inspection, ABENDI, a non-profitable, private technical-scientific entity, recognized nationally and internationally, has observed the necessity of starting a process for certification of thermographers in Brazil. With support of a work group composed by experts from oil and energy industries, transportation, universities and manufactures, the activities started in 2005. This paper describes the economic background required for installation of the certification process, its initial steps, the main characteristics of the Brazilian certification and the expectation for initiating the certification process.

  10. Methodology, models and algorithms in thermographic diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Živčák, Jozef; Madarász, Ladislav; Rudas, Imre J

    2013-01-01

    This book presents  the methodology and techniques of  thermographic applications with focus primarily on medical thermography implemented for parametrizing the diagnostics of the human body. The first part of the book describes the basics of infrared thermography, the possibilities of thermographic diagnostics and the physical nature of thermography. The second half includes tools of intelligent engineering applied for the solving of selected applications and projects. Thermographic diagnostics was applied to problematics of paraplegia and tetraplegia and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The results of the research activities were created with the cooperation of the four projects within the Ministry of Education, Science, Research and Sport of the Slovak Republic entitled Digital control of complex systems with two degrees of freedom, Progressive methods of education in the area of control and modeling of complex object oriented systems on aircraft turbocompressor engines, Center for research of control of te...

  11. The zombie thermographer apocalypse preparedness 101: zombie thermographer pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Fred

    2013-05-01

    Fact: The U.S Government Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, rather remarkably has dedicated part of their web site to" Zombie Preparedness". See: http://www.cdc.gov/phpr/zombies.htm for more information. This is a tongue-incheek campaign with messages to engage audiences with the hazards of unpreparedness. The CDC director, U.S. Assistant Surgeon General Ali S. Khan (RET), MD, MPH notes, "If you are generally well equipped to deal with a zombie apocalypse you will be prepared for a hurricane, pandemic, earthquake, or terrorist attack. Make a plan, and be prepared!" (CDC Website, April 26th, 2013). Today we can make an easy comparison between the humor that the CDC is bringing to light, and what is actually happening in the Thermographic Industry. It must be acknowledge there are "Zombie Thermographers" out there. At times, it can be observed from the sidelines as a pandemic apocalypse attacking the credibility and legitimacy of the science and the industry that so many have been working to advance for over 30 years. This paper outlines and explores the trends currently taking place, the very real risks to facility plant, property, and human life as a result, and the strategies to overcome these problems.

  12. Automatic recognition of thermographic examinations for early detection of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the processing and classification of thermographic examinations taken with device developed by Braster SA. The device records the surface temperature of the breast skin using the liquid crystal matrices. Images are analyzed with the use of machine learning algorithms. The result of classification is available after a few minutes and when it detects suspicious changes patient may be referred for detailed examinations.

  13. Interest and limits of microwaves thermographic measurements for the diagnosis and pronostic of local acute exposure in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daburon, F.; Lefaix, J.L.; Remy, J.; Fayart, G.; Tricaud, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Microwaves thermographic measurements were carried out on 30 pigs following local exposure of the thigh by a collimated source of iridium 192 at doses ranging between 30 and 84 Gy (2 cm depth dose). Measurement and data processing methods were developed both qualitatively (thermographic images vs anatomo-clinical evolution of the lesions) and quantitatively (by means of indexes calculated from the rough thermographic data to evaluate the relations between the intensity of the local thermic reaction and the applied dose or dose rate). Beside the diagnostic value of the method, which accounts for the global radiological injuries better than the physical dose really distributed, its pronostic value -much more reliable- makes it possible to estimate the severity of the injuries and their later evolution very early (between 10 and 15 days) [fr

  14. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B., E-mail: jrenshaw@epri.com; Muthu, Nathan [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West WT Harris Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Lhota, James R.; Shepard, Steven M., E-mail: sshepard@thermalwave.com [Thermal Wave Imaging, 845 Livernois St., Ferndale, MI 48220 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  15. Fluid flow in panel radiator under various conditions - thermographic visualisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bašta Jiří

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermographic investigation of a heating panel radiator under various conditions, especially with various heating water volume flow rate is described in this article. For a radiator type 10-500x1000 TBOE and for two levels of inlet water temperature (75 and 55 °C a set of thermal images of surface temperature patterns for various values of heating water volume flow rate was taken. The initial value of flow rate was derived from nominal heating output and recalculated to real conditions. An increase of volume flow rate higher than 15 % over the nominal recalculated value is for the studied cases easily detectable on the resulting thermal images.

  16. The effect of airflow on thermographically determined temperature of the distal forelimb of the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, S; Stanek, C; Schramel, J P; Ion, A; Buchner, H H F

    2013-09-01

    Current literature suggests that thermographic imaging of horses should be performed in a draught-free room. However, studies on the effect of airflow on determined temperature have not been published. To investigate effects of airflow on thermographically determined temperature of horses' forelimbs; to assess the relationship of wind velocity, rectal temperature, ambient temperature and humidity. Thermographic images were obtained for the forelimbs of 6 horses in a draught-free room. Three replicates (R) with defined wind velocities (R1, 0.5-1.0 m/s; R2, 1.3-2.6 m/s; and R3, 3.0-4.0 m/s) were conducted. Each replicate consisted of a baseline image, a 15 min phase with the wind on and a 15 min phase with the wind off. We exposed only the right leg to airflow and determined the temperature by thermography with the wind on and wind off. Temperature differences between baseline and wind on, between wind on and wind off and between different wind velocities were analysed by a general linear model, Student's paired t test and ANOVA. After the onset of wind, the temperature on the right forelimb decreased within 1-3 min (by approximately 0.6°C at R1, 1.5°C at R2 and 2.1°C at R3). With the wind off, the temperature increased within 3 min (by approximately 1.2°C at R1, 1.7°C at R2 and 2.1°C at R3). With increasing wind velocity, the temperature differences between baseline and wind on and between wind on and wind off increased significantly. Barely noticeable wind velocities caused a decrease in thermographically determined temperatures of the forelimbs of the horse. Further research is required to assess the influence of airflow on other parts of the body and at different ambient temperatures, as well as the effect on horses with inflammatory lesions, especially of the distal limbs. It is essential for practitioners to perform thermography on horses in a draught-free environment in order to avoid false-positive or -negative diagnoses. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  17. Thermographic survey of two rural buildings in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Ocana, S.; Canas Guerrero, I. [Departamento de Construccion y Vias Rurales, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Agronomos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez Requena, I. [Departamento de Materiales y Produccion Aeroespacial, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Two common housing prototypes of existing buildings in Spanish rural areas were surveyed by infrared inspection. The aim of the study is to assess the usefulness of infrared thermography as a technique for the detection of the thermal performance of rural buildings. For the traditional house the best results were obtained in the thermographic survey carried out in the evening. Contrarily, for the modern house the thermographic survey at daybreak provided more information. Infrared thermography allowed the comparison of the thermal performance of two buildings. (author)

  18. Standardized assessment of infrared thermographic fever screening system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Pfefer, Joshua; Casamento, Jon; Wang, Quanzeng

    2017-03-01

    Thermal modalities represent the only currently viable mass fever screening approach for outbreaks of infectious disease pandemics such as Ebola and SARS. Non-contact infrared thermometers (NCITs) and infrared thermographs (IRTs) have been previously used for mass fever screening in transportation hubs such as airports to reduce the spread of disease. While NCITs remain a more popular choice for fever screening in the field and at fixed locations, there has been increasing evidence in the literature that IRTs can provide greater accuracy in estimating core body temperature if appropriate measurement practices are applied - including the use of technically suitable thermographs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a battery of evaluation test methods for standardized, objective and quantitative assessment of thermograph performance characteristics critical to assessing suitability for clinical use. These factors include stability, drift, uniformity, minimum resolvable temperature difference, and accuracy. Two commercial IRT models were characterized. An external temperature reference source with high temperature accuracy was utilized as part of the screening thermograph. Results showed that both IRTs are relatively accurate and stable (<1% error of reading with stability of +/-0.05°C). Overall, results of this study may facilitate development of standardized consensus test methods to enable consistent and accurate use of IRTs for fever screening.

  19. Thermographic measurements of high-speed metal cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Bernhard; Renz, Ulrich

    2002-03-01

    Thermographic measurements of a high-speed cutting process have been performed with an infrared camera. To realize images without motion blur the integration times were reduced to a few microseconds. Since the high tool wear influences the measured temperatures a set-up has been realized which enables small cutting lengths. Only single images have been recorded because the process is too fast to acquire a sequence of images even with the frame rate of the very fast infrared camera which has been used. To expose the camera when the rotating tool is in the middle of the camera image an experimental set-up with a light barrier and a digital delay generator with a time resolution of 1 ns has been realized. This enables a very exact triggering of the camera at the desired position of the tool in the image. Since the cutting depth is between 0.1 and 0.2 mm a high spatial resolution was also necessary which was obtained by a special close-up lens allowing a resolution of app. 45 microns. The experimental set-up will be described and infrared images and evaluated temperatures of a titanium alloy and a carbon steel will be presented for cutting speeds up to 42 m/s.

  20. Calibration and verification of thermographic cameras for geometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagüela, S.; González-Jorge, H.; Armesto, J.; Arias, P.

    2011-03-01

    Infrared thermography is a technique with an increasing degree of development and applications. Quality assessment in the measurements performed with the thermal cameras should be achieved through metrology calibration and verification. Infrared cameras acquire temperature and geometric information, although calibration and verification procedures are only usual for thermal data. Black bodies are used for these purposes. Moreover, the geometric information is important for many fields as architecture, civil engineering and industry. This work presents a calibration procedure that allows the photogrammetric restitution and a portable artefact to verify the geometric accuracy, repeatability and drift of thermographic cameras. These results allow the incorporation of this information into the quality control processes of the companies. A grid based on burning lamps is used for the geometric calibration of thermographic cameras. The artefact designed for the geometric verification consists of five delrin spheres and seven cubes of different sizes. Metrology traceability for the artefact is obtained from a coordinate measuring machine. Two sets of targets with different reflectivity are fixed to the spheres and cubes to make data processing and photogrammetric restitution possible. Reflectivity was the chosen material propriety due to the thermographic and visual cameras ability to detect it. Two thermographic cameras from Flir and Nec manufacturers, and one visible camera from Jai are calibrated, verified and compared using calibration grids and the standard artefact. The calibration system based on burning lamps shows its capability to perform the internal orientation of the thermal cameras. Verification results show repeatability better than 1 mm for all cases, being better than 0.5 mm for the visible one. As it must be expected, also accuracy appears higher in the visible camera, and the geometric comparison between thermographic cameras shows slightly better

  1. Determination of Flaw Size from Thermographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional methods for reducing the pulsed thermographic responses of delaminations tend to overestimate the size of the flaw. Since the heat diffuses in the plane parallel to the surface, the resulting temperature profile over the flaw is larger than the flaw. A variational method is presented for reducing the thermographic data to produce an estimated size for the flaw that is much closer to the true size of the flaw. The size is determined from the spatial thermal response of the exterior surface above the flaw and a constraint on the length of the contour surrounding the flaw. The technique is applied to experimental data acquired on a flat bottom hole composite specimen.

  2. Radioisotopic and thermographic imaging of the lower limbs oedema - comparison diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepien, A.; Pawlus, J.; Nowak, E.; Kulka, J.; Gielzycki, J.; Kraft, O.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, authors achieved comparison between lymphoscintigraphy and thermography in patients with limbs oedema. It allow to determinate current role of lymphoscintigraphy and verify useful of thermography in limbs oedema diagnosis. Analysis included 60 patients with the lower limbs oedema. Each patients Doppler duplex scan and thermographic study was performed. Additionally, 10 patients were classified to the lymphoscintigraphy. Thermography: In studies camera ThermaCAM S60 (FLIR SYSTEM) were used. Infrared radiation detector was 320 x 240 uncooled microbolometers with thermal resolution - 0.08 o C (for 30 o C). Lymphoscintigraphy: Each patient received subcutaneous, in the second web space, Nanosis (schering) labeled 99m Tc. Dynamic data acquisition has been started immediately after injection the radiotracer to the both extremities using digital gamma camera X Ring (Mediso). Static study of whole body was performed after 1.5 hour. Thermal disorders were observed in 58 patients. On the base ultrasound and clinical examinations 10 patients were classified to lymphoscintigraphy. In this group in 5 cases traits lymphatic insufficient were observed. Thermographic study in group of patients with scintigraphic disorders was showed regional hypothermia, with small regions of hypothermia in tissues included oedema. Lymphoscintigraphy is a useful and indispensable tool in oedema diagnosis. In patients with insufficient of lymphatic system, thermography comparison to lymphoscintigraphy, in clinical diagnosis did not influence on the future diagnosis and therapeutics proceedings. Regional hyperthermic disorders in patients with limbs oedema, who had negative results of examinations (Doppler duplex scan and lymphoscintigraphy), could indicate on inflammatory complications. In cases of venous insufficient thermography allow to visualize specific venous disorders. (author)

  3. Infrared Thermographic Diagnosis Mechanism for Fault Detection of Ball Bearing under Dynamic Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jin Ju; Yoon, Hanvit; Kim, Dong Yeon; Hong, Dong Pyo; Kim, Won Tae

    2011-01-01

    Fault detection for dynamic loading conditions of rotational machineries was considered from the contactless, non-destructive infrared thermographic method, rather than the traditional diagnosis method. In this paper, by applying a rotating deep-grooved ball bearing, passive thermographic experiment was performed as an alternative way proceeding the traditional fault monitoring. In addition, the thermographic experiments were compared with the vibration spectrum analysis to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed method. Based on the results, it was concluded the temperature characteristics of the ball bearing under dynamic loading conditions were analyzed thoroughly

  4. The consistency of thermographic findings in breast screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pflanzer, K.; Kleedorfer, D.; Pflanzer, D.; Fochem, K.

    1983-01-01

    Thermography is a valuable complementary method in breast examination, but is not a suitable screening method. However, the results of control investigations in 200 females who were reexamined after at least two years, showed no change in the thermographic pattern in 87.5% of the women. In 10.5% the change in thermogram was due to pathological changes, whilst no explanation could be found in only 2% of cases. This high stability rate of the thermograms permits an alternative procedure: If, one year after a basic examination which includes clinical investigation, mammography and thermography, the thermographic pattern is identical with the first, no mammography is necessary. On the occasion of the next control, mammography should be carried out again at the time of the subsequent control examination. This schedule permits a reduction in irradiation without reducing the security of diagnosis. (Author)

  5. Detection and characterization of exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) via thermography and image processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas; Kappatos, Vassilios; Georgoulas, George

    2017-01-01

    of commonly measurement tools and methods. Thermography has been used successfully as a research detection tool in medicine for the last 6 decades but very limited work has been reported on EIMD area. The main purpose of this research is to assess and characterize EIMD, using thermography and image processing...... techniques. The first step towards that goal is to develop a reliable segmentation technique to isolate the region of interest (ROI). A semi-automatic image processing software was designed and regions of the left and right leg based on superpixels were segmented. The image is segmented into a number...... of regions and the user is able to intervene providing the regions which belong to each of the two legs. In order to validate the image processing software, an extensive experimental investigation was carried out, acquiring thermographic images of the rectus femoris muscle before, immediately post and 24, 48...

  6. Investigation of the effect of engine lubricant oil on remote temperature sensing using thermographic phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou Nada, Fahed, E-mail: Fahed.Abou_Nada@forbrf.lth.se; Aldén, Marcus; Richter, Mattias

    2016-11-15

    Phosphor thermometry, a remote temperature sensing technique, is widely implemented to measure the temperature of different combustion engines components. The presence of engine lubricant can influence the behavior of the applied sensor materials, known as thermographic phosphors, and thus leading to erroneous temperature measurements. The effect of two engine lubricants on decay times originating from six different thermographic phosphors was investigated. The decay time of each thermographic phosphor was investigated as a function of lubricant/phosphor mass ratio. Tests were conducted at temperatures around 293 K and 376 K for both lubricants. The investigations revealed that ZnO:Zn and ZnS:Ag are the only ones that exhibit a change of the decay time as function of the lubricant/phosphor mass ratio. While the remaining thermographic phosphors, namely BaMg{sub 2}Al{sub 16}O{sub 27}:Eu (BAM), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-coated BaMg{sub 2}Al{sub 16}O{sub 27}:Eu, La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu, Mg{sub 3}F{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}:Mn, displayed no sensitivity of their characteristic decay time on to the presence of lubricant on the porous coating. Biases in the calculated temperature are to be expected if the utilized thermographic phosphor displays decay time sensitivity to the existence of the engine lubricant within the sensor. Such distortions are concealed and can occur undetected leading to false temperature readings for the probed engine component.

  7. Fiber Optic Bragg Grating Sensors for Thermographic Detection of Subsurface Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Winfree, William P.; Wu, Meng-Chou

    2009-01-01

    Conventional thermography with an infrared imager has been shown to be an extremely viable technique for nondestructively detecting subsurface anomalies such as thickness variations due to corrosion. A recently developed technique using fiber optic sensors to measure temperature holds potential for performing similar inspections without requiring an infrared imager. The structure is heated using a heat source such as a quartz lamp with fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors at the surface of the structure to detect temperature. Investigated structures include a stainless steel plate with thickness variations simulated by small platelets attached to the back side using thermal grease. A relationship is shown between the FBG sensor thermal response and variations in material thickness. For comparison, finite element modeling was performed and found to agree closely with the fiber optic thermography results. This technique shows potential for applications where FBG sensors are already bonded to structures for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) strain measurements and can serve dual-use by also performing thermographic detection of subsurface anomalies.

  8. Automated system for crack detection using infrared thermograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starman, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development of the automated system for crack detection on square steel bars used in the automotive industry for axle and shaft construction. The automated system for thermographic crack detection uses brief pulsed eddy currents to heat steel components under inspection. Cracks, if present, will disturb the current flow and so generate changes in the temperature profile in the crack area. These changes of temperature are visualized using an infrared camera. The image acquired by the infrared camera is evaluated through an image processing system. The advantages afforded by the system are its inspection time, its excellent flaw detection sensitivity and its ability to detect hidden, subsurface cracks. The automated system consists of four IR cameras (each side of steel bar is evaluated at a time), coil, high frequency generator and control place with computers. The system is a part of the inspection line where the subsurface and surface cracks are searched. If the crack is present, the cracked place is automatically marked. The components without cracks are then deposited apart from defective blocks. The system is fully automated and its ability is to evaluate four meter blocks within 20 seconds. This is the real reason for using this system in real industrial applications. (author)

  9. Integrated procedures and monitoring methodologies for thermographic investigations of architectural heritage: two applicative cases in Sicily, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper explains some opportunities and limitations of thermographic investigations in terms of their capability to define the conservative conditions of architectural heritage and in terms of the historical recollection for a technical diagnosis. Different approaches are demonstrated in two case studies: the first integrates thermography with other investigative methods; the second combines thermographic monitoring with hygrothermal monitoring. (author)

  10. Thermographic and radionuclide investigation in combined diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushakhmanov, A.Kh.

    1986-01-01

    The results of examination of 157 women with breast diseases are given. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 94 patients, benign diseases in 63. The combined use of the thermographic and radionuclide methods was shown to raise the accuracy of breast cancer diagnosis

  11. Mass prophylactic screening of the organized female populaton using the Thermograph-Computer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vepkhvadze, R.Ya.; Khvedelidze, E.Sh.

    1984-01-01

    Organizational aspects of the Thermograph Computer System usage have been analyzed. It has been shown that results of thermodiagnosis completely coincide with clinical conclusion, but roentrenological method permits to reveal a disease only for 19 patients from 36 ones. It is possible to examine 120 women for the aim of early diagnosis of mammary gland diseases during the day operating hours with the use of the Thermograph Computer System. A movable thermodiagnostic room simultaneoUsly served as an inspection room to discover visual forms of tumor diseases including diseases of cervix uteri and may be used for mass preventive examination of the organized female population

  12. Current injection phase thermography for low-velocity impact damage identification in composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammatikos, S.A.; Kordatos, E.Z.; Matikas, T.E.; David, C.; Paipetis, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel Current injection phase thermography NDE method has been developed. • Blind impact damage has been successfully detected in composite laminates. • Carbon nanotubes enhance detection by improving of through thickness conductivity. • Detection is feasible with considerably less energy than for IR excited thermography. - Abstract: An innovative non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique is presented based on current stimulated thermography. Modulated electric current is injected to Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) laminates as an external source of thermal excitation. Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) is concurrently employed to identify low velocity impact induced (LVI) damage. The efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated for both plain and with Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) modified laminates, which are subjected to low-velocity impact damaged composite laminates at different energy levels. The presence of the nano reinforcing phase is important in achieving a uniform current flow along the laminate, as it improves the through thickness conductivity. The acquired thermographs are compared with optical PPT, C-scan images and Computer Tomography (CT) representations. The typical energy input for successful damage identification with current injection is three to four orders of magnitude less compared to the energy required for optical PPT

  13. Thermographic Mobile Mapping of Urban Environment for Lighting and Energy Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Lagüela López

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The generation of 3D models of buildings has been proved as a useful procedure for multiple applications related to energy, from energy rehabilitation management to design of heating systems, analysis of solar contribution to both heating and lighting of buildings. In a greater scale, 3D models of buildings can be used for the evaluation of heat islands, and the global thermal inertia of neighborhoods, which are essential knowledge for urban planning. This paper presents a complete methodology for the generation of 3D models of buildings at big-scale: neighborhoods, villages; including thermographic information as provider of information of the thermal behavior of the building elements and ensemble. The methodology involves sensor integration in a mobile unit for data acquisition, and data processing for the generation of the final thermographic 3D models of urban environment.

  14. Damage Degree Evaluation of Earthquake Area Using UAV Aerial Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV system and its aerial image analysis method are developed to evaluate the damage degree of earthquake area. Both the single-rotor and the six-rotor UAVs are used to capture the visible light image of ground targets. Five types of typical ground targets are considered for the damage degree evaluation: the building, the road, the mountain, the riverway, and the vegetation. When implementing the image analysis, first the Image Quality Evaluation Metrics (IQEMs, that is, the image contrast, the image blur, and the image noise, are used to assess the imaging definition. Second, once the image quality is qualified, the Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM texture feature, the Tamura texture feature, and the Gabor wavelet texture feature are computed. Third, the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier is employed to evaluate the damage degree. Finally, a new damage degree evaluation (DDE index is defined to assess the damage intensity of earthquake. Many experiment results have verified the correctness of proposed system and method.

  15. Application of structured illumination to gas phase thermometry using thermographic phosphor particles: a study for averaged imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, Florian; Stephan, Michael; Berrocal, Edouard; Albert, Barbara; Böhm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    Structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) is combined with gas phase thermometry measurements using thermographic phosphor (TGP) particles. The technique is applied to a heated jet surrounded by a coflow which is operated at ambient temperature. The respective air flows are seeded with a powder of BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BAM) which is used as temperature-sensitive gas phase tracer. Upon pulsed excitation in the ultraviolet spectral range, the temperature is extracted based on the two-color ratio method combined with SLIPI. The main advantage of applying the SLIPI approach to phosphor thermometry is the reduction of particle-to-particle multiple light scattering and diffuse wall reflections, yielding a more robust calibration procedure as well as improving the measurement accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. For demonstration, this paper focuses on sample-averaged measurements of temperature fields in a jet-in-coflow configuration. Using the conventional approach, which in contrast to SLIPI is based on imaging with an unmodulated laser light sheet, we show that for the present setup typically 40% of the recorded signal is affected by the contribution of multiply scattered photons. At locations close to walls even up to 75% of the apparent signal is due to diffuse reflection and wall luminescence of BAM sticking at the surface. Those contributions lead to erroneous temperature fields. Using SLIPI, an unbiased two-color ratio field is recovered allowing for two-dimensional mean temperature reconstructions which exhibit a more realistic physical behavior. This is in contrast to results deduced by the conventional approach. Furthermore, using the SLIPI approach it is shown that the temperature sensitivity is enhanced by a factor of up to 2 at 270 °C. Finally, an outlook towards instantaneous SLIPI phosphorescence thermometry is provided.

  16. Thermographic Inspections And The Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ronald J.

    1983-03-01

    Rhode Islanders Saving Energy (RISE) is a non-profit corporation founded in 1977 to provide Rhode Island residents with a variety of energy conservation services. Since January of 1981, it has been performing energy audits in compliance with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS). One aspect of the RCS program is the performance of inspections on energy conservation activities completed according to RCS installation guidelines. This paper will describe both the use and results of thermographic inspections within the RISE program. The primary objective of these inspections has been to assure the quality of the building envelope after completion of retrofit measures. Thermal anamolies have been detected that vary in size, location and probable cause. Approximately 37% of all jobs performed through RISE in conjunction with the RCS program have required remedial work as a result of problems that were identi-fied during the thermographic inspection. This percentage was much higher when infra-red inspections were conducted on "Non-RCS" retrofits. Statistics will be presented that provide an interesting insight on the quality of retrofit work when performed in associa-tion with a constant inspection process.

  17. Thermographic imaging of superficial temperature in dogs sedated with medetomidine and butorphanol with and without MK-467 (L-659'066).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainionpää, Mari; Salla, Kati; Restitutti, Flávia; Raekallio, Marja; Junnila, Jouni; Snellman, Marjatta; Vainio, Outi

    2013-03-01

    To record, with a thermal camera, peripheral temperature changes during different sedation protocols and to relate the results to changes in the rectal temperature. Randomized crossover part-blinded experimental study. Eight healthy purpose-bred neutered Beagles (two females and six males) weight 14.5 ± 1.6 kg (mean ± SD) and aged 3-4 years. Each dog was sedated four times. Treatments were medetomidine 20 μg kg(-1) and butorphanol 0.1 mg kg(-1) (MB) with or without MK-467 500 μg kg(-1) (MK). Both drug combinations were administered IV and IM as separate treatments. A thermal camera (T425, FLIR) with a resolution of 320 by 240 was used for imaging. The dogs were placed in lateral recumbency on an insulated mattress. Digital (DFT) and metatarsal footpad temperatures (MFT) were measured with thermography. Thermograms and rectal temperature (RT) were taken before and at 3, 10, 20, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after treatment. At 60 minutes after drug administration, MFT was higher (p temperature changes can be seen and detected with thermography. MK-467 used with MB resulted in increased superficial temperatures and a decline in rectal temperature compared to MB alone. The sedation protocol may influence core temperature loss, and may also have an effect on thermographic images. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  18. Mobile Imaging and Computing for Intelligent Structural Damage Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZhiQiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical imaging is a commonly used technique in civil engineering for aiding the archival of damage scenes and more recently for image analysis-based damage quantification. However, the limitations are evident when applying optical imaging in the field. The most significant one is the lacking of computing and processing capability in the real time. The advancement of mobile imaging and computing technologies provides a promising opportunity to change this norm. This paper first provides a timely introduction of the state-of-the-art mobile imaging and computing technologies for the purpose of engineering application development. Further we propose a mobile imaging and computing (MIC framework for conducting intelligent condition assessment for constructed objects, which features in situ imaging and real-time damage analysis. This framework synthesizes advanced mobile technologies with three innovative features: (i context-enabled image collection, (ii interactive image preprocessing, and (iii real-time image analysis and analytics. Through performance evaluation and field experiments, this paper demonstrates the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed framework.

  19. Critical and subcritical damage monitoring of bonded composite repairs using innovative non-destructive techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Aggelis, D. G.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Infrared Thermography (IrT) has been shown to be capable of detecting and monitoring service induced damage of repair composite structures. Full-field imaging, along with portability are the primary benefits of the thermographic technique. On-line lock-in thermography has been reported to successfully monitor damage propagation or/and stress concentration in composite coupons, as mechanical stresses in structures induce heat concentration phenomena around flaws. During mechanical fatigue, cyclic loading plays the role of the heating source and this allows for critical and subcritical damage identification and monitoring using thermography. The Electrical Potential Change Technique (EPCT) is a new method for damage identification and monitoring during loading. The measurement of electrical potential changes at specific points of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymers (CFRPs) under load are reported to enable the monitoring of strain or/and damage accumulation. Along with the aforementioned techniques Finally, Acoustic Emission (AE) method is well known to provide information about the location and type of damage. Damage accumulation due to cyclic loading imposes differentiation of certain parameters of AE like duration and energy. Within the scope of this study, infrared thermography is employed along with AE and EPCT methods in order to assess the integrity of bonded repair patches on composite substrates and to monitor critical and subcritical damage induced by the mechanical loading. The combined methodologies were effective in identifying damage initiation and propagation of bonded composite repairs.

  20. Imaging the DNA damage response with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, James C.; Koustoulidou, Sofia; Cornelissen, Bart [University of Oxford, CR-UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    DNA integrity is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous factors that can alter the DNA sequence, leading to mutagenesis, aberrant transcriptional activity, and cytotoxicity. Left unrepaired, damaged DNA can ultimately lead to the development of cancer. To overcome this threat, a series of complex mechanisms collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) are able to detect the various types of DNA damage that can occur and stimulate the appropriate repair process. Each DNA damage repair pathway leads to the recruitment, upregulation, or activation of specific proteins within the nucleus, which, in some cases, can represent attractive targets for molecular imaging. Given the well-established involvement of DDR during tumorigenesis and cancer therapy, the ability to monitor these repair processes non-invasively using nuclear imaging techniques may facilitate the earlier detection of cancer and may also assist in monitoring response to DNA damaging treatment. This review article aims to provide an overview of recent efforts to develop PET and SPECT radiotracers for imaging of DNA damage repair proteins. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative damage imaging using Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Ruan Min; Zhu Wen-Fa; Chai Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diffraction tomography for quantitative imaging damages of partly through-thickness holes with various shapes in isotropic plates by using converted and non-converted scattered Lamb waves generated numerically. Finite element simulations are carried out to provide the scattered wave data. The validity of the finite element model is confirmed by the comparison of scattering directivity pattern (SDP) of circle blind hole damage between the finite element simulations and the analytical results. The imaging method is based on a theoretical relation between the one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform of the scattered projection and two-dimensional (2D) spatial Fourier transform of the scattering object. A quantitative image of the damage is obtained by carrying out the 2D inverse Fourier transform of the scattering object. The proposed approach employs a circle transducer network containing forward and backward projections, which lead to so-called transmission mode (TMDT) and reflection mode diffraction tomography (RMDT), respectively. The reconstructed results of the two projections for a non-converted S0 scattered mode are investigated to illuminate the influence of the scattering field data. The results show that Lamb wave diffraction tomography using the combination of TMDT and RMDT improves the imaging effect compared with by using only the TMDT or RMDT. The scattered data of the converted A0 mode are also used to assess the performance of the diffraction tomography method. It is found that the circle and elliptical shaped damages can still be reasonably identified from the reconstructed images while the reconstructed results of other complex shaped damages like crisscross rectangles and racecourse are relatively poor. (special topics)

  2. A Thermographic Measurement Approach to Assess Supercapacitor Electrical Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Galla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a proposal for the qualitative assessment of condition of supercapacitors based on the conducted thermographic measurements. The presented measurement stand was accompanied by the concept of methodology of performing tests. Necessary conditions, which were needed to minimize the influence of disturbing factors on the performance of thermal imaging measurements, were also indicated. Mentioned factors resulted from both: the hardware limitations and from the necessity to prepare samples. The algorithm that was used to determine the basic parameters for assessment has been presented. The article suggests to use additional factors that may facilitate the analysis of obtained results. Measuring the usefulness of the proposed methodology was tested on commercial samples of supercapacitors. All of the tests were taken in conjunction with the classical methods based on capacitance (C and equivalent series resistance (ESR measurements, which were also presented in the paper. Selected results presenting the observed changes occurring in both: basic parameters of supercapacitors and accompanying fluctuations of thermal fields, along with analysis, were shown. The observed limitations of the proposed assessment method and the suggestions for its development were also described.

  3. Satellite Image Classification of Building Damages Using Airborne and Satellite Image Samples in a Deep Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, D.; Nex, F.; Kerle, N.; Vosselman, G.

    2018-05-01

    The localization and detailed assessment of damaged buildings after a disastrous event is of utmost importance to guide response operations, recovery tasks or for insurance purposes. Several remote sensing platforms and sensors are currently used for the manual detection of building damages. However, there is an overall interest in the use of automated methods to perform this task, regardless of the used platform. Owing to its synoptic coverage and predictable availability, satellite imagery is currently used as input for the identification of building damages by the International Charter, as well as the Copernicus Emergency Management Service for the production of damage grading and reference maps. Recently proposed methods to perform image classification of building damages rely on convolutional neural networks (CNN). These are usually trained with only satellite image samples in a binary classification problem, however the number of samples derived from these images is often limited, affecting the quality of the classification results. The use of up/down-sampling image samples during the training of a CNN, has demonstrated to improve several image recognition tasks in remote sensing. However, it is currently unclear if this multi resolution information can also be captured from images with different spatial resolutions like satellite and airborne imagery (from both manned and unmanned platforms). In this paper, a CNN framework using residual connections and dilated convolutions is used considering both manned and unmanned aerial image samples to perform the satellite image classification of building damages. Three network configurations, trained with multi-resolution image samples are compared against two benchmark networks where only satellite image samples are used. Combining feature maps generated from airborne and satellite image samples, and refining these using only the satellite image samples, improved nearly 4 % the overall satellite image

  4. Fiber Optic Thermographic Detection of Flaws in Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings bonded to surfaces of structures were used for thermographic detection of subsurface defects in structures. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The obtained data were analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with the simulation results.

  5. Thermographic visualization of the superficial vein and extravasation using the temperature gradient produced by the injected materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Shinoto, Makoto; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nishie, Akihoro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    There are few effective methods to detect or prevent the extravasation of injected materials such as chemotherapeutic agents and radiographic contrast materials. To investigate whether a thermographic camera could visualize the superficial vein and extravasation using the temperature gradient produced by the injected materials, an infrared thermographic camera with a high resolution of 0.04 °C was used. At the room temperature of 26 °C, thermal images and the time course of the temperature changes of a paraffin phantom embedded with rubber tubes (diameter 3.2 mm, wall thickness 0.8 mm) were evaluated after the tubes were filled with water at 15 °C or 25 °C. The rubber tubes were embedded at depths of 0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 3.0 mm from the surface of the phantom. Temperature changes were visualized in the areas of the phantom where the tubes were embedded. In general, changes were more clearly detected when greater temperature differences between the phantom and the water and shallower tube locations were employed. The temperature changes of the surface of a volunteer's arm were also examined after a bolus injection of physiological saline into the dorsal hand vein or the subcutaneous space. The injection of 5 ml room-temperature (26 °C) saline into the dorsal hand vein enabled the visualization of the vein. When 3 ml of room-temperature saline was injected through the vein into the subcutaneous space, extravasation was detected without any visualization of the vein. The subtraction image before and after the injection clearly showed the temperature changes induced by the saline. Thermography may thus be useful as a monitoring system to detect extravasation of the injected materials.

  6. Heat Tolerance in Curraleiro Pe-Duro, Pantaneiro and Nelore Cattle Using Thermographic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio Cesar Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare physiological and thermographic responses to heat stress in three breeds of cattle. Fifteen animals of each of the Nelore, Pantaneiro and Curraleiro Pe-Duro breeds, of approximately two years of age, were evaluated. Heart and respiratory rates, rectal and surface temperature of animals as well as soil temperature were recorded at 8:30 and 15:30 on six days. Variance, correlation, principal factors and canonical analyses were carried out. There were significant differences in the rectal temperature, heart and respiratory rate between breeds (p < 0.001. Nelore and Pantaneiro breeds had the highest rectal temperatures and the lowest respiratory rate (p < 0.001. Breed was also significant for surface temperatures (p < 0.05 showing that this factor significantly affected the response of the animal to heat tolerance in different ways. The Curraleiro Pe-Duro breed had the lowest surface temperatures independent of the period evaluated, with fewer animals that suffered with the climatic conditions, so this may be considered the best adapted when heat challenged under the experimental conditions. Thermography data showed a good correlation with the physiological indexes, and body area, neck and rump were the main points.

  7. Mechanical Damage Detection of Indonesia Local Citrus Based on Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, T. H.; Ahmad, U.; Sutrisno; Maddu, A.

    2018-05-01

    Citrus experienced physical damage in peel will produce essential oils that contain polymethoxylated flavone. Polymethoxylated flavone is fluorescence substance; thus can be detected by fluorescence imaging. This study aims to study the fluorescence spectra characteristic and to determine the damage region in citrus peel based on fluorescence image. Pulung citrus from Batu district, East Java, as a famous citrus production area in Indonesia, was used in the experiment. It was observed that the image processing could detect the mechanical damage region. Fluorescence imaging can be used to classify the citrus into two categories, sound and defect citruses.

  8. Mapping corrosion of metallic slab by thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bison, P; Ceseri, M; Inglese, G

    2010-01-01

    Thermography is used to detect corrosion on a aluminum specimen. Two identical aluminum plates are extracted from the same base material. One of them is machined on one side, in such a way to simulate a material loss. Both the sound and damaged plate are heated on the undamaged side by a sine modulated heating source. A thermographic camera records a sequence of images of the temperature surface of both the sound and damaged sample on the heated (undamaged) sides. Several sequences are recorded with different modulation periods. By a suitable data reduction procedure, the thermographic sequence is reduced to a couple of images representing amplitude and phase of the oscillating temperature field. A perturbative method is used to solve iteratively the direct problem in the corroded domain that is confronted with the experimental data until an optimum matching is reached.

  9. Automatic thermographic scanning with the creation of 3D panoramic views of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarini, G.; Cadelano, G.; Bortolin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared thermography is widely applied to the inspection of building, enabling the identification of thermal anomalies due to the presence of hidden structures, air leakages, and moisture. One of the main advantages of this technique is the possibility to acquire rapidly a temperature map of a surface. However, due to the actual low-resolution of thermal camera and the necessity of scanning surfaces with different orientation, during a building survey it is necessary to take multiple images. In this work a device based on quantitative infrared thermography, called aIRview, has been applied during building surveys to automatically acquire thermograms with a camera mounted on a robotized pan tilt unit. The goal is to perform a first rapid survey of the building that could give useful information for the successive quantitative thermal investigations. For each data acquisition, the instrument covers a rotational field of view of 360° around the vertical axis and up to 180° around the horizontal one. The obtained images have been processed in order to create a full equirectangular projection of the ambient. For this reason the images have been integrated into a web visualization tool, working with web panorama viewers such as Google Street View, creating a webpage where it is possible to have a three dimensional virtual visit of the building. The thermographic data are embedded with the visual imaging and with other sensor data, facilitating the understanding of the physical phenomena underlying the temperature distribution.

  10. The imaging research of myocardial damage in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Peng; Wei Lingge; Hu Jing; Huang Jianmin; Liu Xiaomei

    2011-01-01

    It is common that Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients can suffer from cardiac damage, which performed variously. Cardiac damage in DMD often be paid no attention in early stage,since the clinical symptoms is slight. With the decline of cardiac function, the quality of life, treatment and rehabilitation training of patients will be affected significantly. Furthermore, the progress of the disease will be speeded up and the difficulty of treatment will be increased. Therefore, there will be important significance in delaying the progression of cardiac damage and prolonging the life of patients by the early diagnosis and intervention treatment of cardiac damage in DMD. For the convenience of the clinician to choose suitable imaging methods, to improve the cardiac damage in patients of DMD, imaging researches which are applied to the DMD cardiac damage are reviewed. (authors)

  11. Plasmatic and thermographic consequences of local acute irradiation; a qualitative and quantitative analysis in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaix, J.L; Daburon, F.; Crechet, F.; Tricaud, Y.

    1987-04-01

    Acute phase reactant proteins associated with thermographic measurements and enzymatic activity assays in plasma were carried out on 39 pigs, following local exposure of the thigh to a collimated source of iridium 192 at doses ranging between 30 and 84 Gy (2 cm depth dose). The inflammatory response after irradiation, from day 1 to day 30 was accompanied by plasma protein changes associated with an elevation of local and general temperatures in irradiated animals. Degenerative processes in muscle led to an increase of plasmatic creatine kinase and lactate-dehydrogenase. Results were developed qualitatively (distribution pattern of proteins, thermographic measurements, enzymatic activities and clinical evolution of the lesions) and qualitatively (plasma level of creatine kinase versus applied radiation doses and pharmalogical treatments) [fr

  12. Digital Imaging of Pipeline Mechanical Damage and Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    The purpose of this program was to enhance characterization of mechanical damage in pipelines through application of digital eddy current imaging. Lift-off maps can be used to develop quantitative representations of mechanical damage and magnetic per...

  13. Methods to attack or defend the professional integrity and competency of infrared thermographers and their work; what every attorney and infrared thermographer needs to know before going into a lawsuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, Fred

    2013-05-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of in-house Infrared Thermographic Predictive Maintenance programs for Electrical/Mechanical inspections as compared to out-sourced programs using hired consultants. In addition, the number of infrared consulting services companies offering out-sourced programs has also has grown exponentially. These market segments include: Building Envelope (commercial and residential), Refractory, Boiler Evaluations, etc... These surges are driven by two main factors: 1. The low cost of investment in the equipment (the cost of cameras and peripherals continues to decline). 2. Novel marketing campaigns by the camera manufacturers who are looking to sell more cameras into an otherwise saturated market. The key characteristics of these campaigns are to over simplify the applications and understate the significances of technical training, specific skills and experience that's needed to obtain the risk-lowering information that a facility manager needs. These camera selling campaigns focuses on the simplicity of taking a thermogram, but ignores the critical factors of what it takes to actually perform and manage a creditable, valid IR program, which in-turn expose everyone to tremendous liability. As the In-house vs. Out-sourced consulting services compete for market share head to head with each other in a constricted market space, the price for out-sourced/consulting services drops to try to compete on price for more market share. The consequences of this approach are, something must be compromised to be able to stay competitive from a price point, and that compromise is the knowledge, technical skills and experience of the thermographer. This also ends up being reflected back into the skill sets of the in-house thermographer as well. This over simplification of the skill and experience is producing the "Perfect Storm" for Infrared Thermography, for both in-house and out-sourced programs.

  14. Television-aided thermographic investigations in nuclear and solid state research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettig, H.; Wollschlaeger, K.

    1983-01-01

    After a brief review of the physical and hardware fundamentals of televison-aided thermographic investigations, two practical examples of nuclear and solid state research work are presented. The problems discussed concern studies of the relative density distribution in beams of particles (ions, electrons, neutral atoms) or of visible radiation on the one hand, and the optimization of operating conditions in heavy-current implantations (ion implantation in Si at ion beam currents up to 60 μA) on the other hand

  15. High Resolution SAR Imaging Employing Geometric Features for Extracting Seismic Damage of Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, L. P.; Wang, X. P.; Dou, A. X.; Ding, X.

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image is relatively easy to acquire but difficult for interpretation. This paper probes how to identify seismic damage of building using geometric features of SAR. The SAR imaging geometric features of buildings, such as the high intensity layover, bright line induced by double bounce backscattering and dark shadow is analysed, and show obvious differences texture features of homogeneity, similarity and entropy in combinatorial imaging geometric regions between the un-collapsed and collapsed buildings in airborne SAR images acquired in Yushu city damaged by 2010 Ms7.1 Yushu, Qinghai, China earthquake, which implicates a potential capability to discriminate collapsed and un-collapsed buildings from SAR image. Study also shows that the proportion of highlight (layover & bright line) area (HA) is related to the seismic damage degree, thus a SAR image damage index (SARDI), which related to the ratio of HA to the building occupation are of building in a street block (SA), is proposed. While HA is identified through feature extraction with high-pass and low-pass filtering of SAR image in frequency domain. A partial region with 58 natural street blocks in the Yushu City are selected as study area. Then according to the above method, HA is extracted, SARDI is then calculated and further classified into 3 classes. The results show effective through validation check with seismic damage classes interpreted artificially from post-earthquake airborne high resolution optical image, which shows total classification accuracy 89.3 %, Kappa coefficient 0.79 and identical to the practical seismic damage distribution. The results are also compared and discussed with the building damage identified from SAR image available by other authors.

  16. Micro-computer system for quantitative image analysis of damage microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Satoh, K.; Igata, N.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis of radiation induced damage microstructure is very important in evaluating material behaviors in radiation environment. But, quite a few improvement have been seen in quantitative analysis of damage microstructure in these decades. The objective of this work is to develop new system for quantitative image analysis of damage microstructure which could improve accuracy and efficiency of data sampling and processing and could enable to get new information about mutual relations among dislocations, precipitates, cavities, grain boundaries, etc. In this system, data sampling is done with X-Y digitizer. The cavity microstructure in dual-ion irradiated 316 SS is analyzed and the effectiveness of this system is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Thermographic skin temperature measurement compared with cold sensation in predicting the efficacy and distribution of epidural anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruins, Arnoud A; Kistemaker, Kay R J; Boom, Annemieke; Klaessens, John H G M; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M; Boer, Christa

    2018-04-01

    Due to the high rates of epidural failure (3-32%), novel techniques are required to objectively assess the successfulness of an epidural block. In this study we therefore investigated whether thermographic temperature measurements have a higher predictive value for a successful epidural block when compared to the cold sensation test as gold standard. Epidural anesthesia was induced in 61 patients undergoing elective abdominal, thoracic or orthopedic surgery. A thermographic picture was recorded at 5, 10 and 15 min following epidural anesthesia induction. After 15 min a cold sensation test was performed. Epidural anesthesia is associated with a decrease in skin temperature. Thermography predicts a successful epidural block with a sensitivity of 54% and a PPV of 92% and a specificity of 67% and a NPV of 17%. The cold sensation test shows a higher sensitivity and PPV than thermography (97 and 93%), but a lower specificity and NPV than thermography (25 and 50%). Thermographic temperature measurements can be used as an additional and objective method for the assessment of the effectiveness of an epidural block next to the cold sensation test, but have a low sensitivity and negative predictive value. The local decrease in temperature as observed in our study during epidural anesthesia is mainly attributed to a core-to-peripheral redistribution of body heat and vasodilation.

  18. Computer vision syndrome (CVS) - Thermographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamosa-Rincón, L. E.; Jaime-Díaz, J. M.; Ruiz-Cardona, D. F.

    2017-01-01

    The use of computers has reported an exponential growth in the last decades, the possibility of carrying out several tasks for both professional and leisure purposes has contributed to the great acceptance by the users. The consequences and impact of uninterrupted tasks with computers screens or displays on the visual health, have grabbed researcher’s attention. When spending long periods of time in front of a computer screen, human eyes are subjected to great efforts, which in turn triggers a set of symptoms known as Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS). Most common of them are: blurred vision, visual fatigue and Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) due to unappropriate lubrication of ocular surface when blinking decreases. An experimental protocol was de-signed and implemented to perform thermographic studies on healthy human eyes during exposure to dis-plays of computers, with the main purpose of comparing the existing differences in temperature variations of healthy ocular surfaces.

  19. Pest damage assessment in fruits and vegetables using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkapattu Canthadai, Badrinath; Muthuraju, M. Esakki; Pachava, Vengalrao; Sengupta, Dipankar

    2015-05-01

    In some fruits and vegetables, it is difficult to visually identify the ones which are pest infested. This particular aspect is important for quarantine and commercial operations. In this article, we propose to present the results of a novel technique using thermal imaging camera to detect the nature and extent of pest damage in fruits and vegetables, besides indicating the level of maturity and often the presence of the pest. Our key idea relies on the fact that there is a difference in the heat capacity of normal and damaged ones and also observed the change in surface temperature over time that is slower in damaged ones. This paper presents the concept of non-destructive evaluation using thermal imaging technique for identifying pest damage levels of fruits and vegetables based on investigations carried out on random samples collected from a local market.

  20. On-Line Multi-Damage Scanning Spatial-Wavenumber Filter Based Imaging Method for Aircraft Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqiang Ren

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM of aircraft composite structure is helpful to increase reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Due to the great effectiveness in distinguishing particular guided wave modes and identifying the propagation direction, the spatial-wavenumber filter technique has emerged as an interesting SHM topic. In this paper, a new scanning spatial-wavenumber filter (SSWF based imaging method for multiple damages is proposed to conduct on-line monitoring of aircraft composite structures. Firstly, an on-line multi-damage SSWF is established, including the fundamental principle of SSWF for multiple damages based on a linear piezoelectric (PZT sensor array, and a corresponding wavenumber-time imaging mechanism by using the multi-damage scattering signal. Secondly, through combining the on-line multi-damage SSWF and a PZT 2D cross-shaped array, an image-mapping method is proposed to conduct wavenumber synthesis and convert the two wavenumber-time images obtained by the PZT 2D cross-shaped array to an angle-distance image, from which the multiple damages can be directly recognized and located. In the experimental validation, both simulated multi-damage and real multi-damage introduced by repeated impacts are performed on a composite plate structure. The maximum localization error is less than 2 cm, which shows good performance of the multi-damage imaging method. Compared with the existing spatial-wavenumber filter based damage evaluation methods, the proposed method requires no more than the multi-damage scattering signal and can be performed without depending on any wavenumber modeling or measuring. Besides, this method locates multiple damages by imaging instead of the geometric method, which helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, it can be easily applied to on-line multi-damage monitoring of aircraft composite structures.

  1. Impact induced damage assessment by means of Lamb wave image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, Pawel; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this research is an analysis of full wavefield Lamb wave interaction with impact-induced damage at various impact energies in order to find out the limitation of the wavenumber adaptive image filtering method. In other words, the relation between impact energy and damage detectability will be shown. A numerical model based on the time domain spectral element method is used for modeling of Lamb wave propagation and interaction with barely visible impact damage in a carbon-epoxy laminate. Numerical studies are followed by experimental research on the same material with an impact damage induced by various energy and also a Teflon insert simulating delamination. Wavenumber adaptive image filtering and signal processing are used for damage visualization and assessment for both numerical and experimental full wavefield data. It is shown that it is possible to visualize and assess the impact damage location, size and to some extent severity by using the proposed technique.

  2. Identification of Fusarium damaged wheat kernels using image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Jirsa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual evaluation of kernels damaged by Fusarium spp. pathogens is labour intensive and due to a subjective approach, it can lead to inconsistencies. Digital imaging technology combined with appropriate statistical methods can provide much faster and more accurate evaluation of the visually scabby kernels proportion. The aim of the present study was to develop a discrimination model to identify wheat kernels infected by Fusarium spp. using digital image analysis and statistical methods. Winter wheat kernels from field experiments were evaluated visually as healthy or damaged. Deoxynivalenol (DON content was determined in individual kernels using an ELISA method. Images of individual kernels were produced using a digital camera on dark background. Colour and shape descriptors were obtained by image analysis from the area representing the kernel. Healthy and damaged kernels differed significantly in DON content and kernel weight. Various combinations of individual shape and colour descriptors were examined during the development of the model using linear discriminant analysis. In addition to basic descriptors of the RGB colour model (red, green, blue, very good classification was also obtained using hue from the HSL colour model (hue, saturation, luminance. The accuracy of classification using the developed discrimination model based on RGBH descriptors was 85 %. The shape descriptors themselves were not specific enough to distinguish individual kernels.

  3. Thermal Imaging and Biometrical Thermography of Humpback Whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W. Horton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining species' distributions through time and space remains a primary challenge in cetacean science and conservation. For example, many whales migrate thousands of kilometers every year between remote seasonal habitats along migratory corridors that cross major shipping lanes and intensively harvested fisheries, creating a dynamic spatial and temporal context that conservation decisions must take into account. Technological advances enabling automated whale detection have the potential to dramatically improve our knowledge of when and where whales are located, presenting opportunities to help minimize adverse human-whale interactions. Using thermographic data we show that near-horizontal (i.e., high zenith angle infrared images of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae blows, dorsal fins, flukes and rostrums record similar magnitude brightness temperature anomalies relative to the adjacent ocean surface. Our results demonstrate that these anomalies are similar in both low latitude and high latitude environments despite a ~16°C difference in ocean surface temperature between study areas. We show that these similarities occur in both environments due to emissivity effects associated with oblique target imaging, rather than differences in cetacean thermoregulation. The consistent and reproducible brightness temperature anomalies we report provide important quantitative constraints that will help facilitate the development of transient temperature anomaly detection algorithms in diverse marine environments. Thermographic videography coupled with laser range finding further enables calculation of whale blow velocity, demonstrating that biometrical measurements are possible for near-horizontal datasets that otherwise suffer from emissivity effects. The thermographic research we present creates a platform for the delivery of three important contributions to cetacean conservation: (1 non-invasive species-level identifications based on whale blow

  4. Evaluation in vitro of effects of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers irradiation on root canal wall, by stereoscopy, scanning electron micrography and thermographic camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goya, Claudia

    2001-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate in vitro the effects of Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG laser irradiation in the root canal wall by SEM, evaluating the apical leakage and the temperature changes during the laser irradiation. Seventy four extracted human teeth were used, they were instrumented and divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth were evaluated through stereoscopy, by SEM, and with the thermographic camera. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation parameters were 100 mJ/p, 15 Hz, and Er:YAG laser were 160 mJ/p and 10 Hz, the irradiation was 4 times at 2 mm/sec speed, with 20 sec interval. The apical leakage was not observed in the teeth irradiated by Nd:YAG laser alone or in association with Er:YAG laser. However in the teeth irradiated only by the Er:YAG laser we observed a little leakage. By SEM observation the Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed melting and recrystallization in the dentin surface closing dentinal tubules, and in the samples irradiated by Er:Y AG laser a clean surface, opened dentinal tubules, and the combination by two lasers, showed melting covering some dentinal tubules The thermographic study found the temperature increase was not more than 6 deg C. This study showed the safety parameters applications of Er:YAG laser in association with Nd:YAG laser in root canal treatment, in order to not cause thermal damages to the periodontal tissues. (author)

  5. Certification of building thermographers: experiences after three courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Timo; Hekkanen, Martti; Paloniitty, Sauli; Krankka, Juha

    2006-04-01

    The certification procedure of building thermographers was started in 2003, even though thermography has been used in Finland in building survey since late 70's. There has been about a 25 years' unorganized and more or less wild period, without any generally accepted rules for interpretation, as well as how to order thermography services, how to report the results, how to do the practical work in the buildings etc. The service was provided by consultants with varied backgrounds. More operators have come into the market and building developers and contractors have begun to use thermography for quality control in new building and in renovation planning. In the year 2004 various organizations in building trade launched a pilot project to certificate building thermographers. The structure and the topics of the course were introduced in Thermosense 2005. By the end of the year 2005 the third course was completed. From the beginning of the procedure to the end of the third course about 40 persons have received a certificate. During the certification process, two guidelines have been published, as part of RT (Building Information) - files: instructions for ordering, for practical field work and for reporting of thermography survey in buildings. The guidelines also contain basics for interpretation. The interpretation is consistent with the other existing directions (building codes etc). At the turn of 2005 - 2006 a new book of building thermography was published. There is still lack of comprehensive as well as unambiguous rules for interpretation. In the paper we will present experiences on the courses, the main problems posed to the participants and findings during the last two - three years' field work. We will also introduce briefly the structure and content of the guidelines and an example how to use thermography as a tool of quality control in new building. The case studies are new one-family houses in a housing fair and exhibition area in the city of Oulu.

  6. Surface Temperature Measurements from a Stator Vane Doublet in a Turbine Engine Afterburner Flame Using a YAG:Tm Thermographic Phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Walker, D. G.; Gollub, S. L.; Jenkins, T. P.; Allison, S. W.

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements were obtained from a YAG:Tm-coated stator vane doublet exposed to the afterburner flame of a J85 test engine at University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). The objective of the testing was to demonstrate that reliable surface temperatures based on luminescence decay of a thermographic phosphor producing short-wavelength emission could be obtained from the surface of an actual engine component in a high gas velocity, highly radiative afterburner flame environment. YAG:Tm was selected as the thermographic phosphor for its blue emission at 456 nm (1D23F4 transition) and UV emission at 365 nm (1D23H6 transition) because background thermal radiation is lower at these wavelengths, which are shorter than those of many previously used thermographic phosphors. Luminescence decay measurements were acquired using a probe designed to operate in the afterburner flame environment. The probe was mounted on the sidewall of a high-pressure turbine vane doublet from a Honeywell TECH7000 turbine engine coated with a standard electron-beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) 200-m-thick TBC composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) onto which a 25-m-thick YAG:Tm thermographic phosphor layer was deposited by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). Spot temperature measurements were obtained by measuring luminescence decay times at different afterburner power settings and then converting decay time to temperature via calibration curves. Temperature measurements using the decays of the 456 and 365 nm emissions are compared. While successful afterburner environment measurements were obtained to about 1300C with the 456 nm emission, successful temperature measurements using the 365 nm emission were limited to about 1100C due to interference by autofluorescence of probe optics at short decay times.

  7. Effect of frost on phosphorescence for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed phosphorescence lifetime and its accuracy by growing frost for thermographic phosphor thermometry in a low-temperature environment. Mg4FGeO6:Mn particles were coated on an aluminum plate and excited with a UV-LED to obtain phosphorescence signals. The surface temperature was maintained at  -20, -15, -10 °C, and the phosphorescence signal was acquired as the frost grew for 3700 s. The lifetime was calculated and compared with the calibration curve under no-frost conditions. The error of the measured lifetime was within 0.7% of that in the no-frost conditions. A 2D surface temperature profile of the target plate was successfully obtained with the frost formation.

  8. Thermographic observation of the divertor target plates in the stellarators W7-AS and W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Gadelmeier, F.; Grigull, P.; McCormick, K.; Naujoks, D.; Suender, D.

    2003-01-01

    Thermography is applied on the stellarator W7-AS to monitor the thermal load of the recently installed divertor targets. A three dimensional numerical code was developed to evaluate power fluxes arriving at the targets from the measured temporal evolution of the surface temperature distribution. Values of the thermal conductivity of the used CFC-target material for all three directions are required for this evaluation and determined by observing the propagation of controlled heat pulses applied by an infrared laser. The evaluation of the thermographic measurements during plasma operation shows characteristic spatial and temporal features of the arrived heat fluxes. Significant features in high density regimes like plasma detachment from the divertor target plates or strongly enhanced localised plasma radiation (MARFE) has been observed by the installed infrared cameras. The implications of these observations for the thermographic system for W7-X are shortly addressed

  9. Infrared thermography quantitative image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouroliakou, A.; Kalatzis, I.; Kalyvas, N.; Grivas, TB

    2017-11-01

    Infrared thermography is an imaging technique that has the ability to provide a map of temperature distribution of an object’s surface. It is considered for a wide range of applications in medicine as well as in non-destructive testing procedures. One of its promising medical applications is in orthopaedics and diseases of the musculoskeletal system where temperature distribution of the body’s surface can contribute to the diagnosis and follow up of certain disorders. Although the thermographic image can give a fairly good visual estimation of distribution homogeneity and temperature pattern differences between two symmetric body parts, it is important to extract a quantitative measurement characterising temperature. Certain approaches use temperature of enantiomorphic anatomical points, or parameters extracted from a Region of Interest (ROI). A number of indices have been developed by researchers to that end. In this study a quantitative approach in thermographic image processing is attempted based on extracting different indices for symmetric ROIs on thermograms of the lower back area of scoliotic patients. The indices are based on first order statistical parameters describing temperature distribution. Analysis and comparison of these indices result in evaluating the temperature distribution pattern of the back trunk expected in healthy, regarding spinal problems, subjects.

  10. Research on Damage Identification of Bridge Based on Digital Image Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjing; Huan, Shi; Tao, Weijun

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the number of the damage bridge due to excessive deformation gradually increased, which caused significant property damage and casualties. Hence health monitoring and the damage detection of the bridge structure based on the deflection measurement are particularly important. The current conventional deflection measurement methods, such as total station, connected pipe, GPS, etc., have many shortcomings as low efficiency, heavy workload, low degree of automation, operating frequency and working time constrained. GPS has a low accuracy in the vertical displacement measurement and cannot meet the dynamic measured requirements of the current bridge engineering. This paper presents a bridge health monitoring and damage detection technology based on digital image measurement method in which the measurement accuracy is sub-millimeter level and can achieve the 24-hour automatic non-destructive monitoring for the deflection. It can be concluded from this paper that it is feasible to use digital image measurement method for identification of the damage in the bridge structure, because it has been validated by the theoretical analysis, the laboratory model and the application of the real bridge.

  11. UAV-based urban structural damage assessment using object-based image analysis and semantic reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Galarreta, J.; Kerle, N.; Gerke, M.

    2015-06-01

    Structural damage assessment is critical after disasters but remains a challenge. Many studies have explored the potential of remote sensing data, but limitations of vertical data persist. Oblique imagery has been identified as more useful, though the multi-angle imagery also adds a new dimension of complexity. This paper addresses damage assessment based on multi-perspective, overlapping, very high resolution oblique images obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). 3-D point-cloud assessment for the entire building is combined with detailed object-based image analysis (OBIA) of façades and roofs. This research focuses not on automatic damage assessment, but on creating a methodology that supports the often ambiguous classification of intermediate damage levels, aiming at producing comprehensive per-building damage scores. We identify completely damaged structures in the 3-D point cloud, and for all other cases provide the OBIA-based damage indicators to be used as auxiliary information by damage analysts. The results demonstrate the usability of the 3-D point-cloud data to identify major damage features. Also the UAV-derived and OBIA-processed oblique images are shown to be a suitable basis for the identification of detailed damage features on façades and roofs. Finally, we also demonstrate the possibility of aggregating the multi-perspective damage information at building level.

  12. Correlation of simulated TEM images with irradiation induced damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Almeida, P. de; Almazouzi, A.; Victoria, M.

    2000-01-01

    Crystal damage induced by irradiation is investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled to molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The displacement cascades are simulated for energies ranging from 10 to 50 keV in Al, Ni and Cu and for times of up to a few tens of picoseconds. Samples are then used to perform simulations of the TEM images that one could observe experimentally. Diffraction contrast is simulated using a method based on the multislice technique. It appears that the cascade induced damage in Al imaged in weak beam exhibits little contrast, which is too low to be experimentally visible, while in Ni and Cu a good contrast is observed. The number of visible clusters is always lower than the actual one. Conversely, high resolution TEM (HRTEM) imaging allows most of the defects contained in the sample to be observed, although experimental difficulties arise due to the low contrast intensity of the smallest defects. Single point defects give rise in HTREM to a contrast that is similar to that of cavities. TEM imaging of the defects is discussed in relation to the actual size of the defects and to the number of clusters deduced from MD simulations

  13. Fast damage imaging using the time-reversal technique in the frequency–wavenumber domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R; Huang, G L; Yuan, F G

    2013-01-01

    The time-reversal technique has been successfully used in structural health monitoring (SHM) for quantitative imaging of damage. However, the technique is very time-consuming when it is implemented in the time domain. In this paper, we study the technique in the frequency–wavenumber (f–k) domain for fast real-time imaging of multiple damage sites in plates using scattered flexural plate waves. Based on Mindlin plate theory, the time reversibility of dispersive flexural waves in an isotropic plate is theoretically investigated in the f–k domain. A fast damage imaging technique is developed by using the cross-correlation between the back-propagated scattered wavefield and the incident wavefield in the frequency domain. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed technique cannot only localize multiple damage sites but also potentially identify their sizes. Moreover, the time-reversal technique in the f–k domain is about two orders of magnitude faster than the method in the time domain. Finally, experimental testing of an on-line SHM system with a sparse piezoelectric sensor array is conducted for fast multiple damage identification using the proposed technique. (paper)

  14. Radiation damage assessment by digital correlation of images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, J.; Salih, S.M.; Cosslett, V.E.

    1974-01-01

    Structural changes in the electron microscopic specimen due to radiation damage are conveniently studied by electron diffraction. However, two disadvantages of this method are that it does not work for amorphous specimens and that it is not sensitive to structural changes that affect only the phase of the structure factor. It has been proposed that a series of successive images taken under minimum exposure conditions could provide additional information in those cases where the relationship between object function and image intensity can be established. In order to test the proposed method, both lattice images and diffraction patterns of coronene crystals were recorded in separate experiments at controlled levels of exposure. (author)

  15. Electrical impedance tomography-based sensing skin for quantitative imaging of damage in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaji, Milad; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad; Seppänen, Aku

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a large-area sensing skin for damage detection in concrete structures. The developed sensing skin consists of a thin layer of electrically conductive copper paint that is applied to the surface of the concrete. Cracking of the concrete substrate results in the rupture of the sensing skin, decreasing its electrical conductivity locally. The decrease in conductivity is detected with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging. In previous works, electrically based sensing skins have provided only qualitative information on the damage on the substrate surface. In this paper, we study whether quantitative imaging of the damage is possible. We utilize application-specific models and computational methods in the image reconstruction, including a total variation (TV) prior model for the damage and an approximate correction of the modeling errors caused by the inhomogeneity of the painted sensing skin. The developed damage detection method is tested experimentally by applying the sensing skin to polymeric substrates and a reinforced concrete beam under four-point bending. In all test cases, the EIT-based sensing skin provides quantitative information on cracks and/or other damages on the substrate surface: featuring a very low conductivity in the damage locations, and a reliable indication of the lengths and shapes of the cracks. The results strongly support the applicability of the painted EIT-based sensing skin for damage detection in reinforced concrete elements and other substrates. (paper)

  16. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  17. Characterization of Photovoltaic Panels by means of Thermograph Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noe Samano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar panels have become attractive in order to generate and supply electricity in commercial and residential applications. Their increased module efficiencies have caused not only a massive production but also a sensible drop on sale prices. Methods of characterization, instrumentation for in situ measurements, defect monitoring, process control, and performance are required. A temperature characterization method by means of thermograph analysis is exposed in this paper. The method was applied to multicrystalline modules, and the characterization was made with respect to two different variables, first a thermal transient and second a characterization with respect to the current. The method is useful in order to detect hot spots caused by mismatch conditions in electrical parameters. The description, results, and limitations of the proposed method are discussed.

  18. Influencial factors in thermographic analysis in substations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco-Periñán, Pedro J.; Martínez-Ramos, José L.

    2018-05-01

    Thermography is one of the best predictive maintenance tools available due to its low cost, fast implementation and effectiveness of the results obtained. The detected hot spots enable serious incidents to be prevented, both in the facilities and equipment where they have been located. In accordance with the criticality of such points, the repair is carried out with greater or lesser urgency. However, for detection to remain reliable, the facility must meet a set of requirements that are normally assumed, otherwise hot spots cannot be detected correctly and will subsequently cause unwanted defects. This paper analyses three aspects that influence the reliability of the results obtained: the minimum percentage of load that a circuit must contain in order to be able to locate all the hot spots therein; the minimum waiting time from when an item of equipment or facility is energized until a thermographic inspection can be carried out with a complete guarantee of hot spot detection; and the influence on the generation of hot spots exerted by the tightening torque realized in the assembly process.

  19. Metric to quantify white matter damage on brain magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Anblagan, Devasuda; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Chappell, Francesca M.; Morris, Zoe; Sakka, Eleni; Dickie, David Alexander; Royle, Natalie A.; Armitage, Paul A.; Deary, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is challenging. It is important to harmonise results from different software tools considering not only the volume but also the signal intensity. Here we propose and evaluate a metric of white matter (WM) damage that addresses this need. We obtained WMH and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) volumes from brain structural MRI from community dwelling older individuals and stroke patients enrolled in three different studies, using two automatic methods followed by manual editing by two to four observers blind to each other. We calculated the average intensity values on brain structural fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the NAWM and WMH. The white matter damage metric is calculated as the proportion of WMH in brain tissue weighted by the relative image contrast of the WMH-to-NAWM. The new metric was evaluated using tissue microstructure parameters and visual ratings of small vessel disease burden and WMH: Fazekas score for WMH burden and Prins scale for WMH change. The correlation between the WM damage metric and the visual rating scores (Spearman ρ > =0.74, p =0.72, p < 0.0001). The repeatability of the WM damage metric was better than WM volume (average median difference between measurements 3.26% (IQR 2.76%) and 5.88% (IQR 5.32%) respectively). The follow-up WM damage was highly related to total Prins score even when adjusted for baseline WM damage (ANCOVA, p < 0.0001), which was not always the case for WMH volume, as total Prins was highly associated with the change in the intense WMH volume (p = 0.0079, increase of 4.42 ml per unit change in total Prins, 95%CI [1.17 7.67]), but not with the change in less-intense, subtle WMH, which determined the volumetric change. The new metric is practical and simple to calculate. It is robust to variations in image processing methods and scanning protocols, and sensitive to subtle and severe white

  20. A quantitative damage imaging technique based on enhanced CCRTM for composite plates using 2D scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-10-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric wafer mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region in the vicinity of the PZT to capture the scattered wavefield. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, a reflectivity coefficients of the delamination is calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2D areal scans and 1D line scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  1. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  2. Establishing Differences in Thermographic Patterns between the Various Complications in Diabetic Foot Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Gatt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the potential of thermography as an assessment tool for the detection of foot complications by understanding the variations in temperature that occur in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Methods. Participants were categorized according to a medical examination, ankle brachial index, doppler waveform analysis, and 10-gram monofilament testing into five groups: healthy adult, DM with no complications, DM with peripheral neuropathy, DM with neuroischaemia, and DM with peripheral arterial disease (PAD groups. Thermographic imaging of the toes and forefeet was performed. Results. 43 neuroischaemic feet, 41 neuropathic feet, 58 PAD feet, 21 DM feet without complications, and 126 healthy feet were analyzed. The temperatures of the feet and toes were significantly higher in the complications group when compared to the healthy adult and DM healthy groups. The higher the temperatures of the foot in DM, the higher the probability that it is affected by neuropathy, neuroischaemia, or PAD. Conclusions. Significant differences in mean temperatures exist between participants who were healthy and those with DM with no known complications when compared to participants with neuroischaemia, neuropathy, or PAD. As foot temperature rises, so does the probability of the presence of complications of neuropathy, neuroischaemia, or peripheral arterial disease.

  3. Thermographic method for evaluation of thermal influence of exterior surface colour of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanpeng; Li, Deying; Jin, Rendong; Liu, Li; Bai, Jiabin; Feng, Jianming

    2008-12-01

    Architecture colour is an important part in urban designing. It directly affects the expressing and the thermal effect of exterior surface of buildings. It has proved that four factors affect the sign visibility, graphics, colour, lighting condition and age of the observers, and colour is the main aspect. The best method is to prevent the exterior space heating up in the first place, by reflecting heat away room the exterior surface.The colour of paint to coat building's exterior wall can have a huge impact on energy efficiency. While the suitable colour is essential to increasing the energy efficiency of paint colour during the warm summer months, those products also help paint colour efficiency and reduce heat loss from buildings during winter months making the interior more comfortable all year long. The article is based on analyzing the importance of architecture color design and existing urban colour design. The effect of external surface colour on the thermal behaviour of a building has been studied experimentally by Infrared Thermographic method in University of Science and technology Beijing insummer.The experimental results showed that different colour has quietly different thermal effect on the exterior surface of buildings. The thermal effect of carmine and fawn has nearly the same values. The main factor which is color express, give some suggest ting about urban color design. The investigation reveals that the use of suitable surface colour can dramatically reduce maximum the temperatures of the exterior wall. Keywords: architectural colour, thermal, thermographic

  4. Impact damage imaging in a curved composite panel with wavenumber index via Riesz transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan-Yu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2018-03-01

    The barely visible impact damages reduce the strength of composite structures significantly; however, they are difficult to be detected during regular visual inspection. A guided wave based damage imaging condition method is developed and applied on a curved composite panel, which is a part of an aileron from a retired Boeing C-17 Globemaster III. Ultrasonic guided waves are excited by a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) and then captured by a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The wavefield images are constructed by measuring the out-of-plane velocity point by point within interrogation region, and the anomalies at the damage area can be observed with naked eye. The discontinuities of material properties leads to the change of wavenumber while the wave propagating through the damaged area. These differences in wavenumber can be observed by deriving instantaneous wave vector via Riesz transform (RT), and then be shown and highlighted with the proposed imaging condition named wavenumber index (WI). RT can be introduced as a two-dimensional (2-D) generalization of Hilbert transform (HT) to derive instantaneous phases, amplitudes, orientations of a guided-wave field. WI employs the instantaneous wave vector and weighted instantaneous wave energy computed from the instantaneous amplitudes, yielding high sensitivity and sharp damage image with computational efficiency. The BVID of the composite structure becomes therefore "visible" with the developed technique.

  5. Automatic Detection of Storm Damages Using High-Altitude Photogrammetric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litkey, P.; Nurminen, K.; Honkavaara, E.

    2013-05-01

    The risks of storms that cause damage in forests are increasing due to climate change. Quickly detecting fallen trees, assessing the amount of fallen trees and efficiently collecting them are of great importance for economic and environmental reasons. Visually detecting and delineating storm damage is a laborious and error-prone process; thus, it is important to develop cost-efficient and highly automated methods. Objective of our research project is to investigate and develop a reliable and efficient method for automatic storm damage detection, which is based on airborne imagery that is collected after a storm. The requirements for the method are the before-storm and after-storm surface models. A difference surface is calculated using two DSMs and the locations where significant changes have appeared are automatically detected. In our previous research we used four-year old airborne laser scanning surface model as the before-storm surface. The after-storm DSM was provided from the photogrammetric images using the Next Generation Automatic Terrain Extraction (NGATE) algorithm of Socet Set software. We obtained 100% accuracy in detection of major storm damages. In this investigation we will further evaluate the sensitivity of the storm-damage detection process. We will investigate the potential of national airborne photography, that is collected at no-leaf season, to automatically produce a before-storm DSM using image matching. We will also compare impact of the terrain extraction algorithm to the results. Our results will also promote the potential of national open source data sets in the management of natural disasters.

  6. Three dimensional imaging of damage in structural materials using high resolution micro-tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffiere, J.-Y. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jean-yves.buffiere@insa-lyon.fr; Proudhon, H. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ferrie, E. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ludwig, W. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Maire, E. [GEMPPM UMR CNRS 5510, INSA Lyon, 20 Av. A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Cloetens, P. [ESRF Grenoble (France)

    2005-08-15

    This paper presents recent results showing the ability of high resolution synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to image damage initiation and development during mechanical loading of structural metallic materials. First, the initiation, growth and coalescence of porosities in the bulk of two metal matrix composites have been imaged at different stages of a tensile test. Quantitative data on damage development has been obtained and related to the nature of the composite matrix. Second, three dimensional images of fatigue crack have been obtained in situ for two different Al alloys submitted to fretting and/or uniaxial in situ fatigue. The analysis of those images shows the strong interaction of the cracks with the local microstructure and provides unique experimental data for modelling the behaviour of such short cracks.

  7. Three dimensional imaging of damage in structural materials using high resolution micro-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffiere, J.-Y.; Proudhon, H.; Ferrie, E.; Ludwig, W.; Maire, E.; Cloetens, P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results showing the ability of high resolution synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography to image damage initiation and development during mechanical loading of structural metallic materials. First, the initiation, growth and coalescence of porosities in the bulk of two metal matrix composites have been imaged at different stages of a tensile test. Quantitative data on damage development has been obtained and related to the nature of the composite matrix. Second, three dimensional images of fatigue crack have been obtained in situ for two different Al alloys submitted to fretting and/or uniaxial in situ fatigue. The analysis of those images shows the strong interaction of the cracks with the local microstructure and provides unique experimental data for modelling the behaviour of such short cracks

  8. Metric to quantify white matter damage on brain magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes Hernandez, Maria del C.; Munoz Maniega, Susana; Anblagan, Devasuda; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M. [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); UK Dementia Research Institute, Edinburgh Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Chappell, Francesca M.; Morris, Zoe; Sakka, Eleni [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); UK Dementia Research Institute, Edinburgh Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Dickie, David Alexander; Royle, Natalie A. [University of Edinburgh, Department of Neuroimaging Sciences, Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Armitage, Paul A. [University of Sheffield, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Deary, Ian J. [University of Edinburgh, Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); University of Edinburgh, Department of Psychology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Quantitative assessment of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is challenging. It is important to harmonise results from different software tools considering not only the volume but also the signal intensity. Here we propose and evaluate a metric of white matter (WM) damage that addresses this need. We obtained WMH and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) volumes from brain structural MRI from community dwelling older individuals and stroke patients enrolled in three different studies, using two automatic methods followed by manual editing by two to four observers blind to each other. We calculated the average intensity values on brain structural fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI for the NAWM and WMH. The white matter damage metric is calculated as the proportion of WMH in brain tissue weighted by the relative image contrast of the WMH-to-NAWM. The new metric was evaluated using tissue microstructure parameters and visual ratings of small vessel disease burden and WMH: Fazekas score for WMH burden and Prins scale for WMH change. The correlation between the WM damage metric and the visual rating scores (Spearman ρ > =0.74, p < 0.0001) was slightly stronger than between the latter and WMH volumes (Spearman ρ > =0.72, p < 0.0001). The repeatability of the WM damage metric was better than WM volume (average median difference between measurements 3.26% (IQR 2.76%) and 5.88% (IQR 5.32%) respectively). The follow-up WM damage was highly related to total Prins score even when adjusted for baseline WM damage (ANCOVA, p < 0.0001), which was not always the case for WMH volume, as total Prins was highly associated with the change in the intense WMH volume (p = 0.0079, increase of 4.42 ml per unit change in total Prins, 95%CI [1.17 7.67]), but not with the change in less-intense, subtle WMH, which determined the volumetric change. The new metric is practical and simple to calculate. It is robust to variations in

  9. An enhanced CCRTM (E-CCRTM) damage imaging technique using a 2D areal scan for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiaze; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    A two-dimensional (2-D) non-contact areal scan system was developed to image and quantify impact damage in a composite plate using an enhanced zero-lag cross-correlation reverse-time migration (E-CCRTM) technique. The system comprises a single piezoelectric actuator mounted on the composite plate and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) for scanning a region to capture the scattered wavefield in the vicinity of the PZT. The proposed damage imaging technique takes into account the amplitude, phase, geometric spreading, and all of the frequency content of the Lamb waves propagating in the plate; thus, the reflectivity coefficients of the delamination can be calculated and potentially related to damage severity. Comparisons are made in terms of damage imaging quality between 2-D areal scans and linear scans as well as between the proposed and existing imaging conditions. The experimental results show that the 2-D E-CCRTM performs robustly when imaging and quantifying impact damage in large-scale composites using a single PZT actuator with a nearby areal scan using LDV.

  10. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  11. Automatic detection and classification of damage zone(s) for incorporating in digital image correlation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudipta; Deb, Debasis

    2016-07-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) is a technique developed for monitoring surface deformation/displacement of an object under loading conditions. This method is further refined to make it capable of handling discontinuities on the surface of the sample. A damage zone is referred to a surface area fractured and opened in due course of loading. In this study, an algorithm is presented to automatically detect multiple damage zones in deformed image. The algorithm identifies the pixels located inside these zones and eliminate them from FEM-DIC processes. The proposed algorithm is successfully implemented on several damaged samples to estimate displacement fields of an object under loading conditions. This study shows that displacement fields represent the damage conditions reasonably well as compared to regular FEM-DIC technique without considering the damage zones.

  12. Identification of Structurally Damaged Areas in Airborne Oblique Images Using a Visual-Bag-of-Words Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Vetrivel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Automatic post-disaster mapping of building damage using remote sensing images is an important and time-critical element of disaster management. The characteristics of remote sensing images available immediately after the disaster are not certain, since they may vary in terms of capturing platform, sensor-view, image scale, and scene complexity. Therefore, a generalized method for damage detection that is impervious to the mentioned image characteristics is desirable. This study aims to develop a method to perform grid-level damage classification of remote sensing images by detecting the damage corresponding to debris, rubble piles, and heavy spalling within a defined grid, regardless of the aforementioned image characteristics. The Visual-Bag-of-Words (BoW is one of the most widely used and proven frameworks for image classification in the field of computer vision. The framework adopts a kind of feature representation strategy that has been shown to be more efficient for image classification—regardless of the scale and clutter—than conventional global feature representations. In this study supervised models using various radiometric descriptors (histogram of gradient orientations (HoG and Gabor wavelets and classifiers (SVM, Random Forests, and Adaboost were developed for damage classification based on both BoW and conventional global feature representations, and tested with four datasets. Those vary according to the aforementioned image characteristics. The BoW framework outperformed conventional global feature representation approaches in all scenarios (i.e., for all combinations of feature descriptors, classifiers, and datasets, and produced an average accuracy of approximately 90%. Particularly encouraging was an accuracy improvement by 14% (from 77% to 91% produced by BoW over global representation for the most complex dataset, which was used to test the generalization capability.

  13. Assessment of Forest Damage in Croatia using Landsat-8 OLI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Simic Milas

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Rapid assessments of forest damage caused by natural disasters such as ice-break, wind, flooding, hurricane, or forest fires are necessary for mitigation and forest management. Forest damage directly impacts carbon uptake and biogeochemical cycles, and thus, has an impact on climate change. It intensifies erosion and flooding, and influences socio-economic well-being of population. Quantification of forest cover change represents a challenge for the scientific community as damaged areas are often in the mountainous and remote regions. Forested area in the western Croatia was considerably damaged by ice-breaking and flooding in 2014. Satellite remote sensing technology has opened up new possibilities for detecting and quantifying forest damage. Several remote sensing tools are available for rapid assessment of forest damage. These include aerial photographic interpretation, and airborne and satellite imagery. This study evaluates the capability of Landsat-8 optical data and a vegetation index for mapping forest damage in Croatia that occurred during the winter of 2014. Materials and Methods: The change detection analysis in this study was based on the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI difference approach, where pre- and post- event Landsat-8 images were employed in the ENVI image change workflow. The validation was done by comparing the satellite-generated change detection map with the ground truth data based on field observations and spatial data of forest management units and plans. Results: The overall damage assessment from this study suggests that the total damaged area covers 45,265.32 ha of forest. It is 19.20% less than estimated by Vuletić et al. [3] who found that 56,021.86 ha of forest were affected. Most damage was observed in the mixed, broadleaf and coniferous forest. The change errors of commission and omission were calculated to be 35.73% and 31.60%, respectively. Conclusions: Landsat-8 optical

  14. Helium ion microscopy of graphene: beam damage, image quality and edge contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, D; Zhou, Y B; O’Neill, A; Wang, J J; Coleman, J N; Donegan, J F; Zhang, H Z; Kumar, S; Duesberg, G S

    2013-01-01

    A study to analyse beam damage, image quality and edge contrast in the helium ion microscope (HIM) has been undertaken. The sample investigated was graphene. Raman spectroscopy was used to quantify the disorder that can be introduced into the graphene as a function of helium ion dose. The effects of the dose on both freestanding and supported graphene were compared. These doses were then correlated directly to image quality by imaging graphene flakes at high magnification. It was found that a high magnification image with a good signal to noise ratio will introduce very significant sample damage. A safe imaging dose of the order of 10 13 He + cm −2 was established, with both graphene samples becoming highly defective at doses over 5 × 10 14 He + cm −2 . The edge contrast of a freestanding graphene flake imaged in the HIM was then compared with the contrast of the same flake observed in a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. Very strong edge sensitivity was observed in the HIM. This enhanced edge sensitivity over the other techniques investigated makes the HIM a powerful nanoscale dimensional metrology tool, with the capability of both fabricating and imaging features with sub-nanometre resolution. (paper)

  15. Developing Dynamic Digital Image Techniques with Continuous Parameters to Detect Structural Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several earthquakes with strong magnitude occurred globally at various locations, especially the unforgettable tsunami disaster caused by the earthquake in Indonesia and Japan. If the characteristics of structures can be well understood to implement new technology, the damages caused by most natural disasters can be significantly alleviated. In this research, dynamic digital image correlation method for using continuous parameter is applied for developing a low-cost digital image correlation coefficient method with advanced digital cameras and high-speed computers. The experimental study using cantilever test object with defect control confirms that the vibration mode calculated using this proposed method can highly express the defect locations. This proposed method combined with the sensitivity of Inter-Story Drift Mode Shape, IDMS, can also reveal the damage degree of damage structure. These test and analysis results indicate that this proposed method is high enough for applying to achieve the object of real-time online monitoring of structure.

  16. Using thermographic cameras to investigate eye temperature and clinical severity in depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J.; George, Shefin Sam; Viswanathan, Rekha Puzhavakkathumadom; Fitzgerald, Paul B.; Junor, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that altered corneal temperature may be a feature of schizophrenia, but the association between major depressive disorder (MDD) and corneal temperature has yet to be assessed. The aim of this study is to investigate whether eye temperature is different among MDD patients than among healthy individuals. We used a thermographic camera to measure and compare the temperature profile across the corneas of 16 patients with MDD and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. We found that the average corneal temperature between the two groups did not differ statistically, although clinical severity correlated positively with right corneal temperature. Corneal temperature may be an indicator of clinical severity in psychiatric disorders, including depression.

  17. Image-based creep-fatigue damage mechanism investigation of Alloy 617 at 950 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, Fraaz; Dahire, Sonam; Liu, Yongming, E-mail: yongming.liu@asu.edu

    2017-01-02

    Alloy 617 is a primary candidate material to be used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. Structural materials for these plants are expected to undergo creep and fatigue at temperatures as high as 950 °C. This study uses a hybrid-control creep-fatigue loading profile, as opposed to the traditional strain-controlled loading, to generate creep dominated failure. Qualitative and quantitative image analysis through SEM, EDS, and EBSD, is used to show that hybrid control testing is capable of producing creep dominated failure and that time fraction approach is not a valid indicator of creep or fatigue dominated damage. The focus of image analysis is on surface fatigue cracks and internal creep voids. A creep-fatigue damage interaction diagram based on these micro-scale features is plotted. It is shown that the classical time fraction approach suggested by the ASME code does not agree with the experimental findings and has a poor correlation with observed microscale damage features. A new definition of creep damage fraction based on an effective hold time is found to correlate well with the micro-scale image analysis.

  18. Displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zujun; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Xiao, Zhigang; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2014-01-01

    The experiments of displacement damage effects on CMOS APS image sensors induced by neutron irradiation from a nuclear reactor are presented. The CMOS APS image sensors are manufactured in the standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The flux of neutron beams was about 1.33 × 10 8 n/cm 2 s. The three samples were exposed by 1 MeV neutron equivalent-fluence of 1 × 10 11 , 5 × 10 11 , and 1 × 10 12 n/cm 2 , respectively. The mean dark signal (K D ), dark signal spike, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), noise (V N ), saturation output signal voltage (V S ), and dynamic range (DR) versus neutron fluence are investigated. The degradation mechanisms of CMOS APS image sensors are analyzed. The mean dark signal increase due to neutron displacement damage appears to be proportional to displacement damage dose. The dark images from CMOS APS image sensors irradiated by neutrons are presented to investigate the generation of dark signal spike

  19. Evaluation of saw damage using diamond-coated wire in crystalline silicon solar cells by photoluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kosuke; Kojima, Takuto; Suzuki, Ryota; Kawatsu, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Kyotaro; Ohshita, Yoshio; Ogura, Atsushi

    2018-05-01

    Si ingots were sliced using a diamond-coated wire, and saw damage was observed even after damage removal etching and texturization. Since invisible microscopic damage was observed only under uncontrolled slice conditions, such damage was identified as saw damage. The wafers with saw damage exhibited the degradation of solar cell conversion efficiency (approximately 1–2% absolute). The results of external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements showed a slight deterioration of EQE in the short wavelength region. Current–voltage characteristic measurements showed similar results that agreed with the EQE measurement results. In addition, EQE mapping measurements were carried out at various irradiation wavelengths between 350 and 1150 nm. Areas with dark contrasts in EQE mapping correspond to saw damage. In the cells with a low conversion efficiency, both EQE mapping and PL images exhibited dark areas and lines. On the other hand, in the cells with a high conversion efficiency, a uniform distribution of saw damage was observed even with the saw damage in the PL images. We believe that sophisticated control to suppress saw damage during sawing is required to realize higher conversion efficiency solar cells in the future.

  20. CometQ: An automated tool for the detection and quantification of DNA damage using comet assay image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Sreelatha; Muraleedharan, Aparna; Sathidevi, Puthumangalathu Savithri; Chand, Parkash; Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2016-09-01

    DNA damage analysis plays an important role in determining the approaches for treatment and prevention of various diseases like cancer, schizophrenia and other heritable diseases. Comet assay is a sensitive and versatile method for DNA damage analysis. The main objective of this work is to implement a fully automated tool for the detection and quantification of DNA damage by analysing comet assay images. The comet assay image analysis consists of four stages: (1) classifier (2) comet segmentation (3) comet partitioning and (4) comet quantification. Main features of the proposed software are the design and development of four comet segmentation methods, and the automatic routing of the input comet assay image to the most suitable one among these methods depending on the type of the image (silver stained or fluorescent stained) as well as the level of DNA damage (heavily damaged or lightly/moderately damaged). A classifier stage, based on support vector machine (SVM) is designed and implemented at the front end, to categorise the input image into one of the above four groups to ensure proper routing. Comet segmentation is followed by comet partitioning which is implemented using a novel technique coined as modified fuzzy clustering. Comet parameters are calculated in the comet quantification stage and are saved in an excel file. Our dataset consists of 600 silver stained images obtained from 40 Schizophrenia patients with different levels of severity, admitted to a tertiary hospital in South India and 56 fluorescent stained images obtained from different internet sources. The performance of "CometQ", the proposed standalone application for automated analysis of comet assay images, is evaluated by a clinical expert and is also compared with that of a most recent and related software-OpenComet. CometQ gave 90.26% positive predictive value (PPV) and 93.34% sensitivity which are much higher than those of OpenComet, especially in the case of silver stained images. The

  1. Supportive Noninvasive Tool for the Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Using a Thermographic Camera as Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Garduño-Ramón

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the leading disease in incidence and mortality among women in developing countries. The opportune diagnosis of this disease strengthens the survival index. Mammography application is limited by age and periodicity. Temperature is a physical magnitude that can be measured by using multiple sensing techniques. IR (infrared thermography using commercial cameras is gaining relevance in industrial and medical applications because it is a non-invasive and non-intrusive technology. Asymmetrical temperature in certain human body zones is associated with cancer. In this paper, an IR thermographic sensor is applied for breast cancer detection. This work includes an automatic breast segmentation methodology, to spot the hottest regions in thermograms using the morphological watershed operator to help the experts locate the tumor. A protocol for thermogram acquisition considering the required time to achieve a thermal stabilization is also proposed. Breast thermograms are evaluated as thermal matrices, instead of gray scale or false color images, increasing the certainty of the provided diagnosis. The proposed tool was validated using the Database for Mastology Research and tested in a voluntary group of 454 women of different ages and cancer stages with good results, leading to the possibility of being used as a supportive tool to detect breast cancer and angiogenesis cases.

  2. A time reversal damage imaging method for structure health monitoring using Lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hai-Yan; Cao Ya-Ping; Sun Xiu-Li; Chen Xian-Hua; Yu Jian-Bo

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the Lamb wave imaging method combining time reversal for health monitoring of a metallic plate structure. The temporal focusing effect of the time reversal Lamb waves is investigated theoretically. It demonstrates that the focusing effect is related to the frequency dependency of the time reversal operation. Numerical simulations are conducted to study the time reversal behaviour of Lamb wave modes under broadband and narrowband excitations. The results show that the reconstructed time reversed wave exhibits close similarity to the reversed narrowband tone burst signal validating the theoretical model. To enhance the similarity, the cycle number of the excited signal should be increased. Experiments combining finite element model are then conducted to study the imaging method in the presence of damage like hole in the plate structure. In this work, the time reversal technique is used for the recompression of Lamb wave signals. Damage imaging results with time reversal using broadband and narrowband excitations are compared to those without time reversal. It suggests that the narrowband excitation combined time reversal can locate and determine the size of structural damage more precisely, but the cycle number of the excited signal should be chosen reasonably

  3. A fractal image analysis methodology for heat damage inspection in carbon fiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Aswin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Prabhathan, P.; Chan, Kelvin; Murukeshan, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The use of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite materials in the aerospace industry have far improved the load carrying properties and the design flexibility of aircraft structures. A high strength to weight ratio, low thermal conductivity, and a low thermal expansion coefficient gives it an edge for applications demanding stringent loading conditions. Specifically, this paper focuses on the behavior of CFRP composites under stringent thermal loads. The properties of composites are largely affected by external thermal loads, especially when the loads are beyond the glass temperature, Tg, of the composite. Beyond this, the composites are subject to prominent changes in mechanical and thermal properties which may further lead to material decomposition. Furthermore, thermal damage formation being chaotic, a strict dimension cannot be associated with the formed damage. In this context, this paper focuses on comparing multiple speckle image analysis algorithms to effectively characterize the formed thermal damages on the CFRP specimen. This would provide us with a fast method for quantifying the extent of heat damage in carbon composites, thus reducing the required time for inspection. The image analysis methods used for the comparison include fractal dimensional analysis of the formed speckle pattern and analysis of number and size of various connecting elements in the binary image.

  4. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  5. Panorama Image Processing for Condition Monitoring with Thermography in Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Byoung Joon; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Soon Geol; Mo, Yoon Syub [UNETWARE, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Gongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    In this paper, imaging processing study obtained from CCD image and thermography image was performed in order to treat easily thermographic data without any risks of personnel who conduct the condition monitoring for the abnormal or failure status occurrable in industrial power plants. This imaging processing is also applicable to the predictive maintenance. For confirming the broad monitoring, a methodology producting single image from the panorama technique was developed no matter how many cameras are employed, including fusion method for discrete configuration for the target. As results, image fusion from quick realtime processing was obtained and it was possible to save time to track the location monitoring in matching the images between CCTV and thermography

  6. Panorama Image Processing for Condition Monitoring with Thermography in Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Byoung Joon; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Soon Geol; Mo, Yoon Syub; Kim, Won Tae

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, imaging processing study obtained from CCD image and thermography image was performed in order to treat easily thermographic data without any risks of personnel who conduct the condition monitoring for the abnormal or failure status occurrable in industrial power plants. This imaging processing is also applicable to the predictive maintenance. For confirming the broad monitoring, a methodology producting single image from the panorama technique was developed no matter how many cameras are employed, including fusion method for discrete configuration for the target. As results, image fusion from quick realtime processing was obtained and it was possible to save time to track the location monitoring in matching the images between CCTV and thermography

  7. Infrared image monitoring of local anesthetic poisoning in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Manoel G. Carstens

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: To evaluate the thermographic predictive value of local anesthetic poisoning in rats that indicates the early recognition of thermal signs of intoxication and enable the immediate start of advanced life support. Methods: Wistar rats underwent intraperitoneal injection of saline and ropivacaine; they were allocated into pairs, and experiments performed at baseline and experimental times. For thermography, central and peripheral compartment were analyzed, checking the maximum and average differences of temperatures between groups. Thermographic and clinical observations were performed for each experiment, and the times in which the signs of intoxication occurred were recorded. In the thermal analysis, the thermograms corresponding to the times of interest were sought and relevant data sheets extracted for statistical analysis. Results: Basal and experimental: the display of the thermal images at times was possible. It was possible to calculate the heat transfer rate in all cases. At baseline it was possible to see the physiology of microcirculation, characterized by thermal distribution in the craniocaudal direction. It was possible to visualize the pathophysiological changes or thermal dysautonomias caused by intoxication before clinical signs occur, characterized by areas of hyper-radiation, translating autonomic nervous system pathophysiological disorders. In animals poisoned by ropivacaine, there was no statistically significant difference in heat transfer rate at the experimental time. Conclusions: The maximum temperature, medium temperature, and heat transfer rate were different from the statistical point of view between groups at the experimental time, thus confirming the systemic thermographic predictive value.

  8. Characterization of impact damage in metallic/nonmetallic composites using x-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, William H.; Wells, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Characterizing internal impact damage in composites can be difficult, especially in structurally complex composites or those consisting of many materials. Many methods for nondestructive inspection/nondestructive testing (NDI/NDT) of materials have been known and in use for many years, including x-ray film, real-time, and digital radiographic techniques, and ultrasonic techniques. However, these techniques are generally not capable of three-dimensional (3D) mapping of complex damage patterns, which is necessary to visualize and understand damage cracking modes. Conventional x-ray radiography suffers from the loss of 3D information. Structural complexity and signal dispersion in materials with many interfaces significantly effect ultrasonic inspection techniques. This makes inspection scan interpretation difficult, especially in composites containing a number of different materials (i.e., polymer, ceramic, and metallic). X-ray computed tomography (CT) is broadly applicable to any material or test object through which a beam of penetrating radiation may be passed and detected, including metals, plastics, ceramics, metallic/nonmetallic composites, and assemblies. The principal advantage of CT is that it provides densitometric (that is, radiological density and geometry) images of thin cross sections through an object. Because of the absence of structural superposition, images are much easier to interpret than conventional radiological images. The user can quickly learn to read CT data because images correspond more closely to the way the human mind visualizes 3D structures than projection radiology (that is, film radiography, real-time radiography (RTR), and digital radiography (DR)). Any number of CT images, or slices, from scanning an object can be volumetrically reconstructed to produce a 3D attenuation map of the object. The 3D attenuation data can be rendered using multiplanar or 3D solid visualization. In multiplanar visualization there are four planes of view

  9. PRE AND POSTPRANDIAL THERMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF GREEN IGUANAS (IGUANA IGUANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Rusu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The body temperature of 10 clinically healthy green iguanas (Iguana iguana was measured using a thermographic camera (FLIR E6, Flir Systems Sweden before and after the food was offered. For each animal there were performed a total of 6 measurements (3 before feeding and 3 after the food was offered. The purpose of this experiment was to observe the thermographic pattern of the body before and after the feeding, since herbivore reptiles tend to bask after the feeding to increase the body temperature that will help them afterwards digest the food. The animals were housed in individual vivariums with every animal having a basking spot available. The pictures were taken outside the vivarium in an adjacent room. The animals were handled with gloves and transported in a cardboard box in order to avoid heat transfer between the handler and the iguana that would have produced thermal artefacts. Each individual was placed on a table on a styrofoam slate, again, to avoid the heat transfer between the table and the animal`s body. For each animal a total of 4 pictures were taken (up, front, left and right. The pictures were analysed with the FLIR Tools program that is provided by the manufacturer and 3 temperatures were taken into consideration (the head temperature, body temperature on the right side and body temperature on the left side. The temperatures were compared between them and with the temperature of the vivariums that consisted of the average between the temperature in 3 different spots (basking spot, the feeding bowl site and the coldest spot measured with an infrared thermometer GM300 (Benetech, China. The temperature of the body was dependent on the vivarium temperature and it was a significant temperature difference between the measurements before the feeding and after the feeding. Also we discovered a significant difference between the head temperature and the body temperature on the left side before the feeding that disappeared

  10. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  11. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR TRIQUETROUS FIBROCARTILAGE COMPLEX DAMAGES AT WRIST JOINT INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kadubovskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the literature on normal anatomy and pathological changes of trihedral fibro-cartilage complex of wrist. The authors described in detail a method of wrist MRI, MR-image of normal and damaged articular disk, considered possible variants for his injuries. The results of MRI of wrist in 110 people including 40 patients with suspected damage were analyzed. At present MRI is the only available non-invasive method for diagnosing injuries of intraarticular structures, in particular trihedral fibro-cartilage complex.

  12. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  13. Implementation of an Ultra-Bright Thermographic Phosphor for Gas Turbine Engine Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Allison, Stephen W.; Beshears, David L.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Heeg, Bauke; Howard, Robert P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The overall goal of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Seedling Phase II effort was to build on the promising temperature-sensing characteristics of the ultrabright thermographic phosphor Cr-doped gadolinium aluminum perovskite (Cr:GAP) demonstrated in Phase I by transitioning towards an engine environment implementation. The strategy adopted was to take advantage of the unprecedented retention of ultra-bright luminescence from Cr:GAP at temperatures over 1000 C to enable fast 2D temperature mapping of actual component surfaces as well as to utilize inexpensive low-power laser-diode excitation suitable for on-wing diagnostics. A special emphasis was placed on establishing Cr:GAP luminescence-based surface temperature mapping as a new tool for evaluating engine component surface cooling effectiveness.

  14. Full-Field Indentation Damage Measurement Using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías López-Alba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach based on full-field indentation measurements to characterize and quantify the effect of contact in thin plates is presented. The proposed method has been employed to evaluate the indentation damage generated in the presence of bending deformation, resulting from the contact between a thin plate and a rigid sphere. For this purpose, the 3D Digital Image Correlation (3D-DIC technique has been adopted to quantify the out of plane displacements at the back face of the plate. Tests were conducted using aluminum thin plates and a rigid bearing sphere to evaluate the influence of the thickness and the material behavior during contact. Information provided by the 3D-DIC technique has been employed to perform an indirect measurement of the contact area during the loading and unloading path of the test. A symmetrical distribution in the contact damage region due to the symmetry of the indenter was always observed. In the case of aluminum plates, the presence of a high level of plasticity caused shearing deformation as the load increased. Results show the full-field contact damage area for different plates’ thicknesses at different loads. The contact damage region was bigger when the thickness of the specimen increased, and therefore, bending deformation was reduced. With the proposed approach, the elastic recovery at the contact location was quantified during the unloading, as well as the remaining permanent indentation damage after releasing the load. Results show the information obtained by full-field measurements at the contact location during the test, which implies a substantial improvement compared with pointwise techniques.

  15. Relationship between ocular surface temperature and peripheral vasoconstriction in healthy subjects: a thermographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannetti, Federica; Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Lacarbonara, Francesco; Sodi, Andrea; Menchini, Ugo; Corvi, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    An impairment of ocular blood flow regulation is commonly considered one of the main pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the development of several eye diseases, like glaucoma. The aim of this study was to investigate whether an alteration of ocular blood supply induced by peripheral vasoconstriction might be detected by measuring the ocular surface temperature. The ocular surface temperature was evaluated in a group of 38 healthy young subjects (28 males and 10 females; mean age: 25.4 ± 4.1 years) by infrared thermography. For each subject, the experimental procedure consisted of two thermographic acquisitions both lasting 10 s, recorded before and during the immersion of both hands in a mixture of ice and water (1.6 °C ± 0.4 °C). Specifically, the second acquisition began 20 s after the hand immersion. Analysis of variance was used to compare the ocular surface temperature of the two profiles. The analysis of infrared images was carried out every 2 s: at the eye opening (t(0)) until 10 s (t(5)), for both profiles. Data showed that ocular surface temperature increased significantly (p-value temperature at t(0) for P(1) = 0.12 °C ± 0.13 °C). Therefore, these results suggest a response of the ocular hemodynamic to the peripheral vasoconstriction. The ocular surface temperature may represent a cheap, non-invasive and non-time-consuming test to evaluate ocular vaso-regulation.

  16. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mathematical Foundation Based Inter-Connectivity modelling of Thermal Image processing technique for Fire Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Nath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, integration between multiple functions of image processing and its statistical parameters for intelligent alarming series based fire detection system is presented. The proper inter-connectivity mapping between processing elements of imagery based on classification factor for temperature monitoring and multilevel intelligent alarm sequence is introduced by abstractive canonical approach. The flow of image processing components between core implementation of intelligent alarming system with temperature wise area segmentation as well as boundary detection technique is not yet fully explored in the present era of thermal imaging. In the light of analytical perspective of convolutive functionalism in thermal imaging, the abstract algebra based inter-mapping model between event-calculus supported DAGSVM classification for step-by-step generation of alarm series with gradual monitoring technique and segmentation of regions with its affected boundaries in thermographic image of coal with respect to temperature distinctions is discussed. The connectedness of the multifunctional operations of image processing based compatible fire protection system with proper monitoring sequence is presently investigated here. The mathematical models representing the relation between the temperature affected areas and its boundary in the obtained thermal image defined in partial derivative fashion is the core contribution of this study. The thermal image of coal sample is obtained in real-life scenario by self-assembled thermographic camera in this study. The amalgamation between area segmentation, boundary detection and alarm series are described in abstract algebra. The principal objective of this paper is to understand the dependency pattern and the principles of working of image processing components and structure an inter-connected modelling technique also for those components with the help of mathematical foundation.

  18. Airborne eXpendable BathyThermographs (AXBT) data from Ocean Surveys in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Lili 2002-10-02 to 2002-10-04 (NCEI Accession 0159386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Airborne eXpendable BathyThermographs (AXBT) data from deployments during field operations to study Hurricane Lili. The data were used in model simulations for...

  19. Use of a laser-induced fluorescence thermal imaging system for film cooling heat transfer measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyu, M.K. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This paper describes a novel approach based on fluorescence imaging of thermographic phosphor that enables the simultaneous determination of both local film effectiveness and local heat transfer on a film-cooled surface. The film cooling model demonstrated consists of a single row of three discrete holes on a flat plate. The transient temperature measurement relies on the temperature-sensitive fluorescent properties of europium-doped lanthanum oxysulfide (La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:EU{sup 3+}) thermographic phosphor. A series of full-field surface temperatures, mainstream temperatures, and coolant film temperatures were acquired during the heating of a test surface. These temperatures are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients and the film effectiveness simultaneously. Because of the superior spatial resolution capability for the heat transfer data reduced from these temperature frames, the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging system, the present study observes the detailed heat transfer characteristics over a film-protected surface. The trend of the results agrees with those obtained using other conventional thermal methods, as well as the liquid crystal imaging technique. One major advantage of this technique is the capability to record a large number of temperature frames over a given testing period. This offers multiple-sample consistency.

  20. A Low-Cost Environmental Monitoring System: How to Prevent Systematic Errors in the Design Phase through the Combined Use of Additive Manufacturing and Thermographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Salamone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available nEMoS (nano Environmental Monitoring System is a 3D-printed device built following the Do-It-Yourself (DIY approach. It can be connected to the web and it can be used to assess indoor environmental quality (IEQ. It is built using some low-cost sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller board. The device is assembled in a small-sized case and both thermohygrometric sensors used to measure the air temperature and relative humidity, and the globe thermometer used to measure the radiant temperature, can be subject to thermal effects due to overheating of some nearby components. A thermographic analysis was made to rule out this possibility. The paper shows how the pervasive technique of additive manufacturing can be combined with the more traditional thermographic techniques to redesign the case and to verify the accuracy of the optimized system in order to prevent instrumental systematic errors in terms of the difference between experimental and actual values of the above-mentioned environmental parameters.

  1. A Low-Cost Environmental Monitoring System: How to Prevent Systematic Errors in the Design Phase through the Combined Use of Additive Manufacturing and Thermographic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Francesco; Danza, Ludovico; Meroni, Italo; Pollastro, Maria Cristina

    2017-04-11

    nEMoS (nano Environmental Monitoring System) is a 3D-printed device built following the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) approach. It can be connected to the web and it can be used to assess indoor environmental quality (IEQ). It is built using some low-cost sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller board. The device is assembled in a small-sized case and both thermohygrometric sensors used to measure the air temperature and relative humidity, and the globe thermometer used to measure the radiant temperature, can be subject to thermal effects due to overheating of some nearby components. A thermographic analysis was made to rule out this possibility. The paper shows how the pervasive technique of additive manufacturing can be combined with the more traditional thermographic techniques to redesign the case and to verify the accuracy of the optimized system in order to prevent instrumental systematic errors in terms of the difference between experimental and actual values of the above-mentioned environmental parameters.

  2. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ciampa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters’ primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  3. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Mahmoodi, Pooya; Pinto, Fulvio; Meo, Michele

    2018-02-16

    Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters' primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  4. Detection of insect damage in almonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soowon; Schatzki, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Pinhole insect damage in natural almonds is very difficult to detect on-line. Further, evidence exists relating insect damage to aflatoxin contamination. Hence, for quality and health reasons, methods to detect and remove such damaged nuts are of great importance in this study, we explored the possibility of using x-ray imaging to detect pinhole damage in almonds by insects. X-ray film images of about 2000 almonds and x-ray linescan images of only 522 pinhole damaged almonds were obtained. The pinhole damaged region appeared slightly darker than non-damaged region in x-ray negative images. A machine recognition algorithm was developed to detect these darker regions. The algorithm used the first order and the second order information to identify the damaged region. To reduce the possibility of false positive results due to germ region in high resolution images, germ detection and removal routines were also included. With film images, the algorithm showed approximately an 81 percent correct recognition ratio with only 1 percent false positives whereas line scan images correctly recognized 65 percent of pinholes with about 9 percent false positives. The algorithms was very fast and efficient requiring only minimal computation time. If implemented on line, theoretical throughput of this recognition system would be 66 nuts/second.

  5. A Micro-Damage Detection Method of Litchi Fruit Using Hyperspectral Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntao Xiong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The non-destructive testing of litchi fruit is of great significance to the fresh-keeping, storage and transportation of harvested litchis. To achieve quick and accurate micro-damage detection, a non-destructive grading test method for litchi fruits was studied using 400–1000 nm hyperspectral imaging technology. The Huaizhi litchi was chosen in this study, and the hyperspectral data average for the region of interest (ROI of litchi fruit was extracted for spectral data analysis. Then the hyperspectral data samples of fresh and micro-damaged litchi fruits were selected, and a partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA was used to establish a prediction model for the realization of qualitative analysis for litchis with different qualities. For the external validation set, the mean per-type recall and precision were 94.10% and 93.95%, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA was used to determine the sensitive wavelength for recognition of litchi quality characteristics, with the results of wavelengths corresponding to the local extremum for the weight coefficient of PC3, i.e., 694, 725 and 798 nm. Then the single-band images corresponding to each sensitive wavelength were analyzed. Finally, the 7-dimension features of the PC3 image were extracted using the Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM. Through image processing, least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM modeling was conducted to classify the different qualities of litchis. The model was validated using the experiment data, and the average accuracy of the validation set was 93.75%, while the external validation set was 95%. The results indicate the feasibility of using hyperspectral imaging technology in litchi postpartum non-destructive detection and classification.

  6. Wireless ultrasonic wavefield imaging via laser for hidden damage detection inside a steel box girder bridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Song, Homin; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a wireless ultrasonic wavefield imaging (WUWI) technique for detecting hidden damage inside a steel box girder bridge. The proposed technique allows (1) complete wireless excitation of piezoelectric transducers and noncontact sensing of the corresponding responses using laser beams, (2) autonomous damage visualization without comparing against baseline data previously accumulated from the pristine condition of a target structure and (3) robust damage diagnosis even for real structures with complex structural geometries. First, a new WUWI hardware system was developed by integrating optoelectronic-based signal transmitting and receiving devices and a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Next, a damage visualization algorithm, self-referencing f-k filter (SRF), was introduced to isolate and visualize only crack-induced ultrasonic modes from measured ultrasonic wavefield images. Finally, the performance of the proposed technique was validated through hidden crack visualization at a decommissioned Ramp-G Bridge in South Korea. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique instantaneously detects and successfully visualizes hidden cracks even in the complex structure of a real bridge. (paper)

  7. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging accurately quantifies freezing damage and cold acclimation responses in Arabidopsis leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hincha Dirk K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freezing tolerance is an important factor in the geographical distribution of plants and strongly influences crop yield. Many plants increase their freezing tolerance during exposure to low, nonfreezing temperatures in a process termed cold acclimation. There is considerable natural variation in the cold acclimation capacity of Arabidopsis that has been used to study the molecular basis of this trait. Accurate methods for the quantitation of freezing damage in leaves that include spatial information about the distribution of damage and the possibility to screen large populations of plants are necessary, but currently not available. In addition, currently used standard methods such as electrolyte leakage assays are very laborious and therefore not easily applicable for large-scale screening purposes. Results We have performed freezing experiments with the Arabidopsis accessions C24 and Tenela, which differ strongly in their freezing tolerance, both before and after cold acclimation. Freezing tolerance of detached leaves was investigated using the well established electrolyte leakage assay as a reference. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging was used as an alternative method that provides spatial resolution of freezing damage over the leaf area. With both methods, LT50 values (i.e. temperature where 50% damage occurred could be derived as quantitative measures of leaf freezing tolerance. Both methods revealed the expected differences between acclimated and nonacclimated plants and between the two accessions and LT50 values were tightly correlated. However, electrolyte leakage assays consistently yielded higher LT50 values than chlorophyll fluorescence imaging. This was to a large part due to the incubation of leaves for electrolyte leakage measurements in distilled water, which apparently led to secondary damage, while this pre-incubation was not necessary for the chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. Conclusion Chlorophyll

  8. Imaging study of brain damage from methanol intoxication of wine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Chengfu; Liu Yimin; Yang Yi; Shi Jing; Wu Yihang; Zhang Weisen; Mao Xiaofen; Luo Jing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging of CT and MRI in brain damage caused by methanol intoxication from false wine, and to study the relations between imaging manifestation and different degrees of the methanol intoxication. Method: Thirty nine cases with methanol intoxication from false wine were retrospectively reported, The latent period of these patients was 0-4 days, and the average latent period of these patients was 0.5 days, All cases were performed by serology examination, brain CT scan, and four cases performed by MRI scan after average 2.5 days (range, 1-6 days) the onset of methanol intoxication. Results: Six cases showed hyperintense signals in bilateral putamen, two cases also showed hyperintense signals in biolateral subcortex white substance regions. Four cases showed hyperintense signals in unilateral internal capsule. One case showed hyperintense changess in subcortex white substance regions. Our study showed the positive correlation between CT features and the amount of methanol and stage of clinic manifestation(χ 2 =4.232, P 2 =0.001, P>0.05). Conclusions: MRI was better than CT in finding early brain damage caused by methanol intoxication from false wine. The characteristic finding changes of the patients was showed mainly in in bilateral putamen, Prognosis for the patients combined with subcortex white substance lesion wasn't hopeful. (authors)

  9. The development of damage identification methods for buildings with image recognition and machine learning techniques utilizing aerial photographs of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohei, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Naoichi, M.; Hiromitsu, T.

    2017-12-01

    It is important to get schematic information of the damage situation immediately after the earthquake utilizing photographs shot from an airplane in terms of the investigation and the decision-making for authorities. In case of the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, we have acquired more than 1,800 orthographic projection photographs adjacent to damaged areas. These photos have taken between April 16th and 19th by airplanes, then we have distinguished damages of all buildings with 4 levels, and organized as approximately 296,000 GIS data corresponding to the fundamental Geospatial data published by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan. These data have organized by effort of hundreds of engineers. However, it is not considered practical for more extensive disasters like the Nankai Trough earthquake by only human powers. So, we have been developing the automatic damage identification method utilizing image recognition and machine learning techniques. First, we have extracted training data of more than 10,000 buildings which have equally damage levels divided in 4 grades. With these training data, we have been raster scanning in each scanning ranges of entire images, then clipping patch images which represents damage levels each. By utilizing these patch images, we have been developing discriminant models by two ways. One is a model using the Support Vector Machine (SVM). First, extract a feature quantity of each patch images. Then, with these vector values, calculate the histogram density as a method of Bag of Visual Words (BoVW), then classify borders with each damage grades by SVM. The other one is a model using the multi-layered Neural Network. First, design a multi-layered Neural Network. Second, input patch images and damage levels based on a visual judgement, and then, optimize learning parameters with error backpropagation method. By use of both discriminant models, we are going to discriminate damage levels in each patches, then create the image that shows

  10. A study of mammographic and thermographic findings in breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Sik; Jeon, Woo Ki; Kim, Jeong Sook; Han, Chang Yul

    1989-01-01

    The ideal diagnostic methods in breast diseases consist of the physical examination and complementary radiologic examination. In radiologic examination mammography is the most popular screening methods and the older simple complementary method is thermography which is efficient under the conditions of elevated skin temperature in inflammatory and malignant lesions. From Jan. 1st 1987 through Jan. 30th, 1988, 110 pts. with complaints of mammary problems were examined by mammography and thermography at Paik Hospital, Inje University. The authors selected and analyzed 97 cases had been pathologically proved through the operation and the fine needle aspiration biopsy. The results were as follows: 1. The most prevalent age group was 5th decade (40%) in cancer, 4th decade (47%) in mammary dysplasia and followed by fibroadenoma (63%) in 4th decade. 2. The mammographic and thermographic findings were compared between the mammary dysplasia and the infiltrating ductal cancer. In mammary dysplasia abnormal hot emissions were appeared in 9/44 (17%) correlated with atypical hyperchromatic cytoplasm relates to pre-malignant group. 3. We hope and expect the early detection of breast cancer through the follow-up study in pre-malignant group of mammary dysplasia

  11. Analysis of high resolution scatter images from laser damage experiments performed on KDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runkel, M.; Woods, B.; Yan, M.

    1996-01-01

    Interest in producing high damage threshold KH 2 PO 4 (KDP) and (D x H 1-x ) 2 PO 4 (KD*P, DKDP) for optical switching and frequency conversion applications is being driven by the system requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). Historically, the path to achieving higher damage thresholds has been to improve the purity of crystal growth solutions. Application of advanced filtration technology has increased the damage threshold, but gives little insight into the actual mechanisms of laser damage. We have developed a laser scatter diagnostic to better study bulk defects and laser damage mechanisms in KDP and KD*P crystals. This diagnostic consists of a cavity doubled, kilohertz class, Nd:YLF laser (527 nm) and high dynamic range CCD camera which allows imaging of bulk scatter signals. With it, we have performed damage tests at 355 nm on four different open-quotes vintagesclose quotes of KDP crystals, concentrating on crystals produced via fast growth methods. We compare the diagnostic's resolution to LLNL's standard damage detection method of 100X darkfield microscopy and discuss its impact on damage threshold determination. We have observed the disappearance of scatter sites upon exposure to subthreshold irradiation. In contrast, we have seen scatterers appear where none previously existed. This includes isolated, large (high signal) sites as well as multiple small scatter sites which appear at fluences above 7 J/cm 2 (fine tracking). However, we have not observed a strong correlation of preexisting scatter sites and laser damage sites. We speculate on the connection between the laser-induced disappearance of scatter sites and the observed increase in damage threshold with laser conditioning

  12. Photoshop-based image analysis of canine articular cartilage after subchondral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Lehr, H A; Ihling, C; Kreuz, P C; Haberstroh, J

    2004-09-01

    The validity of histopathological grading is a major problem in the assessment of articular cartilage. Calculating the cumulative strength of signal intensity of different stains gives information regarding the amount of proteoglycan, glycoproteins, etc. Using this system, we examined the medium-term effect of subchondral lesions on initially healthy articular cartilage. After cadaver studies, an animal model was created to produce pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage in 12 beagle dogs under MRI control. Quantification of the different stains was provided using a Photoshop-based image analysis (pixel analysis) with the histogram command 6 months after subchondral trauma. FLASH 3D sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases. The best detection of subchondral fractures was achieved with fat-suppressed TIRM sequences. Semiquantitative image analysis showed changes in proteoglycan and glycoprotein quantities in 9 of 12 samples that had not shown any evidence of damage during the initial examination. Correlation analysis showed a loss of the physiological distribution of proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the different zones of articular cartilage. Currently available software programs can be applied for comparative analysis of histologic stains of hyaline cartilage. After subchondral fractures, significant changes in the cartilage itself occur after 6 months.

  13. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  14. Development of composite calibration standard for quantitative NDE by ultrasound and thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Vinay; Benedict, Zach G.; Bhatnagar, Nishtha; Harper, Adam G.

    2018-04-01

    Inspection of aircraft components for damage utilizing ultrasonic Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) is a time intensive endeavor. Additional time spent during aircraft inspections translates to added cost to the company performing them, and as such, reducing this expenditure is of great importance. There is also great variance in the calibration samples from one entity to another due to a lack of a common calibration set. By characterizing damage types, we can condense the required calibration sets and reduce the time required to perform calibration while also providing procedures for the fabrication of these standard sets. We present here our effort to fabricate composite samples with known defects and quantify the size and location of defects, such as delaminations, and impact damage. Ultrasonic and Thermographic images are digitally enhanced to accurately measure the damage size. Ultrasonic NDE is compared with thermography.

  15. The use of offensive public relations during a conflict: Hamas's efforts to damage Israel's image during the 2010 flotilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Mozes-Sadeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crisis communication models contain strategies to rehabilitate an organization's image, but do not deal with strategies used to damage the image of another player or competitor. Using qualitative content analysis of 178 items published by Palestinian Information Center (PIC, the Hamas's leading website, the purpose of this manuscript is to examine Hamas's efforts to run offensive PR and to harm Israel's image restoration efforts at the time of the flotilla crisis in May 2010. We discover that Hamas deployed a strategy that consisted of five elements: evidence of existence of the crisis event, damages, victims, performance history and undermining the competitor's response.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarkers to Assess Substantia Nigra Damage in Idiopathic Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Gaurav, Rahul; Arnaldi, Dario; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Valabregue, Romain; Vidailhet, Marie; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lehéricy, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    Idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is considered to be a prodromal stage of Parkinson's disease (PD). At PD onset, 40 to 70% of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) are already lost. Thus, milder SN damage is expected in participants with iRBD. We aimed to quantify SN damage in participants with iRBD using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine biomarker efficacy in preclinical Parkinsonism. Nineteen participants with iRBD and 18 controls underwent 3-Tesla MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging, neuromelanin (NM)-sensitive imaging, and T2* mapping. Regions of interest in the SN area were drawn in NM-sensitive and T2-weighted images. The volume and normalized signal intensity in NM-sensitive images, R2*, and diffusion tensor measures were quantified in the SN. Additionally, two raters performed visual analysis of the SN using the NM-sensitive images. Participants with iRBD showed a reduction in the NM-sensitive volume and signal intensity and a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA) versus controls, but showed no differences in axial, radial, or mean diffusivity or in R2*. For NM-sensitive volume and signal intensity, the receiver operating characteristic analysis discriminated between participants with iRBD and controls with a diagnostic accuracy of 0.86 and 0.79, respectively, whereas the accuracy was 0.77 for FA. The three biomarkers had a combined accuracy of 0.92. The fraction of participants correctly characterized by visual assessment was 0.81. NM-sensitive imaging and FA allowed for the detection of SN damage in participants with iRBD with good diagnostic accuracy. These measures may represent valuable biomarkers for prodromal Parkinsonism. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Thermographic Analisys, an Energy Audit Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Luis; Coelho, Sonia [RAR - Refinaria de Acucar Reunidas, S.A. (Portugal)

    2009-07-01

    Thermography is a technique that allows the thermal characterization of one, of several objects, based on heat transfer by radiation recuring to infrared system. Observing the images we can easily locate heat losses, compressed air leaks, and identify potential problems with equipment or insulation. When correctly used it can reduce the time spent in the analysis performed on location, for a large quantity of equipment observed, and also provide useful information otherwise unavailable. This paper states the work developed in Portuguese Sugar Refinery - RAR - Refinaria de Acucar Reunidas S.A. more specifically on its cogen plant. Using an infra-red camera it was made an identification of the places to be checked regarding the thermal insulation (installation and recovery of damaged material and bad applications). This technique provided good information regarding the best places to achieve maximum results, some sections with heat losses were identified which otherwise would persist undetected. This analysis provided the best information with minimal spent time, maximizing the productivity of the auditor's work. The practical result of this work was insulation installation and repair. The outcome was a payback time of about five months.

  18. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    potential to detect the impact of climatic effects, such as frost, on crop growth, which is relevant information to evaluate the negative impact on sugarcane production. Thus, the objective of the present study is to detect the impact of the frost occurred on 28 June 2011 in the sugarcane production region of São Paulo state, using MODIS images acquired on board of Terra and Aqua satellites before and after the frost event. Also, Landsat type images were used to map the harvested sugarcane fields up to the frost event based on a sugarcane crop map for year 2011. The remaining sugarcane fields available for harvest in 2011 were monitored with the MODIS images acquired on 17, 19, 27, 28 June and 8 and 9 July, to detect frost damage. Field work was conducted shortly after frost occurrence to identify sugarcane fields with frost damage for training and validation purposes. MODIS images transformed to vegetation indices and morphometric variables extracted from SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) data are being analyzed to detect and quantify the damage of the frost from 28 July 2011 on sugarcane crop.

  19. Analysis of electron beam damage of exfoliated MoS2 sheets and quantitative HAADF-STEM imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Alejandra; Raya, Andres M.; Mariscal, Marcelo M.; Esparza, Rodrigo; Herrera, Miriam; Molina, Sergio I.; Scavello, Giovanni; Galindo, Pedro L.; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; Ponce, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    In this work we examined MoS 2 sheets by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) at three different energies: 80, 120 and 200 kV. Structural damage of the MoS 2 sheets has been controlled at 80 kV according a theoretical calculation based on the inelastic scattering of the electrons involved in the interaction electron–matter. The threshold energy for the MoS 2 material has been found and experimentally verified in the microscope. At energies higher than the energy threshold we show surface and edge defects produced by the electron beam irradiation. Quantitative analysis at atomic level in the images obtained at 80 kV has been performed using the experimental images and via STEM simulations using SICSTEM software to determine the exact number of MoS 2 layers. - Highlights: • MoS 2 sheets were exfoliated by using hydrogen gas flow to separate the MoS 2 layers. • The optimum energy to avoid structural damage was calculated. • Cs-corrected STEM imaging was used to obtain atomic resolution images. • Three energies were used in STEM imaging: 80, 120 and 200 kV. • A quantitative method for determining the number of layers has been applied

  20. Human emotions detection based on a smart-thermal system of thermographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Albarran, Irving A.; Benitez-Rangel, Juan P.; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.; Morales-Hernandez, Luis A.

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a noninvasive methodology to obtain biomedical thermal imaging which provide relevant information that may assist in the diagnosis of emotions. Biomedical thermal images of the facial expressions of 44 subjects were captured experiencing joy, disgust, anger, fear and sadness. The analysis of these thermograms was carried out through its thermal value not with its intensity value. Regions of interest were obtained through image processing techniques that allow to differentiate between the subject and the background, having only the subject, the centers of each region of interest were obtained in order to get the same region of the face for each subject. Through the thermal analysis a biomarker for each region of interest was obtained, these biomarkers can diagnose when an emotion takes place. Because each subject tends to react differently to the same stimuli, a self-calibration phase is proposed, its function is to have the same thermal trend for each subject in order to make a decision so that the five emotions can be correctly diagnosed through a top-down hierarchical classifier. As a final result, a smart-thermal system that diagnose emotions was obtained and it was tested on twenty-five subjects (625 thermograms). The results of this test were 89.9% successful.

  1. Coupling image processing and stress analysis for damage identification in a human premolar tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreaus, U; Colloca, M; Iacoviello, D

    2011-08-01

    Non-carious cervical lesions are characterized by the loss of dental hard tissue at the cement-enamel junction (CEJ). Exceeding stresses are therefore generated in the cervical region of the tooth that cause disruption of the bonds between the hydroxyapatite crystals, leading to crack formation and eventual loss of enamel and the underlying dentine. Damage identification was performed by image analysis techniques and allowed to quantitatively assess changes in teeth. A computerized two-step procedure was generated and applied to the first left maxillary human premolar. In the first step, dental images were digitally processed by a segmentation method in order to identify the damage. The considered morphological properties were the enamel thickness and total area, the number of fragments in which the enamel is chipped. The information retrieved by the data processing of the section images allowed to orient the stress investigation toward selected portions of the tooth. In the second step, a three-dimensional finite element model based on CT images of both the tooth and the periodontal ligament was employed to compare the changes occurring in the stress distributions in normal occlusion and malocclusion. The stress states were analyzed exclusively in the critical zones designated in the first step. The risk of failure at the CEJ and of crack initiation at the dentin-enamel junction through the quantification of first and third principal stresses, von Mises stress, and normal and tangential stresses, were also estimated. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Application of Principal Component Analysis Using Fixed Eigenvectors to the Infrared Thermographic Inspection of the Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Winfree, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The Nondestructive Evaluation Sciences Branch at NASA s Langley Research Center has been actively involved in the development of thermographic inspection techniques for more than 15 years. Since the Space Shuttle Columbia accident, NASA has focused on the improvement of advanced NDE techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels that comprise the orbiter s wing leading edge. Various nondestructive inspection techniques have been used in the examination of the RCC, but thermography has emerged as an effective inspection alternative to more traditional methods. Thermography is a non-contact inspection method as compared to ultrasonic techniques which typically require the use of a coupling medium between the transducer and material. Like radiographic techniques, thermography can be used to inspect large areas, but has the advantage of minimal safety concerns and the ability for single-sided measurements. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) has been shown effective for reducing thermographic NDE data. A typical implementation of PCA is when the eigenvectors are generated from the data set being analyzed. Although it is a powerful tool for enhancing the visibility of defects in thermal data, PCA can be computationally intense and time consuming when applied to the large data sets typical in thermography. Additionally, PCA can experience problems when very large defects are present (defects that dominate the field-of-view), since the calculation of the eigenvectors is now governed by the presence of the defect, not the good material. To increase the processing speed and to minimize the negative effects of large defects, an alternative method of PCA is being pursued when a fixed set of eigenvectors is used to process the thermal data from the RCC materials. These eigen vectors can be generated either from an analytic model of the thermal response of the material under examination, or from a large cross section of experimental data. This paper will provide the

  3. Avaluation of the adaptability of dairy goats with help of thermographic precision in the semiarid brazilian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Maria Nunes da Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Silva E.M.N., Souza B.B., Silva G.A., Alcântara M.D.B., Cunha M.G.G. & Marques B.A.A. [Avaluation of the adaptability of dairy goats with help of thermographic precision in the semiarid brazilian.] Avaliação da adaptabilidade de caprinos leiteiros com auxílio da precisão termográfica no semiárido brasileiro. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinaria, 36(2:231-237, 2014. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Rodovia Patos-Teixeira, Km 01, Jatobá, Patos, PB 58708-110, Brasil. E-mail: elisangelamns@yahoo.com.br The present study aimed to evaluate the adaptability of dairy goats with help of thermographic precision in the semiarid brazilian. Thirty-six female goats were used in the study, mean age 2.5 years old and mean weight of 45 kg, all of them pure-bred, lactating and not pregnant, distributed in a completely randomized design, in a factorial outline 2 x 2; two genotypes (Anglo Nubian and Alpine vs two shifts (morning and afternoon with 18 repetitions. Analysis of variance showed that the shift had significant effect (P0.05. Also, there was no significant interaction between breed and shift. Regarding the parameters: respiratory rate (RR and surface temperature of the muzzle of cinnamon there was significant effect of breed and shift and significant interaction between breed and shift (P<0.05. Positive correlations between physiological parameters and room temperature and negative correlation between thermal gradients and more parameters. The Anglo Nubian breed had become more adapted to the semi-arid environmental conditions representing a good alternative for breeding programs. The Alpine breed increased respiratory effort required to dissipate heat and maintain homeothermy, proving to be more demanding regarding system creation and management in the semi-arid climatic conditions.

  4. Quantification of radiation absorbed dose and DNA damages in subjects undergoing computer tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanagaraj, Karthik; Basheerudeen, Safa Abdul Syed; Tamizh Selvan, G.; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Jose, M.T.; Ozhimuthu, Annalakshmi; Panneer Selvam, S.; Pattan, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    X-rays are extensively used in medical field for imaging, diagnostic radiology and radiotherapy. Irrespective of the application, the procedures deliver a significant amount of dose to the subject, while undergoing the procedure, which vary from imaging (low dose in the order mGy) and therapy (high doses in the order of several Gy). Of the various imaging modalities, the computed tomography (CT) is commonly used to diagnose many health alignments, in all age groups. Though the personals involved in performing the procedures are monitored for the levels of exposure, it is uncommon to monitor the patient after the examination, as the benefits outweigh the risk. However an enhanced concern on the risk associated due to the exposure of low dose X-radiation in CT has been reported. Therefore, we aim to quantify the absorbed dose to the eye, thyroid and forehead using thermo luminescence dosimeter of Lithium Manganese Borate doped with Terbium (LMB:Tb) in subjects undergoing CT examination (n= 27), as a methodology to investigate the effects of low dose ionizing radiation. Further, the DNA damages was measured using chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) assay, from the blood samples obtained from the study subjects before and after the procedures. The overall measured organ dose ranged between 1.92 and 520.14 mGy for eye, 0.84 and 210.33 mGy for forehead and 1.79-185 mGy for thyroid, with an average of 128.86 1 137.16, 78.25 1 69.02 and 48.86 1 63.60 respectively. The DNA damages measured using CA and MN assay, showed an extreme statistically significant (p<0.0001) increase in CA and significant increase (p<0.001) in MN frequency in post exposure when compared to that of unexposed control. The significance of the estimated dose and the DNA damages will be discussed. (author)

  5. Development and optimization of thermographic techniques for Non-Destructive Evaluation of multilayered structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Dmitry J.

    Quality control of modern materials is of the utmost importance in science and industry. Methods for nondestructive evaluation of material properties and the presence of defects are numerous. They differ in terms of their sensitivity and applicability in various conditions, and they provide different kinds of data such as the speed of sound in the material, its hardness, radiation absorption, etc. Based on measured characteristics an analyst makes a decision on the material studied. This work addresses a class of methods known as active thermographic analysis. Thermography analyzes the temperature of the surface of the sample under different external conditions. By keeping track of temperature changes at the surface caused by a deposition of heat on the sample one can determine its material properties such as theand processing the data captured it is possible to make decisions on parameters of this sample. Among the data which can be acquired are such important information as the location of internal defects (e.g., detachments, hollows, inclusions), thickness of the material layers, thermal parameters of the material and the location of internal defects (e.g., detachments, hollows, inclusions). The first part of this research investigates a method for analysis of layered composite materials using the approach based on interference of so called temperature waves. As demonstrated using the expressions derived, one can determine the thermal properties of the layers of the sample by applying a harmonically modulated heat flux to the surfaces and measuring the phase of the periodically changing surface temperature. This approach can be of use in the field of designing and analysis of composite thermal insulation coatings. In the second part of this work a method of analyzing objects of fine art was investigated, particularly - detection of subsurface defects. In the process of preserving art it is of primary importance to determine whether restoration is necessary

  6. Solar Tower Experiments for Radiometric Calibration and Validation of Infrared Imaging Assets and Analysis Tools for Entry Aero-Heating Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Horvath, Thomas J.; Mercer, David C.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ross, Martin N.; Tietjen, Alan; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements assessment team has a task to perform radiometric calibration and validation of land-based and airborne infrared imaging assets and tools for remote thermographic imaging. The IR assets and tools will be used for thermographic imaging of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry aero-heating to provide flight boundary layer transition thermography data that could be utilized for calibration and validation of empirical and theoretical aero-heating tools. A series of tests at the Sandia National Laboratories National Solar Thermal Test Facility were designed for this task where reflected solar radiation from a field of heliostats was used to heat a 4 foot by 4 foot test panel consisting of LI 900 ceramic tiles located on top of the 200 foot tall Solar Tower. The test panel provided an Orbiter-like entry temperature for the purposes of radiometric calibration and validation. The Solar Tower provided an ideal test bed for this series of radiometric calibration and validation tests because it had the potential to rapidly heat the large test panel to spatially uniform and non-uniform elevated temperatures. Also, the unsheltered-open-air environment of the Solar Tower was conducive to obtaining unobstructed radiometric data by land-based and airborne IR imaging assets. Various thermocouples installed on the test panel and an infrared imager located in close proximity to the test panel were used to obtain surface temperature measurements for evaluation and calibration of the radiometric data from the infrared imaging assets. The overall test environment, test article, test approach, and typical test results are discussed.

  7. Building Damage Extraction Triggered by Earthquake Using the Uav Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S.; Tang, H.

    2018-04-01

    When extracting building damage information, we can only determine whether the building is collapsed using the post-earthquake satellite images. Even the satellite images have the sub-meter resolution, the identification of slightly damaged buildings is still a challenge. As the complementary data to satellite images, the UAV images have unique advantages, such as stronger flexibility and higher resolution. In this paper, according to the spectral feature of UAV images and the morphological feature of the reconstructed point clouds, the building damage was classified into four levels: basically intact buildings, slightly damaged buildings, partially collapsed buildings and totally collapsed buildings, and give the rules of damage grades. In particular, the slightly damaged buildings are determined using the detected roof-holes. In order to verify the approach, we conduct experimental simulations in the cases of Wenchuan and Ya'an earthquakes. By analyzing the post-earthquake UAV images of the two earthquakes, the building damage was classified into four levels, and the quantitative statistics of the damaged buildings is given in the experiments.

  8. Detecting Damaged Building Regions Based on Semantic Scene Change from Multi-Temporal High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Tu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of damaged building regions is crucial to emergency response actions and rescue work after a disaster. Change detection methods using multi-temporal remote sensing images are widely used for this purpose. Differing from traditional methods based on change detection for damaged building regions, semantic scene change can provide a new point of view since it can indicate the land-use variation at the semantic level. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for detecting damaged building regions based on semantic scene change in a visual Bag-of-Words model. Pre- and post-disaster scene change in building regions are represented by a uniform visual codebook frequency. The scene change of damaged and non-damaged building regions is discriminated using the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier. An evaluation of experimental results, for a selected study site of the Longtou hill town of Yunnan, China, which was heavily damaged in the Ludian earthquake of 14 March 2013, shows that this method is feasible and effective for detecting damaged building regions. For the experiments, WorldView-2 optical imagery and aerial imagery is used.

  9. Structural damage identification based on laser ultrasonic propagation imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chen-Ciang; Jang, Si-Gwang; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2009-06-01

    An ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) system consisted of a Q-switched Nd-YAG pulsed laser and a galvanometer laser mirror scanner was developed. The system which requires neither reference data nor fixed focal length could be used for health monitoring of curved structures. If combined with a fiber acoustic wave PZT (FAWPZT) sensor, it could be used to inspect hot target structures that present formidable challenges to the usage of contact piezoelectric transducers mainly due to the operating temperature limitation of transducers and debonding problem due to the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion between the target, transducer and bonding material. The inspection of a stainless steel plate with a curvature radius of about 4 m, having 2mm×1mm open-crack was demonstrated at 150°C using a FAWPZT sensor welded on the plate. Highly-curved surfaces scanning capability and adaptivity of the system for large laser incident angle up to 70° was demonstrated on a stainless steel cylinder with 2mm×1mm open-crack. The imaging results were presented in ultrasonic propagation movie which was a moving wavefield emerged from an installed ultrasonic sensor. Damages were localized by the scattering wavefields. The result images enabled easy detection and interpretation of structural defects as anomalies during ultrasonic wave propagation.

  10. Automatic metal parts inspection: Use of thermographic images and anomaly detection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussat, M. S.; Guillaume, M.; Caulier, Y.; Spinnler, K.

    2013-11-01

    A fully-automatic approach based on the use of induction thermography and detection algorithms is proposed to inspect industrial metallic parts containing different surface and sub-surface anomalies such as open cracks, open and closed notches with different sizes and depths. A practical experimental setup is developed, where lock-in and pulsed thermography (LT and PT, respectively) techniques are used to establish a dataset of thermal images for three different mockups. Data cubes are constructed by stacking up the temporal sequence of thermogram images. After the reduction of the data space dimension by means of denoising and dimensionality reduction methods; anomaly detection algorithms are applied on the reduced data cubes. The dimensions of the reduced data spaces are automatically calculated with arbitrary criterion. The results show that, when reduced data cubes are used, the anomaly detection algorithms originally developed for hyperspectral data, the well-known Reed and Xiaoli Yu detector (RX) and the regularized adaptive RX (RARX), give good detection performances for both surface and sub-surface defects in a non-supervised way.

  11. Thermographic inspection of bond defects in Fiber Reinforced Polymer applied to masonry structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Aiello, M. A.; Capozzoli, L.; Vasanelli, E.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays, externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) are extensively used for strengthening and repairing masonry and reinforced concrete existing structures; they have had a rapid spread in the area of rehabilitation for their many advantages over other conventional repair systems, such as lightweight, excellent corrosion and fatigue resistance, high strength, etc. FRP systems applied to masonry or concrete structures are typically installed using a wet-layup technique.The method is susceptible to cause flaws or defects in the bond between the FRP system and the substrate, which may reduce the effectiveness of the reinforcing systems and the correct transfer of load from the structure to the composite. Thus it is of primary importance to detect the presence of defects and to quantify their extension in order to eventually provide correct repair measurements. The IR thermography has been cited by the several guidelines as a good mean to qualitatively evaluate the presence of installation defects and to monitor the reinforcing system with time.The method is non-destructive and does not require contact with the composite or other means except air to detect the reinforcement. Some works in the literature have been published on this topic. Most of the researches aim at using the IR thermography technique to characterize quantitatively the defects in terms of depth, extension and type in order to have an experimental database on defect typology to evaluate the long term performances of the reinforcing system. Nevertheless, most of the works in the literature concerns with FRP applied to concrete structures without considering the case of masonry structures. In the present research artificial bond defects between FRP and the masonry substrate have been reproduced in laboratory and the IR multi temporal thermography technique has been used to detect them. Thermographic analysis has been carried out on two wall samples having limited dimensions (100 x 70 cm) both

  12. A thermographic study on eyes affected by Age-related Macular Degeneration: Comparison among various forms of the pathology and analysis of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteoli, Sara; Finocchio, Lucia; Biagini, Ilaria; Giacomelli, Giovanni; Sodi, Andrea; Corvi, Andrea; Virgili, Gianni; Rizzo, Stanislao

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate (1) the ocular thermographic profiles in eyes affected by Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) and age-matched controls to detect possible hemodynamic abnormalities that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, (2) whether any risk factors associated with the disease could affect the development of a form of AMD rather than another. Thirty-four eyes with Age-Related Maculopathy (ARM), 41 eyes with dry AMD, 60 eyes affected by wet AMD, and 74 eyes with fibrotic AMD were included in the study. The control group consisted of 48 healthy eyes. Exclusion criteria were represented by any other ocular diseases other than AMD, tear film abnormalities, systemic cardiovascular abnormalities, systemic diseases and a body temperature higher than 37.5 °C. A total of 210 eyes without pupil dilation were investigated by infrared thermography (FLIR A320). The Ocular Surface Temperature (OST) of five ocular areas was calculated by means of an image processing technique from the infrared images. Two-sample t-test, one-way ANOVA test and multivariate analysis were used for statistical analyses. ANOVA analyses showed no significant differences among AMD groups (P-value > 0.05), however, OST in AMD patients was significantly lower than in controls (P-value < 0.0001). Smokers showed higher possibility (P-value = 0.012) of developing wet AMD instead of dry AMD. Infrared thermography may be a helpful, non-invasive and not time-consuming method to be used in the management of patients with this common degenerative maculopathy.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of treatment-related central nervous system damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, R.J.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    Neurologic and neuropsychologic treatment related sequelae are increasingly encountered in children with cancer, but conventional means of neurologic investigation are insensitive to the presence and extent of damage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown brain damage not demonstrable by other means of investigation. For this reason, 11 children with cancer and with nontumor-related neurologic dysfunction were studied on a 1.5 Tesla MRI unit. All had concurrent computed tomography (CT). MRI abnormalities were seen in all (100%) patients. In 10 of 11 patients, abnormalities were of greater extent on MRI than on CT. White matter changes were frequently seen on MRI without corresponding CT abnormality. Those patients with the most severe forms of neurologic compromise had the most extensive changes on MRI. Focal neurologic findings correlated well with regions of focal signal change. Milder forms of neurologic compromise occurred in patients with definite, but less extensive, periventricular and/or subcortical change on MRI. MRI is more sensitive than CT in demonstrating treatment-related neurologic damage in children with cancer, and the type of change seen on MRI seems to correlate well with the type and severity of neurologic dysfunction present

  14. Developing Dynamic Digital Image Correlation Technique to Monitor Structural Damage of Old Buildings under External Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsiang Shih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of buildings to resist external excitation is an important factor to consider for the structural design of buildings. When subject to external excitation, a building may suffer a certain degree of damages, and its residual capacity to resist external excitation cannot be evaluated. In this research, dynamic digital image correlation method combined with parameter evaluation available in system identification is used to evaluate the structural capacity to resist external excitation. The results reveal possible building latent safety problems so that timely structural reinforcement or dismantling of the building can be initiated to alleviate further damages. The results of experiments using the proposed method conform to the results obtained using the conventional method, but this method is more convenient and rapid than the latter in the subsequent procedure of data processing. If only the frequency change is used, the damages suffered by the building can be detected, but the damage location is not revealed. The interstory drift mode shape (IDMS based on the characteristic of story drift has higher sensitivity than the approximate story damage index (ADSI method based on modal frequency and vibration type; however, both indices can be used to determine the degree and location of building damages.

  15. Distal infrared thermography and skin temperature after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Bjerregaard, Lars S; Lundstrøm, Lars H

    2014-01-01

    thermographic imaging of the hand before and at 1 min intervals for 30 min after an ultrasound-guided IBPB with 20 ml ropivacaine 7.5 mg ml. Cooling of both hands was performed to standardise measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Thermographic changes in skin temperature on the dorsum of the hand. RESULTS: Forty...

  16. Evaluation in vitro of effects of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers irradiation on root canal wall, by stereoscopy, scanning electron micrography and thermographic camera; Avaliacao in vitro dos efeitos da irradiacao laser de Er:YAG e Nd:YAG na parede dentinaria do canal radicular, sob observacao do estereoscopio, da micrografia eletronica e da camera termografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goya, Claudia

    2001-07-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate in vitro the effects of Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG laser irradiation in the root canal wall by SEM, evaluating the apical leakage and the temperature changes during the laser irradiation. Seventy four extracted human teeth were used, they were instrumented and divided into seven groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth were evaluated through stereoscopy, by SEM, and with the thermographic camera. The Nd:YAG laser irradiation parameters were 100 mJ/p, 15 Hz, and Er:YAG laser were 160 mJ/p and 10 Hz, the irradiation was 4 times at 2 mm/sec speed, with 20 sec interval. The apical leakage was not observed in the teeth irradiated by Nd:YAG laser alone or in association with Er:YAG laser. However in the teeth irradiated only by the Er:YAG laser we observed a little leakage. By SEM observation the Nd:YAG laser irradiation showed melting and recrystallization in the dentin surface closing dentinal tubules, and in the samples irradiated by Er:Y AG laser a clean surface, opened dentinal tubules, and the combination by two lasers, showed melting covering some dentinal tubules The thermographic study found the temperature increase was not more than 6 deg C. This study showed the safety parameters applications of Er:YAG laser in association with Nd:YAG laser in root canal treatment, in order to not cause thermal damages to the periodontal tissues. (author)

  17. Lock-in thermographic inspection of squats on rail steel head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, D.; Jones, R.

    2013-03-01

    The development of squat defects has become a major concern in numerous railway systems throughout the world. Infrared thermography is a relatively new non-destructive inspection technique used for a wide range of applications. However, it has not been used for rail squat detection. Lock-in thermography is a non-destructive inspection technique that utilizes an infrared camera to detect the thermal waves. A thermal image is produced, which displays the local thermal wave variation in phase or amplitude. In inhomogeneous materials, the amplitude and phase of the thermal wave carries information related to both the local thermal properties and the nature of the structure being inspected. By examining the infrared thermal signature of squat damage on the head of steel rails, it was possible to generate a relationship matching squat depth to thermal image phase angle, using appropriate experimental/numerical calibration. The results showed that with the additional data sets obtained from further experimental tests, the clarity of this relationship will be greatly improved to a level whereby infrared thermal contours can be directly translated into the precise subsurface behaviour of a squat.

  18. Fusion of Multi-Temporal Interferometric Coherence and Optical Image Data for the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquake Damage Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nopphawan Tamkuan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes are one of the most devastating types of natural disasters, and happen with little to no warning. This study combined Landsat-8 and interferometric ALOS-2 coherence data without training area techniques by classifying the remote sensing ratios of specific features for damage assessment. Waterbodies and highly vegetated areas were extracted by the modified normalized difference water index (MNDWI and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, respectively, from after-earthquake images in order to improve the accuracy of damage maps. Urban areas were classified from pre-event interferometric coherence data. The affected areas from the earthquake were detected with the normalized difference (ND between the pre- and co-event interferometric coherence. The results presented three damage types; namely, damage to buildings caused by ground motion, liquefaction, and landslides. The overall accuracy (94% of the confusion matrix was excellent. Results for urban areas were divided into three damage levels (e.g., none–slight, slight–heavy, heavy–destructive at a high (90% overall accuracy level. Moreover, data on buildings damaged by liquefaction and landslides were in good agreement with field survey information. Overall, this study illustrates an effective damage assessment mapping approach that can support post-earthquake management activities for future events, especially in areas where geographical data are sparse.

  19. Simulation of Detecting Damage in Composite Stiffened Panel Using Lamb Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Ross, Richard W.; Huang, Guo L.; Yuan, Fuh G.

    2013-01-01

    Lamb wave damage detection in a composite stiffened panel is simulated by performing explicit transient dynamic finite element analyses and using signal imaging techniques. This virtual test process does not need to use real structures, actuators/sensors, or laboratory equipment. Quasi-isotropic laminates are used for the stiffened panels. Two types of damage are studied. One type is a damage in the skin bay and the other type is a debond between the stiffener flange and the skin. Innovative approaches for identifying the damage location and imaging the damage were developed. The damage location is identified by finding the intersection of the damage locus and the path of the time reversal wave packet re-emitted from the sensor nodes. The damage locus is a circle that envelops the potential damage locations. Its center is at the actuator location and its radius is computed by multiplying the group velocity by the time of flight to damage. To create a damage image for estimating the size of damage, a group of nodes in the neighborhood of the damage location is identified for applying an image condition. The image condition, computed at a finite element node, is the zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) of the time-reversed incident wave signal and the time reversal wave signal from the sensor nodes. This damage imaging process is computationally efficient since only the ZLCC values of a small amount of nodes in the neighborhood of the identified damage location are computed instead of those of the full model.

  20. Brain damages in ketamine addicts as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei eWang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a known antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA glutamate receptors, had been used as an anesthetic particularly for pediatric or for cardiac patients. Unfortunately, ketamine has become an abusive drug in many parts of the world while chronic and prolonged usage led to damages of many organs including the brain. However, no studies on possible damages in the brains induced by chronic ketamine abuse have been documented in the human via neuroimaging. This paper described for the first time via employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI the changes in ketamine addicts of 0.5 to 12 years and illustrated the possible brain regions susceptible to ketamine abuse. Twenty-one ketamine addicts were recruited and the results showed that the lesions in the brains of ketamine addicts were located in many regions which appeared 2-4 years after ketamine addiction. Cortical atrophy was usually evident in the frontal, parietal or occipital cortices of addicts. Such study confirmed that many brain regions in the human were susceptible to chronic ketamine injury and presented a diffuse effect of ketamine on the brain which might differ from other central nervous system (CNS drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine.

  1. Thermography. Principles and measurements; Thermographie. Principes et mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajani, D. [Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69 - Ecully (France)

    2001-09-01

    Thermography is a technique which allows to obtain the thermal image of a given scene and for a determined spectral domain. Infrared thermography is the most well-known and used technique of thermography, but this article deals with the thermographic measurements in general and for a wider part of the radiation spectrum: 1 - general considerations: terminology, fluxes and temperatures measurement; 2 - radiations (emission and reception), radiative properties of materials: basic notions, simplified radiometer, radiative properties of materials; 3 - thermographic measurements: general considerations, calibration, radiometric measurement situation, from the radiometric measurement to the thermometric measurement and to the thermographic measurement, measurement uncertainties. (J.S.)

  2. Correlating TEM images of damage in irradiated materials to molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Caturla, M.-J.; Wall, M.; Felter, T.; Fluss, M.; Wirth, B.D.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Victoria, M.

    2002-01-01

    TEM image simulations are used to couple the results from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to experimental TEM images. In particular we apply this methodology to the study of defects produced during irradiation. MD simulations have shown that irradiation of FCC metals results in a population of vacancies and interstitials forming clusters. The limitation of these simulations is the short time scales available, on the order of 100 s of picoseconds. Extrapolation of the results from these short times to the time scales of the laboratory has been difficult. We address this problem by two methods: we perform TEM image simulations of MD simulations of cascades with an improved technique, to relate defects produced at short time scales with those observed experimentally at much longer time scales. On the other hand we perform in situ TEM experiments of Au irradiated at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, and study the evolution of the produced damage as the temperature is increased to room temperature. We find that some of the defects observed in the MD simulations at short time scales using the TEM image simulation technique have features that resemble those observed in laboratory TEM images of irradiated samples. In situ TEM shows that stacking fault tetrahedra are present at the lowest temperatures and are stable during annealing up to room temperature, while other defect clusters migrate one dimensionally above -100 deg. C. Results are presented here

  3. Application of a Near Infrared Imaging System for Thermographic Imaging of the Space Shuttle during Hypersonic Re-Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Tietjen, Alan B.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Tomek, Deborah M.; Gibson, David M.; Taylor, Jeff C.; Tack, Steve; Bush, Brett C.; Mercer, C. David; Shea, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution calibrated near infrared (NIR) imagery was obtained of the Space Shuttle s reentry during STS-119, STS-125, and STS-128 missions. The infrared imagery was collected using a US Navy NP-3D Orion aircraft using a long-range infrared optical package referred to as Cast Glance. The slant ranges between the Space Shuttle and Cast Glance were approximately 26-41 nautical miles at point of closest approach. The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements (HYTHIRM) project was a NASA Langley led endeavor sponsored by the NASA Engineering Safety Center, the Space Shuttle Program Office and the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate to demonstrate a quantitative thermal imaging capability. HYTHIRM required several mission tools to acquire the imagery. These tools include pre-mission acquisition simulations of the Shuttle trajectory in relationship to the Cast Glance aircraft flight path, radiance modeling to predict the infrared response of the Shuttle, and post mission analysis tools to process the infrared imagery to quantitative temperature maps. The spatially resolved global thermal measurements made during the Shuttle s hypersonic reentry provides valuable flight data for reducing the uncertainty associated with present day ground-to-flight extrapolation techniques and current state-of-the-art empirical boundary-layer transition or turbulent heating prediction methods. Laminar and turbulent flight data is considered critical for the development of turbulence models supporting NASA s next-generation spacecraft. This paper will provide the motivation and details behind the use of an upgraded NIR imaging system used onboard a Navy Cast Glance aircraft and describe the characterizations and procedures performed to obtain quantitative temperature maps. A brief description and assessment will be provided of the previously used analog NIR camera along with image examples from Shuttle missions STS-121, STS-115, and solar tower test. These thermal

  4. Dark current spectroscopy of space and nuclear environment induced displacement damage defects in pinned photodiode based CMOS image sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloir, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are envisioned for an increasing number of high-end scientific imaging applications such as space imaging or nuclear experiments. Indeed, the performance of high-end CMOS image sensors has dramatically increased in the past years thanks to the unceasing improvements of microelectronics, and these image sensors have substantial advantages over CCDs which make them great candidates to replace CCDs in future space missions. However, in space and nuclear environments, CMOS image sensors must face harsh radiation which can rapidly degrade their electro-optical performances. In particular, the protons, electrons and ions travelling in space or the fusion neutrons from nuclear experiments can displace silicon atoms in the pixels and break the crystalline structure. These displacement damage effects lead to the formation of stable defects and to the introduction of states in the forbidden bandgap of silicon, which can allow the thermal generation of electron-hole pairs. Consequently, non ionizing radiation leads to a permanent increase of the dark current of the pixels and thus a decrease of the image sensor sensitivity and dynamic range. The aim of the present work is to extend the understanding of the effect of displacement damage on the dark current increase of CMOS image sensors. In particular, this work focuses on the shape of the dark current distribution depending on the particle type, energy and fluence but also on the image sensor physical parameters. Thanks to the many conditions tested, an empirical model for the prediction of the dark current distribution induced by displacement damage in nuclear or space environments is experimentally validated and physically justified. Another central part of this work consists in using the dark current spectroscopy technique for the first time on irradiated CMOS image sensors to detect and characterize radiation-induced silicon bulk defects. Many types of defects are detected and two of them are identified

  5. Online imaging of initial DNA damages at the PTB microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, U.; Langner, F.; Mielke, C.; Mosconi, M.; Dirks, W. G.

    2011-01-01

    In an inter-disciplinary collaboration of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures (DSMZ) and Heinrich-Heine Univ., live-cell imaging has been established at the charged-particle microbeam facility of PTB. Candidate genes participating in DNA strand-break repair pathways such as PARP-1, MRE11, MSH2, MDC1 and p53BP1 have been modified to generate fluorescent fusion proteins. Using multi-cistronic expression vectors, stable genomic integration was achieved in HT-1080 fibroblasts. The aim of this study is to characterise and use these highly reliable cell lines for studying initial steps of DNA damage responses and kinetics of repair after microbeam irradiation with high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) particles in living cells at physiological conditions. (authors)

  6. Damage methodology approach on a composite panel based on a combination of Fringe Projection and 2D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sesé, Luis; Díaz, Francisco A.

    2018-02-01

    The recent improvement in accessibility to high speed digital cameras has enabled three dimensional (3D) vibration measurements employing full-field optical techniques. Moreover, there is a need to develop a cost-effective and non-destructive testing method to quantify the severity of damages arising from impacts and thus, enhance the service life. This effect is more interesting in composite structures since possible internal damage has low external manifestation. Those possible damages have been previously studied experimentally by using vibration testing. Namely, those analyses were focused on variations in the modal frequencies or, more recently, mode shapes variations employing punctual accelerometers or vibrometers. In this paper it is presented an alternative method to investigate the severity of damage on a composite structure and how the damage affects to its integrity through the analysis of the full field modal behaviour. In this case, instead of punctual measurements, displacement maps are analysed by employing a combination of FP + 2D-DIC during vibration experiments in an industrial component. In addition, to analyse possible mode shape changes, differences between damaged and undamaged specimens are studied by employing a recent methodology based on Adaptive Image Decomposition (AGMD) procedure. It will be demonstrated that AGMD Image decomposition procedure, which decompose the displacement field into shape descriptors, is capable to detect and quantify the differences between mode shapes. As an application example, the proposed approach has been evaluated on two large industrial components (car bonnets) made of short-fibre reinforced composite. Specifically, the evolution of normalized AGMD shape descriptors has been evaluated for three different components with different damage levels. Results demonstrate the potential of the presented approach making it possible to measure the severity of a structural damage by evaluating the mode shape based in

  7. Development and validation of rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging inflammation thresholds associated with lack of damage progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine thresholds for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) magnetic resonance imaging scores (RAMRIS) associated with a low risk of structural damage progression. Methods MRI of the dominant hand was performed and RAMRIS scores determined at weeks 0, 24, and 52. X-rays were performed and van...

  8. Characterization of total ionizing dose damage in COTS pinned photodiode CMOS image sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zujun, E-mail: wangzujun@nint.ac.cn; Ma, Wuying; Huang, Shaoyan; Yao, Zhibin; Liu, Minbo; He, Baoping; Sheng, Jiangkun; Xue, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Radiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan (China)

    2016-03-15

    The characterization of total ionizing dose (TID) damage in COTS pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) is investigated. The radiation experiments are carried out at a {sup 60}Co γ-ray source. The CISs are produced by 0.18-μm CMOS technology and the pixel architecture is 8T global shutter pixel with correlated double sampling (CDS) based on a 4T PPD front end. The parameters of CISs such as temporal domain, spatial domain, and spectral domain are measured at the CIS test system as the EMVA 1288 standard before and after irradiation. The dark current, random noise, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), photo response non-uniformity (PRNU), overall system gain, saturation output, dynamic range (DR), signal to noise ratio (SNR), quantum efficiency (QE), and responsivity versus the TID are reported. The behaviors of the tested CISs show remarkable degradations after radiation. The degradation mechanisms of CISs induced by TID damage are also analyzed.

  9. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westra Mirjam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1 is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease. The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared imaging obtained during temperature provocation. The secondary objective was to obtain information about the involvement of the sympathetic system in CRPS1. Methods We studied 12 patients in whom CRPS1 was diagnosed according to the criteria of Bruehl. High and low whole body cooling and warming induced and reduced sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. The degree of vasoconstrictor activity in both hands was monitored using a videothermograph. The sensitivity and specificity of the calculation methods used to assess the thermographic images were calculated. Results The temperature difference between the hands in the CRPS patients increases significantly when the sympathetic system is provoked. At both the maximum and minimum vasoconstriction no significant differences were found in fingertip temperatures between both hands. Conclusion The majority of CRPS1 patients do not show maximal obtainable temperature differences between the involved and contralateral extremity at room temperature (static measurement. During cold and warm temperature challenges this temperature difference increases significantly. As a result a higher sensitivity and specificity could be achieved in the diagnosis of CRPS1. These findings suggest that the sympathetic efferent system is involved in CRPS1.

  10. Longitudinal diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study of radiation-induced white matter damage in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Silun; Wu, Ed X; Qiu, Deqiang; Leung, Lucullus H T; Lau, Ho-Fai; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2009-02-01

    Radiation-induced white matter (WM) damage is a major side effect of whole brain irradiation among childhood cancer survivors. We evaluate longitudinally the diffusion characteristics of the late radiation-induced WM damage in a rat model after 25 and 30 Gy irradiation to the hemibrain at 8 time points from 2 to 48 weeks postradiation. We hypothesize that diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) indices including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (lambda(//)), and radial diffusivity (lambda( perpendicular)) can accurately detect and monitor the histopathologic changes of radiation-induced WM damage, measured at the EC, and that these changes are dose and time dependent. Results showed a progressive reduction of FA, which was driven by reduction in lambda(//) from 4 to 40 weeks postradiation, and an increase in lambda( perpendicular) with return to baseline in lambda(//) at 48 weeks postradiation. Histologic evaluation of irradiated WM showed reactive astrogliosis from 4 weeks postradiation with reversal at 36 weeks, and demyelination, axonal degeneration, and necrosis at 48 weeks postradiation. Moreover, changes in lambda(//) correlated with reactive astrogliosis (P histopathologic changes of WM damage and our results support the use of DTI as a biomarker to noninvasively monitor radiation-induced WM damage.

  11. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  12. Material State Awareness for Composites Part II: Precursor Damage Analysis and Quantification of Degraded Material Properties Using Quantitative Ultrasonic Image Correlation (QUIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav

    2017-01-01

    Material state awareness of composites using conventional Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) method is limited by finding the size and the locations of the cracks and the delamination in a composite structure. To aid the progressive failure models using the slow growth criteria, the awareness of the precursor damage state and quantification of the degraded material properties is necessary, which is challenging using the current NDE methods. To quantify the material state, a new offline NDE method is reported herein. The new method named Quantitative Ultrasonic Image Correlation (QUIC) is devised, where the concept of microcontinuum mechanics is hybrid with the experimentally measured Ultrasonic wave parameters. This unique combination resulted in a parameter called Nonlocal Damage Entropy for the precursor awareness. High frequency (more than 25 MHz) scanning acoustic microscopy is employed for the proposed QUIC. Eight woven carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic composite specimens were tested under fatigue up to 70% of their remaining useful life. During the first 30% of the life, the proposed nonlocal damage entropy is plotted to demonstrate the degradation of the material properties via awareness of the precursor damage state. Visual proofs for the precursor damage states are provided with the digital images obtained from the micro-optical microscopy, the scanning acoustic microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy. PMID:29258256

  13. Material State Awareness for Composites Part II: Precursor Damage Analysis and Quantification of Degraded Material Properties Using Quantitative Ultrasonic Image Correlation (QUIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Patra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Material state awareness of composites using conventional Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE method is limited by finding the size and the locations of the cracks and the delamination in a composite structure. To aid the progressive failure models using the slow growth criteria, the awareness of the precursor damage state and quantification of the degraded material properties is necessary, which is challenging using the current NDE methods. To quantify the material state, a new offline NDE method is reported herein. The new method named Quantitative Ultrasonic Image Correlation (QUIC is devised, where the concept of microcontinuum mechanics is hybrid with the experimentally measured Ultrasonic wave parameters. This unique combination resulted in a parameter called Nonlocal Damage Entropy for the precursor awareness. High frequency (more than 25 MHz scanning acoustic microscopy is employed for the proposed QUIC. Eight woven carbon-fiber-reinforced-plastic composite specimens were tested under fatigue up to 70% of their remaining useful life. During the first 30% of the life, the proposed nonlocal damage entropy is plotted to demonstrate the degradation of the material properties via awareness of the precursor damage state. Visual proofs for the precursor damage states are provided with the digital images obtained from the micro-optical microscopy, the scanning acoustic microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Study on mechanical properties and damage behaviors of Kevlar fiber reinforced epoxy composites by digital image correlation technique under optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Shao, Wenquan; Ji, Hongwei

    2010-10-01

    Kevlar fiber-reinforced epoxy (KFRE) composites are widely used in the fields of aerospace, weapon, shipping, and civil industry, due to their outstanding capabilities. In this paper, mechanical properties and damage behaviors of KFRE laminate (02/902) were tested and studied under tension condition. To precisely measure the tensile mechanical properties of the material and investigate its micro-scale damage evolution, a micro-image measuring system with in-situ tensile device was designed. The measuring system, by which the in-situ tensile test can be carried out and surface morphology evolution of the tensile specimen can be visually monitored and recorded during the process of loading, includes an ultra-long working distance zoom microscope and a in-situ tensile loading device. In this study, a digital image correlation method (DICM) was used to calculate the deformation of the tensile specimen under different load levels according to the temporal series images captured by an optical microscope and CCD camera. Then, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the KFRE was obtained accordingly. The damage progresses of the KFRE laminates were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that: (1) the KFRE laminate (02/902) is almost elastic, its failure mode is brittle tensile fracture.(2) Mechanical properties parameters of the material are as follows: elastic modulus is 14- 16GPa, and tensile ultimate stress is 450-480 Mpa respectively. (3) The damage evolution of the material is that cracks appear in epoxy matrix firstly, then, with the increasing of the tensile loading, matrix cracks add up and extend along a 45° angle direction with tensile load. Furthermore, decohesion between matrix and fibers as well as delamination occurs. Eventually, fibers break and the material is damaged.

  15. Cationic Organochalcogen with Monomer/Excimer Emissions for Dual-Color Live Cell Imaging and Cell Damage Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xi-Juan; Wang, Kang-Nan; Sun, Li-Li; Cao, Qian; Ke, Zhuo-Feng; Cao, Du-Xia; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2018-04-25

    Studies on the development of fluorescent organic molecules with different emission colors for imaging of organelles and their biomedical application are gaining lots of focus recently. Here, we report two cationic organochalcogens 1 and 2, both of which exhibit very weak green emission (Φ 1 = 0.12%; Φ 2 = 0.09%) in dilute solution as monomers, but remarkably enhanced green emission upon interaction with nucleic acids and large red-shifted emission in aggregate state by the formation of excimers at high concentration. More interestingly, the monomer emission and excimer-like emission can be used for dual color imaging of different organelles. Upon passively diffusing into cells, both probes selectively stain nucleoli with strong green emission upon 488 nm excitation, whereas upon 405 nm excitation, a completely different stain pattern by staining lysosomes (for 1) or mitochondria (for 2) with distinct red emission is observed because of the highly concentrated accumulation in these organelles. Studies on the mechanism of the accumulation in lysosomes (for 1) or mitochondria (for 2) found that the accumulations of the probes are dependent on the membrane permeabilization, which make the probes have great potential in diagnosing cell damage by sensing lysosomal or mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. The study is demonstrative, for the first time, of two cationic molecules for dual-color imaging nucleoli and lysosomes (1)/mitochondria (2) simultaneously in live cell based on monomer and excimer-like emission, respectively, and more importantly, for diagnosing cell damage.

  16. The influence of image sensor irradiation damage on the tracking and pointing accuracy of optical communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoliang; Luo, Lei; Li, Pengwei; Yu, Qingkui

    2018-03-01

    The image sensor in satellite optical communication system may generate noise due to space irradiation damage, leading to deviation for the determination of the light spot centroid. Based on the irradiation test data of CMOS devices, simulated defect spots in different sizes have been used for calculating the centroid deviation value by grey-level centroid algorithm. The impact on tracking & pointing accuracy of the system has been analyzed. The results show that both the amount and the position of irradiation-induced defect pixels contribute to spot centroid deviation. And the larger spot has less deviation. At last, considering the space radiation damage, suggestions are made for the constraints of spot size selection.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows the Evaluation of Tissue Damage and Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Zaccagnini

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides non-invasive, repetitive measures in the same individual, allowing the study of a physio-pathological event over time. In this study, we tested the performance of 7 Tesla multi-parametric MRI to monitor the dynamic changes of mouse skeletal muscle injury and regeneration upon acute ischemia induced by femoral artery dissection. T2-mapping (T2 relaxation time, diffusion-tensor imaging (Fractional Anisotropy and perfusion by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (K-trans were measured and imaging results were correlated with histological morphometric analysis in both Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles. We found that tissue damage positively correlated with T2-relaxation time, while myofiber regeneration and capillary density positively correlated with Fractional Anisotropy. Interestingly, K-trans positively correlated with capillary density. Accordingly, repeated MRI measurements between day 1 and day 28 after surgery in ischemic muscles showed that: 1 T2-relaxation time rapidly increased upon ischemia and then gradually declined, returning almost to basal level in the last phases of the regeneration process; 2 Fractional Anisotropy dropped upon ischemic damage induction and then recovered along with muscle regeneration and neoangiogenesis; 3 K-trans reached a minimum upon ischemia, then progressively recovered. Overall, Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles displayed similar patterns of MRI parameters dynamic, with more marked responses and less variability in Tibialis anterior. We conclude that MRI provides quantitative information about both tissue damage after ischemia and the subsequent vascular and muscle regeneration, accounting for the differences between subjects and, within the same individual, between different muscles.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows the Evaluation of Tissue Damage and Regeneration in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccagnini, Germana; Palmisano, Anna; Canu, Tamara; Maimone, Biagina; Lo Russo, Francesco M; Ambrogi, Federico; Gaetano, Carlo; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Esposito, Antonio; Martelli, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides non-invasive, repetitive measures in the same individual, allowing the study of a physio-pathological event over time. In this study, we tested the performance of 7 Tesla multi-parametric MRI to monitor the dynamic changes of mouse skeletal muscle injury and regeneration upon acute ischemia induced by femoral artery dissection. T2-mapping (T2 relaxation time), diffusion-tensor imaging (Fractional Anisotropy) and perfusion by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (K-trans) were measured and imaging results were correlated with histological morphometric analysis in both Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles. We found that tissue damage positively correlated with T2-relaxation time, while myofiber regeneration and capillary density positively correlated with Fractional Anisotropy. Interestingly, K-trans positively correlated with capillary density. Accordingly, repeated MRI measurements between day 1 and day 28 after surgery in ischemic muscles showed that: 1) T2-relaxation time rapidly increased upon ischemia and then gradually declined, returning almost to basal level in the last phases of the regeneration process; 2) Fractional Anisotropy dropped upon ischemic damage induction and then recovered along with muscle regeneration and neoangiogenesis; 3) K-trans reached a minimum upon ischemia, then progressively recovered. Overall, Gastrocnemius and Tibialis anterior muscles displayed similar patterns of MRI parameters dynamic, with more marked responses and less variability in Tibialis anterior. We conclude that MRI provides quantitative information about both tissue damage after ischemia and the subsequent vascular and muscle regeneration, accounting for the differences between subjects and, within the same individual, between different muscles.

  19. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Harald, E-mail: harald.krauss@iwb.tum.de; Zaeh, Michael F. [AMLab, iwb Application Center Augsburg, Technische Universität München (Germany); Zeugner, Thomas [Augsburg University (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    on the other hand. These issues and proper key figures for thermographic monitoring of the Selective Laser Melting process are discussed in the paper. Even though microbolometric temperature measurement is limited to repetition rates in the Hz-regime and sub megapixel resolution, current results show the feasibility of process surveillance by thermography for a limited section of the building platform in a commercial system.

  20. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  1. Confocal Adaptive Optics Imaging of Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Bundles: Implications for Glaucomatous Damage Seen on Circumpapillary OCT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald C; Chen, Monica F; Lee, Dongwon; Epstein, Benjamin; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Chui, Toco Y P

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of glaucomatous damage as seen on circumpapillary disc scans obtained with frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT), fdOCT scans were compared to images of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber (RNF) bundles obtained with an adaptive optics-scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). The AO-SLO images and fdOCT scans were obtained on 6 eyes of 6 patients with deep arcuate defects (5 points ≤-15 db) on 10-2 visual fields. The AO-SLO images were montaged and aligned with the fdOCT images to compare the RNF bundles seen with AO-SLO to the RNF layer thickness measured with fdOCT. All 6 eyes had an abnormally thin (1% confidence limit) RNF layer (RNFL) on fdOCT and abnormal (hyporeflective) regions of RNF bundles on AO-SLO in corresponding regions. However, regions of abnormal, but equal, RNFL thickness on fdOCT scans varied in appearance on AO-SLO images. These regions could be largely devoid of RNF bundles (5 eyes), have abnormal-appearing bundles of lower contrast (6 eyes), or have isolated areas with a few relatively normal-appearing bundles (2 eyes). There also were local variations in reflectivity of the fdOCT RNFL that corresponded to the variations in AO-SLO RNF bundle appearance. Relatively similar 10-2 defects with similar fdOCT RNFL thickness profiles can have very different degrees of RNF bundle damage as seen on fdOCT and AO-SLO. While the results point to limitations of fdOCT RNFL thickness as typically analyzed, they also illustrate the potential for improving fdOCT by attending to variations in local intensity.

  2. Computational reduction of specimen noise to enable improved thermography characterization of flaws in graphite polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-05-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites are often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These result in a "noise" floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. A method is presented for computationally removing a significant amount of the "noise" from near surface porosity by diffusing the early time response, then subtracting it from subsequent responses. Simulations of the thermal response of a composite are utilized in defining the limitations of the technique. This method for reducing the data is shown to give considerable improvement characterizing both the size and depth of damage. Examples are shown for data acquired on specimens with fabricated delaminations and impact damage.

  3. Computational Reduction of Specimen Noise to Enable Improved Thermography Characterization of Flaws in Graphite Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfree, William P.; Howell, Patricia A.; Zalameda, Joseph N.

    2014-01-01

    Flaw detection and characterization with thermographic techniques in graphite polymer composites are often limited by localized variations in the thermographic response. Variations in properties such as acceptable porosity, fiber volume content and surface polymer thickness result in variations in the thermal response that in general cause significant variations in the initial thermal response. These result in a "noise" floor that increases the difficulty of detecting and characterizing deeper flaws. A method is presented for computationally removing a significant amount of the "noise" from near surface porosity by diffusing the early time response, then subtracting it from subsequent responses. Simulations of the thermal response of a composite are utilized in defining the limitations of the technique. This method for reducing the data is shown to give considerable improvement characterizing both the size and depth of damage. Examples are shown for data acquired on specimens with fabricated delaminations and impact damage.

  4. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the l......Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery...... by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software...... originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced...

  5. Thermographic analysis of photodynamic therapy with intense pulsed light and needle-free injection photosensitizer delivery: an animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Requena, Michelle B.; Stringasci, Mirian D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José Dirceu; de Nardi, Andrigo B.; Escobar, Andre; da Rocha, Rozana W.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; de Menezes, Priscila F. C.

    2018-02-01

    The photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a therapeutic modality that depends mostly on photosensitizer (PS), light and molecular oxygen species. However, there are still technical limitations in clinical PDT that are under constant development, particularly concerning PS and light delivery. Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) sources are systems able to generate pulses of high energy with polychromatic light. IPL is a technique mainly used in the cosmetic area to perform various skin treatments for therapeutic and aesthetic applications. The goals of this study were to determine temperature variance during the application of IPL in porcine skin model, and the PDT effects using this light source with PS delivery by a commercial high pressure, needle-free injection system. The PSs tested were Indocyanine Green (ICG) and Photodithazine (PDZ), and the results showed an increase bellow 10 °C in the skin surface using a thermographic camera to measure. In conclusion, our preliminary study demonstrated that IPL associated with needle-free injection PS delivery could be a promising alternative to PDT.

  6. Process of radiation damage in BaFX:Eu2+ (X=Br, I) photo-stimulable phosphor for imaging plate (IP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Munetaka; Takahashi, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    Imaging Plate (IP) is a 2-dimensional radiation detector utilizing photo-stimulable phosphors. Photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) is a kind of process in radiation-induced reactions and IP can be repeatedly performed. The mechanism of PSL is reviewed and the radiation damage, which is a phenomenon that the luminescence goes down under X-ray irradiation, is also referred to. The relation between the composition of BaFX: Eu 2+ (X=Br, I), which is widely used in IPs, and the degree of radiation damage is investigated. The degree of radiation damage is smaller in the mixed crystal system of Br and I such as BaFBr 0.85 I 0.15 :Eu 2+ than in BaFBr: Eu 2+ and BaFI: Eu 2+ . This is explained by the characteristics of luminescence centers and F centers under X-ray irradiation. (author)

  7. Hurricane Harvey Building Damage Assessment Using UAV Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, J.; Jung, J.; Chang, A.; Choi, I.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Harvey which was extremely destructive major hurricane struck southern Texas, U.S.A on August 25, causing catastrophic flooding and storm damages. We visited Rockport suffered severe building destruction and conducted UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) surveying for building damage assessment. UAV provides very high resolution images compared with traditional remote sensing data. In addition, prompt and cost-effective damage assessment can be performed regardless of several limitations in other remote sensing platforms such as revisit interval of satellite platforms, complicated flight plan in aerial surveying, and cloud amounts. In this study, UAV flight and GPS surveying were conducted two weeks after hurricane damage to generate an orthomosaic image and a DEM (Digital Elevation Model). 3D region growing scheme has been proposed to quantitatively estimate building damages considering building debris' elevation change and spectral difference. The result showed that the proposed method can be used for high definition building damage assessment in a time- and cost-effective way.

  8. Physics-Based Image Segmentation Using First Order Statistical Properties and Genetic Algorithm for Inductive Thermography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Li, Xiaoqing; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun

    2018-05-01

    Thermographic inspection has been widely applied to non-destructive testing and evaluation with the capabilities of rapid, contactless, and large surface area detection. Image segmentation is considered essential for identifying and sizing defects. To attain a high-level performance, specific physics-based models that describe defects generation and enable the precise extraction of target region are of crucial importance. In this paper, an effective genetic first-order statistical image segmentation algorithm is proposed for quantitative crack detection. The proposed method automatically extracts valuable spatial-temporal patterns from unsupervised feature extraction algorithm and avoids a range of issues associated with human intervention in laborious manual selection of specific thermal video frames for processing. An internal genetic functionality is built into the proposed algorithm to automatically control the segmentation threshold to render enhanced accuracy in sizing the cracks. Eddy current pulsed thermography will be implemented as a platform to demonstrate surface crack detection. Experimental tests and comparisons have been conducted to verify the efficacy of the proposed method. In addition, a global quantitative assessment index F-score has been adopted to objectively evaluate the performance of different segmentation algorithms.

  9. Focused ion beam damage to MOS integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Campbell, Ann N.; Hembree, Charles E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.

    2000-01-01

    Commercial focused ion beam (FIB) systems are commonly used to image integrated circuits (ICS) after device processing, especially in failure analysis applications. FIB systems are also often employed to repair faults in metal lines for otherwise functioning ICS, and are being evaluated for applications in film deposition and nanofabrication. A problem that is often seen in FIB imaging and repair is that ICS can be damaged during the exposure process. This can result in degraded response or out-right circuit failure. Because FIB processes typically require the surface of an IC to be exposed to an intense beam of 30--50 keV Ga + ions, both charging and secondary radiation damage are potential concerns. In previous studies, both types of effects have been suggested as possible causes of device degradation, depending on the type of device examined and/or the bias conditions. Understanding the causes of this damage is important for ICS that are imaged or repaired by a FIB between manufacture and operation, since the performance and reliability of a given IC is otherwise at risk in subsequent system application. In this summary, the authors discuss the relative roles of radiation damage and charging effects during FIB imaging. Data from exposures of packaged parts under controlled bias indicate the possibility for secondary radiation damage during FIB exposure. On the other hand, FIB exposure of unbiased wafers (a more common application) typically results in damage caused by high-voltage stress or electrostatic discharge. Implications for FIB exposure and subsequent IC use are discussed

  10. Damage law identification of a quasi brittle ceramic from a b ending test using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meille S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quasi brittle ceramics show a non linear mechanical behaviour resulting most of the time in a dissymetry between their tensile and compressive stress-strain laws. The characterization of their fracture strengths might be biased if elastic linear formulae are used to analyze classical tests like bending tests. Based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC, a methodology is proposed to characterize materials with dissymmetric behaviours. Applying specific DIC decomposition functions for bending, compressive and tensile tests, a stress-strain model and its damage law are identified for aluminium titanate, a damageable micro cracked ceramic. This identification method using DIC can obviously be applied to other quasi brittle materials.

  11. An imaging system for quantitive surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for obtaining detailed quantitative temperature distributions on test models in hypersonic wind tunnels is presented. This technique is based on the ratio of blue to green (450, 520 nm) emission from an UV (365 nm) excited phosphor coating. Separately filtered images are recorded from a three-tube color camera, utilizing off-the-shelf front-end video optics to discriminate wavelengths. Two demonstration studies in a 31-inch Mach 10 tunnel are discussed. One study presents the windward surface temperature-time history for a transatmospheric vehicle, and the other illustrates nosetip heating on a spherically blunted slender cone.

  12. Application of Remote Sensing in Building Damages Assessment after Moderate and Strong Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, J.; Dou, A.

    2003-04-01

    - Earthquake is a main natural disaster in modern society. However, we still cannot predict the time and place of its occurrence accurately. Then it is of much importance to survey the damages information when an earthquake occurs, which can help us to mitigate losses and implement fast damage evaluation. In this paper, we use remote sensing techniques for our purposes. Remotely sensed satellite images often view a large scale of land at a time. There are several kinds of satellite images, which of different spatial and spectral resolutions. Landsat-4/5 TM sensor can view ground at 30m resolution, while Landsat-7 ETM Plus has a resolution of 15m in panchromatic waveband. SPOT satellite can provide images with higher resolutions. Those images obtained pre- and post-earthquake can help us greatly in identifying damages of moderate and large-size buildings. In this paper, we bring forward a method to implement quick damages assessment by analyzing both pre- and post-earthquake satellite images. First, those images are geographically registered together with low RMS (Root Mean Square) error. Then, we clip out residential areas by overlaying images with existing vector layers through Geographic Information System (GIS) software. We present a new change detection algorithm to quantitatively identify damages degree. An empirical or semi-empirical model is then established by analyzing the real damage degree and changes of pixel values of the same ground objects. Experimental result shows that there is a good linear relationship between changes of pixel values and ground damages, which proves the potentials of remote sensing in post-quake fast damage assessment. Keywords: Damages Assessment, Earthquake Hazard, Remote Sensing

  13. Smart concrete slabs with embedded tubular PZT transducers for damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weihang; Huo, Linsheng; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a new concept and methodology of smart concrete slab (SCS) with embedded tubular lead zirconate titanate transducer array for image based damage detection. Stress waves, as the detecting signals, are generated by the embedded tubular piezoceramic transducers in the SCS. Tubular piezoceramic transducers are used due to their capacity of generating radially uniform stress waves in a two-dimensional concrete slab (such as bridge decks and walls), increasing the monitoring range. A circular type delay-and-sum (DAS) imaging algorithm is developed to image the active acoustic sources based on the direct response received by each sensor. After the scattering signals from the damage are obtained by subtracting the baseline response of the concrete structures from those of the defective ones, the elliptical type DAS imaging algorithm is employed to process the scattering signals and reconstruct the image of the damage. Finally, two experiments, including active acoustic source monitoring and damage imaging for concrete structures, are carried out to illustrate and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Thermographic and histological analysis of rabbit different tenorrhaphies techniques (4 and 6 strands after early active mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arenhart

    Full Text Available Introduction This research is based on the results of the surgeries of tenorraphy, which have been improved due to the association between strong and not voluminous sutures and physiotherapic protocols, which preconize the early active motion to the postoperative period. Objective To evaluate the healing process in vivo in different types of tenorraphies. Methods Thirty-six rabbits that underwent early active motion after tenorraphy. The sample was constituted of 3 groups of 12, in accordance with the 3 different types of suture (Brasil, Indiana and Tsai. Results On the 15th and 30th days after the surgery, thermographic and histological analyses revealed similar results that all groups showed similar behaviors in the same time of surgical repair, just differentiating between the periods. On the 30th day analysis were observed that collagen fibers being more exuberant thickening, thus being able to offer higher tensile strength to the tendon. Conclusion That suggests early active motion may be increased gradually to around the 30th day taking this as clinical relevance.

  15. Image analysis of epicuticular damage to foliage caused by dry deposition of the air pollutant nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Pamela E; Parry, Sally D; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Heath, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Nitric acid vapor is produced by the same photochemical processes that produce ozone. In the laboratory, concentrated nitric acid is a strong acid and a powerful oxidant. In the environment, where the concentrations are much lower, it is an innocuous source of plant nitrogen. As an air pollutant, which mode of action does dry deposition of nitric acid follow? We investigated the effects of dry deposition of nitric acid on the foliage of four tree species native to the western United States. A novel controlled environment, fumigation system enabled a four-week exposure at concentrations consistent with ambient diurnal patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and automated image analysis revealed changes in the epicuticular wax layer during fumigation. Exposure to nitric acid resulted in a reproducible suite of damage symptoms that increased with increasing dose. Each tree species tested exhibited a unique set of damage features, including cracks, lesions, and conformation changes to epicuticular crystallite structures. Dry deposition of atmospheric nitric acid caused substantial perturbation to the epicuticular surface of all four tree species investigated, consistent with the chemical oxidation of epicuticular waxes. Automated image analysis eliminated many biases that can trouble microscopy studies. Trade names and commercial enterprises or products are mentioned solely for information. No endorsements by the U.S. Department of Agriculture are implied.

  16. Knowledge-Based Detection and Assessment of Damaged Roads Using Post-Disaster High-Resolution Remote Sensing Image

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Qiming; Zhao, Jianghua; Ye, Xin; Feng, Xiao; Qin, Xuebin; Yang, Xiucheng

    2015-01-01

    Road damage detection and assessment from high-resolution remote sensing image is critical for natural disaster investigation and disaster relief. In a disaster context, the pairing of pre-disaster and post-disaster road data for change detection and assessment is difficult to achieve due to the mismatch of different data sources, especially for rural areas where the pre-disaster data (i.e., remote sensing imagery or vector map) are hard to obtain. In this study, a knowledge-based method for ...

  17. Thermographical Measuring of the Skin Temperature Using Laser Needle Acupuncture in Preterm Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Raith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In children, laser acupuncture is used more often than needle acupuncture in Western countries, due to their aversion to needles. When applying laser acupuncture to premature babies and neonates, firstly the degree of the thermal increase to the skin has to be evaluated so as to guarantee safe application. The patients were premature neonates before their discharge from hospital. The measurements were carried out by means of a polygraphy while they were asleep shortly. The large intestine 4 acupoint (LI4, Hegu was stimulated by a microlaser needle (10 mW, 685 nm twice (5 and 10 min. Local thermographic pictures were taken with a thermal camera (Flir i5, Flir Systems Inc., Portland, USA, and the warmest point was determined and subsequently compared. The study included 10 premature neonates (7 male, 3 female. The measurements were carried out on the 33rd day of life (weight 2030 g, gestational age 36+3 weeks of pregnancy. In comparison to the initial temperature (32.9C°, after 5 minutes of stimulation (33.9°C (P=0.025 and also after 10 minutes of stimulation (34.0°C (P=0.01, there was found to be a significant increase in the skin temperature. The singular maximum value of 37.9°C bears a potential danger; however, compared to the local temperatures reached in transcutaneous blood gas measurements it appears not to entail any risks.

  18. Are chargemaster rates for imaging studies lower in States that cap noneconomic damages (tort reform)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Seth I; Barry, Jeffrey R; Jha, Saurabh

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether chargemaster (a list of prices for common services and procedures set by individual hospitals) rates for diagnostic imaging were lower in states that cap awards for noneconomic damages (NED) than states with unlimited awards for medical negligence. We analyzed 2011 chargemaster data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid, pertaining to 6 ambulatory patient classifications specific to imaging. The dataset includes outpatient imaging facilities and hospitals in 49 states and the District of Columbia. The association between caps on NED and chargemaster rates for imaging in a sample of 15,218 data points was analyzed using linear regression and two-sample t tests assuming unequal variances. In states that cap NED, the chargemaster rates were higher for the following modalities: Level II Echocardiogram without Contrast (mean charges: $2,015.60 versus $1,884.81, P = .0018); Level II Cardiac Imaging ($4,670.25 versus $4,398.58, P = .002); MRI & Magnetic Resonance Angiography without Contrast ($2,654.31 versus $2,526.74, P = .002); and Level III Diagnostic and Screening Ultrasound ($1,073.31 versus $1,027.32, P = .037). High charge-to-payment ratios were associated with states with the highest charges. There was a positive correlation between number of outpatient centers in the state and the average chargemaster rates for the state (mean chargemaster rate = 1727 + 0.79*Number of Outpatient Centers; R-squared = 0.23, P = .0004). Chargemaster rates for select imaging services are not lower in states that have capped NED. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  20. Thermography applied acupuncture and qi-gong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuwen; Ji, Hong-Wei; Chen, Jin-Long; Li, Hong-Qi

    1997-04-01

    Thermographic technique can be used to measure temperature distribution of body surface in real-time, non-contact and full-field, which has been successfully used in medical diagnosis, remote sensing, and NDT, etc. The authors have developed a thermographic experiment that can be applied to inspect the effect of action of acupuncture and qi-gong (a system of deep breathing exercises) by measuring the temperature of hand and arm. The observation is performed respectively by thermography for the dynamic changes of temperature of the arm and hand after acupuncture therapy and qi-gong therapy. Thermographic results show that the temperature on the collateral channels increases markedly. In the meantime, it can be seen that the above therapies of Chinese medicine can stimulate the channel collateral system. This also contributes a new basis to the effect of action of the therapies of Chinese medicine. The work shows that thermographic technique is a powerful tool for research in Chinese medicine. In this paper, some thermal images are obtained from the persons treated with acupuncture and qi- gong.

  1. Multipurpose, dual-mode imaging in the 3-5 μm range (MWIR) for artwork diagnostics: A systematic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, Claudia; Parisotto, Simone; Ambrosini, Dario

    2018-05-01

    We present a multi-purpose, dual-mode imaging method in the Mid-Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) range (from 3 μm to 5 μm) for a more efficient nondestructive analysis of artworks. Using a setup based on a MWIR thermal camera and multiple radiation sources, two radiometric image datasets are acquired in different acquisition modalities, the image in quasi-reflectance mode (TQR) and the thermal sequence in emission mode. Here, the advantages are: the complementarity of the information; the use of the quasi-reflectance map for calculating the emissivity map; the use of TQR map for a referentiation to the visible of the thermographic images. The concept of the method is presented, the practical feasibility is demonstrated through a custom imaging setup, the potentiality for the nondestructive analysis is shown on a notable application to cultural heritage. The method has been used as experimental tool in support of the restoration of the mural painting "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci. Feedback from the operators and a comparison with some conventional diagnostic techniques is also given to underline the novelty and potentiality of the method.

  2. DETECTING FORESTS DAMAGED BY PINE WILT DISEASE AT THE INDIVIDUAL TREE LEVEL USING AIRBORNE LASER DATA AND WORLDVIEW-2/3 IMAGES OVER TWO SEASONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Takenaka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pine wilt disease is caused by the pine wood nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Japanese pine sawyer (Monochamus alternatus. This study attempted to detect damaged pine trees at different levels using a combination of airborne laser scanning (ALS data and high-resolution space-borne images. A canopy height model with a resolution of 50 cm derived from the ALS data was used for the delineation of tree crowns using the Individual Tree Detection method. Two pan-sharpened images were established using the ortho-rectified images. Next, we analyzed two kinds of intensity-hue-saturation (IHS images and 18 remote sensing indices (RSI derived from the pan-sharpened images. The mean and standard deviation of the 2 IHS images, 18 RSI, and 8 bands of the WV-2 and WV-3 images were extracted for each tree crown and were used to classify tree crowns using a support vector machine classifier. Individual tree crowns were assigned to one of nine classes: bare ground, Larix kaempferi, Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa, broadleaved trees, healthy pines, and damaged pines at slight, moderate, and heavy levels. The accuracy of the classifications using the WV-2 images ranged from 76.5 to 99.6 %, with an overall accuracy of 98.5 %. However, the accuracy of the classifications using the WV-3 images ranged from 40.4 to 95.4 %, with an overall accuracy of 72 %, which suggests poorer accuracy compared to those classes derived from the WV-2 images. This is because the WV-3 images were acquired in October 2016 from an area with low sun, at a low altitude.

  3. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica-related pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    IgG autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel. Antibodies against AQP4 can damage astrocytes via complement, but NMO histopathology also shows demyelination, and - importantly - axon injury, which may determine permanent deficits following NMO relapses. The dynamics...... antibodies in mice. RESULTS: We found that human AQP4 antibodies caused acute astrocyte depletion with initial oligodendrocyte survival. Within two hours of antibody application, we observed secondary axon injury in the form of progressive swellings. Astrocyte toxicity and axon damage were dependent on AQP4...... antibody concentration and complement, specifically C1q. INTERPRETATION: In vivo imaging of the spinal cord reveals the swift development of NMO-related acute axon injury following AQP4 antibody-mediated astrocyte depletion. This approach will be useful in studying the mechanisms underlying the spread...

  4. Persistence and dynamics of DNA damage signal amplification determined by microcolony formation and live-cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yasuyoshi; Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi; Suzuki, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are essential cellular process protecting the integrity of the genome from DNA damaging agents. In the present study, we developed a microcolony assay, in which normal human diploid fibroblast-like cells exposed to ionizing radiation, were plated onto coverslips at very low density (3 cells/cm 2 ). Cells were grown for up to 3 days, and phosphorylated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at Ser1981 and 53BP1 foci were analyzed as the markers for an amplified DNA damage signal. We observed a dose-dependent increase in the fraction of non-dividing cells, whose increase was compromised by knocking down p53 expression. While large persistent foci were predominantly formed in non-dividing cells, we observed some growing colonies that contained cells with large foci. As each microcolony was derived from a single cell, it appeared that some cells could proliferate with large foci. A live-imaging analysis using hTERT-immortalized normal human diploid cells transfected with the EGFP-tagged 53BP1 gene revealed that the formation of persistent large foci was highly dynamic. Delayed appearance and disappearance of large foci were frequently observed in exposed cells visualized 12-72 hours after X-irradiation. Thus, our results indicate that amplified DNA damage signal could be ignored, which may be explained in part by the dynamic nature of the amplification process. (author)

  5. Distributed and hierarchical object-based image analysis for damage assessment: a case study of 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Object-based image analysis (OBIA is an emerging technique for analyzing remote sensing image based on object properties including spectral, geometry, contextual and texture information. To reduce the computational cost of this comprehensive OBIA and make it more feasible in disaster responses, we developed a unique approach – distributed and hierarchical OBIA approach for damage assessment. This study demonstrated a completed classification of YingXiu town, heavily devastated by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake using Quickbrid imagery. Two distinctive areas, mountainous areas and urban, were analyzed separately. This approach does not require substantial processing power and large amounts of available memory because image of a large disaster-affected area was split in smaller pieces. Two or more computers could be used in parallel to process and analyze these sub-images based on different requirements. The approach can be applicable in other cases whereas the established set of rules can be adopted in similar study areas. More experiments will be carried out in future studies to prove its feasibility.

  6. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  7. An extended diffraction tomography method for quantifying structural damage using numerical Green's functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene; Rose, L R Francis; Wang, Chun H

    2015-05-01

    Existing damage imaging algorithms for detecting and quantifying structural defects, particularly those based on diffraction tomography, assume far-field conditions for the scattered field data. This paper presents a major extension of diffraction tomography that can overcome this limitation and utilises a near-field multi-static data matrix as the input data. This new algorithm, which employs numerical solutions of the dynamic Green's functions, makes it possible to quantitatively image laminar damage even in complex structures for which the dynamic Green's functions are not available analytically. To validate this new method, the numerical Green's functions and the multi-static data matrix for laminar damage in flat and stiffened isotropic plates are first determined using finite element models. Next, these results are time-gated to remove boundary reflections, followed by discrete Fourier transform to obtain the amplitude and phase information for both the baseline (damage-free) and the scattered wave fields. Using these computationally generated results and experimental verification, it is shown that the new imaging algorithm is capable of accurately determining the damage geometry, size and severity for a variety of damage sizes and shapes, including multi-site damage. Some aspects of minimal sensors requirement pertinent to image quality and practical implementation are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. POTENTIAL OF MULTI-TEMPORAL OBLIQUE AIRBORNE IMAGERY FOR STRUCTURAL DAMAGE ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vetrivel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quick post-disaster actions demand automated, rapid and detailed building damage assessment. Among the available technologies, post-event oblique airborne images have already shown their potential for this task. However, existing methods usually compensate the lack of pre-event information with aprioristic assumptions of building shapes and textures that can lead to uncertainties and misdetections. However, oblique images have been already captured over many cities of the world, and the exploitation of pre- and post-event data as inputs to damage assessment is readily feasible in urban areas. In this paper, we investigate the potential of multi-temporal oblique imagery for detailed damage assessment focusing on two methodologies: the first method aims at detecting severe structural damages related to geometrical deformation by combining the complementary information provided by photogrammetric point clouds and oblique images. The developed method detected 87% of damaged elements. The failed detections are due to varying noise levels within the point cloud which hindered the recognition of some structural elements. We observed, in general that the façade regions are very noisy in point clouds. To address this, we propose our second method which aims to detect damages to building façades using the oriented oblique images. The results show that the proposed methodology can effectively differentiate among the three proposed categories: collapsed/highly damaged, lower levels of damage and undamaged buildings, using a computationally light-weight approach. We describe the implementations of the above mentioned methods in detail and present the promising results achieved using multi-temporal oblique imagery over the city of L’Aquila (Italy.

  9. Fatigue Life of Postbuckled Structures with Indentation Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue life of composite stiffened panels with indentation damage was investigated experimentally using single stringer compression specimens. Indentation damage was induced on one of the two flanges of the stringer. The experiments were conducted using advanced instrumentation, including digital image correlation, passive thermography, and in-situ ultrasonic scanning. Specimens with initial indentation damage lengths of 37 millimeters to 56 millimeters were tested in fatigue and the effects of cyclic load amplitude and damage size were studied. A means of comparison of the damage propagation rates and collapse loads based on a stress intensity measure and the Paris law is proposed.

  10. TOWARDS A MORE EFFICIENT DETECTION OF EARTHQUAKE INDUCED FAÇADE DAMAGES USING OBLIQUE UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Duarte

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban search and rescue (USaR teams require a fast and thorough building damage assessment, to focus their rescue efforts accordingly. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV are able to capture relevant data in a short time frame and survey otherwise inaccessible areas after a disaster, and have thus been identified as useful when coupled with RGB cameras for façade damage detection. Existing literature focuses on the extraction of 3D and/or image features as cues for damage. However, little attention has been given to the efficiency of the proposed methods which hinders its use in an urban search and rescue context. The framework proposed in this paper aims at a more efficient façade damage detection using UAV multi-view imagery. This was achieved directing all damage classification computations only to the image regions containing the façades, hence discarding the irrelevant areas of the acquired images and consequently reducing the time needed for such task. To accomplish this, a three-step approach is proposed: i building extraction from the sparse point cloud computed from the nadir images collected in an initial flight; ii use of the latter as proxy for façade location in the oblique images captured in subsequent flights, and iii selection of the façade image regions to be fed to a damage classification routine. The results show that the proposed framework successfully reduces the extracted façade image regions to be assessed for damage 6 fold, hence increasing the efficiency of subsequent damage detection routines. The framework was tested on a set of UAV multi-view images over a neighborhood of the city of L’Aquila, Italy, affected in 2009 by an earthquake.

  11. Renal damage after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, Shinichiro; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Yoshigoe, Fukuo

    1988-08-01

    The acute effects of extracorporeal Shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology of the renal parenchyma were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in 15 kidneys, before and immediately after (within 24 hours) ESWL in 11 cases. The renal parenchymal damages were observed by MRI as the changes of signal itensity of renal cortex and medulla, perirenal fluid, loss of corticomedullar differentiation, and other renal traumas. Loss of corticomedullar differentiation was seen in 9/11 cases and peripheral fluid of the kidney was seen in 4/11 cases. Irregular and edematous changes of renal capsula were seen in 5/11 cases. Obvious abnormal findings indicated renal trauma were not observed in this study. Several MRI findings may transient and reversible changes and the morpholigic changes detected by MRI may attributed to renal parenchymal obstruction and edema and decreasing of renal capillary flow, such as in renal contusion. It is concluded that MRI is very sensitive and the best technique to detect the effects and clinical trouble of ESWL.

  12. 3D imaging of radiation damage in silicon sensor and spatial mapping of charge collection efficiency

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakůbek, M.; Jakůbek, J.; Žemlička, J.; Platkevič, M.; Havránek, Vladimír; Semián, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), C03023 ISSN 1748-0221. [14th International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors. Figueira da Foz, Coimbra, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:68378297 Keywords : solid media * radiation damage * Pixelated detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders; JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics (UTAM-F) Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/03/C03023/pdf/1748-0221_8_03_C03023.pdf

  13. Investigation on the thermographic detection of corrosion in RC structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantele, Elia A.; Votsis, Renos A.; Kyriakides, Nicholas; Georgiou, Panagiota G.; Ioannou, Fotia G.

    2017-09-01

    Corrosion of the steel reinforcement is the main problem of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Over the past decades, several methods have been developed aiming to detect the corrosion process early in order to minimise the structural damage and consequently the repairing costs. Emphasis was given in developing methods and techniques of non-destructive nature providing fast on-the-spot detection and covering large areas rather that concentrating on single locations. This study, investigates a non-destructive corrosion detection technique for reinforced concrete, which is based on infrared thermography and the difference in thermal characteristics of corroded and non-corroded steel rebars. The technique is based on the principle that corrosion products have poor heat conductivity, and they inhibit the diffusion of heat that is generated in the reinforcing bar due to heating. For the investigation RC specimens, have been constructed in the laboratory using embedded steel bars of different corrosion states. Afterward, one surface of the specimens was heated using an electric device while thermal images were captured at predefined time instants on the opposite surface with an IR camera. The test results showed a clear difference between the thermal characteristics of the corroded and the non-corroded samples, which demonstrates the potential of using thermography in corrosion detection in RC structures.

  14. The use of infrared thermography to detect the stages of estrus cycle and ovulation time in anatolian shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olğaç, Kemal Tuna; Akçay, Ergun; Çil, Beste; Uçar, Burak Mehmet; Daşkın, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thermographic monitoring, using the temperature changes of perianal and perivulvar areas for the determination of estrus in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. Fifteen bitches were used in the study. Blood and vaginal smear samples were collected and thermographic monitoring of perianal and perivulvar areas were carried out starting from proestrus to early diestrus. Also, external signs of estrus were investigated. Smear samples were evaluated by light microscopy after Diff-Quik staining method and superficial and keratinized superficial cells were determined as percentage (S + KS%). Progesterone and luteinizing hormone measurements were done by radioimmunoassay. The difference in temperature between perianal and perivulvar areas was evaluated through thermographic images by FLIR ResearchIR Software. According to the results obtained from the study, differences between progesterone and S + KS% were statistically significant ( P   0,05). Serum luteinizing hormone levels did not sign any difference ( P  > 0,05). As a result, thermographic monitoring alone is not enough for estrus detection in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. However, it can be used to assist the actual estrus detection technique in terms of providing some foreknowledge by evaluating the differences in temperature.

  15. Fatigue Life of Postbuckled Structures with Indentation Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Bisagni, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue life of composite stiffened panels with indentation damage was investigated experimentally using single stringer compression specimens. Indentation damage was induced on one of the two flanges of each stringer. The experiments were conducted using advanced instrumentation, including digital image correlation, passive thermography, and in-situ ultrasonic scanning. Specimens with initial indentation damage lengths of 32 millimeters to 56 millimeters were tested quasi-statically and in fatigue, and the effects of cyclic load amplitude and damage size were studied. A means of comparison of the damage propagation rates and collapse loads based on a stress intensity measure and the Paris law is proposed.

  16. Free-Form Deformation Approach for Registration of Visible and Infrared Facial Images in Fever Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yedukondala Narendra Dwith Chenna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fever screening based on infrared (IR thermographs (IRTs is an approach that has been implemented during infectious disease pandemics, such as Ebola and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. A recently published international standard indicates that regions medially adjacent to the inner canthi provide accurate estimates of core body temperature and are preferred sites for fever screening. Therefore, rapid, automated identification of the canthi regions within facial IR images may greatly facilitate rapid fever screening of asymptomatic travelers. However, it is more difficult to accurately identify the canthi regions from IR images than from visible images that are rich with exploitable features. In this study, we developed and evaluated techniques for multi-modality image registration (MMIR of simultaneously captured visible and IR facial images for fever screening. We used free form deformation (FFD models based on edge maps to improve registration accuracy after an affine transformation. Two widely used FFD models in medical image registration based on the Demons and cubic B-spline algorithms were qualitatively compared. The results showed that the Demons algorithm outperformed the cubic B-spline algorithm, likely due to overfitting of outliers by the latter method. The quantitative measure of registration accuracy, obtained through selected control point correspondence, was within 2.8 ± 1.2 mm, which enables accurate and automatic localization of canthi regions in the IR images for temperature measurement.

  17. Diagnostic usefulness of the oedema-infarct ratio to differentiate acute from chronic myocardial damage using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Kiyoyasu; Suzuki, Susumu; Kinoshita, Kousuke; Yokouchi, Kazuhiko; Iwata, Hirokazu; Sawada, Ken; Isobe, Satoshi; Ohshima, Satoru; Murohara, Toyoaki; Hirai, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    To differentiate acute from chronic damage to the myocardium in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) using DE and T2w MR. Short-axis T2w and DE MR images were acquired twice after the onset of MI in 36 patients who successfully underwent emergency coronary revascularisation. The areas of infarct and oedema were measured. The oedema-infarct ratio (O/I) of the left ventricular area was calculated by dividing the oedema by the infarct area. The oedema size on T2w MR was significantly larger than the infarct size on DE MR in the acute phase. Both the oedema size on T2w MR and the infarct size on DE MR in the acute phase were significantly larger than those in the chronic phase. The O/I was significantly greater in the acute phase compared with that in the chronic phase (P < 0.05). An analysis of relative cumulative frequency distributions revealed an O/I of 1.4 as a cut-off value for differentiating acute from chronic myocardial damage with the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85.1%, 82.7% and 83.9%, respectively. The oedema-infarct ratio may be a useful index in differentiating acute from chronic myocardial damage in patients with MI. (orig.)

  18. Categorizing natural disaster damage assessment using satellite-based geospatial techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S.W.; Yuan, M.; Cerveny, R.S.; Giri, C.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of a natural disaster's damage offers an exciting backup and/or alternative to traditional means of on-site damage assessment. Although necessary for complete assessment of damage areas, ground-based damage surveys conducted in the aftermath of natural hazard passage can sometimes be potentially complicated due to on-site difficulties (e.g., interaction with various authorities and emergency services) and hazards (e.g., downed power lines, gas lines, etc.), the need for rapid mobilization (particularly for remote locations), and the increasing cost of rapid physical transportation of manpower and equipment. Satellite image analysis, because of its global ubiquity, its ability for repeated independent analysis, and, as we demonstrate here, its ability to verify on-site damage assessment provides an interesting new perspective and investigative aide to researchers. Using one of the strongest tornado events in US history, the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado, as a case example, we digitized the tornado damage path and co-registered the damage path using pre- and post-Landsat Thematic Mapper image data to perform a damage assessment. We employed several geospatial approaches, specifically the Getis index, Geary's C, and two lacunarity approaches to categorize damage characteristics according to the original Fujita tornado damage scale (F-scale). Our results indicate strong relationships between spatial indices computed within a local window and tornado F-scale damage categories identified through the ground survey. Consequently, linear regression models, even incorporating just a single band, appear effective in identifying F-scale damage categories using satellite imagery. This study demonstrates that satellite-based geospatial techniques can effectively add spatial perspectives to natural disaster damages, and in particular for this case study, tornado damages.

  19. Post-hurricane forest damage assessment using satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Wang; J.J. Qu; X. Hao; Y. Liu; J.A. Stanturf

    2010-01-01

    This study developed a rapid assessment algorithm for post-hurricane forest damage estimation using moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements. The performance of five commonly used vegetation indices as post-hurricane forest damage indicators was investigated through statistical analysis. The Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) was...

  20. Analysis of anisotropic damage in forged Al–Cu–Mg–Si alloy based on creep tests, micrographs of fractured specimen and digital image correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariboldi, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.gariboldi@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via La Masa 34 20156 Milano (Italy); Naumenko, Konstantin, E-mail: konstantin.naumenko@ovgu.de [Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Institute of Mechanics, D-39106 Magdeburg (Germany); Ozhoga-Maslovskaja, Oksana, E-mail: oksana.ozhogamaslovskaja@gmail.com [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via La Masa 34 20156 Milano (Italy); Zappa, Emanuele, E-mail: emanuele.zappa@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via La Masa 34 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to analyze anisotropic damage mechanisms in forged Al–Cu–Mg–Si alloy based on the results of creep tests. Smooth specimens are sampled in three forging directions. Creep strain vs. time curves as well as light optical microscope and scanning electron microscope observations illustrate basic features of damage growth. Flat notch specimens are sampled in different directions to analyze stress redistributions and damage in zones of stress concentration. The digital image correlation technique has been applied in situ in order to extract the strain values on the surface of the notched specimens. All observations demonstrate that the principal origins of anisotropic creep and damage are associated with elongated grains and second phase clustered particles located at grain boundaries. Longitudinal specimens possess nucleations of decohesion sites and growth of voids around second phase particles at grain boundaries. Damage evolution for radial and transverse specimens is due to the formation and growth of cracks in second phase particles orthogonal to the principal stress axis. Residual strains are confined to the notch root as well as to the flanges of advanced macrocrack, indicating the small scale yielding during the creep fracture process.

  1. Laboratory simulation of Euclid-like sky images to study the impact of CCD radiation damage on weak gravitational lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, T.; Verhoeve, P.; Oosterbroek, T.; Boudin, N.; Short, A.; Kohley, R.

    2014-07-01

    Euclid is the ESA mission to map the geometry of the dark universe. It uses weak gravitational lensing, which requires the accurate measurement of galaxy shapes over a large area in the sky. Radiation damage in the 36 Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) composing the Euclid visible imager focal plane has already been identified as a major contributor to the weak-lensing error budget; radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) distorts the galaxy images and introduces a bias in the galaxy shape measurement. We designed a laboratory experiment to project Euclid-like sky images onto an irradiated Euclid CCD. In this way - and for the first time - we are able to directly assess the effect of CTI on the Euclid weak-lensing measurement free of modelling uncertainties. We present here the experiment concept, setup, and first results. The results of such an experiment provide test data critical to refine models, design and test the Euclid data processing CTI mitigation scheme, and further optimize the Euclid CCD operation.

  2. Advances in fatigue lifetime predictive techniques; Proceedings of the Symposium, San Francisco, CA, Apr. 24, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, M.R.; Landgraf, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of methods to predict fatigue performance of materials and structures is reviewed. Attention is given to general approaches to fatigue mechanics, elevated temperature phenomena, spectrum loading, the multiaxial behavior, and applications. Particular attention is given to a fracture-mechanics-based model for cumulative damage assessment, thermo-mechanical fatigue life prediction methods, a probabilistic fracture mechanics approach for structural reliability assessment of space flight systems, a multiaxial fatigue life estimation technique, plasticity and fatigue damage modeling of severely loaded tubing, damage evaluation in composite materials using thermographic stress analysis, and fatigue lifetime monitoring in power plants

  3. A study on ground truth data for impact damaged polymer matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentine, Sarah M.; Uchic, Michael D.

    2018-04-01

    This study presents initial results toward correlative characterization of barely-visible impact damage (BVID) in unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite laminate plates using nondestructive ultrasonic testing (UT) and destructive serial sectioning microscopy. To produce damage consistent with BVID, plates were impacted using an instrumented drop-weight tower with pneumatic anti-rebound brake. High-resolution, normal-incidence, single-sided, pulse-echo, immersion UT scans were performed to verify and map internal damage after impact testing. UT C-scans were registered to optical images of the specimen via landmark registration and the use of an affine transformation, allowing location of internal damage in reference to the overall plate and enabling specimen preparation for subsequent serial sectioning. The impact-damaged region was extracted from each plate, prepared and mounted for materialographic sectioning. A modified RoboMet.3D version 2 was employed for serial sectioning and optical microscopy characterization of the impact damaged regions. Automated montage capture of sub-micron resolution, bright-field reflection, 12-bit monochrome optical images was performed over the entire specimen cross-section. These optical images were post- processed to produce 3D data sets, including segmentation to improve visualization of damage features. Impact-induced delaminations were analyzed and characterized using both serial sectioning and ultrasonic methods. Those results and conclusions are presented, as well as future direction of the current study.

  4. Automatic segmentation of thermal images of diabetic-at-risk feet using the snakes algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz; Ng, E. Y. K.; Kaabouch, Naima

    2017-11-01

    Diabetes is a disease with multi-systemic problems. It is a leading cause of death, medical costs, and loss of productivity. Foot ulcers are one generally known problem of uncontrolled diabetes that can lead to amputation signs of foot ulcers are not always obvious. Sometimes, symptoms won't even show up until ulcer is infected. Hence, identification of pre-ulceration of the plantar surface of the foot in diabetics is beneficial. Thermography has the potential to identify regions of the plantar with no evidence of ulcer but yet risk. Thermography is a technique that is safe, easy, non-invasive, with no contact, and repeatable. In this study, 59 thermographic images of the plantar foot of patients with diabetic neuropathy are implemented using the snakes algorithm to separate two feet from background automatically and separating the right foot from the left on each image. The snakes algorithm both separates the right and left foot into segmented different clusters according to their temperatures. The hottest regions will have the highest risk of ulceration for each foot. This algorithm also worked perfectly for all the current images.

  5. Renal damage after extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy detected by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, Shinichiro; Machida, Toyohei; Ooishi, Yukihiko; Tashiro, Kazuya; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Yoshigoe, Fukuo

    1988-01-01

    The acute effects of extracorporeal Shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) on morphology of the renal parenchyma were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in 15 kidneys, before and immediately after (within 24 hours) ESWL in 11 cases. The renal parenchymal damages were observed by MRI as the changes of signal itensity of renal cortex and medulla, perirenal fluid, loss of corticomedullar differentiation, and other renal traumas. Loss of corticomedullar differentiation was seen in 9/11 cases and peripheral fluid of the kidney was seen in 4/11 cases. Irregular and edematous changes of renal capsula were seen in 5/11 cases. Obvious abnormal findings indicated renal trauma were not observed in this study. Several MRI findings may transient and reversible changes and the morpholigic changes detected by MRI may attributed to renal parenchymal obstruction and edema and decreasing of renal capillary flow, such as in renal contusion. It is concluded that MRI is very sensitive and the best technique to detect the effects and clinical trouble of ESWL. (author)

  6. Achilles tendons from decorin- and biglycan-null mouse models have inferior mechanical and structural properties predicted by an image-based empirical damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J A; Freedman, B R; Zuskov, A; Iozzo, R V; Birk, D E; Soslowsky, L J

    2015-07-16

    Achilles tendons are a common source of pain and injury, and their pathology may originate from aberrant structure function relationships. Small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) influence mechanical and structural properties in a tendon-specific manner. However, their roles in the Achilles tendon have not been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and structural differences observed in mouse Achilles tendons lacking class I SLRPs; either decorin or biglycan. In addition, empirical modeling techniques based on mechanical and image-based measures were employed. Achilles tendons from decorin-null (Dcn(-/-)) and biglycan-null (Bgn(-/-)) C57BL/6 female mice (N=102) were used. Each tendon underwent a dynamic mechanical testing protocol including simultaneous polarized light image capture to evaluate both structural and mechanical properties of each Achilles tendon. An empirical damage model was adapted for application to genetic variation and for use with image based structural properties to predict tendon dynamic mechanical properties. We found that Achilles tendons lacking decorin and biglycan had inferior mechanical and structural properties that were age dependent; and that simple empirical models, based on previously described damage models, were predictive of Achilles tendon dynamic modulus in both decorin- and biglycan-null mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. SPEEDY RECOVERY OF DAMAGED DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHS USING MULTI STRUCTURE MORPHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jemi Florinabel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A speedy recovery of damaged digitized photographs based on orientation driven multi structure morphology is proposed. The recovery order plays an important factor for human visualization and hence it is guided by the orientation of edges at the surrounding known regions of the missing domain. The image is edge detected by thresholding the image gradient along the eight possible orientations. These eight edge images are represented as eight edge planes. The edge-plane-sliced information is used twice manifold for reconstructing the regions within the missing part, as well as for guiding the integration that follows. The damaged regions are morphologically eroded using the structuring elements of corresponding orientations dictated by the edge-planes. The resultant filled image is obtained using local isotopic driven integration. The novelty of our approach is to explicitly specify the direction of filling herby ensuring ease in convergence in different orientations and then streamlining the process to guarantee complete and natural look. By implementing region-filling through morphological erosion, several pixels instead of one can be restored at every inpainting step, making the method faster than many traditional texture synthesis inpainting algorithms and successfully recovers images with better Peak Signal to Noise ratios even for massive damages.

  8. Nonlinear ultrasonic stimulated thermography for damage assessment in isotropic fatigued structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Gian Piero Malfense; Calla', Danielle; Ginzburg, Dmitri; Ciampa, Francesco; Meo, Michele

    2017-09-01

    Traditional non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are used to analyse that a structure is free of any harmful damage. However, these techniques still lack sensitivity to detect the presence of material micro-flaws in the form of fatigue damage and often require time-consuming procedures and expensive equipment. This research work presents a novel "nonlinear ultrasonic stimulated thermography" (NUST) method able to overcome some of the limitations of traditional linear ultrasonic/thermography NDE-SHM systems and to provide a reliable, rapid and cost effective estimation of fatigue damage in isotropic materials. Such a hybrid imaging approach combines the high sensitivity of nonlinear acoustic/ultrasonic techniques to detect micro-damage, with local defect frequency selection and infrared imaging. When exciting structures with an optimised frequency, nonlinear elastic waves are observed and higher frictional work at the fatigue damaged area is generated due to clapping and rubbing of the crack faces. This results in heat at cracked location that can be measured using an infrared camera. A Laser Vibrometer (LV) was used to evaluate the extent that individual frequency components contribute to the heating of the damage region by quantifying the out-of-plane velocity associated with the fundamental and second order harmonic responses. It was experimentally demonstrated the relationship between a nonlinear ultrasound parameter (βratio) of the material nonlinear response to the actual temperature rises near the crack. These results demonstrated that heat generation at damaged regions could be amplified by exciting at frequencies that provide nonlinear responses, thus improving the imaging of material damage and the reliability of NUST in a quick and reproducible manner.

  9. A comprehensive analysis of earthquake damage patterns using high dimensional model representation feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkin Kaya, Gülşen

    2013-10-01

    Recently, earthquake damage assessment using satellite images has been a very popular ongoing research direction. Especially with the availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, a quite detailed damage map based on building scale has been produced, and various studies have also been conducted in the literature. As the spatial resolution of satellite images increases, distinguishability of damage patterns becomes more cruel especially in case of using only the spectral information during classification. In order to overcome this difficulty, textural information needs to be involved to the classification to improve the visual quality and reliability of damage map. There are many kinds of textural information which can be derived from VHR satellite images depending on the algorithm used. However, extraction of textural information and evaluation of them have been generally a time consuming process especially for the large areas affected from the earthquake due to the size of VHR image. Therefore, in order to provide a quick damage map, the most useful features describing damage patterns needs to be known in advance as well as the redundant features. In this study, a very high resolution satellite image after Iran, Bam earthquake was used to identify the earthquake damage. Not only the spectral information, textural information was also used during the classification. For textural information, second order Haralick features were extracted from the panchromatic image for the area of interest using gray level co-occurrence matrix with different size of windows and directions. In addition to using spatial features in classification, the most useful features representing the damage characteristic were selected with a novel feature selection method based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) giving sensitivity of each feature during classification. The method called HDMR was recently proposed as an efficient tool to capture the input

  10. Expanded image database of pistachio x-ray images and classification by conventional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keagy, Pamela M.; Schatzki, Thomas F.; Le, Lan Chau; Casasent, David P.; Weber, David

    1996-12-01

    In order to develop sorting methods for insect damaged pistachio nuts, a large data set of pistachio x-ray images (6,759 nuts) was created. Both film and linescan sensor images were acquired, nuts dissected and internal conditions coded using the U.S. Grade standards and definitions for pistachios. A subset of 1199 good and 686 insect damaged nuts was used to calculate and test discriminant functions. Statistical parameters of image histograms were evaluated for inclusion by forward stepwise discrimination. Using three variables in the discriminant function, 89% of test set nuts were correctly identified. Comparable data for 6 human subjects ranged from 67 to 92%. If the loss of good nuts is held to 1% by requiring a high probability to discard a nut as insect damaged, approximately half of the insect damage present in clean pistachio nuts may be detected and removed by x-ray inspection.

  11. Imaging diagnosis and clinical findings of cerebral venous thrombosis in full-term neonates without brain damage: a ten-year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; Lima, Claudio Marcio Amaral de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Erica Barreiros; Lins, Maria Cristina; Miranda, Silvia; Miranda, Luis Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to describe and compare imaging methods and clinical findings of cerebral venous thrombosis in four full-term neonates without brain damage, admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. Materials and methods: ten-year review of four cases diagnosed with cerebral venous thrombosis by transfontanellar ultrasonography associated with Doppler fluxometry and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography in correlation with clinical findings and neurological progression. Results: ultrasonography presented normal results in 75% of cases and magnetic resonance imaging in 100%. Doppler fluxometry and magnetic resonance angiography were abnormal in 100% of cases. Hypoxia (100%) and early seizures (100%) were predominant among clinical findings with evoked potential changes in 50% of cases. In the assessment of the neuro development all the areas remained within normality parameters up to the conclusion of the present study. Conclusion: ultrasonography in association with Doppler can identify changes related to cerebral venous thrombosis and should be complemented with magnetic resonance imaging that is the gold standard for diagnosis in these cases. (author)

  12. The use of infrared thermography to detect the stages of estrus cycle and ovulation time in anatolian shepherd dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Tuna Olğaç

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of thermographic monitoring, using the temperature changes of perianal and perivulvar areas for the determination of estrus in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. Fifteen bitches were used in the study. Blood and vaginal smear samples were collected and thermographic monitoring of perianal and perivulvar areas were carried out starting from proestrus to early diestrus. Also, external signs of estrus were investigated. Smear samples were evaluated by light microscopy after Diff-Quik staining method and superficial and keratinized superficial cells were determined as percentage (S + KS%. Progesterone and luteinizing hormone measurements were done by radioimmunoassay. The difference in temperature between perianal and perivulvar areas was evaluated through thermographic images by FLIR ResearchIR Software. Results According to the results obtained from the study, differences between progesterone and S + KS% were statistically significant (P  0,05. Serum luteinizing hormone levels did not sign any difference (P > 0,05. Conclusions As a result, thermographic monitoring alone is not enough for estrus detection in Anatolian Shepherd bitches. However, it can be used to assist the actual estrus detection technique in terms of providing some foreknowledge by evaluating the differences in temperature.

  13. Infarct-like acute myocarditis: relation between electrocardiographic findings and myocardial damage as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucifora, Gaetano; Miani, Daniela; Di Chiara, Antonio; Piccoli, Gianluca; Artico, Jessica; Puppato, Michela; Slavich, Gianaugusto; De Biasio, Marzia; Gasparini, Daniele; Proclemer, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    Acute myocarditis (AM) may occasionally have an infarct-like presentation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in this group of patients and myocardial damage assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) technique. Myocardial damage may be associated with ECG changes in infarct-like AM. Forty-one consecutive patients (36 males; mean age, 36 ± 12 years) with diagnosis of AM according to cardiac MRI Lake Louise criteria and infarct-like presentation were included. The relation between site of ST-segment elevation (STE), sum of STE (sumSTE), time to normalization of STE, and development of negative T wave with the extent of LGE (expressed as % of left ventricular mass [%LV LGE]), was evaluated. Most (80%) patients presented with inferolateral STE; mean sumSTE was 5 ± 3 mm. Normalization of STE occurred within 24 hours in 20 (49%) patients. Development of negative T wave occurred in 28 (68%) patients. Cardiac MRI showed LGE in all patients; mean %LV LGE was 9.6 ± 7.2%. Topographic agreement between site of STE and LGE was 68%. At multivariate analysis, sumSTE (β = 0.42, P 24 hours (β = 0.39, P 24 hours, and development of negative T wave) may help to identify patients with larger areas of myocardial damage. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. WE-FG-BRA-04: A Portable Confocal Microscope to Image Live Cell Damage Response Induced by Therapeutic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFadden, C; Flint, D; Grosshans, D; Sawakuchi, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Sadetaporn, D [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Asaithamby, A [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To construct a custom and portable fluorescence confocal laser-scanning microscope (FCLSM) that can be placed in the path of therapeutic radiation beams to study real-time radiation-induced damage response in live cells. Methods: We designed and constructed a portable FCLSM with three laser diodes for excitation (405, 488, and 635 nm). An objective lens focuses the excitation light and collects fluorescence from the sample. A pair of galvanometer mirrors scans/collects the laser beam/fluorescence along the focal plane (x/y-directions). A stepper motor stage scans in the axial direction and positions the x/y of the image field. Barrier filters and dichroic mirrors are used to route the spectral emission bands to the appropriate photodetector. An avalanche photodiode collects near-infrared fluorescence; a photodiode collects back-reflected 635 nm light; and a photomultiplier tube collects green fluorescence in the range of eGFP/eYFP. A 200-µm diameter pinhole was used to implement the confocal geometry for near-infrared and red channels and a 150-µm diameter pinhole for the green channel. Data acquisition and system control were achieved using a high-throughput data acquisition card. In-house software developed in LabVIEW was used to control the hardware, collect data from the photodetectors and reconstruct the confocal images. Results: 6 frames/s can be acquired for a 25 µm{sup 2} (128×128 pixels) field of view, visualizing the entire volume of the cell nucleus (∼10 µm depth) in <10 s. To demonstrate the usefulness of our FCLSM, we imaged gold nanoshells in live cells, radiation-induced damage in fibrosarcoma cells expressing eGFP tagged to a DNA repair protein, and neurons expressing eGFP. The system can also image particle tracks in fluorescent nuclear track detectors. Conclusion: We developed a versatile and portable FCLSM that allows radiobiology studies in live cells exposed to therapeutic radiation. The FCLSM can be placed in any vertical beam

  15. WE-FG-BRA-04: A Portable Confocal Microscope to Image Live Cell Damage Response Induced by Therapeutic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, C; Flint, D; Grosshans, D; Sawakuchi, G; Sadetaporn, D; Asaithamby, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To construct a custom and portable fluorescence confocal laser-scanning microscope (FCLSM) that can be placed in the path of therapeutic radiation beams to study real-time radiation-induced damage response in live cells. Methods: We designed and constructed a portable FCLSM with three laser diodes for excitation (405, 488, and 635 nm). An objective lens focuses the excitation light and collects fluorescence from the sample. A pair of galvanometer mirrors scans/collects the laser beam/fluorescence along the focal plane (x/y-directions). A stepper motor stage scans in the axial direction and positions the x/y of the image field. Barrier filters and dichroic mirrors are used to route the spectral emission bands to the appropriate photodetector. An avalanche photodiode collects near-infrared fluorescence; a photodiode collects back-reflected 635 nm light; and a photomultiplier tube collects green fluorescence in the range of eGFP/eYFP. A 200-µm diameter pinhole was used to implement the confocal geometry for near-infrared and red channels and a 150-µm diameter pinhole for the green channel. Data acquisition and system control were achieved using a high-throughput data acquisition card. In-house software developed in LabVIEW was used to control the hardware, collect data from the photodetectors and reconstruct the confocal images. Results: 6 frames/s can be acquired for a 25 µm 2 (128×128 pixels) field of view, visualizing the entire volume of the cell nucleus (∼10 µm depth) in <10 s. To demonstrate the usefulness of our FCLSM, we imaged gold nanoshells in live cells, radiation-induced damage in fibrosarcoma cells expressing eGFP tagged to a DNA repair protein, and neurons expressing eGFP. The system can also image particle tracks in fluorescent nuclear track detectors. Conclusion: We developed a versatile and portable FCLSM that allows radiobiology studies in live cells exposed to therapeutic radiation. The FCLSM can be placed in any vertical beam line

  16. Laser-based structural sensing and surface damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldur, Burcu

    Damage due to age or accumulated damage from hazards on existing structures poses a worldwide problem. In order to evaluate the current status of aging, deteriorating and damaged structures, it is vital to accurately assess the present conditions. It is possible to capture the in situ condition of structures by using laser scanners that create dense three-dimensional point clouds. This research investigates the use of high resolution three-dimensional terrestrial laser scanners with image capturing abilities as tools to capture geometric range data of complex scenes for structural engineering applications. Laser scanning technology is continuously improving, with commonly available scanners now capturing over 1,000,000 texture-mapped points per second with an accuracy of ~2 mm. However, automatically extracting meaningful information from point clouds remains a challenge, and the current state-of-the-art requires significant user interaction. The first objective of this research is to use widely accepted point cloud processing steps such as registration, feature extraction, segmentation, surface fitting and object detection to divide laser scanner data into meaningful object clusters and then apply several damage detection methods to these clusters. This required establishing a process for extracting important information from raw laser-scanned data sets such as the location, orientation and size of objects in a scanned region, and location of damaged regions on a structure. For this purpose, first a methodology for processing range data to identify objects in a scene is presented and then, once the objects from model library are correctly detected and fitted into the captured point cloud, these fitted objects are compared with the as-is point cloud of the investigated object to locate defects on the structure. The algorithms are demonstrated on synthetic scenes and validated on range data collected from test specimens and test-bed bridges. The second objective of

  17. Damage Atlas for Photographic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristel Van Camp

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available La conservation des documents photographiques peut nécessiter des interventions préventives ou curatives. Ce choix est guidé par leur état de conservation. Une meilleure connaissance des détériorations est donc cruciale. Le répertoire présenté ici essaie de les classifier selon des caractéristiques spécifiques et leur niveau de gravité. Les différents types de dégradation sont illustrés et décrits avec une terminologie précise. L’auteur propose en regard de ceux-ci l’intervention qui semble la plus appropriée. Ce répertoire s’adresse à toutes les personnes concernées par la photographie, qu’ils soient dans le milieu de la conservation ou dans le domaine artistique, dans les musées ou dans les archives. In order to rescue a damaged photographic object, preventive or conservative actions are needed. Knowing the specific characteristics of different types of damage is crucial. A damage atlas can provide these characteristics. With this atlas the damage can be recognised and appropriate actions can be taken. This damage atlas offers a first attempt to such a characterisation in the field of photography. The damage atlas contains images and the necessary information about damage on photographic material. The atlas with special annotations about the terminology and the grade of the damage is meant for everybody who works with photographic material, as well in museums as in archives.

  18. Measured airtightness of twenty-four detached houses over periods of up to three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prowskiw, G.

    1992-05-01

    A three year field study of 20 energy efficient houses and four conventional dwellings was conducted to evaluate the performance of their building envelope systems. Ten of the houses were built with polyethylene air barriers and 14 using the airtight drywall approach (ADA). All were newly built and used dry wood for framing members, i.e. with a wood moisture content (WMC) below 19%. Building envelope performace was evaluated by developing a comprehensive monitoring program which included measurements of wall, attic and floor joist WMC levels, detailed thermographic examinations and regular airtightness testing. Over 13,000 WMC measurements were performed, 1013 thermographic images recorded and 167 airtightness tests conducted. Both the energy efficient and conventional building envelope systems performed satisfactory manner although fewer problems were found in the energy efficient houses. Lower mean WMC levels were measured in the walls and attics and fewer WMC excursions above 19% were recorded. The energy efficient houses also displayed fewer thermographic anomalies, particulary those of a severe nature. The energy efficient houses were found to be more airtight. No evidence of envelope degradation was found in the energy efficient houses. Both the polyethylene air barriers and the ADA system demonstrated predominately stable WMC levels, thermographic characteristics and airtightness. The building envelopes constructed using polyethylene barriers generally performed in a superior fashion to those which used ADA, although both systems provided satisfactory performance. WMC levels were slightly lower in the polyethylene houses as were the number of thermographic faults, particularly those of a severe nature. 11 refs., 28 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Research on Optimal Observation Scale for Damaged Buildings after Earthquake Based on Optimal Feature Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Chen, W.; Dou, A.; Li, W.; Sun, Y.

    2018-04-01

    A new information extraction method of damaged buildings rooted in optimal feature space is put forward on the basis of the traditional object-oriented method. In this new method, ESP (estimate of scale parameter) tool is used to optimize the segmentation of image. Then the distance matrix and minimum separation distance of all kinds of surface features are calculated through sample selection to find the optimal feature space, which is finally applied to extract the image of damaged buildings after earthquake. The overall extraction accuracy reaches 83.1 %, the kappa coefficient 0.813. The new information extraction method greatly improves the extraction accuracy and efficiency, compared with the traditional object-oriented method, and owns a good promotional value in the information extraction of damaged buildings. In addition, the new method can be used for the information extraction of different-resolution images of damaged buildings after earthquake, then to seek the optimal observation scale of damaged buildings through accuracy evaluation. It is supposed that the optimal observation scale of damaged buildings is between 1 m and 1.2 m, which provides a reference for future information extraction of damaged buildings.

  20. Optimization and Characterization of the Friction Stir Welded Sheets of AA 5754-H111: Monitoring of the Quality of Joints with Thermographic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Alberto Ciro De Filippis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Friction Stir Welding (FSW is a solid-state welding process, based on frictional and stirring phenomena, that offers many advantages with respect to the traditional welding methods. However, several parameters can affect the quality of the produced joints. In this work, an experimental approach has been used for studying and optimizing the FSW process, applied on 5754-H111 aluminum plates. In particular, the thermal behavior of the material during the process has been investigated and two thermal indexes, the maximum temperature and the heating rate of the material, correlated to the frictional power input, were investigated for different process parameters (the travel and rotation tool speeds configurations. Moreover, other techniques (micrographs, macrographs and destructive tensile tests were carried out for supporting in a quantitative way the analysis of the quality of welded joints. The potential of thermographic technique has been demonstrated both for monitoring the FSW process and for predicting the quality of joints in terms of tensile strength.

  1. Optimization and Characterization of the Friction Stir Welded Sheets of AA 5754-H111: Monitoring of the Quality of Joints with Thermographic Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Luigi Alberto Ciro; Serio, Livia Maria; Palumbo, Davide; De Finis, Rosa; Galietti, Umberto

    2017-10-11

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state welding process, based on frictional and stirring phenomena, that offers many advantages with respect to the traditional welding methods. However, several parameters can affect the quality of the produced joints. In this work, an experimental approach has been used for studying and optimizing the FSW process, applied on 5754-H111 aluminum plates. In particular, the thermal behavior of the material during the process has been investigated and two thermal indexes, the maximum temperature and the heating rate of the material, correlated to the frictional power input, were investigated for different process parameters (the travel and rotation tool speeds) configurations. Moreover, other techniques (micrographs, macrographs and destructive tensile tests) were carried out for supporting in a quantitative way the analysis of the quality of welded joints. The potential of thermographic technique has been demonstrated both for monitoring the FSW process and for predicting the quality of joints in terms of tensile strength.

  2. Imaging subsurface damage of grinded fused silica optics by confocal fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neauport, J.; Cormont, P.; Destribats, J.; Legros, P.; Ambard, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report an experimental investigation of fluorescence confocal microscopy as a tool to measure subsurface damage on grinded fused silica optics. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed with an excitation at the wavelength of 405 nm on fixed abrasive diamond grinded fused silica samples. We detail the measured fluorescence spectrums and compare them to those of oil based coolants and grinding slurries. We evidence that oil based coolant used in diamond grinding induces a fluorescence that marks the subsurface damages and eases its observation. Such residual traces might also be involved in the laser damage process. (authors)

  3. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  4. Combination of Three Methods of Photo Voltaic Panels Damage Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olšan T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In broken photovoltaic (PV cells the flow of electric current can be reduced in some places, which results in a lowered efficiency. In the present study, the damage of PV cells and panels was evaluated using three methods - electroluminescence, infrared camera imaging, and visual examination. The damage is detectable by all these methods which were presented and compared from the viewpoint of resolution, difficulty, and accuracy of monitoring the PV panels damage.

  5. Electron damage and defects in organic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howitt, D.G.

    1976-06-01

    The nature of the defects discernable from and the radiation damage that is induced by high resolution electron microscopy is reported. The structural aspects of the radiation damage process can be correlated to the expected radiochemical decomposition of these materials and these effects identified. The types of local defect formed by radiation damage are often clearly distinguishable, in high resolution images, from those inherent in the microstructure. Techniques used in this type of electron microscopy and the limitations imposed by radiation damage are described as are the relevant radiochemical characteristics of these processes. In copper pthalocyanine, microstructural features distinct from those induced by radiation damage were identified which are consistent with those predicted and described by other workers in similar materials. The high resolution studies indicate that some of the microstructures observed are caused by structural rearrangements that can account, to some extent, for additional crystallographic forms that have been identified in this material and the photochemical behaviour of related structures

  6. Integrating Machine Learning into a Crowdsourced Model for Earthquake-Induced Damage Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Oommen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    On January 12th, 2010, a catastrophic 7.0M earthquake devastated the country of Haiti. In the aftermath of an earthquake, it is important to rapidly assess damaged areas in order to mobilize the appropriate resources. The Haiti damage assessment effort introduced a promising model that uses crowdsourcing to map damaged areas in freely available remotely-sensed data. This paper proposes the application of machine learning methods to improve this model. Specifically, we apply work on learning from multiple, imperfect experts to the assessment of volunteer reliability, and propose the use of image segmentation to automate the detection of damaged areas. We wrap both tasks in an active learning framework in order to shift volunteer effort from mapping a full catalog of images to the generation of high-quality training data. We hypothesize that the integration of machine learning into this model improves its reliability, maintains the speed of damage assessment, and allows the model to scale to higher data volumes.

  7. Advanced nondestructive evaluation for creep damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    As a result of operation at elevated temperatures, power plant components experience creep. Changes in metallurgical structure and microscopic cracking occur after periods of operation and lead to component failure. In order to detect the presence of creep and avoid creep-related failures, EPRI has just initiated a five year program entitled Advanced NDE for Creep Damage (RP 1856-7). The objective of this program is to develop NDE methods for detection and characterization of microscopic creep damage. Several NDE methods will be initially evaluated to determine their potential for detecting and characterizing such damage. These NDE methods include ultrasonics, eddy current, Barkhausen, positron annihilation, and thermal-wave imaging. A prototype system will be developed and tested for commercial applications in a follow-on project, utilizing characteristics of the best NDE method for creep detection. A brief description of the project and results of a theoretical investigation, to determine feasibility of ultrasonic NDE method, for detection of creep damage are presented

  8. Laser Speckle Imaging of Rat Pial Microvasculature during Hypoperfusion-Reperfusion Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Mastantuono

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to in vivo assess the blood flow oscillatory patterns in rat pial microvessels during 30 min bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO and 60 min reperfusion by laser speckle imaging (LSI. Pial microcirculation was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The blood flow oscillations of single microvessels were recorded by LSI; spectral analysis was performed by Wavelet transform. Under baseline conditions, arterioles and venules were characterized by blood flow oscillations in the frequency ranges 0.005–0.0095 Hz, 0.0095–0.021 Hz, 0.021–0.052 Hz, 0.052–0.150 Hz and 0.150–0.500 Hz. Arterioles showed oscillations with the highest spectral density when compared with venules. Moreover, the frequency components in the ranges 0.052–0.150 Hz and 0.150–0.500 were predominant in the arteriolar total power spectrum; while, the frequency component in the range 0.150–0.500 Hz showed the highest spectral density in venules. After 30 min BCCAO, the arteriolar spectral density decreased compared to baseline; moreover, the arteriolar frequency component in the range 0.052–0.150 Hz significantly decreased in percent spectral density, while the frequency component in the range 0.150–0.500 Hz significantly increased in percent spectral density. However, an increase in arteriolar spectral density was detected at 60 min reperfusion compared to BCCAO values; consequently, an increase in percent spectral density of the frequency component in the range 0.052–0.150 Hz was observed, while the percent spectral density of the frequency component in the range 0.150–0.500 Hz significantly decreased. The remaining frequency components did not significantly change during hypoperfusion and reperfusion. The changes in blood flow during hypoperfusion/reperfusion caused tissue damage in the cortex and striatum of all animals. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that the frequency component in the range 0.052–0.150 Hz

  9. Performance Evaluation of Thermographic Cameras for Photogrammetric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yastikli, N.; Guler, E.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this research is the performance evaluation of the termographic cameras for possible use for photogrammetric documentation and deformation analyses caused by moisture and isolation problem of the historical and cultural heritage. To perform geometric calibration of the termographic camera, the 3D test object was designed with 77 control points which were distributed in different depths. For performance evaluation, Flir A320 termographic camera with 320 × 240 pixels and lens with 18 mm focal length was used. The Nikon D3X SLR digital camera with 6048 × 4032 pixels and lens with 20 mm focal length was used as reference for comparison. The size of pixel was 25 μm for the Flir A320 termographic camera and 6 μm for the Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The digital images of the 3D test object were recorded with the Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera and the image coordinate of the control points in the images were measured. The geometric calibration parameters, including the focal length, position of principal points, radial and tangential distortions were determined with introduced additional parameters in bundle block adjustments. The measurement of image coordinates and bundle block adjustments with additional parameters were performed using the PHIDIAS digital photogrammetric system. The bundle block adjustment was repeated with determined calibration parameter for both Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image coordinates was 9.6 μm and 10.5 μm for Flir A320 termographic camera and 8.3 μm and 7.7 μm for Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image points in Flir A320 termographic camera images almost same accuracy level with digital camera in comparison with 4 times bigger pixel size. The obtained results from this research, the interior geometry of the termographic cameras and lens distortion was modelled efficiently

  10. The neuroimaging evidence for chronic brain damage due to boxing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moseley, I.F. [Lysholm Radiological Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2000-01-01

    A number of imaging techniques have been used to investigate changes produced in the brain by boxing. Most morphological studies have failed to show significant correlations between putative abnormalities on imaging and clinical evidence of brain damage. Fenestration of the septum pellucidum, with formation of a cavum, one of the most frequent observations, does not appear to correlate with neurological or physiological evidence of brain damage. Serial studies on large groups may be more informative. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cerebral blood flow studies have been reported in only small numbers of boxers; serial studies are not available to date. (orig.)

  11. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  12. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components

  13. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  14. Cipher image damage and decisions in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-García, Victor Manuel; Flores-Carapia, Rolando; Rentería-Márquez, Carlos; Luna-Benoso, Benjamín; Jiménez-Vázquez, Cesar Antonio; González-Ramírez, Marlon David

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for constructing permutations on m position arrangements. Our objective is to encrypt color images using advanced encryption standard (AES), using variable permutations means a different one for each 128-bit block in the first round after the x-or operation is applied. Furthermore, this research offers the possibility of knowing the original image when the encrypted figure suffered a failure from either an attack or not. This is achieved by permuting the original image pixel positions before being encrypted with AES variable permutations, which means building a pseudorandom permutation of 250,000 position arrays or more. To this end, an algorithm that defines a bijective function between the nonnegative integer and permutation sets is built. From this algorithm, the way to build permutations on the 0,1,…,m-1 array, knowing m-1 constants, is presented. The transcendental numbers are used to select these m-1 constants in a pseudorandom way. The quality of the proposed encryption according to the following criteria is evaluated: the correlation coefficient, the entropy, and the discrete Fourier transform. A goodness-of-fit test for each basic color image is proposed to measure the bits randomness degree of the encrypted figure. On the other hand, cipher images are obtained in a loss-less encryption way, i.e., no JPEG file formats are used.

  15. ESTIMATION OF DAMAGED AREAS DUE TO THE 2010 CHILE EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI USING SAR IMAGERY OF ALOS/PALSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Ni Made

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale earthquake and tsunami affect thousands of people and cause serious damages worldwide every year. Quick observation of the disaster damage is extremely important for planning effective rescue operations. In the past, acquiring damage information was limited to only field surveys or using aerial photographs. In the last decade, space-borne images were used in many disaster researches, such as tsunami damage detection. In this study, SAR data of ALOS/PALSAR satellite images were used to estimate tsunami damage in the form of inundation areas in Talcahuano, the area near the epicentre of the 2010 Chile earthquake. The image processing consisted of three stages, i.e. pre-processing, analysis processing, and post-processing. It was conducted using multi-temporal images before and after the disaster. In the analysis processing, inundation areas were extracted through the masking processing. It consisted of water masking using a high-resolution optical image of ALOS/AVNIR-2 and elevation masking which built upon the inundation height using DEM image of ASTER-GDEM. The area result was 8.77 Km2. It showed a good result and corresponded to the inundation map of Talcahuano. Future study in another area is needed in order to strengthen the estimation processing method.

  16. Detecting damaged regions of cerebral white matter in the subacute phase after carbon monoxide poisoning using voxel-based analysis with diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shunrou; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Beppu, Takaaki; Sanjo, Katsumi; Koeda, Atsuhiko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kudo, Kohsuke; Sasaki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the main regions of cerebral white matter (CWM) showing damage in the subacute phase for CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms using voxel-based analysis (VBA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Subjects comprised 22 adult CO-poisoned patients and 16 age-matched healthy volunteers as controls. Patients were classified into patients with transient acute symptoms only (group A) and patients with chronic neurological symptoms (group S). In all patients, DTI covering the whole brain was performed with a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging system at 2 weeks after CO exposure. As procedures for VBA, all fractional anisotropy (FA) maps obtained from DTI were spatially normalized, and FA values for all voxels in the whole CWM on normalized FA maps were statistically compared among the two patient groups and controls. Voxels with significant differences in FA were detected at various regions in comparisons between groups S and A and between group S and controls. In these comparisons, more voxels were detected in deep CWM, including the centrum semiovale, than in other regions. A few voxels were detected between group A and controls. Absolute FA values in the centrum semiovale were significantly lower in group S than in group A or controls. VBA demonstrated that CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms had already suffered damage to various CWM regions in the subacute phase. In these regions, the centrum semiovale was suggested to be the main region damaged in the subacute phase after CO inhalation. (orig.)

  17. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THERMOGRAPHIC CAMERAS FOR PHOTOGRAMMETRIC MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yastikli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is the performance evaluation of the termographic cameras for possible use for photogrammetric documentation and deformation analyses caused by moisture and isolation problem of the historical and cultural heritage. To perform geometric calibration of the termographic camera, the 3D test object was designed with 77 control points which were distributed in different depths. For performance evaluation, Flir A320 termographic camera with 320 × 240 pixels and lens with 18 mm focal length was used. The Nikon D3X SLR digital camera with 6048 × 4032 pixels and lens with 20 mm focal length was used as reference for comparison. The size of pixel was 25 μm for the Flir A320 termographic camera and 6 μm for the Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The digital images of the 3D test object were recorded with the Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera and the image coordinate of the control points in the images were measured. The geometric calibration parameters, including the focal length, position of principal points, radial and tangential distortions were determined with introduced additional parameters in bundle block adjustments. The measurement of image coordinates and bundle block adjustments with additional parameters were performed using the PHIDIAS digital photogrammetric system. The bundle block adjustment was repeated with determined calibration parameter for both Flir A320 termographic camera and Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image coordinates was 9.6 μm and 10.5 μm for Flir A320 termographic camera and 8.3 μm and 7.7 μm for Nikon D3X SLR digital camera. The obtained standard deviation of measured image points in Flir A320 termographic camera images almost same accuracy level with digital camera in comparison with 4 times bigger pixel size. The obtained results from this research, the interior geometry of the termographic cameras and lens distortion was

  18. Building Damage Estimation by Integration of Seismic Intensity Information and Satellite L-band SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuoto Nojima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available For a quick and stable estimation of earthquake damaged buildings worldwide, using Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR loaded on the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS satellite, a model combining the usage of satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA-scale seismic intensity is proposed. In order to expand the existing C-band SAR based damage estimation model into L-band SAR, this paper rebuilds a likelihood function for severe damage ratio, on the basis of dataset from Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1 (JERS-1/SAR (L-band SAR images observed during the 1995 Kobe earthquake and its detailed ground truth data. The model which integrates the fragility functions of building damage in terms of seismic intensity and the proposed likelihood function is then applied to PALSAR images taken over the areas affected by the 2007 earthquake in Pisco, Peru. The accuracy of the proposed damage estimation model is examined by comparing the results of the analyses with field investigations and/or interpretation of high-resolution satellite images.

  19. Radiation damage relative to transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens at low temperature: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.; Taylor, K.A.

    1978-01-01

    When biological specimens are irradiated by the electron beam in the electron microscope, the specimen structure is damaged as a result of molecular excitation, ionization, and subsequent chemical reactions. The radiation damage that occurs in the normal process of electron microscopy is known to present severe limitations for imaging high resolution detail in biological specimens. The question of radiation damage at low temperatures has therefore been investigated with the view in mind of reducing somewhat the rate at which damage occurs. The radiation damage protection found for small molecule (anhydrous) organic compounds is generally rather limited or even non-existent. However, large molecule, hydrated materials show as much as a 10-fold reduction at low temperature in the rate at which radiation damage occurs, relative to the damage rate at room temperature. In the case of hydrated specimens, therefore, low temperature electron microscopy offers an important advantage as part of the overall effort required in obtaining high resolution images of complex biological structures. (author)

  20. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girolamo, D.; Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies

  1. High temperature damage of a re-sulfurized stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinet, Hougo

    2002-01-01

    After having evoked the industrial problem raised by high-temperature damage in the 303 stainless steel, and outlined that the experimental study of high-temperature damage implies the study of the sane (or non damaged) material, the study of micro-voids germination, growth and coalescence, and the study of the material failure process, the author of this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on the behaviour of sane re-sulfurized stainless steel and different damage models. He presents experimental techniques (thermal-mechanical compression and tensile tests, image analysis in optical microscopy) which have been used in this work, and describes and comments results obtained on axisymmetric samples for micro-void germination, growth and coalescence in case of a damage under low and medium stress triaxiality. The last part addresses the study of the damage of strongly notched samples (stress triaxialities close to those existing at the crack bottom) [fr

  2. The Use of Novel PET Tracers to Image Breast Cancer Biologic Processes Such as Proliferation, DNA Damage and Repair, and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The balance between proliferation and cell death is pivotal to breast tumor growth. Because of a combination of environmental and genetic factors leading to activation of oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, these processes become deregulated in cancer. PET imaging of proliferation, angiogenesis, and DNA damage and repair offers the opportunity to monitor therapeutic efficacy to detect changes in tumor biology that may precede physical size reduction and simultaneously allows the study of intratumoral and intertumoral heterogeneity.This review examines recent developments in breast cancer imaging using novel probes. The probes discussed here are not licensed for routine use and are at various stages of development ranging from preclinical development (e.g., the DNA repair marker γH2AX) to clinical validation in larger studies (such as the proliferation probe 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine [(18)F-FLT]). In breast cancer, most studies have focused on proliferation imaging mainly based on (18)F-labeled thymidine analogs. Initial studies have been promising; however, the results of larger validation studies are necessary before being incorporated into routine clinical use. Although there are distinct advantages in using process-specific probes, properties such as metabolism need careful consideration, because high background uptake in the liver due to glucuronidation in the case of (18)F-FLT may limit utility for imaging of liver metastases.Targeting angiogenesis has had some success in tumors such as renal cell carcinoma; however, angiogenesis inhibitors have not been particularly successful in the clinical treatment of breast cancer. This could be potentially attributed to patient selection due to the lack of validated predictive and responsive biomarkers; the quest for a successful noninvasive biomarker for angiogenesis could solve this challenge. Finally, we look at cell death including apoptosis and DNA damage and repair probes, the most well

  3. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) reveals characteristic pattern of myocardial damage in patients with mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Gdynia, Hans-Jürgen; Ponfick, Matthias; Rösch, Sabine; Lindner, Alfred; Ludolph, Albert C; Sechtem, Udo

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial myopathy comprises various clinical subforms of neuromuscular disorders that are characterised by impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism due to dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. No comprehensive and targeted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) studies have been performed so far in patients with mitochondrial disorders. The present study aimed at characterising cardiac disease manifestations in patients with mitochondrial myopathy and elucidating the in vivo cardiac damage pattern of patients with different subforms of mitochondrial disease by CMR studies. In a prospective study, 37 patients with mitochondrial myopathy underwent comprehensive neurological and cardiac evaluations including physical examination, resting ECG and CMR. The CMR studies comprised cine-CMR, T2-weighted "edema" imaging and T1-weighted late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging. Various patterns and degrees of skeletal myopathy were present in the participants of this study, whereas clinical symptoms such as chest pain symptoms (in eight (22%) patients) and various degrees of dyspnea (in 16 (43%) patients) were less frequent. Pathological ECG findings were documented in eight (22%) patients. T2-weighted "edema" imaging was positive in one (3%) patient with MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes) only. LGE imaging demonstrated the presence of non-ischemic LGE in 12 (32%) patients: 10 out of 24 (42%) patients with CPEO (chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia) or KSS (Kearns-Sayre syndrome) and 2 of 3 (67%) patients with MELAS were LGE positive. All 10 LGE-positive patients with CPEO or KSS demonstrated a potentially typical pattern of diffuse intramural LGE in the left-ventricular (LV) inferolateral segments. Cardiac involvement is a frequent finding in patients with mitochondrial myopathy. A potentially characteristic pattern of diffuse intramural LGE in the LV inferolateral segments was identified in

  4. Analysis of grease contamination influence on the internal radial clearance of ball bearings by thermographic inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišković Žarko Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors influencing ball bearings service life is its internal radial clearance. However, this parameter is also very complex because it depends on applied radial load and ball bearings dimensions, surface finish and manufacturing materials. Thermal condition of ball bearings also significantly affects internal radial clearance. Despite many researches performed in order to find out relevant facts about different aspects of ball bearings thermal behaviour, only few of them are dealing with the real working conditions, where high concentration of solid contaminant particles is present. That’s why the main goal of research presented in this paper was to establish statistically significant correlation between ball bearings temperatures, their working time and concentration of contaminant particles in their grease. Because of especially difficult working conditions, the typical conveyor idlers bearings were selected as representative test samples and appropriate solid particles from open pit coal mines were used as artificial contaminants. Applied experimental methodology included thermographic inspection, as well as usage of custom designed test rig for ball bearings service life testing. Finally, by obtained experimental data processing in advanced software, statistically significant mathematical correlation between mentioned bearings characteristics was determined and applied in commonly used internal radial clearance equation. That is the most important contribution of performed research - the new equation and methodology for ball bearings internal clearance determination which could be used for eventual improvement of existing bearings service life equations. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR35029 i br. TR14033

  5. Salvaging and Conserving Water Damaged Photographic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryuji

    Degradation of water damaged photographic materials is discussed; the most vulnerable elements are gelatin layers and silver image. A simple and inexpensive chemical treatment is proposed, consisting of a bath containing a gelatin-protecting biocide and a silver image protecting agent. These ingredients were selected among those used in manufacturing of silver halide photographic emulsions or processing chemicals. Experiments confirmed that this treatment significantly reduced oxidative attacks to silver image and bacterial degradation of gelatin layers. The treated material was also stable under intense light fading test. Method of hardening gelatin to suppress swelling is also discussed.

  6. Disaster damage detection through synergistic use of deep learning and 3D point cloud features derived from very high resolution oblique aerial images, and multiple-kernel-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrivel, Anand; Gerke, Markus; Kerle, Norman; Nex, Francesco; Vosselman, George

    2018-06-01

    Oblique aerial images offer views of both building roofs and façades, and thus have been recognized as a potential source to detect severe building damages caused by destructive disaster events such as earthquakes. Therefore, they represent an important source of information for first responders or other stakeholders involved in the post-disaster response process. Several automated methods based on supervised learning have already been demonstrated for damage detection using oblique airborne images. However, they often do not generalize well when data from new unseen sites need to be processed, hampering their practical use. Reasons for this limitation include image and scene characteristics, though the most prominent one relates to the image features being used for training the classifier. Recently features based on deep learning approaches, such as convolutional neural networks (CNNs), have been shown to be more effective than conventional hand-crafted features, and have become the state-of-the-art in many domains, including remote sensing. Moreover, often oblique images are captured with high block overlap, facilitating the generation of dense 3D point clouds - an ideal source to derive geometric characteristics. We hypothesized that the use of CNN features, either independently or in combination with 3D point cloud features, would yield improved performance in damage detection. To this end we used CNN and 3D features, both independently and in combination, using images from manned and unmanned aerial platforms over several geographic locations that vary significantly in terms of image and scene characteristics. A multiple-kernel-learning framework, an effective way for integrating features from different modalities, was used for combining the two sets of features for classification. The results are encouraging: while CNN features produced an average classification accuracy of about 91%, the integration of 3D point cloud features led to an additional

  7. A brief history of 25 years (or more) of infrared imaging radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bernard R., Jr.; Orlove, Gary L.

    2003-04-01

    Modern thermal imaging radiometers are infrared systems usually endowed with some means of making surface temperature measurements of objects, as well as providing an image. These devices have evolved considerably over the past few decades, and are continuing to do so at an accelerating rate. Changes are not confined to merely camera size and user interface, but also include critical parameters, such as sensitivity, accuracy, dynamic range, spectral response, capture rates, storage media, and numerous other features, options, and accessories. Familiarity with this changing technology is much more than an academic topic. A misunderstanding or false assumption concerning system differences, could lead to misinterpretation of data, inaccurate temperature measurements, or disappointing, ambiguous results. Marketing demands have had considerable influence in the design and operation of these systems. In the past, many thermographers were scientists, engineers and researchers. Today, however, the majorities of people using these instruments work in the industrial sector and are involved in highly technical skilled trades. This change of operating personnel has effectively changed the status of these devices from a 'scientific instrument', to an 'essential tool'. Manufacturers have recognized this trend and responded accordingly, as seen in their product designs. This paper explores the history of commercial infrared imaging systems and accessories. Emphasis is placed on, but not confined to, real time systems with video output, capable of temperature measurements.

  8. NDE of Damage in Aircraft Flight Control Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, David K.; Barnard, Daniel J.; Dayal, Vinay

    2007-01-01

    Flight control surfaces on an aircraft, such as ailerons, flaps, spoilers and rudders, are typically adhesively bonded composite or aluminum honeycomb sandwich structures. These components can suffer from damage caused by hail stone, runway debris, or dropped tools during maintenance. On composites, low velocity impact damages can escape visual inspection, whereas on aluminum honeycomb sandwich, budding failure of the honeycomb core may or may not be accompanied by a disbond. This paper reports a study of the damage morphology in such structures and the NDE methods for detecting and characterizing them. Impact damages or overload failures in composite sandwiches with Nomex or fiberglass core tend to be a fracture or crinkle or the honeycomb cell wall located a distance below the facesheet-to-core bondline. The damage in aluminum honeycomb is usually a buckling failure, propagating from the top skin downward. The NDE methods used in this work for mapping out these damages were: air-coupled ultrasonic scan, and imaging by computer aided tap tester. Representative results obtained from the field will be shown

  9. Measured airtightness of twenty-four detached houses over periods of up to three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A three year field study of 20 energy efficient houses and four conventional dwellings was conducted in Winnipeg, Manitoba to evaluate the performance of their building envelope systems. Ten of the houses were built with polyethylene air barriers and 14 using the Airtight Drywall Approach (ADA). All were newly constructed and used dry wood for the framing members with a wood moisture content (WMC) below 19 percent. Building envelope performance was evaluated by developing a comprehensive monitoring program which included measurements of wall, attic, and floor joist WMC levels, detailed thermographic examinations and regular airtightness testing. Over 13,000 WMC measurements were performed, 1,013 thermographic images recorded, and 167 airtightness tests conducted.

  10. Spectroscopic photoacoustics for assessing ischemic kidney damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; He, Xiaolin; Yuen, Darren A.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2018-02-01

    Ischemic reperfusion injuries (IRIs) are caused by return of blood to a tissue or organ after a period without oxygen or nutrients. Damage in the microvasculature causes an inflammatory response and heterogeneous scarring, which is associated with an increase in collagen in the extracellular matrix. Although most often associated with heart attacks and strokes, IRI also occurs when blood reperfuses a transplanted organ. Currently, monitoring for IRI is limited to biopsies, which are invasive and sample a limited area. In this work, we explored photoacoustic (PA) biomarkers of scarring. IRI events were induced in mice (n=2) by clamping the left renal artery, then re-establishing flow. At 53 days post-surgery, kidneys were saline perfused and cut in half laterally. One half was immediately imaged with a VevoX system (Fujifilm-VisualSonics, Toronto) in two near infrared ranges - 680 to 970 nm (NIR), and 1200 to 1350 nm (NIR II). The other half was decellularized and then imaged at NIR and NIR II. Regions of interest were manually identified and analyzed for each kidney. For both cellularized and decellularized samples, the PA signal ratio based on irradiation wavelengths of 715:930 nm was higher in damaged kidneys than for undamaged kidneys (p collagen in the NIR II range, while healthy kidneys did not. Collagen rich spectra were more apparent in decellularized kidneys, suggesting that in the cellularized samples, other components may be contributing to the signal. PA imaging using spectral ratios associated with collagen signatures may provide a non-invasive tool to determine areas of tissue damage due to IRIs.

  11. Pulsed Thermography Applied to the Study of Cultural Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Mercuri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an overview of the recent applications of pulsed infrared thermography is presented. Pulsed infrared thermography, which provides stratigraphic information by analyzing the heat diffusion process within the sample after a thermal perturbation, is applied to the investigation of different kinds of cultural heritage artefacts. In particular, it is used to analyze repairs, decorative elements, and casting faults on bronzes, to detect texts hidden or damaged in ancient books/documents, and to characterize paint decorations. Moreover, the integration of pulsed infrared thermography and three-dimensional shape recording methods is proposed in order to provide a three-dimensional representation of the thermographic results. Finally, it is shown how the obtained thermographic results may be crucial from the historical and artistic points of view for understanding the modus operandi of a specific artist and/or of a workshop and for reconstructing the manufacturing process of the analyzed artefacts.

  12. Development of creep damage assessment system for aged thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, Isamu [IshikawaJima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Umaki, Hideo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Hidetalca [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1999-12-31

    IHI has developed the Creep Damage Assessment System to identify voids by processing an image observed by a small laser microscope with an advanced image processing technique jointly with Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. The result can be obtained immediately on the spot. Application tests of the system at the Unit No.3 boiler of the Kudamatsu Power Station showed good operability, adaptability to the environment, and accuracy. The new system can easily indicate damage conditions in parts during the periodical inspection, allowing rapid maintenance. Time reduction required for assessment and increased reliability of equipment can be also achieved. (orig.)

  13. Development of creep damage assessment system for aged thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, Isamu [IshikawaJima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Umaki, Hideo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Hidetalca [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    IHI has developed the Creep Damage Assessment System to identify voids by processing an image observed by a small laser microscope with an advanced image processing technique jointly with Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. The result can be obtained immediately on the spot. Application tests of the system at the Unit No.3 boiler of the Kudamatsu Power Station showed good operability, adaptability to the environment, and accuracy. The new system can easily indicate damage conditions in parts during the periodical inspection, allowing rapid maintenance. Time reduction required for assessment and increased reliability of equipment can be also achieved. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Baz, F.; Al-Ajmi, D.

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of ''oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait

  15. Remote Sensing Image Registration Using Multiple Image Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing image registration plays an important role in military and civilian fields, such as natural disaster damage assessment, military damage assessment and ground targets identification, etc. However, due to the ground relief variations and imaging viewpoint changes, non-rigid geometric distortion occurs between remote sensing images with different viewpoint, which further increases the difficulty of remote sensing image registration. To address the problem, we propose a multi-viewpoint remote sensing image registration method which contains the following contributions. (i A multiple features based finite mixture model is constructed for dealing with different types of image features. (ii Three features are combined and substituted into the mixture model to form a feature complementation, i.e., the Euclidean distance and shape context are used to measure the similarity of geometric structure, and the SIFT (scale-invariant feature transform distance which is endowed with the intensity information is used to measure the scale space extrema. (iii To prevent the ill-posed problem, a geometric constraint term is introduced into the L2E-based energy function for better behaving the non-rigid transformation. We evaluated the performances of the proposed method by three series of remote sensing images obtained from the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV and Google Earth, and compared with five state-of-the-art methods where our method shows the best alignments in most cases.

  16. Monitoring of Damage in Sunflower and Maize Parcels Using Radar and Optical Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Surek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to monitor the temporal behaviour of geometrical structural change of cropland affected by four different types of damage: weed infection, Western Corn Rootworm (WCR, storm damage, and drought by time series of different type of optical and quad-pol RADARSAT2 data. Based on our results it is established that ragweed infection in sunflower can be well identified by evaluation of radar (mid-June and optical (mid-August satellite images. Effect of drought in sunflower is well recognizable by spectral indices derived from optical as well as “I”-component of Shannon entropy (SEI from radar satellite images acquired during the first decade of July. Evaluation of radar and optical satellite images acquired between the last decade of July and mid-August proven to be the most efficient for detecting damages in maize fields caused by either by WCR or storm. Components of Shannon entropy are proven to have significant role in identification. Our project demonstrates the potential in integrated usage of polarimetric radar and optical satellite images for monitoring several types of agricultural damage.

  17. Clinical studies of functional imaging of dynamic CT for chronic brain-damaged patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Haruo; Miyano, Satoshi

    1995-01-01

    The 311 brain-damaged patients, mostly of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) were examined by functional imaging to dynamic CT (FIDCT) at Tokyo Metropolitan Rehabilitation Hospital. The abnormal patterns of FIDCT were classified according to two categories, i.e. focal area where plain CT showed low density area (LDA), and extra-focal area where plain CT showed no abnormal findings. These patterns were diagnosed by using the two parameters, i.e. Corrected First Moment (CM) and Time to Peak (TP). Over 50% of the focal abnormal FIDCT revealed tha same area with LDA on plain CT. The extra-focal FIDCT showed various abnormal patterns, and only 11% of all the findings had no abnormalities. The correlation of the specific patterns of extra-focal FIDCT with the multiple CVD episodes was investigated, and the findings that had significant correlation were (a) delayed CM of bilateral white matter, (b) diffusely delayed TP of the affected hemisphere, and the patient group that showed no extra-focal abnormal FIDCT had significant low incidence of multiple CVD episodes. From these results, it is concluded that the high-risk group of stroke recurrence can be predicted by extra-focal findings of FIDCT. (author)

  18. Clinical studies of functional imaging of dynamic CT for chronic brain-damaged patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Haruo; Miyano, Satoshi [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The 311 brain-damaged patients, mostly of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) were examined by functional imaging to dynamic CT (FIDCT) at Tokyo Metropolitan Rehabilitation Hospital. The abnormal patterns of FIDCT were classified according to two categories, i.e. focal area where plain CT showed low density area (LDA), and extra-focal area where plain CT showed no abnormal findings. These patterns were diagnosed by using the two parameters, i.e. Corrected First Moment (CM) and Time to Peak (TP). Over 50% of the focal abnormal FIDCT revealed tha same area with LDA on plain CT. The extra-focal FIDCT showed various abnormal patterns, and only 11% of all the findings had no abnormalities. The correlation of the specific patterns of extra-focal FIDCT with the multiple CVD episodes was investigated, and the findings that had significant correlation were (a) delayed CM of bilateral white matter, (b) diffusely delayed TP of the affected hemisphere, and the patient group that showed no extra-focal abnormal FIDCT had significant low incidence of multiple CVD episodes. From these results, it is concluded that the high-risk group of stroke recurrence can be predicted by extra-focal findings of FIDCT. (author).

  19. Radiation damage prediction system using damage function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Mori, Seiji

    1979-01-01

    The irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was investigated. This irradiation damage analysis system consists of the following three processes, the unfolding of a damage function, the calculation of the neutron flux spectrum of the object of damage analysis and the estimation of irradiation effect of the object of damage analysis. The damage function is calculated by applying the SAND-2 code. The ANISN and DOT3, 5 codes are used to calculate neutron flux. The neutron radiation and the allowable time of reactor operation can be estimated based on these calculations of the damage function and neutron flux. The flow diagram of the process of analyzing irradiation damage by a damage function and the flow diagram of SAND-2 code are presented, and the analytical code for estimating damage, which is determined with a damage function and a neutron spectrum, is explained. The application of the irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was carried out to the core support structure of a fast breeder reactor for the damage estimation and the uncertainty evaluation. The fundamental analytical conditions and the analytical model for this work are presented, then the irradiation data for SUS304, the initial estimated values of a damage function, the error analysis for a damage function and the analytical results are explained concerning the computation of a damage function for 10% total elongation. Concerning the damage estimation of FBR core support structure, the standard and lower limiting values of damage, the permissible neutron flux and the allowable years of reactor operation are presented and were evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  20. Fatigue damage mechanisms in short fiber reinforced PBT+PET GF30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimkeit, B.; Castagnet, S.; Nadot, Y.; Habib, A. El; Benoit, G.; Bergamo, S.; Dumas, C.; Achard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Final macroscopic cracking only affects the few last percent of the lifetime → Classical approach based on fracture surface observation is not sufficient to characterize micro-mechanisms → Different techniques (scanning electron microscopy, replica technique, infra-red imaging) are compared to the macroscopic mechanical behavior evolution (stiffness, viscous damping, ratcheting effect) → The influence of surrounding fibers on some observed damage processes is being evidenced for the first time. - Abstract: The fatigue damage of a glass-reinforced PolyButylene Terephthalate and PolyEthylene Terephthalate with the fiber volume fraction of 30% (PBT+PET GF30) is investigated by means of various techniques. Fatigue tests at R = 0.1 are carried out on dogbone specimens and tubular specimens with different fiber orientations. The macroscopic evolution of the material behavior is evaluated and fatigue damage mechanisms are observed with a replica technique, Infrared imaging and scanning electron microscopy. A fatigue damage scenario is finally proposed. It is shown that the propagation of a single macroscopic crack is not the major fatigue mechanism under fatigue loading. Damage is spatially distributed in the material and the classical circular crack at the end of the fiber is confirmed as the based fatigue mechanisms. It is also shown that the damage observed alongside the fibers is related to spatial distribution of fiber rather than stress distribution around one single fiber.

  1. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  2. Thermographic Sensing For On-Line Industrial Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmsten, Dag

    1986-10-01

    It is today's emergence of thermoelectrically cooled, highly accurate infrared linescanners and imaging systems that has definitely made on-line Infraread Thermography (IRT) possible. Specifically designed for continuous use, these scanners are equipped with dedicated software capable of monitoring and controlling highly complex thermodynamic situations. This paper will outline some possible implications of using IRT on-line by describing some uses of this technology in the steel-making (hot rolling) and automotive industries (machine-vision). A warning is also expressed that IRT technology not originally designed for automated applications e.g. high resolution, imaging systems, should not be directly applied to an on-line measurement situation without having its measurement resolution, accuracy and especially its repeatability, reliably proven. Some suitable testing procedures are briefly outlined at the end of the paper.

  3. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Camacho M, E.; Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  4. Inspeção termográfica de danos por impacto em laminados de matriz polimérica reforçados por fibras de carbono Thermographic inspection of impact damage in carbon fiber-reinforcing polymer matrix laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Tarpani

    2009-01-01

    specimen's impacted face regarding the infrared camera and the heating source did not affect the thermo-imaging of thermosetting specimens, whereas it substantially influenced the thermograms of thermoplastic laminates. The results obtained allow concluding that infrared thermography is a simple, robust and trustworthy methodology for detecting impact damages as slight as 5 J in carbon fiber composite laminates.

  5. Asymmetry features for classification of thermograms in breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    The computer system for an automatic interpretation of thermographic pictures created by the Br-aster devices uses image processing and machine learning algorithms. The huge set of attributes analyzed by this software includes the asymmetry measurements between corresponding images, and these features are analyzed in presented paper. The system was tested on real data and achieves accuracy comparable to other popular techniques used for breast tumour detection.

  6. MRI findings of brain damage due to neonatal hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Fan Guoguang; Ji Xu; Sun Baohai; Guo Qiyong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To report the MRI findings of brain damage observed in neonatal patients who suffered from isolated hypoglycemia and to explore the value of diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) in early detection of neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury. Methods: Twelve neonates with isolated hypoglycemia (10 of the 12 were diagnosed to suffer from hypoglycemic encephalopathy) were enrolled in this study. They were first scanned at age from 3 days to 10 days with T 1 WI, T 2 WI and DWI(b is 0 s/mm 2 , 1000 s/mm 2 ), and 4 of them were then scanned from 7 days to 10 days following the initial scan. All acquired MR images were retrospectively analysed. Results: First series of DWI images showed distinct hyperintense signal in 11 cases in several areas including bilateral occipital cortex (2 cases), right occipital cortex (1 case), left occipital cortex and subcortical white matter(1 case), bilateral occipital cortex and subcortical white matter (2 cases), bilateral parieto-occipital cortex (2 cases), bilateral parieto-occipital cortex and subcortical white matter(2 cases), the splenium of corpus callosum (4 cases), bilateral corona radiata( 2 cases), left caudate nucleus and globus pallidus (1 case), bilateral thalamus (1 case), bilaterally posterior limb of internal capsule (1 case). In the initial T 1 WI and T 2 WI images, there were subtle hypointensity in the damaged cortical areas (3 cases), hyperintensity in the bilaterally affected occipital cortex( 1 case) on T 1 weighted images, and hyperintensity in the affected cortex and subcortical white matter with poor differentiation on T 2 weighted images. The followed-up MRI of 4 cases showed regional encephalomalacia in the affected occipital lobes(4 cases), slightly hyperintensity on T 2 weighted images in the damaged occipital cortex (2 cases), extensive demyelination (1 case), disappearance of hyperintensity of the splenium of corpus callosum (1 case), and persistent hyperintensity in the splenium of corpus callosum (1 case

  7. Large Scale Automatic Analysis and Classification of Roof Surfaces for the Installation of Solar Panels Using a Multi-Sensor Aerial Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis López-Fernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost multi-sensor aerial platform, aerial trike, equipped with visible and thermographic sensors is used for the acquisition of all the data needed for the automatic analysis and classification of roof surfaces regarding their suitability to harbor solar panels. The geometry of a georeferenced 3D point cloud generated from visible images using photogrammetric and computer vision algorithms, and the temperatures measured on thermographic images are decisive to evaluate the areas, tilts, orientations and the existence of obstacles to locate the optimal zones inside each roof surface for the installation of solar panels. This information is complemented with the estimation of the solar irradiation received by each surface. This way, large areas may be efficiently analyzed obtaining as final result the optimal locations for the placement of solar panels as well as the information necessary (location, orientation, tilt, area and solar irradiation to estimate the productivity of a solar panel from its technical characteristics.

  8. Damage characterization for particles filled semi-crystalline polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Franck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage evolution and characterization in semi-crystalline polymer filled with particles under various loadings is still a challenge. A specific damage characterization method using Digital Image Correlation is proposed for a wide range of strain rates considering tensile tests with hydraulic jacks as well as Hopkinson's bars. This damage measurement is obtained by using and adapting the SEE method [1] which was developed to characterize the behaviour laws at constant strain rates of polymeric materials in dynamic. To validate the characterization process, various damage measurement techniques are used under quasi-static conditions before to apply the procedure in dynamic. So, the well-known damage characterization by loss of stiffness technique under quasi-static loading is applied to a polypropylene. In addition, an in-situ tensile test, carried out in a microtomograph, is used to observe the cavitation phenomenon in real time. A good correlation is obtained between all these techniques and consequently the proposed technique is supposed suitable for measuring the ductile damage observed in semi-crystalline polymers under dynamic loading. By applying it to the semi-crystalline polymer at moderate and high speed loadings, the damage evolution is measured and it is observed that the damage evolution is not strain rate dependent but the failure strain on the contrary is strain rate dependent.

  9. Detection of osmotic damages in GRP boat hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstulović-Opara, L.; Domazet, Ž.; Garafulić, E.

    2013-09-01

    Infrared thermography as a tool of non-destructive testing is method enabling visualization and estimation of structural anomalies and differences in structure's topography. In presented paper problem of osmotic damage in submerged glass reinforced polymer structures is addressed. The osmotic damage can be detected by a simple humidity gauging, but for proper evaluation and estimation testing methods are restricted and hardly applicable. In this paper it is demonstrated that infrared thermography, based on estimation of heat wave propagation, can be used. Three methods are addressed; Pulsed thermography, Fast Fourier Transform and Continuous Morlet Wavelet. An additional image processing based on gradient approach is applied on all addressed methods. It is shown that the Continuous Morlet Wavelet is the most appropriate method for detection of osmotic damage.

  10. Contemporary imaging of mild TBI: the journey toward diffusion tensor imaging to assess neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W Christopher; Park, Min S; Belverud, Shawn; Klugh, Arnett; Rivet, Dennis; Tomlin, Jeffrey M

    2013-04-01

    To follow the progression of neuroimaging as a means of non-invasive evaluation of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in order to provide recommendations based on reproducible, defined imaging findings. A comprehensive literature review and analysis of contemporary published articles was performed to study the progression of neuroimaging findings as a non-invasive 'biomarker' for mTBI. Multiple imaging modalities exist to support the evaluation of patients with mTBI, including ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques continue to evolve with the development of fractional anisotropy (FA), fiber tractography (FT), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Modern imaging techniques, when applied in the appropriate clinical setting, may serve as a valuable tool for diagnosis and management of patients with mTBI. An understanding of modern neuroanatomical imaging will enhance our ability to analyse injury and recognize the manifestations of mTBI.

  11. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Summary of OMERACT 6 MR Imaging Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning is a new method for imaging and quantifying joint inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over the past 4 years, the OMERACT MR Imaging Group has been developing and testing the RA-MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) for use in RA. The OMERACT filter...

  12. Live cell microscopy of DNA damage response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina; Gallina, Irene; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie

    2012-01-01

    live cell imaging allows for multiple cellular markers to be monitored over several hours. This chapter reviews useful fluorescent markers and genotoxic agents for studying the DNA damage response in living cells and provides protocols for live cell imaging, time-lapse microscopy, and for induction...

  13. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Andrew D. [Horticultural Sciences Department and; Henry, Christopher S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, email:; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637; Fiehn, Oliver [Genome Center, University of California, Davis, California 95616, email:; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie [Microbiology and Cell Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, email: ,

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms.

  14. The biospeckle method for early damage detection of fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lei; Liu, Jiaxin; Men, Sen

    2017-07-01

    In the field of fruits damage assessment, biospeckle activity is considered relevant to quality properties of plants, such us damage, aging, or diseases. In this paper, biospeckle technique was applied to identify the early bruising of apples. Then a total of 50 undamaged apples were determined to be artificially bruised as samples. Three methods (Fujii, GD, and LSTCA) were used to extract effective information from these speckle images for measuring the intensity of biospeckle activity. The results showed that for all of three methods, the biospeckle activities of the undamaged areas in apple were similar; after the hit, the damaged area showed a lower biospeckle activity. It can be concluded that early bruising can be identified by biospeckle technique.

  15. Potentialities of infrared thermography to assess damage in bonding between concrete and GFRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. CALDEIRA

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the application of the active infrared thermography to detect damage in bonding between concrete and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP. Specimens of concrete and mortar with GFRP externally bonded were prepared and at their interfaces were inserted polystyrene discs to simulate damages. The samples were divided into two groups. In group 1, one sample was correctly bonded by a GFRP plate to the concrete, but in the other three were inserted polystyrene discs which had different diameters to simulate damages in bonding. In group 2, all of the samples contained identical polystyrene discs at their interfaces, but the total thickness of each specimen was different, because the objective was to evaluate the ability of the camera to capture the simulated damage in depth. The experimental procedure was divided into two stages. In the first stage, four types of heating were used to heat samples of group 1: incandescent lamp, kiln, blended lamp and fan heater. Thus, it was possible to detect the damage and to observe its format and length. It was noticed that the infrared images are different depending on the heat source incident on the specimen. Therefore, group 2 was tested only for the more efficient heating (incandescent lamp. In the second stage, the infrared equipment was tested. Some of the parameters that must be inserted in the camera were varied in order to understand their influence on image formation. The results show the effectiveness of infrared thermography to assess adherence in GFRP/concrete interface. In the present work, the best results were obtained when the image is captured towards GFRP/concrete and using incandescent lamp. It was observed that the image and measured temperature suffer significant distortion when a false value was inserted for the parameter emissivity.

  16. Propagation of Reactions in Thermally-damaged PBX-9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tringe, J W; Glascoe, E A; Kercher, J R; Willey, T M; Springer, H K; Greenwood, D W; Molitoris, J D; Smilowitz, L; Henson, B F; Maienschein, J L

    2010-03-05

    A thermally-initiated explosion in PBX-9501 (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is observed in situ by flash x-ray imaging, and modeled with the LLNL multi-physics arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALE3D. The containment vessel deformation provides a useful estimate of the reaction pressure at the time of the explosion, which we calculate to be in the range 0.8-1.4 GPa. Closely-coupled ALE3D simulations of these experiments, utilizing the multi-phase convective burn model, provide detailed predictions of the reacted mass fraction and deflagration front acceleration. During the preinitiation heating phase of these experiments, the solid HMX portion of the PBX-9501 undergoes a {beta}-phase to {delta}-phase transition which damages the explosive and induces porosity. The multi-phase convective burn model results demonstrate that damaged particle size and pressure are critical for predicting reaction speed and violence. In the model, energetic parameters are taken from LLNL's thermochemical-kinetics code Cheetah and burn rate parameters from Son et al. (2000). Model predictions of an accelerating deflagration front are in qualitative agreement with the experimental images assuming a mode particle diameter in the range 300-400 {micro}m. There is uncertainty in the initial porosity caused by thermal damage of PBX-9501 and, thus, the effective surface area for burning. To better understand these structures, we employ x-ray computed tomography (XRCT) to examine the microstructure of PBX-9501 before and after thermal damage. Although lack of contrast between grains and binder prevents the determination of full grain size distribution in this material, there are many domains visible in thermally damaged PBX-9501 with diameters in the 300-400 {micro}m range.

  17. Structural and functional imaging for vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Buhong; Gu, Ying; Wilson, Brian C.

    2017-02-01

    Vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT) has been widely used for the prevention or treatment of vascular-related diseases, such as localized prostate cancer, wet age-related macular degeneration, port wine stains, esophageal varices and bleeding gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. In this study, the fundamental mechanisms of vascular responses during and after V-PDT will be introduced. Based on the V-PDT treatment of blood vessels in dorsal skinfold window chamber model, the structural and functional imaging, which including white light microscopy, laser speckle imaging, singlet oxygen luminescence imaging, and fluorescence imaging for evaluating vascular damage will be presented, respectively. The results indicate that vessel constriction and blood flow dynamics could be considered as the crucial biomarkers for quantitative evaluation of vascular damage. In addition, future perspectives of non-invasive optical imaging for evaluating vascular damage of V-PDT will be discussed.

  18. RICHTER: A Smartphone Application for Rapid Collection of Geo-Tagged Pictures of Earthquake Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinnemoen, H.; Bossu, R.; Furuheim, K.; Bjorgo, E.

    2010-12-01

    RICHTER (Rapid geo-Images for Collaborative Help Targeting Earthquake Response) is a smartphone version of a professional application developed to provide high quality geo-tagged image communication over challenging network links, such as satellites and poor mobile links. Developed for Android mobile phones, it allows eyewitnesses to share their pictures of earthquake damage easily and without cost with the Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (EMSC). The goal is to engage citizens in the collection of the most up-to-date visual information on local damage for improved rapid impact assessment. RICHTER integrates the innovative and award winning ASIGN protocol initially developed for satellite communication between cameras / computers / satcom terminals and servers at HQ. ASIGN is a robust and optimal image and video communication management solution for bandwidth-limited communication networks which was developed for use particularly in emergency and disaster situations. Contrary to a simple Multimedia Messaging System (MMS), RICHTER allows access to high definition images with embedded location information. Location is automatically assigned from either the internal GPS, derived from the mobile network (triangulation) or the current Wi-Fi domain, in that order, as this corresponds to the expected positioning accuracy. Pictures are compressed to 20-30KB of data typically for fast transfer and to avoid network overload. Full size images can be requested by the EMSC either fully automatically, or on a case-by-case basis, depending on the user preferences. ASIGN was initially developed in coordination with INMARSAT and the European Space Agency. It was used by the Rapid Mapping Unit of the United Nations notably for the damage assessment of the January 12, 2010 Haiti earthquake where more than 700 photos were collected. RICHTER will be freely distributed on the EMSC website to eyewitnesses in the event of significantly damaging earthquakes. The EMSC is the second

  19. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohra E. Beltran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients’ outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine. The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10% for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (. Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia.

  20. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  1. Ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block evaluated by infrared thermography and distal skin temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn

    2014-01-01

    of the 2nd and 5th digits. METHODS: We performed an ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block in 45 patients undergoing upper limb surgery. The contralateral hand served as control and we obtained infrared thermographic images of both hands before the block and during the following 30 min. We defined...

  2. Early evaluation of radiation-induced parotid damage in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma by T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging: initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Chu, Chen; Dou, Xin; Chen, Weibo; He, Jian; Yan, Jing; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2018-02-08

    Radiation-induced parotid damage is a common complication in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with radiotherapy to head and neck region, which severely reduce the life quality of those patients. The aim of this study was to early evaluate the changes of irradiated parotid glands with T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging. Forty-one patients with NPC underwent conventional magnetic resonance imaging for nasopharynx and neck, and T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging for bilateral parotid glands within 2 weeks before radiotherapy (pre-RT), 5 weeks after the beginning of radiotherapy (mid-RT), and 4 weeks after radiotherapy (post-RT). Parotid volume, T2 values, fat fraction (FF) values, and mean radiation dose were recorded and analyzed. From pre-RT to mid-RT, parotid volume decreased (atrophy rate, 27.0 ± 11.5%), while parotid T2 and FF values increased (change rate, 6.0 ± 6.2% for T2 value and 9.1 ± 9.9% for FF value) significantly. From mid-RT to post-RT, parotid T2 value continuously increased (change rate, 4.6 ± 7.7%), but parotid FF value decreased (change rate, - 9.9 ± 18.2%) significantly. Change rate of parotid T2 value significantly correlated with parotid atrophy rate from pre-RT to post-RT (r = 0.313, P = 0.027). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that parotid T2 value (standardized coefficient [SC] = - 0.259, P = 0.001) and FF value (SC = - 0.320, P = 0.014) negatively correlated with parotid volume, while parotid T2 value positively correlated with MR scan time point (SC = 0.476, P = 0.001) significantly. Parotid T2 and FF values showed excellent reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.935-0.992). T2 mapping and mDIXON Quant imaging is useful for noninvasive evaluation of radiation-induced parotid damage.

  3. Pakistan flood damage mapped by UNOSAT at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    As the waters recede, the Pakistan floods are attracting less attention in the world's media. But at the CERN-based headquarters of UNOSAT, the UN Institute for Training and Research Operational Satellite Application Programme, mapping the damage caused by the floods remains the top priority as the “emergency phase” is only now beginning to level off.   Flood analysis in Pakistan from 28 July to 16 September 2010. Credits: © UNOSAT UNOSAT uses impartial, objective data to assess the specifics of a disaster: What surface area has the flood covered? How many bridges and roads have been destroyed? How many areas are impenetrable? Although there are statistical answers to these questions, UNOSAT’s assessment of the damage caused by the Pakistan floods can be simply described in one word: catastrophic. The images used by UNOSAT are taken from a variety of different sources – commercial and scientific. Once a satellite takes an image, the owne...

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of radiation-induced renal damage; Funktionelle MRT der Niere zur Erfassung strahleninduzierter Nierenschaedigungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Michaely, H.J. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany); Boda-Heggemann, J. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The diagnosis of radiation-induced (especially chronic) renal alterations/damage is difficult and currently relies primarily on clinical evaluation. The importance of renal diagnostic evaluation will increase continuously due to the increasing number of long-term survivors after radiotherapy. This article evaluates the potentia diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a focus on functional MRI. The following functional MRI approaches are briefly presented and evaluated: blood oxygenation level-dependent imaging (BOLD), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR perfusion measurements and {sup 23}Na imaging. In summary, only DWI and contrast-enhanced MR perfusion currently seem to be suitable approaches for a broader, clinical implementation. However, up to now valid data from larger patient studies are lacking for both techniques in regard to radiation-induced renal alterations. The BOLD and {sup 23}Na imaging procedures have a huge potential but are currently neither sufficiently evaluated with regard to radiation-induced renal alterations nor technically simple and reliable for implementation into the clinical routine. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik strahleninduzierter, insbesondere chronischer Schaedigungen der Niere ist nach wie vor schwierig und beruht primaer auf der klinischen Beurteilung. Durch die zunehmende Anzahl von Langzeitueberlebenden nach einer Strahlentherapie wird die Bedeutung dieser Diagnostik jedoch weiter zunehmen. In diesem Beitrag wird der Frage nachgegangen, in wieweit hierzu die MRT-Bildgebung und hier besonders die funktionellen Bildgebungsmodalitaeten ihren Beitrag leisten koennen. Die folgenden Verfahren werden kurz vorgestellt und bewertet: die Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent-Bildgebung (BOLD), die diffusionsgewichtete Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) bzw. das ''diffusion tensor imaging'' (DTI), die MR-Perfusionsmessungen, und

  5. Damage analysis of CF/AF hybrid fabric reinforced plastic laminated composites with scanned image microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Kasano, Hideaki; Shull, Peter J.

    2004-07-01

    The article presents an experimental study that has been conducted to evaluate the impact loading damage within hybrid fabric laminates-carbon and Aramid fibers. The experiments have been undertaken on a series of interply hybrid specimens with different preprags stacking sequences. Impact damage was created using an air-gun like impact device propelling spherical steel balls with diameters of 5.0mm and 10.0mm and having velocities of 113m/s and 40m/s respectively. The resulting specimen surface and internal damage (e.g., micro-cracking and debonding) was visualized nondestructively by a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) while further interrogation of specific internal damage was visualized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) on cross-sectioned panels.

  6. Thermographic mapping of a complex vernacular settlement: the case study of Casalnuovo District within the Sassi of Matera (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Tiziana; Balestra, Alessandro; Cardinale, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    appropriate cognitive apparatus has been set up for the entire technical process, first of all making use of infrared thermography. It is an affordable, fast and hence widespread method to detect temperature distributions on the surfaces of buildings. In the investigation of historical structures, where a restoration or conservation treatment can cause irreversible damage to the structure, it is considered to be of most importance. So we have made a thermographic mapping and we have analyzed the thermal conditions of approximately 15 caves, with the presence of rising moisture and condensation moisture. The ability to investigate a so complex reality offers an important opportunity for the knowledge, valorization and fruition of the cultural landscape of Matera, where you can disassemble the constituents of full and empty spaces with the consideration that the whole is not merely the sum of the parts.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Electron Beam Damage in Organic Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Leijten, Zino J. W. A.; Keizer, Arthur D. A.; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2017-01-01

    In transmission electron microscopy (TEM) the interaction of an electron beam with polymers such as P3HT:PCBM photovoltaic nanocomposites results in electron beam damage, which is the most important factor limiting acquisition of structural or chemical data at high spatial resolution. Beam effects can vary depending on parameters such as electron dose rate, temperature during imaging, and the presence of water and oxygen in the sample. Furthermore, beam damage will occur at different length s...

  8. X-ray microtomography of damage in particle-reinforced metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mummery, P.M.; Derby, B.; Anderson, P.; Davis, G.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The damage which occurs on plastic straining of silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminium alloys has been characterised using x-ray microtomography. The technique is used to provide density measurements as a function of strain in addition to imaging the internal structure with a resolution of ∼15μm. This allows a much more accurate determination of microstructural damage in terms of void growth than is available from measurements of density using buoyancy methods or from elastic modulus decrease. These data can be combined with acoustic emission measurements during straining to allow damage nucleation and growth contributions to be separated. (orig.)

  9. Coherent imaging at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, H N; Bajt, S; Duesterer, S; Treusch, R; Barty, A; Benner, W H; Bogan, M J; Frank, M; Hau-Riege, S P; Woods, B W; Boutet, S; Cavalleri, A; Hajdu, J; Iwan, B; Seibert, M M; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Sakdinawat, A; Sokolowski-Tinten, K

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out high-resolution single-pulse coherent diffractive imaging at the FLASH free-electron laser. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. In particular we are developing imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits, developing imaging of ultrafast processes, and testing methods to characterize and perform single-particle imaging.

  10. Belgium's burning coal tips. Coupling thermographic ASTER imagery with topography to map debris slide susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyssen, Jan; Diependaele, Stijn; Goossens, Rudi [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Geography

    2012-03-15

    Burning coal tips and the debris slides induced by this combustion are a potential danger for local residents and visitors, and a method is required to identify areas of susceptibility. The relatively easy circulation of air, enhanced by the poor compaction of the spoil heaps, and the exothermic reaction of pyrite with oxygen may ignite coal tips. Rainwater infiltration and subsequent evaporation inside burning coal tips may create steam pressure, which, combined with humidity and slope steepness can then trigger landsliding. Based on mapping of debris slides and susceptibility factors such as burning (represented by positive surface temperature anomalies on thermographic imagery) and slope gradient, this study aims to define thresholds for debris slide susceptibility on coal tips and to map potential debris slide source areas on spoil heaps. The Belgian coal tips were used as study area. A DTM as well as ASTER Kinetic Surface Temperature products were used to measure slope gradients and temperature anomaly. Locations with typical characteristics of combustion (heat, red soil colour, steam and gases), and debris slides were recorded in the field, and were used to identify thresholds beyond which debris sliding is generally observed: a temperature anomaly of > 0.5 K, when comparing the debris slide areas to the average temperature of the coal tip, and a slope gradient {>=} 28 . The susceptibility zones for debris slide detachment were mapped by considering the imagery pixels that exceeded the thresholds for temperature and slope gradient; the results fitted well when compared with the observed debris slides. The method can be improved by using more coal tips for calibration, and by taking into account rain depth and slope aspect. (orig.)

  11. Objective evaluation for venous leg ulcer-related nociceptive pain using thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto T

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Taichi Goto,1 Ayumi Naito,1,2 Nao Tamai,1 Gojiro Nakagami,1 Makoto Mo,3 Hiromi Sanada1 1Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Fujisawa City Hospital, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan Purpose: We aimed to identify distinguishing characteristics in thermographic images of venous leg ulcer (VLU, for objective evaluation of VLU-related nociceptive pain. Patients and methods: Secondary analysis was performed, using existing data obtained from April to November 2010, for patients with VLU. Thermographic images of wounds and their surrounding area were classified according to the periwound temperature pattern as "normal temperature" or "high temperature". These results were compared with the self-reported pain intensity assessed by the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. Cohen's kappa coefficients were used to evaluate the interrater reliability for temperature assessment, and Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare pain intensities between the two groups. Results: Among 39 thermographic examinations in eight patients, 22 were classified into the high-temperature group and 17 into the normal-temperature group. Kappa coefficients for the temperature classification were 0.90 between the wound, ostomy, and continence nurse and a wound care specialist, and 0.90 between the wound, ostomy, and continence nurse and a graduate student. The pain rating index (Z=−2.981, P=0.003, sensory pain (Z=−3.083, P=0.002, affective pain (Z=−2.764, P=0.006, and present pain intensity (Z=−2.639, P=0.006 ratings were significantly higher in the high-temperature group than in the normal-temperature group, but the visual analog scale (Z=−0.632, P=0.527 was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: Thermographic pattern may reflect VLU

  12. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080–53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. (author)

  13. Thermographic venous blood flow characterization with external cooling stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ashish; Ng, E. Y. K.; Raman, Vignesh

    2018-05-01

    Experimental characterization of blood flow in a human forearm is done with the application of continuous external cooling based active thermography method. Qualitative and quantitative detection of the blood vessel in a thermal image is done, along with the evaluation of blood vessel diameter, blood flow direction, and velocity in the target blood vessel. Subtraction based image manipulation is performed to enhance the feature contrast of the thermal image acquired after the removal of external cooling. To demonstrate the effect of occlusion diseases (obstruction), an external cuff based occlusion is applied after the removal of cooling and its effect on the skin rewarming is studied. Using external cooling, a transit time method based blood flow velocity estimation is done. From the results obtained, it is evident that an external cooling based active thermography method can be used to develop a diagnosis tool for superficial blood vessel diseases.

  14. Algorithm for repairing the damaged images of grain structures obtained from the cellular automata and measurement of grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-López, A.; Romero-Romo, M. A.; Muñoz-Negron, D.; López-Ramírez, S.; Escarela-Pérez, R.; Duran-Valencia, C.

    2012-10-01

    Computational models are developed to create grain structures using mathematical algorithms based on the chaos theory such as cellular automaton, geometrical models, fractals, and stochastic methods. Because of the chaotic nature of grain structures, some of the most popular routines are based on the Monte Carlo method, statistical distributions, and random walk methods, which can be easily programmed and included in nested loops. Nevertheless, grain structures are not well defined as the results of computational errors and numerical inconsistencies on mathematical methods. Due to the finite definition of numbers or the numerical restrictions during the simulation of solidification, damaged images appear on the screen. These images must be repaired to obtain a good measurement of grain geometrical properties. Some mathematical algorithms were developed to repair, measure, and characterize grain structures obtained from cellular automata in the present work. An appropriate measurement of grain size and the corrected identification of interfaces and length are very important topics in materials science because they are the representation and validation of mathematical models with real samples. As a result, the developed algorithms are tested and proved to be appropriate and efficient to eliminate the errors and characterize the grain structures.

  15. Numerical simulations for impact damage detection in composites using vibrothermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieczonka, L J; Uhl, T; Szwedo, M; Staszewski, W J; Aymerich, F

    2010-01-01

    Composite materials are widely used in many engineering applications due to their high strength-to-weight ratios. However, it is well known that composites are susceptible to impact damage. Detection of impact damage is an important issue in maintenance of composite structures. Various non-destructive image-based techniques have been developed for damage detection in composite materials. These include vibrothermography that detects surface temperature changes due to heating associated with frictional energy dissipation by damage. In the present paper numerical simulations are used to investigate heat generation in a composite plate with impact damage in order to support damage detection analysis with vibrothermography. Explicit finite elements are used to model ultrasonic wave propagation in the damaged plate. Simulated delamination and cracks induce frictional heating in the plate. Coupled thermo-mechanical simulations are performed in high frequencies using commercial LS-Dyna finite element code. Very good qualitative agreement between measurements and simulations has been obtained. The area of increased temperature corresponds very well with the damaged area in both experiments and simulations. Numerical model has to be further refined in order to quantitatively match the experiments. The main issues of concern are frictional and thermal properties of composites. The final goal of these research efforts is to predict damage detection sensitivity of vibrothermography in real engineering applications based on numerical models.

  16. Image inpainting based on stacked autoencoders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, O; Batishcheva, V

    2014-01-01

    Recently we have proposed the algorithm for the problem of image inpaiting (filling in occluded or damaged parts of images). This algorithm was based on the criterion spectrum entropy and showed promising results despite of using hand-crafted representation of images. In this paper, we present a method for solving image inpaiting task based on learning some image representation. Some results are shown to illustrate quality of image reconstruction.

  17. Epilepsy in multiple sclerosis: The role of temporal lobe damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, M; Castellaro, M; Bertoldo, A; De Luca, A; Pizzini, F B; Ricciardi, G K; Pitteri, M; Zimatore, S; Magliozzi, R; Benedetti, M D; Manganotti, P; Montemezzi, S; Reynolds, R; Gajofatto, A; Monaco, S

    2017-03-01

    Although temporal lobe pathology may explain some of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS), its role in the pathogenesis of seizures has not been clarified yet. To investigate the role of temporal lobe damage in MS patients suffering from epilepsy, by the application of advanced multimodal 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis. A total of 23 relapsing remitting MS patients who had epileptic seizures (RRMS/E) and 23 disease duration matched RRMS patients without any history of seizures were enrolled. Each patient underwent advanced 3T MRI protocol specifically conceived to evaluate grey matter (GM) damage. This includes grey matter lesions (GMLs) identification, evaluation of regional cortical thickness and indices derived from the Neurite Orientation Dispersion and Density Imaging model. Regional analysis revealed that in RRMS/E, the regions most affected by GMLs were the hippocampus (14.2%), the lateral temporal lobe (13.5%), the cingulate (10.0%) and the insula (8.4%). Cortical thinning and alteration of diffusion metrics were observed in several regions of temporal lobe, in insular cortex and in cingulate gyrus of RRMS/E compared to RRMS ( ptemporal lobe, which exceeds what would be expected on the basis of the global GM damage observed.

  18. Assessing Hurricane Katrina Vegetation Damage at Stennis Space Center using IKONOS Image Classification Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruce, Joseph P.; Ross, Kenton W.; Graham, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina hit southwestern Mississippi on August 29, 2005, at 9:45 a.m. CDT as a category 3 storm with surges up to approx. 9 m and sustained winds of approx. 120 mph. The hurricane's wind, rain, and flooding devastated several coastal towns, from New Orleans through Mobile. The storm also caused significant damage to infrastructure and vegetation of NASA's SSC (Stennis Space Center). Storm recovery at SSC involved not only repairs of critical infrastructure but also forest damage mitigation (via timber harvests and control burns to reduce fire risk). This presentation discusses an effort to use commercially available high spatial resolution multispectral IKONOS data for vegetation damage assessment, based on data collected over SSC on September 2, 2005.

  19. Thermographic analysis of the effect of composite type, layering method, and curing light on the temperature rise of photo-cured composites in tooth cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Ryan Jin-Young; Ferracane, Jack; Lee, In-Bog

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate temperature rise in the composite and dentin of a class I cavity in extracted human molars under different restoration conditions, including the use of different composite types, layering methods, and curing lights. Open occlusal cavities were prepared on 28 extracted human molars. A conventional (Filtek Z250) and a bulk-fill (Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior; BFP) composite were used to restore the preparations. BFP was incrementally layered or bulk-filled. Bulk-filled BFP was cured with two different lights, the Elipar S10 and the BeLite. Each layer was illuminated for 20s, while thermograms of the specimens were recorded for 100s using an infrared thermal camera. Temperature changes on the composite and dentin surfaces were obtained at points of interest (POI) pertaining to successive incremental distances of 0.75mm from the top of the cavity to the pulp. The polymerization kinetics of each composite was determined using photo-differential scanning calorimetry. The greatest temperature rise was observed 0.75mm apical from the top of the cavity. All groups showed over 6°C maximum temperature rise (ΔT max ) at the pulpal side of the dentin. Upon curing, Z250 reached ΔT=5°C faster than BFP; however, ΔT max of the two composites were comparable at any POI. Bulk filling showed greater ΔT max than incremental filling at 0.75mm apical from the top and in the middle of the cavity. The Elipar S10 light generated faster temperature changes in the curing composite at all recorded positions throughout the depth of the cavity and greater ΔT max in all POIs compared to BeLite. Real-time thermographic analysis demonstrated that the composite type and layering method did not influence the temperature rise at the pulpal side of dentin during composite restoration of an occlusal preparation in a tooth. The amount and initial rate of temperature increase was most affected by the radiant exposure of the light curing unit. Within the

  20. Damage detection and isolation via autocorrelation: a step toward passive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2018-03-01

    Passive sensing technique may eliminate the need of expending power from actuators and thus provide a means of developing a compact and simple structural health monitoring system. More importantly, it may provide a solution for monitoring the aircraft subjected to environmental loading from air flow during operation. In this paper, a non-contact auto-correlation based technique is exploited as a feasibility study for passive sensing application to detect damage and isolate the damage location. Its theoretical basis bears some resemblance to reconstructing Green's function from diffusive wavefield through cross-correlation. Localized high pressure air from air compressor are randomly and continuously applied on the one side surface of the aluminum panels through the air blow gun. A laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used to scan a 90 mm × 90 mm area to create a 6 × 6 2D-array signals from the opposite side of the panels. The scanned signals were auto-correlated to reconstruct a "selfimpulse response" (or Green's function). The premise for stably reconstructing the accurate Green's function requires long sensing times. For a 609.6 mm × 609.6 mm flat aluminum panel, the sensing times roughly at least four seconds is sufficient to establish converged Green's function through correlation. For the integral stiffened aluminum panel, the geometrical features of the panel expedite the formation of the diffusive wavefield and thus shorten the sensing times. The damage is simulated by gluing a magnet onto the panels. Reconstructed Green's functions (RGFs) are used for damage detection and damage isolation based on an imaging condition with mean square deviation of the RGFs from the pristine and the damaged structure and the results are shown in color maps. The auto-correlation based technique is shown to consistently detect the simulated damage, image and isolate the damage in the structure subjected to high pressure air excitation. This technique may be transformed into

  1. Laser injury and in vivo multimodal imaging using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Ginger M.; Boretsky, Adam; Gupta, Praveena; Oliver, Jeff W.; Motamedi, Massoud

    2011-03-01

    Balb/c wild type mice were used to perform in vivo experiments of laser-induced thermal damage to the retina. A Heidelberg Spectralis HRA confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope with a spectral domain optical coherence tomographer was used to obtain fundus and cross-sectional images of laser induced injury in the retina. Sub-threshold, threshold, and supra-threshold lesions were observed using optical coherence tomography (OCT), infrared reflectance, red-free reflectance, fluorescence angiography, and autofluorescence imaging modalities at different time points post-exposure. Lesions observed using all imaging modalities, except autofluorescence, were not visible immediately after exposure but did resolve within an hour and grew in size over a 24 hour period. There was a decrease in fundus autofluorescence at exposure sites immediately following exposure that developed into hyper-fluorescence 24-48 hours later. OCT images revealed threshold damage that was localized to the RPE but extended into the neural retina over a 24 hour period. Volumetric representations of the mouse retina were created to visualize the extent of damage within the retina over a 24 hour period. Multimodal imaging provides complementary information regarding damage mechanisms that may be used to quantify the extent of the damage as well as the effectiveness of treatments without need for histology.

  2. MR imaging of posttraumatic spinal ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathria, M.N.; Emery, S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Wilber, R.G.; Bohlman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of MR imaging in the detection of ligamentous injury was evaluated in 29 patients (24 male, five female) with spinal injury resulting in fractures (n=27), evidence of instability (n=11), or neurologic deficit (n=2). MR examinations were performed acutely (average, 7.5 days posttrauma) with T1- and T2-weighted imaging and were blindly evaluated. Subsequently, plain films (n=27), tomograms (n=10), and CT scans (n=22) were evaluated. Eighteen patients underwent surgery. Fourteen patients had torn ligaments as indicated by clinical and surgical findings. MR imaging demonstrated ligament damage in 13. One case imaged 40 days following trauma was not detected. No patients with intact ligaments had evidence of ligamentous damage on MR images. MR imaging demonstrated retropulsed fractures in six patients in whom the posterior longitudinal ligament was intact but displaced from the vertebra. MR imaging was more reliable than radiography and CT for detection of ligamentous injury, and T2- weighted sequences are essential in such cases

  3. In-vivo optical imaging of hsp70 expression to assess collateral tissue damage associated with infrared laser ablation of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmink, Gerald J.; Opalenik, Susan R.; Beckham, Joshua T.; Mackanos, Mark A.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Contag, Christopher H.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Jansen, E. Duco

    2013-01-01

    Laser surgical ablation is achieved by selecting laser parameters that remove confined volumes of target tissue and cause minimal collateral damage. Previous studies have measured the effects of wavelength on ablation, but neglected to measure the cellular impact of ablation on cells outside the lethal zone. In this study, we use optical imaging in addition to conventional assessment techniques to evaluate lethal and sublethal collateral damage after ablative surgery with a free-electron laser (FEL). Heat shock protein (HSP) expression is used as a sensitive quantitative marker of sublethal damage in a transgenic mouse strain, with the hsp70 promoter driving luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression (hsp70A1-L2G). To examine the wavelength dependence in the mid-IR, laser surgery is conducted on the hsp70A1-L2G mouse using wavelengths targeting water (OH stretch mode, 2.94 μm), protein (amide-II band, 6.45 μm), and both water and protein (amide-I band, 6.10 μm). For all wavelengths tested, the magnitude of hsp70 expression is dose-dependent and maximal 5 to 12 h after surgery. Tissues treated at 6.45 μm have approximately 4× higher hsp70 expression than 6.10 μm. Histology shows that under comparable fluences, tissue injury at the 2.94-μm wavelength was 2× and 3× deeper than 6.45 and 6.10 μm, respectively. The 6.10-μm wavelength generates the least amount of epidermal hyperplasia. Taken together, this data suggests that the 6.10-μm wavelength is a superior wavelength for laser ablation of skin. PMID:19021444

  4. Early-state damage detection, characterization, and evolution using high-resolution computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Robert John

    Safely using materials in high performance applications requires adequately understanding the mechanisms which control the nucleation and evolution of damage. Most of a material's operational life is spent in a state with noncritical damage, and, for example in metals only a small portion of its life falls within the classical Paris Law regime of crack growth. Developing proper structural health and prognosis models requires understanding the behavior of damage in these early stages within the material's life, and this early-stage damage occurs on length scales at which the material may be considered "granular'' in the sense that the discrete regions which comprise the whole are large enough to require special consideration. Material performance depends upon the characteristics of the granules themselves as well as the interfaces between granules. As a result, properly studying early-stage damage in complex, granular materials requires a means to characterize changes in the granules and interfaces. The granular-scale can range from tenths of microns in ceramics, to single microns in fiber-reinforced composites, to tens of millimeters in concrete. The difficulty of direct-study is often overcome by exhaustive testing of macro-scale damage caused by gross material loads and abuse. Such testing, for example optical or electron microscopy, destructive and further, is costly when used to study the evolution of damage within a material and often limits the study to a few snapshots. New developments in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) provide the necessary spatial resolution to directly image the granule length-scale of many materials. Successful application of HRCT with fiber-reinforced composites, however, requires extending the HRCT performance beyond current limits. This dissertation will discuss improvements made in the field of CT reconstruction which enable resolutions to be pushed to the point of being able to image the fiber-scale damage structures and

  5. Issues in bridge deck damage evaluation using aerial photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, M.; Chen, S. E.; Boyle, C.; Martin, E.; Hauser, E.

    2012-04-01

    Small format aerial photography (SFAP) with low flying technique is proposed for damage evaluation of bridge decks. High resolution images obtained using under-belly photography can be used to quantify the various bridge deck problems. The conventional truck-mount or vehicle-mount deck imaging technologies require a large number of image samples. Hence the physical scanning is time consuming and it is also challenging consider the size and location of a bridge. Aerial imaging overcomes these issues, but they face different kinds of challenges that are posed by obstacles such as shadow from trees, power lines and vehicles, signs and luminaries structures. The image resolution uncertainty, which is a function of the pilot skills and flying conditions, may also add additional challenges to aerial imaging technique. Hence different image processing tools have to be integrated into a single package to achieve the desired task. This paper summarizes the challenges faced and the preliminary results are presented and discussed.

  6. Detection of Damage in Operating Wind Turbines by Signature Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Manwell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines operate in the atmospheric boundary layer and are subject to complex random loading. This precludes using a deterministic response of healthy turbines as the baseline for identifying the effect of damage on the measured response of operating turbines. In the absence of such a deterministic response, the stochastic dynamic response of the tower to a shutdown maneuver is found to be affected distinctively by damage in contrast to wind. Such a dynamic response, however, cannot be established for the blades. As an alternative, the estimate of blade damage is sought through its effect on the third or fourth modal frequency, each found to be mostly unaffected by wind. To discern the effect of damage from the wind effect on these responses, a unified method of damage detection is introduced that accommodates different responses. In this method, the dynamic responses are transformed to surfaces via continuous wavelet transforms to accentuate the effect of wind or damage on the dynamic response. Regions of significant deviations between these surfaces are then isolated in their corresponding planes to capture the change signatures. The image distances between these change signatures are shown to produce consistent estimates of damage for both the tower and the blades in presence of varying wind field profiles.

  7. Structurally integrated fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measures, R M; Glossop, N D; Lymer, J; Leblanc, M; West, J; Dubois, S; Tsaw, W; Tennyson, R C

    1989-07-01

    Progress toward the development of a fiber optic damage assessment system for composite materials is reported. This system, based on the fracture of embedded optical fibers, has been characterized with respect to the orientation and location of the optical fibers in the composite. Together with a special treatment, these parameters have been tailored to yield a system capable of detecting the threshold of damage for various impacted Kevlar/epoxy panels. The technique has been extended to measure the growth of a damage region which could arise from either impact, manufacturing flaws, or static overloading. The mechanism of optical fiber fracture has also been investigated. In addition, the influence of embedded optical fibers on the tensile and compressive strength of the composite material has been studied. Image enhanced backlighting has been shown to be a powerful and convenient method of assessing internal damage to translucent composite materials.

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging depicting damage to the arcuate fasciculus in patients with conduction aphasia: a study of the Wernicke-Geschwind model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Chunxue; Zhao, Xingquan; Chen, Hongyan; Han, Zaizhu; Wang, Yongjun

    2010-09-01

    In contrast with disorders of comprehension and spontaneous expression, conduction aphasia is characterized by poor repetition, which is a hallmark of the syndrome. There are many theories on the repetition impairment of conduction aphasia. The disconnection theory suggests that a damaged in the arcuate fasciculus, which connects Broca's and Wernicke's area, is the cause of conduction aphasia. In this study, we examined the disconnection theory. We enrolled ten individuals with conduction aphasia and ten volunteers, and analysed their arcuate fasciculus using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and obtained fractional anisotropy (FA) values. Then, the results of the left hemisphere were compared with those of the right hemisphere, and the results of the conduction aphasia cases were compared with those of the volunteers. There were significant differences in the FA values between the left and right hemispheres of volunteers and conduction cases. In volunteers, there was an increase in fiber in the left hemisphere compared with the right hemisphere, whereas there was an increase in fiber in the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere in conduction aphasia patients. The results of diffusion tensor tractography suggested that the configuration of the arcuate fasciculus was different between conduction aphasia patients and volunteers, suggesting that there was damage to the arcuate fasciculus of conduction aphasia cases. The damage seen in the arcuate fasciculus of conduction aphasia cases in this study supports the Wernicke-Geschwind disconnection theory. A disconnection between Broca's area and Wernicke's area is likely to be one mechanism of conduction aphasia repetition impairment.

  9. Cerebellar Damage Produces Selective Deficits in Verbal Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravizza, Susan M.; Mccormick, Cristin A.; Schlerf, John E.; Justus, Timothy; Ivry, Richard B.; Fiez, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    The cerebellum is often active in imaging studies of verbal working memory, consistent with a putative role in articulatory rehearsal. While patients with cerebellar damage occasionally exhibit a mild impairment on standard neuropsychological tests of working memory, these tests are not diagnostic for exploring these processes in detail. The…

  10. A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines withX-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, ChristoperJ.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2007-01-19

    In this study, we investigated {gamma}H2AX{sup ser139} and 53BP1{sup ser25}, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infinite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a finite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50 cGy X-rays, fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37 C, and processed through immunofluorescence. Cells were visualized with a fluorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. We will expand the dose and time course in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is 'normal' and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  11. Damage analysis: damage function development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, R.L.; Odette, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The derivation and application of damage functions, including recent developments for the U.S. LMFBR and CTR programs, is reviewed. A primary application of damage functions is in predicting component life expectancies; i.e., the fluence required in a service spectrum to attain a specified design property change. An important part of the analysis is the estimation of the uncertainty in such fluence limit predictions. The status of standardizing the procedures for the derivation and application of damage functions is discussed. Improvements in several areas of damage function development are needed before standardization can be completed. These include increasing the quantity and quality of the data used in the analysis, determining the limitations of the analysis due to the presence of multiple damage mechanisms, and finally, testing of damage function predictions against data obtained from material surveillance programs in operating thermal and fast reactors. 23 references. (auth)

  12. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  13. Impact damage in aircraft composite sandwich panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordasky, Matthew D.

    An experimental study was conducted to develop an improved understanding of the damage caused by runway debris and environmental threats on aircraft structures. The velocities of impacts for stationary aircraft and aircraft under landing and takeoff speeds was investigated. The impact damage by concrete, asphalt, aluminum, hail and rubber sphere projectiles was explored in detail. Additionally, a kinetic energy and momentum experimental study was performed to look at the nature of the impacts in more detail. A method for recording the contact force history of the impact by an instrumented projectile was developed and tested. The sandwich composite investigated was an IM7-8552 unidirectional prepreg adhered to a NOMEXRTM core with an FM300K film adhesive. Impact experiments were conducted with a gas gun built in-house specifically for delivering projectiles to a sandwich composite target in this specic velocity regime (10--140 m/s). The effect on the impact damage by the projectile was investigated by ultrasonic C-scan, high speed camera and scanning electron and optical microscopy. Ultrasonic C-scans revealed the full extent of damage caused by each projectile, while the high speed camera enabled precise projectile velocity measurements that were used for striking velocity, kinetic energy and momentum analyses. Scanning electron and optical images revealed specific features of the panel failure and manufacturing artifacts within the lamina and honeycomb core. The damage of the panels by different projectiles was found to have a similar damage area for equivalent energy levels, except for rubber which had a damage area that increased greatly with striking velocity. Further investigation was taken by kinetic energy and momentum based comparisons of 19 mm diameter stainless steel sphere projectiles in order to examine the dominating damage mechanisms. The sandwich targets were struck by acrylic, aluminum, alumina, stainless steel and tungsten carbide spheres of the

  14. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Summary of OMERACT 6 MR Imaging Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J

    2003-01-01

    correlates closely with histological evidence and work continues on validating MR erosions with reference to radiographic techniques. The RAMRIS has demonstrated good reliability for bone erosion and synovitis at the wrists and metacarpophalangeal joints subject to reader training, with slightly lower levels......Magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning is a new method for imaging and quantifying joint inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over the past 4 years, the OMERACT MR Imaging Group has been developing and testing the RA-MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) for use in RA. The OMERACT filter...... and scoring, as well as cost and safety issues. The OMERACT RAMRIS provides a framework for scoring inflammation and damage in RA upon which further modifications can be built. It has been endorsed by the MRI working group and OMERACT 6 participants as useful for inclusion as an outcome measure in clinical...

  15. Nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) applied to damage assessment in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Marie; Sutin, Alexander; Guyer, Robert; Talmant, Maryline; Laugier, Pascal; Johnson, Paul A.

    2005-12-01

    Nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) is a resonance-based technique exploiting the significant nonlinear behavior of damaged materials. In NRUS, the resonant frequency(ies) of an object is studied as a function of the excitation level. As the excitation level increases, the elastic nonlinearity is manifest by a shift in the resonance frequency. This study shows the feasibility of this technique for application to damage assessment in bone. Two samples of bovine cortical bone were subjected to progressive damage induced by application of mechanical cycling. Before cycling commenced, and at each step in the cycling process, NRUS was applied for damage assessment. For independent assessment of damage, high-energy x-ray computed tomography imaging was performed but was only useful in identifying the prominent cracks. As the integral quantity of damage increased, NRUS revealed a corresponding increase in the nonlinear response. The measured change in nonlinear response is much more sensitive than the change in linear modulus. The results suggest that NRUS could be a potential tool for micro-damage assessment in bone. Further work must be carried out for a better understanding of the physical nature of damaged bone and for the ultimate goal of the challenging in vivo implementation of the technique.

  16. Which histological characteristics of basal cell carcinomas influence the quality of optical coherence tomography imaging?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, M.; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    We explore how histopathology parameters influence OCT imaging of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and address whether such parameters correlate with the quality of the recorded OCT images. Our results indicate that inflammation impairs OCT imaging and that sun-damaged skin can sometimes provide more ...... clear-cut images of skin cancer lesions using OCT imaging when compared to skin cancer surrounded by skin without sun-damage. ©2009 COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.......We explore how histopathology parameters influence OCT imaging of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and address whether such parameters correlate with the quality of the recorded OCT images. Our results indicate that inflammation impairs OCT imaging and that sun-damaged skin can sometimes provide more...

  17. Rapid quantitative evaluation of vascular damage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griem, M.L.; Kramp, D.; Hedge, K.; Dimitrievich, G.

    1987-01-01

    Using the rabbit ear chamber technique (Rad Res 99:511-535) mature vessels are imaged with a photo microscope and video images are digitized by a Quantex image processor. Each digitized image frame continuously updates a background image via exponential averaging. Simultaneously this background image is subtracted from each input frame to form the difference image. The absolute value of this image, in which significant motion artifacts remain, is summed by a second memory until the intensity of the vessel regions has saturated. High pass spacial filter, followed by a band pass look-up table defines vessels as white and non- vessel regions as black except for ''salt and pepper noises.'' Next, the image is read into computer memory which searches for segments of white pixels of satisfactory length. Then either a) the entire segment or b) the mid-point of the segment is ''color-set'' and displayed with the image after final correction a count of the number of set pixels is made. This count is proportional to either a) total vessel area viewed or b) total vessel length. This technique is then used to create histograms of vessel lengths. Intercomparison with the photographic technique is presented for graded doses of radiation, evaluating vascular damage

  18. MRI Overestimates Excitotoxic Amygdala Lesion Damage in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Basile

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selective, fiber-sparing excitotoxic lesions are a state-of-the-art tool for determining the causal contributions of different brain areas to behavior. For nonhuman primates especially, it is advantageous to keep subjects with high-quality lesions alive and contributing to science for many years. However, this requires the ability to estimate lesion extent accurately. Previous research has shown that in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI accurately estimates damage following selective ibotenic acid lesions of the hippocampus. Here, we show that the same does not apply to lesions of the amygdala. Across 19 hemispheres from 13 rhesus monkeys, MRI assessment consistently overestimated amygdala damage as assessed by microscopic examination of Nissl-stained histological material. Two outliers suggested a linear relation for lower damage levels, and values of unintended amygdala damage from a previous study fell directly on that regression line, demonstrating that T2 hypersignal accurately predicts damage levels below 50%. For unintended damage, MRI estimates correlated with histological assessment for entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex and hippocampus, though MRI significantly overestimated the extent of that damage in all structures. Nevertheless, ibotenic acid injections routinely produced extensive intentional amygdala damage with minimal unintended damage to surrounding structures, validating the general success of the technique. The field will benefit from more research into in vivo lesion assessment techniques, and additional evaluation of the accuracy of MRI assessment in different brain areas. For now, in vivo MRI assessment of ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala can be used to confirm successful injections, but MRI estimates of lesion extent should be interpreted with caution.

  19. Quantitative, Noninvasive Imaging of DNA Damage in Vivo of Prostate Cancer Therapy by Transurethral Photoacoustic (TUPA) Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging with an optimized spectro -spatial detector configuration: theory and simulation, IEEE Trans. Med. Imag., 99...with ultraviolet ( UV ) illumination, and wa- ter [13] and lipid [14] with near-infrared illumination. In fact, PAM can potentially image any molecule

  20. Photothermal imaging of skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Miyazaki, Jun; Kano, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2017-06-01

    The morphology and topology of mitochondria provide useful information about the physiological function of skeletal muscle. Previous studies of skeletal muscle mitochondria are based on observation with transmission, scanning electron microscopy or fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, photothermal (PT) microscopy has advantages over the above commonly used microscopic techniques because of no requirement for complex sample preparation by fixation or fluorescent-dye staining. Here, we employed the PT technique using a simple diode laser to visualize skeletal muscle mitochondria in unstained and stained tissues. The fine mitochondrial network structures in muscle fibers could be imaged with the PT imaging system, even in unstained tissues. PT imaging of tissues stained with toluidine blue revealed the structures of subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria and the swelling behavior of mitochondria in damaged muscle fibers with sufficient image quality. PT image analyses based on fast Fourier transform (FFT) and Grey-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) were performed to derive the characteristic size of mitochondria and to discriminate the image patterns of normal and damaged fibers.

  1. The use of the DInSAR method in the monitoring of road damage caused by mining activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdzek, Radosław; Malik, Hubert; Leśniak, Andrzej

    2018-04-01

    This paper reviews existing remote sensing methods of road damage detection and demonstrates the possibility of using DInSAR (Differential Interferometry SAR) method to identify endangered road sections. In this study two radar images collected by Sentinel-1 satellite have been used. Images were acquired with 24 days interval in 2015. The analysis allowed to estimate the scale of the post-mining deformation that occurred in Upper Silesia and to indicate areas where road infrastructure is particularly vulnerable to damage.

  2. Image recognition on raw and processed potato detection: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yan-nan; Lü, Cheng-xu; Zhang, Jun-ning; Li, Ya-shuo; Zeng, Zhen; Mao, Wen-hua; Jiang, Han-lu; Yang, Bing-nan

    2018-02-01

    Objective: Chinese potato staple food strategy clearly pointed out the need to improve potato processing, while the bottleneck of this strategy is technology and equipment of selection of appropriate raw and processed potato. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the advanced raw and processed potato detection methods. Method: According to consult research literatures in the field of image recognition based potato quality detection, including the shape, weight, mechanical damage, germination, greening, black heart, scab potato etc., the development and direction of this field were summarized in this paper. Result: In order to obtain whole potato surface information, the hardware was built by the synchronous of image sensor and conveyor belt to achieve multi-angle images of a single potato. Researches on image recognition of potato shape are popular and mature, including qualitative discrimination on abnormal and sound potato, and even round and oval potato, with the recognition accuracy of more than 83%. Weight is an important indicator for potato grading, and the image classification accuracy presents more than 93%. The image recognition of potato mechanical damage focuses on qualitative identification, with the main affecting factors of damage shape and damage time. The image recognition of potato germination usually uses potato surface image and edge germination point. Both of the qualitative and quantitative detection of green potato have been researched, currently scab and blackheart image recognition need to be operated using the stable detection environment or specific device. The image recognition of processed potato mainly focuses on potato chips, slices and fries, etc. Conclusion: image recognition as a food rapid detection tool have been widely researched on the area of raw and processed potato quality analyses, its technique and equipment have the potential for commercialization in short term, to meet to the strategy demand of development potato as

  3. Worldwide survey of damage from swallowing multiple magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Radiology Department 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2009-02-15

    It is increasingly recognized that in children swallowed multiple magnets cause considerable damage to the gastrointestinal tract. To emphasize that complications from swallowed magnets are extensive worldwide and throughout childhood. The author surveyed radiologists and researched cases of magnet swallowing in the literature and documented age and gender, numbers of magnets, nature of the magnets, reasons for swallowing, and clinical course. A total of 128 instances of magnet swallowing were identified, one fatal. Cases from 21 countries were found. Magnet swallowing occurred throughout childhood, with most children older than 3 years of age. Numbers of swallowed magnets ranged up to 100. Twelve children were known to be autistic. Many reasons were given for swallowing magnets, and a wide range of gastrointestinal damage was encountered. Considerable delay before seeking medical assistance was frequent, as was delay before obtaining radiographs or US imaging. Damage from swallowing multiple magnets is a considerable worldwide problem. More educational and preventative measures are needed. (orig.)

  4. Worldwide survey of damage from swallowing multiple magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that in children swallowed multiple magnets cause considerable damage to the gastrointestinal tract. To emphasize that complications from swallowed magnets are extensive worldwide and throughout childhood. The author surveyed radiologists and researched cases of magnet swallowing in the literature and documented age and gender, numbers of magnets, nature of the magnets, reasons for swallowing, and clinical course. A total of 128 instances of magnet swallowing were identified, one fatal. Cases from 21 countries were found. Magnet swallowing occurred throughout childhood, with most children older than 3 years of age. Numbers of swallowed magnets ranged up to 100. Twelve children were known to be autistic. Many reasons were given for swallowing magnets, and a wide range of gastrointestinal damage was encountered. Considerable delay before seeking medical assistance was frequent, as was delay before obtaining radiographs or US imaging. Damage from swallowing multiple magnets is a considerable worldwide problem. More educational and preventative measures are needed. (orig.)

  5. A survey of high explosive-induced damage and spall in selected metals using proton radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtkamp, D.B.; Clark, D.A.; Ferm, E.N.; Gallegos, R.A.; Hammon, D.; Hemsing, W.F.; Hogan, G.E.; Holmes, V.H.; King, N.S.P.; Lopez, R.P.; Merrill, F.E.; Morris, C.L.; Morley, K.B.; Murray, M.M.; Pazuchanics, P.D.; Prestridge, K.P.; Quintana, J.P.; Saunders, A.; Shinas, M.A.; Stacy, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Multiple spall and damage layers can be created in metal when the free surface reflects a Taylor wave generated by high explosives. These phenomena have been explored in different thicknesses of several metals (tantalum, copper, 6061 T6-aluminum, and tin) using high-energy proton radiography. Multiple images (up to 21) can be produced of the dynamic evolution of damaged material on the microsecond time scale with a <50 ns 'shutter' time. Movies and multiframe still images of areal and (Abel inverted) volume densities are presented. An example of material that is likely melted on release (tin) is also presented

  6. A multisensor approach for the 2016 Amatrice earthquake damage assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Romaniello

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes methodologies aimed at evaluating the damage occurred in the Amatrice town by using optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR change features obtained from satellite images. The objective is to achieve a damage map employing the satellite change features in a classifier algorithm, namely the Features Stepwise Thresholding (FST method. The main novelties of the proposed analysis concern the estimation of derived features at object scale and the exploitation of the unsupervised FST algorithm. A segmentation of the study area into several buildings blocks has been done by considering a set of polygons, over the Amatrice town, extracted from the open source Open Street Map (OSM geo-database. The available satellite dataset is composed of several optical and SAR images, collected before and after the seismic event. Regarding the optical data, we selected the Normalised Difference Index (NDI, and two quantities coming from the Information Theory, namely the Kullback-Libler Divergence (KLD and the Mutual Information (MI. In addition, for the SAR data we picked out the Intensity Correlation Difference (ICD and the KLD parameter. The exploitation of these features in the FST algorithm permits to obtain a plausible damage map that is able to indicate the most affected areas.

  7. Assessment of gamma ray-induced DNA damage in Lasioderma serricorne using the comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameya, Hiromi; Miyanoshita, Akihiro; Imamura, Taro; Todoriki, Setsuko

    2012-01-01

    We attempted a DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions to verify the irradiation treatment of pests. Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius) were chosen as test insects and irradiated with gamma rays from a 60 Co source at 1 kGy. We conducted the comet assay immediately after irradiation and over time for 7 day. Severe DNA fragmentation in L. serricorne cells was observed just after irradiation and the damage was repaired during the post-irradiation period in a time-dependent manner. The parameters of the comet image analysis were calculated, and the degree of DNA damage and repair were evaluated. Values for the Ratio (a percentage determined by fluorescence in the damaged area to overall luminance, including intact DNA and the damaged area of a comet image) of individual cells showed that no cells in the irradiated group were included in the Ratio<0.1 category, the lowest grade. This finding was observed consistently throughout the 7-day post-irradiation period. We suggest that the Ratio values of individual cells can be used as an index of irradiation history and conclude that the DNA comet assay under alkaline conditions, combined with comet image analysis, can be used to identify irradiation history. - Highlights: ► We investigated the DNA comet assay to verify the irradiation of pests. ► Ratio and Tail Moment were higher in irradiated groups than in the control group. ► The DNA comet assay can be used to identify irradiation history.

  8. Vibration-based damage detection in wind turbine blades using Phase-based Motion Estimation and motion magnification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafi, Aral; Mao, Zhu; Niezrecki, Christopher; Poozesh, Peyman

    2018-05-01

    Vibration-based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques are among the most common approaches for structural damage identification. The presence of damage in structures may be identified by monitoring the changes in dynamic behavior subject to external loading, and is typically performed by using experimental modal analysis (EMA) or operational modal analysis (OMA). These tools for SHM normally require a limited number of physically attached transducers (e.g. accelerometers) in order to record the response of the structure for further analysis. Signal conditioners, wires, wireless receivers and a data acquisition system (DAQ) are also typical components of traditional sensing systems used in vibration-based SHM. However, instrumentation of lightweight structures with contact sensors such as accelerometers may induce mass-loading effects, and for large-scale structures, the instrumentation is labor intensive and time consuming. Achieving high spatial measurement resolution for a large-scale structure is not always feasible while working with traditional contact sensors, and there is also the potential for a lack of reliability associated with fixed contact sensors in outliving the life-span of the host structure. Among the state-of-the-art non-contact measurements, digital video cameras are able to rapidly collect high-density spatial information from structures remotely. In this paper, the subtle motions from recorded video (i.e. a sequence of images) are extracted by means of Phase-based Motion Estimation (PME) and the extracted information is used to conduct damage identification on a 2.3-m long Skystream® wind turbine blade (WTB). The PME and phased-based motion magnification approach estimates the structural motion from the captured sequence of images for both a baseline and damaged test cases on a wind turbine blade. Operational deflection shapes of the test articles are also quantified and compared for the baseline and damaged states. In addition

  9. Classifying apples by the means of fluorescence imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Codrea, Marius C.; Nevalainen, Olli S.; Tyystjärvi, Esa; VAN DE VEN, Martin; VALCKE, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Classification of harvested apples when predicting their storage potential is an important task. This paper describes how chlorophyll a fluorescence images taken in blue light through a red filter, can be used to classify apples. In such an image, fluorescence appears as a relatively homogenous area broken by a number of small nonfluorescing spots, corresponding to normal corky tissue patches, lenticells, and to damaged areas that lower the quality of the apple. The damaged regions appear mor...

  10. Characterizing Hypervelocity Impact (HVI-Induced Pitting Damage Using Active Guided Ultrasonic Waves: From Linear to Nonlinear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impact (HVI, ubiquitous in low Earth orbit with an impacting velocity in excess of 1 km/s, poses an immense threat to the safety of orbiting spacecraft. Upon penetration of the outer shielding layer of a typical two-layer shielding system, the shattered projectile, together with the jetted materials of the outer shielding material, subsequently impinge the inner shielding layer, to which pitting damage is introduced. The pitting damage includes numerous craters and cracks disorderedly scattered over a wide region. Targeting the quantitative evaluation of this sort of damage (multitudinous damage within a singular inspection region, a characterization strategy, associating linear with nonlinear features of guided ultrasonic waves, is developed. Linear-wise, changes in the signal features in the time domain (e.g., time-of-flight and energy dissipation are extracted, for detecting gross damage whose characteristic dimensions are comparable to the wavelength of the probing wave; nonlinear-wise, changes in the signal features in the frequency domain (e.g., second harmonic generation, which are proven to be more sensitive than their linear counterparts to small-scale damage, are explored to characterize HVI-induced pitting damage scattered in the inner layer. A numerical simulation, supplemented with experimental validation, quantitatively reveals the accumulation of nonlinearity of the guided waves when the waves traverse the pitting damage, based on which linear and nonlinear damage indices are proposed. A path-based rapid imaging algorithm, in conjunction with the use of the developed linear and nonlinear indices, is developed, whereby the HVI-induced pitting damage is characterized in images in terms of the probability of occurrence.

  11. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A G; Bovens, S M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F L; de Borst, G J

    2011-02-01

    In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk.

  12. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A.G; Bovens, S.M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F.L; de Borst, G.J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. Study objective: The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. Design: We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. Discussion: We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:22294972

  13. Automatic recognition of damaged town buildings caused by earthquake using remote sensing information: Taking the 2001 Bhuj, India, earthquake and the 1976 Tangshan, China, earthquake as examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hang; Shan, Xin-Jian; Yin, Jing-Yuan

    2004-11-01

    In the high-resolution images, the undamaged buildings generally show a natural textural feature, while the damaged or semi-damaged buildings always exhibit some low-grayscale blocks because of their coarsely damaged sections. If we use a proper threshold to classify the grayscale of image, some independent holes will appear in the damaged regions. By using such statistical information as the number of holes in every region, or the ratio between the area of holes and that of the region, etc, the damaged buildings can be separated from the undamaged, thus automatic detection of damaged buildings can be realized. Based on these characteristics, a new method to automatically detect the damage buildings by using regional structure and statistical information of texture is presented in the paper. In order to test its validity, 1-m-resolution iKonos merged image of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake and grayscale aerial photos of the 1976 Tangshan earthquake are selected as two examples to automatically detect the damaged buildings. Satisfied results are obtained.

  14. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iezzi, F; Todisco, M T

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  15. Imaging of Phase Objects using Partially Coherent Illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravizza, F. L. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Screening high-power laser optics for light intensifying phase objects that cause laserinduced damage on downstream optics is critical to sustaining laser operation. Identifying such flaws on large-apertures is quite challenging since they are relatively small and invisible to conventional inspection methods. A Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI) system was developed to rapidly identify these flaws on large-aperture optics within a single full-aperture dark-field image. We describe a two-step production phase object screening process consisting of LPDI mapping and image analysis, followed by high-resolution interferometry and propagation based evaluation of the downstream damage potential of identified flaws. An image simulation code capable of modeling the LPDI partially coherent illumination was used to optimize its phase object sensitivity.

  16. Using GeoEye-1 Imagery for Multi-Temporal Object-Based Detection of Canegrub Damage in Sugarcane Fields in Queensland, Australia

    KAUST Repository

    Johansen, Kasper

    2017-12-18

    The greyback canegrub (Dermolepida albohirtum) is the main pest of sugarcane crops in all cane-growing regions between Mossman (16.5°S) and Sarina (21.5°S) in Queensland, Australia. In previous years, high infestations have cost the industry up to $40 million. However, identifying damage in the field is difficult due to the often impenetrable nature of the sugarcane crop. Satellite imagery offers a feasible means of achieving this by examining the visual characteristics of stool tipping, changed leaf color, and exposure of soil in damaged areas. The objective of this study was to use geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) and high-spatial resolution GeoEye-1 satellite imagery for three years to map canegrub damage and develop two mapping approaches suitable for risk mapping. The GEOBIA mapping approach for canegrub damage detection was evaluated over three selected study sites in Queensland, covering a total of 254 km2 and included five main steps developed in the eCognition Developer software. These included: (1) initial segmentation of sugarcane block boundaries; (2) classification and subsequent omission of fallow/harvested fields, tracks, and other non-sugarcane features within the block boundaries; (3) identification of likely canegrub-damaged areas with low NDVI values and high levels of image texture within each block; (4) the further refining of canegrub damaged areas to low, medium, and high likelihood; and (5) risk classification. The validation based on field observations of canegrub damage at the time of the satellite image capture yielded producer’s accuracies between 75% and 98.7%, depending on the study site. Error of commission occurred in some cases due to sprawling, drainage issues, wind, weed, and pig damage. The two developed risk mapping approaches were based on the results of the canegrub damage detection. This research will improve decision making by growers affected by canegrub damage.

  17. Application of Different HSI Color Models to Detect Fire-Damaged Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a better understanding of the effect of vehicle fires on rigid pavement, a nondestructive test method utilizing an ordinary digital camera to capture images of mortar at five elevated temperatures was undertaken. These images were then analyzed by “image color-intensity analyzer” software. In image analysis, the RGB color model was the basic system used to represent the color information of images. HSI is a derived-color model that is transformed from an RGB model by formulae. In order to understand more about surface color changes and temperatures after a vehicle fire, various transformation formulae used in different research areas were applied in this study. They were then evaluated to obtain the optimum HSI model for further studies of fire-damaged mortar through the use of image analysis.

  18. Carboxylated nanodiamonds inhibit γ-irradiation damage of human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K; Silva-Campa, E; Melendrez-Amavizca, R; Teran Arce, F; Mata-Haro, V; Landon, P B; Zhang, C; Pedroza-Montero, M; Lal, R

    2016-04-07

    Nanodiamonds when carboxylated (cNDs) act as reducing agents and hence could limit oxidative damage in biological systems. Gamma (γ)-irradiation of whole blood or its components is required in immunocompetent patients to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). However, γ-irradiation of blood also deoxygenates red blood cells (RBCs) and induces oxidative damage, including abnormalities in cellular membranes and hemolysis. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we examined the effect of cNDs on γ-irradiation mediated deoxygenation and morphological damage of RBCs. γ-Radiation induced several morphological phenotypes, including stomatocytes, codocytes and echinocytes. While stomatocytes and codocytes are reversibly damaged RBCs, echinocytes are irreversibly damaged. AFM images show significantly fewer echinocytes among cND-treated γ-irradiated RBCs. The Raman spectra of γ-irradiated RBCs had more oxygenated hemoglobin patterns when cND-treated, resembling those of normal, non-irradiated RBCs, compared to the non-cND-treated RBCs. cND inhibited hemoglobin deoxygenation and morphological damage, possibly by neutralizing the free radicals generated during γ-irradiation. Thus cNDs have the therapeutic potential to preserve the quality of stored blood following γ-irradiation.

  19. Applications of Earth Remote Sensing for Identifying Tornado and Severe Weather Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Lori; Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason E.; Bell, Jordan; McGrath, Kevin; Cole, Tony

    2016-01-01

    NASA SPoRT (Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center) provided MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) and ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) imagery to WFOs (Weather Forecast Offices) in Alabama to support April 27th, 2011 damage assessments across the state. SPoRT was awarded a NASA Applied Science: Disasters Feasibility award to investigate the applicability of including remote sensing imagery and derived products into the NOAA/NWS (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather System) Damage Assessment Toolkit (DAT). Proposal team was awarded the 3-year proposal to implement a web mapping service and associate data feeds from the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) to provide satellite imagery and derived products directly to the NWS thru the DAT. In the United States, NOAA/NWS is charged with performing damage assessments when storm or tornado damage is suspected after a severe weather event. This has led to the development of the Damage Assessment Toolkit (DAT), an application for smartphones, tablets and web browsers that allows for the collection, geo-location, and aggregation of various damage indicators collected during storm surveys.

  20. Quantitative Prediction of Power Loss for Damaged Photovoltaic Modules Using Electroluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Kropp

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electroluminescence (EL is a powerful tool for the qualitative mapping of the electronic properties of solar modules, where electronic and electrical defects are easily detected. However, a direct quantitative prediction of electrical module performance purely based on electroluminescence images has yet to be accomplished. Our novel approach, called “EL power prediction of modules” (ELMO as presented here, used just two electroluminescence images to predict the electrical loss of mechanically damaged modules when compared to their original (data sheet power. First, using this method, two EL images taken at different excitation currents were converted into locally resolved (relative series resistance images. From the known, total applied voltage to the module, we were then able to calculate absolute series resistance values and the real distribution of voltages and currents. Then, we reconstructed the complete current/voltage curve of the damaged module. We experimentally validated and confirmed the simulation model via the characterization of a commercially available photovoltaic module containing 60 multicrystalline silicon cells, which were mechanically damaged by hail. Deviation between the directly measured and predicted current/voltage curve was less than 4.3% at the maximum power point. For multiple modules of the same type, the level of error dropped below 1% by calibrating the simulation. We approximated the ideality factor from a module with a known current/voltage curve and then expand the application to modules of the same type. In addition to yielding series resistance mapping, our new ELMO method was also capable of yielding parallel resistance mapping. We analyzed the electrical properties of a commercially available module, containing 72 monocrystalline high-efficiency back contact solar cells, which suffered from potential induced degradation. For this module, we predicted electrical performance with an accuracy of better

  1. A COMPARISON OF DNA DAMAGE PROBES IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisnewski, C.L.; Bjornstad, K.A.; Rosen, C.J.; Chang, P.Y.; Blakely, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated γH2AXser139 and 53BP1ser25, DNA damage pathway markers, to observe responses to radiation insult. Two Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) lines were utilized to research the role of immortalization in DNA damage marker expression, HMEC HMT-3522 (S1) with an infi nite lifespan, and a subtype of HMEC 184 (184V) with a fi nite lifespan. Cells were irradiated with 50cGy X-rays, fi xed with 4% paraformaldehyde after 1 hour repair at 37°C, and processed through immunofl uorescence. Cells were visualized with a fl uorescent microscope and images were digitally captured using Image-Pro Plus software. The 184V irradiated cells exhibited a more positive punctate response within the nucleus for both DNA damage markers compared to the S1 irradiated cells. The dose and time course will be expanded in future studies to augment the preliminary data from this research. It is important to understand whether the process of transformation to immortalization compromises the DNA damage sensor and repair process proteins of HMECs in order to understand what is “normal” and to evaluate the usefulness of cell lines as experimental models.

  2. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hun; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not

  3. Damage detection in high-rise buildings using damage-induced rotations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Seung Hoon; Jung, Ho Youn; Lee, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyung Jo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new damage-detection method based on structural vibration is proposed. The essence of the proposed method is the detection of abrupt changes in rotation. Damage-induced rotation (DIR), which is determined from the modal flexibility of the structure, initially occurs only at a specific damaged location. Therefore, damage can be localized by evaluating abrupt changes in rotation. We conducted numerical simulations of two damage scenarios using a 10-story cantilever-type building model. Measurement noise was also considered in the simulation. We compared the sensitivity of the proposed method to localize damage to that of two conventional modal-flexibility-based damage-detection methods, i.e., uniform load surface (ULS) and ULS curvature. The proposed method was able to localize damage in both damage scenarios for cantilever structures, but the conventional methods could not.

  4. Micromechanics-based damage model for failure prediction in cold forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.Z.; Chan, L.C., E-mail: lc.chan@polyu.edu.hk

    2017-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a micromechanics-based damage (micro-damage) model that was concerned with the evolution of micro-voids for failure prediction in cold forming. Typical stainless steel SS316L was selected as the specimen material, and the nonlinear isotropic hardening rule was extended to describe the large deformation of the specimen undergoing cold forming. A micro-focus high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) system was employed to trace and measure the micro-voids inside the specimen directly. Three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) models with different sizes and spatial locations were reconstructed from the processed CT images of the specimen, and the average size and volume fraction of micro-voids (VFMV) for the specimen were determined via statistical analysis. Subsequently, the micro-damage model was compiled as a user-defined material subroutine into the finite element (FE) package ABAQUS. The stress-strain responses and damage evolutions of SS316L specimens under tensile and compressive deformations at different strain rates were predicted and further verified experimentally. It was concluded that the proposed micro-damage model is convincing for failure prediction in cold forming of the SS316L material.

  5. TH-E-BRF-04: Characterizing the Response of Texture-Based CT Image Features for Quantification of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, S; Court, L; Briere, T; Martel, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung damage (RILD) is an important dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with radiation therapy. Scoring systems for RILD are subjective and limit our ability to find robust predictors of toxicity. We investigate the dose and time-related response for texture-based lung CT image features that serve as potential quantitative measures of RILD. Methods: Pre- and post-RT diagnostic imaging studies were collected for retrospective analysis of 21 patients treated with photon or proton radiotherapy for NSCLC. Total lung and selected isodose contours (0–5, 5–15, 15–25Gy, etc.) were deformably registered from the treatment planning scan to the pre-RT and available follow-up CT studies for each patient. A CT image analysis framework was utilized to extract 3698 unique texture-based features (including co-occurrence and run length matrices) for each region of interest defined by the isodose contours and the total lung volume. Linear mixed models were fit to determine the relationship between feature change (relative to pre-RT), planned dose and time post-RT. Results: Seventy-three follow-up CT scans from 21 patients (median: 3 scans/patient) were analyzed to describe CT image feature change. At the p=0.05 level, dose affected feature change in 2706 (73.1%) of the available features. Similarly, time affected feature change in 408 (11.0%) of the available features. Both dose and time were significant predictors of feature change in a total of 231 (6.2%) of the extracted image features. Conclusion: Characterizing the dose and time-related response of a large number of texture-based CT image features is the first step toward identifying objective measures of lung toxicity necessary for assessment and prediction of RILD. There is evidence that numerous features are sensitive to both the radiation dose and time after RT. Beyond characterizing feature response, further investigation is warranted to determine the utility of these features as

  6. Modifications of alkaline microgel electrophoresis for sensitive detection of DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Stephens, R.E.; Schneider, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    The alkaline microgel electrophoresis technique was modified to achieve a substantial increase in sensitivity for the detection of radiation-induced DNA damage in human lymphocytes. This increased sensitivity was achieved through: (1) the addition of free radical scavengers to the electrophoresis solution to reduce DNA damage generated during alkaline unwinding and electrophoresis; (2) the modification of the electrophoresis unit to achieve a more uniform electric field; (3) the use of YOYO-1, a DNA dye, producing fluorescence 500-fold more intense than ethidium bromide; and (4) the introduction of an image analysis system for the quantitation of DNA migration. In human lymphocytes, these modifications have resulted in an increased sensitivity of several fold, allowing the detection of DNA damage in the range of 50 mGy. (author)

  7. Measurement of damage in systemic vasculitis: a comparison of the Vasculitis Damage Index with the Combined Damage Assessment Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppiah, Ravi; Flossman, Oliver; Mukhtyar, Chetan

    2011-01-01

    To compare the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) with the Combined Damage Assessment Index (CDA) as measures of damage from vasculitis.......To compare the Vasculitis Damage Index (VDI) with the Combined Damage Assessment Index (CDA) as measures of damage from vasculitis....

  8. Computer-assisted imaging algorithms facilitate histomorphometric quantification of kidney damage in rodent renal failure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Klapczynski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical 5/6 nephrectomy and adenine-induced kidney failure in rats are frequently used models of progressive renal failure. In both models, rats develop significant morphological changes in the kidneys and quantification of these changes can be used to measure the efficacy of prophylactic or therapeutic approaches. In this study, the Aperio Genie Pattern Recognition technology, along with the Positive Pixel Count, Nuclear and Rare Event algorithms were used to quantify histological changes in both rat renal failure models. Methods: Analysis was performed on digitized slides of whole kidney sagittal sections stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemistry with an anti-nestin antibody to identify glomeruli, regenerating tubular epithelium, and tubulointerstitial myofibroblasts. An anti-polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN antibody was also used to investigate neutrophil tissue infiltration. Results: Image analysis allowed for rapid and accurate quantification of relevant histopathologic changes such as increased cellularity and expansion of glomeruli, renal tubular dilatation, and degeneration, tissue inflammation, and mineral aggregation. The algorithms provided reliable and consistent results in both control and experimental groups and presented a quantifiable degree of damage associated with each model. Conclusion: These algorithms represent useful tools for the uniform and reproducible characterization of common histomorphologic features of renal injury in rats.

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... It’s also used to help guide biopsies, diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. ...

  10. Corticospinal tract damage in patients with severe diffuse axonal injury in a chronic stage on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and motor evoked potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasokawa, Yu-to; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Iwama, Toru; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the disturbed motor function of the corticospinal tract (CST) of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and motor evoked potential (MEP) examination, and to analyze these comparatively. Forty-three patients (86 sides of the CST) with severe DAI in a chronic stage underwent DTMR imaging and MEP examination using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Fractional anisotrophy (FA) values of 6 regions of interests (ROIs) in the CST were measured on FA map obtained from DTMR imaging. The lowest FA value among the FA values of the 6 ROIs in each of the CSTs was defined as the minimum FA value. And the lowest magnetic stimulation strength that could derive MEP was defined as the minimum threshold of MEP. The mean minimum FA value of the CSTs in which MEP could not be obtained even by the maximum strength of magnetic stimulation (the MEP (-) group) was significantly lower than that of the CSTs in which MEP could be obtained (the MEP (+) group). In the MEP (+) group, the minimum FA value decreased with the increase of the minimum threshold of MEP with a significant correlation. These results demonstrate that physiological motor dysfunction disclosed on MEP is significantly correlated with morphological damage of the CST observed on DTMR imaging in patients with DAI in a chronic stage. DTMR imaging is strongly suggested to be helpful to evaluate disturbed motor function and to infer its severity in DAI. (author)

  11. Experimental and analytical investigation on metal damage suffered from simulated lightning currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakun, LIU; Zhengcai, FU; Quanzhen, LIU; Baoquan, LIU; Anirban, GUHA

    2017-12-01

    The damage of two typical metal materials, Al alloy 3003 and steel alloy Q235B, subjected to four representative lightning current components are investigated by laboratory and analytical studies to provide fundamental data for lightning protection. The four lightning components simulating the natural lightning consist of the first return stroke, the continuing current of interval stroke, the long continuing current, and the subsequent stroke, with amplitudes 200 kA, 8 kA, 400 A, and 100 kA, respectively. The damage depth and area suffered from different lightning components are measured by the ultrasonic scanning system. And the temperature rise is measured by the thermal imaging camera. The results show that, for both Al 3003 and steel Q235B, the first return stroke component results in the largest damage area with damage depth 0.02 mm uttermost. The long continuing current component leads to the deepest damage depth of 3.3 mm for Al 3003 and much higher temperature rise than other components. The correlation analysis between damage results and lightning parameters indicates that the damage depth has a positive correlation with charge transfer. The damage area is mainly determined by the current amplitude and the temperature rise increases linearly with the charge transfer larger.

  12. The Extraction of Post-Earthquake Building Damage Informatiom Based on Convolutional Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Wang, X.; Dou, A.; Wu, X.

    2018-04-01

    The seismic damage information of buildings extracted from remote sensing (RS) imagery is meaningful for supporting relief and effective reduction of losses caused by earthquake. Both traditional pixel-based and object-oriented methods have some shortcoming in extracting information of object. Pixel-based method can't make fully use of contextual information of objects. Object-oriented method faces problem that segmentation of image is not ideal, and the choice of feature space is difficult. In this paper, a new stratage is proposed which combines Convolution Neural Network (CNN) with imagery segmentation to extract building damage information from remote sensing imagery. the key idea of this method includes two steps. First to use CNN to predicate the probability of each pixel and then integrate the probability within each segmentation spot. The method is tested through extracting the collapsed building and uncollapsed building from the aerial image which is acquired in Longtoushan Town after Ms 6.5 Ludian County, Yunnan Province earthquake. The results show that the proposed method indicates its effectiveness in extracting damage information of buildings after earthquake.

  13. Nondestructive Testing of Ceramic Hip Joint Implants with Laser Spot Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemer J.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an application of laser spot thermography for damage detection in ceramic samples with surface breaking cracks. The measurement technique is an active thermographic approach based on an external heat delivery to a test sample, by means of a laser pulse, and signal acquisition by an infrared camera. Damage detection is based on the analysis of surface temperature distribution near the exciting laser spot. The technique is nondestructive, non-contact and allows for full-field measurements. Surface breaking cracks are a very common type of damage in ceramic materials that are introduced in the manufacturing process or during the service period. This paper briefly discusses theoretical background of laser spot thermography, describes the experimental test rig and signal processing methods involved. Damage detection results obtained with laser spot thermography are compared with reference measurements obtained with vibrothermography. This is a different modality of active thermography, that has been previously proven effective for this type of damage. We demonstrate that both measurement techniques can be effectively used for damage detection and quality control applications of ceramic materials.

  14. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  15. Critical Evolution of Damage Toward System-Size Failure in Crystalline Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, François; Weiss, Jérôme; Mathiesen, Joachim; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Kandula, Neelima; Cordonnier, Benoît

    2018-02-01

    Rock failure under shear loading conditions controls earthquake and faulting phenomena. We study the dynamics of microscale damage precursory to shear faulting in a quartz-monzonite rock representative of crystalline rocks of the continental crust. Using a triaxial rig that is transparent to X-rays, we image the mechanical evolution of centimeter-size core samples by in situ synchrotron microtomography with a resolution of 6.5 μm. Time-lapse three-dimensional images of the samples inside the rig provide a unique data set of microstructural evolution toward faulting. Above a yield point there is a gradual weakening during which microfractures nucleate and grow until this damage span the whole sample. This leads to shear faults oriented about 30° to the main compressive stress in agreement with Anderson's theory and macroscopic failure. The microfractures can be extracted from the three-dimensional images, and their dynamics and morphology (i.e., number, volume, orientation, shape, and largest cluster) are quantified as a function of increasing stress toward failure. The experimental data show for the first time that the total volume of microfractures, the rate of damage growth, and the size of the largest microfracture all increase and diverge when approaching faulting. The average flatness of the microfractures (i.e., the ratio between the second and third eigenvalues of their covariance matrix) shows a significant decrease near failure. The precursors to faulting developing in the future faulting zone are controlled by the evolving microfracture population. Their divergent dynamics toward failure is reminiscent of a dynamical critical transition.

  16. Ex-situ time-lapse x-ray CT study of 3D micro-structural fatigue damage evolution in uni-directional composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Kristine Munk; Wang, Ying; Zangenberg Hansen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the progress of damage under tension-tension fatigue of a uni-directional (UD) glass fibre composite made from a non-crimp fabric is studied using transilluminated white light imaging (TWLI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). TWLI images are automatically captured throughout...... to initiate already after the first cycle, whereas some grow gradually and others appear suddenly during cycling. The off-axis cracks are observed to saturate after a few thousand cycles. The UD fibre fracture damage in the region observed by X-ray CT is probably already saturated at the first interruption...... point, as no significant change is seen between the two X-ray images. However, the study indicates how TWLI can be used as an initial indicator to locate damage regions at an early stage for the future ex-situ X-ray CT experiments....

  17. Dislocation dynamics modelling of radiation damage in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a key tool for the extraction of information on radiation damage, the understanding of which is critical for materials development for nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Dislocations in TEM samples are subject to strong image forces, owing to the nanometric sample thicknesses, which may introduce artifacts in the damage analysis. Using dislocation dynamics, we elucidate the roles played by dislocation–surface interactions, dislocation–dislocation interactions and self-interactions due to climb for loop types observed in TEM. Comparisons with analytic solutions for a dislocation loop and an edge dislocation in a half-space are included, and the relationship between glide force and loop tilt examined. The parameters for convergence of the zero-traction boundary conditions are obtained, after which the evolution of dislocation structures in a thin film is studied. It is found that three main length scales govern the physical processes: the image force is governed by the distance of the loop from the surface and scales with the film thickness; the glide force is governed by the image stress as well as the loop–loop interaction stress which is in turn governed by the loop spacing L∼1/√ρ, where ρ is the loop density; finally, the climb force depends on the loop size. The three forces compete and their relative magnitudes define the evolution pathway of the dislocation structure. (paper)

  18. Exploring cartilage damage in gout using 3-T MRI: distribution and associations with joint inflammation and tophus deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, I.; Dalbeth, N.; Doyle, A.; Reeves, Q.; McQueen, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Few imaging studies have investigated cartilage in gout. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image cartilage damage and also reveals other features of gouty arthropathy. The objective was to develop and validate a system for quantifying cartilage damage in gout. 3-T MRI scans of the wrist were obtained in 40 gout patients. MRI cartilage damage was quantified using an adaptation of the radiographic Sharp van der Heijde score. Two readers scored cartilage loss at 7 wrist joints: 0 (normal), 1 (partial narrowing), 2 (complete narrowing) and concomitant osteoarthritis was recorded. Bone erosion, bone oedema and synovitis were scored (RAMRIS) and tophi were assessed. Correlations between radiographic and MRI cartilage scores were investigated, as was the reliability of the MRI cartilage score and its associations. The GOut MRI Cartilage Score (GOMRICS) was highly correlated with the total Sharp van der Heijde (SvdH) score and the joint space narrowing component (R = 0.8 and 0.71 respectively, p < 0.001). Reliability was high (intraobserver, interobserver ICCs = 0.87 [0.57-0.97], 0.64 [0.41-0.79] respectively), and improved on unenhanced scans; interobserver ICC = 0.82 [0.49-0.95]. Cartilage damage was predominantly focal (82 % of lesions) and identified in 40 out of 280 (14 %) of joints. Cartilage scores correlated with bone erosion (R = 0.57), tophus size (R = 0.52), and synovitis (R = 0.55), but not bone oedema scores. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to investigate cartilage in gout. Cartilage damage was relatively uncommon, focal, and associated with bone erosions, tophi and synovitis, but not bone oedema. This emphasises the unique pathophysiology of gout. (orig.)

  19. Exploring cartilage damage in gout using 3-T MRI: distribution and associations with joint inflammation and tophus deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, I. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Dalbeth, N. [University of Auckland, Department of Medicine, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand); Doyle, A.; Reeves, Q. [Auckland District Health Board, Department of Radiology, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, F.M. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Few imaging studies have investigated cartilage in gout. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image cartilage damage and also reveals other features of gouty arthropathy. The objective was to develop and validate a system for quantifying cartilage damage in gout. 3-T MRI scans of the wrist were obtained in 40 gout patients. MRI cartilage damage was quantified using an adaptation of the radiographic Sharp van der Heijde score. Two readers scored cartilage loss at 7 wrist joints: 0 (normal), 1 (partial narrowing), 2 (complete narrowing) and concomitant osteoarthritis was recorded. Bone erosion, bone oedema and synovitis were scored (RAMRIS) and tophi were assessed. Correlations between radiographic and MRI cartilage scores were investigated, as was the reliability of the MRI cartilage score and its associations. The GOut MRI Cartilage Score (GOMRICS) was highly correlated with the total Sharp van der Heijde (SvdH) score and the joint space narrowing component (R = 0.8 and 0.71 respectively, p < 0.001). Reliability was high (intraobserver, interobserver ICCs = 0.87 [0.57-0.97], 0.64 [0.41-0.79] respectively), and improved on unenhanced scans; interobserver ICC = 0.82 [0.49-0.95]. Cartilage damage was predominantly focal (82 % of lesions) and identified in 40 out of 280 (14 %) of joints. Cartilage scores correlated with bone erosion (R = 0.57), tophus size (R = 0.52), and synovitis (R = 0.55), but not bone oedema scores. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to investigate cartilage in gout. Cartilage damage was relatively uncommon, focal, and associated with bone erosions, tophi and synovitis, but not bone oedema. This emphasises the unique pathophysiology of gout. (orig.)

  20. Medical infrared imaging and orthostatic analysis to determine lameness in the pelvic limbs of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Fernanda V. Garcia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Subtle lameness makes it difficult to ascertain which is the affected limb. A study was conducted to investigate a change in the thermal pattern and temperature of the thermal image of the paw print in a lame pelvic limb compared to a non-lame pelvic limb of dogs confirmed by orthostatic analysis. Fourteen client owned dogs with a unilateral pelvic limb lameness and 14 healthy employee dogs were examined and the pelvic limbs radiographed. Thermal images of the paw print were taken after each dog was kept in a static position on a foam mat for 30 seconds. Average temperatures and thermographic patterns were analyzed. Analysis was performed in a static position. The asymmetry index for each stance variable and optimal cutoff point for the peak vertical force and thermal image temperatures were calculated. Image pattern analysis revealed 88% success in differentiating the lame group, and 100% in identifying the same thermal pattern in the healthy group. The mean of the peak vertical force revealed a 10.0% difference between the left and right pelvic limb in healthy dogs and a 72.4% between the lame and non-lame limb in the lame dog group. Asymmetry index analysis revealed 5% in the healthy group and 36.2% in the lame group. The optimal cutoff point for the peak vertical force to determine lameness was 41.77% (AUC = 0.93 and for MII 0.943% (AUC = 0.72. The results of this study highlight the change in the thermal pattern of the paw print in the lame pelvic limb compared to a non-lame pelvic limb in the lame group and the healthy group. Medical infrared imaging of the paw prints can be utilized to screen for the lame limb in dogs.

  1. Acoustic Emission Monitoring of Lightning-Damaged CFRP Laminates during Compression-after-Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Shin, Jae Ha [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon-fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP) laminates made of nano-particle-coated carbon fibers and damaged by a simulated lightning strike were tested under compression-after-impact(CAI) mode, during which the damage progress due to compressive loading has been monitored by acoustic emission(AE). The impact damage was induced not by mechanical loading but by a simulated lightning strike. Conductive nano-particles were coated directly on the fibers, from which CFRP coupons were made. The coupon were subjected to the strikes with a high voltage/current impulse of 10-40 kA within a few . The effects of nano-particle coating and the degree of damage induced by the simulated lightning strikes on AE activities were examined, and the relationship between the compressive residual strength and AE behavior has been evaluated in terms of AE event counts and the onset of AE activity with the compressive loading. The degree of impact damage was also measured in terms of damage area by using ultrasonic C-scan images. The assessment during the CAI tests of damaged CFRP showed that AE monitoring appeared to be useful to differentiate the degree of damage hence the mechanical integrity of composite structures damaged by lightning strikes.

  2. Damage Detection for Historical Architectures Based on Tls Intensity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Cheng, X.

    2018-04-01

    TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) has long been preferred in the cultural heritage field for 3D documentation of historical sites thanks to its ability to acquire the geometric information without any physical contact. Besides the geometric information, most TLS systems also record the intensity information, which is considered as an important measurement of the spectral property of the scanned surface. Recent studies have shown the potential of using intensity for damage detection. However, the original intensity is affected by scanning geometry such as range and incidence angle and other factors, thus making the results less accurate. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method to detect certain damage areas using the corrected intensity data. Firstly, two data-driven models have been developed to correct the range and incidence angle effect. Then the corrected intensity is used to generate 2D intensity images for classification. After the damage areas being detected, they are re-projected to the 3D point cloud for better visual representation and further investigation. The experiment results indicate the feasibility and validity of the corrected intensity for damage detection.

  3. Damage-free vibrational spectroscopy of biological materials in the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rez, Peter; Aoki, Toshihiro; March, Katia; Gur, Dvir; Krivanek, Ondrej L; Dellby, Niklas; Lovejoy, Tracy C; Wolf, Sharon G; Cohen, Hagai

    2016-03-10

    Vibrational spectroscopy in the electron microscope would be transformative in the study of biological samples, provided that radiation damage could be prevented. However, electron beams typically create high-energy excitations that severely accelerate sample degradation. Here this major difficulty is overcome using an 'aloof' electron beam, positioned tens of nanometres away from the sample: high-energy excitations are suppressed, while vibrational modes of energies electron energy loss spectra from biogenic guanine crystals in their native state, resolving their characteristic C-H, N-H and C=O vibrational signatures with no observable radiation damage. The technique opens up the possibility of non-damaging compositional analyses of organic functional groups, including non-crystalline biological materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼10 nm, simultaneously combined with imaging in the electron microscope.

  4. Impaired Emotional Declarative Memory Following Unilateral Amygdala Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Adolphs, Ralph; Tranel, Daniel; Denburg, Natalie

    2000-01-01

    Case studies of patients with bilateral amygdala damage and functional imaging studies of normal individuals have demonstrated that the amygdala plays a critical role in encoding emotionally arousing stimuli into long-term declarative memory. However, several issues remain poorly understood: the separate roles of left and right amygdala, the time course over which the amygdala participates in memory consolidation, and the type of knowledge structures it helps consolidate. We investigated thes...

  5. Ultrasonic detection of spall damage nucleation under low-velocity repeated impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Repeated plate impact testing with impact stress well below the threshold spall-stress (2.6 GPa on medium carbon steel was carried out to the identical target plate by impacting the flyer plate. Occurrence of spall damage under low-velocity repeated impact was evaluated nondestructively with a low frequency scanning acoustic microscope. We observed the spall damage distribution by the B- and C-scan images. In order to initiate the spall damage (voids in a ductile material or cracks in a brittle one the particular value of threshold spall-stress should be exceeded what already belongs to a commonly accepted knowledge. Generally, the spall damage development is dependent on the amplitude and the duration of the stress pulse. If the stress is high and duration is long enough to create tensile failure of material, the voids or cracks nucleate along the spall plane, and consequently, they form macrocracks. Therefore, the spall damage does not create when the first impact stress is less than the threshold spall-stress. However, after the fifth low-velocity repeated impact test, the generation of the spall damage was detected, even if the impact stress (1.1–1.7 GPa was lower than the threshold spall-stress (2.6 GPa.

  6. Characterization of multi-layered impact damage in polymer matrix composites using lateral thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Travis; Sathish, Shamachary

    2017-02-01

    Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are increasingly being integrated into aircraft structures. However, these components are susceptible to impact related delamination, which, on aircrafts, can occur due to a number of reasons during aircraft use and maintenance. Quantifying impact damage is an important aspect for life-management of aircraft and requires in-depth knowledge of the damage zone on a ply-by-ply level. Traditionally, immersion ultrasound has provided relative high resolution images of impact damage. Ultrasonic time-of-flight data can be used to determine the front surface delamination depth and an approximation of the delaminated area. However, such inspections require the material to be immersed in water and can be time consuming. The objective of this work is to develop a quick and robust methodology to non-destructively characterize multi-layered impact damage using lateral thermography. Initial results suggest lateral heat flow is sensitive to the depth of impact damage. The anticipated outcome of this project is to estimate the extent of through-thickness impact damage. Initial results are shown and future efforts are discussed.

  7. Ionization versus displacement damage effects in proton irradiated CMOS sensors manufactured in deep submicron process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goiffon, V.; Magnan, P.; Saint-Pe, O.; Bernard, F.; Rolland, G.

    2009-01-01

    Proton irradiation effects have been studied on CMOS image sensors manufactured in a 0.18μm technology dedicated to imaging. The ionizing dose and displacement damage effects were discriminated and localized thanks to 60 Co irradiations and large photodiode reverse current measurements. The only degradation observed was a photodiode dark current increase. It was found that ionizing dose effects dominate this rise by inducing generation centers at the interface between shallow trench isolations and depleted silicon regions. Displacement damages are is responsible for a large degradation of dark current non-uniformity. This work suggests that designing a photodiode tolerant to ionizing radiation can mitigate an important part of proton irradiation effects.

  8. Recognition and Quantification of Area Damaged by Oligonychus Perseae in Avocado Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Gloria; Romero, Eduardo; Boyero, Juan R.; Malpica, Norberto

    The measure of leaf damage is a basic tool in plant epidemiology research. Measuring the area of a great number of leaves is subjective and time consuming. We investigate the use of machine learning approaches for the objective segmentation and quantification of leaf area damaged by mites in avocado leaves. After extraction of the leaf veins, pixels are labeled with a look-up table generated using a Support Vector Machine with a polynomial kernel of degree 3, on the chrominance components of YCrCb color space. Spatial information is included in the segmentation process by rating the degree of membership to a certain class and the homogeneity of the classified region. Results are presented on real images with different degrees of damage.

  9. Thermo-mechanical response of rigid plastic laminates for greenhouse covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Fuina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Innovation in the field of protected crops represents an argument of great applied and theoretical research attention due to constantly evolving technologies and automation for higher quality flower and vegetable production and to the corresponding environmental and economic impact. The aim of this paper is to provide an analysis of some thermomechanical properties of rigid polymeric laminates for greenhouses claddings, including innovative tests such as the thermographic ones. Four types of laminates have been analysed: two polycarbonates, a polymethylmethacrylate and a polyethylene terephthalate (PET. The tests gave interesting results on different important properties, such as radiometric properties, limit stresses, strains and ductility. Moreover, a direct comparison of infrared images and force elongation curves gave important information on the relation of the (localised or homogeneous damage evolution, with both an applicative and theoretical implication. Finally, even if to the authors knowledge at present there are no examples of using PET for covering greenhouses, the results of this paper indicates the thermomechanical and radiometric characteristics of this material make it interesting for agricultural applications.

  10. Accelerated Aging Experiments for Prognostics of Damage Growth in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Abhinav; Goebel, Kai Frank; Larrosa, Cecilia C.; Janapati, Vishnuvardhan; Roy, Surajit; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2011-01-01

    Composite structures are gaining importance for use in the aerospace industry. Compared to metallic structures their behavior is less well understood. This lack of understanding may pose constraints on their use. One possible way to deal with some of the risks associated with potential failure is to perform in-situ monitoring to detect precursors of failures. Prognostic algorithms can be used to predict impending failures. They require large amounts of training data to build and tune damage model for making useful predictions. One of the key aspects is to get confirmatory feedback from data as damage progresses. These kinds of data are rarely available from actual systems. The next possible resource to collect such data is an accelerated aging platform. To that end this paper describes a fatigue cycling experiment with the goal to stress carbon-carbon composite coupons with various layups. Piezoelectric disc sensors were used to periodically interrogate the system. Analysis showed distinct differences in the signatures of growing failures between data collected at conditions. Periodic X-radiographs were taken to assess the damage ground truth. Results after signal processing showed clear trends of damage growth that were correlated to damage assessed from the X-ray images.

  11. A Case Study Of Applying Infrared Thermography To Identify A Coolant Leak In A Municipal Ice Skating Rink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jay R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of infrared imaging radiometry as a diagnostic inspection tool for locating a concealed leak in the refrigeration system supplying glycol coolant to the arena floor of an ice skating rink in a municipal coliseum facility. Scanning approximately 10 miles of black iron tubing embedded in the arena floor resulted in locating a leak within the supply/return side of the system. A secondary disclosure was a restriction to normal coolant flow in some delivery loops caused by sludge build-up. Specific inspection procedures were established to enhance temperature differentials suitable for good thermal imaging. One procedure utilized the temperature and pressure of the city water supply; a second the availability of 130F hot water from the facility's boiler system; and a third the building's own internal ambient temperature. Destructive testing and other data collection equipment confirmed the thermographic findings revealing a section of corrosion damaged pipe. Repair and flushing of the system was quickly completed with a minimum of construction costs and inconvenience. No financial losses were incurred due to the interruption of scheduled revenue events. Probable cause for the shutdown condition was attributed to a flawed installation decision made 15 years earlier during the initial construction stage.

  12. Digital laminography assessment of the damage in concrete exposed to freezing temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Wakimoto, Kentaro

    2008-10-01

    The research explores the possibility of using digital laminography as a non-destructive inspection X-ray method to image the damage existing in concrete exposed to low temperatures. Freezing-thawing and scaling tests were performed and digital laminography was used to determine the degree of damage existing inside the concrete samples. First, digital laminography was performed on the concrete sample and then a visual inspection was done by slicing the sample after it was vacuum-impregnated with epoxy in order to compare the differences in crack width. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital laminography assessment of the damage in concrete exposed to freezing temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Wakimoto, Kentaro; Blunt, Joshua; Carlos, Cruz; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Ostertag, Claudia P.; Albert, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The research explores the possibility of using digital laminography as a non-destructive inspection X-ray method to image the damage existing in concrete exposed to low temperatures. Freezing-thawing and scaling tests were performed and digital laminography was used to determine the degree of damage existing inside the concrete samples. First, digital laminography was performed on the concrete sample and then a visual inspection was done by slicing the sample after it was vacuum-impregnated with epoxy in order to compare the differences in crack width. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary DNA Damage in Dry Cleaners with Perchlorethylene Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Azimi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Perchloroethylene is a halogenated solvent widely used in dry cleaning. International agency of research on cancer classified this chemical as a probable human carcinogen. Objective: To evaluate the extent of primary DNA damage in dry cleaner workers who were exposed to perchloroethylene as compared to non-exposed subjects. The effect of exposure modifying factors such as use of personal protective equipment, perceived risk, and reported safe behaviors on observed DNA damage were also studied. Methods: 59 exposed and non-exposed workers were selected from Yazd, Iran. All the 33 exposed workers had work history at least 3 months in the dry cleaning shops. Peripheral blood sampling was performed. Microscope examination was performed under fluorescent microscope (400×. Open comet software was used for image analysis. All biological analysis was performed in one laboratory. Results: Primary DNA damage to leukocytes in dry cleaners was relatively high. The median tail length, %DNA in tail, and tail moment in exposed group were significantly higher than those in non-exposed group. There was no significant difference between smokers and nonsmokers in terms of tail length, tail moment, and %DNA in tail. There was no significant correlation between duration of employment in dry cleaning and observed DNA damage in terms of tail length, tail moment and %DNA in tail. Stratified analysis based on exposed and nonexposed category showed no significant relationship between age and observed DNA damage. Conclusion: Occupationally exposure to perchloroethylene can cause early DNA damage in dry cleaners.

  15. In vivo imaging of the retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica Ijams Wolfing

    The retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells form an important layer of the retina because they are responsible for providing metabolic support to the photoreceptors. Techniques to image the RPE layer include autofluorescence imaging with a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). However, previous studies were unable to resolve single RPE cells in vivo. This thesis describes the technique of combining autofluorescence, SLO, adaptive optics (AO), and dual-wavelength simultaneous imaging and registration to visualize the individual cells in the RPE mosaic in human and primate retina for the first time in vivo. After imaging the RPE mosaic non-invasively, the cell layer's structure and regularity were characterized using quantitative metrics of cell density, spacing, and nearest neighbor distances. The RPE mosaic was compared to the cone mosaic, and RPE imaging methods were confirmed using histology. The ability to image the RPE mosaic led to the discovery of a novel retinal change following light exposure; 568 nm exposures caused an immediate reduction in autofluorescence followed by either full recovery or permanent damage in the RPE layer. A safety study was conducted to determine the range of exposure irradiances that caused permanent damage or transient autofluorescence reductions. Additionally, the threshold exposure causing autofluorescence reduction was determined and reciprocity of radiant exposure was confirmed. Light exposures delivered by the AOSLO were not significantly different than those delivered by a uniform source. As all exposures tested were near or below the permissible light levels of safety standards, this thesis provides evidence that the current light safety standards need to be revised. Finally, with the retinal damage and autofluorescence reduction thresholds identified, the methods of RPE imaging were modified to allow successful imaging of the individual cells in the RPE mosaic while still ensuring retinal safety. This thesis has provided a

  16. Thermography for detection of scaling in slurry lines and process vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capolingua, Adam; Petrik, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    A major problem in many of today's refineries and mineral processing plants is internal scale build-up within slurry lines and process vessels. Consequences of such an internal scale build-up within lines and vessels include machinery damage, flow restrictions, blockages and localised pipe wear. These problems lead to a loss of production, increased maintenance costs, impinge on worker safety, increase environmental hazards and inevitably reduces profit for the organisation of concern. Hence, the application of an efficient and accurate non-intrusive detection method for locating internal scale within kilometres of lines and numerous process vessels is imperative to reduce maintenance costs and limit production losses. Thermography has been found to be a very useful NDT technique for applications where there is a differential between the ambient and internal product temperatures. The 'insulating' effect of the internal scaling results in a reduced external temperature over the associated area. These temperature differentials can be efficiently detected via a thermographic scan. While this technique is relatively straightforward, the interpretation of the thermographic images usually requires reasonable skill and experience to assess the true extent of each problem detected. In some cases, the true location and extent of scaling within the slurry lines may not be thermally obvious due to the nature of the internal scaling. In such cases, the use of other complementary methods to effectively 'listen'in to the lines has proved to be a valuable procedure. In particular a technology that is typically used in vibration monitoring to assess bearing and gear degradation has been successfully applied in conjunction with thermography to assess lines with localised or dislodged scale. This paper presents a number of case studies where thermography was either applied independently or in conjunction with other measurement techniques, to detect and assess different internal

  17. Fatigue damage monitoring for basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites using acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wentao; Li, Hui; Qu, Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) is a structural material with superior mechanical properties. In this study, unidirectional BFRP laminates with 14 layers are made with the hand lay-up method. Then, the acoustic emission technique (AE) combined with the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) technique is employed to monitor the fatigue damage evolution of the BFRP plates in the fatigue loading tests. Time-frequency analysis using the wavelet transform technique is proposed to analyze the received AE signal instead of the peak frequency method. A comparison between AE signals and SEM images indicates that the multi-frequency peaks picked from the time-frequency curves of AE signals reflect the accumulated fatigue damage evolution and fatigue damage patterns. Furthermore, seven damage patterns, that is, matrix cracking, delamination, fiber fracture and their combinations, are identified from the time-frequency curves of the AE signals.

  18. Damage estimation of sewer pipe using subtitles of CCTV inspection video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kitae; Kim, Byeongcheol; Kim, Taeheon; Seo, Dongwoo

    2017-04-01

    Recent frequent occurrence of urban sinkhole serves as a momentum of the periodic inspection of sewer pipelines. Sewer inspection using a CCTV device needs a lot of time and efforts. Many of previous studies which reduce the laborious tasks are mainly interested in the developments of image processing S/W and exploring H/W. And there has been no attempt to find meaningful information from the existing CCTV images stored by the sewer maintenance manager. This study adopts a cross-correlation based image processing method and extracts sewer inspection device's location data from CCTV images. As a result of the analysis of location-time relation, it show strong correlation between device stand time and the sewer damages. In case of using this method to investigate sewer inspection CCTV images, it will save the investigator's efforts and improve sewer maintenance efficiency and reliability.

  19. Automated Damage Onset Analysis Techniques Applied to KDP Damage and the Zeus Small Area Damage Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.; Runkel, M.

    1999-01-01

    Automated damage testing of KDP using LLNL's Zeus automated damage test system has allowed the statistics of KDP bulk damage to be investigated. Samples are now characterized by the cumulative damage probability curve, or S-curve, that is generated from hundreds of individual test sites per sample. A HeNe laser/PMT scatter diagnostic is used to determine the onset of damage at each test site. The nature of KDP bulk damage is such that each scatter signal may possess many different indicators of a damage event. Because of this, the determination of the initial onset for each scatter trace is not a straightforward affair and has required considerable manual analysis. The amount of testing required by crystal development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has made it impractical to continue analysis by hand. Because of this, we have developed and implemented algorithms for analyzing the scatter traces by computer. We discuss the signal cleaning algorithms and damage determination criteria that have lead to the successful implementation of a LabView based analysis code. For the typical R/1 damage data set, the program can find the correct damage onset in more than 80% of the cases, with the remaining 20% being left to operator determination. The potential time savings for data analysis is on the order of ∼ 100X over manual analysis and is expected to result in the savings of at least 400 man-hours over the next 3 years of NIF quality assurance testing

  20. Simulating Neutron Radiation Damage of Graphite by In-situ Electron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, Brindusa E; Freeman, H M; Brydson, R M D; Westwood, A V K; Scott, A J

    2014-01-01

    Radiation damage in nuclear grade graphite has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Changes in the structure on the atomic scale and chemical bonding, and the relationship between each were of particular interest. TEM was used to study damage in nuclear grade graphite on the atomic scale following 1.92×10 8 electrons nm −2 of electron beam exposure. During these experiments EELS spectra were also collected periodically to record changes in chemical bonding and structural disorder, by analysing the changes of the carbon K-edge. Image analysis software from the 'PyroMaN' research group provides further information, based on (002) fringe analysis. The software was applied to the micrographs of electron irradiated virgin 'Pile Grade A' (PGA) graphite to quantify the extent of damage from electron beam exposure

  1. Medulla oblongata damage and cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatigorskaya, Nadya; Mongin, Marie; Valabregue, Romain; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Ewenczyk, Claire; Poupon, Cyril; Debellemaniere, Eden; Vidailhet, Marie; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lehéricy, Stephane

    2016-12-13

    To characterize medulla oblongata damage using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in Parkinson disease (PD) and correlate it with dysfunction of the cardiac sympathetic/vagal balance. Fifty-two patients with PD and 24 healthy controls were included in the study. All participants underwent clinical examination and 3T MRI using 3D T1-weighted imaging and DTI. DTI metrics were calculated within manually drawn regions of interest. Heart rate variability was evaluated using spectral analysis of the R-R cardiac interval during REM and slow-wave sleep based on continuous overnight electrocardiographic monitoring. Respiratory frequency was measured in 30-second contiguous epochs of REM and slow-wave sleep. The relationships between imaging and cardiac variables were calculated using partial correlations followed by the multiple comparisons permutation approach. The changes in heart rate and respiratory frequency variability from slow-wave sleep to REM sleep in healthy controls were no longer detectable in patients with PD. There were significant increases in the mean (p = 0.006), axial (p = 0.006), and radial diffusivities (p = 0.005) in the medulla oblongata of patients with PD. In PD, diffusion changes were specifically correlated with a lower heart rate and respiratory frequency variability during REM sleep. This study provides evidence that medulla oblongata damage underlies cardiac sympathetic/vagal balance and respiratory dysfunction in patients with PD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  3. Towards diffractive imaging with single pulses of FEL radiation. Dynamics within irradiatied samples and their influence on the analysis of imaging data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fenglin

    2010-08-15

    3D single particle coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) of bioparticles (such as proteins, macromolecules and viruses) is one of the main possible applications of the new generation of light sources: free-electron lasers (FELs), which are now available at FLASH (Hamburg, Germany) and LCLS (Stanford, U.S.A.). The extremely bright and ultrashort FEL pulses potentially enable CDI to achieve high resolution down to subnanometer length scale. However, intense FEL pulses cause serious radiation damage in bioparticles, even during single shots, which may set the resolution limits for CDI with FELs. Currently, since the signal-to-noise ratio is very low for small biological particles, direct experimental study of radiation damage in the single particle imaging is fairly difficult. Single atomic (noble gas) clusters become good objects to reveal effects of radiation damage processes on CDI with FEL radiation. This thesis studies three aspects of the radiation damage problem, which are treated in three independent chapters: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations to quantitively describe radiation damage processes within irradiated atomic clusters during single pulses; (2) reconstruction analysis of single-shot CDI diffraction patterns of atomic clusters, which may potentially help to understand the radiation damage occurring in biological samples; and (3) testing the effects of coating water layers in CDI, which is supposed to minimize the radiation damage in irradiated bioparticles. (orig.)

  4. BUILDING DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AFTER EARTHQUAKE USING POST-EVENT LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rastiveis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available After an earthquake, damage assessment plays an important role in leading rescue team to help people and decrease the number of mortality. Damage map is a map that demonstrates collapsed buildings with their degree of damage. With this map, finding destructive buildings can be quickly possible. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for automatic damage map generation after an earthquake using post-event LiDAR Data and pre-event vector map. The framework of the proposed approach has four main steps. To find the location of all buildings on LiDAR data, in the first step, LiDAR data and vector map are registered by using a few number of ground control points. Then, building layer, selected from vector map, are mapped on the LiDAR data and all pixels which belong to the buildings are extracted. After that, through a powerful classifier all the extracted pixels are classified into three classes of “debris”, “intact building” and “unclassified”. Since textural information make better difference between “debris” and “intact building” classes, different textural features are applied during the classification. After that, damage degree for each candidate building is estimated based on the relation between the numbers of pixels labelled as “debris” class to the whole building area. Calculating the damage degree for each candidate building, finally, building damage map is generated. To evaluate the ability proposed method in generating damage map, a data set from Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital after the 2010 Haiti earthquake was used. In this case, after calculating of all buildings in the test area using the proposed method, the results were compared to the damage degree which estimated through visual interpretation of post-event satellite image. Obtained results were proved the reliability of the proposed method in damage map generation using LiDAR data.

  5. In Situ Tomography of Microcracking in Cross Ply Carbon Fiber Composites with Pre-existing Debonding Damage

    KAUST Repository

    Traudes, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Carbon fiber based composites are an essential material in weight-critical applications such as in the aerospace industry. However, these materials are susceptible to damage such as matrix microcracking and fiber/matrix debonding (diffuse damage), which occurs at stresses much lower than the failure stress. A T700/M21 [0/90]s laminate was tensile loaded to introduce diffuse damage and prepared for a study on the initiation of transverse microcracks. The material was tensile loaded in a [+45/-45]s orientation to induce diffuse damage. A diffuse damage indicator was developed by measuring the decrease in shear stiffness. Samples with diffuse damage levels of 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, and 0.25 were prepared to be tensile tested in a [0/90]s orientation to induce microcracks. A successful development of the microcracking test procedure was performed. The edge of the material was studied with optical microscopy and x-ray to establish the structure of the fiber bundle geometry when undamaged. A sample containing microcracks was treated with diiodomethane dye penetrant, which successfully highlighted microcracks during x-ray imaging. The application time was not sufficient to produce consistent x-ray images over time, so a 45 minute soak time was recommended instead. The same damaged sample was subjected to a tomographic scan without a dye penetrant and while unloaded. Transverse microcracks were successfully identified from the data, although the results were not clean enough and likely omitted some smaller microcracks. Results are expected to be cleaner if performed during tensile testing. Future tensile testing will quantify the induced crack density of samples containing various degrees of initial diffuse damage, either using x-rays with a dye penetrant or using x-ray microtomography.

  6. Forecasting Frost Damage: Follow the Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    Frost damage takes place when the pressure exerted against pore walls exceeds the cohesive strength of water-infiltrated rock and causes cracks to extend. Elegant theoretical treatments supported by meticulous field and laboratory observations have combined to unravel the basic mechanical and thermodynamic controls in idealized systems. Frost damage is most vigorous when conditions are cold enough that the net pressure exerted against the pore walls can cause crack extension, yet warm enough to enable the flow that supplies further ice growth in the newly opened space. This insight is applied here to develop practical geomorphic process laws for the effects of frost damage at the larger scales that are relevant for describing the evolution of landscapes. To this end, a direct connection is made between the intensity of frost damage and the porosity increase that results from gradients in water flux under conditions that are cold enough for ice-rock interactions to propagate cracks. This implies that the annual temperature variation at the ground surface can be combined with considerations of heat and mass transport to derive rigorous forecasts of the potential for frost damage that are tied to the increases in water mass that accompany solidification in porous rock. As an example, the image shows the depth-integrated porosity change λ promoted by crack growth at temperatures colder than -ΔTc over an annual cycle for different choices of mean annual temperature MAT and surface amplitude A (assuming a thermal diffusivity of 1 mm2/s and a power-law relationship between permeability and undercooling with exponent α=4, such that a base value of 10-14m2 is reached at a reference undercooling of 0.1 ºC). The abrupt onset in cracking once MAT decreases below a threshold is produced by the requirement that undercooling surpass ΔTc in order to generate sufficient pressures to propagate cracks. The eventual reduction and gradual tail in λ at colder MAT is produced by

  7. Year-Round Use Of Thermography In House Doctoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, Kenneth J.; Harrje, David T.; Dutt, Gautam S.

    1983-03-01

    There have been many presentations of thermographic residential building analyses at the past ThermosInse conferences. A number of these papers have dealt with evaluation of insulation voids and more recently a few have described air leakage detection 2,3 during the colder winter months. This paper will focus on the thermographic application in the House Doctor instrumented energy analysis approach as developed by Princeton University. The central theme will be the application to a year-round research or commercial activity. Some of the conditions that could create thermographic problems, as well as techniques that may be used to lessen these difficulties, thereby extending the thermographic "season" is discussed. Our experiences in summer thermography with and without the use of a building pressurization system is also covered.

  8. Error Concealment using Neural Networks for Block-Based Image Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mokos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel adaptive error concealment (EC algorithm, which lowers the requirements for channel coding, is proposed. It conceals errors in block-based image coding systems by using neural network. In this proposed algorithm, only the intra-frame information is used for reconstruction of the image with separated damaged blocks. The information of pixels surrounding a damaged block is used to recover the errors using the neural network models. Computer simulation results show that the visual quality and the MSE evaluation of a reconstructed image are significantly improved using the proposed EC algorithm. We propose also a simple non-neural approach for comparison.

  9. Damage evaluation under thermal fatigue of a vertical target full scale component for the ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missirlian, M.; Escourbiac, F.; Merola, M.; Durocher, A.; Bobin-Vastra, I.; Schedler, B.

    2007-01-01

    An extensive development programme has been carried out in the EU on high heat flux components within the ITER project. In this framework, a Full Scale Vertical Target (VTFS) prototype was manufactured with all the main features of the corresponding ITER divertor design. The fatigue cycling campaign on CFC and W armoured regions, proved the capability of such a component to meet the ITER requirements in terms of heat flux performances for the vertical target. This paper discusses thermographic examination and thermal fatigue testing results obtained on this component. The study includes thermal analysis, with a tentative proposal to evaluate with finite element approach the location/size of defects and the possible propagation during fatigue cycling

  10. Changes in Skin Surface Temperature during Muscular Endurance indicated Strain – An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fröhlich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-contact thermography enables the diagnosis of the distribution of skin surface temperature during athletic movement. Resistance exercise results in stress of required musculature, which is supposed to be measurable thermographically in terms of skin surface temperature change. Objective: This study aims to evaluate the application of thermography to analyze changes in skin temperature, representing specific muscle groups, during and after resistance exercise. Method: Thirteen male participants (age: 27.1 ± 4.9 years, height: 181.5 ± 5.7 cm, mass: 74.8 ± 7.4 kg completed the study. On 5 separate visits to the laboratory, participants performed one of 5 resistance exercise to target specific muscles (M. pectoralis major, M. rectus abdominis, M. trapezius, M. erector spinae, M. quadriceps femoris. The exercise protocol consisted of 3 sets of 20 repetitions, with 1 minute rest between exercise sets. The average skin surface temperature above the muscle groups used was thermographically determined using standard methods at 7 time points; pre-exercise, immediately following each exercise set, and post exercise (2, 3, and 6 minutes after the finale exercise set. The measurement areas were standardized using anatomic reference points. Results: From an inferential statistical point of view, no significant change in the average temperature caused by the applied resistance training was found for the individual muscle groups over time at the individual measurement times (all P>0.08. However, thermography showed a characteristic chronological temperature curve for the five body areas between measurement times, as well as a distinctive spatial temperature distribution over the measurement areas. Discussion: Based on the thermographic image data and the characteristic temperature curve, it is possible to identify the primarily used functional musculature after device-controlled resistance training. Therefore, thermography seems to be

  11. Patellofemoral Instability in Children: Correlation Between Risk Factors, Injury Patterns, and Severity of Cartilage Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Shiraj, Sahar; Kang, Chang Ho; Anton, Christopher; Kim, Dong Hoon; Horn, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings between groups with and without patellofemoral instability and to correlate the MRI findings with the severity of patellar cartilage damage. Fifty-three children with patellofemoral instability and 53 age- and sex-matched children without patellofemoral instability (15.9 ± 2.4 years) were included. Knee MRI with T2-weighted mapping was performed. On MR images, femoral trochlear dysplasia, patellofemoral malalignment, medial retinaculum injury, and bone marrow edema were documented. The degree of patellar cartilage damage was evaluated on MR images by use of a morphologic grading scale (0-4) and on T2 maps with mean T2 values at the medial, central, and lateral facets. MRI findings were compared between the two groups. In cases of patellofemoral instability, MRI findings were correlated with the severity of cartilage damage at each region. Trochlear structure and alignment were significantly different between the two groups (Wilcoxon p patellofemoral instability, a high-riding patella was associated with central patellar cartilage damage with a higher morphologic grade and T2 value (Spearman p patellofemoral instability have significantly different trochlear structure and alignment than those who do not, and these differences are known risk factors for patellofemoral instability. However, the only risk factors or injury patterns that directly correlated with the severity of patellar cartilage damage were patella alta, medial stabilizer injury, and bone marrow edema.

  12. Early recognition of damage and course of damage on metal components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In 1985, the German Research Association set up the programme 'Early recognition of damage and course of damage on metal components'. The concept worked out by a programme committee provided that scientifically secured bases for the understanding of the occurrence of damage, the prevention of damage, affecting damage, and the mechanism triggering damage, or cumulation of damage should be obtained. 36 individual projects costing 14 million DM were supported in the course of 6 years. The task of a test group was to find these projects from a far larger number of applications which promised an increase in knowledge in the sense of the target of the programme. For the final colloquium, the test group chose those contributions which had not previously been published to the wider technical public. (orig.) [de

  13. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatigue assessment by energy approach during tensile tests on AISI 304 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Risitano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the fatigue limit for steel ductile materials using non-destructive methods is a topic of great interest to researchers today. In recent years, the method adopted has implemented infrared sensors to detect the surface temperature and correlate it with the fatigue limit. In previous paper, a new energy approach was proposed to investigate the fatigue limit during tensile test. The numerical procedure proposed by Chrysochoos is adopted to clean infrared images and applied to analyse the surface heat sources during tensile test. AISI 304 specimens with rectangular cross-sections are tested. Moreover fatigue tests at increasing loads were carried out on steel by a stepwise succession, applied to the same specimen, for applying the thermographic method. The predictions of the fatigue limit, obtained by the analysis of the energy evolution during the static tests, were compared with the predictions obtained applying the thermographic method during fatigue tests.

  15. On-rail solution for autonomous inspections in electrical substations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruno P. A.; Ferreira, Rafael A. M.; Gomes, Selson C.; Calado, Flavio A. R.; Andrade, Roberto M.; Porto, Matheus P.

    2018-05-01

    This work presents an alternative solution for autonomous inspections in electrical substations. The autonomous system is a robot that moves on rails, collects infrared and visible images of selected targets, also processes the data and predicts the components lifetime. The robot moves on rails to overcome difficulties found in not paved substations commonly encountered in Brazil. We take advantage of using rails to convey the data by them, minimizing the electromagnetic interference, and at the same time transmitting electrical energy to feed the autonomous system. As part of the quality control process, we compared thermographic inspections made by the robot with inspections made by a trained thermographer using a scientific camera Flir® SC660. The results have shown that the robot achieved satisfactory results, identifying components and measuring temperature accurately. The embodied routine considers the weather changes along the day, providing a standard result of the components thermal response, also gives the uncertainty of temperature measurement, contributing to the quality in the decision making process.

  16. Hyperspectral Imaging as an Early Biomarker for Radiation Exposure and Microcirculatory Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Chin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation exposure can lead to detrimental effects in skin microcirculation. The precise relationship between radiation dose received and its effect on cutaneous perfusion still remains controversial. Previously, we have shown that hyperspectral imaging (HSI is able to demonstrate long-term reductions in cutaneous perfusion secondary to chronic microvascular injury. This study characterizes the changes in skin microcirculation in response to varying doses of ionizing radiation and investigates these microcirculatory changes as a possible early non-invasive biomarker that may correlate with the extent of long-term microvascular damage.METHODS: Immunocompetent hairless mice (n=66 were exposed to single fractions of superficial beta-irradiation in doses of 0, 5, 10, 20, 35, or 50 Gy. A HSI device was utilized to measure deoxygenated hemoglobin levels in irradiated and control areas. HSI measurements were performed at baseline before radiation exposure and for the first three days post-irradiation. Maximum macroscopic skin reactions were graded, and histological assessment of cutaneous microvascular densities at four weeks post-irradiation was performed in harvested tissue by CD31 immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: CD31 immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant correlation (r=0.90, p<0.0001 between dose and vessel density reduction at four weeks. Using HSI analysis, early changes in deoxygenated hemoglobin levels were observed during the first three days post-irradiation in all groups. These deoxygenated hemoglobin changes varied proportionally with dose (r=0.98, p<0.0001 and skin reactions (r=0.98, p<0.0001. There was a highly significant correlation (r= 0.91, p<0.0001 between these early changes in deoxygenated hemoglobin and late vascular injury severity assessed at the end of four weeks.CONCLUSIONS: Radiation dose is directly correlated with cutaneous microvascular injury severity at four weeks in our model. Early post

  17. The study of past damaging hydrogeological events for damage susceptibility zonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Petrucci

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Damaging Hydrogeological Events are defined as periods during which phenomena, such as landslides, floods and secondary floods, cause damage to people and the environment.

    A Damaging Hydrogeological Event which heavily damaged Calabria (Southern Italy between December 1972, and January 1973, has been used to test a procedure to be utilised in the zonation of a province according to damage susceptibility during DHEs. In particular, we analyzed the province of Catanzaro (2391 km2, an administrative district composed of 80 municipalities, with about 370 000 inhabitants.

    Damage, defined in relation to the reimbursement requests sent to the Department of Public Works, has been quantified using a procedure based on a Local Damage Index. The latter, representing classified losses, has been obtained by multiplying the value of the damaged element and the percentage of damage affecting it.

    Rainfall has been described by the Maximum Return Period of cumulative rainfall, for both short (1, 3, 5, 7, 10 consecutive days and long duration (30, 60, 90, 180 consecutive days, recorded during the event.

    Damage index and population density, presumed to represent the location of vulnerable elements, have been referred to Thiessen polygons associated to rain gauges working at the time of the event.

    The procedure allowed us to carry out a preliminary classification of the polygons composing the province according to their susceptibility to damage during DHEs. In high susceptibility polygons, severe damage occurs during rainfall characterised by low return periods; in medium susceptibility polygons maximum return period rainfall and induced damage show equal levels of exceptionality; in low susceptibility polygons, high return period rainfall induces a low level of damage.

    The east and west sectors of the province show the highest susceptibility, while polygons of the N-NE sector show the lowest

  18. Imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Doyle, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    Imaging tests are in clinical use for diagnosis, assessment of disease severity and as a marker of treatment response in people with gout. Various imaging tests have differing properties for assessing the three key disease domains in gout: urate deposition (including tophus burden), joint inflammation and structural joint damage. Dual-energy CT allows measurement of urate deposition and bone damage, and ultrasonography allows assessment of all three domains. Scoring systems have been described that allow radiological quantification of disease severity and these scoring systems may play a role in assessing the response to treatment in gout. This article reviews the properties of imaging tests, describes the available scoring systems for quantification of disease severity and discusses the challenges and controversies regarding the use of imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Enhancement of Lamb Wave Imaging Resolution by Step Pulse Excitation and Prewarping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangchen Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the damage localization accuracy, a prewarping technology is combined with step pulse excitation and this method is used in Lamb wave imaging of plate structures with adjacent damages. Based on the step pulse excitation, various narrowband or burst response can be derived by signal processing technology and this method provides flexibility for further prewarping approach. A narrowband signal warped with a preselected distance is then designed, and the dispersion in the response of this prewarping signal will be greatly reduced. However, in order to calculate the distance for prewarping, the first arrival needs to be estimated from the burst response. From the step-pulse response, narrowband responses at different central frequencies can be obtained, and by averaging peak-value time of their first arrivals, a more accurate estimation can be calculated. By using the prewarping method to the damage scattering signals before imaging, the imaging resolution of the delay-and-sum method can be highly enhanced. The experiment carried out in an aluminum plate with adjacent damages proves the efficiency of this method.

  20. Damage scenarios and an onboard support system for damaged ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a safety assessment of damaged ships, which considers environmental conditions such as waves and wind, is important in both the design and operation phases of ships, in Korea, rules or guidelines to conduct such assessments are not yet developed. However, NATO and European maritime societies have developed guidelines for a safety assessment. Therefore, it is required to develop rules or guidelines for safety assessments such as the Naval Ship Code (NSC of NATO. Before the safety assessment of a damaged ship can be performed, the available damage scenarios must be developed and the safety assessment criteria must be established. In this paper, the parameters related to damage by accidents are identified and categorized when developing damage scenarios. The need for damage safety assessment criteria is discussed, and an example is presented. In addition, a concept and specifications for the DB-based supporting system, which is used in the operation phases, are proposed.

  1. POST-DISASTER DAMAGE ASSESSMENT THROUGH COHERENT CHANGE DETECTION ON SAR IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guida

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Damage assessment is a fundamental step to support emergency response and recovery activities in a post-earthquake scenario. In recent years, UAVs and satellite optical imagery was applied to assess major structural damages before technicians could reach the areas affected by the earthquake. However, bad weather conditions may harm the quality of these optical assessments, thus limiting the practical applicability of these techniques. In this paper, the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imagery is investigated and a novel approach to SAR-based damage assessment is presented. Coherent Change Detection (CCD algorithms on multiple interferometrically pre-processed SAR images of the area affected by the seismic event are exploited to automatically detect potential damages to buildings and other physical structures. As a case study, the 2016 Central Italy earthquake involving the cities of Amatrice and Accumoli was selected. The main contribution of the research outlined above is the integration of a complex process, requiring the coordination of a variety of methods and tools, into a unitary framework, which allows end-to-end application of the approach from SAR data pre-processing to result visualization in a Geographic Information System (GIS. A prototype of this pipeline was implemented, and the outcomes of this methodology were validated through an extended comparison with traditional damage assessment maps, created through photo-interpretation of high resolution aerial imagery. The results indicate that the proposed methodology is able to perform damage detection with a good level of accuracy, as most of the detected points of change are concentrated around highly damaged buildings.

  2. Post-Disaster Damage Assessment Through Coherent Change Detection on SAR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, L.; Boccardo, P.; Donevski, I.; Lo Schiavo, L.; Molinari, M. E.; Monti-Guarnieri, A.; Oxoli, D.; Brovelli, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Damage assessment is a fundamental step to support emergency response and recovery activities in a post-earthquake scenario. In recent years, UAVs and satellite optical imagery was applied to assess major structural damages before technicians could reach the areas affected by the earthquake. However, bad weather conditions may harm the quality of these optical assessments, thus limiting the practical applicability of these techniques. In this paper, the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery is investigated and a novel approach to SAR-based damage assessment is presented. Coherent Change Detection (CCD) algorithms on multiple interferometrically pre-processed SAR images of the area affected by the seismic event are exploited to automatically detect potential damages to buildings and other physical structures. As a case study, the 2016 Central Italy earthquake involving the cities of Amatrice and Accumoli was selected. The main contribution of the research outlined above is the integration of a complex process, requiring the coordination of a variety of methods and tools, into a unitary framework, which allows end-to-end application of the approach from SAR data pre-processing to result visualization in a Geographic Information System (GIS). A prototype of this pipeline was implemented, and the outcomes of this methodology were validated through an extended comparison with traditional damage assessment maps, created through photo-interpretation of high resolution aerial imagery. The results indicate that the proposed methodology is able to perform damage detection with a good level of accuracy, as most of the detected points of change are concentrated around highly damaged buildings.

  3. Experimental and numerical characterization of anisotropic damage evolution of forged Al6061-T6 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.; Garnier, J.; Allais, L.; Crepin, J.; Ancelet, O.; Hiver, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum alloy 6061-T6 (Al-Mg-Si) has been selected as the material of the vessel for the construction of Jules-Horowitz material testing reactor. Fracture mechanism of this alloy has been investigated using mechanical testing of smooth and notched tensile specimens loaded in different directions. A strong anisotropic fracture behavior has been observed. Microstructural studies using tomography and image analysis have shown a presence of anisotropic distributed coarse precipitates which is the key microstructural feature affecting the damage evolution. These observations were complemented by investigations on fractured tensile samples. A damage scenario of anisotropic growth and coalescence of voids is proposed to explain the fracture behavior associated with the distribution of precipitates. A GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model is used to simulate this scenario and to predict damage evolution. (authors)

  4. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples.

  5. MR assessment of end-organ damage in the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, Linda Danielle van

    2014-01-01

    The first part of this thesis focuses on assessing end-organ damage in individuals with the metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (1H-MRS). We performed cross sectional and intervention studies to investigate the contribution of obesity,

  6. A New Damage Assessment Method by Means of Neural Network and Multi-Sensor Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Piscini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Neural Network (ANN is a valuable and well-established inversion technique for the estimation of geophysical parameters from satellite images. After training, ANNs are able to generate very fast products for several types of applications. Satellite remote sensing is an efficient way to detect and map strong earthquake damage for contributing to post-disaster activities during emergency phases. This work aims at presenting an application of the ANN inversion technique addressed to the evaluation of building collapse ratio (CR, defined as the number of collapsed buildings with respect to the total number of buildings in a city block, by employing optical and SAR satellite data. This is done in order to directly relate changes in images with damage that has occurred during strong earthquakes. Furthermore, once they have been trained, neural networks can be used rapidly at application stage. The goal was to obtain a general tool suitable for re-use in different scenarios. An ANN has been implemented in order to emulate a regression model and to estimate the CR as a continuous function. The adopted ANN has been trained using some features obtained from optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images, as inputs, and the corresponding values of collapse ratio obtained from the survey of the 2010 M7 Haiti Earthquake, i.e., as target output. As regards the optical data, we selected three change parameters: the Normalized Difference Index (NDI, the Kullback–Leibler divergence (KLD, and Mutual Information (MI. Concerning the SAR images, the Intensity Correlation Difference (ICD and the KLD parameters have been considered. Exploiting an object-oriented approach, a segmentation of the study area into several regions has been performed. In particular, damage maps have been generated by considering a set of polygons (in which satellite parameters have been calculated extracted from the open source Open Street Map (OSM geo-database. The trained

  7. Structural assessment of aerospace components using image processing algorithms and Finite Element models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamatelos, Dimtrios; Kappatos, Vassilios

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This paper presents the development of an advanced structural assessment approach for aerospace components (metallic and composites). This work focuses on developing an automatic image processing methodology based on Non Destructive Testing (NDT) data and numerical models, for predicting...... the residual strength of these components. Design/methodology/approach – An image processing algorithm, based on the threshold method, has been developed to process and quantify the geometric characteristics of damages. Then, a parametric Finite Element (FE) model of the damaged component is developed based...... on the inputs acquired from the image processing algorithm. The analysis of the metallic structures is employing the Extended FE Method (XFEM), while for the composite structures the Cohesive Zone Model (CZM) technique with Progressive Damage Modelling (PDM) is used. Findings – The numerical analyses...

  8. PoliRisposta: Overcoming present limits of flood damage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Daniela; Mazuran, Mirjana; Arias, Carolina; Minucci, Guido; Atun, Funda; Ardagna, Danilo

    2014-05-01

    ; - Develop educational material and modules for training practitioners in the use of the procedure; - Develop enhanced IT tools (both hardware and software) to support the procedure, easing as much as possible the collection of field data, the creation of databases and the connection between the latter and different regional and municipal databases that already exist for different purposes (from cadastral data, to satellite images, etc.). Results will be discussed with respect to first applications in the Umbria Region (Central Italy). Emphasis will be put on the utility of results for damage modelling, risk mitigation and emergency management.

  9. Implementation of an anisotropic damage material model using general second order damage tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Mori, K.; Wisselink, H.H.; Pietrzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; ten Horn, Carel; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. With the growing complexity in materials and forming proc-esses, it becomes inevitable to include anisotropy in damage (tensorial damage variable). Most of the anisotropic damage models define the damage tensor in the

  10. The association of infrared imaging findings of the breast with prognosis in breast cancer patients: an observational cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Li-An; Kuo, Wen-Hung; Chen, Chin-Yu; Tsai, Yuh-Show; Wang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether infrared (IR) imaging findings are associated with prognosis in patients with invasive breast carcinomas. This study was approved by the institutional review board of the research ethics committee of our hospital, and all participants gave written informed consent. From March 2005 to June 2007, we enrolled 143 patients with invasive breast cancer that underwent preoperative IR imaging. We used five IR signs to interpret breast IR imaging. Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the effect of IR signs on long-term mortality. During a median follow-up of 2451 days (6.7 years), 31 patients died. Based on the Cox Proportional Hazards Model, IR1 sign (the temperature of cancer site minus that of the contralateral mirror imaging site) was positively associated with mortality in the univariate analysis (overall mortality hazard ratio [HR], 2.29; p = 0.03; disease-specific mortality HR, 2.57; p = 0.04) as well as the multivariate analysis after controlling for clinicopathological factors (overall mortality HR, 3.85; p = 0.01; disease-specific mortality HR, 3.91, p = 0.02). In patients with clinical stage I and II disease, IR1 was also positively associated with mortality (overall mortality HR, 3.76; p = 0.03; disease-specific mortality HR, 4.59; p = 0.03). Among patients with node-negative disease, IR1 and IR5 (asymmetrical thermographic pattern) were associated with mortality (p = 0.04 for both IR1 and IR5, chi-squared test). Breast IR findings are associated with mortality in patients with invasive breast carcinomas. The association remained in patients with node-negative disease. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00166998

  11. Detection of creep damage in a nickel base superalloy using NDE techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreon, H.; Mora, B.; Barrera, G.

    2009-10-01

    Due to elevated temperatures, excessive stresses and severed corrosion conditions, turbine engine components are subject to creep processes that limit the components life such as a turbine bucket. The failure mechanism of a turbine bucket is related primarily to creep and corrosion and secondarily to thermal fatigue. As a result, it is desirable to assess the current conditions of such turbine component. This study uses the eddy current nondestructive evaluation technique in an effort to monitor the creep damage in a nickel base super-alloy, turbine bucket after service. The experimental results show an important electrical conductivity variation in eddy current images on the creep damage zone of nickel base super-alloy samples cut from a turbine bucket. Thermoelectric power measurements were also conducted in order to obtain a direct correlation between the presence of material changes due to creep damage and the electrical conductivity measurements. This research work shows an alternative non-destructive method in order to detect creep damage in a nickel base super-alloy turbine bucket. (Author)

  12. Study of a Pipe Inner Conditions Using a Thermographic Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Ibrahim Ahmad; Muhammad Aidiyat Ismail; Shukri Mohd

    2015-01-01

    Pipeline inspection has been more significant in industries as the safety of the pipeline system has been a very crucial aspect that needs an extra precaution. There is a few records of accidents occurred that are cause by the failure of the pipeline system. It has been proves that a regular inspection is a crucial activity in industrial practice. Thermography is one of the Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) method used to carry out the inspection over a system or specimen. Thermography inspection is consider as one of the versatile NDT because the inspection is carry out without damaging the physical properties, function and the quality of the inspected part. This work presents experimental works on studying the effectiveness of the thermography method in accessing the internal conditions of the pipe components. (Author)

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of UV pulse laser-induced damage performance of fused silica optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Wang, Fengrui; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Jiang, Xiaodong; Sun, Laixi; Ye, Xin; Li, Qingzhi; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Sun, Dunlu

    2017-11-24

    The surface laser damage performance of fused silica optics is related to the distribution of surface defects. In this study, we used chemical etching assisted by ultrasound and magnetorheological finishing to modify defect distribution in a fused silica surface, resulting in fused silica samples with different laser damage performance. Non-destructive test methods such as UV laser-induced fluorescence imaging and photo-thermal deflection were used to characterize the surface defects that contribute to the absorption of UV laser radiation. Our results indicate that the two methods can quantitatively distinguish differences in the distribution of absorptive defects in fused silica samples subjected to different post-processing steps. The percentage of fluorescence defects and the weak absorption coefficient were strongly related to the damage threshold and damage density of fused silica optics, as confirmed by the correlation curves built from statistical analysis of experimental data. The results show that non-destructive evaluation methods such as laser-induced fluorescence and photo-thermal absorption can be effectively applied to estimate the damage performance of fused silica optics at 351 nm pulse laser radiation. This indirect evaluation method is effective for laser damage performance assessment of fused silica optics prior to utilization.

  14. Radiation damage study in CZT matrix detectors exposed to gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva Fabelo, Antonio; Pinnera Hernandez, Ibrahin; Cruz Inclan, Carlos Manuel; Abreu Alfonso, Yamiel; Dona Lemus, Olga; Diaz Garcia, Angelina; Montanno Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Radiation damage in terms of atomic displacements in a typical CZT detector used in medical imaging applications was studied using the Monte Carlo statistical method. All detector structural and geometric features as well as different energies of the photons usually used in the application were taken into account. Considering the Mott McKinley Feshbach classical approach, effective cross sections of the displacements were calculated, including the number of displacements per atom for each atomic species present in the material and each photon energy considered. These results are analyzed and compared. Finally, the radiation damage on CZT detector is compared to that calculated in a similar detector manufactured with other semiconducting materials. (author)

  15. Reconstruction of structural damage based on reflection intensity spectra of fiber Bragg gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Guojun; Wei, Changben; Chen, Shiyuan; Yang, Guowei

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach for structural damage reconstruction based on the reflection intensity spectra of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). Our approach incorporates the finite element method, transfer matrix (T-matrix), and genetic algorithm to solve the inverse photo-elastic problem of damage reconstruction, i.e. to identify the location, size, and shape of a defect. By introducing a parameterized characterization of the damage information, the inverse photo-elastic problem is reduced to an optimization problem, and a relevant computational scheme was developed. The scheme iteratively searches for the solution to the corresponding direct photo-elastic problem until the simulated and measured (or target) reflection intensity spectra of the FBGs near the defect coincide within a prescribed error. Proof-of-concept validations of our approach were performed numerically and experimentally using both holed and cracked plate samples as typical cases of plane-stress problems. The damage identifiability was simulated by changing the deployment of the FBG sensors, including the total number of sensors and their distance to the defect. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that our approach is effective and promising. It provides us with a photo-elastic method for developing a remote, automatic damage-imaging technique that substantially improves damage identification for structural health monitoring. (paper)

  16. Spirally-patterned pinhole arrays for long-term fluorescence cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon Ung; Kang, YooNa; Moon, SangJun; Lee, Won Gu

    2015-11-07

    Fluorescence cell imaging using a fluorescence microscope is an extensively used technique to examine the cell nucleus, internal structures, and other cellular molecules with fluorescence response time and intensity. However, it is difficult to perform high resolution cell imaging for a long period of time with this technique due to necrosis and apoptosis depending on the type and subcellular location of the damage caused by phototoxicity. A large number of studies have been performed to resolve this problem, but researchers have struggled to meet the challenge between cellular viability and image resolution. In this study, we employ a specially designed disc to reduce cell damage by controlling total fluorescence exposure time without deterioration of the image resolution. This approach has many advantages such as, the apparatus is simple, cost-effective, and easily integrated into the optical pathway through a conventional fluorescence microscope.

  17. Anisotropic creep damage in the framework of continuum damage mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caboche, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    For some years, various works have shown the possibility of applying continuum mechanics to model the evolution of the damage variable, initially introduced by Kachanov. Of interest here are the complex problems posed by the anisotropy which affects both the elastic behaviour and the viscoplastic one, and also the rupture phenomenon. The main concepts of the Continuum Damage Mechanics are briefly reviewed together with some classical ways to introduce anisotropy of damage in the particular case of proportional loadings. Based on previous works, two generalizations are presented and discussed, which use different kinds of tensors to describe the anisotropy of creep damage: - The first one, by Murakami and Ohno introduces a second rank damage tensor and a net stress tensor through a net area definition. The effective stress-strain behaviour is then obtained by a fourth rank tensor. - The second theory, by the author, uses one effective stress tensor only, defined in terms of the macroscopic strain behaviour, through a fourth-order non-symmetrical damage tensor. The two theories are compared at several levels: difference and similarities are pointed out for the damage evolution during tensile creep as well as for anisotropy effects. The possibilities are discussed and compared on the basis of some existing experimental results, which leads to a partial validation of the two approaches. (orig.)

  18. Experiment and numerical simulation of welding induced damage: stainless steel 15-5PH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study is the prediction of damage and residual stresses induced by hot processing which leads to phase transformation in martensitic stainless steel. This study firstly concerns the modelling of the damage of material induced by a complex history of thermo-elastoplastic multiphase in heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of welding. In this work, a two-scale mode of elastoplastic damage multiphase was developed in the framework of thermodynamics of irreversible process. The constitutive equations are coupling with ductile damage, elasto-plasticity, phase transformation, and transformation plasticity. Besides, a damage equation was proposed based on the Lemaitre's damage model in the framework of continuum damage mechanics. The experiments of 15-5PH were implemented for the identification of phase transformation, transformation plasticity and damage models. Tensile tests of round specimens were used to identify the parameters of damage model as well as mechanical behaviours at various temperatures. Tests of flat notched specimen were designed to provide the validation of damage model and strain localization using three dimensional image correlation technologies. In addition, microscopic analysis was performed to provide microstructure characterization of 15-5PH and to discover the damage mechanism. Finally the numerical simulation was performed in the code CAST3M of CEA. On the one hand, numerical verification of the flat notched plates was implemented and compared with experimental results. On the other hand, we used the two-scale model including phase transformation, transformation plasticity and damage to simulate the level of residual stresses of a disk made of 15-5PH metal heated by laser. The internal variables, such as strain, stress, damage, were successfully traced in the simulation of two-scale model. The simulation results showed the transformation plasticity changes the level of residual stresses and should not be negligible; damage decreases

  19. Structural imaging of mild traumatic brain injury may not be enough: overview of functional and metabolic imaging of mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Samuel S; Bales, James W; Edward Dixon, C; Hwang, Misun

    2017-04-01

    A majority of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) present as mild injury with no findings on conventional clinical imaging methods. Due to this difficulty of imaging assessment on mild TBI patients, there has been much emphasis on the development of diffusion imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). However, basic science research in TBI shows that many of the functional and metabolic abnormalities in TBI may be present even in the absence of structural damage. Moreover, structural damage may be present at a microscopic and molecular level that is not detectable by structural imaging modality. The use of functional and metabolic imaging modalities can provide information on pathological changes in mild TBI patients that may not be detected by structural imaging. Although there are various differences in protocols of positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) methods, these may be important modalities to be used in conjunction with structural imaging in the future in order to detect and understand the pathophysiology of mild TBI. In this review, studies of mild TBI patients using these modalities that detect functional and metabolic state of the brain are discussed. Each modality's advantages and disadvantages are compared, and potential future applications of using combined modalities are explored.

  20. A high sensitivity, high throughput, automated single-cell gel electrophoresis ('Comet') DNA damage assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vojnovic, B.; Barber, P.R.; Johnston, P.J.; Gregory, H.C.; Locke, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    A fully automated microscopy machine vision image capture and analysis system for the collection of data from slides of 'comets' has been developed. The novel image processing algorithms employed in delineating the 'comet head' from the 'comet tail' allow us to determine accurately very low levels of damage. In conjunction with calibrated and automated image capture methods, we are able to eliminate operator subjectivity and analyse large numbers of cells (>2500) in a short time (<1 hour). The image processing algorithm is designed to handle particularly difficult nuclei containing a high degree of structure, due to DNA clumping. We also present techniques used to extend the assay's dynamic range by removing interfering background fluorescence and to define a region of interest. If subtle biological variations are to be quantified (e.g. cell cycle dependant damage), then the use of large cell populations is dictated. Under those circumstances, the use of a fully automated system is particularly advantageous providing that the manner in which data is extracted does not introduce any inadvertent bias. In practice, it is essential that the image processing steps are geared towards the correct recognition of an acceptable cell nucleus, i.e. comet 'head'. We acknowledge the financial support of CRUK, Programme Grant C133/A1812 - SP 2195-01/02 and the US Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program grant DE-FG07-99ER62878

  1. Imaging the Visual Pathway in Neuromyelitis Optica

    OpenAIRE

    Pfueller, Caspar F.; Paul, Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to summarize the current knowledge on visual pathway damage in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT).

  2. Evidence for highly localized damage in internal tin and powder-in-tube Nb{sub 3}Sn strands rolled before reaction obtained from coupled magneto-optical imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyanskii, A A; Lee, P J; Jewell, M C; Larbalestier, D C [Applied Superconductivity Center, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Barzi, E; Turrioni, D; Zlobin, A V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Nb{sub 3}Sn strands for high-current, high-field magnets must be cabled before reaction while the conductor is still composed of ductile components. Even though still in the ductile, deformable state, significant damage can occur in this step, which expresses itself by inhomogeneous A15 formation, Sn leakage or even worse effects during later reaction. In this study, we simulate cabling damage by rolling recent high performance powder-in-tube (PIT) and internal tin (IT) strands in controlled increments, applying standard Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatments, and then examining the local changes using magneto-optical imaging (MOI), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). These combined characterizations allow any local damage to the filament architecture to be made clear. MOI directly reveals the local variation of superconductivity while CLSM is extremely sensitive in revealing Sn leakage beyond the diffusion barrier into the stabilizing Cu. These techniques reveal a markedly different response to deformation by the PIT and IT strands. The study demonstrates that these tools can provide a local, thorough, and detailed view of how strands degrade and thus complement more complex extracted strand studies.

  3. Restoration of high-resolution AFM images captured with broken probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. F.; Corrigan, D.; Forman, C.; Jarvis, S.; Kokaram, A.

    2012-03-01

    A type of artefact is induced by damage of the scanning probe when the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) captures a material surface structure with nanoscale resolution. This artefact has a dramatic form of distortion rather than the traditional blurring artefacts. Practically, it is not easy to prevent the damage of the scanning probe. However, by using natural image deblurring techniques in image processing domain, a comparatively reliable estimation of the real sample surface structure can be generated. This paper introduces a novel Hough Transform technique as well as a Bayesian deblurring algorithm to remove this type of artefact. The deblurring result is successful at removing blur artefacts in the AFM artefact images. And the details of the fibril surface topography are well preserved.

  4. Impact and damage of an armour composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Parry, S.; Bourne, N. K.; Townsend, D.; James, B.

    2017-01-01

    The current study assesses the application of the Taylor Test to validate hydrocode modelling of composite materials. 0° in-plane and through-thickness rods were cut from a 25 mm thick composite panel, made from autoclave cured 0°, 90° uni-directional carbon/epoxy prepreg. The rods were fired against a semi-infinite steel anvil and high-speed video imaging was used to capture the difference in rod shape and damage patterns during the experiments. Results of simulation with a rate sensitive, transversely isotropic composite material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode were compared with the present experiments. The model showed good correlation with global deformation of the rods, and was used to qualitatively assess some of the asymmetric deformation features in the material. As the present model implementation did not account for damage at this stage, it did not predict inter-ply delamination normal to the impact face for the in-plane 0° rods and that parallel to the impact face in the through-thickness samples.

  5. PHOTOACOUSTIC NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND IMAGING OF CARIES IN DENTAL SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.; Dewhurst, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries is a disease wherein bacterial processes damage hard tooth structure. Traditional dental radiography has its limitations for detecting early stage caries. In this study, a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with the near-infrared light source has been applied to postmortem dental samples to obtain 2-D and 3-D images. Imaging results showed that the PA technique can be used to image human teeth caries. For non-destructive photoacoustic evaluation and imaging, the induced temperature and pressure rises within biotissues should not cause physical damage to the tissue. For example, temperature rises above 5 deg. C within live human teeth will cause pulpal necrosis. Therefore, several simulations based on the thermoelastic effect have been applied to predict temperature and pressure fields within samples. Predicted temperature levels are below corresponding safety limits, but care is required to avoid nonlinear absorption phenomena. Furthermore, PA imaging results from the phantom provide evidence for high sensitivity, which shows the imaging potential of the PA technique for detecting early stage disease.

  6. Cardiac sympathetic neuronal damage precedes myocardial fibrosis in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbriaco, Massimo; Piscopo, Valentina; Ponsiglione, Andrea; Nappi, Carmela; Puglia, Marta; Dell'Aversana, Serena; Spinelli, Letizia; Cuocolo, Alberto; Pellegrino, Teresa; Petretta, Mario; Riccio, Eleonora; Pisani, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic denervation may be detectable in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD), suggesting its usefulness for early detection of the disease. However, the relationship between sympathetic neuronal damage measured by 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging with myocardial fibrosis on cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is still unclear. Cardiac sympathetic innervation was assessed by 123 I-MIBG single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in 25 patients with genetically proved AFD. Within one month from MIBG imaging, all patients underwent contrast-enhanced CMR. MIBG defect size and fibrosis size on CMR were measured for the left ventricle (LV) and expressed as %LV. Patients were divided into three groups according to MIBG and CMR findings: (1) matched normal, without MIBG defects and without fibrosis on CMR (n = 10); (2) unmatched, with MIBG defect but without fibrosis (n = 5); and (3) matched abnormal, with MIBG defect and fibrosis (n = 10). The three groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, α-galactosidase, proteinuria, glomerular filtration rate, and troponin I, while New York Heart Association class (p = 0.008), LV hypertrophy (p = 0.05), and enzyme replacement therapy (p = 0.02) were different among groups. Although in patients with matched abnormal findings, there was a significant correlation between MIBG defect size and area of fibrosis at CMR (r 2 = 0.98, p < 0.001), MIBG defect size was larger than fibrosis size (26 ± 23 vs. 18 ± 13%LV, p = 0.02). Sympathetic neuronal damage is frequent in AFD patients, and it may precede myocardial damage, such as fibrosis. Thus, 123 I-MIBG imaging can be considered a challenging technique for early detection of cardiac involvement in AFD. (orig.)

  7. The alteration of chromatin domains during damage repair induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Olson, K.M.; Olson, G.B.

    1995-01-01

    Several groups previously have reported the ability of chromatin structure to influence the production of damage induced by ionizing radiation. The authors' interest has been to determine whether chromatin structural alterations exist after ionizing radiation during a repair interval. The earlier work investigated this question using biochemical techniques. The crosslinking of nuclear structural proteins to DNA after ionizing radiation was observed. In addition, they found that the chromatin structure in vitro as measured by sucrose density gradient sedimentation, was altered after ionizing radiation. These observations added to earlier studies in which digital imaging techniques showed an alteration in feulgen-positive DNA after irradiation prompted the present study. The object of this study was to detect whether the higher order structure of DNA into chromatin domains within interphase human cells was altered in interphase cells in response to a radiation induced damage. The present study takes advantage of the advances in the detection of chromatin domains in situ using DNA specific dyes and digital image processing of established human T and B cell lines

  8. Terahertz and Thermal Testing of Glass-Fiber Reinforced Composites with Impact Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chady

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on glass-fiber reinforced composites, due to their growing popularity and high diversity of industrial applications, are becoming an increasingly popular branch of the nondestructive testing. Mentioned composites are used, among other applications, in wind turbine blades and are exposed to various kinds of damages. The equipment reliability requirements force the development of accurate methods of their health monitoring. In this paper we present the study of composite samples with impact damages, using three methods: terahertz time domain inspection, active thermography with convective excitation, and active thermography with microwave excitation. The results of discrete Fourier transform of obtained time sequences of signals will be presented as well as some image processing of resulting amplitude and phase images. Proposed experimental methods combined with harmonic analysis are efficient tool of defects detection and allowed to detect flaws in examined specimens. Reader may find it interesting that in spite of differences in nature of applied experimental methods, one technique of signal processing (harmonic analysis gave adequate and comparable results in each case.

  9. A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  10. Non-damaging laser therapy of the macula: Titration algorithm and tissue response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Lavinsky, Daniel; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Retinal photocoagulation typically results in permanent scarring and scotomata, which limit its applicability to the macula, preclude treatments in the fovea, and restrict the retreatments. Non-damaging approaches to laser therapy have been tested in the past, but the lack of reliable titration and slow treatment paradigms limited their clinical use. We developed and tested a titration algorithm for sub-visible and non-damaging treatments of the retina with pulses sufficiently short to be used with pattern laser scanning. The algorithm based on Arrhenius model of tissue damage optimizes the power and duration for every energy level, relative to the threshold of lesion visibility established during titration (and defined as 100%). Experiments with pigmented rabbits established that lesions in the 50-75% energy range were invisible ophthalmoscopically, but detectable with Fluorescein Angiography and OCT, while at 30% energy there was only very minor damage to the RPE, which recovered within a few days. Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR) have been treated over the edematous areas at 30% energy, using 200μm spots with 0.25 diameter spacing. No signs of laser damage have been detected with any imaging modality. In CSR patients, subretinal fluid resolved within 45 days. In DME patients the edema decreased by approximately 150μm over 60 days. After 3-4 months some patients presented with recurrence of edema, and they responded well to retreatment with the same parameters, without any clinically visible damage. This pilot data indicates a possibility of effective and repeatable macular laser therapy below the tissue damage threshold.

  11. Imaging tools in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G

    2012-01-01

    As modern imaging tools such as US and MRI become increasingly available, rheumatologists now have access to highly sensitive measures to assist in the evaluation of both the inflammatory and structural damage components underlying various arthritides over the disease duration. Both US and MRI ha...

  12. First Evaluation of Infrared Thermography as a Tool for the Monitoring of Udder Health Status in Farms of Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Zaninelli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to test infrared thermography (IRT, under field conditions, as a possible tool for the evaluation of cow udder health status. Thermographic images (n. 310 from different farms (n. 3 were collected and evaluated using a dedicated software application to calculate automatically and in a standardized way, thermographic indices of each udder. Results obtained have confirmed a significant relationship between udder surface skin temperature (USST and classes of somatic cell count in collected milk samples. Sensitivity and specificity in the classification of udder health were: 78.6% and 77.9%, respectively, considering a level of somatic cell count (SCC of 200,000 cells/mL as a threshold to classify a subclinical mastitis or 71.4% and 71.6%, respectively when a threshold of 400,000 cells/mL was adopted. Even though the sensitivity and specificity were lower than in other published papers dealing with non-automated analysis of IRT images, they were considered acceptable as a first field application of this new and developing technology. Future research will permit further improvements in the use of IRT, at farm level. Such improvements could be attained through further image processing and enhancement, and the application of indicators developed and tested in the present study with the purpose of developing a monitoring system for the automatic and early detection of mastitis in individual animals on commercial farms.

  13. Radiation temperature of chosen fruit and seed as a parameter of their quality evaluation (model investigation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowski, P.

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation presents the investigation on application of passive and active thermography for evaluation of seed and fruit quality. A hypothesis was formulated, that internal defects and physiological disorders of fruit as well as biochemical processes which cause diminishing of seed viability lead to changes of thermal properties within these objects. It was stated that radiation temperature of seed and fruit surface is a good parameter of evaluation of their quality. During thermal stimulation, hetero-geneities of thermal properties lead to the occurrence of thermal contrasts on the surface of these materials which can be successfully registered with the use of thermographic device. A method was elaborated of early detection of apple bruises with the use of pulsed phase thermography (PPT). On the base of model investigations of heat transfer in fruit, optimal parameters of thermographic registration were chosen. Both model and experimental studies revealed that heat pulse of 1000 W, ranging from one to three seconds, caused the increase of fruit surface temperature of only 3-4°C, however due to the high heat capacity of apple skin its internal temperature did not increase above 1°C. The use of Fourier transformation, the analysis of ampligrams and phasegrams of fruit heat response as well as thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) enabled to eliminate from the thermographic images the contrasts resulting from non-uniform heating of the object and to distinguish defects occurring at different depths. The studies were performed on detection of flesh watercore in apples through the analysis of radiation temperature change on the surface of fruit during short-time heating. It was stated that the derivative of apple temperature in time per apple mass is a good parameter to evaluate the differences in thermal properties between apples with and without watercore affected tissues. The temperature gradient of 18.5°C between the fruit surface and the ambient

  14. Imaging of patellofemoral ins