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Sample records for thermodynamic state functions

  1. Thermodynamic functions of element 105 in neutral and ionized states

    Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.; Ionova, G.V.; Johnson, E.

    1994-01-01

    The basic thermodynamic functions, the entropy, free energy, and enthalpy, for element 105 (hahnium) in electronic configurations d 3 s 2 , d 3 sp, and d 4 s 1 and for its + 5 ionized state (5f 14 ) have been calculated as a function of temperature. The data are based on the results of the calculations of the corresponding electronic states of element 105 using the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock method. 19 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs

  2. On the thermodynamics of the McMillan-Mayer state function

    Mollerup, Jørgen; Breil, Martin Peter

    2009-01-01

    to develop the McMillan-Mayer framework in a classical thermodynamic context for which we develop the relationship between the state function of the McMillan-Mayer framework and the Helmholtz state function. A Taylor expansion method can be applied to the osmotic pressure of a solution which is dilute...

  3. Ferroelectric-antiferroelectric mixed systems. Equation of state, thermodynamic functions

    N.A.Korynevskii

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of equation of state for ferroelectric-antiferroelectric mixed systems in the whole region of a concentration change (0≤n≤1 is discussed. The main peculiarity of the presented model turns out to be the possibility for the site dipole momentum to be oriented ferroelectrically in z-direction and antiferroelectrically in x-direction. Such a situation takes place in mixed compounds of KDP type. The different phases (ferro-, antiferro-, paraelectric, dipole glass and some combinations of them have been found and analyzed.

  4. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattices, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. This book is divided into three parts. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. In the third part, the multi-electron system is discussed theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for the superconducting state in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and examined in-depth. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States is an introductory treatise and textbook on meso...

  5. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States

    Fujimoto, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a well-established discipline of physics for properties of matter in thermal equilibrium with the surroundings. Applying to crystals, however, the laws encounter undefined properties of crystal lattice, which therefore need to be determined for a clear and well-defined description of crystalline states. Thermodynamics of Crystalline States explores the roles played by order variables and dynamic lattices in crystals in a wholly new way. The book begins by clarifying basic concepts for stable crystals. Next, binary phase transitions are discussed to study collective motion of order variables, as described mostly as classical phenomena. New to this edition is the examination of magnetic crystals, where magnetic symmetry is essential for magnetic phase transitions. The multi-electron system is also discussed  theoretically, as a quantum-mechanical example, for superconductivity in metallic crystals. Throughout the book, the role played by the lattice is emphasized and studied in-depth. Thermod...

  6. Relationship between the partial molar and molar quantity of a thermodynamic state function in a multicomponent mixture – revisited

    Näfe, H.

    2013-01-01

    As far as a multicomponent mixture is concerned, different versions exist in the literature for the relationship between the partial molar and molar quantity of a thermodynamic state function with the most prominent example of the two quantities being the activity coefficient of an arbitrary component and the excess Gibbs free energy of a mixture comprising this component. Since the relationships published so far have to a large degree been derived independently of each other and result from apparently conflicting approaches, they are still considered as separate subjects in the literature. It is demonstrated that despite this curious situation all relationships are equivalent to each other from a mathematical point of view

  7. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of interacting tunneling transport: variational grand potential, density functional formulation and nature of steady-state forces

    Hyldgaard, P

    2012-01-01

    The standard formulation of tunneling transport rests on an open-boundary modeling. There, conserving approximations to nonequilibrium Green function or quantum statistical mechanics provide consistent but computational costly approaches; alternatively, the use of density-dependent ballistic-transport calculations (e.g., Lang 1995 Phys. Rev. B 52 5335), here denoted ‘DBT’, provides computationally efficient (approximate) atomistic characterizations of the electron behavior but has until now lacked a formal justification. This paper presents an exact, variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic theory for fully interacting tunneling and provides a rigorous foundation for frozen-nuclei DBT calculations as a lowest-order approximation to an exact nonequilibrium thermodynamic density functional evaluation. The theory starts from the complete electron nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics and I identify the operator for the nonequilibrium Gibbs free energy which, generally, must be treated as an implicit solution of the fully interacting many-body dynamics. I demonstrate a minimal property of a functional for the nonequilibrium thermodynamic grand potential which thus uniquely identifies the solution as the exact nonequilibrium density matrix. I also show that the uniqueness-of-density proof from a closely related Lippmann-Schwinger collision density functional theory (Hyldgaard 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 165109) makes it possible to express the variational nonequilibrium thermodynamic description as a single-particle formulation based on universal electron-density functionals; the full nonequilibrium single-particle formulation improves the DBT method, for example, by a more refined account of Gibbs free energy effects. I illustrate a formal evaluation of the zero-temperature thermodynamic grand potential value which I find is closely related to the variation in the scattering phase shifts and hence to Friedel density oscillations. This paper also discusses the

  8. Quantum thermodynamics of nanoscale steady states far from equilibrium

    Taniguchi, Nobuhiko

    2018-04-01

    We develop an exact quantum thermodynamic description for a noninteracting nanoscale steady state that couples strongly with multiple reservoirs. We demonstrate that there exists a steady-state extension of the thermodynamic function that correctly accounts for the multiterminal Landauer-Büttiker formula of quantum transport of charge, energy, or heat via the nonequilibrium thermodynamic relations. Its explicit form is obtained for a single bosonic or fermionic level in the wide-band limit, and corresponding thermodynamic forces (affinities) are identified. Nonlinear generalization of the Onsager reciprocity relations are derived. We suggest that the steady-state thermodynamic function is also capable of characterizing the heat current fluctuations of the critical transport where the thermal fluctuations dominate. Also, the suggested nonequilibrium steady-state thermodynamic relations seemingly persist for a spin-degenerate single level with local interaction.

  9. Quantum Thermodynamics at Strong Coupling: Operator Thermodynamic Functions and Relations

    Jen-Tsung Hsiang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying or constructing a fine-grained microscopic theory that will emerge under specific conditions to a known macroscopic theory is always a formidable challenge. Thermodynamics is perhaps one of the most powerful theories and best understood examples of emergence in physical sciences, which can be used for understanding the characteristics and mechanisms of emergent processes, both in terms of emergent structures and the emergent laws governing the effective or collective variables. Viewing quantum mechanics as an emergent theory requires a better understanding of all this. In this work we aim at a very modest goal, not quantum mechanics as thermodynamics, not yet, but the thermodynamics of quantum systems, or quantum thermodynamics. We will show why even with this minimal demand, there are many new issues which need be addressed and new rules formulated. The thermodynamics of small quantum many-body systems strongly coupled to a heat bath at low temperatures with non-Markovian behavior contains elements, such as quantum coherence, correlations, entanglement and fluctuations, that are not well recognized in traditional thermodynamics, built on large systems vanishingly weakly coupled to a non-dynamical reservoir. For quantum thermodynamics at strong coupling, one needs to reexamine the meaning of the thermodynamic functions, the viability of the thermodynamic relations and the validity of the thermodynamic laws anew. After a brief motivation, this paper starts with a short overview of the quantum formulation based on Gelin & Thoss and Seifert. We then provide a quantum formulation of Jarzynski’s two representations. We show how to construct the operator thermodynamic potentials, the expectation values of which provide the familiar thermodynamic variables. Constructing the operator thermodynamic functions and verifying or modifying their relations is a necessary first step in the establishment of a viable thermodynamics theory for

  10. Thermodynamic Fluid Equations-of-State

    Leslie V. Woodcock

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As experimental measurements of thermodynamic properties have improved in accuracy, to five or six figures, over the decades, cubic equations that are widely used for modern thermodynamic fluid property data banks require ever-increasing numbers of terms with more fitted parameters. Functional forms with continuity for Gibbs density surface ρ(p,T which accommodate a critical-point singularity are fundamentally inappropriate in the vicinity of the critical temperature (Tc and pressure (pc and in the supercritical density mid-range between gas- and liquid-like states. A mesophase, confined within percolation transition loci that bound the gas- and liquid-state by third-order discontinuities in derivatives of the Gibbs energy, has been identified. There is no critical-point singularity at Tc on Gibbs density surface and no continuity of gas and liquid. When appropriate functional forms are used for each state separately, we find that the mesophase pressure functions are linear. The negative and positive deviations, for both gas and liquid states, on either side of the mesophase, are accurately represented by three or four-term virial expansions. All gaseous states require only known virial coefficients, and physical constants belonging to the fluid, i.e., Boyle temperature (TB, critical temperature (Tc, critical pressure (pc and coexisting densities of gas (ρcG and liquid (ρcL along the critical isotherm. A notable finding for simple fluids is that for all gaseous states below TB, the contribution of the fourth virial term is negligible within experimental uncertainty. Use may be made of a symmetry between gas and liquid states in the state function rigidity (dp/dρT to specify lower-order liquid-state coefficients. Preliminary results for selected isotherms and isochores are presented for the exemplary fluids, CO2, argon, water and SF6, with focus on the supercritical mesophase and critical region.

  11. Methods for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2013-05-21

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  12. Fundamental functions in equilibrium thermodynamics

    Horst, H.J. ter

    In the standard presentations of the principles of Gibbsian equilibrium thermodynamics one can find several gaps in the logic. For a subject that is as widely used as equilibrium thermodynamics, it is of interest to clear up such questions of mathematical rigor. In this paper it is shown that using

  13. Thermodynamic Ground States of Complex Oxide Heterointerfaces

    Gunkel, F.; Hoffmann-Eifert, S.; Heinen, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    The formation mechanism of 2-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) at heterointerfaces between nominally insulating oxides is addressed with a thermodynamical approach. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the thermodynamic ground states of various 2DEG systems directly probed in high temperature...

  14. Quantum thermodynamics: a nonequilibrium Green's function approach.

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Ochoa, Maicol A; Galperin, Michael

    2015-02-27

    We establish the foundations of a nonequilibrium theory of quantum thermodynamics for noninteracting open quantum systems strongly coupled to their reservoirs within the framework of the nonequilibrium Green's functions. The energy of the system and its coupling to the reservoirs are controlled by a slow external time-dependent force treated to first order beyond the quasistatic limit. We derive the four basic laws of thermodynamics and characterize reversible transformations. Stochastic thermodynamics is recovered in the weak coupling limit.

  15. Making thermodynamic functions of nanosystems intensive

    Nassimi, Ali Mohammad; Parsafar, Gholamabbas

    2006-01-01

    The interaction potential energy among particles in many systems is of the form of r^-(alpha), at least at long distances. It has been argued that, in systems for which (alpha) < d (d is the space dimension) we encounter with nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions. A scaling parameter N~ has been introduced to make nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of such systems extensive (intensive) functions. Our simulation results show that this parameter is not capable of ...

  16. Making thermodynamic functions of nanosystems intensive

    Nassimi, A M; Parsafar, G A

    2007-01-01

    The potential energy of interaction among particles in many systems is proportional to r -α . In systems for which α< d, we encounter nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions, where d is the space dimension. A scaling parameter, N-tilde, has been introduced to make the nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of such systems extensive (intensive). Our simulation results show that this parameter is not capable of making the thermodynamic functions of a nanosystem extensive (intensive). Here we have presented a theoretical justification for N-tilde. Then we have generalized this scaling parameter to be capable of making the nonextensive (nonintensive) thermodynamic functions of nanosystems extensive (intensive). This generalized parameter is proportional to the potential energy per particle at zero temperature

  17. Thermodynamic laws apply to brain function.

    Salerian, Alen J

    2010-02-01

    Thermodynamic laws and complex system dynamics govern brain function. Thus, any change in brain homeostasis by an alteration in brain temperature, neurotransmission or content may cause region-specific brain dysfunction. This is the premise for the Salerian Theory of Brain built upon a new paradigm for neuropsychiatric disorders: the governing influence of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, thermodynamic laws. The principles of region-specific brain function thermodynamics are reviewed. The clinical and supporting evidence including the paradoxical effects of various agents that alter brain homeostasis is demonstrated.

  18. Thermodynamic state, specific heat, and enthalpy function of saturated UO2 vapor between 3,000 K and 5,000 K

    Karow, H.U.

    1977-02-01

    The properties have been determined by means of statistical mechanics. The discussion of the thermodynamic state includes the evaluation of the plasma state and its contribution to the caloric variables-of-state of saturated oxide fuel vapor. Because of the extremely high ion and electron density due to thermal ionization, the ionized component of the fuel vapor does no more represent a perfect kinetic plasma. At temperatures around 5,000 K, UO 2 vapor reaches the collective plasma state and becomes increasingly 'metallic'. - Moreover, the nonuniform molecular equilibrium composition of UO 2 vapor has been taken into account in calculating its caloric functions-of-state. The contribution to specific heat and enthalpy of thermally excited electronic states of the vapor molecules has been derived by means of a Rydberg orbital model of the UO 2 molecule. The resulting enthalpy functions and specific heats for saturated UO 2 vapor of equilibrium composition and that for pure UO 2 gas are compared with the enthalpy and specific heat data of gaseous UO 2 at lower temperatures known from literature. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Thermodynamic picture of the glassy state

    Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    A picture for the thermodynamics of the glassy state is introduced. It assumes that one extra parameter, the effective temperature, is needed to describe the glassy state. This explains the classical paradoxes concerning the Ehrenfest relations and the Prigogine-Defay ratio. As a second feature, the

  20. Thermodynamic state ensemble models of cis-regulation.

    Marc S Sherman

    Full Text Available A major goal in computational biology is to develop models that accurately predict a gene's expression from its surrounding regulatory DNA. Here we present one class of such models, thermodynamic state ensemble models. We describe the biochemical derivation of the thermodynamic framework in simple terms, and lay out the mathematical components that comprise each model. These components include (1 the possible states of a promoter, where a state is defined as a particular arrangement of transcription factors bound to a DNA promoter, (2 the binding constants that describe the affinity of the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that occur in each state, and (3 whether each state is capable of transcribing. Using these components, we demonstrate how to compute a cis-regulatory function that encodes the probability of a promoter being active. Our intention is to provide enough detail so that readers with little background in thermodynamics can compose their own cis-regulatory functions. To facilitate this goal, we also describe a matrix form of the model that can be easily coded in any programming language. This formalism has great flexibility, which we show by illustrating how phenomena such as competition between transcription factors and cooperativity are readily incorporated into these models. Using this framework, we also demonstrate that Michaelis-like functions, another class of cis-regulatory models, are a subset of the thermodynamic framework with specific assumptions. By recasting Michaelis-like functions as thermodynamic functions, we emphasize the relationship between these models and delineate the specific circumstances representable by each approach. Application of thermodynamic state ensemble models is likely to be an important tool in unraveling the physical basis of combinatorial cis-regulation and in generating formalisms that accurately predict gene expression from DNA sequence.

  1. “Covalent Hydration” Reactions in Model Monomeric Ru 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes: Thermodynamic Favorability as a Function of Metal Oxidation and Overall Spin States

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Cape, Jonathan L.; Hurst, James K.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2011-09-05

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the plausibility of water addition to the simple mononuclear ruthenium complexes, [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 2+}/{sup 3+} and [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)RuOH]{sup 3+}, in which the OH fragment adds to the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. Activation of bpy toward water addition has frequently been postulated within the literature, although there exists little definitive experimental evidence for this type of 'covalent hydration'. In this study, we examine the energetic dependence of the reaction upon metal oxidation state, overall spin state of the complex, as well as selectivity for various positions on the bipyridine ring. The thermodynamic favorability is found to be highly dependent upon all three parameters, with free energies of reaction that span favorable and unfavorable regimes. Aqueous addition to [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 3+} was found to be highly favorable for the S = 1/2 state, while reduction of the formal oxidation state on the metal center makes the reaction highly unfavorable. Examination of both facial and meridional isomers reveals that when bipyridine occupies the position trans to the ruthenyl oxo atom, reactivity toward OH addition decreases and the site preferences are altered. The electronic structure and spectroscopic signatures (EPR parameters and simulated spectra) have been determined to aid in recognition of 'covalent hydration' in experimental systems. EPR parameters are found to uniquely characterize the position of the OH addition to the bpy as well as the overall spin state of the system.

  2. International thermodynamic tables of the fluid state propylene (propene)

    Angus, S; De Reuck, K M

    2013-01-01

    International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State - 7 Propylene (Propene) is a compilation of internationally agreed values of the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of propylene. This book is composed of three chapters, and begins with the presentation of experimental result of thermodynamic studies compared with the equations used to generate the tables. The succeeding chapter deals with correlating equations for thermodynamic property determination of propylene. The last chapter provides the tabulations of the propylene's thermodynamic properties and constants. This book will prove

  3. convergent methods for calculating thermodynamic Green functions

    Bowen, S. P.; Williams, C. D.; Mancini, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    A convergent method of approximating thermodynamic Green functions is outlined briefly. The method constructs a sequence of approximants which converges independently of the strength of the Hamiltonian's coupling constants. Two new concepts associated with the approximants are introduced: the resolving power of the approximation, and conditional creation (annihilation) operators. These ideas are illustrated on an exactly soluble model and a numerical example. A convergent expression for the s...

  4. Thermodynamic Green functions in theory of superconductivity

    N.M.Plakida

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A general theory of superconductivity is formulated within the thermodynamic Green function method for various types of pairing mediated by phonons, spin fluctuations, and strong Coulomb correlations in the Hubbard and t-J models. A rigorous Dyson equation for matrix Green functions is derived in terms of a self-energy as a many-particle Green function. By applying the noncrossing approximation for the self-energy, a closed self-consistent system of equations is obtained, similar to the conventional Eliashberg equations. A brief discussion of superconductivity mediated by kinematic interaction with an estimation of a superconducting transition temperature in the Hubbard model is given.

  5. Thermodynamically constrained correction to ab initio equations of state

    French, Martin; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We show how equations of state generated by density functional theory methods can be augmented to match experimental data without distorting the correct behavior in the high- and low-density limits. The technique is thermodynamically consistent and relies on knowledge of the density and bulk modulus at a reference state and an estimation of the critical density of the liquid phase. We apply the method to four materials representing different classes of solids: carbon, molybdenum, lithium, and lithium fluoride. It is demonstrated that the corrected equations of state for both the liquid and solid phases show a significantly reduced dependence of the exchange-correlation functional used.

  6. Identifying functional thermodynamics in autonomous Maxwellian ratchets

    Boyd, Alexander B.; Mandal, Dibyendu; Crutchfield, James P.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. This reveals that these Demons are more functional than previous candidates. They too behave either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or as Landauer erasers, consuming external work to remove information from a sequence of binary symbols by decreasing their individual uncertainty. Going beyond these, our Demon exhibits a new functionality that erases bits not by simply decreasing individual-symbol uncertainty, but by increasing inter-bit correlations (that is, by adding temporal order) while increasing single-symbol uncertainty. In all cases, but especially in the new erasure regime, exactly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dynamical processes and not on changes purely in system configurational entropy, as previously employed. We rigorously derive the refined Second Law under minimal assumptions and so it applies quite broadly—for Demons with and without memory and input sequences that are correlated or not. We note that general Maxwellian Demons readily violate previously proposed, alternative such bounds, while the current bound still holds. As such, it broadly describes the minimal energetic cost of any computation by a thermodynamic system.

  7. A method for the selection of a functional form for a thermodynamic equation of state using weighted linear least squares stepwise regression

    Jacobsen, R. T.; Stewart, R. B.; Crain, R. W., Jr.; Rose, G. L.; Myers, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for establishing a rational choice of the terms to be included in an equation of state with a large number of adjustable coefficients. The methods presented were developed for use in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen. However, a general application of the methods is possible in studies involving the determination of an optimum polynomial equation for fitting a large number of data points. The data considered in the least squares problem are experimental thermodynamic pressure-density-temperature data. Attention is given to a description of stepwise multiple regression and the use of stepwise regression in the determination of an equation of state for oxygen and nitrogen.

  8. International thermodynamic tables of the fluid state helium-4

    de Reuck, K M; McCarty, R D

    2013-01-01

    International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State Helium-4 presents the IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables for the thermodynamic properties of helium. The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project has therefore encouraged the critical analysis of the available thermodynamic measurements for helium and their synthesis into tables. This book is divided into three chapters. The first chapter discusses the experimental results and compares with the equations used to generate the tables. These equations are supplemented by a vapor pressure equation, which represents the 1958 He-4 scale of temperature that is

  9. Methods and systems for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2014-12-02

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  10. Thermodynamics

    Zanchini, E.

    1988-01-01

    The definition of energy, in thermodynamics, is dependent by starting operative definitions of the basic concepts of physics on which it rests, such as those of isolated systems, ambient of a system, separable system and set of separable states. Then the definition of energy is rigorously extended to open systems. The extension gives a clear physical meaning to the concept of energy difference between two states with arbitrary different compositions

  11. Thermodynamic approach to the inelastic state variable theories

    Dashner, P.A.

    1978-06-01

    A continuum model is proposed as a theoretical foundation for the inelastic state variable theory of Hart. The model is based on the existence of a free energy function and the assumption that a strained material element recalls two other local configurations which are, in some specified manner, descriptive of prior deformation. A precise formulation of these material hypotheses within the classical thermodynamical framework leads to the recovery of a generalized elastic law and the specification of evolutionary laws for the remembered configurations which are frame invariant and formally valid for finite strains. Moreover, the precise structure of Hart's theory is recovered when strains are assumed to be small

  12. Chlorine international thermodynamic tables of the fluid state

    Angus, S; de Reuck, K M

    1985-01-01

    Chlorine: International Thermodynamic Tables of the Fluid State-8 is a four-chapter book that covers available and estimated data on chlorine; estimation of the element's properties; the correlating equations for the element; and how the tabulated properties are calculated from chosen equation. The tables in this book give the volume, entropy, enthalpy, isobaric heat capacity, compression factor, fugacity/pressure ratio, Joule-Thomson coefficient, ratio of the heat capacities, and speed of sound as a function of pressure and temperature. Given in the tables as well are the pressure, entropy, i

  13. Eliashberg Inversion of superconducting state thermodynamics

    Junod, A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the inversion of the Eliashberg equations currently used in tunneling spectroscopy may be applied to calorimetric data in the superconducting state. This method yields integrals of the spectral function of the electron-phonon interaction α 2 F(ω). Experimental results in pure Nb are presented

  14. The thermodynamic functions of gaseous actinide elements

    Rand, M.H.

    1979-01-01

    The actinide gases have large number of unobserved energy states - up to 3 x 10 6 for Pu(g) - which could contribute to the partition function and its derivatives, from which the thermal functions of these gases are calculated. Existing compilations have simply ignored these levels. By making reasonable assumptions as to the distribution of these energy states, their effect on the functions can be calculated. It is concluded that the existing compilations will be inadequate above approximately 2000K. The effect is particularly marked on the heat capacity. For example, when unobserved levels for Pu(g) are included, the heat capacity of Pu(g) reaches a maximum value of more than 12R at 3200K. Similar considerations will apply to the gaseous actinide ions. (orig.) [de

  15. Hartree-Fock states in the thermodynamic limit

    Aguilera-Navarro, V.C.; Llano, M. de; Peltier, S.; Plastino, A.

    1976-01-01

    Two infinite families of two-parameter generalized Overhauser orbitals are introduced and shown to explicitly satisfy, for occupied states, the self-consistent Hartree-Fock equations in the thermodynamic limit. For an attractive delta interaction, they give lower Hartree-Fock energy than the usual plane-wave solutions, even for relatively weak coupling and/or low density. The limiting members (possessing an infinite number of harmonics) of both families appear to tend to a 'classical static lattice' state. The related density profiles and energy expressions are calculated as functions of the two new parameters. A direct-variation with respect to these parameters was done numerically and results are presented graphically. (Author) [pt

  16. Some problems on the thermodynamic state of the metallogenetic systems

    Mingarro, E.

    1965-01-01

    In order to get a classification of the uranium deposits, the geological processes have been ordered in thermodynamic systems according to the independent parameters that define their equilibrium state. Also, to apply the phase rule, we suppose that the ore forming elements are always ideally mobile components; that is, in the geological systems, these components are defined by their chemical potentials. In this paper, we show that in random conditions, i. e.; for any possible value of the factors of equilibrium or state the stable mineralizations are formed only in metasomatic regimes; so that the mineralogical sequence is a function both of the Helmholtz's free energy and the crystallisation pressure of the minerals. (Author) 7 refs

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF PARASTATISTICS FUNCTIONS: AN OVERVIEW OF THERMODYNAMICS PROPERTIES

    R. Yosi Aprian Sari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the thermodynamic properties of the parastatistics system of order two. The thermodynamic properties to be searched include the Grand Canonical Partition Function (GCPF Z, and the average number of particles N. These parastatistics systems is in a more general form compared to quantum statistical distribution that has been known previously, i.e.: the Fermi-Dirac (FD and Bose-Einstein (BE. Starting from the recursion relation of grand canonical partition function for parastatistics system of order two that has been known, recuresion linkages for some simple thermodynamic functions for parastatistics system of order two are derived. The recursion linkages are then used to calculate the thermodynamic functions of the model system of identical particles with limited energy levels which is similar to the harmonic oscillator. From these results we concluded that from the Grand Canonical Partition Function (GCPF, Z, the thermodynamics properties of parastatistics system of order two (paraboson and parafermion can be derived and have similar shape with parastatistics system of order one (Boson and Fermion. The similarity of the graph shows similar thermodynamic properties.   Keywords: parastatistics, thermodynamic properties

  18. Equation of state and thermodynamic properties of BCC metals

    Vu Van Hung, N.T. Hoa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The moment method in statistical dynamics is used to study the equation of state and thermodynamic properties of the bcc metals taking into account the anharmonicity effects of the lattice vibrations and hydrostatic pressures. The explicit expressions of the lattice constant, thermal expansion  oefficient, and the specific heats of the bcc metals are derived within the fourth order moment approximation. The termodynamic quantities of W, Nb, Fe,and Ta metals are calculated as a function of the pressure, and they are in good agreement with the corresponding results obtained from the first principles calculations and experimental results. The effective pair potentials work well for the calculations of bcc metals.

  19. The statistic-thermodynamically calculations of magnetic thermodynamically functions for nuclear magnetic moments

    Zhu Zhenghe; Luo Deli; Feng Kaiming

    2013-01-01

    The present work is to calculate the magnetic thermodynamically functions, i.e. energy, the intensity of magnetization, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs function for nuclear magnetic moments of T, D and neutron n at 2 T and 1, 50, 100 and 150 K from partition functions. It is shown that magnetic saturation of thermonuclear plasma does not easily occur for nuclear magneton is only of 10 -3 of Bohr magneton. The work done by magnetic field is considerable. (authors)

  20. Availability of thermodynamic system with multiple performance parameters based on vector-universal generating function

    Cai Qi; Shang Yanlong; Chen Lisheng; Zhao Yuguang

    2013-01-01

    Vector-universal generating function was presented to analyze the availability of thermodynamic system with multiple performance parameters. Vector-universal generating function of component's performance was defined, the arithmetic model based on vector-universal generating function was derived for the thermodynamic system, and the calculation method was given for state probability of multi-state component. With the stochastic simulation of the degeneration trend of the multiple factors, the system availability with multiple performance parameters was obtained under composite factors. It is shown by an example that the results of the availability obtained by the binary availability analysis method are somewhat conservative, and the results considering parameter failure based on vector-universal generating function reflect the operation characteristics of the thermodynamic system better. (authors)

  1. Fluctuating States: What is the Probability of a Thermodynamical Transition?

    Álvaro M. Alhambra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available If the second law of thermodynamics forbids a transition from one state to another, then it is still possible to make the transition happen by using a sufficient amount of work. But if we do not have access to this amount of work, can the transition happen probabilistically? In the thermodynamic limit, this probability tends to zero, but here we find that for finite-sized and quantum systems it can be finite. We compute the maximum probability of a transition or a thermodynamical fluctuation from any initial state to any final state and show that this maximum can be achieved for any final state that is block diagonal in the energy eigenbasis. We also find upper and lower bounds on this transition probability, in terms of the work of transition. As a by-product, we introduce a finite set of thermodynamical monotones related to the thermomajorization criteria which governs state transitions and compute the work of transition in terms of them. The trade-off between the probability of a transition and any partial work added to aid in that transition is also considered. Our results have applications in entanglement theory, and we find the amount of entanglement required (or gained when transforming one pure entangled state into any other.

  2. Thermodynamic behavior of glassy state of structurally related compounds.

    Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-08-01

    Thermodynamic properties of amorphous pharmaceutical forms are responsible for enhanced solubility as well as poor physical stability. The present study was designed to investigate the differences in thermodynamic parameters arising out of disparate molecular structures and associations for four structurally related pharmaceutical compounds--celecoxib, valdecoxib, rofecoxib, and etoricoxib. Conventional and modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study glass forming ability and thermodynamic behavior of the glassy state of model compounds. Glass transition temperature of four glassy compounds was in a close range of 327.6-331.8 K, however, other thermodynamic parameters varied considerably. Kauzmann temperature, strength parameter and fragility parameter showed rofecoxib glass to be most fragile of the four compounds. Glass forming ability of the compounds fared similar in the critical cooling rate experiments, suggesting that different factors were determining the glass forming ability and subsequent behavior of the compounds in glassy state. A comprehensive understanding of such thermodynamic facets of amorphous form would help in rationalizing the approaches towards development of stable glassy pharmaceuticals.

  3. Thermodynamic Properties from Corresponding States Theory

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    A corresponding states approach has been applied to the two-constant equations of state by Wilson, Soave, Peng—Robinson, Hamam et al., Lu et al., Simonet—Behar, and Chaudron et al. in order to obtain the equivalent shape-factor correlations. The correlations derived are compared with the Leach...

  4. Thermodynamics

    Fermi, Enrico

    1956-01-01

    Indisputably, this is a modern classic of science. Based on a course of lectures delivered by the author at Columbia University, the text is elementary in treatment and remarkable for its clarity and organization. Although it is assumed that the reader is familiar with the fundamental facts of thermometry and calorimetry, no advanced mathematics beyond calculus is assumed.Partial contents: thermodynamic systems, the first law of thermodynamics (application, adiabatic transformations), the second law of thermodynamics (Carnot cycle, absolute thermodynamic temperature, thermal engines), the entr

  5. Limitations and Functions: Four Examples of Integrating Thermodynamics

    Chang, Wheijen

    2011-01-01

    Physics students are usually unaware of the limitations and functions of related principles, and they tend to adopt "hot formulas" inappropriately. This paper introduces four real-life examples for bridging five principles, from fluids to thermodynamics, including (1) buoyant force, (2) thermal expansion, (3) the ideal-gas law, (4) the 1st law,…

  6. Thermodynamics as a Foundation for Density Functional Theory

    Argaman, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) is the method of choice for an ever increasing number of electronic structure computations (recently reaching 30,000 publications per year). It was founded in the sixties on the basis of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and the Kohn-Sham equations, which were originally proved and derived for electronic ground states. Alternatively, one may use thermodynamics to derive DFT for finite-temperature ensembles, with the ground-state theory recovered in the zero temperature limit. Specifically, the transformation from chemical potential µ to electron number N as a free variable may be directly generalized to clarify how DFT uses the density distribution n(r), rather than the external potential v(r), to specify a particular inhomogeneous electronic system. Relating interacting and non-interacting systems with the same n(r) distribution, one recovers not only the Kohn-Sham formulation, but also the so-called adiabatic connection theorem, which gives an explicit expression for the exchange-correlation energy in terms of the 'exchangecorrelation hole.' This derivation has the advantage of being constructive, rather than being based on a reductio ad absurdum argument. It thus serves as an excellent basis for a discussion of the approximations which are inevitably introduced, including the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA)

  7. Analysis of radioactive-matter interaction near thermodynamical equilibrium states

    Damamme, G.

    1993-01-01

    We study the absorption/emission process of photon by matter in the framework of a radiativo-collisionnal model of atom, a thermodynamical approach being used. The considered matter description is the atomic sphere one. First we give the expression of the balance equation around an equilibrium state. Then we express the atomic populations in function of the characteristics of the radiation and of the free electrons and of their time history. This permit us to interpret the photon balance as being due to true emission/absorption process of photons as well as fluorescence terms, all these processes being affected by relaxation effects. The total energy balance between matter and radiation can also be analyzed in the same way and conduct to introduce one photon effective interactions terms for each radiative proper mode, terms also affected by retardation effects. Such a taking into account of atom populations has no consequence on the radiative flux equation (i.e. the transfer opacity) but can considerably modify the energy balance between matter and radiation. (author). 11 refs., 3 figs

  8. Thermodynamic study of fluid in terms of equation of state containing physical parameters

    Khasare, S. B.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a simple condition for one mole fluid by considering the thermodynamics of molecules pointing towards the effective potential for the cluster. Efforts are made to estimate new physical parameter f in liquid state using the equation of state containing only two physical parameters such as the hard sphere diameter and binding energy. The temperature dependence of the structural properties and the thermodynamic behavior of the clusters are studied. Computations based on f predict the variation of numbers of particles at the contact point of the molecular cavity (radial distribution function). From the thermodynamic profile of the fluid, the model results are discussed in terms of the cavity due to the closed surface along with suitable energy. The present calculation is based upon the sample thermodynamic data for n-hexanol, such as the ultrasonic wave, density, volume expansion coefficient, and ratio of specific heat in the liquid state, and it is consistent with the thermodynamic relations containing physical parameters such as size and energy. Since the data is restricted to n-hexanol, we avoid giving the physical meaning of f, which is the key parameter studied in the present work. (paper)

  9. Stationary Distribution and Thermodynamic Relation in Nonequilibrium Steady States

    Komatsu, Teruhisa S.; Nakagawa, Naoko; Sasa, Shin-ichi; Tasaki, Hal; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2010-01-01

    We describe our recent attempts toward statistical mechanics and thermodynamics for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS) realized, e.g., in a heat conducting system. Our first result is a simple expression of the probability distribution (of microscopic states) of a NESS. Our second result is a natural extension of the thermodynamic Clausius relation and a definition of an accompanying entropy in NESS. This entropy coincides with the normalization constant appearing in the above mentioned microscopic expression of NESS, and has an expression similar to the Shannon entropy (with a further symmetrization). The NESS entropy proposed here is a clearly defined measurable quantity even in a system with a large degrees of freedom. We numerically measure the NESS entropy in hardsphere fluid systems with a heat current, by observing energy exchange between the system and the heat baths when the temperatures of the baths are changed according to specified protocols.

  10. Corrosion Thermodynamics of Magnesium and Alloys from First Principles as a Function of Solvation

    Limmer, Krista; Williams, Kristen; Andzelm, Jan

    Thermodynamics of corrosion processes occurring on magnesium surfaces, such as hydrogen evolution and water dissociation, have been examined with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate the effect of impurities and dilute alloying additions. The modeling of corrosion thermodynamics requires examination of species in a variety of chemical and electronic states in order to accurately represent the complex electrochemical corrosion process. In this study, DFT calculations for magnesium corrosion thermodynamics were performed with two DFT codes (VASP and DMol3), with multiple exchange-correlation functionals for chemical accuracy, as well as with various levels of implicit and explicit solvation for surfaces and solvated ions. The accuracy of the first principles calculations has been validated against Pourbaix diagrams constructed from solid, gas and solvated charged ion calculations. For aqueous corrosion, it is shown that a well parameterized implicit solvent is capable of accurately representing all but the first coordinating layer of explicit water for charged ions.

  11. Statistical thermodynamics

    Hwang, Jeong Ui; Jang, Jong Jae; Jee, Jong Gi

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are thermodynamics on the law of thermodynamics, classical thermodynamics and molecule thermodynamics, basics of molecule thermodynamics, molecule and assembly partition function, molecule partition function, classical molecule partition function, thermodynamics function for ideal assembly in fixed system, thermodynamics function for ideal assembly in running system, Maxwell-Boltzmann's law of distribution, chemical equilibrium like calculation of equilibrium constant and theory of absolute reaction rate.

  12. Integrated stoichiometric, thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of steady state metabolism.

    Fleming, R M T; Thiele, I; Provan, G; Nasheuer, H P

    2010-06-07

    The quantitative analysis of biochemical reactions and metabolites is at frontier of biological sciences. The recent availability of high-throughput technology data sets in biology has paved the way for new modelling approaches at various levels of complexity including the metabolome of a cell or an organism. Understanding the metabolism of a single cell and multi-cell organism will provide the knowledge for the rational design of growth conditions to produce commercially valuable reagents in biotechnology. Here, we demonstrate how equations representing steady state mass conservation, energy conservation, the second law of thermodynamics, and reversible enzyme kinetics can be formulated as a single system of linear equalities and inequalities, in addition to linear equalities on exponential variables. Even though the feasible set is non-convex, the reformulation is exact and amenable to large-scale numerical analysis, a prerequisite for computationally feasible genome scale modelling. Integrating flux, concentration and kinetic variables in a unified constraint-based formulation is aimed at increasing the quantitative predictive capacity of flux balance analysis. Incorporation of experimental and theoretical bounds on thermodynamic and kinetic variables ensures that the predicted steady state fluxes are both thermodynamically and biochemically feasible. The resulting in silico predictions are tested against fluxomic data for central metabolism in Escherichia coli and compare favourably with in silico prediction by flux balance analysis. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermodynamic holography

    Wei, Bo-Bo; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The holographic principle states that the information about a volume of a system is encoded on the boundary surface of the volume. Holography appears in many branches of physics, such as optics, electromagnetism, many-body physics, quantum gravity, and string theory. Here we show that holography is also an underlying principle in thermodynamics, a most important foundation of physics. The thermodynamics of a system is fully determined by its partition function. We prove that the partition function of a finite but arbitrarily large system is an analytic function on the complex plane of physical parameters, and therefore the partition function in a region on the complex plane is uniquely determined by its values along the boundary. The thermodynamic holography has applications in studying thermodynamics of nano-scale systems (such as molecule engines, nano-generators and macromolecules) and provides a new approach to many-body physics. PMID:26478214

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of amorphous and liquid states

    Granato, A.V.

    1998-01-01

    The magnitude and temperature dependence of the liquid state shear modulus G, specific heat C p , diffusivity D, and viscosity η should all be closely related, according to the interstitialcy model, if a recent proposal by Dyre et al. is generally true. They suppose that the viscosity is given by η = η 0 exp (F/kT), where η 0 is a reference viscosity and F is given by the work required to shove aside neighboring particle in a diffusion process, where F = GV c and V c is a characteristic volume. In the interstitialcy model the high frequency thermodynamic liquid state shear modulus is given by G(T) = G 0 exp [-γ(T/T 0 - 1)], where G 0 is the shear modulus at a reference temperature T 0 , which can be taken as the glass temperature. The resulting non-Arrhenius behavior of the viscosity is compared with experimental data. A critical quantitative analysis for a Zr 41.2 Ti 13.8 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 225 alloy does not support the shoving model, but the thermodynamic properties can be understood in terms of mixed interstitials composed of metal-beryllium complexes

  15. The vitreous state thermodynamics, structure, rheology, and crystallization

    Gutzow, Ivan S

    2013-01-01

    This book summarizes the experimental evidence and modern classical and theoretical approaches in understanding the vitreous state, from structural problems, over equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, to statistical physics. Glasses, and especially silicate glasses, are only the best known representatives of this particular physical state of matter. Other typical representatives include organic polymer glasses, and many other easily vitrifying organic and inorganic substances, technically important materials, amidst them vitreous water and vitrified aqueous solutions, and also many metallic alloy systems. Some of these systems only form glasses under particular conditions, e.g. through ultra-rapid cooling. This book describes the properties and the formation of both every-day technical glasses and especially of such more exotic forms of vitreous matter. It is a unique source of knowledge and new ideas for materials scientists, engineers and researchers working on condensed matter. The new edition e...

  16. Discerning Thermodynamic Basis of Self-Organization in Critical Zone Structure and Function

    Richardson, M.; Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    Self-organization characterizes the spontaneous emergence of order. Self-organization in the Critical Zone, the region of Earth's skin from below the groundwater table to the top of the vegetation canopy, involves the interaction of biotic and abiotic processes occurring through a hierarchy of temporal and spatial scales. The self-organization is sustained through input of energy and material in an open system framework, and the resulting formations are called dissipative structures. Why do these local states of organization form and how are they thermodynamically favorable? We hypothesize that structure formation is linked to energy conversion and matter throughput rates across driving gradients. Furthermore, we predict that structures in the Critical Zone evolve based on local availability of nutrients, water, and energy. By considering ecosystems as open thermodynamic systems, we model and study the throughput signatures on short times scales to determine origins and characteristics of ecosystem structure. This diagnostic approach allows us to use fluxes of matter and energy to understand the thermodynamic drivers of the system. By classifying the fluxes and dynamics in a system, we can identify patterns to determine the thermodynamic drivers for organized states. Additionally, studying the partitioning of nutrients, water, and energy throughout ecosystems through dissipative structures will help identify reasons for structure shapes and how these shapes impact major Critical Zone functions.

  17. Thermodynamics of bread baking: A two-state model

    Zürcher, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Bread baking can be viewed as a complex physico-chemical process. It is governed by transport of heat and is accompanied by changes such as gelation of starch, the expansion of air cells within dough, and others. We focus on the thermodynamics of baking and investigate the heat flow through dough and find that the evaporation of excess water in dough is the rate-limiting step. We consider a simplified one-dimensional model of bread, treating the excess water content as a two-state variable that is zero for baked bread and a fixed constant for unbaked dough. We arrive at a system of coupled, nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved using a standard Runge-Kutta integration method. The calculated baking times are consistent with common baking experience.

  18. Biological catalysis of the hydrological cycle: life's thermodynamic function

    Michaelian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Darwinian theory depicts life as being overwhelmingly consumed by a fight for survival in a hostile environment. However, from a thermodynamic perspective, life is a dynamic out of equilibrium process, stabilizing and coevolving in concert with its abiotic environment. The living component of the biosphere on the surface of the Earth of greatest biomass, the plants and cyanobacteria, are involved in the transpiration of a vast amount of water. Transpiration is part of the global water cycle, and it is this cycle that distinguishes Earth from its apparently life barren neighboring planets, Venus and Mars. The dissipation of sunlight into heat by organic molecules in the biosphere and its coupling to the water cycle (as well as other abiotic processes), is by far the greatest entropy producing process occurring on Earth. Life, from this perspective, can be viewed as performing an important thermodynamic function; acting as a dynamic catalyst by aiding irreversible abiotic process such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents to produce entropy. The role of animals in this view is that of unwitting but dedicated servants of the plants and cyanobacteria, helping them to grow and to spread into initially inhospitable areas.

  19. Distribution functions and thermodynamic functions of many particle systems

    Isihara, A.; Rosa Junior, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is given of determining and upper bound of the entropy of a classical interacting system. A family of gaussian trial distribution functions is introduced for an electron gas. It was found that the ring diagram energy corresponds to the minimum free energy which the family produces. In contrast to the ring diagram method, the new approach is extremely simple and general [pt

  20. Approximate thermodynamic state relations in partially ionized gas mixtures

    Ramshaw, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Thermodynamic state relations for mixtures of partially ionized nonideal gases are often approximated by artificially partitioning the mixture into compartments or subvolumes occupied by the pure partially ionized constituent gases, and requiring these subvolumes to be in temperature and pressure equilibrium. This intuitively reasonable procedure is easily shown to reproduce the correct thermal and caloric state equations for a mixture of neutral (nonionized) ideal gases. The purpose of this paper is to point out that (a) this procedure leads to incorrect state equations for a mixture of partially ionized ideal gases, whereas (b) the alternative procedure of requiring that the subvolumes all have the same temperature and free electron density reproduces the correct thermal and caloric state equations for such a mixture. These results readily generalize to the case of partially degenerate and/or relativistic electrons, to a common approximation used to represent pressure ionization effects, and to two-temperature plasmas. This suggests that equating the subvolume electron number densities or chemical potentials instead of pressures is likely to provide a more accurate approximation in nonideal plasma mixtures

  1. A consistent model for the equilibrium thermodynamic functions of partially ionized flibe plasma with Coulomb corrections

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2003-01-01

    Flibe (2LiF-BeF2) is a molten salt that has been chosen as the coolant and breeding material in many design studies of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) chamber. Flibe plasmas are to be generated in the ICF chamber in a wide range of temperatures and densities. These plasmas are more complex than the plasma of any single chemical species. Nevertheless, the composition and thermodynamic properties of the resulting flibe plasmas are needed for the gas dynamics calculations and the determination of other design parameters in the ICF chamber. In this paper, a simple consistent model for determining the detailed plasma composition and thermodynamic functions of high-temperature, fully dissociated and partially ionized flibe gas is presented and used to calculate different thermodynamic properties of interest to fusion applications. The computed properties include the average ionization state; kinetic pressure; internal energy; specific heats; adiabatic exponent, as well as the sound speed. The presented results are computed under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and electro-neutrality. A criterion for the validity of the LTE assumption is presented and applied to the computed results. Other attempts in the literature are assessed with their implied inaccuracies pointed out and discussed

  2. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V., E-mail: evp@iscras.ru

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  3. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N 2 adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica

  4. Polylogs, thermodynamics and scaling functions of one-dimensional quantum many-body systems

    Guan, X-W; Batchelor, M T

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the thermodynamics of one-dimensional Lieb-Liniger bosons can be accurately calculated in analytic fashion using the polylog function in the framework of the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. The approach does away with the need to numerically solve the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (Yang-Yang) equation. The expression for the equation of state allows the exploration of Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid physics and quantum criticality in an archetypical quantum system. In particular, the low-temperature phase diagram is obtained, along with the scaling functions for the density and compressibility. It has been shown recently by Guan and Ho (arXiv:1010.1301) that such scaling can be used to map out the criticality of ultracold fermionic atoms in experiments. We show here how to map out quantum criticality for Lieb-Liniger bosons. More generally, the polylog function formalism can be applied to a wide range of Bethe ansatz integrable quantum many-body systems which are currently of theoretical and experimental interest, such as strongly interacting multi-component fermions, spinor bosons and mixtures of bosons and fermions. (fast track communication)

  5. Partition functions. I. Improved partition functions and thermodynamic quantities for normal, equilibrium, and ortho and para molecular hydrogen

    Popovas, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. Its thermodynamic quantities dominate the physical conditions in molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, etc. It is also of high interest in plasma physics. Therefore thermodynamic data for molecular hydrogen have to be as accurate as possible in a wide temperature range. Aims: We here rigorously show the shortcomings of various simplifications that are used to calculate the total internal partition function. These shortcomings can lead to errors of up to 40 percent or more in the estimated partition function. These errors carry on to calculations of thermodynamic quantities. Therefore a more complicated approach has to be taken. Methods: Seven possible simplifications of various complexity are described, together with advantages and disadvantages of direct summation of experimental values. These were compared to what we consider the most accurate and most complete treatment (case 8). Dunham coefficients were determined from experimental and theoretical energy levels of a number of electronically excited states of H2. Both equilibrium and normal hydrogen was taken into consideration. Results: Various shortcomings in existing calculations are demonstrated, and the reasons for them are explained. New partition functions for equilibrium, normal, and ortho and para hydrogen are calculated and thermodynamic quantities are reported for the temperature range 1-20 000 K. Our results are compared to previous estimates in the literature. The calculations are not limited to the ground electronic state, but include all bound and quasi-bound levels of excited electronic states. Dunham coefficients of these states of H2 are also reported. Conclusions: For most of the relevant astrophysical cases it is strongly advised to avoid using simplifications, such as a harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor or ad hoc summation limits of the eigenstates to estimate accurate partition functions and to be particularly careful when

  6. Thermodynamic stability of elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates revisited using Lyapunov function analysis

    Burande, Chandrakant S.; Bhalekar, Anil A.

    2005-01-01

    The thermodynamic stability of a few representative elementary chemical reactions proceeding at finite rates has been investigated using the recently proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function and following the steps of Lyapunov's second method (also termed as the direct method) of stability of motion. The thermodynamic Lyapunov function; L s , used herein is the excess rate of entropy production in the thermodynamic perturbation space, which thereby inherits the dictates of the second law of thermodynamics. This Lyapunov function is not the same as the excess entropy rate that one encounters in thermodynamic (irreversible) literature. The model chemical conversions studied in this presentation are A+B→v x X and A+B↔ν x X. For the sake of simplicity, the thermal effects of chemical reactions have been considered as not adding to the perturbation as our main aim was to demonstrate how one should use systematically the proposed thermodynamic Lyapunov function following the steps of Lyapunov's second method of stability of motion. The domains of thermodynamic stability under the constantly acting small disturbances, thermodynamic asymptotic stability and thermodynamic instability in these model systems get established

  7. Thermodynamical and Green function many-body Wick theorems

    Westwanski, B.

    1987-01-01

    The thermodynamical and Green function many-body reduction theorems of Wick type are proved for the arbitrary mixtures of the fermion, boson and spin systems. ''Many-body'' means that the operators used are the products of the arbitrary number of one-body standard basis operators [of the fermion or (and) spin types] with different site (wave vector) indices, but having the same ''time'' (in the interaction representation). The method of proving is based on'' 1) the first-order differential equation of Schwinger type for: 1a) anti T-product of operators; 1b) its average value; 2) KMS boundary conditions for this average. It is shown that the fermion, boson and spin systems can be unified in the many-body formulation (bosonification of the fermion systems). It is impossible in the one-body approach. Both of the many-body versions of the Wick theorem have the recurrent feature: nth order moment diagrams for the free energy or Green functions can be expressed by the (n-1)th order ones. This property corresponds to the automatic realization of: (i) summations over Bose-Einstein or (and) Fermi-Dirac frequencies; (ii) elimination of Bose-Einstein or (and) Fermi-Dirac distributions. The procedures (i) and (ii), being the results of using the Green function one-body reduction theorem, have constituted the significant difficulty up to now in the treatment of quantum systems. (orig.)

  8. The Theory of Thermodynamic Systems with Internal Variables of State: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions for Compliance with the Second Law of Thermodynamics

    Shnip, A. I.

    2018-01-01

    Based on the entropy-free thermodynamic approach, a generalized theory of thermodynamic systems with internal variables of state is being developed. For the case of nonlinear thermodynamic systems with internal variables of state and linear relaxation, the necessary and sufficient conditions have been proved for fulfillment of the second law of thermodynamics in entropy-free formulation which, according to the basic theorem of the theory, are also necessary and sufficient for the existence of a thermodynamic potential. Moreover, relations of correspondence between thermodynamic systems with memory and systems with internal variables of state have been established, as well as some useful relations in the spaces of states of both types of systems.

  9. Rational extended thermodynamics

    Müller, Ingo

    1998-01-01

    Ordinary thermodynamics provides reliable results when the thermodynamic fields are smooth, in the sense that there are no steep gradients and no rapid changes. In fluids and gases this is the domain of the equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier. Extended thermodynamics becomes relevant for rapidly varying and strongly inhomogeneous processes. Thus the propagation of high­ frequency waves, and the shape of shock waves, and the regression of small-scale fluctuation are governed by extended thermodynamics. The field equations of ordinary thermodynamics are parabolic while extended thermodynamics is governed by hyperbolic systems. The main ingredients of extended thermodynamics are • field equations of balance type, • constitutive quantities depending on the present local state and • entropy as a concave function of the state variables. This set of assumptions leads to first order quasi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems of field equations; it guarantees the well-posedness of initial value problems and f...

  10. VALIDITY OF EXCESS ENTROPY PRODUCTION CRITERION OF THERMODYNAMIC STABILITY FOR NONEQUILIBRIUM STEADY STATES

    吴金平

    1991-01-01

    The relation between the excess entropy production criterion of thermodynamic stabilityfor nonequilibrium states and kinetic linear stability principle is discussed. It is shown thatthe condition required by the excess entropy production criterion generally is sufficient, butnot necessary to judge the system stability. The condition required by the excess entropyproduction criterion is stronger than that of the linear stability principle. Only when theproduct matrix between the linearized matrix of kinetic equations and matrix of quadraticform of second-order excess entropy is symmetric, is the condition required by the excessentropy production criterion that the steady steate is asymptotically stable (δ_xP>0) necessaryand sufficient. The counterexample given by Fox to prove that the excess entropy, (δ~2S)ss,is not a Liapunov function is incorrect. Contradictory to his conclusion, the counterexampleis just a positive one that proves that the excess entropy is a Liapunov function. Moreover,the excess entropy production criterion is not limited by symmetric conditions of the linear-ized matrix of kinetic equations. The excess entropy around nonequilibrium steady states,(δ~2S)ss, is a Liapunov function of thermodynamic system.

  11. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  12. Thermodynamic state updated of the volcanic caldera and geothermal reservoir of Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico

    Martinez Reyes, Jose; Gonzalez Partida, Eduardo; Jorge, A [Centro de Geociencias, Universidad National Autonoma de Mexico Campo de Juriquilla, Qro., Mexico, apartado postal 76230 (Mexico); Perez, Renee J [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Calgary, 500 University Drive, Calgary Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tinoco, Michel

    2008-10-01

    Based on information of enthalpies of the fluids of wells from the geothermal reservoir of Los Humeros, Puebla, Mexico, we determined the thermodynamic conditions of the reservoir comparing the values of enthalpies of the fluids of discharge of the wells with the values published in the literature for different thermodynamic state of fluids.

  13. Statistical thermodynamics of long straight rigid rods on triangular lattices: nematic order and adsorption thermodynamic functions.

    Matoz-Fernandez, D A; Linares, D H; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2012-09-04

    The statistical thermodynamics of straight rigid rods of length k on triangular lattices was developed on a generalization in the spirit of the lattice-gas model and the classical Guggenheim-DiMarzio approximation. In this scheme, the Helmholtz free energy and its derivatives were written in terms of the order parameter, δ, which characterizes the nematic phase occurring in the system at intermediate densities. Then, using the principle of minimum free energy with δ as a parameter, the main adsorption properties were calculated. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data were performed in order to evaluate the outcome and limitations of the theoretical model.

  14. The Markov process admits a consistent steady-state thermodynamic formalism

    Peng, Liangrong; Zhu, Yi; Hong, Liu

    2018-01-01

    The search for a unified formulation for describing various non-equilibrium processes is a central task of modern non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this paper, a novel steady-state thermodynamic formalism was established for general Markov processes described by the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation. Furthermore, corresponding formalisms of steady-state thermodynamics for the master equation and Fokker-Planck equation could be rigorously derived in mathematics. To be concrete, we proved that (1) in the limit of continuous time, the steady-state thermodynamic formalism for the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation fully agrees with that for the master equation; (2) a similar one-to-one correspondence could be established rigorously between the master equation and Fokker-Planck equation in the limit of large system size; (3) when a Markov process is restrained to one-step jump, the steady-state thermodynamic formalism for the Fokker-Planck equation with discrete state variables also goes to that for master equations, as the discretization step gets smaller and smaller. Our analysis indicated that general Markov processes admit a unified and self-consistent non-equilibrium steady-state thermodynamic formalism, regardless of underlying detailed models.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for thermodynamical properties calculations of plasmas at thermodynamical equilibrium. Applications to opacity and equation of state calculations

    Gilles, D.

    2005-01-01

    This report is devoted to illustrate the power of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation code to study the thermodynamical properties of a plasma, composed of classical point particles at thermodynamical equilibrium. Such simulations can help us to manage successfully the challenge of taking into account 'exactly' all classical correlations between particles due to density effects, unlike analytical or semi-analytical approaches, often restricted to low dense plasmas. MC simulations results allow to cover, for laser or astrophysical applications, a wide range of thermodynamical conditions from more dense (and correlated) to less dense ones (where potentials are long ranged type). Therefore Yukawa potentials, with a Thomas-Fermi temperature- and density-dependent screening length, are used to describe the effective ion-ion potentials. In this report we present two MC codes ('PDE' and 'PUCE') and applications performed with these codes in different fields (spectroscopy, opacity, equation of state). Some examples of them are discussed and illustrated at the end of the report. (author)

  16. Thermodynamics analysis of the rare earth metals and their alloys with indium in solid state

    Vassiliev, V.P.; Benaissa, Ablazeze; Taldrik, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Gibbs energies of formation vs. RE atomic numbers in REIn 3 . Highlights: •Set of experimental values was collected for REIn 3 phases. •Thermodynamic functions of formation were calculated at 298 K and 775 K. •Experimental and calculated values were compared. -- Abstract: Nonlinear correlative analyses between thermodynamic and some physico-chemical properties of rare-earth metals (RE) and their alloys with indium are performed for the isostructural phases RE and REIn 3 . The thermodynamics values (Gibbs energies of formation, enthalpies of formation, and entropies of formation at 298 K and 775 K and standard entropies) of LnIn 3 phases are calculated on the basis of calorimetry and potentiometry results. The proposed correlation between physico-chemical and thermodynamic properties agrees for all the isostructural phases REX (X are others elements of the periodic table). The resulting thermodynamic data are recommended for metallurgical handbook

  17. Statistical thermodynamics

    Lim, Gyeong Hui

    2008-03-01

    This book consists of 15 chapters, which are basic conception and meaning of statistical thermodynamics, Maxwell-Boltzmann's statistics, ensemble, thermodynamics function and fluctuation, statistical dynamics with independent particle system, ideal molecular system, chemical equilibrium and chemical reaction rate in ideal gas mixture, classical statistical thermodynamics, ideal lattice model, lattice statistics and nonideal lattice model, imperfect gas theory on liquid, theory on solution, statistical thermodynamics of interface, statistical thermodynamics of a high molecule system and quantum statistics

  18. Tables of thermodynamic functions for gaseous thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxides

    Green, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    Measured and estimated spectroscopic data for thorium, uranium, and plutonium oxide vapor species have been used with the methods of statistical mechanics to calculate thermodynamic functions. Some inconsistencies between spectroscopic data and some thermodynamic data have been resolved by recalculating ΔH 0 /sub f/ (298.15 0 K) values for the vapor species of these oxides. Evaluation of the uncertainties in data, methods of estimating molecular parameters, and effects of assumptions have been discussed elsewhere. The tables of thermodynamic functions that were reported earlier have been revised principally because the low-frequency vibrational modes of UO 2 and UO 3 have now been measured. These new empirical data resulted in changes in the electronic contributions to the calculated thermodynamic functions of UO 2 and the estimated vibrational contributions for PuO 2 . In addition, some minor changes have been made in the methods of calculation of the electronic contributions for all molecules

  19. Illustration of the thermodynamical method of research into a critical state through the Rainford-Edwards model

    Soldatova, Je.D.; Snegyir'ov, M.G.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamical method for studing a critical state is illustrated by the example of critical behavior of metallic cerium in the frameworks of the improved Rainford-Edwards model. Thermodynamical stability of the model is investigated, and behavior of the whole complex of thermodynamical characteristics of the system is analyzed. It is concluded that the model has the first type of critical behaviour

  20. Formulation of thermodynamics for the glassy state : Configurational energy as a modest source of energy

    Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Glass is an under-cooled liquid that very slowly relaxes towards the equilibrium crystalline state. Its energy balance is ill understood, since it is widely believed that the glassy state cannot be described thermodynamically. However, the classical paradoxes involving the Ehrenfest relations and

  1. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of solar assisted multi-functional trigeneration system

    Önder KIZILKAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, modelling and thermodynamic analysis of solar assisted trigeneration system was carried out. The required thermal energy for gas and vapor cycles were supplied from solar tower which is a new concept for gas cycle applications. Additionally, an absorption refrigeration cycle, vapor production process, drying process and water heating process were integrated to the system. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the trigeneration system were determined by the application of first and second law analyses. The results showed that the gas cycle efficiency was found to be 31%, vapor cycle efficiency was found to be 28% and coefficient of performance (COP values of the refrigeration system was found to be 0.77. Also the highest exergy destruction rate was found to be 4154 kW in solar tower.Keywords: Solar tower, Trigeneration, Gas cycle, Vapor cycle, Energy, Exergy

  3. Local thermodynamic mapping for effective liquid density-functional theory

    Kyrlidis, Agathagelos; Brown, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The structural-mapping approximation introduced by Lutsko and Baus (1990) in the generalized effective-liquid approximation is extended to include a local thermodynamic mapping based on a spatially dependent effective density for approximating the solid phase in terms of the uniform liquid. This latter approximation, called the local generalized effective-liquid approximation (LGELA) yields excellent predictions for the free energy of hard-sphere solids and for the conditions of coexistence of a hard-sphere fcc solid with a liquid. Moreover, the predicted free energy remains single valued for calculations with more loosely packed crystalline structures, such as the diamond lattice. The spatial dependence of the weighted density makes the LGELA useful in the study of inhomogeneous solids.

  4. Geodesics in thermodynamic state spaces of quantum gases

    Oshima, H.; Obata, T.; Hara, H.

    2002-01-01

    The geodesics for ideal quantum gases are numerically studied. We show that 30 ideal quantum state is connected to an ideal classical state by geodesics and that the bundle of geodesics for Bose gases have a tendency of convergence

  5. Thermodynamic properties by Equation of state of liquid sodium under pressure

    Li, Huaming; Sun, Yongli; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Mo

    Isothermal bulk modulus, molar volume and speed of sound of molten sodium are calculated through an equation of state of a power law form within good precision as compared with the experimental data. The calculated internal energy data show the minimum along the isothermal lines as the previous result but with slightly larger values. The calculated values of isobaric heat capacity show the unexpected minimum in the isothermal compression. The temperature and pressure derivative of various thermodynamic quantities in liquid Sodium are derived. It is discussed about the contribution from entropy to the temperature and pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus. The expressions for acoustical parameter and nonlinearity parameter are obtained based on thermodynamic relations from the equation of state. Both parameters for liquid Sodium are calculated under high pressure along the isothermal lines by using the available thermodynamic data and numeric derivations. By comparison with the results from experimental measurements and quasi-thermodynamic theory, the calculated values are found to be very close at melting point at ambient condition. Furthermore, several other thermodynamic quantities are also presented. Scientific Research Starting Foundation from Taiyuan university of Technology, Shanxi Provincial government (``100-talents program''), China Scholarship Council and National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11204200.

  6. Principles of Considering the Effect of the Limited Volume of a System on Its Thermodynamic State

    Tovbin, Yu. K.

    2018-01-01

    The features of a system with a finite volume that affect its thermodynamic state are considered in comparison to describing small bodies in macroscopic phases. Equations for unary and pair distribution functions are obtained using difference derivatives of a discrete statistical sum. The structure of the equation for the free energy of a system consisting of an ensemble of volume-limited regions with different sizes and a full set of equations describing a macroscopic polydisperse system are discussed. It is found that the equations can be applied to molecular adsorption on small faces of microcrystals, to bound and isolated pores of a polydisperse material, and to describe the spinodal decomposition of a fluid in brief periods of time and high supersaturations of the bulk phase when each local region functions the same on average. It is shown that as the size of a system diminishes, corrections must be introduced for the finiteness of the system volume and fluctuations of the unary and pair distribution functions.

  7. A miniaturized technique for assessing protein thermodynamics and function using fast determination of quantitative cysteine reactivity.

    Isom, Daniel G; Marguet, Philippe R; Oas, Terrence G; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-04-01

    Protein thermodynamic stability is a fundamental physical characteristic that determines biological function. Furthermore, alteration of thermodynamic stability by macromolecular interactions or biochemical modifications is a powerful tool for assessing the relationship between protein structure, stability, and biological function. High-throughput approaches for quantifying protein stability are beginning to emerge that enable thermodynamic measurements on small amounts of material, in short periods of time, and using readily accessible instrumentation. Here we present such a method, fast quantitative cysteine reactivity, which exploits the linkage between protein stability, sidechain protection by protein structure, and structural dynamics to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins. In this approach, the reaction of a protected cysteine and thiol-reactive fluorogenic indicator is monitored over a gradient of temperatures after a short incubation time. These labeling data can be used to determine the midpoint of thermal unfolding, measure the temperature dependence of protein stability, quantify ligand-binding affinity, and, under certain conditions, estimate folding rate constants. Here, we demonstrate the fQCR method by characterizing these thermodynamic and kinetic properties for variants of Staphylococcal nuclease and E. coli ribose-binding protein engineered to contain single, protected cysteines. These straightforward, information-rich experiments are likely to find applications in protein engineering and functional genomics. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Fluid phases of hydrogen-bound states and thermodynamical properties

    Ebeling, W.; Kraeft, W.D.

    1985-08-01

    The fluid phases of hydrogen and especially the existence of two critical points, the density dependence of the two - particle states and the effective interactions are discussed. An effective Schroedinger equation and a Saha equation are given. (author)

  9. An Equation of State for the Thermodynamic Properties of Cyclohexane

    Zhou, Yong, E-mail: Yong.Zhou2@honeywell.com; Liu, Jun [Honeywell Integrated Technology China Co. Ltd., 430 Li Bing Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203 (China); Penoncello, Steven G. [Center for Applied Thermodynamic Studies, College of Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho 83844 (United States); Lemmon, Eric W. [Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    An equation of state for cyclohexane has been developed using the Helmholtz energy as the fundamental property with independent variables of density and temperature. Multi-property fitting technology was used to fit the equation of state to data for pρT, heat capacities, sound speeds, virial coefficients, vapor pressures, and saturated densities. The equation of state was developed to conform to the Maxwell criteria for two-phase vapor-liquid equilibrium states, and is valid from the triple-point temperature to 700 K, with pressures up to 250 MPa and densities up to 10.3 mol dm{sup −3}. In general, the uncertainties (k = 2, indicating a level of confidence of 95%) in density for the equation of state are 0.1% (liquid and vapor) up to 500 K, and 0.2% above 500 K, with higher uncertainties within the critical region. Between 283 and 473 K with pressures lower than 30 MPa, the uncertainty is as low as 0.03% in density in the liquid phase. The uncertainties in the speed of sound are 0.2% between 283 and 323 K in the liquid, and 1% elsewhere. Other uncertainties are 0.05% in vapor pressure and 2% in heat capacities. The behavior of the equation of state is reasonable within the region of validity and at higher and lower temperatures and pressures. A detailed analysis has been performed in this article.

  10. Is the thermodynamic behavior of the noble fluids consistent with the principle of corresponding states?

    Kulinskii, V.L.; Malomuzh, N.P.; Matvejchuk, O.I.

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of the Principle of Corresponding States (PCS) for the noble fluids is discussed. We give the thermodynamic evidence for the dimerization of the liquid phase in heavy noble gases like argon, krypton etc. which manifests itself in deviations from the PCS. The behavior of the

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen fluoride at several thermodynamic states

    Kreitmeir, M.; Bertagnolli, H.; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen fluoride is a simple but interesting system for studies of the influence of hydrogen bonds on physical properties. We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF at several thermodynamic states, where we examine the microscopic structure of the liquid as well...

  12. The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state

    Philipse, A.P.; Vrij, A.

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium between charged colloids and an electrolyte reservoir is named after Frederic Donnan who first published on it one century ago (Donnan 1911 Z. Electrochem. 17 572). One of the intriguing features of the Donnan equilibrium is the ensuing osmotic equation of state which

  13. Control of Thermodynamical System with Input-Dependent State Delays

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Krstic, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    We consider control of a cooling system with several consumers that require cooling from a common source. The flow feeding coolant to the consumers can be controlled, but due to significant physical distances between the common source and the consumers, the coolant flow takes a non......-negligible amount of time to travel to the consumers, giving rise to input-dependent state delays. We first present a simple bilinear model of the system, followed by a state feedback control design that is able to stabilize the system at a chosen equilibrium in spite of the delays. We also present a heuristic...

  14. Thermodynamically consistent simulation of nonisothermal diffuse-interface two-phase flow with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a diffuse-interface gas-liquid two-phase flow model with inhomogeneous temperatures, in which we employ the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the temperature-dependent influence parameter instead of the van der Waals equation of state and the constant influence parameter used in the existing models. As a result, our model can characterize accurately the physical behaviors of numerous realistic gas-liquid fluids, especially hydrocarbons. Furthermore, we prove a relation associating the pressure gradient with the gradients of temperature and chemical potential, and thereby derive a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which shows that gradients of the chemical potential and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion. It is rigorously proved that the new formulations of the model obey the first and second laws of thermodynamics. To design efficient numerical methods, we prove that Helmholtz free energy density is a concave function with respect to the temperature under certain physical conditions. Based on the proposed modeling formulations and the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density, we propose a novel thermodynamically stable numerical scheme. We rigorously prove that the proposed method satisfies the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Finally, numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed simulation method.

  15. Thermodynamically consistent simulation of nonisothermal diffuse-interface two-phase flow with Peng-Robinson equation of state

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-12-06

    In this paper, we consider a diffuse-interface gas-liquid two-phase flow model with inhomogeneous temperatures, in which we employ the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the temperature-dependent influence parameter instead of the van der Waals equation of state and the constant influence parameter used in the existing models. As a result, our model can characterize accurately the physical behaviors of numerous realistic gas-liquid fluids, especially hydrocarbons. Furthermore, we prove a relation associating the pressure gradient with the gradients of temperature and chemical potential, and thereby derive a new formulation of the momentum balance equation, which shows that gradients of the chemical potential and temperature become the primary driving force of the fluid motion. It is rigorously proved that the new formulations of the model obey the first and second laws of thermodynamics. To design efficient numerical methods, we prove that Helmholtz free energy density is a concave function with respect to the temperature under certain physical conditions. Based on the proposed modeling formulations and the convex-concave splitting of Helmholtz free energy density, we propose a novel thermodynamically stable numerical scheme. We rigorously prove that the proposed method satisfies the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Finally, numerical tests are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed simulation method.

  16. The Donnan equilibrium: I. On the thermodynamic foundation of the Donnan equation of state

    Philipse, A; Vrij, A

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium between charged colloids and an electrolyte reservoir is named after Frederic Donnan who first published on it one century ago (Donnan 1911 Z. Electrochem. 17 572). One of the intriguing features of the Donnan equilibrium is the ensuing osmotic equation of state which is a nonlinear one, even when both colloids and ions obey Van 't Hoff's ideal osmotic pressure law. The Donnan equation of state, nevertheless, is internally consistent; we demonstrate it to be a rigorous consequence of the phenomenological thermodynamics of a neutral bulk suspension equilibrating with an infinite salt reservoir. Our proof is based on an exact thermodynamic relation between osmotic pressure and salt adsorption which, when applied to ideal ions, does indeed entail the Donnan equation of state. Our derivation also shows that, contrary to what is often assumed, the Donnan equilibrium does not require ideality of the colloids: the Donnan model merely evaluates the osmotic pressure of homogeneously distributed ions, in excess of the pressure exerted by an arbitrary reference fluid of uncharged colloids. We also conclude that results from the phenomenological Donnan model coincide with predictions from statistical thermodynamics in the limit of weakly charged, point-like colloids.

  17. Irreversible thermodynamics, parabolic law and self-similar state in grain growth

    Rios, P.R.

    2004-01-01

    The formalism of the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes is applied to grain growth to investigate the nature of the self-similar state and its corresponding parabolic law. Grain growth does not reach a steady state in the sense that the entropy production remains constant. However, the entropy production can be written as a product of two factors: a scale factor that tends to zero for long times and a scaled entropy production. It is suggested that the parabolic law and the self-similar state may be associated with the minimum of this scaled entropy production. This result implies that the parabolic law and the self-similar state have a sound irreversible thermodynamical basis

  18. Cycle kinetics, steady state thermodynamics and motors-a paradigm for living matter physics

    Qian, Hong

    2005-01-01

    An integration of the stochastic mathematical models for motor proteins with Hill's steady state thermodynamics yields a rather comprehensive theory for molecular motors as open systems in the nonequilibrium steady state. This theory, a natural extension of Gibbs' approach to isothermal molecular systems in equilibrium, is compared with other existing theories with dissipative structures and dynamics. The theory of molecular motors might be considered as an archetype for studying more complex open biological systems such as biochemical reaction networks inside living cells

  19. Mean spherical model for hard ions and dipoles: Thermodynamics and correlation functions

    Vericat, F.; Blum, L.

    1980-01-01

    The solution of the mean spherical model of a mixture of equal-size hard ions and dipoles is reinvestigated. Simple expressions for the coefficients of the Laplace transform of the pair correlation function and the other thermodynamic properties are given

  20. Denatured states of yeast cytochrome c induced by heat and guanidinium chloride are structurally and thermodynamically different.

    Zaidi, Sobia; Haque, Md Anzarul; Ubaid-Ullah, Shah; Prakash, Amresh; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Islam, Asimul; Batra, Janendra K; Ahmad, Faizan

    2017-05-01

    A sequence alignment of mammalian cytochromes c with yeast iso-1-cytochrome c (y-cyt-c) shows that the yeast protein contains five extra N-terminal residues. We have been interested in understanding the question: What is the role of these five extra N-terminal residues in folding and stability of the protein? To answer this question we have prepared five deletants of y-cyt-c by sequentially removing these extra residues. During our studies on the wild type (WT) protein and its deletants, we observed that the amount of secondary structure in the guanidinium chloride (GdmCl)-induced denatured (D) state of each protein is different from that of the heat-induced denatured (H) state. This finding is confirmed by the observation of an additional cooperative transition curve of optical properties between H and D states on the addition of different concentrations of GdmCl to the already heat denatured WT y-cyt-c and its deletants at pH 6.0 and 68°C. For each protein, analysis of transition curves representing processes, native (N) state ↔ D state, N state ↔ H state, and H state ↔ D state, was done to obtain Gibbs free energy changes associated with all the three processes. This analysis showed that, for each protein, thermodynamic cycle accommodates Gibbs free energies associated with transitions between N and D states, N and H states, and H and D states, the characteristics required for a thermodynamic function. All these experimental observations have been supported by our molecular dynamics simulation studies.

  1. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic functions for Ag-Hg and Cu-Hg binary systems

    Liu, Yajun, E-mail: yajunliu@gatech.edu [School of Materials and Energy, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Wang, Guan [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510006 (China); Wang, Jiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China); Chen, Yang [Mining, Metallurgy and Materials Research Department, General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Long, Zhaohui [School of Mechanical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2012-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic properties of Ag-Hg and Cu-Hg are explored in order to facilitate dental materials design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A self-consistent set of thermodynamic parameters is obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The experimental information can be well reproduced by the optimized thermodynamic data. - Abstract: In order to facilitate the computational design of new amalgams for novel dental alloys, the phase equilibria, phase diagrams and thermodynamic functions for Ag-Hg and Cu-Hg binary systems are explored in this work, based on the CALPHAD framework and experimental characterizations. The Gibbs free energies of the solution phases as well as the stoichiometric phases are calculated, with the aid of enthalpies of mixing, activities, enthalpies of formation, and phase equilibrium data. The thermodynamic descriptions provided in this work enable the stabilities of each phase at various temperatures and compositions to be well described, which contribute to the establishment of a general database to design novel metallic dental materials.

  2. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic functions for Ag–Hg and Cu–Hg binary systems

    Liu, Yajun; Wang, Guan; Wang, Jiang; Chen, Yang; Long, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermodynamic properties of Ag–Hg and Cu–Hg are explored in order to facilitate dental materials design. ► A self-consistent set of thermodynamic parameters is obtained. ► The experimental information can be well reproduced by the optimized thermodynamic data. - Abstract: In order to facilitate the computational design of new amalgams for novel dental alloys, the phase equilibria, phase diagrams and thermodynamic functions for Ag–Hg and Cu–Hg binary systems are explored in this work, based on the CALPHAD framework and experimental characterizations. The Gibbs free energies of the solution phases as well as the stoichiometric phases are calculated, with the aid of enthalpies of mixing, activities, enthalpies of formation, and phase equilibrium data. The thermodynamic descriptions provided in this work enable the stabilities of each phase at various temperatures and compositions to be well described, which contribute to the establishment of a general database to design novel metallic dental materials.

  3. Thermodynamics and equations of state of matter from ideal gas to quark-gluon plasma

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2016-01-01

    The monograph presents a comparative analysis of different thermodynamic models of the equations of state. The basic ideological premises of the theoretical methods and the experiment are considered. The principal attention is on the description of states that are of greatest interest for the physics of high energy concentrations which are either already attained or can be reached in the near future in controlled terrestrial conditions, or are realized in astrophysical objects at different stages of their evolution. Ultra-extreme astrophysical and nuclear-physical applications are also analyzed where the thermodynamics of matter is affected substantially by relativism, high-power gravitational and magnetic fields, thermal radiation, transformation of nuclear particles, nucleon neutronization, and quark deconfinement. The book is intended for a wide range of specialists engaged in the study of the equations of state of matter and high energy density physics, as well as for senior students and postgraduates.

  4. Every storage function is a state function

    Trentelman, H.L.; Willems, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that for linear dynamical systems with quadratic supply rates, a storage function can always be written as a quadratic function of the state of an associated linear dynamical system. This dynamical system is obtained by combining the dynamics of the original system with the dynamics of

  5. A Concise Equation of State for Aqueous Solutions of Electrolytes Incorporating Thermodynamic Laws and Entropy

    Raji Heyrovská

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Recently, the author suggested a simple and composite equation of state by incorporating fundamental thermodynamic properties like heat capacities into her earlier concise equation of state for gases based on free volume and molecular association / dissociation. This work brings new results for aqueous solutions, based on the analogy of the equation of state for gases and solutions over wide ranges of pressures (for gases and concentrations (for solutions. The definitions of entropy and heat energy through the equation of state for gases, also holds for solutions.

  6. A thermodynamic approach to nonlinear ultrasonics for material state awareness and prognosis

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna

    2017-11-01

    We develop a thermodynamic framework for modeling nonlinear ultrasonic damage sensing and prognosis in materials undergoing progressive damage. The framework is based on the internal variable approach and relies on the construction of a pseudo-elastic strain energy function that captures the energetics associated with the damage progression. The pseudo-elastic strain energy function is composed of two energy functions—one that describes how a material stores energy in an elastic fashion and the other describes how material dissipates energy or stores it in an inelastic fashion. Experimental motivation for the choice of the above two functionals is discussed and some specific choices pertaining to damage progression during fatigue and creep are presented. The thermodynamic framework is employed to model the nonlinear response of material undergoing stress relaxation and creep-like degradation. For each of the above cases, evolution of the nonlinearity parameter with damage as well as with macroscopic measurables like accumulated plastic strain is obtained.

  7. A Unification between Dynamical System Theory and Thermodynamics Involving an Energy, Mass, and Entropy State Space Formalism

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we combine the two universalisms of thermodynamics and dynamical systems theory to develop a dynamical system formalism for classical thermodynamics. Specifically, using a compartmental dynamical system energy flow model involving heat flow, work energy, and chemical reactions, we develop a state-space dynamical system model that captures the key aspects of thermodynamics, including its fundamental laws. In addition, we show that our thermodynamically consistent dynamical system model is globally semistable with system states converging to a state of temperature equipartition. Furthermore, in the presence of chemical reactions, we use the law of mass-action and the notion of chemical potential to show that the dynamic system states converge to a state of temperature equipartition and zero affinity corresponding to a state of chemical equilibrium.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content

    Ana Paula Prette

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Jackfruit tree is one of the most significant trees in tropical home gardens and perhaps the most widespread and useful tree in the important genus Artocarpus. The fruit is susceptible to mechanical and biological damage in the mature state, and some people find the aroma of the fruit objectionable, particularly in confined spaces. The dehydration process could be an alternative for the exploitation of this product, and the relationship between moisture content and water activity provides useful information for its processing and storage. The aim of this study was to determine the thermodynamic properties of the water sorption of jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. as a function of moisture content. Desorption isotherms of the different parts of the jackfruit (pulp, peduncle, mesocarp, peel, and seed were determined at four different temperatures (313.15, 323.15, 333.15, and 343.15 K in a water activity range of 0.02-0.753 using the static gravimetric method. Theoretical and empirical models were used to model the desorption isotherms. An analytical solution of the Clausius-Clapeyron equation was proposed to calculate the isosteric heat of sorption, the differential entropy, and Gibbs' free energy using the Guggenhein-Anderson-de Boer and Oswin models considering the effect of temperature on the hygroscopic equilibrium.

  9. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled liquid state of pharmaceuticals: Itraconazole and ketoconazole.

    Tarnacka, M; Madejczyk, O; Adrjanowicz, K; Pionteck, J; Kaminska, E; Kamiński, K; Paluch, M

    2015-06-14

    Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) measurements and broadband dielectric spectroscopy were carried out to investigate molecular dynamics and to test the validity of thermodynamic scaling of two homologous compounds of pharmaceutical activity: itraconazole and ketoconazole in the wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The pressure coefficients of the glass transition temperature (dT(g)/dp) for itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined to be equal to 183 and 228 K/GPa, respectively. However, for itraconazole, the additional transition to the nematic phase was observed and characterized by the pressure coefficient dT(n)/dp = 258 K/GPa. From PVT and dielectric data, we obtained that the liquid-nematic phase transition is governed by the relaxation time since it occurred at constant τ(α) = 10(-5) s. Furthermore, we plotted the obtained relaxation times as a function of T(-1)v(-γ), which has revealed that the validity of thermodynamic scaling with the γ exponent equals to 3.69 ± 0.04 and 3.64 ± 0.03 for itraconazole and ketoconazole, respectively. Further analysis of the scaling parameter in itraconazole revealed that it unexpectedly decreases with increasing relaxation time, which resulted in dramatic change of the shape of the thermodynamic scaling master curve. While in the case of ketoconazole, it remained the same within entire range of data (within experimental uncertainty). We suppose that in case of itraconazole, this peculiar behavior is related to the liquid crystals' properties of itraconazole molecule.

  10. The enthalpy of sublimation and thermodynamic functions of fermium

    Haire, R.G.; Gibson, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The enthalpy of sublimation of fermium (Fm), element 100, has now been determined directly by measuring the partial pressure of Fm over alloys, for the temperature range of 642 to 905 K. The partial pressures were determined using Knudsen effusion and target collection techniques. Dilute (10 -5 --10 -7 atom %) solid alloys of Fm and mixtures of Fm and Es in both Sm and Yb solvents were studied. The presence of Es in two of the alloys allowed a direct comparison of the behavior of Fm and Es, where the latter could be used as a reference. It was possible to calculate enthalpies of sublimation and a hypothetical vapor pressure/temperature relationship for pure Fm metal by selecting Yb as the solvent most likely to form a nearly ideal alloy with Fm. From the experimental vapor pressure data, we derived average Second Law values of 33.8±3 kcal/mol and 23.5±3 cal/mol deg for the enthalpy and entropy of sublimation of Fm at 298 K. Third Law enthalpy values were also calculated using the experimental partial pressure data and entropies estimated from derived free energy functions and heat capacities for the solid and gaseous forms of Fm. The average Third Law values (34.8 kcal/mol and 25.1 cal/mol deg, respectively, at 298 K) are in agreement with those obtained via the Second Law. These results establish that Fm, like Es (element 99), is a divalent metal. The finding that Fm metal is the second divalent actinide element experimentally establishes the trend towards metallic divalency expected in the second half of the actinide series

  11. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    Reynier, Yvan [Meylan, FR; Yazami, Rachid [Los Angeles, CA; Fultz, Brent T [Pasadena, CA

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  12. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the hard-sphere system: From stable to metastable states

    Bomont, Jean-Marc, E-mail: jean-marc.bomont@univ-lorraine.fr; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis

    2014-08-17

    Highlights: • Three different scaling laws, devoted to transport properties of hard-sphere system, are investigated over a wide range of packing fractions. • A new semiempirical relation linking the transport properties to the excess pressure is derived. • The present relation allows to better understand the link between the thermodynamic and the dynamic properties of the hard-sphere system. - Abstract: A set of three different scaling laws is investigated, which are devoted to link the transport properties, i.e. diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity, to the thermodynamic properties for the athermal hard-sphere system, over the wider range of packing fraction covering the stable and metastable regimes. Except for the thermal conductivity, the Rosenfeld (1999) [15] relation is found to be applicable to the stable states while the Adam and Gibbs (1965) [24] relation holds well for the metastable states. In contrast, the modified Cohen and Turnbull (1959) [25] relation proposed here gives sound support for a universal scaling law connecting the dynamic and thermodynamic properties, over the domain of packing fraction including the stable and metastable states. In particular, it is found that the most relevant control parameter is not the excess entropy, but the logarithm derivative of the excess entropy with respect to the packing fraction. In the same context, the Stokes–Einstein relation between the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity is also examined. The possible violation of the Stokes–Einstein relation is investigated over a large domain of packing fractions.

  13. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the hard-sphere system: From stable to metastable states

    Bomont, Jean-Marc; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three different scaling laws, devoted to transport properties of hard-sphere system, are investigated over a wide range of packing fractions. • A new semiempirical relation linking the transport properties to the excess pressure is derived. • The present relation allows to better understand the link between the thermodynamic and the dynamic properties of the hard-sphere system. - Abstract: A set of three different scaling laws is investigated, which are devoted to link the transport properties, i.e. diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity, to the thermodynamic properties for the athermal hard-sphere system, over the wider range of packing fraction covering the stable and metastable regimes. Except for the thermal conductivity, the Rosenfeld (1999) [15] relation is found to be applicable to the stable states while the Adam and Gibbs (1965) [24] relation holds well for the metastable states. In contrast, the modified Cohen and Turnbull (1959) [25] relation proposed here gives sound support for a universal scaling law connecting the dynamic and thermodynamic properties, over the domain of packing fraction including the stable and metastable states. In particular, it is found that the most relevant control parameter is not the excess entropy, but the logarithm derivative of the excess entropy with respect to the packing fraction. In the same context, the Stokes–Einstein relation between the diffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity is also examined. The possible violation of the Stokes–Einstein relation is investigated over a large domain of packing fractions

  14. Functional observer and state feedback

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we show the relation between state space approach and transfer function approach for functional observer and state feedback design. Two approaches can be transformed into each other, based on this result. More importantly, we find that the state space approach introduces some severe, unnecessary restrictions in solving the problem. The restrictions are, however, reduced to be a trivial condition in transfer function approach. It is believed that the result presented in this paper will be useful in developing both approaches, and motivate some new results for solving the problem

  15. Thermodynamic functions and vapor pressures of uranium and plutonium oxides at high temperatures

    Green, D.W.; Reedy, G.T.; Leibowitz, L.

    1977-01-01

    The total energy release in a hypothetical reactor accident is sensitive to the total vapor pressure of the fuel. Thermodynamic functions which are accurate at high temperature can be calculated with the methods of statistical mechanics provided that needed spectroscopic data are available. This method of obtaining high-temperature vapor pressures should be greatly superior to the extrapolation of experimental vapor pressure measurements beyond the temperature range studied. Spectroscopic data needed for these calculations are obtained from infrared spectroscopy of matrix-isolated uranium and plutonium oxides. These data allow the assignments of the observed spectra to specific molecular species as well as the calculation of anharmonicities for monoxides, bond angles for dioxides, and molecular geometries for trioxides. These data are then employed, in combination with data on rotational and electronic molecular energy levels, to determine thermodynamic functions that are suitable for the calculation of high-temperature vapor pressures

  16. Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation in normal alcohols of aliphatic series

    Sergeeva, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic functions of ion solvation of alkali, alkaline earth metals and halogenides in 9 alcohols are calculated using the earlier suggested method. It is shown that summary values are in good accord with experimental ones, the deviations do not surpass 0-5%, solvation energies of one and the same electrolyte in the series of n-alcohols do not change, enthalpy and entropy of solvation increase from lower alcohols to higher ones

  17. Fluctuations and thermodynamic response functions in a Lennard-Jones solid

    Li, M.; Johnson, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic response functions of a nearest-neighbor Lennard-Jones solid--heat capacity, thermal-expansion coefficient, compressibility, and elastic constants--are calculated directly from fluctuations using molecular-dynamics simulations. The algorithm used is the earlier Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics modified to take into account symmetry and rotation invariance of the system under investigation. The convergence is very fast and results are in good agreement with existing Monte Carlo and molecular-dynamics results

  18. A thermodynamical analysis of the π and K meson valence structure functions

    Angelini, C.; Pazzi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The π and K meson valance structure functions are analysed in the framework of a thermodynamical model already applied to the nucleon. We obtain a simple expression which reproduces quite well the data for chi > 0.3. The effective temperatures are found to be of the order of 20 MeV for the pion and 65 MeV for the kaon. (orig.)

  19. Thermodynamic Functions of Yttrium Trifluoride and Its Dimer in the Gas Phase

    Osina, E. L.; Kovtun, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    New calculations of the functions for YF3 and Y2F6 in the gas phase using quantum-chemical calculations by MP2 and CCSD(T) methods are performed in connection with the ongoing work on obtaining reliable thermodynamic data of yttrium halides. The obtained values are entered in the database of the IVTANTERMO software complex. Equations approximating the temperature dependence of the reduced Gibbs energy in the T = 298.15-6000 K range of temperatures are presented.

  20. Urea-temperature phase diagrams capture the thermodynamics of denatured state expansion that accompany protein unfolding

    Tischer, Alexander; Auton, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the thermodynamic properties of the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain using urea-induced unfolding at variable temperature and thermal unfolding at variable urea concentrations to generate a phase diagram that quantitatively describes the equilibrium between native and denatured states. From this analysis, we were able to determine consistent thermodynamic parameters with various spectroscopic and calorimetric methods that define the urea–temperature parameter plane from cold denaturation to heat denaturation. Urea and thermal denaturation are experimentally reversible and independent of the thermal scan rate indicating that all transitions are at equilibrium and the van't Hoff and calorimetric enthalpies obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions are equivalent demonstrating two-state character. Global analysis of the urea–temperature phase diagram results in a significantly higher enthalpy of unfolding than obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions and significant cross correlations describing the urea dependence of and that define a complex temperature dependence of the m-value. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy illustrates a large increase in secondary structure content of the urea-denatured state as temperature increases and a loss of secondary structure in the thermally denatured state upon addition of urea. These structural changes in the denatured ensemble make up ∼40% of the total ellipticity change indicating a highly compact thermally denatured state. The difference between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from phase diagram analysis and those obtained from analysis of individual thermal transitions illustrates that phase diagrams capture both contributions to unfolding and denatured state expansion and by comparison are able to decipher these contributions. PMID:23813497

  1. Thermodynamic consistency test procedure using orthogonal collocation and the Peng-Robinson equation of state

    Hamm, L.L.; Van Brunt, V.

    1982-08-01

    The Christiansen and Fredenslund programs for calculating vapor-liquid equilibria have been modified by replacing the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state with the newly developed Peng-Robinson equation of state. This modification was shown to be a decided improvement for high pressure systems, especially in the critical and upper retrograde regions. Thermodynamic consistency tests were developed and used to evaluate and compare calculated values from both the modified and unmodified programs with reported experimental data for several vapor-liquid systems

  2. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of zircon ZrSiO4

    Mittal, R.; Chaplot, S.L.; Choudhury, N.

    1998-01-01

    The silicate mineral zircon is a host material for radioactive materials in the earth's crust and is a natural candidate for usage as a nuclear waste storage material. Lattice dynamical calculations have been carried out to understand its thermodynamic properties and high pressure behavior. The calculated phonon density of states, variation of phonon frequencies with pressure and equation of state are in good agreement with the available experimental data. One of the zone center optic mode involving SiO 4 rotations becomes soft at 47 GPa

  3. Some problems on the thermodynamic state of the metallogenetic systems; Consideraciones sobre la genesis de los yacimientos uraniferos

    Mingarro, E.

    1965-07-01

    In order to get a classification of the uranium deposits, the geological processes have been ordered in thermodynamic systems according to the independent parameters that define their equilibrium state. Also, to apply the phase rule, we suppose that the ore forming elements are always ideally mobile components; that is, in the geological systems, these components are defined by their chemical potentials. In this paper, we show that in random conditions, i. e.; for any possible value of the factors of equilibrium or state the stable mineralizations are formed only in metasomatic regimes; so that the mineralogical sequence is a function both of the Helmholtz's free energy and the crystallisation pressure of the minerals. (Author) 7 refs.

  4. Some problems on the thermodynamic state of the metallogenetic systems; Consideraciones sobre la genesis de los yacimientos uraniferos

    Mingarro, E

    1965-07-01

    In order to get a classification of the uranium deposits, the geological processes have been ordered in thermodynamic systems according to the independent parameters that define their equilibrium state. Also, to apply the phase rule, we suppose that the ore forming elements are always ideally mobile components; that is, in the geological systems, these components are defined by their chemical potentials. In this paper, we show that in random conditions, i. e.; for any possible value of the factors of equilibrium or state the stable mineralizations are formed only in metasomatic regimes; so that the mineralogical sequence is a function both of the Helmholtz's free energy and the crystallisation pressure of the minerals. (Author) 7 refs.

  5. ASTEM, Evaluation of Gibbs, Helmholtz and Saturation Line Function for Thermodynamics Calculation

    Moore, K.V.; Burgess, M.P.; Fuller, G.L.; Kaiser, A.H.; Jaeger, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ASTEM is a modular set of FORTRAN IV subroutines to evaluate the Gibbs, Helmholtz, and saturation line functions as published by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1967). Any thermodynamic quantity including derivative properties can be obtained from these routines by a user-supplied main program. PROPS is an auxiliary routine available for the IBM360 version which makes it easier to apply the ASTEM routines to power station models. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Unless re-dimensioned by the user, the highest derivative allowed is order 9. All arrays within ASTEM are one-dimensional to save storage area

  6. Thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamics in supercooled liquid state of pharmaceuticals: Itraconazole and ketoconazole

    Tarnacka, M., E-mail: mtarnacka@us.edu.pl; Madejczyk, O.; Kamiński, K.; Paluch, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Silesian Center of Education and Interdisciplinary Research, University of Silesia, ul. 75 Pulku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzow (Poland); Adrjanowicz, K. [NanoBioMedical Centre, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland); Pionteck, J. [Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Hohe Strasse 6, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Kaminska, E. [Department of Pharmacognosy and Phytochemistry, School of Pharmacy and Division of Laboratory Medicine in Sosnowiec, Medical University of Silesia, ul. Jagiellonska 4, 41-200 Sosnowiec (Poland)

    2015-06-14

    Pressure-Volume-Temperature (PVT) measurements and broadband dielectric spectroscopy were carried out to investigate molecular dynamics and to test the validity of thermodynamic scaling of two homologous compounds of pharmaceutical activity: itraconazole and ketoconazole in the wide range of thermodynamic conditions. The pressure coefficients of the glass transition temperature (dT{sub g}/dp) for itraconazole and ketoconazole were determined to be equal to 183 and 228 K/GPa, respectively. However, for itraconazole, the additional transition to the nematic phase was observed and characterized by the pressure coefficient dT{sub n}/dp = 258 K/GPa. From PVT and dielectric data, we obtained that the liquid-nematic phase transition is governed by the relaxation time since it occurred at constant τ {sub α} = 10{sup −5} s. Furthermore, we plotted the obtained relaxation times as a function of T{sup −1}v{sup −γ}, which has revealed that the validity of thermodynamic scaling with the γ exponent equals to 3.69 ± 0.04 and 3.64 ± 0.03 for itraconazole and ketoconazole, respectively. Further analysis of the scaling parameter in itraconazole revealed that it unexpectedly decreases with increasing relaxation time, which resulted in dramatic change of the shape of the thermodynamic scaling master curve. While in the case of ketoconazole, it remained the same within entire range of data (within experimental uncertainty). We suppose that in case of itraconazole, this peculiar behavior is related to the liquid crystals’ properties of itraconazole molecule.

  7. On explicit thermodynamic functions and extremal limits of Myers-Perry black holes

    Aaman, Jan E.; Pidokrajt, Narit

    2013-01-01

    We study thermodynamic geometries of Myers-Perry (MP) black holes with arbitrary number of angular momenta. This geometric method allows us to visualize thermodynamic state spaces of the MP black holes as wedges embedded in a Minkowski-like parameter space. The opening angles of these wedges are uniquely determined by the number of spacetime dimensions d, and the number of angular momenta associated with the MP black holes, n. The geometric structure captures extremal limits of the MP black holes, and hence serves as a method for identifying the black hole's extremal limit. We propose that classification of the MP black hole solutions should based on these uncovered structures. In order for the ultraspinning regime to exist, at least one of the angular momenta has to be set to zero. Finally, we conjecture that the membrane phase of ultraspinning MP black holes is reached at the minimum temperature in the case where 2n< d-3 based on the thermodynamic curvature obtained. (orig.)

  8. Microscopic dynamics in simple liquids: a clue to understanding the basic thermodynamics of the liquid state

    Cabrillo, C; Bermejo, F J; Maira-Vidal, A; Fernandez-Perea, R; Bennington, S M; Martin, D

    2004-01-01

    The advent of inelastic x-ray scattering techniques has prompted a reawakened interest in the dynamics of simple liquids. Such studies are often carried out using simplified models to account for the stochastic dynamics that give rise to quasielastic scattering. The vibrational and diffusive dynamics of molten potassium are studied here by an experiment using neutron scattering and are shown to provide some clues to understand the basic thermodynamics of the liquid state. The findings reported here suggest ways in which the true complementarity of neutron and x-ray scattering may be profitably exploited

  9. Self-assembled materials and supramolecular chemistry within microfluidic environments: from common thermodynamic states to non-equilibrium structures.

    Sevim, S; Sorrenti, A; Franco, C; Furukawa, S; Pané, S; deMello, A J; Puigmartí-Luis, J

    2018-05-01

    Self-assembly is a crucial component in the bottom-up fabrication of hierarchical supramolecular structures and advanced functional materials. Control has traditionally relied on the use of encoded building blocks bearing suitable moieties for recognition and interaction, with targeting of the thermodynamic equilibrium state. On the other hand, nature leverages the control of reaction-diffusion processes to create hierarchically organized materials with surprisingly complex biological functions. Indeed, under non-equilibrium conditions (kinetic control), the spatio-temporal command of chemical gradients and reactant mixing during self-assembly (the creation of non-uniform chemical environments for example) can strongly affect the outcome of the self-assembly process. This directly enables a precise control over material properties and functions. In this tutorial review, we show how the unique physical conditions offered by microfluidic technologies can be advantageously used to control the self-assembly of materials and of supramolecular aggregates in solution, making possible the isolation of intermediate states and unprecedented non-equilibrium structures, as well as the emergence of novel functions. Selected examples from the literature will be used to confirm that microfluidic devices are an invaluable toolbox technology for unveiling, understanding and steering self-assembly pathways to desired structures, properties and functions, as well as advanced processing tools for device fabrication and integration.

  10. Formation, Physicochemical Characterization, and Thermodynamic Stability of the Amorphous State of Drugs and Excipients.

    Martino, Piera Di; Magnoni, Federico; Peregrina, Dolores Vargas; Gigliobianco, Maria Rosa; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan

    2016-01-01

    Drugs and excipients used for pharmaceutical applications generally exist in the solid (crystalline or amorphous) state, more rarely as liquid materials. In some cases, according to the physicochemical nature of the molecule, or as a consequence of specific technological processes, a compound may exist exclusively in the amorphous state. In other cases, as a consequence of specific treatments (freezing and spray drying, melting and co-melting, grinding and compression), the crystalline form may convert into a completely or partially amorphous form. An amorphous material shows physical and thermodynamic properties different from the corresponding crystalline form, with profound repercussions on its technological performance and biopharmaceutical properties. Several physicochemical techniques such as X-ray powder diffraction, thermal methods of analysis, spectroscopic techniques, gravimetric techniques, and inverse gas chromatography can be applied to characterize the amorphous form of a compound (drug or excipient), and to evaluate its thermodynamic stability. This review offers a survey of the technologies used to convert a crystalline solid into an amorphous form, and describes the most important techniques for characterizing the amorphous state of compounds of pharmaceutical interest.

  11. Investigation of the thermodynamics governing metal hydride synthesis in the molten state process

    Stowe, Ashley C.; Berseth, Polly A.; Farrell, Thomas P.; Laughlin, Laura; Anton, Donald; Zidan, Ragaiy

    2008-01-01

    This work is aimed at utilizing a new synthetic technique to form novel complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. This technique is based on fusing different complex hydrides at elevated temperatures and pressures to form new species with improved hydrogen storage properties. Under conditions of elevated hydrogen overpressures and temperatures the starting materials can reach melting or near-melting point without decomposing (molten state processing), allowing for enhanced diffusion and exchange of elements among the starting materials. The formation and stabilization of these compounds, using the molten state process, is driven by the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the starting and resulting compounds. Complex hydrides (e.g. NaK 2 AlH 6 , Mg(AlH 4 ) 2 ) were formed, structurally characterized and their hydrogen desorption properties were tested. In this paper we report on investigations of the thermodynamic aspects governing the process and products. We also report on the role of molar ratio in determining the final products. The effectiveness of the molten state process is compared with chemomechanical synthetic methods (ball milling)

  12. Concise chemical thermodynamics

    Peters, APH

    2010-01-01

    EnergyThe Realm of ThermodynamicsEnergy BookkeepingNature's Driving ForcesSetting the Scene: Basic IdeasSystem and SurroundingsFunctions of StateMechanical Work and Expanding GasesThe Absolute Temperature Scale Forms of Energy and Their Interconversion Forms of Renewable Energy Solar Energy Wind Energy Hydroelectric Power Geothermal Energy Biomass Energy References ProblemsThe First Law of Thermodynamics Statement of the First Law Reversible Expansion of an Ideal GasConstant-Volume ProcessesConstant-Pressure ProcessesA New Function: EnthalpyRelationship between ?H and ?UUses and Conventions of

  13. Low-temperature heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of vitamin B{sub 12}

    Knyazev, A.V., E-mail: knyazevav@gmail.com; Smirnova, N.N.; Plesovskikh, A.S.; Shushunov, A.N.; Knyazeva, S.S.

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B{sub 12} has been measured by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. • The thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B{sub 12} have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. • The character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. • The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. - Abstract: In the present work temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B{sub 12} (cyanocobalamin) has been measured for the first time in the range from 6 to 343 K by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Based on the experimental data, the thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B{sub 12}, namely, the heat capacity, enthalpy H°(T) − H°(0), entropy S°(T) − S°(0) and Gibbs function G°(T) − H°(0) have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. The value of the fractal dimension D in the function of multifractal generalization of Debye's theory of the heat capacity of solids was estimated and the character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was also studied by differential scanning calorimetry.

  14. Low-temperature heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of vitamin B12

    Knyazev, A.V.; Smirnova, N.N.; Plesovskikh, A.S.; Shushunov, A.N.; Knyazeva, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B 12 has been measured by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. • The thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B 12 have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. • The character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. • The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. - Abstract: In the present work temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B 12 (cyanocobalamin) has been measured for the first time in the range from 6 to 343 K by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Based on the experimental data, the thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B 12 , namely, the heat capacity, enthalpy H°(T) − H°(0), entropy S°(T) − S°(0) and Gibbs function G°(T) − H°(0) have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 343 K. The value of the fractal dimension D in the function of multifractal generalization of Debye's theory of the heat capacity of solids was estimated and the character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. The thermal stability of cyanocobalamin was also studied by differential scanning calorimetry

  15. Thermodynamic selectivity of functional agents on zeolite for sodium dodecyl sulfate sequestration

    Leng, Ling; Wang, Jian [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Qiu, Xianxiu; Zhao, Yanxiang; Yip, Yuk-Wang; Law, Ga-Lai [Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Shih, Kaimin; Zhou, Zhengyuan [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Lee, Po-Heng, E-mail: poheng76@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic approach to select a functional agent for adsorbent is proposed. • ITC and QCS were used to interpret the interaction between adsorbate and agent. • The interaction identifies the adsorption mechanism and performance. • This approach enables the manipulation of adsorption capacity optimization. - Abstract: This study proposes a thermodynamic approach to effectively select functional agents onto zeolite for sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) sequestration in greywater reuse. We combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemistry simulation (QCS) to identify the interactions between SDS and agents at the molecular level. Three potential agents, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), N,N,N-trimethyltetradecan-1-aminium bromide (C{sub 14}TAB), and 14-hydroxy-N,N,N-trimethyltetradecan-1-aminium bromide (C{sub 14}HTAB), differ in carbon chain length and hydrophilic groups. The ITC titration of SDS with CTAB released the highest heat, followed by those with C{sub 14}TAB and C{sub 14}HTAB, as was the same trend for the amounts of SDS adsorbed by the respective functionalized-zeolites. Results suggest that the favorable SDS sorption occurred at the bilayer CTAB-zeolite is driven by enthalpy as similar as the SDS…CTAB interaction found, regardless of the contribution from electrostatic and/or hydrophobic behaviors, while the declined sorption is entropy-driven via the predominant hydrophobic interaction onto the monolayer CTAB-zeolite. The data presented here interpret the nature of molecularly thermodynamic quantities and enable the manipulation of sorption capacity optimization.

  16. Low temperature heat capacities and thermodynamic functions described by Debye-Einstein integrals.

    Gamsjäger, Ernst; Wiessner, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    Thermodynamic data of various crystalline solids are assessed from low temperature heat capacity measurements, i.e., from almost absolute zero to 300 K by means of semi-empirical models. Previous studies frequently present fit functions with a large amount of coefficients resulting in almost perfect agreement with experimental data. It is, however, pointed out in this work that special care is required to avoid overfitting. Apart from anomalies like phase transformations, it is likely that data from calorimetric measurements can be fitted by a relatively simple Debye-Einstein integral with sufficient precision. Thereby, reliable values for the heat capacities, standard enthalpies, and standard entropies at T  = 298.15 K are obtained. Standard thermodynamic functions of various compounds strongly differing in the number of atoms in the formula unit can be derived from this fitting procedure and are compared to the results of previous fitting procedures. The residuals are of course larger when the Debye-Einstein integral is applied instead of using a high number of fit coefficients or connected splines, but the semi-empiric fit coefficients keep their meaning with respect to physics. It is suggested to use the Debye-Einstein integral fit as a standard method to describe heat capacities in the range between 0 and 300 K so that the derived thermodynamic functions are obtained on the same theory-related semi-empiric basis. Additional fitting is recommended when a precise description for data at ultra-low temperatures (0-20 K) is requested.

  17. A principle to correlate extreme values of excess thermodynamic functions with partial molar quantities

    尉志武; 刘芸; 周蕊; 薛芳渝

    2001-01-01

    Excess thermodynamic properties are widely used quantitatively for fluids. It was found that at constant temperature and pressure a molar excess quantity of a mutually miscible binary mixture at the extreme points equals the excess partial molar quantities of the two components, i.e.F1E = F2E = FmE , forming a triple cross point. The relationship is hold for properties such as en-thalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, and volume, and is applicable for excess functions with multi extreme points. Solutions at extreme points can be referred to as special mixtures. Particularly fora special mixture of Gibbs free energy, activity coefficients of the two components are identical.

  18. A New Thermodynamic Calculation Method for Binary Alloys: Part I: Statistical Calculation of Excess Functions

    2002-01-01

    The improved form of calculation formula for the activities of the components in binary liquids and solid alloys has been derived based on the free volume theory considering excess entropy and Miedema's model for calculating the formation heat of binary alloys. A calculation method of excess thermodynamic functions for binary alloys, the formulas of integral molar excess properties and partial molar excess properties for solid ordered or disordered binary alloys have been developed. The calculated results are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  19. A principle to correlate extreme values of excess thermody-namic functions with partial molar quantities

    2001-01-01

    Excess thermodynamic properties are widely used quantitatively for fluids. It was found that at constant temperature and pressure a molar excess quantity of a mutually miscible binary mixture at the extreme points equals the excess partial molar quantities of the two components, i.e. , forming a triple cross point. The relationship is hold for properties such as enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy, and volume, and is applicable for excess functions with multi extreme points. Solutions at extreme points can be referred to as special mixtures. Particularly for a special mixture of Gibbs free energy, activity coefficients of the two components are identical.

  20. Bridging scales from molecular simulations to classical thermodynamics: density functional theory of capillary condensation in nanopores

    Neimark, Alexander V; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Vishnyakov, Aleksey

    2003-01-01

    With the example of the capillary condensation of Lennard-Jones fluid in nanopores ranging from 1 to 10 nm, we show that the non-local density functional theory (NLDFT) with properly chosen parameters of intermolecular interactions bridges the scale gap from molecular simulations to macroscopic thermodynamics. On the one hand, NLDFT correctly approximates the results of Monte Carlo simulations (shift of vapour-liquid equilibrium, spinodals, density profiles, adsorption isotherms) for pores wider than about 2 nm. On the other hand, NLDFT smoothly merges (above 7-10 nm) with the Derjaguin-Broekhoff-de Boer equations which represent augmented Laplace-Kelvin equations of capillary condensation and desorption

  1. Tables of thermodynamic functions of a substance at a high concentration of energy

    Kalitkin, N.N.; Kuz'mina, L.V.

    Detailed tables of the Thomas-Fermi thermodynamic functions and the quantum and exchange corrections of order h 2 for them have been prepared. They are presented in a form that enables us to use them for any element of the periodic system. The tables cover a wide range of volumes- from highly compressed substance to rarefied gas, and temperatures from zero to tens of kilovolts. A comparison is made of the results with experimental data and calculations from more accurate models; the limits of applicability of the tables are evaluated

  2. Determination of the protonation state of the Asp dyad: conventional molecular dynamics versus thermodynamic integration.

    Huang, Jinfeng; Zhu, Yali; Sun, Bin; Yao, Yuan; Liu, Junjun

    2016-03-01

    The protonation state of the Asp dyad is important as it can reveal enzymatic mechanisms, and the information this provides can be used in the development of drugs for proteins such as memapsin 2 (BACE-1), HIV-1 protease, and rennin. Conventional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been successfully used to determine the preferred protonation state of the Asp dyad. In the present work, we demonstrate that the results obtained from conventional MD simulations can be greatly influenced by the particular force field applied or the values used for control parameters. In principle, free-energy changes between possible protonation states can be used to determine the protonation state. We show that protonation state prediction by the thermodynamic integration (TI) method is insensitive to force field version or to the cutoff for calculating nonbonded interactions (a control parameter). In the present study, the protonation state of the Asp dyad predicted by TI calculations was the same regardless of the force field and cutoff value applied. Contrary to the intuition that conventional MD is more efficient, our results clearly show that the TI method is actually more efficient and more reliable for determining the protonation state of the Asp dyad.

  3. Equation of state for thermodynamic properties of pure and mixtures liquid alkali metals

    Mousazadeh, M.H.; Faramarzi, E.; Maleki, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an equation of state based on statistical-mechanical perturbation theory for pure and mixtures alkali metals. Thermodynamic properties were calculated by the equation of state, based on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT). The model uses two parameters for a monatomic system, segment size, σ, and segment energy, ε. In this work, we calculate the saturation and compressed liquid density, heat capacity at constant pressure and constant volume, isobaric expansion coefficient, for which accurate experimental data exist in the literatures. Results on the density of binary and ternary alkali metal alloys of Cs-K, Na-K, Na-K-Cs, at temperatures from the freezing point up to several hundred degrees above the boiling point are presented. The calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  4. Tritium aging effect on thermodynamic functions of LaNi4.9Al0.1

    Xiong Yifu; Li Rong; Luo Deli

    2001-01-01

    The influence of tritium aging on thermodynamic function of LaNi 4.9 Al 0.1 is measured. The results show that plateau pressures and reversible hydrogen capacity decrease with aging time, thermodynamics parameters such as ΔH, ΔS and plateau slopes of the P-T curve increase with aging time, tritium heel formed after 1120 d tritium exposure

  5. An analytical longitudinal dielectric function of primitive electrolyte solutions and its application in predicting thermodynamic properties

    Xiao, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the longitudinal dielectric function ϵ_l(k) of primitive electrolyte solutions is discussed. Starting from a modified mean spherical approximation, an analytical dielectric function in terms of two parameters is established. These two parameters can be related to the first two decay parameters k_1_,_2 of the dielectric response modes of the bulk system, and can be determined using constraints of k_1_,_2 from statistical theories. Furthermore, a combination of this dielectric function and the molecular Debye-Hückel theory[J. Chem. Phys. 135(2011)104104] leads to a self-consistent mean filed description of electrolyte solutions. Our theory reveals a relationship between the microscopic structure parameters of electrolyte solutions and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties, which is applied to concentrated electrolyte solutions.

  6. Thermodynamical properties of dark energy with the equation of state ω=ω0+ω1z

    Zhang Yongping; Yi Zelong; Zhang Tongjie; Liu Wenbiao

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamical properties of dark energy are usually investigated with the equation of state ω=ω 0 +ω 1 z. Recent observations show that our Universe is accelerating, and the apparent horizon and the event horizon vary with redshift z. Because definitions of the temperature and entropy of a black hole are used to describe the two horizons of the Universe, we examine the thermodynamical properties of the Universe, which is enveloped by the apparent horizon and the event horizon, respectively. We show that the first and the second laws of thermodynamics inside the apparent horizon in any redshift are satisfied, while they are broken down inside the event horizon in some redshifts. Therefore, the apparent horizon for the Universe may be the boundary of thermodynamical equilibrium for the Universe like the event horizon for a black hole

  7. The virial equation of state for unitary fermion thermodynamics with non-Gaussian correlations

    Chen Jisheng; Li Jiarong; Wang Yanping; Xia Xiangjun

    2008-01-01

    We study the roles of the dynamical high order perturbation and statistically non-linear infrared fluctuation/correlation in the virial equation of state for the Fermi gas in the unitary limit. Incorporating the quantum level crossing rearrangement effects, the spontaneously generated entropy departing from the mean-field theory formalism leads to concise thermodynamical expressions. The dimensionless virial coefficients with complex non-local correlations are calculated up to the fourth order for the first time. The virial coefficients of unitary Fermi gas are found to be proportional to those of the ideal quantum gas with integer ratios through a general term formula. Counterintuitively, contrary to those of the ideal bosons (a (0) 2 =-(1/4√2)) or fermions (a (0) 2 =(1/4√2)), the second virial coefficient a 2 of Fermi gas at unitarity is found to be equal to zero. With the vanishing leading order quantum correction, the BCS–BEC crossover thermodynamics manifests the famous pure classical Boyle's law in the Boltzmann regime. The non-Gaussian correlation phenomena can be validated by studying the Joule–Thomson effect

  8. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  9. Relativistic bound state wave functions

    Micu, L.

    2005-01-01

    A particular method of writing the bound state wave functions in relativistic form is applied to the solutions of the Dirac equation with confining potentials in order to obtain a relativistic description of a quark antiquark bound system representing a given meson. Concerning the role of the effective constituent in the present approach we first observe that without this additional constituent we couldn't expand the bound state wave function in terms of products of free states. Indeed, we notice that if the wave function depends on the relative coordinates only, all the expansion coefficients would be infinite. Secondly we remark that the effective constituent enabled us to give a Lorentz covariant meaning to the potential energy of the bound system which is now seen as the 4th component of a 4-momentum. On the other side, by relating the effective constituent to the quantum fluctuations of the background field which generate the binding, we provided a justification for the existence of some spatial degrees of freedom accompanying the interaction potential. These ones, which are quite unusual in quantum mechanics, in our model are the natural consequence of the the independence of the quarks and can be seen as the effect of the imperfect cancellation of the vector momenta during the quantum fluctuations. Related with all these we remark that the adequate representation for the relativistic description of a bound system is the momentum representation, because of the transparent and easy way of writing the conservation laws and the transformation properties of the wave functions. The only condition to be fulfilled is to find a suitable way to take into account the potential energy of the bound system. A particular feature of the present approach is that the confining forces are due to a kind of glue where both quarks are embedded. This recalls other bound state models where the wave function is factorized in terms of constituent wave functions and the confinement is

  10. Partition Function and Configurational Entropy in Non-Equilibrium States: A New Theoretical Model

    Akira Takada

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new model of non-equilibrium thermodynamic states has been investigated on the basis of the fact that all thermodynamic variables can be derived from partition functions. We have thus attempted to define partition functions for non-equilibrium conditions by introducing the concept of pseudo-temperature distributions. These pseudo-temperatures are configurational in origin and distinct from kinetic (phonon temperatures because they refer to the particular fragments of the system with specific energies. This definition allows thermodynamic states to be described either for equilibrium or non-equilibrium conditions. In addition; a new formulation of an extended canonical partition function; internal energy and entropy are derived from this new temperature definition. With this new model; computational experiments are performed on simple non-interacting systems to investigate cooling and two distinct relaxational effects in terms of the time profiles of the partition function; internal energy and configurational entropy.

  11. Mathematical foundations of thermodynamics

    Giles, R; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical Foundations of Thermodynamics details the core concepts of the mathematical principles employed in thermodynamics. The book discusses the topics in a way that physical meanings are assigned to the theoretical terms. The coverage of the text includes the mechanical systems and adiabatic processes; topological considerations; and equilibrium states and potentials. The book also covers Galilean thermodynamics; symmetry in thermodynamics; and special relativistic thermodynamics. The book will be of great interest to practitioners and researchers of disciplines that deal with thermodyn

  12. THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF NONAQUEOUS SINGLE SALT SOLUTIONS USING THE Q-ELECTROLATTICE EQUATION OF STATE

    A. Zuber

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe correlation of thermodynamic properties of nonaqueous electrolyte solutions is relevant to design and operation of many chemical processes, as in fertilizer production and the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, the Q-electrolattice equation of state (EOS is used to model vapor pressure, mean ionic activity coefficient, osmotic coefficient, and liquid density of sixteen methanol and ten ethanol solutions containing single strong 1:1 and 2:1 salts. The Q-electrolattice comprises the lattice-based Mattedi-Tavares-Castier (MTC EOS, the Born term and the explicit MSA term. The model requires two adjustable parameters per ion, namely the ionic diameter and the solvent-ion interaction energy. Predictions of osmotic coefficient at 298.15 K and liquid density at different temperatures are also presented.

  13. Equation-of-state for fluids at high densities-hydrogen isotope measurements and thermodynamic derivations

    Liebenberg, D.H.; Mills, R.L.; Bronson, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes play an important role in energy technologies, in particular, the compression to high densities for initiation of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy. At high densities the properties of the compressed hydrogen isotopes depart drastically from ideal thermodynamic predictions. The measurement of accurate data including the author's own recent measurements of n-H 2 and n-D 2 in the range 75 to 300 K and 0.2 to 2.0 GPa (2 to 20 kbar) is reviewed. An equation-of-state of the Benedict type is fit to these data with a double-process least-squares computer program. The results are reviewed and compared with existing data and with a variety of theoretical work reported for fluid hydrogens. A new heuristic correlation is presented for simplicity in predicting volumes and sound velocity at high pressures. 9 figures, 1 table

  14. HESS Opinions "Biological catalysis of the hydrological cycle: life's thermodynamic function"

    Michaelian, K.

    2012-08-01

    Darwinian theory depicts life as being overwhelmingly consumed by a fight for survival in a hostile environment. However, from a thermodynamic perspective, life is a dynamic, out of equilibrium process, stabilizing and coevolving in concert with its abiotic environment. The living components of the biosphere on the Earth's surface of greatest biomass, the plants and cyanobacteria, are involved in the transpiration of a vast amount of water. Transpiration is part of the global water cycle, and it is this cycle that distinguishes Earth from its apparently life-barren neighboring planets, Venus and Mars. The dissipation of sunlight into heat by organic molecules in the biosphere, and its coupling to the water cycle (as well as other abiotic processes), is by far the greatest entropy-producing process occurring on Earth. Life, from this perspective, can be viewed as performing an important thermodynamic function, acting as a dynamic catalyst by aiding irreversible abiotic processes such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents to produce entropy. The role of animals in this view is that of unwitting but dedicated servants of the plants and cyanobacteria, helping them to grow, and to spread into initially inhospitable areas.

  15. HESS Opinions "Biological catalysis of the hydrological cycle: life's thermodynamic function"

    K. Michaelian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Darwinian theory depicts life as being overwhelmingly consumed by a fight for survival in a hostile environment. However, from a thermodynamic perspective, life is a dynamic, out of equilibrium process, stabilizing and coevolving in concert with its abiotic environment. The living components of the biosphere on the Earth's surface of greatest biomass, the plants and cyanobacteria, are involved in the transpiration of a vast amount of water. Transpiration is part of the global water cycle, and it is this cycle that distinguishes Earth from its apparently life-barren neighboring planets, Venus and Mars. The dissipation of sunlight into heat by organic molecules in the biosphere, and its coupling to the water cycle (as well as other abiotic processes, is by far the greatest entropy-producing process occurring on Earth. Life, from this perspective, can be viewed as performing an important thermodynamic function, acting as a dynamic catalyst by aiding irreversible abiotic processes such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents to produce entropy. The role of animals in this view is that of unwitting but dedicated servants of the plants and cyanobacteria, helping them to grow, and to spread into initially inhospitable areas.

  16. Energy effects on the structure and thermodynamic properties of nanoconfined fluids (a density functional theory study).

    Keshavarzi, Ezat; Kamalvand, Mohammad

    2009-04-23

    The structure and properties of fluids confined in nanopores may show a dramatic departure from macroscopic bulk fluids. The main reason for this difference lies in the influence of system walls. In addition to the entropic wall effect, system walls can significantly change the energy of the confined fluid compared to macroscopic bulk fluids. The energy effect of the walls on a nanoconfined fluid appears in two forms. The first effect is the cutting off of the intermolecular interactions by the walls, which appears for example in the integrals for calculation of the thermodynamic properties. The second wall effect involves the wall-molecule interactions. In such confined fluids, the introduction of wall forces and the competition between fluid-wall and fluid-fluid forces could lead to interesting thermodynamic properties, including new kinds of phase transitions not observed in the macroscopic fluid systems. In this article, we use the perturbative fundamental measure density functional theory to study energy effects on the structure and properties of a hard core two-Yukawa fluid confined in a nanoslit. Our results show the changes undergone by the structure and phase transition of the nanoconfined fluids as a result of energy effects.

  17. Thermodynamic simulation and evaluation of sugar refinery evaporators using a steady state modelling approach

    Lewis, A.E.; Khodabocus, F.; Dhokun, V.; Khalife, M.

    2010-01-01

    In a sugar refinery, the juice is concentrated through evaporation, with the objective of concentrating the juice to syrup as rapidly as possible. Because the heat of vaporization of water is relatively high, the evaporation process can be highly energy intensive, and therefore the economical use of steam is important in the refinery. This paper reports on the development of a simulation model for the evaporation sections of two Mauritian sugar refineries. The first objective was to use the simulation model to carry out an energy balance over the evaporators in order to assess the economy of steam usage over the refinery. The second objective was to examine to what extent a fundamental steady state model, based on thermodynamics (not kinetics) was capable of predicting the material and energy flows in two operating sugar refineries and thereby to evaluate the applicability of the modelling framework. The simulation model was validated using historical data as well as data from the plant DCS system. The simulation results generally correlated well with the measured values, except for one of the evaporators on one refinery. Some suggestions were made as to the cause of the discrepancy. On balance, it was found that both refineries are extremely efficient in terms of steam and equipment usage and that there is not much scope for energy optimisation within the present configuration - nor for much spare steam capacity for an additional refinery. It was also shown that steady state process simulation, using thermodynamic models, can generate a very useful representation of a working refinery. Besides being able to use the model to 'benchmark' the operation and thus evaluate its performance as a whole as well as across individual units, it could also be used to evaluate refinery performance across refineries, nationally as well as globally.

  18. Green's functions, states and renormalisation

    Brown, M.R.; Ottewill, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The significance that is to be attached to different operator orderings of free quantum field theories in curved space-time is examined. It is hoped thus to elucidate the renormalization of such theories. It is argued that as in flat space, these theories should be rendered finite by normal ordering with respect to a local geometrical vacuum state. Flat space is considered first, then an analogous local, geometrical Green's function for curved space-time is defined. Examples given are the Einstein static universe, the open Einstein universe and the de Sitter universe. It is observed that normalization provides some insight into the nature of vacuum stress. (U.K.)

  19. Thermodynamic and Quantum Thermodynamic Analyses of Brownian Movement

    Gyftopoulos, Elias P.

    2006-01-01

    Thermodynamic and quantum thermodynamic analyses of Brownian movement of a solvent and a colloid passing through neutral thermodynamic equilibrium states only. It is shown that Brownian motors and E. coli do not represent Brownian movement.

  20. Thermodynamics of complexity

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Snoep, Jacky L.

    1998-01-01

    -called emergent properties. Tendency towards increased entropy is an essential determinant for the behaviour of ideal gas mixtures, showing that even in the simplest physical/chemical systems, (dys)organisation of components is crucial for the behaviour of systems. This presentation aims at illustrating...... that the behaviour of two functionally interacting biological components (molecules, protein domains, pathways, organelles) differs from the behaviour these components would exhibit in isolation from one another, where the difference should be essential for the maintenance and growth of the living state, For a true...... understanding of this BioComplexity, modem thermodynamic concepts and methods (nonequilibrium thermodynamics, metabolic and hierarchical control analysis) will be needed. We shall propose to redefine nonequilibrium thermodynamics as: The science that aims at understanding the behaviour of nonequilibrium systems...

  1. Towards a functional model of mental disorders incorporating the laws of thermodynamics.

    Murray, George C; McKenzie, Karen

    2013-05-01

    The current paper presents the hypothesis that the understanding of mental disorders can be advanced by incorporating the laws of thermodynamics, specifically relating to energy conservation and energy transfer. These ideas, along with the introduction of the notion that entropic activities are symptomatic of inefficient energy transfer or disorder, were used to propose a model of understanding mental ill health as resulting from the interaction of entropy, capacity and work (environmental demands). The model was applied to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, and was shown to be compatible with current thinking about this condition, as well as emerging models of mental disorders as complex networks. A key implication of the proposed model is that it argues that all mental disorders require a systemic functional approach, with the advantage that it offers a number of routes into the assessment, formulation and treatment for mental health problems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Major Source of Error in QSPR Prediction of Intrinsic Thermodynamic Solubility of Drugs: Solid vs Nonsolid State Contributions?

    Abramov, Yuriy A

    2015-06-01

    The main purpose of this study is to define the major limiting factor in the accuracy of the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models of the thermodynamic intrinsic aqueous solubility of the drug-like compounds. For doing this, the thermodynamic intrinsic aqueous solubility property was suggested to be indirectly "measured" from the contributions of solid state, ΔGfus, and nonsolid state, ΔGmix, properties, which are estimated by the corresponding QSPR models. The QSPR models of ΔGfus and ΔGmix properties were built based on a set of drug-like compounds with available accurate measurements of fusion and thermodynamic solubility properties. For consistency ΔGfus and ΔGmix models were developed using similar algorithms and descriptor sets, and validated against the similar test compounds. Analysis of the relative performances of these two QSPR models clearly demonstrates that it is the solid state contribution which is the limiting factor in the accuracy and predictive power of the QSPR models of the thermodynamic intrinsic solubility. The performed analysis outlines a necessity of development of new descriptor sets for an accurate description of the long-range order (periodicity) phenomenon in the crystalline state. The proposed approach to the analysis of limitations and suggestions for improvement of QSPR-type models may be generalized to other applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Using Rubber-Elastic Material-Ideal Gas Analogies To Teach Introductory Thermodynamics. Part I: Equations of State.

    Smith, Brent

    2002-01-01

    Describes equations of state as a supplement to an introductory thermodynamics undergraduate course. Uses rubber-elastic materials (REM) which have strong analogies to the concept of an ideal gas and explains the molar basis of REM. Provides examples of the analogies between ideal gas and REM and mathematical analogies. (Contains 22 references.)…

  4. Surface dependency in thermodynamics of ideal gases

    Sisman, Altug

    2004-01-01

    The Casimir-like size effect rises in ideal gases confined in a finite domain due to the wave character of atoms. By considering this effect, thermodynamic properties of an ideal gas confined in spherical and cylindrical geometries are derived and compared with those in rectangular geometry. It is seen that an ideal gas exhibits an unavoidable quantum surface free energy and surface over volume ratio becomes a control variable on thermodynamic state functions in microscale. Thermodynamics turns into non-extensive thermodynamics and geometry difference becomes a driving force since the surface over volume ratio depends on the geometry

  5. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics and energy distribution function of neutron gas in constant power reactor under coupling of neutrons and medium

    Hayasaka, Hideo

    1983-01-01

    The thermodynamics and the energy distribution function of the neutron gas in a constant power reactor are considered, taking into account the burn-up of fuel. To separate the secular motion of neutrons owing to fuel burn-up and the microscopic fluctuations of neutrons around this motion, a long time of the order of several months is divided into m equal intervals, and the respective states corresponding to m small time intervals are treated as quasi-stationary states. The local energy distribution function of the neutron gas in the quasi-stationary state is given by a generalized Boltzmann distribution specified by the respective generalized activity coefficient for each subsystem. The effects of fuel burn-up on the respective distribution functions for successive small time intervals are taken into account through various quantities relating to reactor physics, depending upon the fuel burn-up, by successive approximation. (author)

  6. Systematic thermodynamic properties of actinide metal-oxygen systems at high temperatures: Emphasis on lower valence states

    Ackermann, R.J.; Chandrasekharaiah, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    The thermodynamic data for the actinide metals and oxides (thorium to curium ) have been assessed, examined for consistency, and compared with the lanthanides. Correlations relating the enthalpies of formation of the solid oxides with the corresponding aquo ions make possible the estimation of the thermodynamic properties of AmO 2 (s) and Am 2 O 3 (s) which are in accordance with vaporization data. The known thermodynamic properties of the substoichiometric dioxides MOsub(2-x)(s) at high temperatures demonstrate the relative stabilities of valence states less than 4+ and lead to the examination of stability requirements for the sesquioxides M 2 O 3 (s) and the monoxides MO(s). Sequential trends in the gaseous metals, monoxides and dioxides are examined, compared, and contrasted with the lanthanides. (author)

  7. Exceptional thermodynamics. The equation of state of G{sub 2} gauge theory

    Bruno, Mattia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Caselle, Michele [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Panero, Marco [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Pellegrini, Roberto [Swansea Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2014-10-15

    We present a lattice study of the equation of state in Yang-Mills theory based on the exceptional G{sub 2} gauge group. As is well-known, at zero temperature this theory shares many qualitative features with real-world QCD, including the absence of colored states in the spectrum and dynamical string breaking at large distances. In agreement with previous works, we show that at finite temperature this theory features a first-order deconfining phase transition, whose nature can be studied by a semi-classical computation. We also show that the equilibrium thermodynamic observables in the deconfined phase bear striking quantitative similarities with those found in SU(N) gauge theories: in particular, these quantities exhibit nearly perfect proportionality to the number of gluon degrees of freedom, and the trace anomaly reveals a characteristic quadratic dependence on the temperature, also observed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories (both in four and in three spacetime dimensions). We compare our lattice data with analytical predictions from effective models, and discuss their implications for the deconfinement mechanism and high-temperature properties of strongly interacting, non-supersymmetric gauge theories. Our results give strong evidence for the conjecture that the thermal deconfining transition is governed by a universal mechanism, common to all simple gauge groups.

  8. Exceptional thermodynamics. The equation of state of G2 gauge theory

    Bruno, Mattia; Panero, Marco; Pellegrini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    We present a lattice study of the equation of state in Yang-Mills theory based on the exceptional G 2 gauge group. As is well-known, at zero temperature this theory shares many qualitative features with real-world QCD, including the absence of colored states in the spectrum and dynamical string breaking at large distances. In agreement with previous works, we show that at finite temperature this theory features a first-order deconfining phase transition, whose nature can be studied by a semi-classical computation. We also show that the equilibrium thermodynamic observables in the deconfined phase bear striking quantitative similarities with those found in SU(N) gauge theories: in particular, these quantities exhibit nearly perfect proportionality to the number of gluon degrees of freedom, and the trace anomaly reveals a characteristic quadratic dependence on the temperature, also observed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories (both in four and in three spacetime dimensions). We compare our lattice data with analytical predictions from effective models, and discuss their implications for the deconfinement mechanism and high-temperature properties of strongly interacting, non-supersymmetric gauge theories. Our results give strong evidence for the conjecture that the thermal deconfining transition is governed by a universal mechanism, common to all simple gauge groups.

  9. Reverse engineering of fluid selection for thermodynamic cycles with cubic equations of state, using a compression heat pump as example

    Roskosch, Dennis; Atakan, Burak

    2015-01-01

    Fluid selection for thermodynamic cycles like refrigeration cycles, heat pumps or organic Rankine cycles remains an actual topic. Generally the search for a working fluid is based on experimental approaches or on a not very systematic trial and error approach, far from being elegant. An alternative method may be a theory based reverse engineering approach, proposed and investigated here: The design process should start with an optimal process and with (abstract) properties of the fluid needed to fit into this optimal process, best described by some general equation of state and the corresponding fluid-describing parameters. These should be analyzed and optimized with respect to the defined model process, which also has to be optimized simultaneously. From this information real fluids can be selected or even synthesized which have fluid defining properties in the optimum regime like critical temperature or ideal gas capacities of heat, allowing to find new working fluids, not considered so far. The number and kind of the fluid-defining parameters is mainly based on the choice of the used EOS (equation of state). The property model used in the present work is based on the cubic Peng–Robinson equation, chosen due to its moderate numerical expense, sufficient accuracy as well as a general availability of the fluid-defining parameters for many compounds. The considered model-process works between the temperature levels of 273.15 and 333.15 K and can be used as heat pump for supplying buildings with heat, typically. The objective functions are the COP (coefficient of performance) and the VHC (volumetric heating capacity) as a function of critical pressure, critical temperature, acentric factor and two coefficients for the temperature-dependent isobaric ideal gas heat capacity. Also, the steam quality at the compressor entrance has to be regarded as a problem variable. The results give clear hints regarding optimal fluid parameters of the analyzed process and deepen

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 eV comp...

  11. Studies of thermodynamic properties and relative stability of a series of polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins by density functional theory

    Yang Xi; Liu Hui; Hou Haifeng; Flamm, Alison; Zhang Xuesheng; Wang Zunyao

    2010-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of 75 polyfluorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PFDDs) in the ideal gas state at 298.15 K and 1.013 x 10 5 Pa have been calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G* level using Gaussian 03 program. The isodesmic reactions were designed to calculate standard enthalpy of formation (ΔH f o ) and standard free energy of formation (ΔG f o ) of PFDDs congeners. The relations of these thermodynamic parameters with the number and position of fluorine atom substitution (N PFS ) were discussed, and it was found that there exist high correlations between thermodynamic parameters (entropy (S o ), ΔH f o and ΔG f o ) and N PFS . According to the relative magnitude of their ΔG f o , the relative stability order of PFDD congeners was theoretically proposed.

  12. Structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of curium dioxide: Density functional theory calculations

    Hou, Ling; Li, Wei-Dong; Wang, Fangwei; Eriksson, Olle; Wang, Bao-Tian

    2017-12-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the structural, magnetic, electronic, mechanical, and thermodynamic properties of CmO2 with the local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U approaches. The strong Coulomb repulsion and the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects on the lattice structures, electronic density of states, and band gaps are carefully studied, and compared with other A O2 (A =U , Np, Pu, and Am). The ferromagnetic configuration with half-metallic character is predicted to be energetically stable while a charge-transfer semiconductor is predicted for the antiferromagnetic configuration. The elastic constants and phonon spectra show that the fluorite structure is mechanically and dynamically stable. Based on the first-principles phonon density of states, the lattice vibrational energy is calculated using the quasiharmonic approximation. Then, the Gibbs free energy, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat, and entropy are obtained and compared with experimental data. The mode Grüneisen parameters are presented to analyze the anharmonic properties. The Slack relation is applied to obtain the lattice thermal conductivity in temperature range of 300-1600 K. The phonon group velocities are also calculated to investigate the heat transfer. For all these properties, if available, we compare the results of CmO2 with other A O2 .

  13. Thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes III

    Štejfa, Vojtěch; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, Květoslav; Červinka, Ctirad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • (−)-trans-Pinane, (+)-Δ-carene, eucalyptol, and limonene were studied. • New thermodynamic data were measured and calculated. • Many of thermodynamic data are reported for the first time. - Abstract: A thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes, (−)-trans-pinane, (+)-Δ-carene, eucalyptol, (+)-limonene, and (−)-limonene, is presented in this work. The vapor pressure measurements were performed using the static method over the environmentally important temperature range (238 to 308) K. Liquid heat capacities were measured by Tian–Calvet calorimetry in the temperature interval (258 to 355) K. The phase behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) from T = 183 K. The thermodynamic properties in the ideal-gas state were calculated by combining statistical thermodynamic and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculated ideal-gas heat capacities and experimental data for vapor pressures and condensed phase heat capacities were treated simultaneously to obtain a consistent thermodynamic description

  14. Thermodynamic properties by equation of state and from Ab initio molecular dynamics of liquid potassium under pressure

    Li, Huaming; Tian, Yanting; Sun, Yongli; Li, Mo; Nonequilibrium materials; physics Team; Computational materials science Team

    In this work, we apply a general equation of state of liquid and Ab initio molecular-dynamics method to study thermodynamic properties in liquid potassium under high pressure. Isothermal bulk modulus and molar volume of molten sodium are calculated within good precision as compared with the experimental data. The calculated internal energy data and the calculated values of isobaric heat capacity of molten potassium show the minimum along the isothermal lines as the previous result obtained in liquid sodium. The expressions for acoustical parameter and nonlinearity parameter are obtained based on thermodynamic relations from the equation of state. Both parameters for liquid potassium are calculated under high pressure along the isothermal lines by using the available thermodynamic data and numeric derivations. Furthermore, Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations are used to calculate some thermodynamic properties of liquid potassium along the isothermal lines. Scientific Research Starting Foundation from Taiyuan university of Technology, Shanxi Provincial government (``100-talents program''), China Scholarship Council and National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 51602213.

  15. An analytical coarse-graining method which preserves the free energy, structural correlations, and thermodynamic state of polymer melts from the atomistic to the mesoscale.

    McCarty, J; Clark, A J; Copperman, J; Guenza, M G

    2014-05-28

    Structural and thermodynamic consistency of coarse-graining models across multiple length scales is essential for the predictive role of multi-scale modeling and molecular dynamic simulations that use mesoscale descriptions. Our approach is a coarse-grained model based on integral equation theory, which can represent polymer chains at variable levels of chemical details. The model is analytical and depends on molecular and thermodynamic parameters of the system under study, as well as on the direct correlation function in the k → 0 limit, c0. A numerical solution to the PRISM integral equations is used to determine c0, by adjusting the value of the effective hard sphere diameter, dHS, to agree with the predicted equation of state. This single quantity parameterizes the coarse-grained potential, which is used to perform mesoscale simulations that are directly compared with atomistic-level simulations of the same system. We test our coarse-graining formalism by comparing structural correlations, isothermal compressibility, equation of state, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, and potential energy and entropy using both united atom and coarse-grained descriptions. We find quantitative agreement between the analytical formalism for the thermodynamic properties, and the results of Molecular Dynamics simulations, independent of the chosen level of representation. In the mesoscale description, the potential energy of the soft-particle interaction becomes a free energy in the coarse-grained coordinates which preserves the excess free energy from an ideal gas across all levels of description. The structural consistency between the united-atom and mesoscale descriptions means the relative entropy between descriptions has been minimized without any variational optimization parameters. The approach is general and applicable to any polymeric system in different thermodynamic conditions.

  16. Calculation of thermodynamic properties of sodium and potassium vapors on the base of semiempirical state equation. Group integrals and virial coefficients

    Reva, T.D.; Semenov, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    Statistically significant estimations of the second, third and fourth group integrals of sodium and potassium vapors were obtained in the framework of the initial atom method on the basis of semiempirical equation of state derived by the authors. Possibility is duscussed of estimating dimer, trimer and tetramer concentrations from these data with account of unideality of vapors. High rate of convergence of density and pressure group expansion is demonstrated. Virial coefficients were calculated. It is shown that virial expansions of thermodynamic functions diverge at elevated densities of the gases under study. The estimations of senior virial coefficients of sodium and potassium vapors available in literature were proved to be faulty

  17. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of liquid lead and lead bismuth eutectic

    Sobolev, V. P.; Schuurmans, P.; Benamati, G.

    2008-06-01

    Since the 1950s, liquid lead (Pb) and lead-bismuth eutectic (Pb-Bi) have been studied in the USA, Canada and in the former-USSR as potential coolants for nuclear installations due to their very attractive thermophysical and neutronic properties. However, experimental data on the thermal properties of these coolants in the temperature range of interest are still incomplete and often contradictory. This makes it very difficult to perform design calculations and to analyse the normal and abnormal behaviour of nuclear installations where these coolants are expected to be used. Recently, a compilation of heavy liquid metal (HLM) properties along with recommendations for its use was prepared by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Fuel Cycle (WPFC) Expert Group on Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Technology. A brief review of this compilation and some new data are presented in this article. A set of correlations for the temperature dependence of the main thermodynamic properties of Pb and Pb-Bi(e) at normal pressure, and a set of simplified thermal and caloric equations of state for the liquid phase are proposed.

  18. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology and diseased states.

    Trevors, Jack T; Saier, Milton H

    2011-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. Copyright © 2010 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology, diseased states and human population control

    Saier, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Many knowledge gaps abound, hence our understanding is still fragmented and incomplete. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms must free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient enough to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment, that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. PMID:21262480

  20. Modern thermodynamics

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-01-01

    This textbook introduces thermodynamics with a modern approach, starting from four fundamental physical facts (the atomic nature of matter, the indistinguishability of atoms and molecules of the same species, the uncertainty principle, and the existence of equilibrium states) and analyzing the behavior of complex systems with the tools of information theory, in particular with Shannon's measure of information (or SMI), which can be defined on any probability distribution. SMI is defined and its properties and time evolution are illustrated, and it is shown that the entropy is a particular type of SMI, i.e. the SMI related to the phase-space distribution for a macroscopic system at equilibrium. The connection to SMI allows the reader to understand what entropy is and why isolated systems follow the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The Second Llaw is also formulated for other systems, not thermally isolated and even open with respect to the transfer of particles. All the fundamental aspects of thermodynamics are d...

  1. Excited-state density functional theory

    Harbola, Manoj K; Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Samal, P

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to excited-state density functional theory, we present our method of constructing modified local density approximated (MLDA) energy functionals for the excited states. We show that these functionals give accurate results for kinetic energy and exchange energy compared to the ground state LDA functionals. Further, with the inclusion of GGA correction, highly accurate total energies for excited states are obtained. We conclude with a brief discussion on the further direction of research that include the construction of correlation energy functional and exchange potential for excited states.

  2. Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Thermodynamics, Ion Transport, and Use in Solid- State Lithium/Sulfur Cells

    Teran, Alexander Andrew

    Nanostructured block copolymer electrolytes containing an ion-conducting block and a modulus-strengthening block are of interest for applications in solid-state lithium metal batteries. These materials can self-assemble into well-defined microstructures, creating conducting channels that facilitate ion transport. The overall objective of this dissertation is to gain a better understanding of the behavior of salt-containing block copolymers, and evaluate their potential for use in solid-state lithium/sulfur batteries. Anionically synthesized polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) copolymers doped with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt were used as a model system. This thesis investigates the model system on several levels: from fundamental thermodynamic studies to bulk characterization and finally device assembly and testing. First, the thermodynamics of neat and salt-containing block copolymers was studied. The addition of salt to these materials is necessary to make them conductive, however even small amounts of salt can have significant effects on their phase behavior, and consequently their iontransport and mechanical properties. As a result, the effect of salt addition on block copolymer thermodynamics has been the subject of significant interest over the last decade. A comprehensive study of the thermodynamics of block copolymer/salt mixtures over a wide range of molecular weights, compositions, salt concentrations and temperatures was conducted. Next, the effect of molecular weight on ion transport in both homopolymer and copolymer electrolytes were studied over a wide range of chain lengths. Homopolymer electrolytes show an inverse relationship between conductivity and chain length, with a plateau in the infinite molecular weight limit. This is due to the presence of two mechanisms of ion conduction in homopolymers; the first mechanism is a result of the segmental motion of the chains surrounding the salt ions, 2 creating a liquid

  3. Thermodynamics of two component gaseous and solid state plasmas at any degeneracy

    Kraeft, W.D.; Stolzmann, W.; Fromhold-Treu, I.; Rother, T.

    1988-10-01

    We give the results of thermodynamical calculations for two component plasmas which are of interest for dense hydrogen, noble gas and alkali plasmas and for electron hole plasmas in optically excited semiconductors as well. 25 refs, 4 figs

  4. System Tb-Fe-O: thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides using solid-state electrochemical cells

    Rakshit, S.K.; Parida, S.C.; Dash, S.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2003-01-01

    The standard molar Gibbs free energies of formation of TbFeO 3 (s) and Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 (s) have been determined using solid-state electrochemical cell employing different solid electrolytes. The reversible emfs of the following solid-state electrochemical cells have been measured in the temperature range 1050≤T/K≤1250. Cell (I):(-)Pt/{TbFeO 3 (s)+Tb 2 O 3 (s)+Fe(s)}//YDT/CSZ//{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95 O(s)}/Pt(+))) (Cell (II):(-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95 O(s)}//CSZ//{TbFeO 3 (s)+Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 (s)+Fe 3 O 4 (s)}/Pt(+) The oxygen chemical potentials corresponding to the three-phase equilibria involving the ternary oxides have been computed from the emf data. The standard molar Gibbs free energies of formation of solid TbFeO 3 and Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 calculated by the least-squares regression analysis of the data obtained in the present study are given by {Δ f G compfn m (TbFeO 3 ,s)/(kJ·mol -1 )±3.2}=-1357.5+0.2531·(T/K); (1050≤T/K≤1548);))and({Δ f G compfn m (Tb 3 Fe 5 O 12 ,s)/(kJ·mol -1 )±3.5}=-4901.7+ 0.9997·(T/K); (1050≤T/K≤1250).)) The uncertainty estimates for Δ f G compfn m include the standard deviation in the emf and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. Based on the thermodynamic information, oxygen potential diagram and chemical potential diagrams were computed for the system Tb-Fe-O at T=1250 K

  5. Chemical engineering and thermodynamics using Mat lab

    Kim Heon; Kim, Moon Gap; Lee, Hak Yeong; Yeo, Yeong Gu; Ham, Seong Won

    2002-02-01

    This book consists of twelve chapters and four appendixes about chemical engineering and thermodynamics using Mat lab, which deals with introduction, energy budget, entropy, thermodynamics process, generalization on any fluid, engineering equation of state for PVT properties, deviation of the function, phase equilibrium of pure fluid, basic of multicomponent, phase equilibrium of compound by state equation, activity model and reaction system. The appendixes is about summary of computer program, related mathematical formula and material property of pure component.

  6. Solubility and thermodynamic function of vanillin in ten different environmentally benign solvents.

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; Haq, Nazrul; Siddiqui, Nasir A

    2015-08-01

    The solubility of vanillin in ten different environmentally benign solvents namely water, ethanol, ethylene glycol (EG), ethyl acetate (EA), isopropanol (IPA), propylene glycol (PG), polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), Transcutol, butanol-1 and butanol-2 was measured and correlated at T=(298-318)K. The resulting experimental data were correlated with the modified Apelblat and Van't Hoff models. Both the models showed good correlation of experimental solubility data with calculated ones with root mean square deviations in the range of (0.08-1.55)%. The mole fraction solubility of vanillin was observed highest in PEG-400 (4.29 × 10(-1) at 298 K) followed by Transcutol, EA, butanol-2, ethanol, EG, PG, IPA, butanol-1 and water from T=(298-318)K. The results of thermodynamic function in terms of dissolution enthalpy, Gibbs energy and dissolution entropy showed endothermic, spontaneous and entropy-driven dissolution of vanillin in all environmentally benign solvents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vibrational and electronic investigations, thermodynamic parameters, HOMO and LUMO analysis on Lornoxicam by density functional theory

    Suhasini, M.; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.; Ramkumaar, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectra of Lornoxicam were recorded in the region 4000-450 cm-1 and 4000-50 cm-1 respectively. Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to calculate the optimized geometrical parameters, atomic charges, and vibrational wavenumbers and intensity of the vibrational bands. The computed vibrational wave numbers were compared with the FT-IR and FT-Raman experimental data. The computational calculations at DFT/B3LYP level with 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) basis sets. The complete vibrational assignments were performed on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the Vibrational modes calculated using Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA 4) program. The oscillator's strength calculated by TD-DFT and Lornoxicam is approach complement with the experimental findings. The NMR chemical shifts 13C and 1H were recorded and calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The Natural charges and intermolecular contacts have been interpreted using Natural Bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap has been calculated. The thermodynamic properties like Entropy, Enthalpy, Specific heat capacity and zero vibrational energy have been calculated. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) was investigated using theoretical calculations.

  8. Thermodynamic Equations of State for Aqueous Solutions Applied to Deep Icy Satellite and Exoplanet Oceans

    Vance, S.; Brown, J. M.; Bollengier, O.; Journaux, B.; Sotin, C.; Choukroun, M.; Barnes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Supporting life in icy world or exoplanet oceans may require global seafloor chemical reactions between water and rock. Such interactions have been regarded as limited in larger icy worlds such as Ganymede and Titan, where ocean depths approach 800 km and GPa pressures (>10katm). If the oceans are composed of pure water, such conditions are consistent with the presence of dense ice phases V and VI that cover the rocky seafloor. Exoplanets with oceans can obtain pressures sufficient to generate ices VII and VIII. We have previously demonstrated temperature gradients in such oceans on the order of 20 K or more, resulting from fluid compressibility in a deep adiabatic ocean based on our experimental work. Accounting for increases in density for highly saline oceans leads to the possibility of oceans perched under and between high pressure ices. Ammonia has the opposite effect, instead decreasing ocean density, as reported by others and confirmed by our laboratory measurements in the ammonia water system. Here we report on the completed equation of state for aqueous ammonia derived from our prior measurements and optimized global b-spline fitting methods We use recent diamond anvil cell measurements for water and ammonia to extend the equation of state to 400°C and beyond 2 GPa, temperatures and pressures applicable to icy worlds and exoplanets. Densities show much less temperature dependence but comparabe high-pressure derivatives to previously published ammonia-water properties derived for application to Titan (Croft et al. 1988). Thermal expansion is in better agreement with the more self-consistent equation of state of Tillner-Roth and Friend (1998). We also describe development of a planetary NaCl equation of state using recent measurements of phase boundaries and sound speeds. We examine implications of realistic ocean-ice thermodynamics for Titan and exoplanet interiors using the methodology recently applied to Ganymede for oceans dominated by MgSO4. High

  9. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  10. Applied Thermodynamics: Grain Boundary Segregation

    Pavel Lejček

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of interfaces—free surfaces and grain boundaries—is generally described by the Langmuir–McLean segregation isotherm controlled by Gibbs energy of segregation. Various components of the Gibbs energy of segregation, the standard and the excess ones as well as other thermodynamic state functions—enthalpy, entropy and volume—of interfacial segregation are derived and their physical meaning is elucidated. The importance of the thermodynamic state functions of grain boundary segregation, their dependence on volume solid solubility, mutual solute–solute interaction and pressure effect in ferrous alloys is demonstrated.

  11. A Numerical Comparison of Soave Redlich Kwong and Peng-Robinson Equations of State for Predicting Hydrocarbons’ Thermodynamic Properties

    B. Hussain

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mixture phase equilibrium and thermodynamic properties have a significant role in industry. Numerical analysis of flash calculation generates an appropriate solution for the problem. In this research, a comparison of Soave Redlich Kwong (SRK and Peng-Robinson (PR equations of state predicting the thermodynamic properties of a mixture of hydrocarbon and related compounds in a critical region at phase equilibrium is performed. By applying mathematical modeling of both equations of states, the behavior of binary gases mixtures is monitored. The numerical analysis of isothermal flash calculations is applied to study the pressure behavior with volume and mole fraction. The approach used in this research shows considerable convergence with experimental results available in the literature.

  12. Deviation from local thermodynamical equilibrium in the solar atmosphere. Metodology. The line source function

    Shchukina, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology of the problem of deviation from local thermodynamical equilibrium in the solar atmosphere is presented. The difficulties of solution and methods of realization are systematized. The processes of line formation are considered which take into account velocity fields, structural inhomogeneity, radiation non-coherence etc. as applied to a quiet solar atmosphere. The conclusion is made on the regularity of deviation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in upper layers of the solar atmosphere

  13. Influence of aluminium content on thermodynamic function of LaNi5-xAlx

    Xiong Yifu; Cheng Huchi; Luo Deli

    2000-01-01

    Hydriding thermodynamic parameters were measured on alloys of the general composition of LaNi 5-x Al x (x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) under isothermal and isochoric conditions. The results show that the equilibrium pressure, hydrogen capacity and thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH, ΔS decrease with aluminium content, plateau slopes of the P-C-T curve increase with aluminium content

  14. Thermodynamics of freezing and melting

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Costigliola, Lorenzo; Bailey, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    phases at a single thermodynamic state point provide the basis for calculating the pressure, density and entropy of fusion as functions of temperature along the melting line, as well as the variation along this line of the reduced crystalline vibrational mean-square displacement (the Lindemann ratio...

  15. Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia

    Lin, Chin Yik; Abdullah, Mohd. Harun; Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin

    2011-01-01

    A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH) 3 and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe 2+ stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

  16. Stochastic thermodynamics

    Eichhorn, Ralf; Aurell, Erik

    2014-04-01

    theory for small deviations from equilibrium, in which a general framework is constructed from the analysis of non-equilibrium states close to equilibrium. In a next step, Prigogine and others developed linear irreversible thermodynamics, which establishes relations between transport coefficients and entropy production on a phenomenological level in terms of thermodynamic forces and fluxes. However, beyond the realm of linear response no general theoretical results were available for quite a long time. This situation has changed drastically over the last 20 years with the development of stochastic thermodynamics, revealing that the range of validity of thermodynamic statements can indeed be extended deep into the non-equilibrium regime. Early developments in that direction trace back to the observations of symmetry relations between the probabilities for entropy production and entropy annihilation in non-equilibrium steady states [5-8] (nowadays categorized in the class of so-called detailed fluctuation theorems), and the derivations of the Bochkov-Kuzovlev [9, 10] and Jarzynski relations [11] (which are now classified as so-called integral fluctuation theorems). Apart from its fundamental theoretical interest, the developments in stochastic thermodynamics have experienced an additional boost from the recent experimental progress in fabricating, manipulating, controlling and observing systems on the micro- and nano-scale. These advances are not only of formidable use for probing and monitoring biological processes on the cellular, sub-cellular and molecular level, but even include the realization of a microscopic thermodynamic heat engine [12] or the experimental verification of Landauer's principle in a colloidal system [13]. The scientific program Stochastic Thermodynamics held between 4 and 15 March 2013, and hosted by The Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita), was attended by more than 50 scientists from the Nordic countries and elsewhere, amongst them

  17. Functional State Modelling of Cultivation Processes: Dissolved Oxygen Limitation State

    Olympia Roeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new functional state, namely dissolved oxygen limitation state for both bacteria Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultivation processes is presented in this study. Functional state modelling approach is applied to cultivation processes in order to overcome the main disadvantages of using global process model, namely complex model structure and a big number of model parameters. Alongwith the newly introduced dissolved oxygen limitation state, second acetate production state and first acetate production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of E. coli, while mixed oxidative state and first ethanol production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of S. cerevisiae. For all mentioned above functional states both structural and parameter identification is here performed based on experimental data of E. coli and S. cerevisiae fed-batch cultivations.

  18. Functionally graded material of 304L stainless steel and inconel 625 fabricated by directed energy deposition: Characterization and thermodynamic modeling

    Carroll, Beth E.; Otis, Richard A.; Borgonia, John Paul; Suh, Jong-ook; Dillon, R. Peter; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Many engineering applications, particularly in extreme environments, require components with properties that vary with location in the part. Functionally graded materials (FGMs), which possess gradients in properties such as hardness or density, are a potential solution to address these requirements. The laser-based additive manufacturing process of directed energy deposition (DED) can be used to fabricate metallic parts with a gradient in composition by adjusting the volume fraction of metallic powders delivered to the melt pool as a function of position. As this is a fusion process, secondary phases may develop in the gradient zone during solidification that can result in undesirable properties in the part. This work describes experimental and thermodynamic studies of a component built from 304L stainless steel incrementally graded to Inconel 625. The microstructure, chemistry, phase composition, and microhardness as a function of position were characterized by microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microindentation. Particles of secondary phases were found in small amounts within cracks in the gradient zone. These were ascertained to consist of transition metal carbides by experimental results and thermodynamic calculations. The study provides a combined experimental and thermodynamic computational modeling approach toward the fabrication and evaluation of a functionally graded material made by DED additive manufacturing.

  19. The use of an MHV-2 equation of state for modeling the thermodynamic properties of refrigerant mixtures

    Morrison, J.D.; Barley, M.H.; Parker, I.B.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and application of a thermodynamic model based on the second-order Modified Huron Vidal equation of state (MHV-2) to predict the properties of ternary mixtures of the refrigerants R32, R125, and R134a. The mixing rules of this equation of state have been used to incorporate directly an activity-coefficient model for the excess Gibbs free energy. The parameters for the activity-coefficient model have been derived from experimental VLE data for binary mixtures. This methodology has enabled the production of a thermodynamically consistent model which can be used to predict the phase equilibria of R32/R125/R134a mixtures. The input data used in the model are presented in the paper and the predictions of the model are compared with available experimental data. The model has been used to predict the behavior of ternary refrigerant blends of R32/R125/R134a in fractionation scenarios, such as liquid charging and vapor leakage, which are of direct interest to the refrigeration industry. Details of these applications and comparisons with experimental data are discussed, along with other general uses of the thermodynamic model

  20. Density of states functions for photonic crystals

    McPhedran, R.C.; McOrist, J.; Sterke, C.M. de; Nicorovici, N.A.; Botten, L.C.; Asatryan, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss density of states functions for photonic crystals, in the context of the two-dimensional problem for arrays of cylinders of arbitrary cross section. We introduce the mutual density of states (MDOS), and show that this function can be used to calculate both the local density of states (LDOS), which gives position information for emission of radiation from photonic crystals, and the spectral density of states (SDOS), which gives angular information. We establish the connection between MDOS, LDOS, SDOS and the conventional density of states, which depends only on frequency. We relate all four functions to the band structure and propagating states within the crystal, and give numerical examples of the relation between band structure and density of states functions

  1. Emerging of Stochastic Dynamical Equalities and Steady State Thermodynamics from Darwinian Dynamics

    Ao, P.

    2008-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics first conceived by Darwin and Wallace, referring to as Darwinian dynamics in the present paper, has been found to be universally valid in biology. The statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, while enormous successful in physics, have been in an awkward situation of wanting a consistent dynamical understanding. Here we present from a formal point of view an exploration of the connection between thermodynamics and Darwinian dynamics and a few related topics. We first show that the stochasticity in Darwinian dynamics implies the existence temperature, hence the canonical distribution of Boltzmann-Gibbs type. In term of relative entropy the Second Law of thermodynamics is dynamically demonstrated without detailed balance condition, and is valid regardless of size of the system. In particular, the dynamical component responsible for breaking detailed balance condition does not contribute to the change of the relative entropy. Two types of stochastic dynamical equalities of current interest are explicitly discussed in the present approach: One is based on Feynman-Kac formula and another is a generalization of Einstein relation. Both are directly accessible to experimental tests. Our demonstration indicates that Darwinian dynamics represents logically a simple and straightforward starting point for statistical mechanics and thermodynamics and is complementary to and consistent with conservative dynamics that dominates the physical sciences. Present exploration suggests the existence of a unified stochastic dynamical framework both near and far from equilibrium

  2. The Matrix model, a driven state variables approach to non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the new approaches in non-equilibrium thermodynamics is the so-called matrix model of Jongschaap. In this paper some features of this model are discussed. We indicate the differences with the more common approach based upon internal variables and the more sophisticated Hamiltonian and GENERIC

  3. A computer program for lattice-dynamical evaluation of Debye-Waller factors and thermodynamic functions for minerals, starting from empirical force fields

    Pilati, T.; Dermartin, F.; Gramaccioli, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    A wide-purpose computer program has been written (Fortran) for lattice dynamical evaluation of crystallographic and thermodynamic properties of solids, especially minerals or inorganic substances.The program essentially consists of a routine affording first and second derivatives of energy with respect to mass weighted coordinates, properly modulated by a wave vector algorithm, so that diagonalization can immediately follow and arrive at frequencies, density of states, and eventually to thermodynamic functions and Debye-Waller parameters thorough an automatic Brillouin-zone sampling procedure. The input consists of crystallographic data (unit-cell parameters, space group symmetry operations, atomic coordinates), plus atomic charge and empirical parameters, such as force constants or non-bonded atom-atom interaction energy functions in almost any form. It is also possible to obtain the structure corresponding to the energy minimum, or even to work with partial rigid bodies, in order to reduce the order of the dynamical matrices. The program provides for automatic symmetry labelling of the vibrational modes, in order to compare them with the experimental data; there is possibility of improving the empirical functions through a minimization routine. Examples of application and transferability of force fields to a series of minerals are provided. (author)

  4. Thermodynamics of atomic and ionized hydrogen: analytical results versus equation-of-state tables and Monte Carlo data.

    Alastuey, A; Ballenegger, V

    2012-12-01

    We compute thermodynamical properties of a low-density hydrogen gas within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential. Our calculations are done using the exact scaled low-temperature (SLT) expansion, which provides a rigorous extension of the well-known virial expansion-valid in the fully ionized phase-into the Saha regime where the system is partially or fully recombined into hydrogen atoms. After recalling the SLT expansion of the pressure [A. Alastuey et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)], we obtain the SLT expansions of the chemical potential and of the internal energy, up to order exp(-|E_{H}|/kT) included (E_{H}≃-13.6 eV). Those truncated expansions describe the first five nonideal corrections to the ideal Saha law. They account exactly, up to the considered order, for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations, including the formation of bound states (atom H, ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, molecule H_{2},⋯) and atom-charge and atom-atom interactions. Among the five leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve well-defined internal partition functions for the molecule H_{2} and ions H^{-} and H_{2}^{+}, for which no closed-form analytical formula exist currently. We provide accurate low-temperature approximations for those partition functions by using known values of rotational and vibrational energies. We compare then the predictions of the SLT expansion, for the pressure and the internal energy, with, on the one hand, the equation-of-state tables obtained within the opacity program at Livermore (OPAL) and, on the other hand, data of path integral quantum Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations. In general, a good agreement is found. At low densities, the simple analytical SLT formulas reproduce the values of the OPAL tables up to the last digit in a large range of temperatures, while at higher densities (ρ∼10^{-2} g/cm^{3}), some

  5. Placement by thermodynamic simulated annealing

    Vicente, Juan de; Lanchares, Juan; Hermida, Roman

    2003-01-01

    Combinatorial optimization problems arise in different fields of science and engineering. There exist some general techniques coping with these problems such as simulated annealing (SA). In spite of SA success, it usually requires costly experimental studies in fine tuning the most suitable annealing schedule. In this Letter, the classical integrated circuit placement problem is faced by Thermodynamic Simulated Annealing (TSA). TSA provides a new annealing schedule derived from thermodynamic laws. Unlike SA, temperature in TSA is free to evolve and its value is continuously updated from the variation of state functions as the internal energy and entropy. Thereby, TSA achieves the high quality results of SA while providing interesting adaptive features

  6. Peaceful nuclear explosions and thermodynamics

    Prieto, F.E.

    1975-01-01

    Some theoretical advances in the thermodynamics of very high pressures are reviewed. A universal (system-independent) formulation of the thermodynamics is sketched, and some of the equations more frequently used are written in system-independent form. Among these equations are: Hugoniot pressure and temperature as functions of volume; the Mie-Gruneisen equation; and an explicit form for the equation of state. It is also shown that this formalism can be used to interpret and predict results from peaceful nuclear explosions. (author)

  7. Thermodynamically Based Equation of State for Shock Wave Studies : Application to the Design of Experiments on Tin

    Buy, Francois; Voltz, Christophe; Llorca, Fabrice

    2006-01-01

    This work is devoted to the evaluation of complex behavior of metals under shock wave loading. It presents a methodology for the design of specific experiments performed for validation of models and the evaluation of a multiphase equation of state for tin. This material has been selected because of the numerous works completed during the past years on its equation of state. We focus on the solid diagram which presents two solid phases. A thermodynamically based equation of state is developed which gives the opportunity to search for singularities which could be activated under particular shock wave loading. In the temperature -- pressure diagram, the superimposed Hugoniot and release paths make apparent a double shock, release shock configurations. We propose the design and the VISAR results of a calibrated shock -- reshock test for investigating the validity and the efficiency of the model for predicting the thermodynamical state of tin (phases mixing, temperature...). Comparison between numerical and experimental data shows the good accuracy of the results given by the EOS

  8. Entropy production and thermodynamics of nonequilibrium stationary states: a point of view.

    Gallavotti, Giovanni

    2004-09-01

    Entropy might be a not well defined concept if the system can undergo transformations involving stationary nonequilibria. It might be analogous to the heat content (once called "caloric") in transformations that are not isochoric (i.e., which involve mechanical work): it could be just a quantity that can be transferred or created, like heat in equilibrium. The text first reviews the philosophy behind a recently proposed definition of entropy production in nonequilibrium stationary systems. A detailed technical attempt at defining the entropy of a stationary states via their variational properties follows: the unsatisfactory aspects of the results add arguments in favor of the nonexistence of a function of state to be identified with entropy; at the same time new aspects and properties of the phase space contraction emerge. Copyright 2004 American Institute of Physics

  9. Laser-irradiated thermodynamic behaviors of spallation and recombination at solid-state interface

    Lai, H.-Y.; Huang, P.-H.

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic insight of interfacial spallation and recombination behaviors at multilayer thin-film interface induced by incident femtosecond pulsed laser is presented in this paper. Such two different aforementioned behaviors are investigated via the thermodynamic trajectories obtained by using standard Lennard-Jones (L-J) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on the simulation results, the interfacial damages of multilayer thin film are dominated by a critical threshold that induces an extraordinary expansive dynamics and phase transitions leading to the structural softened and tensile spallation at interface. The critical damage threshold is evaluated at around 8.5 J/m 2 which governs the possible occurrence of two different regimes, i.e. interfacial spallaiton and recombination. In interfacial damage region, quasi-isothermal thermodynamic trajectories can be observed after the interfacial spallation occurs. Moreover, the result of thermodynamic trajectories analyses indicates that, the relaxation of pressure wave may cause the over-heated interfacial zone to reduce volumetric density, thus leading to structural softness and even weaken interfacial structural strength. The crucial effect leading to the phenomenon of low tension spallation is identified

  10. On the derivation of thermodynamic restrictions for materials with internal state variables

    Malmberg, T.

    1987-07-01

    Thermodynamic restrictions for the constitutive relations of an internal variable model are derived by evaluating the Clausius-Duhem entropy inequality with two different approaches. The classical Coleman-Noll argumentation of Rational Thermodynamics applied by Coleman and Gurtin to an internal variable model is summarized. This approach requires an arbitrary modulation of body forces and heat supply in the interior of the body which is subject to criticism. The second approach applied in this presentation is patterned after a concept of Mueller and Liu, originally developed within the context of a different entropy inequality and different classes of constitutive models. For the internal variable model the second approach requires only the modulation of initial values on the boundary of the body. In the course of the development of the second approach certain differences to the argumentation of Mueller and Liu become evident and are pointed out. Finally, the results demonstrate that the first and second approach give the same thermodynamic restrictions for the internal variable model. The derived residual entropy inequality requires further analysis. (orig.) [de

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of elastic-plastic deformation

    Lubarda, V.

    1981-01-01

    The complete set of constitutive equations which fully describes the behaviour of material in elastic-plastic deformation is derived on the basis of thermodynamic analysis of the deformation process. The analysis is done after the matrix decomposition of the deformation gradient is introduced into the structure of thermodynamics with internal state variables. The free energy function, is decomposed. Derive the expressions for the stress response, entropy and heat flux, and establish the evolution equation. Finally, we establish the thermodynamic restrictions of the deformation process. (Author) [pt

  12. Microcanonical ensemble extensive thermodynamics of Tsallis statistics

    Parvan, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    The microscopic foundation of the generalized equilibrium statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis entropy is given by using the Gibbs idea of statistical ensembles of the classical and quantum mechanics.The equilibrium distribution functions are derived by the thermodynamic method based upon the use of the fundamental equation of thermodynamics and the statistical definition of the functions of the state of the system. It is shown that if the entropic index ξ = 1/q - 1 in the microcanonical ensemble is an extensive variable of the state of the system, then in the thermodynamic limit z bar = 1/(q - 1)N = const the principle of additivity and the zero law of thermodynamics are satisfied. In particular, the Tsallis entropy of the system is extensive and the temperature is intensive. Thus, the Tsallis statistics completely satisfies all the postulates of the equilibrium thermodynamics. Moreover, evaluation of the thermodynamic identities in the microcanonical ensemble is provided by the Euler theorem. The principle of additivity and the Euler theorem are explicitly proved by using the illustration of the classical microcanonical ideal gas in the thermodynamic limit

  13. Microcanonical ensemble extensive thermodynamics of Tsallis statistics

    Parvan, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    The microscopic foundation of the generalized equilibrium statistical mechanics based on the Tsallis entropy is given by using the Gibbs idea of statistical ensembles of the classical and quantum mechanics. The equilibrium distribution functions are derived by the thermodynamic method based upon the use of the fundamental equation of thermodynamics and the statistical definition of the functions of the state of the system. It is shown that if the entropic index ξ=1/(q-1) in the microcanonical ensemble is an extensive variable of the state of the system, then in the thermodynamic limit z-bar =1/(q-1)N=const the principle of additivity and the zero law of thermodynamics are satisfied. In particular, the Tsallis entropy of the system is extensive and the temperature is intensive. Thus, the Tsallis statistics completely satisfies all the postulates of the equilibrium thermodynamics. Moreover, evaluation of the thermodynamic identities in the microcanonical ensemble is provided by the Euler theorem. The principle of additivity and the Euler theorem are explicitly proved by using the illustration of the classical microcanonical ideal gas in the thermodynamic limit

  14. Functional State Modelling of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cultivations

    Iasen Hristozov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of functional state approach for modelling of yeast cultivation is considered in this paper. This concept helps in monitoring and control of complex processes such as bioprocesses. Using of functional state modelling approach for fermentation processes aims to overcome the main disadvantage of using global process model, namely complex model structure and big number of model parameters. The main advantage of functional state modelling is that the parameters of each local model can be separately estimated from other local models parameters. The results achieved from batch, as well as from fed-batch, cultivations are presented.

  15. Estimating state-contingent production functions

    Rasmussen, Svend; Karantininis, Kostas

    The paper reviews the empirical problem of estimating state-contingent production functions. The major problem is that states of nature may not be registered and/or that the number of observation per state is low. Monte Carlo simulation is used to generate an artificial, uncertain production...... environment based on Cobb Douglas production functions with state-contingent parameters. The pa-rameters are subsequently estimated based on different sizes of samples using Generalized Least Squares and Generalized Maximum Entropy and the results are compared. It is concluded that Maximum Entropy may...

  16. Thermodynamic characterization of bio-fuels: Excess functions for binary mixtures containing ETBE and hydrocarbons

    Segovia, Jose J.; Villamanan, Rosa M.; Martin, M. Carmen; Chamorro, Cesar R.; Villamanan, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    European energy policy is promoting the use of bio-fuels for transportation. Bioethers and bioalcohols are used as blending agents for enhancing the octane number. They make gasoline work harder, help the engine last longer and reduce air pollution. They also cause changes in the fuel properties. Development of renewable fuels needs both knowledge of new thermodynamic data and improvement of clean energy technologies. In this context, the use of ethanol of vegetable origin in its manufacture process, increases the interest of ETBE or bio-ETBE as an oxygenated additive. A complete study of the behaviour of ETBE + hydrocarbons mixtures is presented. Some experimental data concerning vapor-liquid equilibria and heats of mixing were determined in our laboratory. All the techniques have a high accuracy. The data were reduced by well-known models, such as NRTL and used to model the thermodynamic properties.

  17. Assessing exchange-correlation functionals for elasticity and thermodynamics of α -ZrW2O8 : A density functional perturbation theory study

    Weck, Philippe F.; Kim, Eunja; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Gordon, Margaret E.; Bryan, Charles R.

    2018-04-01

    Elastic and thermodynamic properties of negative thermal expansion (NTE) α -ZrW2O8 have been calculated using PBEsol and PBE exchange-correlation functionals within the framework of density functional perturbation theory (DFPT). Measured elastic constants are reproduced within ∼ 2 % with PBEsol and ∼ 6 % with PBE. The thermal evolution of the Grüneisen parameter computed within the quasi-harmonic approximation exhibits negative values below the Debye temperature, consistent with observation. The standard molar heat capacity is predicted to be CP0 = 192.2 and 193.8 J mol-1K-1 with PBEsol and PBE, respectively. These results suggest superior accuracy of DFPT/PBEsol for studying the lattice dynamics, elasticity and thermodynamics of NTE materials.

  18. Equation of state and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of monoclinic 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene.

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Liping

    2016-10-05

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were conducted on 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7) at pressures up to 6.8 GPa and temperatures up to 485 K. Within the resolution of the present diffraction data, our results do not reveal evidence for a pressure-induced structural phase transition near 2 GPa, previously observed in several vibrational spectroscopy experiments. Based on unit-cell volume measurements, the least-squares fit using the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EOS) yields K 0  =  12.6  ±  1.4 GPa and [Formula: see text]  =  11.3  ±  2.1 for the α-phase of FOX-7, which are in good agreement with recently reported values for the deuterated sample, indicating that the effect of hydrogen-deuterium substitution on the compressibility of FOX-7 is negligibly small. A thermal EOS is also obtained for the α-phase of FOX-7, including pressure dependence of thermal expansivity, (∂α/∂P)T  =  -7.0  ±  2.0  ×  10(-5) K(-1) GPa(-1), and temperature derivative of the bulk modulus, (∂K T/∂T)P  =  -1.1  ×  10(-2) GPa K(-1). From these EOS parameters, we calculate heat capacity at constant volume (C V) and thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter (γ TH) as a function of temperature. At ambient conditions, the calculated γ TH is 1.055, which is in good agreement with the value (1.09) previously obtained from density functional theory (DFT). The obtained C V, however, is 13% larger than that calculated from the first-principles calculations, indicating that the dispersion correction in the DFT calculations may need to be further improved for describing intermolecular interactions of molecular crystals.

  19. Solvation thermodynamics

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    1987-01-01

    This book deals with a subject that has been studied since the beginning of physical chemistry. Despite the thousands of articles and scores of books devoted to solvation thermodynamics, I feel that some fundamen­ tal and well-established concepts underlying the traditional approach to this subject are not satisfactory and need revision. The main reason for this need is that solvation thermodynamics has traditionally been treated in the context of classical (macroscopic) ther­ modynamics alone. However, solvation is inherently a molecular pro­ cess, dependent upon local rather than macroscopic properties of the system. Therefore, the starting point should be based on statistical mechanical methods. For many years it has been believed that certain thermodynamic quantities, such as the standard free energy (or enthalpy or entropy) of solution, may be used as measures of the corresponding functions of solvation of a given solute in a given solvent. I first challenged this notion in a paper published in 1978 b...

  20. Basic Thermodynamics

    Duthil, P

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a general thermodynamic basis that is useable in the context of superconductivity and particle accelerators. The first part recalls the purpose of thermodynamics and summarizes its important concepts. Some applications, from cryogenics to magnetic systems, are covered. In the context of basic thermodynamics, only thermodynamic equilibrium is considered

  1. Basic Thermodynamics

    Duthil, P [Orsay, IPN (France)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a general thermodynamic basis that is useable in the context of superconductivity and particle accelerators. The first part recalls the purpose of thermodynamics and summarizes its important concepts. Some applications, from cryogenics to magnetic systems, are covered. In the context of basic thermodynamics, only thermodynamic equilibrium is considered.

  2. Steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamic modeling of the relaxation process of isolated chemically reactive systems using density of states and the concept of hypoequilibrium state

    Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the nonequilibrium relaxation process of chemically reactive systems using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). The trajectory of the chemical reaction, i.e., the accessible intermediate states, is predicted and discussed. The prediction is made using a thermodynamic-ensemble approach, which does not require detailed information about the particle mechanics involved (e.g., the collision of particles). Instead, modeling the kinetics and dynamics of the relaxation process is based on the principle of steepest-entropy ascent (SEA) or maximum-entropy production, which suggests a constrained gradient dynamics in state space. The SEAQT framework is based on general definitions for energy and entropy and at least theoretically enables the prediction of the nonequilibrium relaxation of system state at all temporal and spatial scales. However, to make this not just theoretically but computationally possible, the concept of density of states is introduced to simplify the application of the relaxation model, which in effect extends the application of the SEAQT framework even to infinite energy eigenlevel systems. The energy eigenstructure of the reactive system considered here consists of an extremely large number of such levels (on the order of 10130) and yields to the quasicontinuous assumption. The principle of SEA results in a unique trajectory of system thermodynamic state evolution in Hilbert space in the nonequilibrium realm, even far from equilibrium. To describe this trajectory, the concepts of subsystem hypoequilibrium state and temperature are introduced and used to characterize each system-level, nonequilibrium state. This definition of temperature is fundamental rather than phenomenological and is a generalization of the temperature defined at stable equilibrium. In addition, to deal with the large number of energy eigenlevels, the equation of motion is formulated on the basis of the density of states and a set of

  3. Thermodynamic-state and kinetic-process dependent dual ferromagnetic states in high-Si content FeMn(PSi) alloys

    Li, Guijiang; Eriksson, Olle; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    We have found that thermodynamic state and kinetic process co-determine the dual ferromagnetic (FM) orders in high-Si content FeMnP 1−x Si x (0.25 < x < 0.5). Alloys undergoing high temperature annealing and quenching process prefer a high magnetic moment FM state in a chemically partial disordered structure with low c/a ratio. This mechanism is suggested to be responsible for the often discussed virgin effect as well. A chemically ordered structure obtained by a slow cooling process from a relatively low annealing temperature and the increase in Si content stabilize a metastable lattice with high c/a ratio and FM order with low magnetic moment. The non-simultaneity of the magnetic and structural transitions can be responsible for the occurrence of FM state in the high c/a range. Thus, a c/a ratio that changes from high to low is physically plausible to stabilize the metastable FM order at low temperature. Our theoretical observations indicate that suitable thermodynamic state and kinetic diffusion process is crucial for optimizing magnetocaloric properties and exploring feasible magnetocaloric materials

  4. Thermodynamics of Bioreactions.

    Held, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-06-07

    Thermodynamic principles have been applied to enzyme-catalyzed reactions since the beginning of the 1930s in an attempt to understand metabolic pathways. Currently, thermodynamics is also applied to the design and analysis of biotechnological processes. The key thermodynamic quantity is the Gibbs energy of reaction, which must be negative for a reaction to occur spontaneously. However, the application of thermodynamic feasibility studies sometimes yields positive Gibbs energies of reaction even for reactions that are known to occur spontaneously, such as glycolysis. This article reviews the application of thermodynamics in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It summarizes the basic thermodynamic relationships used for describing the Gibbs energy of reaction and also refers to the nonuniform application of these relationships in the literature. The review summarizes state-of-the-art approaches that describe the influence of temperature, pH, electrolytes, solvents, and concentrations of reacting agents on the Gibbs energy of reaction and, therefore, on the feasibility and yield of biological reactions.

  5. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of the transition between metallic and nonmetallic states in dense media

    Fortin, Xavier

    1971-01-01

    The effects of thermal excitation are introduced in the study of a simple electronic structure model for condensed media. The choice of a particle-interaction potential leads to a self-consistent calculation performed on a computer. This calculation gives a metal - nonmetal transition similar to the MOTT transition. We consider the effects of temperature and density variations upon this transition. It is possible to make use of this electronic structure to obtain the thermodynamic properties near the transition: pressure, free energy, sound velocity. The numerical results of this simple model are satisfactory. Particularly, if a dielectric constant is taken into account, the transition temperature and density are of the same order of magnitude as those observed experimentally in semiconductors. (author) [fr

  6. Microsoft excel spreadsheets for calculation of P-V-T relations and thermodynamic properties from equations of state of MgO, diamond and nine metals as pressure markers in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    Sokolova, Tatiana S.; Dorogokupets, Peter I.; Dymshits, Anna M.; Danilov, Boris S.; Litasov, Konstantin D.

    2016-09-01

    We present Microsoft Excel spreadsheets for calculation of thermodynamic functions and P-V-T properties of MgO, diamond and 9 metals, Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W, depending on temperature and volume or temperature and pressure. The spreadsheets include the most common pressure markers used in in situ experiments with diamond anvil cell and multianvil techniques. The calculations are based on the equation of state formalism via the Helmholtz free energy. The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel and is a time-efficient tool to evaluate volume, pressure and other thermodynamic functions using T-P and T-V data only as input parameters. This application is aimed to solve practical issues of high pressure experiments in geosciences and mineral physics.

  7. Clinical applications of resting state functional connectivity

    Michael D Fox

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During resting conditions the brain remains functionally and metabolically active. One manifestation of this activity that has become an important research tool is spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal of fMRI. The identification of correlation patterns in these spontaneous fluctuations has been termed resting state functional connectivity (fcMRI and has the potential to greatly increase the translation of fMRI into clinical care. In this article we review the advantages of the resting state signal for clinical applications including detailed discussion of signal to noise considerations. We include guidelines for performing resting state research on clinical populations, outline the different areas for clinical application, and identify important barriers to be addressed to facilitate the translation of resting state fcMRI into the clinical realm.

  8. Chiral thermodynamics of nuclear matter

    Fiorilla, Salvatore

    2012-10-23

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is calculated at finite temperature in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory up to three-loop order. The dependence of its thermodynamic properties on the isospin-asymmetry is investigated. The chiral quark condensate is evaluated for symmetric nuclear matter. Its behaviour as a function of density and temperature sets important nuclear physics constraints for the QCD phase diagram.

  9. Chiral thermodynamics of nuclear matter

    Fiorilla, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    The equation of state of nuclear matter is calculated at finite temperature in the framework of in-medium chiral perturbation theory up to three-loop order. The dependence of its thermodynamic properties on the isospin-asymmetry is investigated. The chiral quark condensate is evaluated for symmetric nuclear matter. Its behaviour as a function of density and temperature sets important nuclear physics constraints for the QCD phase diagram.

  10. Partial thermodynamic functions of hydrogen in complex hydrated vanadium(5) and tungsten(6) oxides

    Volkov, V.L.; Zakharova, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    The partial thermodynamic characteristics of hydrogen in the complex hydrated vanadium(5) and tungsten(6) oxides, obtained through the sol-gel method, of the general formula H 2 V 12-y W y O 31+δ ·nH 2 O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.33) are determined through the emf method. The changes in these values (ΔG-bar(H 2 ), ΔH-bar(H 2 ) and ΔS-bar(H 2 )) in dependence on the compound composition are discussed. It is established that ΔG-bar(H 2 ) phases, amorphous to X-rays are determined by the ΔS-bar(H 2 ) value and crystalline ones by ΔH-bar(H 2 ). The scheme of the phase relationships of the H 2 O-H-WO 3 -V 2 O 5 system, whereto the given phases are related are presented [ru

  11. The finite temperature QCD phase transition and the thermodynamic equation of state. An investigation employing lattice QCD with Nf=2 twisted mass quarks

    Burger, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we report about an investigation of the finite temperature crossover/phase transition of quantum chromodynamics and the evaluation of the thermodynamic equation of state. To this end the lattice method and the Wilson twisted mass discretisation of the quark action are used. This formulation is known to have an automatic improvement of lattice artifacts and thus an improved continuum limit behaviour. This work presents first robust results using this action for the non-vanishing temperature case. We investigate the chiral limit of the two flavour phase transition with several small values of the pion mass in order to address the open question of the order of the transition in the limit of vanishing quark mass. For the currently simulated pion masses in the range of 300 to 700 MeV we present evidence that the finite temperature transition is a crossover transition rather than a genuine phase transition. The chiral limit is investigated by comparing the scaling of the observed crossover temperature with the mass including several possible scenarios. Complementary to this approach the chiral condensate as the order parameter for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is analysed in comparison with the O(4) universal scaling function which characterises a second order transition. With respect to thermodynamics the equation of state is obtained from the trace anomaly employing the temperature integral method which provides the pressure and energy density in the crossover region. The continuum limit of the trace anomaly is studied by considering several values of N τ and the tree-level correction technique.

  12. Functional Dependence of Thermodynamic and Thermokinetic Parameters of Refrigerants Used in Mine Air Refrigerators. Part 1 - Refrigerant R407C

    Nowak, Bernard; Życzkowski, Piotr; Łuczak, Rafał

    2017-03-01

    The authors of this article dealt with the issue of modeling the thermodynamic and thermokinetic properties (parameters) of refrigerants. The knowledge of these parameters is essential to design refrigeration equipment, to perform their energy efficiency analysis, or to compare the efficiency of air refrigerators using different refrigerants. One of the refrigerants used in mine air compression refrigerators is R407C. For this refrigerant, 23 dependencies were developed, determining its thermodynamic and thermokinetic parameters in the states of saturated liquid, dry saturated vapour, superheated vapor, subcooled liquid, and in the two-phase region. The created formulas have been presented in Tables 2, 5, 8, 10 and 12, respectively. It should be noted that the scope of application of these formulas is wider than the range of changes of that refrigerant during the normal operation of mine refrigeration equipment. The article ends with the statistical verification of the developed dependencies. For this purpose, for each model correlation coefficients and coefficients of determination were calculated, as well as absolute and relative deviations between the given values from the program REFPROP 7 (Lemmon et al., 2002) and the calculated ones. The results of these calculations have been contained in Tables 14 and 15.

  13. Use of state-dependent pair potentials in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties of noble gases

    Jakse, Noel; Bretonnet, Jean-Louis [Laboratoire de Theorie de la Matiere Condensee, Universite de Metz, 1 Boulevard FD Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France)

    2003-12-08

    Understanding the interatomic interactions in noble gases remains one of the fundamental problems not completely solved to date. From small-angle neutron scattering experiments it is well-known that three-body forces exist and cannot be neglected. On the theoretical side, semi-analytic and simulation methods have been used to reveal the nature of these many-body interactions. The purpose of the present work is to provide an overview of the different three-body contributions to the interactions and their relative importance in describing the structural and thermodynamic properties for noble gases by means of the integral equation theory and molecular dynamics simulations. We examine the relevance of the effective state-dependent pair potential in this framework, as well as the self-consistency problem that we are faced with in the integral equation theory.

  14. A Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics

    Baldiotti, M.C., E-mail: baldiotti@uel.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, 86051-990, Londrina-PR (Brazil); Fresneda, R., E-mail: rodrigo.fresneda@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC, Av. dos Estados 5001, 09210-580, Santo André-SP (Brazil); Molina, C., E-mail: cmolina@usp.br [Escola de Artes, Ciências e Humanidades, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Arlindo Bettio 1000, CEP 03828-000, São Paulo-SP (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    In the present work we develop a strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics. A thermodynamic description based on symplectic geometry is introduced, where all thermodynamic processes can be described within the framework of Analytic Mechanics. Our proposal is constructed on top of a usual symplectic manifold, where phase space is even dimensional and one has well-defined Poisson brackets. The main idea is the introduction of an extended phase space where thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. We are then able to apply the canonical transformation toolkit to thermodynamic problems. Throughout this development, Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. To illustrate the formalism, we consider paradigmatic examples, namely, the ideal, van der Waals and Clausius gases. - Highlights: • A strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics is proposed. • Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. • Thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. • Thermodynamic potentials are related by canonical transformations.

  15. A Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics

    Baldiotti, M.C.; Fresneda, R.; Molina, C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work we develop a strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics. A thermodynamic description based on symplectic geometry is introduced, where all thermodynamic processes can be described within the framework of Analytic Mechanics. Our proposal is constructed on top of a usual symplectic manifold, where phase space is even dimensional and one has well-defined Poisson brackets. The main idea is the introduction of an extended phase space where thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. We are then able to apply the canonical transformation toolkit to thermodynamic problems. Throughout this development, Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. To illustrate the formalism, we consider paradigmatic examples, namely, the ideal, van der Waals and Clausius gases. - Highlights: • A strictly Hamiltonian approach to Thermodynamics is proposed. • Dirac’s theory of constrained systems is extensively used. • Thermodynamic equations of state are realized as constraints. • Thermodynamic potentials are related by canonical transformations.

  16. Conformal partition functions of critical percolation from D 3 thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations

    Morin-Duchesne, Alexi; Klümper, Andreas; Pearce, Paul A.

    2017-08-01

    Using the planar Temperley-Lieb algebra, critical bond percolation on the square lattice can be reformulated as a loop model. In this form, it is incorporated as {{ L}}{{ M}}(2, 3) in the Yang-Baxter integrable family of logarithmic minimal models {{ L}}{{ M}}( p, p\\prime) . We consider this model of percolation in the presence of boundaries and with periodic boundary conditions. Inspired by Kuniba, Sakai and Suzuki, we rewrite the recently obtained infinite Y-system of functional equations. In this way, we obtain nonlinear integral equations in the form of a closed finite set of TBA equations described by a D 3 Dynkin diagram. Following the methods of Klümper and Pearce, we solve the TBA equations for the conformal finite-size corrections. For the ground states of the standard modules on the strip, these agree with the known central charge c  =  0 and conformal weights Δ1, s for \\renewcommand≥≥slant} s\\in {{ Z}≥slant 1} with Δr, s=\\big((3r-2s){\\hspace{0pt}}^2-1\\big)/24 . For the periodic case, the finite-size corrections agree with the conformal weights Δ0, s , Δ1, s with \\renewcommand{≥{≥slant} s\\in\\frac{1}{2}{{ Z}≥slant 0} . These are obtained analytically using Rogers dilogarithm identities. We incorporate all finite excitations by formulating empirical selection rules for the patterns of zeros of all the eigenvalues of the standard modules. We thus obtain the conformal partition functions on the cylinder and the modular invariant partition function (MIPF) on the torus. By applying q-binomial and q-Narayana identities, it is shown that our refined finitized characters on the strip agree with those of Pearce, Rasmussen and Zuber. For percolation on the torus, the MIPF is a non-diagonal sesquilinear form in affine u(1) characters given by the u(1) partition function Z2, 3(q)=Z2, 3{Circ}(q) . The u(1) operator content is {{ N}}Δ, \\barΔ=1 for Δ=\\barΔ=-\\frac{1}{24}, \\frac{35}{24} and {{ N}}Δ, \\barΔ=2 for

  17. Structure and thermodynamics of molten salts

    Papatheodorou, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter investigates single-component molten salts and multicomponent salt mixtures. Molten salts provide an important testing ground for theories of liquids, solutions, and plasmas. Topics considered include molten salts as liquids (the pair potential, the radial distribution function, methods of characterization), single salts (structure, thermodynamic correlations), and salt mixtures (the thermodynamics of mixing; spectroscopy and structure). Neutron and X-ray scattering techniques are used to determine the structure of molten metal halide salts. The corresponding-states theory is used to obtain thermodynamic correlations on single salts. Structural information on salt mixtures is obtained by using vibrational (Raman) and electronic absorption spectroscopy. Charge-symmetrical systems and charge-unsymmetrical systems are used to examine the thermodynamics of salt mixtures

  18. A Typed Functional Calculus With State

    Rensink, Arend; Müllhäuser, M.

    1997-01-01

    We extend the simple typed \\lambda-calculus with statements. A statement (which can also be thought of as a method or transition) is an abstraction similar to function abstraction: it can be instantiated by providing it with a source state, whereafter it yields a pair of values consisting of an

  19. Surface thermodynamics

    Garcia-Moliner, F.

    1975-01-01

    Basic thermodynamics of a system consisting of two bulk phases with an interface. Solid surfaces: general. Discussion of experimental data on surface tension and related concepts. Adsorption thermodynamics in the Gibbsian scheme. Adsorption on inert solid adsorbents. Systems with electrical charges: chemistry and thermodynamics of imperfect crystals. Thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Simple models of charge transfer chemisorption. Adsorption heat and related concepts. Surface phase transitions

  20. Imbalanced Learning for Functional State Assessment

    Li, Feng; McKenzie, Frederick; Li, Jiang; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents results of several imbalanced learning techniques applied to operator functional state assessment where the data is highly imbalanced, i.e., some function states (majority classes) have much more training samples than other states (minority classes). Conventional machine learning techniques usually tend to classify all data samples into majority classes and perform poorly for minority classes. In this study, we implemented five imbalanced learning techniques, including random undersampling, random over-sampling, synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE), borderline-SMOTE and adaptive synthetic sampling (ADASYN) to solve this problem. Experimental results on a benchmark driving lest dataset show thai accuracies for minority classes could be improved dramatically with a cost of slight performance degradations for majority classes,

  1. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  2. Black hole thermodynamics under the microscope

    Falls, Kevin; Litim, Daniel F.

    2014-04-01

    A coarse-grained version of the effective action is used to study the thermodynamics of black holes, interpolating from largest to smallest masses. The physical parameters of the black hole are linked to the running couplings by thermodynamics, and the corresponding equation of state includes quantum corrections for temperature, specific heat, and entropy. If quantum gravity becomes asymptotically safe, the state function predicts conformal scaling in the limit of small horizon area and bounds on black hole mass and temperature. A metric-based derivation for the equation of state and quantum corrections to the thermodynamical, statistical, and phenomenological definition of entropy are also given. Further implications and limitations of our study are discussed.

  3. Thermodynamic and redox properties of graphene oxides for lithium-ion battery applications: a first principles density functional theory modeling approach.

    Kim, Sunghee; Kim, Ki Chul; Lee, Seung Woo; Jang, Seung Soon

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the thermodynamic stability and redox properties of oxygen functional groups on graphene is critical to systematically design stable graphene-based positive electrode materials with high potential for lithium-ion battery applications. In this work, we study the thermodynamic and redox properties of graphene functionalized with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups, and the evolution of these properties with the number, types and distribution of functional groups by employing the density functional theory method. It is found that the redox potential of the functionalized graphene is sensitive to the types, number, and distribution of oxygen functional groups. First, the carbonyl group induces higher redox potential than the hydroxyl group. Second, more carbonyl groups would result in higher redox potential. Lastly, the locally concentrated distribution of the carbonyl group is more beneficial to have higher redox potential compared to the uniformly dispersed distribution. In contrast, the distribution of the hydroxyl group does not affect the redox potential significantly. Thermodynamic investigation demonstrates that the incorporation of carbonyl groups at the edge of graphene is a promising strategy for designing thermodynamically stable positive electrode materials with high redox potentials.

  4. Applied chemical engineering thermodynamics

    Tassios, Dimitrios P

    1993-01-01

    Applied Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics provides the undergraduate and graduate student of chemical engineering with the basic knowledge, the methodology and the references he needs to apply it in industrial practice. Thus, in addition to the classical topics of the laws of thermodynamics,pure component and mixture thermodynamic properties as well as phase and chemical equilibria the reader will find: - history of thermodynamics - energy conservation - internmolecular forces and molecular thermodynamics - cubic equations of state - statistical mechanics. A great number of calculated problems with solutions and an appendix with numerous tables of numbers of practical importance are extremely helpful for applied calculations. The computer programs on the included disk help the student to become familiar with the typical methods used in industry for volumetric and vapor-liquid equilibria calculations.

  5. Thermodynamics of pion gas using states predicted from κ-deformed Poincare algebra

    Cordeiro, Claudete E.; Delfino, Antonio; Dey, Jishnu

    1995-01-01

    K-deformed Poincare algebra, which preserves rotational and translational symmetries, can successfully predict the angular and radial excited states of the pion. At high temperature, T these states can be excited in the pion gas, in addition to the usual momentum excitation. We exploit this to look at pion free energy finding it increases linearly with T. The energy per particle and the entropy show evidence of a smooth phase transition after T=0.2 GeV. (author)

  6. Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties and sound velocities derived from a multiple Einstein method using vibrational densities of states : an application to MgO–SiO2

    Jacobs, Michael H G; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; van den Berg, Arie P.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed a technique that simplifies Kieffer’s lattice vibrational method by representing the vibrational density of states with multiple Einstein frequencies. Here, we show that this technique can be applied to construct a thermodynamic database that accurately represents

  7. Discrete state perturbation theory via Green's functions

    Rubinson, W.

    1975-01-01

    The exposition of stationary-state perturbation theory via the Green's function method in Goldberger and Watson's Collision Theory is reworked in a way that makes explicit its mathematical basis. It is stressed that the theory consists of the construction of, and manipulations on, a mathematical identity. The perturbation series fall out of the identity almost immediately. The logical status of the method is commented on

  8. Cranked cluster wave function for molecular states

    Horiuchi, Hisashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Wada, Takahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Construction of the cranked cluster wave function is discussed by focussing on three problems; the self-consistency between the potential and the density distribution, the properties of the rotational angular frequency which is strongly influenced by the inter-cluster Pauli principle and by the parity projection, and the spin alignment along the rotation axis with the resulting structure-change of the molecular state. (author)

  9. Calculation of the phonon density of states and related thermodynamic properties for trigonal selenium

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Alldredge, G. P.; McMurry, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The phonon density of states for trigonal selenium has been calculated on the basis of a short range force model giving good overall agreement with experimental room temperature phonon dispersion data. A qualitative comparison with an experimental determination of the phonon density of states shows...... similarities in the gross features, but the experimental data lacks many of the finer details shown by the theoretical results due to resolution effects. The lattice dynamical contribution to the heat capacity CV is calculated and is found to be in good agreement with experimental determinations of Cp after...

  10. Reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V: function, thermodynamic stability, and NMR solution structure.

    Cai, M; Gong, Y; Prakash, O; Krishnamoorthi, R

    1995-09-26

    Reactive-site (Lys44-Asp45 peptide bond) hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor-V (CMTI-V*) was prepared and characterized: In comparison to the intact form, CMTI-V* exhibited markedly reduced inhibitory properties and binding affinities toward trypsin and human blood coagulation factor XIIa. The equilibrium constant of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis, Khyd, defined as [CMTI-V*]/[CMTI-V], was measured to be approximately 9.4 at 25 degrees C (delta G degrees = -1.3 kcal.mol-1). From the temperature dependence of delta G degrees, the following thermodynamic parameters were estimated: delta H degrees = 1.6 kcal.mol-1 and delta S degrees = 9.8 eu. In order to understand the functional and thermodynamic differences between the two forms, the three-dimensional solution structure of CMTI-V* was determined by a combined approach of NMR, distance geometry, and simulated annealing methods. Thus, following sequence-specific and stereospecific resonance assignments, including those of beta-, gamma-, delta-, and epsilon-hydrogens and valine methyl hydrogens, 809 interhydrogen distances and 123 dihedral angle constraints were determined, resulting in the computation and energy-minimization of 20 structures for CMTI-V*. The average root mean squared deviation in position for equivalent atoms between the 20 individual structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 0.67 +/- 0.15 A for the main chain atoms and 1.19 +/- 0.23 A for all the non-hydrogen atoms of residues 5-40 and residues 48-67.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Thermodynamic functions of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol derived from solution calorimetry data and headspace analysis

    Zaitseva, Ksenia V.; Varfolomeev, Mikhail A.; Solomonov, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solution enthalpies and activity coefficients of amines in methanol were measured. ► Thermodynamic functions of H-bonding of amines with methanol were determined. ► Specific interaction entropy of amines in methanol can be about zero or positive. ► Cooperativity of H-bonds in methanol media is smaller than in water solutions. ► A new view on analysis of specific interaction of solute with methanol is presented. - Abstract: Reactivity and equilibrium properties of organic molecules in self-associated liquids greatly depend on the hydrogen bonding with solvent. This work contains comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen bonding of aliphatic and aromatic amines in self-associated solvent methanol. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution and limiting activity coefficients for the studied systems were measured experimentally. Enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol were determined. These values were found to be decreased compared with hydrogen bond energy in equimolar complexes “methanol–amine” determined in inert solvent or base media. A linear dependence between enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol was observed. It was firstly revealed that the entropy of specific interactions of amines with neat methanol can be about zero or positive. Disruption of solvent–solvent hydrogen bonds can be regarded as the most important step during dissolution of amine in methanol. It was found that the cooperative effect influences on the Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol, but in a lesser extent than in aqueous solutions. The new results show that the hydrogen bonding process in the self-associated solvents differs significantly from equimolar complexation in aprotic media.

  12. Thermodynamic functions of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol derived from solution calorimetry data and headspace analysis

    Zaitseva, Ksenia V., E-mail: zaitseva.ksenia@gmail.com [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Varfolomeev, Mikhail A., E-mail: vma.ksu@gmail.com [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Solomonov, Boris N., E-mail: boris.solomonov@ksu.ru [Chemical Institute, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlevskaya 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation)

    2012-05-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution enthalpies and activity coefficients of amines in methanol were measured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic functions of H-bonding of amines with methanol were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific interaction entropy of amines in methanol can be about zero or positive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cooperativity of H-bonds in methanol media is smaller than in water solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new view on analysis of specific interaction of solute with methanol is presented. - Abstract: Reactivity and equilibrium properties of organic molecules in self-associated liquids greatly depend on the hydrogen bonding with solvent. This work contains comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen bonding of aliphatic and aromatic amines in self-associated solvent methanol. Enthalpies of solution at infinite dilution and limiting activity coefficients for the studied systems were measured experimentally. Enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol were determined. These values were found to be decreased compared with hydrogen bond energy in equimolar complexes 'methanol-amine' determined in inert solvent or base media. A linear dependence between enthalpies and Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines with neat methanol was observed. It was firstly revealed that the entropy of specific interactions of amines with neat methanol can be about zero or positive. Disruption of solvent-solvent hydrogen bonds can be regarded as the most important step during dissolution of amine in methanol. It was found that the cooperative effect influences on the Gibbs energies of hydrogen bonding of amines in methanol, but in a lesser extent than in aqueous solutions. The new results show that the hydrogen bonding process in the self-associated solvents differs significantly from equimolar complexation in aprotic media.

  13. Additive manufacturing of a functionally graded material from Ti-6Al-4V to Invar: Experimental characterization and thermodynamic calculations

    Bobbio, Lourdes D.; Otis, Richard A.; Borgonia, John Paul; Dillon, R. Peter; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Beese, Allison M.

    2017-01-01

    In functionally graded materials (FGMs), the elemental composition, or structure, within a component varies gradually as a function of position, allowing for the gradual transition from one alloy to another, and the local tailoring of properties. One method for fabricating FGMs with varying elemental composition is through layer-by-layer directed energy deposition additive manufacturing. This work combines experimental characterization and computational analysis to investigate a material graded from Ti-6Al-4V to Invar 36 (64 wt% Fe, 36 wt% Ni). The microstructure, composition, phases, and microhardness were determined as a function of position within the FGM. During the fabrication process, detrimental phases associated with the compositional blending of the Ti-6Al-4V and Invar formed, leading to cracking in the final deposited part. Intermetallic phases (FeTi, Fe_2Ti, Ni_3Ti, and NiTi_2) were experimentally identified to occur throughout the gradient region, and were considered as the reason that the FGM cracked during fabrication. CALPHAD (CALculation of PHase Diagrams) thermodynamic calculations were used concurrently to predict phases that would form during the manufacturing process and were compared to the experimental results. The experimental-computational approach described herein for characterizing FGMs can be used to improve the understanding and design of other FGMs.

  14. High dilution calorimetric determination of the standard state thermodynamic differences between the properties of H+(aq) and Na+(aq) up to 598.15 K

    Djamali, Essmaiil; Cobble, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Standard state thermodynamic properties for fully ionized aqueous perrhenic acid at temperature in the range of (298.15 to 598.15) K and at p sat were determined by high dilution solution calorimetry (10 -4 m). A comparison of the standard state thermodynamic properties for fully ionized aqueous perrhenic acid, HReO 4 (aq), and sodium perrhenate, NaReO 4 (aq), establishes for the first time the quantitative values for the differences between H + (aq) and Na + (aq) from temperature of (298.15 to 598.15) K. Perrhenic acid is believed to be the first strong acid to be thermodynamically well characterized under standard state conditions to date from measurements down to 10 -4 m. The value of the Debye-Hueckel limiting slope for enthalpies of dilution at temperature of 596.30 K of 122 ± 6 kJ . mol -3/2 . kg 1/2 , obtained from the integral heats of solution measurement at various concentrations, is in good agreement with theoretical value in literature, 121 kJ . mol -3/2 . kg 1/2 . This agreement verifies that HReO 4 (aq) obeys the simple limiting law for strong electrolytes. Many thermodynamic properties of soluble sodium electrolytes can now be converted to the corresponding acid form.

  15. Extended thermodynamics

    Müller, Ingo

    1993-01-01

    Physicists firmly believe that the differential equations of nature should be hyperbolic so as to exclude action at a distance; yet the equations of irreversible thermodynamics - those of Navier-Stokes and Fourier - are parabolic. This incompatibility between the expectation of physicists and the classical laws of thermodynamics has prompted the formulation of extended thermodynamics. After describing the motifs and early evolution of this new branch of irreversible thermodynamics, the authors apply the theory to mon-atomic gases, mixtures of gases, relativistic gases, and "gases" of phonons and photons. The discussion brings into perspective the various phenomena called second sound, such as heat propagation, propagation of shear stress and concentration, and the second sound in liquid helium. The formal mathematical structure of extended thermodynamics is exposed and the theory is shown to be fully compatible with the kinetic theory of gases. The study closes with the testing of extended thermodynamics thro...

  16. Strength functions for fragmented doorway states

    MacDonald, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Coupling a strongly excited ''doorway state'' to weak ''hallway states'' distributes its strength into micro-resonances seen in differential cross sections taken with very good energy resolution. The distribution of strength is shown to be revealed by reduced widths of the K-matrix rather than by the imaginary part of poles of the S-matrix. Different strength functions (SF) constructed by averaging the K-matrix widths are then investigated to determine their dependences on energy and on parameters related to averages of microscopic matrix elements. A new sum rule on the integrated strength of these SF is derived and used to show that different averaging procedures actually distribute the strength differently. Finally, it is shown that the discontinuous summed strength defines spreading parameters for the doorway state only in strong coupling, where it approximates the idefinite integral of the continuous SF of MacDonald-Mekjian-Kerman-De Toledo Piza. A new method of ''parametric continuation'' is used to relate a discontinuous sliding box-average, or a finite sum, of discrete terms to a continous function

  17. Thermodynamics I essentials

    REA, The Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Thermodynamics I includes review of properties and states of a pure substance, work and heat, energy and the first law of thermodynamics, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics

  18. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  19. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  20. Systematic vibration thermodynamic properties of bromine

    Liu, G. Y.; Sun, W. G.; Liao, B. T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the analysis of the maturity and finiteness of vibrational levels of bromine molecule in ground state and evaluating the effect on statistical computation, according to the elementary principles of quantum statistical theorem, using the full set of bromine molecular vibrational levels determined with algebra method, the statistical contribution for bromine systematical macroscopic thermodynamic properties is discussed. Thermodynamic state functions Helmholtz free energy, entropy and observable vibration heat capacity are calculated. The results show that the determination of full set of vibrational levels and maximum vibrational quantum number is the key in the correct statistical analysis of bromine systematical thermodynamic property. Algebra method results are clearly different from data of simple harmonic oscillator and the related algebra method results are no longer analytical but numerical and are superior to simple harmonic oscillator results. Compared with simple harmonic oscillator's heat capacities, the algebra method's heat capacities are more consistent with the experimental data in the given temperature range of 600-2100 K.

  1. Thermodynamics of quantum strings

    Morgan, M J

    1994-01-01

    A statistical mechanical analysis of an ideal gas of non-relativistic quantum strings is presented, in which the thermodynamic properties of the string gas are calculated from a canonical partition function. This toy model enables students to gain insight into the thermodynamics of a simple 'quantum field' theory, and provides a useful pedagogical introduction to the more complicated relativistic string theories. A review is also given of the thermodynamics of the open bosonic string gas and the type I (open) superstring gas. (author)

  2. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  3. Delineation of alternative conformational states in Escherichia coli peptide deformylase via thermodynamic studies for the binding of actinonin.

    Berg, Alexander K; Srivastava, D K

    2009-02-24

    We investigated the binding of a naturally occurring antibiotic, actinonin, to the Ni(2+)-reconstituted recombinant form of Escherichia coli peptide deformylase (PDF(Ec)) via isothermal titration microcalorimetry. The binding data conformed to both exothermic and endothermic phases with magnitudes of DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees , and TDeltaS degrees being equal to -12, -2.7, and 9.3 kcal/mol and -8.7, 3.9, and 12.6 kcal/mol, respectively. Evidently, although both phases are dominated by favorable entropic changes, the exothermic phase has about 6.7 kcal/mol enthalpic advantage over the endothermic phase. We observed that the removal of bound Ni(2+) from PDF(Ec) abolished the exothermic phase without affecting the endothermic phase, but it was regained upon addition of Zn(2+). In conjunction with metal analysis data, we propose that the recombinant form of PDF(Ec) is expressed in two stable conformational states that yield markedly distinct ITC profiles (i.e., exothermic versus endothermic) upon interaction with actinonin. The existence of two conformational states of PDF(Ec) is further supported by the observation of two distinct and independent transitions during the thermal unfolding of the enzyme. In addition, the thermodynamic data reveal that the formation of the PDF(Ec)-actinonin complex results in the transfer of one H(+) from the enzyme phase to the bulk solvent at pH 6.3. Both exothermic and endothermic phases produce highly negative DeltaC(p) degrees values, but there is no apparent enthalpy-entropy compensation effect upon formation of the PDF(Ec)-actinonin complex. In view of the known structural features of the enzyme, arguments are presented that the alternative conformational states of PDF(Ec) are modulated by the metal ligation at the enzyme site.

  4. Thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes II

    Štejfa, Vojtěch; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, Květoslav; Červinka, Ctirad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • (−)-Borneol, (−)-camphor, (±)-camphene, and (+)-fenchone were studied. • New thermodynamic data were measured and calculated. • Most of thermodynamic data are reported for the first time. - Abstract: A thermodynamic study of selected monoterpenes, (−)-borneol, (−)-camphor, (±)-camphene, and (+)-fenchone is presented in this work. The vapor pressure measurements were performed using the static method over the environmentally important temperature range from (238 to 308) K. Heat capacities of condensed phases were measured by Tian–Calvet calorimetry in the temperature interval from (258 to 355) K. The phase behavior was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) from subambient temperatures up to the fusion temperatures. The thermodynamic properties in the ideal-gas state were calculated by combining statistical thermodynamic and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Calculated ideal-gas heat capacities and experimental data for vapor pressures and condensed phase heat capacities were treated simultaneously to obtain a consistent thermodynamic description

  5. Effect of thermodynamic fluctuations of magnetization on the bound magnetic polaron state in ferromagnetic semiconductors

    Bednarski, Henryk; Spałek, Józef

    2014-01-01

    We extend the theory of the bound magnetic polaron (BMP) in diluted paramagnetic semiconductors to the situation with a ferromagnetic phase transition. This is achieved by including the classical Gaussian fluctuations of magnetization from the quartic (non-Gaussian) term in the effective Ginzburg–Landau Hamiltonian for the spins. Within this approach, we find a ferromagnetically ordered state within the BMP in the temperature range well above the Curie temperature for the host magnetic semiconductor. Numerical results are compared directly with the recently available experimental data for the ferromagnetic semiconductor GdN. The agreement is excellent, given the simplicity of our model, and is because the polaron size (≃1.4 nm) encompasses a relatively large but finite number (N≈400) of quasiclassical spins S=7/2 coming from Gd 3+ ions. The presence of BMP invalidates the notion of critical temperature and thus makes the incorporation of classical Gaussian fluctuations sufficient to realistically describe the situation. (paper)

  6. Experimental validation of a thermodynamic boiler model under steady state and dynamic conditions

    Carlon, Elisa; Verma, Vijay Kumar; Schwarz, Markus; Golicza, Laszlo; Prada, Alessandro; Baratieri, Marco; Haslinger, Walter; Schmidl, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laboratory tests on two commercially available pellet boilers. • Steady state and a dynamic load cycle tests. • Pellet boiler model calibration based on data registered in stationary operation. • Boiler model validation with reference to both stationary and dynamic operation. • Validated model suitable for coupled simulation of building and heating system. - Abstract: Nowadays dynamic building simulation is an essential tool for the design of heating systems for residential buildings. The simulation of buildings heated by biomass systems, first of all needs detailed boiler models, capable of simulating the boiler both as a stand-alone appliance and as a system component. This paper presents the calibration and validation of a boiler model by means of laboratory tests. The chosen model, i.e. TRNSYS “Type 869”, has been validated for two commercially available pellet boilers of 6 and 12 kW nominal capacities. Two test methods have been applied: the first is a steady state test at nominal load and the second is a load cycle test including stationary operation at different loads as well as transient operation. The load cycle test is representative of the boiler operation in the field and characterises the boiler’s stationary and dynamic behaviour. The model had been calibrated based on laboratory data registered during stationary operation at different loads and afterwards it was validated by simulating both the stationary and the dynamic tests. Selected parameters for the validation were the heat transfer rates to water and the water temperature profiles inside the boiler and at the boiler outlet. Modelling results showed better agreement with experimental data during stationary operation rather than during dynamic operation. Heat transfer rates to water were predicted with a maximum deviation of 10% during the stationary operation, and a maximum deviation of 30% during the dynamic load cycle. However, for both operational regimes the

  7. Thermodynamics of geothermal fluids

    Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1981-03-01

    A model to predict the thermodynamic properties of geothermal brines, based on a minimum amount of experimental data on a few key systems, is tested. Volumetric properties of aqueous sodium chloride, taken from the literature, are represented by a parametric equation over the range 0 to 300{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 1 kbar. Density measurements at 20 bar needed to complete the volumetric description also are presented. The pressure dependence of activity and thermal properties, derived from the volumetric equation, can be used to complete an equation of state for sodium chloride solutions. A flow calorimeter, used to obtain heat capacity data at high temperatures and pressures, is described. Heat capacity measurements, from 30 to 200{sup 0}C and 1 bar to 200 bar, are used to derive values for the activity coefficient and other thermodynamic properties of sodium sulfate solutions as a function of temperature. Literature data on the solubility of gypsum in mixed electrolyte solutions have been used to evaluate model parameters for calculating gypsum solubility in seawater and natural brines. Predictions of strontium and barium sulfate solubility in seawater also are given.

  8. Maximally Localized States and Quantum Corrections of Black Hole Thermodynamics in the Framework of a New Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    Zhang, Shao-Jun; Miao, Yan-Gang; Zhao, Ying-Jie

    2015-01-01

    As a generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) leads to the effects of the minimal length of the order of the Planck scale and UV/IR mixing, some significant physical concepts and quantities are modified or corrected correspondingly. On the one hand, we derive the maximally localized states—the physical states displaying the minimal length uncertainty associated with a new GUP proposed in our previous work. On the other hand, in the framework of this new GUP we calculate quantum corrections to the thermodynamic quantities of the Schwardzschild black hole, such as the Hawking temperature, the entropy, and the heat capacity, and give a remnant mass of the black hole at the end of the evaporation process. Moreover, we compare our results with that obtained in the frameworks of several other GUPs. In particular, we observe a significant difference between the situations with and without the consideration of the UV/IR mixing effect in the quantum corrections to the evaporation rate and the decay time. That is, the decay time can greatly be prolonged in the former case, which implies that the quantum correction from the UV/IR mixing effect may give rise to a radical rather than a tiny influence to the Hawking radiation.

  9. Thermodynamic investigations of the Mn-Ni-C-N quarternary alloys by solid-state galvanic cell technique

    Teng Lidong; Aune, Ragnhild; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2005-01-01

    In view of the important applications of carbides and nitrides of transition metals in the hard materials industries, the thermodynamic activities of manganese in Mn-Ni-C-N alloys have been studied by solid-state galvanic cell technique with CaF 2 as the solid electrolyte. The phase compositions and microstructure of various alloys have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nitrogen was introduced into the alloy by equilibrating with N 2 gas. It was established during the experiments that the solubility of nitrogen in the alloys was affected by the carbon content. A (Mn,Ni) 4 (N,C) nitride was formed during the nitriding procedure in the alloys. The electromotive force (EMF) measurements were carried out in the temperature range 940-1127 K in order to determine the activities of Mn in the alloys. The activities of manganese were calculated and compared with those of the corresponding Mn-Ni-C ternary alloys

  10. General thermodynamics

    Olander, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The book’s methodology is unified, concise, and multidisciplinary, allowing students to understand how the principles of thermodynamics apply to all technical fields that touch upon this most fundamental of scientific theories. It also offers a rigorous approach to the quantitative aspects of thermodynamics, accompanied by clear explanations to help students transition smoothly from the physical concepts to their mathematical representations

  11. Calculation of thermodynamic functions of aluminum plasma for high-energy-density systems

    Shumaev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    The results of calculating the degree of ionization, the pressure, and the specific internal energy of aluminum plasma in a wide temperature range are presented. The TERMAG computational code based on the Thomas–Fermi model was used at temperatures T > 105 K, and the ionization equilibrium model (Saha model) was applied at lower temperatures. Quantitatively similar results were obtained in the temperature range where both models are applicable. This suggests that the obtained data may be joined to produce a wide-range equation of state.

  12. Thermodynamics and economics

    Mansson, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    Economics, as the social science most concerned with the use and distribution of natural resources, must start to make use of the knowledge at hand in the natural sciences about such resources. In this, thermodynamics is an essential part. In a physicists terminology, human economic activity may be described as a dissipative system which flourishes by transforming and exchanging resources, goods and services. All this involves complex networks of flows of energy and materials. This implies that thermodynamics, the physical theory of energy and materials flows, must have implications for economics. On another level, thermodynamics has been recognized as a physical theory of value, with value concepts similar to those of economic theory. This paper discusses some general aspects of the significance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics for economics. The role of exergy, probably the most important of the physical measures of value, is elucidated. Two examples of integration of thermodynamics with economic theory are reviewed. First, a simple model of a steady-state production system is sued to illustrate the effects of thermodynamic process constraints. Second, the framework of a simple macroeconomic growth model is used to illustrate how some thermodynamic limitations may be integrated in macroeconomic theory

  13. Local thermodynamics of a magnetized, anisotropic plasma

    Hazeltine, R. D.; Mahajan, S. M.; Morrison, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    An expression for the internal energy of a fluid element in a weakly coupled, magnetized, anisotropic plasma is derived from first principles. The result is a function of entropy, particle density and magnetic field, and as such plays the role of a thermodynamic potential: it determines in principle all thermodynamic properties of the fluid element. In particular it provides equations of state for the magnetized plasma. The derivation uses familiar fluid equations, a few elements of kinetic theory, the MHD version of Faraday's law, and certain familiar stability and regularity conditions.

  14. On Equivalence of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamic and Statistical Entropies

    Purushottam D. Gujrati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We review the concept of nonequilibrium thermodynamic entropy and observables and internal variables as state variables, introduced recently by us, and provide a simple first principle derivation of additive statistical entropy, applicable to all nonequilibrium states by treating thermodynamics as an experimental science. We establish their numerical equivalence in several cases, which includes the most important case when the thermodynamic entropy is a state function. We discuss various interesting aspects of the two entropies and show that the number of microstates in the Boltzmann entropy includes all possible microstates of non-zero probabilities even if the system is trapped in a disjoint component of the microstate space. We show that negative thermodynamic entropy can appear from nonnegative statistical entropy.

  15. The influence of thermodynamic state of mineral hydraulic oil on flow rate through radial clearance at zero overlap inside the hydraulic components

    Knežević Darko M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In control hydraulic components (servo valves, LS regulators, etc. there is a need for precise mathematical description of fluid flow through radial clearances between the control piston and body of component at zero overlap, small valve opening and small lengths of overlap. Such a mathematical description would allow for a better dynamic analysis and stability analysis of hydraulic systems. The existing formulas in the literature do not take into account the change of the physical properties of the fluid with a change of thermodynamic state of the fluid to determine the flow rate through radial clearances in hydraulic components at zero overlap, a small opening, and a small overlap lengths, which leads to the formation of insufficiently precise mathematical models. In this paper model description of fluid flow through radial clearances at zero overlap is developed, taking into account the changes of physical properties of hydraulic fluid as a function of pressure and temperature. In addition, the experimental verification of the mathematical model is performed.

  16. Thermodynamic functions of hydration of hydrocarbons at 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa

    Plyasunov, Andrey V.; Shock, Everett L.

    2000-02-01

    An extensive compilation of experimental data yielding the infinite dilution partial molar Gibbs energy of hydration Δ hGO, enthalpy of hydration Δ hHO, heat capacity of hydration Δ hCpO, and volume V2O, at the reference temperature and pressure, 298.15 K and 0.1 MPa, is presented for hydrocarbons (excluding polyaromatic compounds) and monohydric alcohols. These results are used in a least-squares procedure to determine the numerical values of the corresponding properties of the selected functional groups. The simple first order group contribution method, which in general ignores nearest-neighbors and steric hindrance effects, was chosen to represent the compiled data. Following the precedent established by Cabani et al. (1981), the following groups are considered: CH 3, CH 2, CH, C for saturated hydrocarbons; c-CH 2, c-CH, c-C for cyclic saturated hydrocarbons; CH ar, C ar for aromatic hydrocarbons (containing the benzene ring); C=C, C≡C for double and triple bonds in linear hydrocarbons, respectively; c-C=C for the double bond in cyclic hydrocarbons; H for a hydrogen atom attached to the double bond (both in linear and cyclic hydrocarbons) or triple bond; and OH for the hydroxyl functional group. In addition it was found necessary to include the "pseudo"-group I(C-C) to account for the specific interactions of the neighboring hydrocarbon groups attached to the benzene or cyclic ring (in the latter case only for cis-isomers). Results of this study, the numerical values of the group contributions, will allow in most cases reasonably accurate estimations of Δ hGO, Δ hHO, Δ hCpO, and V2O at 298.15 K, 0.1 MPa for many hydrocarbons involved in geochemical and environmental processes.

  17. Study of elastic and thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide under high temperature and pressure with density functional theory

    Zhou Mu; Wang Feng; Zheng Zhou; Liu Xiankun; Jiang Tao

    2013-01-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of UO 2 under extreme physical condition are studied by using the density functional theory and quasi-harmonic Debye model. Results show that UO 2 is still stable ionic crystal under high temperatures, and pressures. Tetragonal shear constant is steady under high pressures and temperatures, while elastic constant C 44 is stable under high temperatures, but rises with pressure sharply. Bulk modulus, shear modulus and Young's modulus increase with pressure rapidly, but temperature would not cause evident debasement of the moduli, all of which indicate that UO 2 has excellent mechanical properties. Heat capacity of different pressures increases with temperature and is close to the Dulong-Petit limit near 1000 K. Debye temperature decreases with temperature, and increases with pressure. Under low pressure, thermal expansion coefficient raises with temperature rapidly, and then gets slow at higher pressure and temperature. Besides, the thermal expansion coefficient of UO 2 is much lower than that of other nuclear materials. (authors)

  18. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Debenedetti, Pablo G. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Biddle, John W.; Anisimov, Mikhail A., E-mail: anisimov@umd.edu [Institute of Physical Science and Technology and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-04-14

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures (“states”). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure.

  19. Two-state thermodynamics and the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition in supercooled TIP4P/2005 water

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Biddle, John W.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2016-01-01

    Water shows intriguing thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies in the supercooled liquid state. One possible explanation of the origin of these anomalies lies in the existence of a metastable liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two (high and low density) forms of water. While the anomalies are observed in experiments on bulk and confined water and by computer simulation studies of different water-like models, the existence of a LLPT in water is still debated. Unambiguous experimental proof of the existence of a LLPT in bulk supercooled water is hampered by fast ice nucleation which is a precursor of the hypothesized LLPT. Moreover, the hypothesized LLPT, being metastable, in principle cannot exist in the thermodynamic limit (infinite size, infinite time). Therefore, computer simulations of water models are crucial for exploring the possibility of the metastable LLPT and the nature of the anomalies. In this work, we present new simulation results in the NVT ensemble for one of the most accurate classical molecular models of water, TIP4P/2005. To describe the computed properties and explore the possibility of a LLPT, we have applied two-structure thermodynamics, viewing water as a non-ideal mixture of two interconvertible local structures (“states”). The results suggest the presence of a liquid-liquid critical point and are consistent with the existence of a LLPT in this model for the simulated length and time scales. We have compared the behavior of TIP4P/2005 with other popular water-like models, namely, mW and ST2, and with real water, all of which are well described by two-state thermodynamics. In view of the current debate involving different studies of TIP4P/2005, we discuss consequences of metastability and finite size in observing the liquid-liquid separation. We also address the relationship between the phenomenological order parameter of two-structure thermodynamics and the microscopic nature of the low-density structure.

  20. Towards a Predictive Thermodynamic Model of Oxidation States of Uranium Incorporated in Fe (hydr) oxides

    Bagus, Paul S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    -Level Excited States: Consequences For X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy”, J. Elec. Spectros. and Related Phenom., 200, 174 (2015) describes our first application of these methods. As well as applications to problems and materials of direct interest for our PNNL colleagues, we have pursued applications of fundamental theoretical significance for the analysis and interpretation of XPS and XAS spectra. These studies are important for the development of the fields of core-level spectroscopies as well as to advance our capabilities for applications of interest to our PNNL colleagues. An excellent example is our study of the surface core-level shifts, SCLS, for the surface and bulk atoms of an oxide that provides a new approach to understanding how the surface electronic of oxides differs from that in the bulk of the material. This work has the potential to lead to a new key to understanding the reactivity of oxide surfaces. Our theoretical studies use cluster models with finite numbers of atoms to describe the properties of condensed phases and crystals. This approach has allowed us to focus on the local atomistic, chemical interactions. For these clusters, we obtain orbitals and spinors through the solution of the Hartree-Fock, HF, and the fully relativistic Dirac HF equations. These orbitals are used to form configuration mixing wavefunctions which treat the many-body effects responsible for the open shell angular momentum coupling and for the satellites of the core-level spectra. Our efforts have been in two complementary directions. As well as the applications described above, we have placed major emphasis on the enhancement and extension of our theoretical and computational capabilities so that we can treat complex systems with a greater range of many-body effects. Noteworthy accomplishments in terms of method development and enhancement have included: (1) An improvement in our treatment of the large matrices that must be handled when many-body effects are treated. (2

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of intrinsic defects and Mg transmutants in 3C–SiC determined by density functional theory

    Hu, Shenyang; Setyawan, Wahyu; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Jiang, Weilin; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of transmutant Mg in 3C–SiC due to high-energy neutron irradiation associated with the fusion nuclear environment. The formation and binding energies of intrinsic defects, Mg-related defects, and clusters in 3C–SiC are systematically calculated. The minimum energy paths and activation energies during point defect migration and small cluster evolution are studied using a generalized solid-state nudged elastic band (G-SSNEB) method with DFT energy calculations. Stable defect structures and possible defect migration mechanisms are identified. The evolution of binding energies during Mg 2 Si formation demonstrates that the formation of Mg 2 Si needs to overcome a critical nucleus size and nucleation barrier. It is found that C vacancies promote the formation of the Mg 2 Si nucleus, and formation of which results in a compressive stress field around the nucleus. These data are important inputs in meso- and macro-scale modeling and experiments to understand and predict the impact of Mg on phase stability, microstructure evolution, and performance of SiC and SiC-based materials during long-term neutron exposures

  2. Thermodynamic properties of selenoether-functionalized ionic liquids and their use for the synthesis of zinc selenide nanoparticles.

    Klauke, Karsten; Zaitsau, Dzmitry H; Bülow, Mark; He, Li; Klopotowski, Maximilian; Knedel, Tim-Oliver; Barthel, Juri; Held, Christoph; Verevkin, Sergey P; Janiak, Christoph

    2018-04-03

    Three selenoether-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs) of N-[(phenylseleno)methylene]pyridinium (1), N-(methyl)- (2) and N-(butyl)-N'-[(phenylseleno)methylene]imidazolium (3) with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anions ([NTf2]) were prepared from pyridine, N-methylimidazole and N-butylimidazole with in situ obtained phenylselenomethyl chloride, followed by ion exchange to give the desired compounds. The crystal structures of the bromide and tetraphenylborate salts of the above cations (1-Br, 2-BPh4 and 3-BPh4) confirm the formation of the desired cations and indicate a multitude of different supramolecular interactions besides the dominating Coulomb interactions between the cations and anions. The vaporization enthalpies of the synthesized [NTf2]-containing ILs were determined by means of a quartz-crystal microbalance method (QCM) and their densities were measured with an oscillating U-tube. These thermodynamic data have been used to develop a method for assessment of miscibility of conventional solvents in the selenium-containing ILs by using Hildebrandt solubility parameters, as well as for modeling with the electrolyte perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (ePC-SAFT) method. Furthermore, structure-property relations between selenoether-functionalized and similarly shaped corresponding aryl-substituted imidazolium- and pyridinium-based ILs were analyzed and showed that the contribution of the selenium moiety to the enthalpy of vaporization of an IL is equal to the contribution of a methylene (CH2) group. An incremental approach to predict vaporization enthalpies of ILs by a group contribution method has been developed. The reaction of these ILs with zinc acetate dihydrate under microwave irradiation led to ZnSe nanoparticles of an average diameter between 4 and 10 nm, depending on the reaction conditions.

  3. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  4. On the thermodynamic stability of the generalized Chaplygin gas

    Santos, F.C.; Bedran, M.L.; Soares, V.

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this Letter is to discuss the temperature behavior and the thermodynamic stability of an exotic fluid known as generalized Chaplygin gas considering only general thermodynamics. This fluid is considered a perfect fluid which obeys an adiabatic equation of state like P=-A/ρ α , where P and ρ are respectively the pressure and energy density; the parameter A is a positive universal constant and α>0. It is remarked that if the energy density of the fluid is a function of volume only, the temperature of the fluid remains zero at any pressure or volume, violating the third law of thermodynamics. We have determined a scenario where its thermal equation of state depends on temperature only and the fluid presents thermodynamic stability during any expansion process. Such a scenario also reveals that the fluid cools down through the expansion without facing any critical point or phase transition

  5. On thermodynamic limits of entropy densities

    Moriya, H; Van Enter, A

    We give some sufficient conditions which guarantee that the entropy density in the thermodynamic limit is equal to the thermodynamic limit of the entropy densities of finite-volume (local) Gibbs states.

  6. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI), plutonium(VI) and americium(III) with HTTA/HPMBP using mono- and bi-functional neutral donors. Synergism and thermodynamics

    Pai, S.A.; Lohithakshan, K.V.; Mithapara, P.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of hexavalent uranium and plutonium as well as trivalent americium was studied in HNO 3 with thenoyl, trifluoro-acetone (HTTA)/1-phenyl, 3-methyl, 4-benzoyl pyrazolone-5 (HPMBP) in combination with neutral donors viz. DPSO, TBP, TOPO (mono-functional) and DBDECMP, DHDECMP, CMPO (bi-functional) with wide basicity range using benzene as diluent. A linear correlation was observed when the equilibrium constant log Ks for the organic phase synergistic reaction of both U(VI) and Pu(VI) with either of the chelating agents HTTA or HPMBP was plotted vs. the basicity (log Kh) of the donor (both mono- and bi-functional) indicating bi-functional donors also behave as mono-functional. This was supported by the thermodynamic data (ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 ) obtained for these systems. The organic phase adduct formation reactions were identified for the above systems from the thermodynamic data. In the Am(III) HTTA system log K s values of bi-functional donors were found to be very high and deviate from the linear plot (log K s vs. log K h ) obtained for mono-functional donors, indicating that they function as bi-functional for the Am(III)/HTTA) system studied. This was supported by high +ve ΔS 0 values obtained for this system. (author)

  7. Resting state functional connectivity predicts neurofeedback response

    Dustin eScheinost

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tailoring treatments to the specific needs and biology of individual patients – personalized medicine – requires delineation of reliable predictors of response. Unfortunately, these have been slow to emerge, especially in neuropsychiatric disorders. We have recently described a real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI neurofeedback protocol that can reduce contamination-related anxiety, a prominent symptom of many cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Individual response to this intervention is variable. Here we used patterns of brain functional connectivity, as measured by baseline resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI, to predict improvements in contamination anxiety after neurofeedback training. Activity of a region of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and anterior prefrontal cortex, Brodmann area (BA 10, associated with contamination anxiety in each subject was measured in real time and presented as a neurofeedback signal, permitting subjects to learn to modulate this target brain region. We have previously reported both enhanced OFC/BA 10 control and improved anxiety in a group of subclinically anxious subjects after neurofeedback. Five individuals with contamination-related OCD who underwent the same protocol also showed improved clinical symptomatology. In both groups, these behavioral improvements were strongly correlated with baseline whole-brain connectivity in the OFC/BA 10, computed from rs-fMRI collected several days prior to neurofeedback training. These pilot data suggest that rs-fMRI can be used to identify individuals likely to benefit from rt-fMRI neurofeedback training to control contamination anxiety.

  8. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of liquid di-isodecyl phthalate at temperature between (273 and 423) K and at pressures up to 140 MPa

    Peleties, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Segovia, J.J. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); Trusler, J.P.M., E-mail: m.trusler@imperial.ac.u [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Vega-Maza, D. [Grupo de Termodinamica y Calibracion (TERMOCAL), Dpto. Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, E.T.S. de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    We report measurements of the thermodynamic properties of liquid di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) and an equation of state determined therefrom. The speed of sound in DIDP was measured at temperatures between (293.15 and 413.15) K and a pressures between (0.1 and 140) MPa with a relative uncertainty of 0.1%. In addition, the isobaric specific heat capacity was measured at temperatures between (293.15 and 423.15) K at a pressure of 0.1 MPa with a relative uncertainty of 1%, and the density was measured at temperatures between (273.15 and 413.15) K at a pressure of 0.1 MPa with a relative uncertainty of 0.015%. The thermodynamic properties of DIDP were obtained from the measured speeds of sound by thermodynamic integration starting from the initial values of density and isobaric specific heat capacity obtained experimentally. The results have been represented by a new equation of state containing nine parameters with an uncertainty in density not worse than 0.025%. Comparisons with literature data are made.

  9. Thermodynamic properties and equation of state of liquid di-isodecyl phthalate at temperature between (273 and 423) K and at pressures up to 140 MPa

    Peleties, F.; Segovia, J.J.; Trusler, J.P.M.; Vega-Maza, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report measurements of the thermodynamic properties of liquid di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) and an equation of state determined therefrom. The speed of sound in DIDP was measured at temperatures between (293.15 and 413.15) K and a pressures between (0.1 and 140) MPa with a relative uncertainty of 0.1%. In addition, the isobaric specific heat capacity was measured at temperatures between (293.15 and 423.15) K at a pressure of 0.1 MPa with a relative uncertainty of 1%, and the density was measured at temperatures between (273.15 and 413.15) K at a pressure of 0.1 MPa with a relative uncertainty of 0.015%. The thermodynamic properties of DIDP were obtained from the measured speeds of sound by thermodynamic integration starting from the initial values of density and isobaric specific heat capacity obtained experimentally. The results have been represented by a new equation of state containing nine parameters with an uncertainty in density not worse than 0.025%. Comparisons with literature data are made.

  10. Contact Geometry of Mesoscopic Thermodynamics and Dynamics

    Miroslav Grmela

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution during which macroscopic systems reach thermodynamic equilibrium states proceeds as a continuous sequence of contact structure preserving transformations maximizing the entropy. This viewpoint of mesoscopic thermodynamics and dynamics provides a unified setting for the classical equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and statistical mechanics. One of the illustrations presented in the paper is a new version of extended nonequilibrium thermodynamics with fluxes as extra state variables.

  11. Nonclassical states of light with a smooth P function

    Damanet, François; Kübler, Jonas; Martin, John; Braun, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    There is a common understanding in quantum optics that nonclassical states of light are states that do not have a positive semidefinite and sufficiently regular Glauber-Sudarshan P function. Almost all known nonclassical states have P functions that are highly irregular, which makes working with them difficult and direct experimental reconstruction impossible. Here we introduce classes of nonclassical states with regular, non-positive-definite P functions. They are constructed by "puncturing" regular smooth positive P functions with negative Dirac-δ peaks or other sufficiently narrow smooth negative functions. We determine the parameter ranges for which such punctures are possible without losing the positivity of the state, the regimes yielding antibunching of light, and the expressions of the Wigner functions for all investigated punctured states. Finally, we propose some possible experimental realizations of such states.

  12. Critical systematic evaluation and thermodynamic optimization of the Mn–RE system: RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm

    Kim, Junghwan; Jung, In-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Mn–RE (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm) systems have been critically reviewed. ► The thermodynamic optimization of the Mn–RE systems have been performed. ► Systematic changes in the phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties were found. ► The systematic approach resolved inconsistencies in the experimental data. - Abstract: Critical evaluation and optimization of all available phase diagram and thermodynamic data for the Mn–RE (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm) systems have been conducted to obtain reliable thermodynamic functions of all the phases in the system. In the thermodynamic modeling, it is found that the Mn–RE systems show systematic changes in the phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties such as enthalpy of mixing in liquid state in the order of periodic number in the lanthanide series. This systematic thermodynamic modeling approach for all light RE elements can allow to resolve inconsistencies in the experimental data.

  13. Systems Ln-Fe-O ( Ln=Eu, Gd): thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides using solid-state electrochemical cells

    Parida, S. C.; Rakshit, S. K.; Dash, S.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2003-05-01

    The standard molar Gibbs energies of formation of LnFeO 3(s) and Ln3Fe 5O 12(s) where Ln=Eu and Gd have been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing different solid electrolytes. The reversible e.m.f.s of the following solid-state electrochemical cells have been measured in the temperature range from 1050 to 1255 K. Cell (I): (-)Pt / { LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln2O 3(s)+Fe(s)} // YDT/CSZ // {Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)} / Pt(+); Cell (II): (-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)}//CSZ//{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}/Pt(+); Cell (III): (-)Pt/{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}//YSZ//{Ni(s)+NiO(s)}/Pt(+); and Cell(IV):(-)Pt/{Fe(s)+Fe 0.95O(s)}//YDT/CSZ//{ LnFeO 3(s)+ Ln3Fe 5O 12(s)+Fe 3O 4(s)}/Pt(+). The oxygen chemical potentials corresponding to the three-phase equilibria involving the ternary oxides have been computed from the e.m.f. data. The standard Gibbs energies of formation of solid EuFeO 3, Eu 3Fe 5O 12, GdFeO 3 and Gd 3Fe 5O 12 calculated by the least-squares regression analysis of the data obtained in the present study are given by Δ fG°m(EuFeO 3, s) /kJ mol -1 (± 3.2)=-1265.5+0.2687( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1570), Δ fG°m(Eu 3Fe 5O 12, s)/kJ mol -1 (± 3.5)=-4626.2+1.0474( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1255), Δ fG°m(GdFeO 3, s) /kJ mol -1 (± 3.2)=-1342.5+0.2539( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1570), and Δ fG°m(Gd 3Fe 5O 12, s)/kJ·mol -1 (± 3.5)=-4856.0+1.0021( T/K) (1050 ⩽ T/K ⩽ 1255). The uncertainty estimates for Δ fG°m include the standard deviation in the e.m.f. and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. Based on the thermodynamic information, oxygen potential diagrams for the systems Eu-Fe-O and Gd-Fe-O and chemical potential diagrams for the system Gd-Fe-O were computed at 1250 K.

  14. Electrochemical determination of the oxidation potentials and the thermodynamic stability of the valence states of the transuranium elements in aqueous alkaline media

    Peretrukhin, V.F.; Spitsyn, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation potentials of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in the valance states from (III) to (VII) have been determined experimentally in 0.1-15 M NaOH. Heptavalent plutonium and americium are thermodynamically able to oxidize water with the evolution of oxygen in 0.1-15 M NaOH, neptunium(VII) in 0.1-7 M NaOH. All valance states of plutonium resist disproportionation in alkaline solutions; in the case of neptunium and americium only one disproportionation reaction is possible; of the hexavalent state in to penta- and heptavalent states. The degree of completion of the reaction can be calculated accurately from the oxidation potentials determined

  15. Determination of the thermodynamic state of concentrated hemoglobin solutions by means of small angle X-ray scattering

    Zinke, M.

    1979-01-01

    Exemplified by hemoglobin, the thermodynamic equilibrium properties of the dissolved macromolecular system could be determined solely from the small angle X-ray scattering of concentrated macromolecular solutions via the intermolecular structure of the dissolved macromolecules and their intermolecular potentials. From the scattering experiment on concentrated Hb solutions the concentration dependence of the following properties of the dissolved Hb system were determined: fluctuation, isothermic compressibility, internal energy, surface tension, and osmotic pressure. (author)

  16. Braun-Le Chatelier principle in dissipative thermodynamics

    Pavelka, Michal; Grmela, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Braun-Le Chatelier principle is a fundamental result of equilibrium thermodynamics, showing how stable equilibrium states shift when external conditions are varied. The principle follows from convexity of thermodynamic potential. Analogously, from convexity of dissipation potential it follows how steady non-equilibrium states shift when thermodynamic forces are varied, which is the extension of the principle to dissipative thermodynamics.

  17. Statistical thermodynamics

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1952-01-01

    Nobel Laureate's brilliant attempt to develop a simple, unified standard method of dealing with all cases of statistical thermodynamics - classical, quantum, Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac, and more.The work also includes discussions of Nernst theorem, Planck's oscillator, fluctuations, the n-particle problem, problem of radiation, much more.

  18. A density functional reactivity theory (DFRT) based approach to understand the effect of symmetry of fullerenes on the kinetic, thermodynamic and structural aspects of carbon NanoBuds

    Sarmah, Amrit; Roy, Ram Kinkar, E-mail: rkroy2@rediffmail.com

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of the interaction between fullerene (C{sub 32}) and SWCNT using CDASE scheme. • Role of symmetry of fullerenes as well as the site of covalent attachment to the SWCNT in the structural stability of the NanoBud structure. • Increase in the fullerene symmetry improves the relative stability of hybrid NanoBud structure. - Abstract: In the present study, we have rationalized the effect of variation in the symmetry of relatively smaller fullerene (C{sub 32}) on the mode of its interaction with semi-conducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the process of formation of stable hybrid carbon NanoBuds. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, along with the charge transfer values associated with the interaction between fullerene and SWCNTs, have been evaluated using an un-conventional and computationally cost–effective method based on density functional reactivity theory (DFRT). In addition to this, conventional DFT based studies are also performed to substantiate the growth of NanoBud structures formed by the interaction between fullerene and SWCNTs. The findings of the present study suggest that the kinetic, thermodynamic and structural aspects of hybrid carbon NanoBuds are significantly influenced by both the symmetry of C{sub 32} fullerene and its site of covalent attachment to the SWCNT.

  19. Calculation of the Aqueous Thermodynamic Properties of Citric Acid Cycle Intermediates and Precursors and the Estimation of High Temperature and Pressure Equation of State Parameters

    Mitchell Schulte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The citric acid cycle (CAC is the central pathway of energy transfer for many organisms, and understanding the origin of this pathway may provide insight into the origins of metabolism. In order to assess the thermodynamics of this key pathway for microorganisms that inhabit a wide variety of environments, especially those found in high temperature environments, we have calculated the properties and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for the major components of the CAC. While a significant amount of data is not available for many of the constituents of this fundamental pathway, methods exist that allow estimation of these missing data.

  20. Bifurcation and Stability Analysis of the Equilibrium States in Thermodynamic Systems in a Small Vicinity of the Equilibrium Values of Parameters

    Barsuk, Alexandr A.; Paladi, Florentin

    2018-04-01

    The dynamic behavior of thermodynamic system, described by one order parameter and one control parameter, in a small neighborhood of ordinary and bifurcation equilibrium values of the system parameters is studied. Using the general methods of investigating the branching (bifurcations) of solutions for nonlinear equations, we performed an exhaustive analysis of the order parameter dependences on the control parameter in a small vicinity of the equilibrium values of parameters, including the stability analysis of the equilibrium states, and the asymptotic behavior of the order parameter dependences on the control parameter (bifurcation diagrams). The peculiarities of the transition to an unstable state of the system are discussed, and the estimates of the transition time to the unstable state in the neighborhood of ordinary and bifurcation equilibrium values of parameters are given. The influence of an external field on the dynamic behavior of thermodynamic system is analyzed, and the peculiarities of the system dynamic behavior are discussed near the ordinary and bifurcation equilibrium values of parameters in the presence of external field. The dynamic process of magnetization of a ferromagnet is discussed by using the general methods of bifurcation and stability analysis presented in the paper.

  1. System DyFeO: thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides using Calvet calorimetry and solid-state electrochemical cell

    Parida, S. C.; Jacob, K. T.; Venugopal, V.

    2002-10-01

    The enthalpy increments and the standard molar Gibbs energies of formation of DyFeO 3(s) and Dy 3Fe 5O 12(s) have been measured using a Calvet micro-calorimeter and a solid oxide galvanic cell, respectively. A co-operative phase transition, related to anti-ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transformation, is apparent from the heat capacity data for DyFeO 3 at ˜648 K. A similar type of phase transition has been observed for Dy 3Fe 5O 12 at ˜560 K which is related to ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic transformation. Enthalpy increment data for DyFeO 3(s) and Dy 3Fe 5O 12(s), except in the vicinity of the second-order transition, can be represented by the following polynomial expressions: {H 0m(T)-H 0m(298.15 K)} ( J mol-1) (±1.1%)=-52754+142.9×(T ( K))+2.48×10 -3×(T ( K)) 2+2.951×10 6×(T ( K)) -1;(298.15⩽ T ( K)⩽1000) for DyFeO 3(s), and {H 0m(T)-H 0m(298.15 K)} ( J mol-1) (±1.2%)=-191048+545.0×(T ( K))+2.0×10 -5×(T ( K)) 2+8.513×10 6×(T ( K)) -1;(298.15⩽T ( K)⩽1000) for Dy 3Fe 5O 12(s). The reversible emfs of the solid-state electrochemical cells: (-)Pt/{DyFeO 3(s) + Dy 2O 3(s) + Fe(s)}//YDT/CSZ//{Fe(s) + Fe 0.95O(s)}/Pt(+) and (-)Pt/{Fe(s) + Fe 0.95O(s)}//CSZ//{DyFeO 3(s) + Dy 3Fe 5O 12(s) + Fe 3O 4(s)}/Pt(+), were measured in the temperature range from 1021 to 1250 K and 1035 to 1250 K, respectively. The standard Gibbs energies of formation of solid DyFeO 3 and Dy 3Fe 5O 12 calculated by the least squares regression analysis of the data obtained in the present study, and data for Fe 0.95O and Dy 2O 3 from the literature, are given by: Δ fG 0m( DyFeO3, s) ( kJ mol-1) (±3.2)=-1339.9+0.2473×(T ( K));(1021⩽T ( K)⩽1548) and Δ fG 0m( Dy3Fe5O12, s) ( kJ mol-1) (±3.5)=-4850.4+0.9846×(T ( K));(1035⩽T ( K)⩽1250). The uncertainty estimates for Δ fG 0m include the standard deviation in the emf and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. Based on the thermodynamic information, oxygen potential diagram and chemical potential diagrams for

  2. Chemical Thermodynamics and Information Theory with Applications

    Graham, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    Thermodynamics and information touch theory every facet of chemistry. However, the physical chemistry curriculum digested by students worldwide is still heavily skewed toward heat/work principles established more than a century ago. Rectifying this situation, Chemical Thermodynamics and Information Theory with Applications explores applications drawn from the intersection of thermodynamics and information theory--two mature and far-reaching fields. In an approach that intertwines information science and chemistry, this book covers: The informational aspects of thermodynamic state equations The

  3. One-point functions in AdS/dCFT from matrix product states

    Buhl-Mortensen, Isak; Leeuw, Marius de; Kristjansen, Charlotte; Zarembo, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    One-point functions of certain non-protected scalar operators in the defect CFT dual to the D3-D5 probe brane system with k units of world volume flux can be expressed as overlaps between Bethe eigenstates of the Heisenberg spin chain and a matrix product state. We present a closed expression of determinant form for these one-point functions, valid for any value of k. The determinant formula factorizes into the k=2 result times a k-dependent pre-factor. Making use of the transfer matrix of the Heisenberg spin chain we recursively relate the matrix product state for higher even and odd k to the matrix product state for k=2 and k=3 respectively. We furthermore find evidence that the matrix product states for k=2 and k=3 are related via a ratio of Baxter’s Q-operators. The general k formula has an interesting thermodynamical limit involving a non-trivial scaling of k, which indicates that the match between string and field theory one-point functions found for chiral primaries might be tested for non-protected operators as well. We revisit the string computation for chiral primaries and discuss how it can be extended to non-protected operators.

  4. Molecular excited states from the SCAN functional

    Tozer, David J.; Peach, Michael J. G.

    2018-06-01

    The performance of the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalised gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional is investigated for the calculation of time-dependent density-functional theory molecular excitation energies of local, charge-transfer and Rydberg character, together with the excited ? potential energy curve in H2. The SCAN results frequently resemble those obtained using a global hybrid functional, with either a standard or increased fraction of exact orbital exchange. For local excitations, SCAN can exhibit significant triplet instability problems, resulting in imaginary triplet excitation energies for a number of cases. The Tamm-Dancoff approximation offers a simple approach to improve the situation, but the excitation energies are still significantly underestimated. Understanding the origin of these (near)-triplet instabilities may provide useful insight into future functional development.

  5. First principles thermodynamics of alloys

    Ducastelle, F.

    1993-01-01

    We present a brief report on the methods of solid state physics (electronic structure, statistical thermodynamics) that allow us to discuss the phase stability of alloys and to determine their phase diagrams. (orig.)

  6. Wigner function and tomogram of the pair coherent state

    Meng, Xiang-Guo; Wang, Ji-Suo; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Using the entangled state representation of Wigner operator and the technique of integration within an ordered product (IWOP) of operators, the Wigner function of the pair coherent state is derived. The variations of the Wigner function with the parameters α and q in the ρ-γ phase space are discussed. The physical meaning of the Wigner function for the pair coherent state is given by virtue of its marginal distributions. The tomogram of the pair coherent state is calculated with the help of the Radon transform between the Wigner operator and the projection operator of the entangled state |η 1 ,η 2 ,τ 1 ,τ 2 >

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of biochemical systems

    Yuan, Y.; Fan, L.T.; Shieh, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction of the concepts of the availability (or exergy), datum level materials, and the dead state has been regarded as some of the most significant recent developments in classical thermodynamics. Not only the available energy balance but also the material and energy balances of a biological system may be established in reference to the datum level materials in the dead state or environment. In this paper these concepts are illustrated with two examples of fermentation and are shown to be useful in identifying sources of thermodynamic inefficiency, thereby leading naturally to the rational definition of thermodynamic efficiency of a biochemical process

  8. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of the Escherichia coli RelBE toxin-antitoxin system: indication for a functional role of differential stability

    Cherny, Izhack; Overgaard, Martin; Borch, Jonas

    2007-01-01

    on the folding and stability of the protein pair in solution. Here we structurally and thermodynamically characterize the RelBE system components from E. coli in solution, both separately and in their complexed state. The RelB antitoxin, an alpha-helical protein according to circular dichroism and infrared.......5 degrees C, and exhibits exceptional sensitivity to heat. Complex formation, accompanied by a structural transition, leads to a 12 degrees C increase in the TM and substantial heat resistance. Moreover, in vivo interaction and protein footprint experiments indicate that the C-terminal part of Rel...

  9. For effective thermodynamic calculation of turbines flow-through by gas and steam

    Fischer, S; Hultsch, M

    1982-03-01

    A programme system for the medium and multiple section calculation of axial-flow turbines is explained. It allows calculations of turbine flow-through by gas and steam at designing and partial load states. The algorithms are independent upon the formulation of thermodynamic function, so that the programmes can be used for any means of production. The highest accuracy and efficiency can be guaranteed by the use of formulations of thermodynamic functions of water.

  10. Changes in the convective population and thermodynamic environments in convection-permitting regional climate simulations over the United States

    Rasmussen, K. L.; Prein, A. F.; Rasmussen, R. M.; Ikeda, K.; Liu, C.

    2017-11-01

    Novel high-resolution convection-permitting regional climate simulations over the US employing the pseudo-global warming approach are used to investigate changes in the convective population and thermodynamic environments in a future climate. Two continuous 13-year simulations were conducted using (1) ERA-Interim reanalysis and (2) ERA-Interim reanalysis plus a climate perturbation for the RCP8.5 scenario. The simulations adequately reproduce the observed precipitation diurnal cycle, indicating that they capture organized and propagating convection that most climate models cannot adequately represent. This study shows that weak to moderate convection will decrease and strong convection will increase in frequency in a future climate. Analysis of the thermodynamic environments supporting convection shows that both convective available potential energy (CAPE) and convective inhibition (CIN) increase downstream of the Rockies in a future climate. Previous studies suggest that CAPE will increase in a warming climate, however a corresponding increase in CIN acts as a balancing force to shift the convective population by suppressing weak to moderate convection and provides an environment where CAPE can build to extreme levels that may result in more frequent severe convection. An idealized investigation of fundamental changes in the thermodynamic environment was conducted by shifting a standard atmospheric profile by ± 5 °C. When temperature is increased, both CAPE and CIN increase in magnitude, while the opposite is true for decreased temperatures. Thus, even in the absence of synoptic and mesoscale variations, a warmer climate will provide more CAPE and CIN that will shift the convective population, likely impacting water and energy budgets on Earth.

  11. Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Microstructural Evolution of the Compound Layer; a Comparison of the States of Knowledge of Nitriding and Nitrocarburising

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2000-01-01

    and atmospheric corrosion performance. The diffusion zone brings about an improvement of the endurance limit as compared to an untreated component. Hence, nitrocarburising is perhaps the most versatile surface treatment for ferritic steel and has a potential for wide application. From the literature...... conditions for tailoring a certain combination of properties. The present paper describes aspects of the thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure evolution of the compound layer on pure iron during nitrocarburising, by comparing the current status of qualitative understanding with that for nitriding...

  12. Statistical thermodynamics understanding the properties of macroscopic systems

    Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    Basic Principles of Statistical PhysicsMicroscopic and Macroscopic Description of StatesBasic PostulatesGibbs Ergodic AssumptionGibbsian EnsemblesExperimental Basis of Statistical MechanicsDefinition of Expectation ValuesErgodic Principle and Expectation ValuesProperties of Distribution FunctionRelative Fluctuation of an Additive Macroscopic ParameterLiouville TheoremGibbs Microcanonical EnsembleMicrocanonical Distribution in Quantum MechanicsDensity MatrixDensity Matrix in Energy RepresentationEntropyThermodynamic FunctionsTemperatureAdiabatic ProcessesPressureThermodynamic IdentityLaws of Th

  13. Theoretical calculation of reorganization energy for electron self-exchange reaction by constrained density functional theory and constrained equilibrium thermodynamics.

    Ren, Hai-Sheng; Ming, Mei-Jun; Ma, Jian-Yi; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2013-08-22

    Within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT), the diabatic or charge localized states of electron transfer (ET) have been constructed. Based on the diabatic states, inner reorganization energy λin has been directly calculated. For solvent reorganization energy λs, a novel and reasonable nonequilibrium solvation model is established by introducing a constrained equilibrium manipulation, and a new expression of λs has been formulated. It is found that λs is actually the cost of maintaining the residual polarization, which equilibrates with the extra electric field. On the basis of diabatic states constructed by CDFT, a numerical algorithm using the new formulations with the dielectric polarizable continuum model (D-PCM) has been implemented. As typical test cases, self-exchange ET reactions between tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and their corresponding ionic radicals in acetonitrile are investigated. The calculated reorganization energies λ are 7293 cm(-1) for TCNE/TCNE(-) and 5939 cm(-1) for TTF/TTF(+) reactions, agreeing well with available experimental results of 7250 cm(-1) and 5810 cm(-1), respectively.

  14. Application of computational thermodynamics to the determination of thermophysical properties as a function of temperature for multicomponent Al-based alloys

    Nascimento, Fabiana C. [Fluminense Federal University, Graduate Program in Metallurgical Engineering, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Paresque, Mara C.C. [Fluminense Federal University, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Castro, José A. de [Fluminense Federal University, Graduate Program in Metallurgical Engineering, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Jácome, Paulo A.D. [Fluminense Federal University, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Garcia, Amauri, E-mail: amaurig@fem.unicamp.br [University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Department of Manufacturing and Materials Engineering, 13083-860 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ferreira, Ivaldo L. [Fluminense Federal University, Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Av. dos Trabalhadores, 420-27255-125 Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-11-10

    Highlights: • A model coupled to a computational thermodynamics software is proposed to compute thermophysical properties. • The model applies to multicomponent alloys and has been validated against experimental results. • Density and specific heat as a function of temperature are computed for Al–Si–Cu alloys. - Abstract: Despite the technological importance of Al–Si–Cu alloys in manufacturing processes involving heat transfer, such as welding, casting and heat treatment, thermophysical properties of this system of alloys are very scarce in the literature. In this paper, a model connected to a computational thermodynamics software is proposed permitting density and specific heats as a function of temperature and enthalpy of transformations to be numerically determined. The model is pre-validated against experimental density as a function of temperature for liquid and solid phases of A319 and 7075 alloys found in the literature and validated against experimental density values for the solid phase of an Al-6 wt%Cu-1 wt%Si alloy determined in the present study. In both cases the numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. Specific heat and temperatures and heats of transformation are also numerically determined for this ternary Al-based alloy.

  15. Application of computational thermodynamics to the determination of thermophysical properties as a function of temperature for multicomponent Al-based alloys

    Nascimento, Fabiana C.; Paresque, Mara C.C.; Castro, José A. de; Jácome, Paulo A.D.; Garcia, Amauri; Ferreira, Ivaldo L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A model coupled to a computational thermodynamics software is proposed to compute thermophysical properties. • The model applies to multicomponent alloys and has been validated against experimental results. • Density and specific heat as a function of temperature are computed for Al–Si–Cu alloys. - Abstract: Despite the technological importance of Al–Si–Cu alloys in manufacturing processes involving heat transfer, such as welding, casting and heat treatment, thermophysical properties of this system of alloys are very scarce in the literature. In this paper, a model connected to a computational thermodynamics software is proposed permitting density and specific heats as a function of temperature and enthalpy of transformations to be numerically determined. The model is pre-validated against experimental density as a function of temperature for liquid and solid phases of A319 and 7075 alloys found in the literature and validated against experimental density values for the solid phase of an Al-6 wt%Cu-1 wt%Si alloy determined in the present study. In both cases the numerical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. Specific heat and temperatures and heats of transformation are also numerically determined for this ternary Al-based alloy.

  16. Low temperature measurements of the heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of pseudo-malachite Cu5(PO4)2(OH)4

    Bissengaliyeva, M.R.; Gogol, D.B.; Bekturganov, N.S.

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of the heat capacity of a natural specimen of copper phosphate—pseudo-malachite Cu 5 (PO 4 ) 2 (OH) 4 in the temperature range between 4.2 K and 320 K has been carried out by the method of low-temperature adiabatic calorimetry. Tabulated values of the heat capacity and thermodynamic functions of the mineral including the changes of entropy and enthalpy and the Gibbs function of free energy have been calculated. The standard values of thermodynamic functions of pseudo-malachite at T = 298.15 K are C p,m ° =(385.43±0.41)J mole −1  K −1 , Δ 0 T S m ° =(412.16±0.61)J mole −1  K −1 , Δ 0 T H m ° =(63681.5±57.0)J mole −1 , F m ° =(198.57±0.47)J mole −1  K −1 . In the low-temperature area 0 tr = (5.772 ± 0.081) J mole −1 K −1 , ΔH tr = (29.94 ± 0.42) J mole −1 .

  17. Thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function study of different TiCl3 crystalline phases: A theoretical approach

    Guo, Lei; Li, Wenpo; Feng, Wenjiang; Zhang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Shengtao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Three TiCl 3 polymorphs materials were systematically investigated. • Structural results agree well with experimental and available theoretical data. • Morphological and thermodynamic properties were computed and analyzed. • Core-level spectroscopy and work function were obtained. - Abstract: Computer simulation has been widely applied in many research fields owing to its superiority in revealing an insight understanding of the phenomena. In this work, the thermodynamics, core-level spectroscopy, morphology, and work function of TiCl 3 with three different crystalline phases (α, β, and γ) have been comprehensively computed employing the Materials Studio package. Our computational DFT-D approach gives a structural description of the TiCl 3 phases in good agreement with experiment. The core-level spectroscopy confirmed that α, β, and γ modifications for TiCl 3 have lightly affected on the valences of the constitutional elements. A series of possible growth faces (h k l) were deduced using the classic Bravais–Friedel–Donnay–Harker (BFDH) model. We conclude that the sequence of work function for (0 0 1) surface was α > β ≈ γ

  18. A Modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin Equation of State for the Thermodynamic Properties of R152a (1,1-difluoroethane)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L.; McLinden, Mark O.

    1996-03-01

    A modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) equation of state has been developed for R152a (1,1-difluoroethane). The correlation is based on a selection of available experimental thermodynamic property data. Single-phase pressure-volume-temperature (PVT), heat capacity, and sound speed data, as well as second virial coefficient, vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and saturated vapor density data, were used with multi-property linear least-squares fitting to determine the 32 adjustable coefficients of the MBWR equation. Ancillary equations representing the vapor pressure, saturated liquid and saturated vapor densities, and the ideal gas heat capacity were determined. Coefficients for the equation of state and the ancillary equations are given. Experimental data used in this work covered temperatures from 162 K to 453 K and pressures to 35 MPa. The MBWR equation established in this work may be used to predict thermodynamic properties of R152a from the triple-point temperature of 154.56 K to 500 K and for pressures up to 60 MPa except in the immediate vicinity of the critical point.

  19. Effect of relative humidity and temperature control on in-cabin thermal comfort state: Thermodynamic and psychometric analyses

    Alahmer, A.; Omar, M.A.; Mayyas, A.; Dongri, Shan

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the effect of manipulating the Relative Humidity RH of in-cabin environment on the thermal comfort and human occupants' thermal sensation. The study uses thermodynamic and psychometric analyses, to incorporate the effect of changing RH along with the dry bulb temperature on human comfort. Specifically, the study computes the effect of changing the relative humidity on the amount of heat rejected from the passenger compartment and the effect of relative humidity on occupants comfort zone. A practical system implementation is also discussed in terms of an evaporative cooler design. The results show that changing the RH along with dry bulb temperature inside vehicular cabins can improve the air conditioning efficiency by reducing the heat removed while improving the Human comfort sensations as measured by the Predicted Mean Value PMV and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied PPD indices. - Highlights: → Investigates the effect of controlling the RH and dry bulb temperature on in-cabin thermal comfort and sensation. → Conducts the thermodynamic and psychometric analyses for changing the RH and temperature for in-cabin air conditioning. → Discusses a possible system implementation through an evaporative cooler design.

  20. Solid state protein monolayers: Morphological, conformational, and functional properties

    Pompa, P. P.; Biasco, A.; Frascerra, V.; Calabi, F.; Cingolani, R.; Rinaldi, R.; Verbeet, M. Ph.; de Waal, E.; Canters, G. W.

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the morphological, conformational, and electron-transfer (ET) function of the metalloprotein azurin in the solid state, by a combination of physical investigation methods, namely atomic force microscopy, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. We demonstrate that a "solid state protein film" maintains its nativelike conformation and ET function, even after removal of the aqueous solvent.

  1. Pure state condition for the semi-classical Wigner function

    Ozorio de Almeida, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Wigner function W(p,q) is a symmetrized Fourier transform of the density matrix e(q 1 ,q 2 ), representing quantum-mechanical states or their statistical mixture in phase space. Identification of these two alternatives in the case of density matrices depends on the projection identity e 2 = e; its Wigner correspondence is the pure state condition. This criterion is applied to the Wigner functions botained from standard semiclassical wave functions, determining as pure states those whose classical invariant tori satisfy the generalized Bohr-Sommerfeld conditions. Superpositions of eigenstates are then examined and it is found that the Wigner function corresponding to Gaussian random wave functions are smoothed out in the manner of mixedstate Wigner functions. Attention is also given to the pure-state condition in the case where an angular coordinate is used. (orig.)

  2. Wigner Function of Thermo-Invariant Coherent State

    Xue-Fen, Xu; Shi-Qun, Zhu

    2008-01-01

    By using the thermal Winger operator of thermo-field dynamics in the coherent thermal state |ξ) representation and the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators, the Wigner function of the thermo-invariant coherent state |z,ℵ> is derived. The nonclassical properties of state |z,ℵ> is discussed based on the negativity of the Wigner function. (general)

  3. A primeira lei da termodinâmica dos processos homogêneos The first law of homogeneous processes thermodynamics

    Alessandro Ranulfo Lima Nery

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamics of homogeneous processes, which corresponds to the very special situation in thermodynamics of continuous media, is used to discuss the first law. An important part of this work is the exposition of some typical mathematical errors, frequently found in the traditional presentation of thermodynamics. The concepts of state and process functions are discussed, as well as reverse and reversible processes, temporality and its implications on thermodynamics, energy reservoirs and symmetry. Our proposal is to present the first law by using a time dependent viewpoint coherent with mechanics and the foundations of that viewpoint.

  4. On the evaluation of scalarproducts of nonlinear spinorfield state functionals

    Stumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    The metrical structure of the linear state space of a quantized nonlinear field cannot be given a priori. Rather it is determined by the dynamics of the field itself. For the evaluation of state norms and scalarproducts this metric must be known. In functional quantum theory the metrical structure is expressed by the metric tensor G(j) in functional space. Equivalent to the knowledge of G(j) is the knowledge of the set of dual state functionals ( vertical stroke S(j,a)>) together with the corresponding original state functionals ( vertical stroke F(j,a)>). In preceding papers attempts were made to calculate G(j). In this paper an approach is made to determine the dual state functionals directly. Equations are derived which have to be satisfied by the dual functionals. The method works in those state sectors which are characterized by real (monopole) particles or monopole ghosts, while it does not work for multipole ghost states. Norm calculations are performed for local monopole fermion states and local monopole boson states of the lepton- quark model derived in a preceding paper. (orig.)

  5. Hierarchical Functional Modularity in the Resting-State Human Brain

    Ferrarini, Luca; Veer, Ilya M.; Baerends, Evelinda; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Renken, Remco J.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Veltman, Dirk. J.; Aleman, Andre; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Milles, Julien

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that anatomically distinct brain regions are functionally connected during the resting state. Basic topological properties in the brain functional connectivity (BFC) map have highlighted the BFC's small-world topology. Modularity, a

  6. Hierarchical Functional Modularity in the Resting-State Human Brain

    Ferrarini, L.; Veer, I.M.; Baerends, E.; van Tol, M.J.; Renken, R.J.; van der Wee, N.J.A.; Veltman, D.J.; Aleman, A.; Zitman, F.G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; van Buchem, M.A.; Reiber, J.H.C.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Milles, J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that anatomically distinct brain regions are functionally connected during the resting state. Basic topological properties in the brain functional connectivity (BFC) map have highlighted the BFC's small-world topology. Modularity, a

  7. Fragile Thermodynamic Order

    Bernhoeft, N.; Lander, G.H.; Colineau, E.

    2003-01-01

    An asymmetric shift in the position of the magnetic Bragg peak with respect to the fiducial lattice has been observed by resonant X-ray scattering in a diverse series of antiferromagnetic compounds. This apparent violation of Bragg's law is interpreted in terms of a dynamically phased order parameter. We demonstrate the use of this effect as a novel probe of fragile or dynamic thermodynamic order in strongly correlated electronic systems. In particular, fresh light is shed on the paradoxical situation encountered in URu 2 Si 2 where the measured entropy gain on passing through T Neel is incompatible with the ground state moment estimated by neutron diffraction. The intrinsic space-time averaging of the probe used to characterise the thermodynamic macroscopic state may play a crucial and previously neglected role. In turn, this suggests the further use of resonant X-ray scattering in investigations of systems dominated by quantum fluctuations. (author)

  8. Ecosystem thermodynamics

    Gomez Palacio, German Rau

    1998-01-01

    Ecology is no more a descriptive and self-sufficient science. Many viewpoints are needed simultaneously to give a full coverage of such complex systems: ecosystems. These viewpoints come from physics, chemistry, and nuclear physics, without a new far from equilibrium thermodynamics and without new mathematical tools such as catastrophe theory, fractal theory, cybernetics and network theory, the development of ecosystem science would never have reached the point of today. Some ideas are presented about the importance that concept such as energy, entropy, exergy information and none equilibrium have in the analysis of processes taking place in ecosystems

  9. Thermodynamic metrics and optimal paths.

    Sivak, David A; Crooks, Gavin E

    2012-05-11

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  10. Characterization of the Elusive Conformers of Glycine from State-of-the-Art Structural, Thermodynamic, and Spectroscopic Computations: Theory Complements Experiment.

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Bloino, Julien; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2013-03-12

    A state-of-the-art computational strategy for the evaluation of accurate molecular structures as well as thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties along with the direct simulation of infrared (IR) and Raman spectra is established, validated (on the basis of the experimental data available for the Ip glycine conformer) and then used to provide a reliable and accurate characterization of the elusive IVn/gtt and IIIp/tct glycine conformers. The integrated theoretical model proposed is based on accurate post-Hartree-Fock computations (involving composite schemes) of energies, structures, properties, and harmonic force fields coupled to DFT corrections for the proper inclusion of vibrational effects at an anharmonic level (as provided by general second-order perturbative approach). It is shown that the approach presented here allows the evaluation of structural, thermodynamic, and spectroscopic properties with an overall accuracy of about, or better than, 0.001 Å, 20 MHz, 1 kJ·mol(-1), and 10 cm(-1) for bond distances, rotational constants, conformational enthalpies, and vibrational frequencies, respectively. The high accuracy of the computational results allows one to support and complement experimental studies, thus providing (i) an unequivocal identification of several conformers concomitantly present in the experimental mixture and (ii) data not available or difficult to experimentally derive.

  11. Black hole thermodynamical entropy

    Tsallis, Constantino; Cirto, Leonardo J.L.

    2013-01-01

    As early as 1902, Gibbs pointed out that systems whose partition function diverges, e.g. gravitation, lie outside the validity of the Boltzmann-Gibbs (BG) theory. Consistently, since the pioneering Bekenstein-Hawking results, physically meaningful evidence (e.g., the holographic principle) has accumulated that the BG entropy S BG of a (3+1) black hole is proportional to its area L 2 (L being a characteristic linear length), and not to its volume L 3 . Similarly it exists the area law, so named because, for a wide class of strongly quantum-entangled d-dimensional systems, S BG is proportional to lnL if d=1, and to L d-1 if d>1, instead of being proportional to L d (d ≥ 1). These results violate the extensivity of the thermodynamical entropy of a d-dimensional system. This thermodynamical inconsistency disappears if we realize that the thermodynamical entropy of such nonstandard systems is not to be identified with the BG additive entropy but with appropriately generalized nonadditive entropies. Indeed, the celebrated usefulness of the BG entropy is founded on hypothesis such as relatively weak probabilistic correlations (and their connections to ergodicity, which by no means can be assumed as a general rule of nature). Here we introduce a generalized entropy which, for the Schwarzschild black hole and the area law, can solve the thermodynamic puzzle. (orig.)

  12. The Wigner distribution function for squeezed vacuum superposed state

    Zayed, E.M.E.; Daoud, A.S.; AL-Laithy, M.A.; Naseem, E.N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we construct the Wigner distribution function for a single-mode squeezed vacuum mixed-state which is a superposition of the squeezed vacuum state. This state is defined as a P-representation for the density operator. The obtained Wigner function depends, beside the phase-space variables, on the mean number of photons occupied by the coherent state of the mode. This mean number relates to the mean free path through a given relation, which enables us to measure this number experimentally by measuring the mean free path

  13. Thermodynamic Optimality criteria for biological systems in linear irreversible thermodynamics

    Chimal, J C; Sánchez, N; Ramírez, PR

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the methodology of the so-called Linear Irreversible Thermodynamics (LIT) is applied; although traditionally used locally to study general systems in non-equilibrium states in which it is consider both internal and external contributions to the entropy increments in order to analyze the efficiency of two coupled processes with generalized fluxes J 1 , J 2 and their corresponding forces X 1 , X 2 . We extend the former analysis to takes into account two different operating regimes namely: Omega Function and Efficient Power criterion, respectively. Results show analogies in the optimal performance between and we can say that there exist a criteria of optimization which can be used specially for biological systems where a good design of the biological parameters made by nature at maximum efficient power conditions lead to more efficient engines than those at the maximum power conditions or ecological conditions. (paper)

  14. Identification of Resting State Networks Involved in Executive Function.

    Connolly, Joanna; McNulty, Jonathan P; Boran, Lorraine; Roche, Richard A P; Delany, David; Bokde, Arun L W

    2016-06-01

    The structural networks in the human brain are consistent across subjects, and this is reflected also in that functional networks across subjects are relatively consistent. These findings are not only present during performance of a goal oriented task but there are also consistent functional networks during resting state. It suggests that goal oriented activation patterns may be a function of component networks identified using resting state. The current study examines the relationship between resting state networks measured and patterns of neural activation elicited during a Stroop task. The association between the Stroop-activated networks and the resting state networks was quantified using spatial linear regression. In addition, we investigated if the degree of spatial association of resting state networks with the Stroop task may predict performance on the Stroop task. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the Stroop activated network can be decomposed into a number of resting state networks, which were primarily associated with attention, executive function, visual perception, and the default mode network. The close spatial correspondence between the functional organization of the resting brain and task-evoked patterns supports the relevance of resting state networks in cognitive function.

  15. Factor structure of functional state of primary school age children

    Davidenko O.V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The examination of primary school children to determine the ranking of significant factors that determine the structure of their functional state depending on the level of physical health. It is shown that the main factor in the structure of the functional state of younger schoolchildren in low-and lower-middle level of physical fitness is selected morpho-functional status, which characterizes the functions of the body at rest. For children with average or above average level of physical fitness is a leading factor in physical fitness of schoolchildren.

  16. Characteristics of a pure-state ambiguity function

    Praxmeyer, Ludmila; Vitanov, Nikolay; Stenholm, Stig

    2009-01-01

    We present the necessary and sufficient condition for a square integrable function on R 2N to be an ambiguity function corresponding to a square integrable function on R N . This condition has the form of an integral equation. We also list some easier to check necessary conditions that must be fulfilled by a function that is an ambiguity function of a pure state. We show how to construct a wavefunction corresponding to a given ambiguity function and we present examples of how our formal results can be used in practice.

  17. Thermodynamical description of excited nuclei

    Bonche, P.

    1989-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions it has been possible to obtain composite systems at rather high excitation energies corresponding to temperatures of several MeV. The theoretical studies of these systems are based on concepts borrowed from thermodynamics or statistical physics, such as the temperature. In these lectures, we present the concepts of statistical physics which are involved in the physics of heavy ion as they are produced nowadays in the laboratory and also during the final stage of a supernova collapse. We do not attempt to describe the reaction mechanisms which yield such nuclear systems nor their decay by evaporation or fragmentation. We shall only study their static properties. The content of these lectures is organized in four main sections. The first one gives the basic features of statistical physics and thermodynamics necessary to understand quantum mechanics at finite temperature. In the second one, we present a study of the liquid-gas phase transition in nuclear physics. A phenomenological approach of the stability of hot nuclei follows. The microscopic point of view is proposed in the third part. Starting from the basic concepts derived in the first part, it provides a description of excited or hot nuclei which confirms the qualitative results of the second part. Furthermore it gives a full description of most properties of these nuclei as a function of temperature. Finally in the last part, a microscopic derivation of the equation of state of nuclear matter is proposed to study the collapse of a supernova core

  18. Wigner function for the generalized excited pair coherent state

    Meng Xiangguo; Wang Jisuo; Liang Baolong; Li Hongqi

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the generalized excited pair coherent state (GEPCS). Using the entangled state |η> representation of Wigner operator, it obtains the Wigner function for the GEPCS. In the ρ-γ phase space, the variations of the Wigner function distributions with the parameters q, α, k and l are discussed. The tomogram of the GEPCS is calculated with the help of the Radon transform between the Wigner operator and the projection operator of the entangled state |η 1 , η 2 , τ 1 , τ 2 >. The entangled states |η> and η 1 , η 2 , τ 1 , τ 2 > provide two good representative space for studying the Wigner functions and tomograms of various two-mode correlated quantum states

  19. [Impact of frailty over the functional state of hospitalized elderly].

    García-Cruz, Juan Carlos; García-Peña, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Frailty in elderly results from impaired physiological reserve in multiple systems. Establishing if frail elderly inpatients develop more functional impairment at discharge, will allow the development of strategies for preventing or limiting the deterioration in this vulnerable group. Prospective cohort in 133 elderly inpatients. At admission, frailty, functional status, comorbidity and comprehensive geriatric evaluation were determined. The main outcome was functional state at hospital discharge. 64 patients presented frailty (48.1%) and 69 did not present that state (51.9%), with a mean age of 73 and 68 years, respectively. Mean decrement in functional state at discharge was -8.06 % (IC 95 % -10.38 to -5.74), from 97.97 % to 89.91 % (p model, frailty (beta -14.73, IC 95 % -19.39 to -10.07, p decrement. Frailty independently predicts functional impairment at hospital discharge.

  20. A simple scaling law for the equation of state and the radial distribution functions calculated by density-functional theory molecular dynamics

    Danel, J.-F.; Kazandjian, L.

    2018-06-01

    It is shown that the equation of state (EOS) and the radial distribution functions obtained by density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) obey a simple scaling law. At given temperature, the thermodynamic properties and the radial distribution functions given by a DFT-MD simulation remain unchanged if the mole fractions of nuclei of given charge and the average volume per atom remain unchanged. A practical interest of this scaling law is to obtain an EOS table for a fluid from that already obtained for another fluid if it has the right characteristics. Another practical interest of this result is that an asymmetric mixture made up of light and heavy atoms requiring very different time steps can be replaced by a mixture of atoms of equal mass, which facilitates the exploration of the configuration space in a DFT-MD simulation. The scaling law is illustrated by numerical results.

  1. Conductivity and thermodynamic characteristic of superionic transition in strontium chloride

    Voronin, B.M.; Prisyazhnyj, V.D.

    1989-01-01

    Electric conductivity of strontium polycrystalline chloride in the wide temperature range including melting point is measured. Reciprocally caused anomalous behaviour of kinetic and thermodynamic properties, which relates to peculiarities of salt transition to a superionic state is established in the region of high temperatures. Thermodynamic functions corresponding to crystal anion sublattice disordering are determined and characterized. Comparative analysis of data on strontium chloride and other structural-like salts testifies about step-by-step washing-out character of superionic transition, and the depth of transition (the degree of disordering) reached at melting points relates regularly to relative sizes of cations and anions in the fluorite lattice

  2. Structure-function relationships during segregated and integrated network states of human brain functional connectivity.

    Fukushima, Makoto; Betzel, Richard F; He, Ye; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Sporns, Olaf

    2018-04-01

    Structural white matter connections are thought to facilitate integration of neural information across functionally segregated systems. Recent studies have demonstrated that changes in the balance between segregation and integration in brain networks can be tracked by time-resolved functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data and that fluctuations between segregated and integrated network states are related to human behavior. However, how these network states relate to structural connectivity is largely unknown. To obtain a better understanding of structural substrates for these network states, we investigated how the relationship between structural connectivity, derived from diffusion tractography, and functional connectivity, as measured by rs-fMRI, changes with fluctuations between segregated and integrated states in the human brain. We found that the similarity of edge weights between structural and functional connectivity was greater in the integrated state, especially at edges connecting the default mode and the dorsal attention networks. We also demonstrated that the similarity of network partitions, evaluated between structural and functional connectivity, increased and the density of direct structural connections within modules in functional networks was elevated during the integrated state. These results suggest that, when functional connectivity exhibited an integrated network topology, structural connectivity and functional connectivity were more closely linked to each other and direct structural connections mediated a larger proportion of neural communication within functional modules. Our findings point out the possibility of significant contributions of structural connections to integrative neural processes underlying human behavior.

  3. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  4. The OpenCalphad thermodynamic software interface

    Sundman, Bo; Kattner, Ursula R; Sigli, Christophe; Stratmann, Matthias; Le Tellier, Romain; Palumbo, Mauro; Fries, Suzana G

    2017-01-01

    Thermodynamic data are needed for all kinds of simulations of materials processes. Thermodynamics determines the set of stable phases and also provides chemical potentials, compositions and driving forces for nucleation of new phases and phase transformations. Software to simulate materials properties needs accurate and consistent thermodynamic data to predict metastable states that occur during phase transformations. Due to long calculation times thermodynamic data are frequently pre-calculated into “lookup tables” to speed up calculations. This creates additional uncertainties as data must be interpolated or extrapolated and conditions may differ from those assumed for creating the lookup table. Speed and accuracy requires that thermodynamic software is fully parallelized and the Open-Calphad (OC) software is the first thermodynamic software supporting this feature. This paper gives a brief introduction to computational thermodynamics and introduces the basic features of the OC software and presents four different application examples to demonstrate its versatility. PMID:28260838

  5. Thermodynamical quantum information sharing

    Wiesniak, M.; Vedral, V.; Brukner, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thermodynamical properties fully originate from classical physics and can be easily measured for macroscopic systems. On the other hand, entanglement is a widely spoken feature of quantum physics, which allows to perform certain task with efficiency unavailable with any classical resource. Therefore an interesting question is whether we can witness entanglement in a state of a macroscopic sample. We show, that some macroscopic properties, in particular magnetic susceptibility, can serve as an entanglement witnesses. We also study a mutual relation between magnetic susceptibility and magnetisation. Such a complementarity exhibits quantum information sharing between these two thermodynamical quantities. Magnetization expresses properties of individual spins, while susceptibility might reveal non-classical correlations as a witness. Therefore, a rapid change of one of these two quantities may mean a phase transition also in terms of entanglement. The complementarity relation is demonstrated by an analytical solution of an exemplary model. (author)

  6. A commentary on thermodynamics

    Day, William Alan

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this book is to comment on, and clarify, the mathematical aspects of the theory of thermodynamics. The standard presentations of the subject are often beset by a number of obscurities associated with the words "state", "reversible", "irreversible", and "quasi-static". This book is written in the belief that such obscurities are best removed not by the formal axiomatization of thermodynamics, but by setting the theory in the wider context of a genuine field theory which incorporates the effects of heat conduction and intertia, and proving appropriate results about the governing differential equations of this field theory. Even in the simplest one-dimensional case it is a nontrivial task to carry through the details of this program, and many challenging problems remain open.

  7. Teaching Differentials in Thermodynamics Using Spatial Visualization

    Wang, Chih-Yueh; Hou, Ching-Han

    2012-01-01

    The greatest difficulty that is encountered by students in thermodynamics classes is to find relationships between variables and to solve a total differential equation that relates one thermodynamic state variable to two mutually independent state variables. Rules of differentiation, including the total differential and the cyclic rule, are…

  8. Thermodynamics of Crystals

    Navrotsky, Alexandra

    Thermodynamics of Crystals is a gold mine of a references bargain with more derivations of useful equations per dollar, or per page, than almost any other book I know. Useful to whom? To the solid state physicist, the solid state chemist working the geophysicist, the rock mechanic, the mineral physicist. Useful for what? For lattice dynamics, crystal potentials, band structure. For elegant, rigorous, and concise derivations of fundamental equations. For comparison of levels of approximation. For some data and physical insights, especially for metals and simple halides. This book is a reissue, with some changes and additions, of a 1970 treatise. It ages well, since the fundamentals do not change.

  9. The effect of hydroxyl groups on the stability and thermodynamic properties of polyhydroxylated xanthones as calculated by density functional theory

    Qu, Ruijuan; Liu, Hongxia; Zhang, Qi; Flamm, Alison; Yang, Xi; Wang, Zunyao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The strength of the hydrogen bonds existed in PHOXTHs is ascertained. ► Good linear relations exist between the thermodynamic properties and N PHOS . ► The relative stability order of PHOXTH congeners is theoretically proposed. ► There is a good relation between C p,m and the temperature. - Abstract: There are three types of intramolecular hydrogen bonds with bond energy about 52 kJ mol −1 , 12 kJ mol −1 , 20 kJ mol −1 , respectively in PHOXTHs which were determined by computation on B3LYP/6-311G** level. The internal rotational potentials of the hydroxy group of 1-MHOXTH and 4′-MHOXTH are evaluated, and the influences of the spatial orientation of the hydroxy groups on the intramolecular hydrogen bonds and molecular stability are illustrated. The standard enthalpy of formation (Δ f H θ ) and standard Gibbs energy of formation (Δ f G θ ) for the most stable conformation of 135 PHOXTHs are calculated by the combination of Gaussian 03 and isodesmic reactions and the theoretical order of relative stability is proposed according to the relative magnitude of calculated Δ f G θ values. In addition, the values of molar heat capacities at constant pressure (C p,m ) from 200 to 1000 K for PHOXTH congeners are calculated.

  10. Thermodynamic model of a solid with RKKY interaction and magnetoelastic coupling

    Balcerzak, T.; Szałowski, K.; Jaščur, M.

    2018-04-01

    Thermodynamic description of a model system with magnetoelastic coupling is presented. The elastic, vibrational, electronic and magnetic energy contributions are taken into account. The long-range RKKY interaction is considered together with the nearest-neighbour direct exchange. The generalized Gibbs potential and the set of equations of state are derived, from which all thermodynamic functions are self-consistently obtained. Thermodynamic properties are calculated numerically for FCC structure for arbitrary external pressure, magnetic field and temperature, and widely discussed. In particular, for some parameters of interaction potential and electron concentration corresponding to antiferromagnetic phase, the existence of negative thermal expansion coefficient is predicted.

  11. Thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild and the Reissner–Nordström black holes with quintessence

    K. Ghaderi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the thermodynamics of the Schwarzschild and the Reissner–Nordström black holes surrounded by quintessence. By using the thermodynamical laws of the black holes, we derive the thermodynamic properties of these black holes and we compare the results with each other. We investigate the mass, temperature and heat capacity as functions of entropy for these black holes. We also discuss the equation of state of the Schwarzschild and the Reissner–Nordström black holes surrounded by quintessence.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of poly(phenylene-pyridyl) dendrons of the second and the third generations

    Smirnova, Natalia N.; Samosudova, Yanina S.; Markin, Alexey V.; Serkova, Elena S.; Kuchkina, Nina V.; Shifrina, Zinaida B.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We report thermodynamic properties for poly(phenylene-pyridyl) dendrons of the second and the third generations. • The thermodynamic quantities of devitrification and fusion have been determined. • Thermodynamic functions for the temperature range from T → 0 to 520 K for different physical states were calculated. • The dependences of thermodynamic properties of the dendrons on their composition and structure have been obtained. - Abstract: The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of poly(phenylene-pyridyl) dendrons of the second and the third generations have been measured by the method of adiabatic vacuum and differential scanning calorimetry over the range from 6 K to (500–520) K in the present research. Phase transformations have been detected and their thermodynamic characteristics have been estimated and analysed in the above temperature range. The standard thermodynamic functions, namely, the heat capacity C p 0 (T), enthalpy H°(T) − H°(0), entropy S°(T) − S°(0) and potential Φ m °, for the range from T → 0 K to (500–520) K and the standard entropy of formation of the dendrons in different physical states at T = 298.15 K have been calculated based on the experimental results. The thermodynamic characteristics of the samples under study and investigated earlier, poly(phenylene-pyridyl) dendrons decorated with dodecyl groups of the same generations have been compared and discussed.

  13. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, maximum entropy production and Earth-system evolution.

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-01-13

    The present-day atmosphere is in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This uniqueness is for instance reflected in the high concentration of molecular oxygen and the low relative humidity in the atmosphere. Given that the concentration of atmospheric oxygen has likely increased throughout Earth-system history, we can ask whether this trend can be generalized to a trend of Earth-system evolution that is directed away from thermodynamic equilibrium, why we would expect such a trend to take place and what it would imply for Earth-system evolution as a whole. The justification for such a trend could be found in the proposed general principle of maximum entropy production (MEP), which states that non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems maintain steady states at which entropy production is maximized. Here, I justify and demonstrate this application of MEP to the Earth at the planetary scale. I first describe the non-equilibrium thermodynamic nature of Earth-system processes and distinguish processes that drive the system's state away from equilibrium from those that are directed towards equilibrium. I formulate the interactions among these processes from a thermodynamic perspective and then connect them to a holistic view of the planetary thermodynamic state of the Earth system. In conclusion, non-equilibrium thermodynamics and MEP have the potential to provide a simple and holistic theory of Earth-system functioning. This theory can be used to derive overall evolutionary trends of the Earth's past, identify the role that life plays in driving thermodynamic states far from equilibrium, identify habitability in other planetary environments and evaluate human impacts on Earth-system functioning. This journal is © 2010 The Royal Society

  14. Hamiltonian and Thermodynamic Modeling of Quantum Turbulence

    Grmela, Miroslav

    2010-10-01

    The state variables in the novel model introduced in this paper are the fields playing this role in the classical Landau-Tisza model and additional fields of mass, entropy (or temperature), superfluid velocity, and gradient of the superfluid velocity, all depending on the position vector and another tree dimensional vector labeling the scale, describing the small-scale structure developed in 4He superfluid experiencing turbulent motion. The fluxes of mass, momentum, energy, and entropy in the position space as well as the fluxes of energy and entropy in scales, appear in the time evolution equations as explicit functions of the state variables and of their conjugates. The fundamental thermodynamic relation relating the fields to their conjugates is left in this paper undetermined. The GENERIC structure of the equations serves two purposes: (i) it guarantees that solutions to the governing equations, independently of the choice of the fundamental thermodynamic relation, agree with the observed compatibility with thermodynamics, and (ii) it is used as a guide in the construction of the novel model.

  15. State-related functional integration and functional segregation brain networks in schizophrenia.

    Yu, Qingbao; Sui, Jing; Kiehl, Kent A; Pearlson, Godfrey; Calhoun, Vince D

    2013-11-01

    Altered topological properties of brain connectivity networks have emerged as important features of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate how the state-related modulations to graph measures of functional integration and functional segregation brain networks are disrupted in schizophrenia. Firstly, resting state and auditory oddball discrimination (AOD) fMRI data of healthy controls (HCs) and schizophrenia patients (SZs) were decomposed into spatially independent components (ICs) by group independent component analysis (ICA). Then, weighted positive and negative functional integration (inter-component networks) and functional segregation (intra-component networks) brain networks were built in each subject. Subsequently, connectivity strength, clustering coefficient, and global efficiency of all brain networks were statistically compared between groups (HCs and SZs) in each state and between states (rest and AOD) within group. We found that graph measures of negative functional integration brain network and several positive functional segregation brain networks were altered in schizophrenia during AOD task. The metrics of positive functional integration brain network and one positive functional segregation brain network were higher during the resting state than during the AOD task only in HCs. These findings imply that state-related characteristics of both functional integration and functional segregation brain networks are impaired in schizophrenia which provides new insight into the altered brain performance in this brain disorder. © 2013.

  16. Fragmentation of single-particle states and neutron strength functions

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    Fragmentation of one-particle states in odd deformed nuclei is studied in the framework of a model based on the interaction between quasiparticles and phonons. A principally new semi-microscopic method for calculation of force functions using the data on fragmentation of one-particle states is suggested. Calculated s- and p-wave neutron force functions in 239 U and 169 Er are in good agreement with experiment. The correct description of the s-wave neutron force function in the vicinity of is obtained in particular for Sn isotopes/ of its minimum is obtained in particular for Sn isotopes

  17. Image-potential states and work function of graphene

    Niesner, Daniel; Fauster, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Image-potential states of graphene on various substrates have been investigated by two-photon photoemission and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. They are used as a probe for the graphene-substrate interaction and resulting changes in the (local) work function. The latter is driven by the work function difference between graphene and the substrate. This results in a charge transfer which also contributes to core-level shifts in x-ray photoemission. In this review article, we give an overview over the theoretical models and the experimental data for image-potential states and work function of graphene on various substrates. (topical review)

  18. Thermodynamic properties of organic compounds estimation methods, principles and practice

    Janz, George J

    1967-01-01

    Thermodynamic Properties of Organic Compounds: Estimation Methods, Principles and Practice, Revised Edition focuses on the progression of practical methods in computing the thermodynamic characteristics of organic compounds. Divided into two parts with eight chapters, the book concentrates first on the methods of estimation. Topics presented are statistical and combined thermodynamic functions; free energy change and equilibrium conversions; and estimation of thermodynamic properties. The next discussions focus on the thermodynamic properties of simple polyatomic systems by statistical the

  19. Towards Thermodynamics with Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    Moussa, Mohamed; Farag Ali, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Various frameworks of quantum gravity predict a modification in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle to a so-called generalized uncertainty principle (GUP). Introducing quantum gravity effect makes a considerable change in the density of states inside the volume of the phase space which changes the statistical and thermodynamical properties of any physical system. In this paper we investigate the modification in thermodynamic properties of ideal gases and photon gas. The partition function is calculated and using it we calculated a considerable growth in the thermodynamical functions for these considered systems. The growth may happen due to an additional repulsive force between constitutes of gases which may be due to the existence of GUP, hence predicting a considerable increase in the entropy of the system. Besides, by applying GUP on an ideal gas in a trapped potential, it is found that GUP assumes a minimum measurable value of thermal wavelength of particles which agrees with discrete nature of the space that has been derived in previous studies from the GUP

  20. Rydberg energies using excited state density functional theory

    Cheng, C.-L.; Wu Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-01-01

    We utilize excited state density functional theory (eDFT) to study Rydberg states in atoms. We show both analytically and numerically that semilocal functionals can give quite reasonable Rydberg energies from eDFT, even in cases where time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) fails catastrophically. We trace these findings to the fact that in eDFT the Kohn-Sham potential for each state is computed using the appropriate excited state density. Unlike the ground state potential, which typically falls off exponentially, the sequence of excited state potentials has a component that falls off polynomially with distance, leading to a Rydberg-type series. We also address the rigorous basis of eDFT for these systems. Perdew and Levy have shown using the constrained search formalism that every stationary density corresponds, in principle, to an exact stationary state of the full many-body Hamiltonian. In the present context, this means that the excited state DFT solutions are rigorous as long as they deliver the minimum noninteracting kinetic energy for the given density. We use optimized effective potential techniques to show that, in some cases, the eDFT Rydberg solutions appear to deliver the minimum kinetic energy because the associated density is not pure state v-representable. We thus find that eDFT plays a complementary role to constrained DFT: The former works only if the excited state density is not the ground state of some potential while the latter applies only when the density is a ground state density.

  1. Thermodynamic consideration and ground-state search of icosahedral boron subselenide B12(B1-xSex) 2 from a first-principles cluster expansion

    Ektarawong, A.

    2018-05-01

    The phase stability of icosahedral boron subselenide B12(B1-xSex) 2 , where 0.5 ≤x ≤1 , is explored using a first-principles cluster expansion. The results shows that, instead of a continuous solid solution, B12(B1-xSex) 2 is thermodynamically stable as an individual line compound at the composition of B9.5Se . The ground-state configuration of B9.5Se is represented by a mixture of B12(Se-Se), B12(B-Se), and B12(Se-B) with a ratio of 1:1:1, where they form a periodic A B C A B C ⋯ stacking sequence of B12(Se-Se), B12(B-Se), and B12(Se-B) layers along the c axis of the hexagonal conventional unit cell. The structural and electronic properties of the ground-state B9.5Se are also derived and discussed. By comparing the derived ground-state properties of B9.5Se to the existing experimental data of boron subselenide B˜13Se , I proposed that the as-synthesized boron subselenide B˜13Se , as reported in the literature, has the actual composition of B9.5Se .

  2. Thermodynamic properties of antiferromagnetic ordered states of π -d interacting systems of κ -(BETS) 2Fe X4(X =Br ,Cl )

    Fukuoka, Shuhei; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujiwara, Hideki; Shirahata, Takashi; Takahashi, Kazuko

    2016-06-01

    The results are presented for systematic heat capacity measurements of π-d interacting systems of κ -(BETS) 2Fe Br4 and κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 [BETS = bis(ethylenedithio)tetraselenafulvalene] performed under in-plane magnetic fields. We observed sharp thermal anomalies at 2.47 K for κ -(BETS) 2FeB r4 and at 0.47 K for κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 at 0 T that are associated with antiferromagnetic transitions of the 3 d electrons in the anion layers. From analyses of the magnetic heat capacity data, we indicate that the two compounds show unconventional thermodynamic behaviors inherent in the π-d interacting layered system. In the case of κ -(BETS) 2FeB r4 , a small hump structure was observed in the magnetic heat capacity below the transition temperature when a magnetic field was applied parallel to the a axis. In the case of κ -(BETS) 2FeC l4 , a similar hump structure was observed at 0 T that remained in the data with magnetic fields applied parallel to the a axis. We demonstrate that the temperature dependencies of the magnetic heat capacities scale well by normalizing the temperatures with dominant one-dimensional direct interactions (Jdd/kB) of each compound. The field dependencies of the transition temperatures and the hump structures are elucidated in one simple magnetic field vs temperature (H -T ) phase diagram. These results indicate that the thermodynamic features of both κ-type BETS salts are essentially equivalent, and the observed hump structures are derived from the one-dimensional Jdd interaction characters, which are still influential for magnetic features even in the long-range magnetic ordered states.

  3. Geometric description of BTZ black hole thermodynamics

    Quevedo, Hernando; Sanchez, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    We study the properties of the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states of the Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole in (2+1) gravity. We use the formalism of geometrothermodynamics to introduce in the space of equilibrium states a two-dimensional thermodynamic metric whose curvature is nonvanishing, indicating the presence of thermodynamic interaction, and free of singularities, indicating the absence of phase transitions. Similar results are obtained for generalizations of the BTZ black hole which include a Chern-Simons term and a dilatonic field. Small logarithmic corrections of the entropy turn out to be represented by small corrections of the thermodynamic curvature, reinforcing the idea that thermodynamic curvature is a measure of thermodynamic interaction.

  4. Hierarchical functional modularity in the resting-state human brain.

    Ferrarini, Luca; Veer, Ilya M; Baerends, Evelinda; van Tol, Marie-José; Renken, Remco J; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dirk J; Aleman, André; Zitman, Frans G; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Buchem, Mark A; Reiber, Johan H C; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Milles, Julien

    2009-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that anatomically distinct brain regions are functionally connected during the resting state. Basic topological properties in the brain functional connectivity (BFC) map have highlighted the BFC's small-world topology. Modularity, a more advanced topological property, has been hypothesized to be evolutionary advantageous, contributing to adaptive aspects of anatomical and functional brain connectivity. However, current definitions of modularity for complex networks focus on nonoverlapping clusters, and are seriously limited by disregarding inclusive relationships. Therefore, BFC's modularity has been mainly qualitatively investigated. Here, we introduce a new definition of modularity, based on a recently improved clustering measurement, which overcomes limitations of previous definitions, and apply it to the study of BFC in resting state fMRI of 53 healthy subjects. Results show hierarchical functional modularity in the brain. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  5. An extended hybrid density functional (X3LYP) with improved descriptions of nonbond interactions and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems

    Xu, Xin; Zhang, Qingsong; Muller, Richard P.; Goddard, William A., III

    2005-01-01

    We derive here the form for the exact exchange energy density for a density that decays with Gaussian-type behavior at long range. This functional is intermediate between the B88 and the PW91 exchange functionals. Using this modified functional to match the form expected for Gaussian densities, we propose the X3LYP extended functional. We find that X3LYP significantly outperforms Becke three parameter Lee–Yang–Parr (B3LYP) for describing van der Waals and hydrogen bond interactions, while per...

  6. Characterizing Resting-State Brain Function Using Arterial Spin Labeling

    Jann, Kay; Wang, Danny J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an increasingly established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that is finding broader applications in studying the healthy and diseased brain. This review addresses the use of ASL to assess brain function in the resting state. Following a brief technical description, we discuss the use of ASL in the following main categories: (1) resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measurement: the use of ASL-based cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements as an alternative to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) technique to assess resting-state FC; (2) the link between network CBF and FC measurements: the use of network CBF as a surrogate of the metabolic activity within corresponding networks; and (3) the study of resting-state dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and cerebral metabolism: the use of dynamic CBF information obtained using ASL to assess dynamic CBF-BOLD coupling and oxidative metabolism in the resting state. In addition, we summarize some future challenges and interesting research directions for ASL, including slice-accelerated (multiband) imaging as well as the effects of motion and other physiological confounds on perfusion-based FC measurement. In summary, this work reviews the state-of-the-art of ASL and establishes it as an increasingly viable MRI technique with high translational value in studying resting-state brain function. PMID:26106930

  7. Unified geometric description of black hole thermodynamics

    Alvarez, Jose L.; Quevedo, Hernando; Sanchez, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    In the space of thermodynamic equilibrium states we introduce a Legendre invariant metric which contains all the information about the thermodynamics of black holes. The curvature of this thermodynamic metric becomes singular at those points where, according to the analysis of the heat capacities, phase transitions occur. This result is valid for the Kerr-Newman black hole and all its special cases and, therefore, provides a unified description of black hole phase transitions in terms of curvature singularities.

  8. Thermodynamic and transport properties of sodium liquid and vapor

    Fink, J.K.; Leibowitz, L.

    1995-01-01

    Data have been reviewed to obtain thermodynamically consistent equations for thermodynamic and transport properties of saturated sodium liquid and vapor. Recently published Russian recommendations and results of equation of state calculations on thermophysical properties of sodium have been included in this critical assessment. Thermodynamic properties of sodium liquid and vapor that have been assessed include: enthalpy, heat capacity at constant pressure, heat capacity at constant volume, vapor pressure, boiling point, enthalpy of vaporization, density, thermal expansion, adiabatic and isothermal compressibility, speed of sound, critical parameters, and surface tension. Transport properties of liquid sodium that have been assessed include: viscosity and thermal conductivity. For each property, recommended values and their uncertainties are graphed and tabulated as functions of temperature. Detailed discussions of the analyses and determinations of the recommended equations include comparisons with recommendations given in other assessments and explanations of consistency requirements. The rationale and methods used in determining the uncertainties in the recommended values are also discussed

  9. Thermodynamic properties of a liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimer

    Samosudova, Ya. S.; Markin, A. V.; Smirnova, N. N.; Ogurtsov, T. G.; Boiko, N. I.; Shibaev, V. P.

    2016-11-01

    The temperature dependence of the heat capacity of a first-generation liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimer with methoxyphenyl benzoate end groups is studied for the first time in the region of 6-370 K by means of precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Physical transformations are observed in this interval of temperatures, and their standard thermodynamic characteristics are determined and discussed. Standard thermodynamic functions C p ° ( T), H°( T) - H°(0), S°( T) - S°(0), and G°( T) - H°(0) are calculated from the obtained experimental data for the region of T → 0 to 370 K. The standard entropy of formation of the dendrimer in the partially crystalline state at T = 298.15 K is calculated, and the standard entropy of the hypothetic reaction of its synthesis at this temperature is estimated. The thermodynamic properties of the studied dendrimer are compared to those of second- and fourth-generation liquid crystal carbosilane dendrimers with the same end groups studied earlier.

  10. Excited-State N2 Dissociation Pathway on Fe-Functionalized Au.

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-29

    Localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) offer the possibility of light-activated chemical catalysis on surfaces of strongly plasmonic metal nanoparticles. This technology relies on lower-barrier bond formation and/or dissociation routes made available through energy transfer following the eventual decay of LSPRs. The coupling between these decay processes and a chemical trajectory (nuclear motion, charge-transfer, intersystem crossing, etc.) dictates the availability of these alternative (possibly lower barrier) excited-state channels. The Haber-Bosch method of NH 3 synthesis from N 2 and H 2 is notoriously energy intensive. This is due to the difficulty of N 2 dissociation despite the overall reaction being thermodynamically favorable at ambient temperatures and pressures. LSPRs may provide means to improve the kinetics of N 2 dissociation via induced resonance electronic excitation. In this work, we calculate, via embedded n-electron valence second-order perturbation theory within the density functional embedding theory, the excited-state potential energy surfaces for dissociation of N 2 on an Fe-doped Au(111) surface. This metal alloy may take advantage simultaneously of the strong LSPR of Au and the catalytic activity of Fe toward N 2 dissociation. We find the ground-state dissociation activation energy to be 4.74 eV/N 2 , with Fe as the active site on the surface. Consecutive resonance energy transfers (RETs) may be accessed due to the availability of many electronically excited states with intermediate energies arising from the metal surface that may couple to states induced by the Fe-dopant and the adsorbate molecule, and crossing between excited states may effectively lower the dissociation barrier to 1.33 eV. Our work illustrates that large energetic barriers, prohibitive toward chemical reaction, may be overcome through multiple RETs facilitating an otherwise difficult chemical process.

  11. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  12. Thermodynamics Far from the Thermodynamic Limit.

    de Miguel, Rodrigo; Rubí, J Miguel

    2017-11-16

    Understanding how small systems exchange energy with a heat bath is important to describe how their unique properties can be affected by the environment. In this contribution, we apply Landsberg's theory of temperature-dependent energy levels to describe the progressive thermalization of small systems as their spectrum is perturbed by a heat bath. We propose a mechanism whereby the small system undergoes a discrete series of excitations and isentropic spectrum adjustments leading to a final state of thermal equilibrium. This produces standard thermodynamic results without invoking system size. The thermal relaxation of a single harmonic oscillator is analyzed as a model example of a system with a quantized spectrum than can be embedded in a thermal environment. A description of how the thermal environment affects the spectrum of a small system can be the first step in using environmental factors, such as temperature, as parameters in the design and operation of nanosystem properties.

  13. Solubility and thermodynamic function of a bioactive compound bergenin in various pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents at different temperatures

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; AlAjmi, Mohamed F.; Haq, Nazrul; Siddiqui, Nasir A.; Alam, Perwez; Al-Rehaily, Adnan J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of bergenin in eleven different neat solvents was measured. • The mole fraction solubilities of bergenin were observed highest in PEG-400. • Measured solubilities were correlated well with Apelblat and van’t Hoff models. • Bergenin’s dissolution was recorded as endothermic. - Abstract: Bergenin is neither a highly lipophilic nor a highly hydrophilic bioactive compound due to which its dissolution and permeation are poor which results in poor oral bioavailability. The solubility data of bergenin are scarce in literature. Therefore, in this study, the solubility of bergenin was determined in eleven different pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents namely water, ethanol, isopropanol (IPA), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), 1-butanol, 2-butanol, ethyl acetate (EA), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) and Transcutol at five different temperatures (T = 298.15 K–318.15 K) and atmospheric pressure (p = 0.1 MPa). Experimental solubility expressed in mole fraction of bergenin was correlated with semi-empirical models. Root mean square deviations were recorded <1% for the Apelblat model and <2% for the van’t Hoff model. The mole fraction solubility of bergenin was recorded highest in PEG-400 (4.15 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K) followed by DMSO (2.30 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), Transcutol (2.28 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), PG (1.19 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), EG (1.17 × 10"−"2 at T = 318.15 K), ethanol (7.77 × 10"−"3 at T = 318.15 K), IPA (1.69 × 10"−"3 at T = 318.15 K), EA (6.71 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K), 2-butanol (5.14 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K), 1-butanol (4.92 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K) and water (1.87 × 10"−"4 at T = 318.15 K). The results of apparent thermodynamic analysis in terms of standard enthalpy indicated that the dissolution of bergenin is endothermic in all pharmaceutically acceptable neat solvents. The solubility results of this study could be useful in

  14. Solubility and thermodynamic function of a new anticancer drug ibrutinib in 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol + water mixtures at different temperatures

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; Salem-Bekhit, Mounir M.; Iqbal, Muzaffar; Haq, Nazrul

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is a recently approved anticancer drug recommended for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It has been reported as practically insoluble in water and hence it is available in the market at higher doses. Poor solubility of ibrutinib limits its development to oral solid dosage forms only. In this work, the solubilities of ibrutinib were measured in various 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol (Carbitol) + water mixtures at T = (298.15 to 323.15) and p = 0.1 MPa. The solubility of ibrutinib was measured using an isothermal method. The thermodynamics function of ibrutinib was also studied. The measured solubilities of ibrutinib were correlated and fitted with Van’t Hoff, the modified Apelblat and Yalkowsky models. The results of curve fitting of all three models showed good correlation of experimental solubilities of ibrutinib with calculated ones. The mole fraction solubility of ibrutinib was observed highest in pure 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol (2.67 · 10 −2 at T = 298.15 K) and lowest in pure water (1.43 · 10 −7 at T = 298.15 K) at T = (298.15 to 323.15) K. Thermodynamics data of ibrutinib showed an endothermic, spontaneous and an entropy-driven dissolution behavior of ibrutinib in all 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol + water mixtures. Based on these results, ibrutinib has been considered as practically insoluble in water and freely soluble in 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol. Therefore, 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol could be used as a physiologically compatible cosolvent for solubilization and stabilization of ibrutinib in an aqueous media. The solubility data of this work could be extremely useful in preformulation studies and formulation development of ibrutinib

  15. Thermodynamic Properties of Alkali Metal Hydroxides. Part II. Potassium, Rubidium, and Cesium Hydroxides

    Gurvich, L.V.; Bergman, G.A.; Gorokhov, L.N.; Iorish, V.S.; Leonidov, V.Y.; Yungman, V.S.

    1997-01-01

    The data on thermodynamic and molecular properties of the potassium, rubidium and cesium hydroxides have been collected, critically reviewed, analyzed, and evaluated. Tables of the thermodynamic properties [C p circ , Φ=-(G -H(0)/T, S, H -H(0), Δ f H, Δ f G)] of these hydroxides in the condensed and gaseous states have been calculated using the results of the analysis and some estimated values. The recommendations are compared with earlier evaluations given in the JANAF Thermochemical Tables and Thermodynamic Properties of Individual Substances. The properties considered are: the temperature and enthalpy of phase transitions and fusion, heat capacities, spectroscopic data, structures, bond energies, and enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K. The thermodynamic functions in solid, liquid, and gaseous states are calculated from T=0 to 2000 K for substances in condensed phase and up to 6000 K for gases. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society

  16. Thermodynamics of an Attractive 2D Fermi Gas

    Fenech, K.; Dyke, P.; Peppler, T.; Lingham, M. G.; Hoinka, S.; Hu, H.; Vale, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties of matter are conveniently expressed as functional relations between variables known as equations of state. Here we experimentally determine the compressibility, density, and pressure equations of state for an attractive 2D Fermi gas in the normal phase as a function of temperature and interaction strength. In 2D, interacting gases exhibit qualitatively different features to those found in 3D. This is evident in the normalized density equation of state, which peaks at intermediate densities corresponding to the crossover from classical to quantum behavior.

  17. Discrete Wigner function and quantum-state tomography

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    1996-05-01

    The theory of discrete Wigner functions and of discrete quantum-state tomography [U. Leonhardt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4101 (1995)] is studied in more detail guided by the picture of precession tomography. Odd- and even-dimensional systems (angular momenta and spins, bosons, and fermions) are considered separately. Relations between simple number theory and the quantum mechanics of finite-dimensional systems are pointed out. In particular, the multicomplementarity of the precession states distinguishes prime dimensions from composite ones.

  18. A solution thermodynamics definition of the fiber saturation point and the derivation of a wood-water phase (state) diagram

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Samuel V. Glass; Joseph E. Jakes; Donald S. Stone

    2016-01-01

    The fiber saturation point (FSP) is an important concept in wood– moisture relations that differentiates between the states of water in wood and has been discussed in the literature for over 100 years. Despite its importance and extensive study, the exact theoretical definition of the FSP and the operational definition (the correct way to measure the FSP) are still...

  19. On asymptotic continuity of functions of quantum states

    Synak-Radtke, Barbara; Horodecki, Michal

    2006-01-01

    A useful kind of continuity of quantum states functions in asymptotic regime is so-called asymptotic continuity. In this letter, we provide general tools for checking if a function possesses this property. First we prove equivalence of asymptotic continuity with so-called robustness under admixture. This allows us to show that relative entropy distance from a convex set including a maximally mixed state is asymptotically continuous. Subsequently, we consider arrowing-a way of building a new function out of a given one. The procedure originates from constructions of intrinsic information and entanglement of formation. We show that arrowing preserves asymptotic continuity for a class of functions (so-called subextensive ones). The result is illustrated by means of several examples. (letter to the editor)

  20. Energy field of thermodynamic syste'ms

    Volchenkova, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    To reveal the qualitative and quantitative rules, regulating the properties of macro- and microsystems consideration is being given to the dependence of system enthalpy on environmental conditions. It was concluded that the dependence of material system enthalpy on temperature represents the energy field, containing the energy boundaries of phase states, described by exponential functions, in which the elements are arranged monotonically in the sequence of change of interatomic bonds, correlated with their physicomechanical properties; energy boundaries of phase states at that emanate from a single point, which is a reference a single point, which a reference one for the whole material system and determining its energy state in initial position. The presented energy field of thermodynamic systems enables to consider the change of their physicomechanical properties and energy state in dynamic process, depending on environmental parameters. Energy characteristics of single-component systems (W, Re, Hf, Nb, Mo etc) are given

  1. Uniqueness of thermodynamic projector and kinetic basis of molecular individualism

    Gorban, Alexander N.; Karlin, Iliya V.

    2004-05-01

    Three results are presented: First, we solve the problem of persistence of dissipation for reduction of kinetic models. Kinetic equations with thermodynamic Lyapunov functions are studied. Uniqueness of the thermodynamic projector is proven: There exists only one projector which transforms any vector field equipped with the given Lyapunov function into a vector field with the same Lyapunov function for a given anzatz manifold which is not tangent to the Lyapunov function levels. Second, we use the thermodynamic projector for developing the short memory approximation and coarse-graining for general nonlinear dynamic systems. We prove that in this approximation the entropy production increases. ( The theorem about entropy overproduction.) In example, we apply the thermodynamic projector to derive the equations of reduced kinetics for the Fokker-Planck equation. A new class of closures is developed, the kinetic multipeak polyhedra. Distributions of this type are expected in kinetic models with multidimensional instability as universally as the Gaussian distribution appears for stable systems. The number of possible relatively stable states of a nonequilibrium system grows as 2 m, and the number of macroscopic parameters is in order mn, where n is the dimension of configuration space, and m is the number of independent unstable directions in this space. The elaborated class of closures and equations pretends to describe the effects of “molecular individualism”. This is the third result.

  2. Bethe ansatz approach to quantum sine Gordon thermodynamics and finite temperature excitations

    Zotos, X.

    1982-01-01

    Takahashi and Suzuki (TS) using the Bethe ansatz method developed a formalism for the thermodynamics of the XYZ spin chain. Translating their formalism to the quantum sine-Gordon system, the thermodynamics and finite temperature elementary excitations are analyzed. Criteria imposed by TS on the allowed states simply correspond to the condition of normalizability of the wave functions. A set of coupled nonlinear integral equations for the thermodynamic equilibrium densities for particular values of the coupling constant in the attractive regime is derived. Solving numerically these Bethe ansatz equations, curves of the specific heat as a function of temperature are obtained. The soliton contribution peaks at a temperature of about 0.4 soliton masses shifting downward as the classical limit is approached. The weak coupling regime is analyzed by deriving the Bethe ansatz equations including the charged vacuum excitations. It is shown that they are necessary for a consistent presentation of the thermodynamics

  3. Understanding squeezing of quantum states with the Wigner function

    Royer, Antoine

    1994-01-01

    The Wigner function is argued to be the only natural phase space function evolving classically under quadratic Hamiltonians with time-dependent bilinear part. This is used to understand graphically how certain quadratic time-dependent Hamiltonians induce squeezing of quantum states. The Wigner representation is also used to generalize Ehrenfest's theorem to the quantum uncertainties. This makes it possible to deduce features of the quantum evolution, such as squeezing, from the classical evolution, whatever the Hamiltonian.

  4. Dynamic Thermodynamics with Internal Energy, Volume, and Amount of Moles as States : Application to Liquefied Gas Tank

    Arendsen, A. R. J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic models for process design, optimization, and control usually solve a set of heat and/or mass balances as a function of time and/or position in the process. To obtain more robust dynamic models and to minimize the amount of assumptions, internal energy, volume, and amount of moles are chosen

  5. Thermodynamic properties of vitamin B_9

    Knyazev, A.V.; Emel’yanenko, V.N.; Shipilova, A.S.; Lelet, M.I.; Gusarova, E.V.; Knyazeva, S.S.; Verevkin, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B_9 has been measured by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. • The thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B_9 have been determined for the range from T → 0 to 333 K. • The character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. • Enthalpy of combustion of the vitamin B_9 was measured using high-precision combustion calorimeter. - Abstract: In the present work temperature dependence of heat capacity of vitamin B_9 (folic acid dihydrate) has been measured for the first time in the range from (6 to 333) K by precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. Based on the experimental values, the thermodynamic functions of the vitamin B_9, namely, the heat capacity, enthalpy H°(T) − H°(0), entropy S°(T) − S°(0) and Gibbs function G°(T) − H°(0) have been determined for the range from T → (0 to 333) K. The value of the fractal dimension D in the function of multifractal generalization of Debye’s theory of the heat capacity of solids was estimated and the character of heterodynamics of structure was detected. Enthalpy of combustion (−8942.8 ± 7.5) kJ·mol"−"1 of the vitamin B_9 was measured for the first time using a high-precision combustion calorimeter. The standard molar enthalpy of formation in the crystalline state (−1821.0 ± 7.9) kJ·mol"−"1 of B_9 at 298.15 K was derived from the combustion experiments. Using a combination of the adiabatic and combustion calorimetry results, the thermodynamic functions of formation of the folic acid dihydrate at T = 298.15 K and p = 0.1 MPa have been calculated. The low-temperature X-ray diffraction was used for the determination of coefficients of thermal expansion.

  6. Unifying mechanical and thermodynamic descriptions across the thioredoxin protein family.

    Mottonen, James M; Xu, Minli; Jacobs, Donald J; Livesay, Dennis R

    2009-05-15

    We compare various predicted mechanical and thermodynamic properties of nine oxidized thioredoxins (TRX) using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). The DCM is based on a nonadditive free energy decomposition scheme, where entropic contributions are determined from rigidity and flexibility of structure based on distance constraints. We perform averages over an ensemble of constraint topologies to calculate several thermodynamic and mechanical response functions that together yield quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR). Applied to the TRX protein family, QSFR metrics display a rich variety of similarities and differences. In particular, backbone flexibility is well conserved across the family, whereas cooperativity correlation describing mechanical and thermodynamic couplings between the residue pairs exhibit distinctive features that readily standout. The diversity in predicted QSFR metrics that describe cooperativity correlation between pairs of residues is largely explained by a global flexibility order parameter describing the amount of intrinsic flexibility within the protein. A free energy landscape is calculated as a function of the flexibility order parameter, and key values are determined where the native-state, transition-state, and unfolded-state are located. Another key value identifies a mechanical transition where the global nature of the protein changes from flexible to rigid. The key values of the flexibility order parameter help characterize how mechanical and thermodynamic response is linked. Variation in QSFR metrics and key characteristics of global flexibility are related to the native state X-ray crystal structure primarily through the hydrogen bond network. Furthermore, comparison of three TRX redox pairs reveals differences in thermodynamic response (i.e., relative melting point) and mechanical properties (i.e., backbone flexibility and cooperativity correlation) that are consistent with experimental data on thermal stabilities

  7. An extended hybrid density functional (X3LYP) with improved descriptions of nonbond interactions and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems

    Xu, Xin; Zhang, Qingsong; Muller, Richard P.; Goddard, William A.

    2005-01-01

    We derive here the form for the exact exchange energy density for a density that decays with Gaussian-type behavior at long range. This functional is intermediate between the B88 and the PW91 exchange functionals. Using this modified functional to match the form expected for Gaussian densities, we propose the X3LYP extended functional. We find that X3LYP significantly outperforms Becke three parameter Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) for describing van der Waals and hydrogen bond interactions, while performing slightly better than B3LYP for predicting heats of formation, ionization potentials, electron affinities, proton affinities, and total atomic energies as validated with the extended G2 set of atoms and molecules. Thus X3LYP greatly enlarges the field of applications for density functional theory. In particular the success of X3LYP in describing the water dimer (with Re and De within the error bars of the most accurate determinations) makes it an excellent candidate for predicting accurate ligand-protein and ligand-DNA interactions.

  8. Introduction to the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz

    van Tongeren, Stijn J.

    2016-08-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz, a method that allows us to describe the thermodynamics of integrable models whose spectrum is found via the (asymptotic) Bethe ansatz. We set the stage by deriving the Fermi-Dirac distribution and associated free energy of free electrons, and then in a similar though technically more complicated fashion treat the thermodynamics of integrable models, focusing first on the one-dimensional Bose gas with delta function interaction as a clean pedagogical example, secondly the XXX spin chain as an elementary (lattice) model with prototypical complicating features in the form of bound states, and finally the {SU}(2) chiral Gross-Neveu model as a field theory example. Throughout this discussion we emphasize the central role of particle and hole densities, whose relations determine the model under consideration. We then discuss tricks that allow us to use the same methods to describe the exact spectra of integrable field theories on a circle, in particular the chiral Gross-Neveu model. We moreover discuss the simplification of TBA equations to Y systems, including the transition back to integral equations given sufficient analyticity data, in simple examples.

  9. Quantum thermodynamics

    Beretta, G.P.; Gyftopoulos, E.P.; Park, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    A novel nonlinear equation of motion is proposed for a general quantum system consisting of more than one distinguishable elementary constituent of matter. In the domain of idempotent quantum-mechanical state operators, it is satisfied by all unitary evolutions generated by the Schroedinger equation. But in the broader domain of nonidempotent state operators not contemplated by conventional quantum mechanics, it generates a generally nonunitary evolution, it keeps the energy invariant and causes the entropy to increase with time until the system reaches a state of equilibrium or a limit cycle

  10. Advanced adsorption cooling cum desalination cycle: A thermodynamic framework

    Chakraborty, Anutosh; Thu, Kyaw; Ng, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a thermodynamic framework to calculate adsorption cooling cum desalination cycle performances as a function of pore widths and pore volumes of highly porous adsorbents, which are formulated from the rigor of thermodynamic property

  11. Ab initio thermodynamic model for magnesium carbonates and hydrates.

    Chaka, Anne M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2014-09-04

    An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first-principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogues of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite, which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

  12. Thermodynamics of phase transitions

    Cofta, H.

    1972-01-01

    The phenomenology of the phase transitions has been considered. The definitions of thermodynamic functions and parameters, as well as those of the phase transitions, are given and some of the relations between those quantities are discussed. The phase transitions classification proposed by Ehrenfest has been described. The most important features of phase transitions are discussed using the selected physical examples including the critical behaviour of ferromagnetic materials at the Curie temperature and antiferromagnetic materials at the Neel temperature. Some aspects of the Ehrenfest's equations, that have been derived, for the interfacial lines and surfaces are considered as well as the role the notion of interfaces. (S.B.)

  13. Enhanced adsorption of hydroxyl contained/anionic dyes on non functionalized Ni@SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles: Kinetic and thermodynamic profile

    Jiang, Zhifeng, E-mail: ntjiangzf@sina.com; Xie, Jimin, E-mail: xiejm391@sohu.com; Jiang, Deli, E-mail: jiangdeli100@yahoo.com; Yan, Zaoxue, E-mail: yanzaoxue@163.com; Jing, Junjie, E-mail: jingjj1975@163.com; Liu, Dong, E-mail: 919457966@qq.com

    2014-02-15

    A green and low-cost adsorbent with both magnetic property and high adsorption capacity was prepared on the basis of nickel magnetic core with silica shell. The surface of the prepared Ni@SiO{sub 2} composite was not modified. The influence of different functional groups and different charged of the dyes on the adsorption process on the non functionalized Ni@SiO{sub 2} have been studied. The results indicated that synthesized adsorbent exhibited higher adsorption capacity for dyes with negative charge/hydroxyl groups as compared to dyes with positive charge/without hydroxyl groups due to the hydrogen bonding interaction and electrostatic interaction between the adsorbent and dyes. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms experiments were carried out and the results indicated that the adsorption process was fitted by pseudo second order kinetics and Freundlich model. The binding of these dyes with magnetic adsorbent surface mainly involves physical adsorption according to D–R model. Furthermore, the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic as studied from adsorption thermodynamics. The value of ΔH° and mean free energy further confirmed that physical adsorption is the major adsorption process. After regeneration, the adsorbent still shows high adsorption capacity even for 4 cycles of desorption–adsorption.

  14. Friction Force: From Mechanics to Thermodynamics

    Ferrari, Christian; Gruber, Christian

    2010-01-01

    We study some mechanical problems in which a friction force is acting on a system. Using the fundamental concepts of state, time evolution and energy conservation, we explain how to extend Newtonian mechanics to thermodynamics. We arrive at the two laws of thermodynamics and then apply them to investigate the time evolution and heat transfer of…

  15. Understanding the Thermodynamics of Biological Order

    Peterson, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    By growth in size and complexity (i.e., changing from more probable to less probable states), plants and animals appear to defy the second law of thermodynamics. The usual explanation describes the input of nutrient and sunlight energy into open thermodynamic systems. However, energy input alone does not address the ability to organize and create…

  16. Thermodynamic tables to accompany Modern engineering thermodynamics

    Balmer, Robert T

    2011-01-01

    This booklet is provided at no extra charge with new copies of Balmer's Modern Engineering Thermodynamics. It contains two appendices. Appendix C contains 40 thermodynamic tables, and Appendix D consists of 6 thermodynamic charts. These charts and tables are provided in a separate booklet to give instructors the flexibility of allowing students to bring the tables into exams. The booklet may be purchased separately if needed.

  17. Mean-field approximation for thermodynamic and spectral functions of correlated electrons: strong coupling and arbitrary band filling

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav; Kauch, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 16 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 165113. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14259S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : parquet equations * Hubbard model * self-consistency Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  18. Classical and statistical thermodynamics

    Rizk, Hanna A

    2016-01-01

    This is a text book of thermodynamics for the student who seeks thorough training in science or engineering. Systematic and thorough treatment of the fundamental principles rather than presenting the large mass of facts has been stressed. The book includes some of the historical and humanistic background of thermodynamics, but without affecting the continuity of the analytical treatment. For a clearer and more profound understanding of thermodynamics this book is highly recommended. In this respect, the author believes that a sound grounding in classical thermodynamics is an essential prerequisite for the understanding of statistical thermodynamics. Such a book comprising the two wide branches of thermodynamics is in fact unprecedented. Being a written work dealing systematically with the two main branches of thermodynamics, namely classical thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics, together with some important indexes under only one cover, this treatise is so eminently useful.

  19. Simplified calculation of nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium excited state populations contributing to 13.5 nm emission in a tin plasma

    White, J.; Cummings, A.; Dunne, P.; Hayden, P.; O'Sullivan, G.

    2007-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography schemes for the semiconductor industry are currently based on coupling radiation from a plasma source into a 2% bandwidth at 13.5 nm (91.8 eV). In this paper, we consider the case for a laser-produced plasma (LPP) and address the calculation of ionic level populations in the 4p 6 4d N , 4p 6 4d N-1 4f 1 , 4p 5 4d N+1 , and 4p 6 4d N-1 5p 1 configurations in a range of tin ions (Sn 6+ to Sn 13+ ) producing radiation in this bandwidth. The LPP is modeled using a one-dimensional hydrodynamics code, which uses a hydrogenic, average atom model, where the level populations are treated as l degenerate. Hartree-Fock calculations are used to remove the l degeneracy and an energy functional method to calculate the nl level populations involved in n=4-4 transitions as a function of distance from the target surface and time. Detailed data are presented for the tin ions that contribute to in-band emission

  20. Modeling of the Thermodynamics of the Acetic Acid−Water Mixture Using the Cubic-Plus-Association Equation of State

    Breil, Martin Peter; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Behrens, Paul K.

    2011-01-01

    The cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state is applied in this work to mixtures containing acetic acid and water. A previously developed modification of the model, the so-called CPA-Huron−Vidal (CPA-HV), is used. New CPA parameters have been estimated based on the vapor pressure, liquid...... density, enthalpy of vaporization, and vapor-phase compressibility factor data. The CPA-HV parameters have been fitted to, among others, experimental vapor compressibility factor data and experimental relative volatility data at different temperature ranges. The purpose of the work was to investigate...... that satisfactory results are overall obtained, but if an excellent match is needed over the whole temperature range, then different interaction parameters need to be used at the various temperature ranges....

  1. Pre-steady-state kinetics of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase catalyzed reactions and thermodynamic aspects of its substrate specificity

    Kuramitsu, Seiki; Hiromi, Keitaro; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Morino, Yoshimasa; Kagamiyama, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The four half-transamination reactions [the pyridoxal form of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) with aspartate or glutamate and the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme with oxalacetate or 2-oxoglutarate] were followed in a stopped-flow spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance change at either 333 or 358 nm. The reaction progress curves in all cases gave fits to a monophasic exponential process. Kinetic analyses of these reactions showed that each half-reaction is composed of the following three processes: (1) the rapid binding of an amino acid substrate to the pyridoxal form of the enzyme; (2) the rapid binding of the corresponding keto acid to the pyridoxamine form of the enzyme; (3) the rate-determining interconversion between the two complexes. This mechanism was supported by the findings that the equilibrium constants for half- and overall-transamination reactions and the steady-state kinetic constants agreed well with the predicted values on the basis of the above mechanism using pre-steady-state kinetic parameters. The significant primary kinetic isotope effect observed in the reaction with deuterated amino acid suggests that the withdrawal of the α-proton of the substrates is rate determining. The pyridoxal form of E. coli AspAT reacted with a variety of amino acids as substrates. The substrate specificity of the E. coli enzyme was much broader than that of pig isoenzymes, reflecting some subtle but distinct difference in microenvironment accommodating the side chain of the substrate between e. coli and mammalian AspATs

  2. Assessing the impacts of droughts and heat waves at thermoelectric power plants in the United States using integrated regression, thermodynamic, and climate models

    Margaret A. Cook

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent droughts and heat waves have revealed the vulnerability of some power plants to effects from higher temperature intake water for cooling. In this evaluation, we develop a methodology for predicting whether power plants are at risk of violating thermal pollution limits. We begin by developing a regression model of average monthly intake temperatures for open loop and recirculating cooling pond systems. We then integrate that information into a thermodynamic model of energy flows within each power plant to determine the change in cooling water temperature that occurs at each plant and the relationship of that water temperature to other plants in the river system. We use these models together with climate change models to estimate the monthly effluent temperature at twenty-six power plants in the Upper Mississippi River Basin and Texas between 2015 and 2035 to predict which ones are at risk of reaching thermal pollution limits. The intake model shows that two plants could face elevated intake temperatures between 2015 and 2035 compared to the 2010–2013 baseline. In general, a rise in ambient cooling water temperature of 1 °C could cause a drop in power output of 0.15%–0.5%. The energy balance shows that twelve plants might exceed state summer effluent limits.

  3. Fast Computation of Solvation Free Energies with Molecular Density Functional Theory: Thermodynamic-Ensemble Partial Molar Volume Corrections.

    Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr P; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Levesque, Maximilien; Borgis, Daniel

    2014-06-05

    Molecular density functional theory (MDFT) offers an efficient implicit-solvent method to estimate molecule solvation free-energies, whereas conserving a fully molecular representation of the solvent. Even within a second-order approximation for the free-energy functional, the so-called homogeneous reference fluid approximation, we show that the hydration free-energies computed for a data set of 500 organic compounds are of similar quality as those obtained from molecular dynamics free-energy perturbation simulations, with a computer cost reduced by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This requires to introduce the proper partial volume correction to transform the results from the grand canonical to the isobaric-isotherm ensemble that is pertinent to experiments. We show that this correction can be extended to 3D-RISM calculations, giving a sound theoretical justification to empirical partial molar volume corrections that have been proposed recently.

  4. Thermodynamics of gas adsorption on solid adsorbents

    Budrugeac, P.

    1979-01-01

    Starting with several hypotheses about the adsorbtion system and the adsorption phenomenon, a thermodynamic treatment of gas adsorption on solid adsorbants is presented. The relationships for determination from isotherms and calorimetric data of thermodynamic functions are derived. The problem of the phase changes in adsorbed layer is discussed. (author)

  5. Thermodynamically consistent model calibration in chemical kinetics

    Goutsias John

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dynamics of biochemical reaction systems are constrained by the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, which impose well-defined relationships among the reaction rate constants characterizing these systems. Constructing biochemical reaction systems from experimental observations often leads to parameter values that do not satisfy the necessary thermodynamic constraints. This can result in models that are not physically realizable and may lead to inaccurate, or even erroneous, descriptions of cellular function. Results We introduce a thermodynamically consistent model calibration (TCMC method that can be effectively used to provide thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of an open biochemical reaction system. The proposed method formulates the model calibration problem as a constrained optimization problem that takes thermodynamic constraints (and, if desired, additional non-thermodynamic constraints into account. By calculating thermodynamically feasible values for the kinetic parameters of a well-known model of the EGF/ERK signaling cascade, we demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative significance of imposing thermodynamic constraints on these parameters and the effectiveness of our method for accomplishing this important task. MATLAB software, using the Systems Biology Toolbox 2.1, can be accessed from http://www.cis.jhu.edu/~goutsias/CSS lab/software.html. An SBML file containing the thermodynamically feasible EGF/ERK signaling cascade model can be found in the BioModels database. Conclusions TCMC is a simple and flexible method for obtaining physically plausible values for the kinetic parameters of open biochemical reaction systems. It can be effectively used to recalculate a thermodynamically consistent set of parameter values for existing thermodynamically infeasible biochemical reaction models of cellular function as well as to estimate thermodynamically feasible values for the parameters of new

  6. Temporal Asymmetry, Entropic Irreversibility, and Finite-Time Thermodynamics: From Parmenides–Einstein Time-Reversal Symmetry to the Heraclitan Entropic Arrow of Time

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we combine the two universalisms of thermodynamics and dynamical systems theory to develop a dynamical system formalism for classical thermodynamics. Specifically, using a compartmental dynamical system energy flow model we develop a state-space dynamical system model that captures the key aspects of thermodynamics, including its fundamental laws. In addition, we establish the existence of a unique, continuously differentiable global entropy function for our dynamical system model, and using Lyapunov stability theory we show that the proposed thermodynamic model has finite-time convergent trajectories to Lyapunov stable equilibria determined by the system initial energies. Finally, using the system entropy, we establish the absence of Poincaré recurrence for our thermodynamic model and develop clear and rigorous connections between irreversibility, the second law of thermodynamics, and the entropic arrow of time.

  7. A Simple Statistical Thermodynamics Experiment

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Comparing the predicted and actual rolls of combinations of both two and three dice can help to introduce many of the basic concepts of statistical thermodynamics, including multiplicity, probability, microstates, and macrostates, and demonstrate that entropy is indeed a measure of randomness, that disordered states (those of higher entropy) are…

  8. Bayesian quantification of thermodynamic uncertainties in dense gas flows

    Merle, X.; Cinnella, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Bayesian inference methodology is developed for calibrating complex equations of state used in numerical fluid flow solvers. Precisely, the input parameters of three equations of state commonly used for modeling the thermodynamic behavior of the so-called dense gas flows, – i.e. flows of gases characterized by high molecular weights and complex molecules, working in thermodynamic conditions close to the liquid–vapor saturation curve – are calibrated by means of Bayesian inference from reference aerodynamic data for a dense gas flow over a wing section. Flow thermodynamic conditions are such that the gas thermodynamic behavior strongly deviates from that of a perfect gas. In the aim of assessing the proposed methodology, synthetic calibration data – specifically, wall pressure data – are generated by running the numerical solver with a more complex and accurate thermodynamic model. The statistical model used to build the likelihood function includes a model-form inadequacy term, accounting for the gap between the model output associated to the best-fit parameters and the true phenomenon. Results show that, for all of the relatively simple models under investigation, calibrations lead to informative posterior probability density distributions of the input parameters and improve the predictive distribution significantly. Nevertheless, calibrated parameters strongly differ from their expected physical values. The relationship between this behavior and model-form inadequacy is discussed. - Highlights: • Development of a Bayesian inference procedure for calibrating dense-gas flow solvers. • Complex thermodynamic models calibrated by using aerodynamic data for the flow. • Preliminary Sobol analysis used to reduce parameter space. • Piecewise polynomial surrogate model constructed to reduce computational cost. • Calibration results show the crucial role played by model-form inadequacies

  9. Entropy, related thermodynamic properties, and structure of methylisocyanate

    Davis, Phil S.; Kilpatrick, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The thermodynamic properties of methylisocyanate have been determined by isothermal calorimetry from 15 to 298.15 K. ► The third law entropy has been compared with the entropy calculated by statistical thermodynamics. ► The comparisons are consistent with selected proposed molecular structures and vibrational frequencies. -- Abstract: The entropy and related thermodynamic properties of methylisocyanate, CH 3 NCO, have been determined by isothermal calorimetry. The entropy in the ideal gas state at 298.15 K and 1 atmosphere is S m o = 284.3 ± 0.6 J/K · mol. Other thermodynamic properties determined include: the heat capacity from 15 to 300 K, the temperature of fusion (T fus = 178.461 ± 0.024 K), the enthalpy of fusion (ΔH fus = 7455.2 ± 14.0 J/mol), the enthalpy of vaporization at 298.15 K (ΔH vap = 28768 ± 54 J/mol), and the vapor pressure from fusion to 300 K. Using statistical thermodynamics, the entropy in this same state has been calculated for various assumed structures for methylisocyante which have been proposed based on several spectroscopic and ab initio results. Comparisons between the experimental and calculated entropy have led to the following conclusions concerning historical differences among problematic structural properties: (1) The CNC/CNO angles can have the paired values of 140/180° or 135/173° respectively. It is not possible to distinguish between the two by this thermodynamic analysis. (2) The methyl group functions as a free rotor or near free rotor against the NCO rigid frame. The barrier to internal rotation is less than 2100 J/mol. (3) The CNC vibrational bending frequency is consistent with the more recently observed assignments at 165 and 172 cm −1 with some degree of anharmonicity or with a pure harmonic at about 158 cm −1

  10. Design of thermodynamic experiments and analyses of thermodynamic relationships

    Oezer Arnas, A.

    2009-01-01

    In teaching of thermodynamics, a certain textbook is followed internationally whatever language it is written in. However, although some do a very good job, most are not correct and precise and furthermore NONE discuss at all the need for and importance of designing thermodynamic experiments although experimentation in engineering is considered to be the back bone of analyses, not pursued much these days, or numerical studies, so very predominant these days. Here some thermodynamic experiments along with physical interpretation of phenomena through simple mathematics will be discussed that are straightforward, meaningful and which can be performed by any undergraduate/graduate student. Another important topic for discussion is the fact that the thermodynamic state principle demands uniqueness of results. It has been found in literature that this fact is not well understood by those who attempt to apply it loosely and end up with questionable results. Thermodynamics is the fundamental science that clarifies all these issues if well understood, applied and interpreted. The attempt of this paper is to clarify these situations and offer alternative methods for analyses. (author)

  11. Thermodynamics of Fluid Polyamorphism

    Mikhail A. Anisimov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid polyamorphism is the existence of different condensed amorphous states in a single-component fluid. It is either found or predicted, usually at extreme conditions, for a broad group of very different substances, including helium, carbon, silicon, phosphorous, sulfur, tellurium, cerium, hydrogen, and tin tetraiodide. This phenomenon is also hypothesized for metastable and deeply supercooled water, presumably located a few degrees below the experimental limit of homogeneous ice formation. We present a generic phenomenological approach to describe polyamorphism in a single-component fluid, which is completely independent of the molecular origin of the phenomenon. We show that fluid polyamorphism may occur either in the presence or in the absence of fluid phase separation depending on the symmetry of the order parameter. In the latter case, it is associated with a second-order transition, such as in liquid helium or liquid sulfur. To specify the phenomenology, we consider a fluid with thermodynamic equilibrium between two distinct interconvertible states or molecular structures. A fundamental signature of this concept is the identification of the equilibrium fraction of molecules involved in each of these alternative states. However, the existence of the alternative structures may result in polyamorphic fluid phase separation only if mixing of these structures is not ideal. The two-state thermodynamics unifies all the debated scenarios of fluid polyamorphism in different areas of condensed-matter physics, with or without phase separation, and even goes beyond the phenomenon of polyamorphism by generically describing the anomalous properties of fluids exhibiting interconversion of alternative molecular states.

  12. Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. [thermodynamic properties of gases

    1976-01-01

    The basic thermodynamic properties of gases are reviewed and the relations between them are derived from the first and second laws. The elements of statistical mechanics are then formulated and the partition function is derived. The classical form of the partition function is used to obtain the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energies in the gas phase and the equipartition of energy theorem is given in its most general form. The thermodynamic properties are all derived as functions of the partition function. Quantum statistics are reviewed briefly and the differences between the Boltzmann distribution function for classical particles and the Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions for quantum particles are discussed.

  13. Amazon kaolinite functionalized with diethylenetriamine moieties for U(VI) removal: Thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions

    Guerra, Denis L., E-mail: denis@cpd.ufmt.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba, Mato Grosso, 78060 900 (Brazil); Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba, Mato Grosso, 78060 900 (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    The compound N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (MPDET) was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface (KLT) by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite clay samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, ion exchange capacities, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The adsorption of uranyl on natural (KLT) and modified (KLT{sub MPDET}) kaolinite clays was investigated as a function of the solution pH, metal concentration, temperature, and ionic strength. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 8.37 x 10{sup -3} and 13.87 x 10{sup -3} mmol g{sup -1} for KLT and KLT{sub MPDET} at 298 K, respectively. The energetic effects ({Delta}{sub int}H, {Delta}{sub int}G, and {Delta}{sub int}S) caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.

  14. Amazon kaolinite functionalized with diethylenetriamine moieties for U(VI) removal: Thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions

    Guerra, Denis L.; Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The compound N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine (MPDET) was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface (KLT) by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite clay samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), N 2 adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, ion exchange capacities, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of 29 Si and 13 C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the 13 C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The adsorption of uranyl on natural (KLT) and modified (KLT MPDET ) kaolinite clays was investigated as a function of the solution pH, metal concentration, temperature, and ionic strength. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The maximum number of moles adsorbed was determined to be 8.37 x 10 -3 and 13.87 x 10 -3 mmol g -1 for KLT and KLT MPDET at 298 K, respectively. The energetic effects (Δ int H, Δ int G, and Δ int S) caused by metal cations adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations.

  15. Steady-state thermodynamic simulation and structural design of the dephlegmator used in mixed-refrigerant Joule-Thomson refrigerators

    Li, Mei; Gong, Maoqiong; Guo, Hao; Sun, Zhaohu; Wu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Good agreements and the feasibility of the MESH model were found. • Fine applicability and low energy consumption of the dephlegmator were addressed. • A clear and comprehensive three-dimensional dephlegmator model was shown. - Abstract: Dephlegmators can be used to reduce the energy consumption and simplify the layout of the mixed-refrigerant Joule–Thomson (MRJT) cycle. Heat-exchange characteristics and refrigeration design are currently based on highly simplified assumptions. Synthesis methods to efficiently solve all design issues of dephlegmators in MRJT cycle are insufficient. No suitable separation module is available for the simultaneous heat and mass transfer processes in Aspen Plus because the module should be programmed and incorporated into Aspen Plus as a user-defined unit. In this paper, a systematic steady-state method was proposed for the detailed design of dephlegmators for gas mixture separation, considering the simulation and heat exchanger design simultaneously. The material balance, vapor–liquid equilibrium, mole fraction summation and heat balance (MESH) model was programmed in FORTRAN language. Good agreements and the feasibility of the MESH model were found. Deviations between the simulation results and patent data were all within 5%. The errors in the predicted temperatures of vapor and liquid products were less than 2% and 10%, respectively. Fine applicability and low energy consumption of the dephlegmator were addressed. The mole fraction of n-butane in the liquid phase had high recovery ratio of 90%. The dephlegmator decreased more than 30% of energy consumption compared with the traditional distillation tower under similar separation effects. In the structural design process, the dephlegmator was divided into certain segments by baffle plates on the basis of segmented calculation. The heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer area, pressure drop, and structural parameters of the dephlegmator were evaluated. A clear

  16. Green function iterative solution of ground state wave function for Yukawa potential

    Zhang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    The newly developed single trajectory quadrature method is applied to solve central potentials. First, based on the series expansion method an exact analytic solution of the ground state for Hulthen potential and an approximate solution for Yukawa potential are obtained respectively. Second, the newly developed iterative method based on Green function defined by quadratures along the single trajectory is applied to solve Yukawa potential using the Coulomb solution and Hulthen solution as the trial functions respectively. The results show that a more proper choice of the trial function will give a better convergence. To further improve the convergence the iterative method is combined with the variational method to solve the ground state wave function for Yukawa potential, using variational solutions of the Coulomb and Hulthen potentials as the trial functions. The results give much better convergence. Finally, the obtained critical screen coefficient is applied to discuss the dissociate temperature of J/ψ in high temperature QGP

  17. Thermodynamics of Error Correction

    Pablo Sartori

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and work dissipated by the system during wrong incorporations. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics; hence, its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  18. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, th...

  19. Thermodynamic Constraints in Using AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) Alloys as N₂ Dissociation Catalysts: Functionalizing a Plasmon-Active Metal.

    Martirez, John Mark P; Carter, Emily A

    2016-02-23

    The Haber-Bosch process for NH3 synthesis is arguably one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century, with a massive footprint in agriculture and, historically, warfare. Current catalysts for this reaction use Fe for N2 activation, conducted at high temperatures and pressures to improve conversion rate and efficiency. A recent finding shows that plasmonic metal nanoparticles can either generate highly reactive electrons and holes or induce resonant surface excitations through plasmonic decay, which catalyze dissociation and redox reactions under mild conditions. It is therefore appealing to consider AuM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Mo) alloys to combine the strongly plasmonic nature of Au and the catalytic nature of M metals toward N2 dissociation, which together might facilitate ammonia production. To this end, through density functional theory, we (i) explore the feasibility of forming these surface alloys, (ii) find a pathway that may stabilize/deactivate surface M substituents during fabrication, and (iii) define a complementary route to reactivate them under operational conditions. Finally, we evaluate their reactivity toward N2, as well as their ability to support a pathway for N2 dissociation with a low thermodynamic barrier. We find that AuFe possesses similar appealing qualities, including relative stability with respect to phase separation, reversibility of Fe oxidation and reduction, and reactivity toward N2. While AuMo achieves the best affinity toward N2, its strong propensity toward oxidation could greatly limit its use.

  20. Density functional theory study of the structural, electronic, lattice dynamical, and thermodynamic properties of Li4SiO4 and its capability for CO2 capture

    Duan, Yuhua; Parlinski, K.

    2011-01-01

    The structural, electronic, lattice dynamical, optical, thermodynamic, and CO{sub 2} capture properties of monoclinic and triclinic phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are investigated by combining density functional theory with phonon lattice dynamics calculations. We found that these two phases have some similarities in their bulk and thermodynamic properties. The calculated bulk modulus and the cohesive energies of these two phases are close to each other. Although both of them are insulators, the monoclinic phase of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} has a direct band gap of 5.24 eV while the triclinic Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} phase has an indirect band gap of 4.98 eV. In both phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, the s orbital of O mainly contributes to the lower-energy second valence band (VB{sub 2}) and the p orbitals contribute to the fist valence band (VB{sub 1}) and the conduction bands (CBs). The s orbital of Si mainly contributes to the lower portions of the VB1 and VB{sub 2}, and Si p orbitals mainly contribute to the higher portions of the VB{sub 1} and VB{sub 2}. The s and p orbitals of Li contribute to both VBs and to CBs, and Li p orbitals have a higher contribution than the Li s orbital. There is possibly a phonon soft mode existing in triclinic {gamma}-Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}; in the monoclinic Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, there are three phonon soft modes, which correspond to the one type of Li disordered over a few sites. Their LO-TO splitting indicates that both phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are polar anisotropic materials. The calculated infrared absorption spectra for LO and TO modes are different for these two phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. The calculated relationships of the chemical potential versus temperature and CO{sub 2} pressure for reaction of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} with CO{sub 2} shows that Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} could be a good candidate for a high-temperature CO{sub 2} sorbent while used for postcombustion capture technology.

  1. Wigner function and the probability representation of quantum states

    Man’ko Margarita A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relation of theWigner function with the fair probability distribution called tomographic distribution or quantum tomogram associated with the quantum state is reviewed. The connection of the tomographic picture of quantum mechanics with the integral Radon transform of the Wigner quasidistribution is discussed. The Wigner–Moyal equation for the Wigner function is presented in the form of kinetic equation for the tomographic probability distribution both in quantum mechanics and in the classical limit of the Liouville equation. The calculation of moments of physical observables in terms of integrals with the state tomographic probability distributions is constructed having a standard form of averaging in the probability theory. New uncertainty relations for the position and momentum are written in terms of optical tomograms suitable for directexperimental check. Some recent experiments on checking the uncertainty relations including the entropic uncertainty relations are discussed.

  2. Thermodynamics in Einstein's thought

    Klein, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of the thermodynamical approach in the Einstein's scientific work is analyzed. The Einstein's development of a notion about statistical fluctuations of thermodynamical systems that leads him to discovery of corpuscular-wave dualism is retraced

  3. Population spikes in cortical networks during different functional states.

    Shirley eMark

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain computational challenges vary between behavioral states. Engaged animals react according to incoming sensory information, while in relaxed and sleeping states consolidation of the learned information is believed to take place. Different states are characterized by different forms of cortical activity. We study a possible neuronal mechanism for generating these diverse dynamics and suggest their possible functional significance. Previous studies demonstrated that brief synchronized increase in a neural firing (Population Spikes can be generated in homogenous recurrent neural networks with short-term synaptic depression. Here we consider more realistic networks with clustered architecture. We show that the level of synchronization in neural activity can be controlled smoothly by network parameters. The network shifts from asynchronous activity to a regime in which clusters synchronized separately, then, the synchronization between the clusters increases gradually to fully synchronized state. We examine the effects of different synchrony levels on the transmission of information by the network. We find that the regime of intermediate synchronization is preferential for the flow of information between sparsely connected areas. Based on these results, we suggest that the regime of intermediate synchronization corresponds to engaged behavioral state of the animal, while global synchronization is exhibited during relaxed and sleeping states.

  4. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-02-26

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  5. Non-hard sphere thermodynamic perturbation theory.

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2011-08-21

    A non-hard sphere (HS) perturbation scheme, recently advanced by the present author, is elaborated for several technical matters, which are key mathematical details for implementation of the non-HS perturbation scheme in a coupling parameter expansion (CPE) thermodynamic perturbation framework. NVT-Monte Carlo simulation is carried out for a generalized Lennard-Jones (LJ) 2n-n potential to obtain routine thermodynamic quantities such as excess internal energy, pressure, excess chemical potential, excess Helmholtz free energy, and excess constant volume heat capacity. Then, these new simulation data, and available simulation data in literatures about a hard core attractive Yukawa fluid and a Sutherland fluid, are used to test the non-HS CPE 3rd-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) and give a comparison between the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT and other theoretical approaches. It is indicated that the non-HS CPE 3rd-order TPT is superior to other traditional TPT such as van der Waals/HS (vdW/HS), perturbation theory 2 (PT2)/HS, and vdW/Yukawa (vdW/Y) theory or analytical equation of state such as mean spherical approximation (MSA)-equation of state and is at least comparable to several currently the most accurate Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theories. It is discovered that three technical issues, i.e., opening up new bridge function approximation for the reference potential, choosing proper reference potential, and/or using proper thermodynamic route for calculation of f(ex-ref), chiefly decide the quality of the non-HS CPE TPT. Considering that the non-HS perturbation scheme applies for a wide variety of model fluids, and its implementation in the CPE thermodynamic perturbation framework is amenable to high-order truncation, the non-HS CPE 3rd-order or higher order TPT will be more promising once the above-mentioned three technological advances are established. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  6. A functional intranet for the United States Coast Guard Unit

    Hannah, Robert Todd.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution in unlimited. This thesis describes the complete development process of a friendly functional Intranet for an operational United States Coast Guard (USCG) electronic Support Unit (ESU) in Alameda, California. The final product is suitable for immediate use. It may also be used as a prototype for future Intranet development efforts. The methodology used to develop a finished, working product provides the core subject matter for this thesis. The disc...

  7. Thermodynamics of superconducting quantum metamaterials

    Dallaire-Demers, Pierre-Luc; Wilhelm-Mauch, Frank [Universitaet des Saarlandes (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Left-handed matematerials are capacitively coupled layers of inductive pieces of conductors. These systems are well studied in the context of microwave metamaterials but their full quantum description or their embedding in highly correlated materials like superconductors are still an open problem. Notably, they are known to have a Van Hove singularity in the density of states at low energy and high pseudo-momentum that could effectively couple and condense Cooper pairs. The goal of this research is to analyze the thermodynamical properties of the order parameter of stacked layers of superconductors with a small repulsive Coulomb interaction. A 3D toy model of such a material is mapped to a Fermi-Hubbard lattice. The temperature dependent anomalous correlation functions are computed variationally from a self-energy functional of a small cluster where inter-cluster tunneling is treated perturbatively. The effect of the repulsive interaction on the Cooper pairs binding can then be seen from the momentum distribution of the condensation amplitude. Such a material could potentially be realized with optical lattices or nanoscaled superconductors.

  8. Thermodynamic treatment of nonphysical systems: formalism and an example (single-lane traffic)

    Reiss, H.; Hammerich, A.D.; Montroll, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    An effort is made to introduce thermodynamic and statistical thermodynamic methods into the treatment of nonphysical (e.g., social, economic, etc.) systems. Emphasis is placed on the use of the entire thermodynamic framework, not merely entropy. Entropy arises naturally, related in a simple manner to other measurables, but does not occupy a primary position in the theory. However, the maximum entropy formalism is a convenient procedure for deriving the thermodynamic analog framework in which undetermined multipliers are thermodynamic-like variables which summarize the collective behavior of the system. The authors discuss the analysis of Levine and his coworkers showing that the maximum entropy formalism is the unique algorithm for achieving consistent inference of probabilities. The thermodynamic-like formalism for treating a single lane of vehicular traffic is developed and applied to traffic in which the interaction between cars is chosen to be a particular form of the ''follow-the-leader'' type. The equation of state of the traffic, the distributions of velocity and headway, and the various thermodynamic-like parameters, e.g., temperature (collective sensitivity), pressure, etc. are determined for the example of the Holland Tunnel. Nearest-neighbor and pair correlation functions for the vehicles are also determined. Interesting and suggestive results are obtained

  9. Improved modification for the density-functional theory calculation of thermodynamic properties for C-H-O composite compounds.

    Liu, Min Hsien; Chen, Cheng; Hong, Yaw Shun

    2005-02-08

    A three-parametric modification equation and the least-squares approach are adopted to calibrating hybrid density-functional theory energies of C(1)-C(10) straight-chain aldehydes, alcohols, and alkoxides to accurate enthalpies of formation DeltaH(f) and Gibbs free energies of formation DeltaG(f), respectively. All calculated energies of the C-H-O composite compounds were obtained based on B3LYP6-311++G(3df,2pd) single-point energies and the related thermal corrections of B3LYP6-31G(d,p) optimized geometries. This investigation revealed that all compounds had 0.05% average absolute relative error (ARE) for the atomization energies, with mean value of absolute error (MAE) of just 2.1 kJ/mol (0.5 kcal/mol) for the DeltaH(f) and 2.4 kJ/mol (0.6 kcal/mol) for the DeltaG(f) of formation.

  10. Heat and thermodynamics

    Saxena, A K

    2014-01-01

    Heat and thermodynamics aims to serve as a textbook for Physics, Chemistry and Engineering students. The book covers basic ideas of Heat and Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory and Transport Phenomena, Real Gases, Liquafaction and Production and Measurement of very Low Temperatures, The First Law of Thermodynamics, The Second and Third Laws of Thermodynamics and Heat Engines and Black Body Radiation. KEY FEATURES Emphasis on concepts Contains 145 illustrations (drawings), 9 Tables and 48 solved examples At the end of chapter exercises and objective questions

  11. Thermodynamic functions for solubility of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents from T = (283.15 to 318.15) K and apparent thermodynamic properties of solutions

    Li, Xinbao; Wang, Mingju; Du, Cunbin; Cong, Yang; Zhao, Hongkun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubilities of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents were determined. • The solubilities were correlated by using four thermodynamic models. • The mixing properties of solution were computed based on Wilson model. - Abstract: Separation of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid from its isomeric mixtures has essential significance in industry. In this work, by using isothermal saturation method, the solid-liquid equilibrium for 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, 1,4-dioxane and 2-butanone) were obtained experimentally within a temperature range from (283.15 to 318.15) K under atmosphere pressure of 101.2 kPa, and the solubility values of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in these solvents were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography. Within the studied temperature range, the mole fraction solubility of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in selected organic solvents increased with increasing temperature. Except for ethyl acetate, the descending order of the mole fraction solubility values were as follow: 1,4-dioxane > acetone > 2-butanone > methanol > ethanol > isopropanol > n-propanol > acetonitrile. The solubility values determined for 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in the selected solvents were correlated and back calculated with the modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model. The largest values of RAD and RMSD obtained with the four models were 0.67% and 4.02 × 10 −4 , respectively. In general, the four thermodynamic models were all acceptable for describing the solubility behaviour of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in these solvents. In addition, the apparent mixing Gibbs energy, mixing enthalpy, mixing entropy, activity coefficient at infinitesimal concentration and reduced excess enthalpy were calculated. The acquired solubility data and thermodynamic studies would be very important in optimizing the separation process of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid from

  12. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of restricted Boltzmann machines

    Salazar, Domingos S. P.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we analyze the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a class of neural networks known as restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) in the context of unsupervised learning. We show how the network is described as a discrete Markov process and how the detailed balance condition and the Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium distribution are sufficient conditions for a complete thermodynamics description, including nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Numerical simulations in a fully trained RBM are performed and the heat exchange fluctuation theorem is verified with excellent agreement to the theory. We observe how the contrastive divergence functional, mostly used in unsupervised learning of RBMs, is closely related to nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities. We also use the framework to interpret the estimation of the partition function of RBMs with the annealed importance sampling method from a thermodynamics standpoint. Finally, we argue that unsupervised learning of RBMs is equivalent to a work protocol in a system driven by the laws of thermodynamics in the absence of labeled data.

  13. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of restricted Boltzmann machines.

    Salazar, Domingos S P

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we analyze the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a class of neural networks known as restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) in the context of unsupervised learning. We show how the network is described as a discrete Markov process and how the detailed balance condition and the Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium distribution are sufficient conditions for a complete thermodynamics description, including nonequilibrium fluctuation theorems. Numerical simulations in a fully trained RBM are performed and the heat exchange fluctuation theorem is verified with excellent agreement to the theory. We observe how the contrastive divergence functional, mostly used in unsupervised learning of RBMs, is closely related to nonequilibrium thermodynamic quantities. We also use the framework to interpret the estimation of the partition function of RBMs with the annealed importance sampling method from a thermodynamics standpoint. Finally, we argue that unsupervised learning of RBMs is equivalent to a work protocol in a system driven by the laws of thermodynamics in the absence of labeled data.

  14. The Thermodynamic Machinery of Life

    Kurzynski, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Living organisms are open thermodynamic systems whose functional structure has developed and been kinetically frozen during the historical process of biological evolution. A thermodynamics of both nonequilibrium and complex systems is needed for their description. In this book, the foundations of such a thermodynamics are presented. Biological processes at the cellular level are considered as coupled chemical reactions and transport processes across internal and the cytoplasmic membrane. All these processes are catalyzed by specific enzymes hence the kinetics of enzymatic catalysis and its control are described here in detail. The coupling of several processes through a common enzyme is considered in the context of free energy or signal transduction. Special attention is paid to evidence for a rich stochastic internal dynamics of native proteins and its possible role in the control of enzyme activity and in the action of biological molecular machines.

  15. Nanofluidics thermodynamic and transport properties

    Michaelides, Efstathios E (Stathis)

    2014-01-01

    This volume offers a comprehensive examination of the subject of heat and mass transfer with nanofluids as well as a critical review of the past and recent research projects in this area. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of the transport processes using particle-fluid suspensions, such as nanofluids. The nanofluid research is examined and presented in a holistic way using a great deal of our experience with the subjects of continuum mechanics, statistical thermodynamics, and non-equilibrium thermodynamics of transport processes. Using a thorough database, the experimental, analytical, and numerical advances of recent research in nanofluids are critically examined and connected to past research with medium and fine particles as well as to functional engineering systems. Promising applications and technological issues of heat/mass transfer system design with nanofluids are also discussed. This book also: Provides a deep scientific analysis of nanofluids using classical thermodynamics and statistical therm...

  16. Statistical thermodynamics of clustered populations.

    Matsoukas, Themis

    2014-08-01

    We present a thermodynamic theory for a generic population of M individuals distributed into N groups (clusters). We construct the ensemble of all distributions with fixed M and N, introduce a selection functional that embodies the physics that governs the population, and obtain the distribution that emerges in the scaling limit as the most probable among all distributions consistent with the given physics. We develop the thermodynamics of the ensemble and establish a rigorous mapping to regular thermodynamics. We treat the emergence of a so-called giant component as a formal phase transition and show that the criteria for its emergence are entirely analogous to the equilibrium conditions in molecular systems. We demonstrate the theory by an analytic model and confirm the predictions by Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Advanced classical thermodynamics

    Emanuel, G.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical and mathematical foundations of thermodynamics are presented in an advanced text intended for graduate engineering students. Chapters are devoted to definitions and postulates, the fundamental equation, equilibrium, the application of Jacobian theory to thermodynamics, the Maxwell equations, stability, the theory of real gases, critical-point theory, and chemical thermodynamics. Diagrams, graphs, tables, and sample problems are provided. 38 references

  18. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Early Blind Humans

    Harold eBurton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Task-based neuroimaging studies in early blind humans (EB have demonstrated heightened visual cortex responses to non-visual paradigms. Several prior functional connectivity studies in EB have shown altered connections consistent with these task-based results. But these studies generally did not consider behavioral adaptations to lifelong blindness typically observed in EB. Enhanced cognitive abilities shown in EB include greater serial recall and attention to memory. Here, we address the question of the extent to which brain intrinsic activity in EB reflects such adaptations. We performed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study contrasting 14 EB with 14 age/gender matched normally sighted controls (NS. A principal finding was markedly greater functional connectivity in EB between visual cortex and regions typically associated with memory and cognitive control of attention. In contrast, correlations between visual cortex and non-deprived sensory cortices were significantly lower in EB. Thus, the available data, including that obtained in prior task-based and resting state fMRI studies, as well as the present results, indicate that visual cortex in EB becomes more heavily incorporated into functional systems instantiating episodic recall and attention to non-visual events. Moreover, EB appear to show a reduction in interactions between visual and non-deprived sensory cortices, possibly reflecting suppression of inter-sensory distracting activity.

  19. Apparent heat capacity measurements and thermodynamic functions of D(−)-fructose by standard and temperature-modulated calorimetry

    Magoń, A.; Pyda, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental, apparent heat capacity of fructose was investigated by advanced thermal analysis. ► Equilibrium melting parameters of fructose were determined. ► Decomposition, superheating of crystalline fructose during melting process were presented. ► TGA, DSC, and TMDSC are useful tools for characterisation of fructose. - Abstract: The qualitative and quantitative thermal analyses of crystalline and amorphous D(−)-fructose were studied utilising methods of standard differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), quasi-isothermal temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (quasi-isothermal TMDSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Advanced thermal analysis of fructose was performed based on heat capacity. The apparent total and apparent reversing heat capacities, as well as phase transition parameters were examined on heating and cooling. The melting temperature, T m , of crystalline D(−)-fructose shows a heating rate dependency, which increases with raising the heating rate and leads to superheating. The equilibrium melting temperatures: T m ∘ (onset) = 370 K and T m ∘ (peak) = 372 K, and the equilibrium enthalpy of fusion Δ fus H ° = 30.30 kJ · mol −1 , of crystalline D(−)-fructose were estimated on heating for the results at zero heating rate. Anomalies in the heat capacity in the liquid state of D(−)-fructose, assigned as possible tautomerisation equilibrium, were analysed by DSC and quasi-isothermal TMDSC, both on heating and cooling. Thermal stability of crystals in the region of the melting temperature was examined by TGA and quasi-isothermal TMDSC. Melting, mutarotation, and degradation processes occur simultaneously and there are differences in values of the liquid heat capacity of D(−)-fructose with varied thermal history, measured by quasi-isothermal TMDSC. Annealing of amorphous D(−)-fructose between the glass transition temperature, T g , and the melting temperature, T m , also leads to

  20. The interactions between IC engine thermodynamics and knock

    Caton, Jerald A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Importance of engine thermodynamics regarding knock was quantified. • Effects of compression ratio, engine speed and EGR on knock was reported. • Retarding combustion to avoid knock resulted in decreases of efficiency. - Abstract: The development of high efficiency spark-ignition internal combustion engines is often constrained by the occurrence of knock. Knock may result in engine damage, lower performance, and lower efficiency. The options for preventing knock often involve lower compression ratios, lower boost, retarded spark timing, and other design choices that are detrimental to engine performance and efficiency. Since knock is largely a function of the thermodynamic state of the unburned zone, the occurrence of knock is expected to be a strong function of the engine thermodynamics. The purpose of the current work is to couple a simple knock model with a comprehensive engine cycle simulation to determine the interactions between the engine thermodynamics and knock. This work has explored the effects of engine parameters such as compression ratio (4–12), engine speed (500–2500 rpm), inlet pressure (50–100 kPa), exhaust gas recirculation (0–25%), combustion duration and heat transfer on knock. In each case, the occurrence of knock is connected to the cylinder pressures and the gas temperatures of the unburned zone. For example for a compression ratio of 12, to avoid knock the brake thermal efficiency decreased from 36.5% to 34% due to retarding the combustion.

  1. Universalities of thermodynamic signatures in topological phases

    Kempkes, S. N.; Quelle, A.; de Morais Smith, C.

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators (superconductors) are materials that host symmetry-protected metallic edge states in an insulating (superconducting) bulk. Although they are well understood, a thermodynamic description of these materials remained elusive, firstly because the edges yield a non-extensive

  2. Introduction to applied thermodynamics

    Helsdon, R M; Walker, G E

    1965-01-01

    Introduction to Applied Thermodynamics is an introductory text on applied thermodynamics and covers topics ranging from energy and temperature to reversibility and entropy, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, and the properties of ideal gases. Standard air cycles and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances are also discussed, together with gas compressors, combustion, and psychrometry. This volume is comprised of 16 chapters and begins with an overview of the concept of energy as well as the macroscopic and molecular approaches to thermodynamics. The following chapters focus o

  3. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF 4 and UF 6 , including UF 4 (solid and gas), U 4 F 17 (solid), U 2 F 9 (solid), UF 5 (solid and gas), U 2 F 10 (gas), and UF 6 (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior

  4. Habenula functional resting-state connectivity in pediatric CRPS.

    Erpelding, Nathalie; Sava, Simona; Simons, Laura E; Lebel, Alyssa; Serrano, Paul; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2014-01-01

    The habenula (Hb) is a small brain structure located in the posterior end of the medial dorsal thalamus and through medial (MHb) and lateral (LHb) Hb connections, it acts as a conduit of information between forebrain and brainstem structures. The role of the Hb in pain processing is well documented in animals and recently also in acute experimental pain in humans. However, its function remains unknown in chronic pain disorders. Here, we investigated Hb resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) compared with healthy controls. Twelve pediatric patients with unilateral lower-extremity CRPS (9 females; 10-17 yr) and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls provided informed consent to participate in the study. In healthy controls, Hb functional connections largely overlapped with previously described anatomical connections in cortical, subcortical, and brainstem structures. Compared with controls, patients exhibited an overall Hb rsFC reduction with the rest of the brain and, specifically, with the anterior midcingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor cortex, primary motor cortex, and premotor cortex. Our results suggest that Hb rsFC parallels anatomical Hb connections in the healthy state and that overall Hb rsFC is reduced in patients, particularly connections with forebrain areas. Patients' decreased Hb rsFC to brain regions implicated in motor, affective, cognitive, and pain inhibitory/modulatory processes may contribute to their symptomatology.

  5. Thermodynamic theory of equilibrium fluctuations

    Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The postulational basis of classical thermodynamics has been expanded to incorporate equilibrium fluctuations. The main additional elements of the proposed thermodynamic theory are the concept of quasi-equilibrium states, a definition of non-equilibrium entropy, a fundamental equation of state in the entropy representation, and a fluctuation postulate describing the probability distribution of macroscopic parameters of an isolated system. Although these elements introduce a statistical component that does not exist in classical thermodynamics, the logical structure of the theory is different from that of statistical mechanics and represents an expanded version of thermodynamics. Based on this theory, we present a regular procedure for calculations of equilibrium fluctuations of extensive parameters, intensive parameters and densities in systems with any number of fluctuating parameters. The proposed fluctuation formalism is demonstrated by four applications: (1) derivation of the complete set of fluctuation relations for a simple fluid in three different ensembles; (2) fluctuations in finite-reservoir systems interpolating between the canonical and micro-canonical ensembles; (3) derivation of fluctuation relations for excess properties of grain boundaries in binary solid solutions, and (4) derivation of the grain boundary width distribution for pre-melted grain boundaries in alloys. The last two applications offer an efficient fluctuation-based approach to calculations of interface excess properties and extraction of the disjoining potential in pre-melted grain boundaries. Possible future extensions of the theory are outlined.

  6. Thermodynamic Data to 20,000 K For Monatomic Gases

    Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains standard-state thermodynamic functions for 50 gaseous atomic elements plus deuterium and electron gas, 51 singly ionized positive ions, and 36 singly ionized negative ions. The data were generated by the NASA Lewis computer program PAC97, a modified version of PAC91 reported in McBride and Gordon. This report is being published primarily to document part of the data currently being used in several NASA Lewis computer programs. The data are presented in tabular and graphical format and are also represented in the form of least-squares coefficients. The tables give the following data as functions of temperature : heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy Gibbs energy, enthalpy of formation, and equilibrium constant. A brief discussion and a comparison of calculated results are given for several models for calculating ideal thermodynamic data for monatomic gases.

  7. Introduction to the thermodynamics of solids

    Ericksen, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This book addresses issues of thermodynamics associated with solids from a unique point of view. Professor Ericksen provides a perspective of thermodynamics which is based in material science and solid mechanics, and attempts to apply basic thermodynamics to a wide range of phenomena. The book is not written as a text-book, as it does not contain example problems or exercises, is directed primarily at researchers in solids. The author states that much of the book is controversial, and that many of his treatments of thermodynamics are not traditional. The author's assessment is accurate on both counts. However, there are several reasons to believe that many of the issues raised in the book are not so much controversial, but rather simply not well described, either by the author or by thermodynamicists, in general. The primary references for much of the thermodynamics in the book are historic in nature, and certainly worthy of consideration, but only a few current references are provided

  8. Thermodynamics of an accelerated expanding universe

    Wang Bin; Gong Yungui; Abdalla, Elcio

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the laws of thermodynamics in an accelerating universe driven by dark energy with a time-dependent equation of state. In the case we consider that the physically relevant part of the Universe is that enveloped by the dynamical apparent horizon, we have shown that both the first law and second law of thermodynamics are satisfied. On the other hand, if the boundary of the Universe is considered to be the cosmological event horizon the thermodynamical description based on the definitions of boundary entropy and temperature breaks down. No parameter redefinition can rescue the thermodynamics laws from such a fate, rendering the cosmological event horizon unphysical from the point of view of the laws of thermodynamics

  9. Thermodynamics and structure of liquid alkali metals from the charged-hard-sphere reference fluid

    Lai, S.K.; Akinlade, O.; Tosi, M.P.

    1989-12-01

    The evaluation of thermodynamic properties of liquid alkali metals is re-examined in the approach based on the Gibbs-Bogoliubov inequality and using the fluid of charged hard spheres in the mean spherical approximation as reference system, with a view to achieving consistency with the liquid structure factor. The perturbative variational calculation of the Helmholtz free energy is based on an ab initio and highly reliable nonlocal pseudopotential. Only limited improvement is found in the calculated thermodynamic functions, even when full advantage is taken of the two variational parameters inherent in this approach. The role of thermodynamic self-consistency between the equations of state of the reference fluid derived from the routes of the internal energy and of the virial theorem is then discussed, using previous results by Hoye and Stell. An approximate evaluation of the corresponding contribution to the free energy of liquid alkali metals yields appreciable improvements in both the thermodynamic functions and the liquid structure factor. It thus appears that an accurate treatment of thermodynamic self-consistency in the charged-hard-sphere system may help to resolve some of the difficulties that are commonly met in the evaluation of thermodynamic and structural properties of liquid metals. (author). 55 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  10. The Concept of Human Functional State in Russian Applied Psychology

    Anna B. Leonova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of human functional states (HFS is considered in the framework of activity regulation approach developed in Russian applied psychology. Aimed at the analysis of changes in regulatory mechanisms of on-going activity, structural methods for multilevel assessment of workers’ states are discussed. Three different strategies of data integration are proposed regarding the types of essential practical problems. Their usability is exemplified with the help of two empirical studies concerned with reliability of fire-fighters’ work in the Chernobyl Zone and effects of interruptions in computerized office environment. A general framework for applied HFS research is proposed in order to develop new ecologically valid psychodiagnostic procedures that can help to create efficient stress-management programs for enhancing human reliability and performance in complex job environment.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of ternary oxides in the system Ba-Fe-O using solid-state electrochemical cells with oxide and fluoride ion conducting electrolytes

    Rakshit, S. K.; Parida, S. C.; Singh, Ziley; Prasad, R.; Venugopal, V.

    2004-04-01

    The standard molar Gibbs energy of formations of BaFe 12O 19(s), BaFe 2O 4(s), Ba 2Fe 2O 5(s), Ba 3Fe 2O 6(s) and Ba 5Fe 2O 8(s) have been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing CaF 2(s) as an electrolyte. The reversible e.m.f. values have been measured in the temperature range from 970 to 1151 K. The oxygen chemical potential corresponding to three phase equilibria involving technologically important compound BaFe 12O 19(s) has been determined using solid-state electrochemical technique employing CSZ as an electrolyte from 1048 to 1221 K. The values of Δ fGm0( T) for the above ternary oxides are given by ΔfG m0( BaFe12O19, s)/ kJ mol -1(±0.6)=-5431.3+1.5317 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1151) ΔfG m0( BaFe2O4, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.3)=-1461.4+0.3745 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1151) ΔfG m0( Ba2Fe2O5, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.4)=-2038.3+0.4433 (T/ K) (970⩽T/ K⩽1149) ΔfG m0( Ba3Fe2O6, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.5)=-2700.1+0.6090 (T/ K) (969⩽T/ K⩽1150) and ΔfG m0( Ba5Fe2O8, s)/ kJ mol -1(±1.6)=-3984.1+0.9300 (T/ K) (973⩽T/ K⩽1150) The uncertainty estimates for Δ fGm0 includes the standard deviation in the e.m.f. and uncertainty in the data taken from the literature. An isothermal oxygen potential diagram for the system Ba-Fe-O was constructed at 1100 K based on the thermodynamic data obtained in this study.

  12. Bidirectional Texture Function Modeling: State of the Art Survey

    Filip, Jiří; Haindl, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 11 (2009), s. 1921-1940 ISSN 0162-8828 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0593; GA AV ČR 1ET400750407 Grant - others:EC Marie Curie(BE) 41358; GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : BTF * surface texture * 3D texture Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/RO/filip-bidirectional texture function modeling state of the art survey.pdf

  13. Thermodynamic stability of biomolecules and evolution.

    Chakravarty, Ashim K

    2017-08-01

    The thermodynamic stability of biomolecules in the perspective of evolution is a complex issue and needs discussion. Intra molecular bonds maintain the structure and the state of internal energy (E) of a biomolecule at "local minima". In this communication, possibility of loss in internal energy level of a biomolecule through the changes in the bonds has been discussed, that might earn more thermodynamic stability for the molecule. In the process variations in structure and functions of the molecule could occur. Thus, E of a biomolecule is likely to have energy stature for minimization. Such change in energy status is an intrinsic factor for evolving biomolecules buying more stability and generating variations in the structure and function of DNA molecules undergoing natural selection. Thus, the variations might very well contribute towards the process of evolution. A brief discussion on conserved sequence in the light of proposition in this communication has been made at the end. Extension of the idea may resolve certain standing problems in evolution, such as maintenance of conserved sequences in genome of diverse species, pre- versus post adaptive mutations, 'orthogenesis', etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantum thermodynamics of general quantum processes.

    Binder, Felix; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Modi, Kavan; Goold, John

    2015-03-01

    Accurately describing work extraction from a quantum system is a central objective for the extension of thermodynamics to individual quantum systems. The concepts of work and heat are surprisingly subtle when generalizations are made to arbitrary quantum states. We formulate an operational thermodynamics suitable for application to an open quantum system undergoing quantum evolution under a general quantum process by which we mean a completely positive and trace-preserving map. We derive an operational first law of thermodynamics for such processes and show consistency with the second law. We show that heat, from the first law, is positive when the input state of the map majorizes the output state. Moreover, the change in entropy is also positive for the same majorization condition. This makes a strong connection between the two operational laws of thermodynamics.

  15. Thermodynamic properties of vanadium

    Desai, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    This work reviews and discusses the data and information on the various thermodynamic properties of vanadium available through March 1985. These include the heat capacity and enthalpy, enthalpy of melting, vapor pressure, and enthalpy of vaporization. The existing data have been critically evaluated and analyzed, and the recommended values for heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy function covering the temperature range from 1 to 3800 K have been generated. These values are referred to tempertures based on IPTS-1968. The units used for various properties are joules per mole (J. mol - 1 ). The estimated uncertainties in the heat capacity are +/-3% below 15 K, +/-10% from 15 to 150 K, +/-3% from 150 to 298.15 K, +/-2% from 298.15 to 1000 K, +/-3% from 1000 to the melting point (2202 K), and +/-5% in the liquid region

  16. Electronic states of aryl radical functionalized graphenes: Density functional theory study

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized graphenes are known as a high-performance molecular device. In the present study, the structures and electronic states of the aryl radical functionalized graphene have been investigated by the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of graphene (GR). Also, the mechanism of aryl radical reaction with GR was investigated. The benzene, biphenyl, p-terphenyl, and p-quaterphenyl radicals [denoted by (Bz) n (n = 1-4), where n means numbers of benzene rings in aryl radical] were examined as aryl radicals. The DFT calculation of GR-(Bz) n (n = 1-4) showed that the aryl radical binds to the carbon atom of GR, and a C-C single bond was formed. The binding energies of aryl radicals to GR were calculated to be ca. 6.0 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists in the aryl radical addition: the barrier heights were calculated to be 10.0 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of GR-(Bz) n were examined on the basis of theoretical results.

  17. Resting-state functional connectivity differences in premature children

    Eswar Damaraju

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine the coherence in the spontaneous brain activity of sleeping children as measured by the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals. The results are described in terms of resting-state networks (RSN and their properties. More specifically, in this study we examine the effect of severe prematurity on the spatial location of the visual, temporal, motor, basal ganglia, and the default mode networks, the temporal response properties of each of these networks, and the functional connectivity between them. Our results suggest that the anatomical locations of the RSNs are well developed by 18 months of age and their spatial locations are not distinguishable between premature and term born infants at 18 months or at 36 months, with the exception of small spatial differences noted in the basal ganglia area and the visual cortex. The two major differences between term and preterm children were present at 36 but not 18 months and include: 1 increased spectral energy in the low frequency range (0.01 – 0.06 Hz for pre-term children in the basal ganglia component, and 2 stronger connectivity between RSNs in term children. We speculate that children born very prematurely are vulnerable to injury resulting in weaker connectivity between resting state networks by 36 months of age. Further work is required to determine whether this could be a clinically useful tool to identify children at risk of developmental delay related to premature birth.

  18. The Functional State of Intestinal Microcirculation in Diffuse Peritonitis

    A. A. Kosovskikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the functional state of intestinal microcirculation in diffuse peritonitis caused by hollow organ perforation and to determine its possible relationship to skin microcirculation. Subjects and methods. Seventeen patients with diffuse peritonitis resulting from hollow organ perforation were examined. The patients’ mean age was 58.5±2.8 years; a control group consisted of 35 apparently healthy individuals. The functional state of the intestinal microcirculatory bed (the mid-transverse colon, the ileum at a distance of 60 cm from the ileocecal corner, the small bowel at a distance of 50 cm of the ligament of Treitz, and an area next hollow organ perforation and skin was evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry by means of a ЛАКК-02 laser capillary blood flow analyzer made in the Russian Federation (LAZMA Research-and-Production Association, Russian Federation. Results. Perforation of the affected intestinal portion became worse in patients with diffuse peritonitis. Blood flow stability was ensured by the higher effect of mainly active components of vascular tone regulation on the microvascular bed. Regulatory changes were equally pronounced at both the intraorgan and skin levels. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the patients with diffuse peritonitis have changes in microcirculatory regulation aimed at maintaining tissue perfusion. These changes are universal at both the intraorgan and skin levels. Key words: microcirculation, micro blood flow, intestine, peritonitis, tissue perfusion.

  19. Fundamental Research in Engineering Education. Development of Concept Questions and Inquiry-Based Activities in Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: An Example for Equilibrium vs. Steady-State

    Vigeant, Margot; Prince, Michael; Nottis, Katharyn

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the use of inquiry-based instruction to promote the understanding of critical concepts in thermodynamics and heat transfer. Significant research shows that students frequently enter our courses with tightly held misconceptions about the physical world that are not effectively addressed through traditional instruction. Students'…

  20. Thermodynamics of spinning branes and their dual field theories

    Harmark, Troels; Obers, N. A.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss general spinning p-branes of string and M-theory and use their thermodynamics along with the correspondence between near-horizon brane solutions and field theories with 16 supercharges to describe the thermodynamic behavior of these theories in the presence of voltages under the R......-symmetry. The thermodynamics is used to provide two pieces of evidence in favor of a smooth interpolation function between the free energy at weak and strong coupling of the field theory. (i) A computation of the boundaries of stability shows that for the D2, D3, D4, M2 and M5-branes the critical values of Omega/T in the two...... limits are remarkably close and (ii) The tree-level R^4 corrections to the spinning D3-brane generate a decrease in the free energy at strong coupling towards the weak coupling result. We also comment on the generalization to spinning brane bound states and their thermodynamics, which are relevant...

  1. Automatic Facial Expression Recognition and Operator Functional State

    Blanson, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of human error in safety-critical occupations remains a major challenge to mission success despite increasing automation in control processes. Although various methods have been proposed to prevent incidences of human error, none of these have been developed to employ the detection and regulation of Operator Functional State (OFS), or the optimal condition of the operator while performing a task, in work environments due to drawbacks such as obtrusiveness and impracticality. A video-based system with the ability to infer an individual's emotional state from facial feature patterning mitigates some of the problems associated with other methods of detecting OFS, like obtrusiveness and impracticality in integration with the mission environment. This paper explores the utility of facial expression recognition as a technology for inferring OFS by first expounding on the intricacies of OFS and the scientific background behind emotion and its relationship with an individual's state. Then, descriptions of the feedback loop and the emotion protocols proposed for the facial recognition program are explained. A basic version of the facial expression recognition program uses Haar classifiers and OpenCV libraries to automatically locate key facial landmarks during a live video stream. Various methods of creating facial expression recognition software are reviewed to guide future extensions of the program. The paper concludes with an examination of the steps necessary in the research of emotion and recommendations for the creation of an automatic facial expression recognition program for use in real-time, safety-critical missions

  2. Automatic Facial Expression Recognition and Operator Functional State

    Blanson, Nina

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of human error in safety-critical occupations remains a major challenge to mission success despite increasing automation in control processes. Although various methods have been proposed to prevent incidences of human error, none of these have been developed to employ the detection and regulation of Operator Functional State (OFS), or the optimal condition of the operator while performing a task, in work environments due to drawbacks such as obtrusiveness and impracticality. A video-based system with the ability to infer an individual's emotional state from facial feature patterning mitigates some of the problems associated with other methods of detecting OFS, like obtrusiveness and impracticality in integration with the mission environment. This paper explores the utility of facial expression recognition as a technology for inferring OFS by first expounding on the intricacies of OFS and the scientific background behind emotion and its relationship with an individual's state. Then, descriptions of the feedback loop and the emotion protocols proposed for the facial recognition program are explained. A basic version of the facial expression recognition program uses Haar classifiers and OpenCV libraries to automatically locate key facial landmarks during a live video stream. Various methods of creating facial expression recognition software are reviewed to guide future extensions of the program. The paper concludes with an examination of the steps necessary in the research of emotion and recommendations for the creation of an automatic facial expression recognition program for use in real-time, safety-critical missions.

  3. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  4. Thermodynamics for scientists and engineers

    Lim, Gyeong Hui

    2011-02-01

    This book deals with thermodynamics for scientists and engineers. It consists of 11 chapters, which are concept and background of thermodynamics, the first law of thermodynamics, the second law of thermodynamics and entropy, mathematics related thermodynamics, properties of thermodynamics on pure material, equilibrium, stability of thermodynamics, the basic of compound, phase equilibrium of compound, excess gibbs energy model of compound and activity coefficient model and chemical equilibrium. It has four appendixes on properties of pure materials and thermal mass.

  5. Simple functional-differential equations for the bound-state wave-function components

    Kamuntavicius, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The author presents a new method of a direct derivation of differential equations for the wave-function components of identical-particles systems. The method generates in a simple manner all the possible variants of these equations. In some cases they are the differential equations of Faddeev or Yakubovskii. It is shown that the case of the bound states allows to formulate very simple equations for the components which are equivalent to the Schroedinger equation for the complete wave function. The components with a minimal antisymmetry are defined and the corresponding equations are derived. (Auth.)

  6. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state: A functional MRI study.

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-10-25

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46.

  7. Critical properties and high-pressure volumetric behavior of the carbon dioxide+propane system at T=308.15 k. Krichevskii function and related thermodynamic properties.

    Blanco, Sofía T; Gil, Laura; García-Giménez, Pilar; Artal, Manuela; Otín, Santos; Velasco, Inmaculada

    2009-05-21

    Critical properties and volumetric behavior for the {CO2(1)+C3H8(2)} system have been studied. The critical locus was measured with a flow apparatus and detected by critical opalescence. For the mixtures, repeatabilities in critical temperature and pressure are rTcStructural properties such as direct and total correlation function integrals and cluster size were calculated using the Krichevskii function concept. Both the critical and volumetric behavior have been compared with literature data and with those obtained from the PC-SAFT and Patel-Teja equations of state.

  8. Limits of predictions in thermodynamic systems: a review

    Marsland, Robert, III; England, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    The past twenty years have seen a resurgence of interest in nonequilibrium thermodynamics, thanks to advances in the theory of stochastic processes and in their thermodynamic interpretation. Fluctuation theorems provide fundamental constraints on the dynamics of systems arbitrarily far from thermal equilibrium. Thermodynamic uncertainty relations bound the dissipative cost of precision in a wide variety of processes. Concepts of excess work and excess heat provide the basis for a complete thermodynamics of nonequilibrium steady states, including generalized Clausius relations and thermodynamic potentials. But these general results carry their own limitations: fluctuation theorems involve exponential averages that can depend sensitively on unobservably rare trajectories; steady-state thermodynamics makes use of a dual dynamics that lacks any direct physical interpretation. This review aims to present these central results of contemporary nonequilibrium thermodynamics in such a way that the power of each claim for making physical predictions can be clearly assessed, using examples from current topics in soft matter and biophysics.

  9. Thermodynamical properties of dark energy

    Gong Yungui; Wang Bin; Wang Anzhong

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the thermodynamical properties of dark energy. Assuming that the dark energy temperature T∼a -n and considering that the volume of the Universe enveloped by the apparent horizon relates to the temperature, we have derived the dark energy entropy. For dark energy with constant equation of state w>-1 and the generalized Chaplygin gas, the derived entropy can be positive and satisfy the entropy bound. The total entropy, including those of dark energy, the thermal radiation, and the apparent horizon, satisfies the generalized second law of thermodynamics. However, for the phantom with constant equation of state, the positivity of entropy, the entropy bound, and the generalized second law cannot be satisfied simultaneously

  10. Thermodynamically efficient solar concentrators

    Winston, Roland

    2012-10-01

    Non-imaging Optics is the theory of thermodynamically efficient optics and as such depends more on thermodynamics than on optics. Hence in this paper a condition for the "best" design is proposed based on purely thermodynamic arguments, which we believe has profound consequences for design of thermal and even photovoltaic systems. This new way of looking at the problem of efficient concentration depends on probabilities, the ingredients of entropy and information theory while "optics" in the conventional sense recedes into the background.

  11. Black Holes and Thermodynamics

    Wald, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We review the remarkable relationship between the laws of black hole mechanics and the ordinary laws of thermodynamics. It is emphasized that - in analogy with the laws of thermodynamics - the validity the laws of black hole mechanics does not appear to depend upon the details of the underlying dynamical theory (i.e., upon the particular field equations of general relativity). It also is emphasized that a number of unresolved issues arise in ``ordinary thermodynamics'' in the context of gener...

  12. The thermodynamic water retention capacity of solutions and gels.

    Borchard, W; Jablonski, P

    2003-01-01

    The thermodynamic water retention capacity (WRC) has been defined and applied to different heterogeneous phase equilibria. This definition includes others known from the literature for testing heterogeneous systems. For the type of a real solution it is shown that at constant values of temperature and pressure the WRC is related to the difference of the chemical potential of water between the original state and the state after having applied a constraint. The dependence of WRC on concentration of a solute is predicted to be described by an e-function which has been experimentally confirmed in the literature.

  13. Methods of thermodynamics

    Reiss, Howard

    1997-01-01

    Since there is no shortage of excellent general books on elementary thermodynamics, this book takes a different approach, focusing attention on the problem areas of understanding of concept and especially on the overwhelming but usually hidden role of ""constraints"" in thermodynamics, as well as on the lucid exposition of the significance, construction, and use (in the case of arbitrary systems) of the thermodynamic potential. It will be especially useful as an auxiliary text to be used along with any standard treatment.Unlike some texts, Methods of Thermodynamics does not use statistical m

  14. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    Rand, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    A report is presented of the Fourth International Symposium on Thermodynamics of Nuclear Materials held in Vienna, 21-25 October 1974. The technological theme of the Symposium was the application of thermodynamics to the understanding of the chemistry of irradiated nuclear fuels and to safety assessments for hypothetical accident conditions in reactors. The first four sessions were devoted to these topics and they were followed by four more sessions on the more basic thermodynamics, phase diagrams and the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of nuclear materials. Sixty-seven papers were presented

  15. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  16. Understanding the edge effect in wetting: a thermodynamic approach.

    Fang, Guoping; Amirfazli, A

    2012-06-26

    Edge effect is known to hinder spreading of a sessile drop. However, the underlying thermodynamic mechanisms responsible for the edge effect still is not well-understood. In this study, a free energy model has been developed to investigate the energetic state of drops on a single pillar (from upright frustum to inverted frustum geometries). An analysis of drop free energy levels before and after crossing the edge allows us to understand the thermodynamic origin of the edge effect. In particular, four wetting cases for a drop on a single pillar with different edge angles have been determined by understanding the characteristics of FE plots. A wetting map describing the four wetting cases is given in terms of edge angle and intrinsic contact angle. The results show that the free energy barrier observed near the edge plays an important role in determining the drop states, i.e., (1) stable or metastable drop states at the pillar's edge, and (2) drop collapse by liquid spilling over the edge completely or staying at an intermediate sidewall position of the pillar. This thermodynamic model presents an energetic framework to describe the functioning of the so-called "re-entrant" structures. Results show good consistency with the literature and expand the current understanding of Gibbs' inequality condition.

  17. [Correcting influence of music on the students' functional state].

    Gevorkian, É S; Minasian, S M; Abraamian, É T; Adamian, Ts I

    2013-01-01

    The influence of listening to classical music on integral indices of the activity of the regulatory mechanisms of the heart rhythm in students after teaching load was tested with the method of variational pulsometry accordingly to R.M Baevsky procedure. Registration and analysis of ECG was realized on Pentium 4 in three experimental situations: before the start of lessons (norm), after lessons, after listening to the music. Two types of response of students 'functional state to the teaching load: sympathetic and parasympathetic have been established. After teaching load music therapy session was found to led to the shift of levels of all examined indices of heart rhythm toward the original data (norm), most expressed in students with a sympathetic response type.

  18. Improved thermodynamics of SU(2) gauge theory

    Giudice, Pietro [University of Muenster, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Muenster (Germany); Piemonte, Stefano [University of Regensburg, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Regensburg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    In this work we present the results of our investigation of the thermodynamics of SU(2) gauge theory. We employ a Symanzik improved action to reduce strongly the discretisations effects, and we use the scaling relations to take into account the finite volume effects close to the critical temperature. We determine the β-function for this particular theory and we use it in the determination of different thermodynamic observables. Finally we compare our results with previous work where only the standard Wilson action was considered. We confirm the relevance of using the improved action to access easily the correct continuum thermodynamics of the theory. (orig.)

  19. Thermodynamical stability of the Bardeen black hole

    Bretón, Nora [Dpto. de Física, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I. P. N., Apdo. 14-740, D.F. (Mexico); Perez Bergliaffa, Santiago E. [Dpto. de Física, U. Estado do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-01-14

    We analyze the stability of the regular magnetic Bardeen black hole both thermodynamically and dynamically. For the thermodynamical analysis we consider a microcanonical ensemble and apply the turning point method. This method allows to decide a change in stability (or instability) of a system, requiring only the assumption of smoothness of the area functional. The dynamical stability is asserted using criteria based on the signs of the Lagrangian and its derivatives. It turns out from our analysis that the Bardeen black hole is both thermodynamically and dynamically stable.

  20. Thermodynamic mixing properties of the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} solid solution: Density functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations

    Yuan, Ke, E-mail: keyuan@umich.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ewing, Rodney C. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Becker, Udo [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    HfO{sub 2} is a neutron absorber and has been mechanically mixed with UO{sub 2} in nuclear fuel in order to control the core power distribution. During nuclear fission, the temperature at the center of the fuel pellet can reach above 1300 K, where hafnium may substitute uranium and form the binary solid solution of UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2}. UO{sub 2} adopts the cubic fluorite structure, but HfO{sub 2} can occur in monoclinic, tetragonal, and cubic structures. The distribution of Hf and U ions in the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary and its atomic structure influence the thermal conductivity and melting point of the fuel. However, experimental data on the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary are limited. Therefore, the enthalpies of mixing of the UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary with three different structures were calculated in this study using density functional theory and subsequent Monte Carlo simulations. The free energy of mixing was obtained from thermodynamic integration of the enthalpy of mixing over temperature. From the ΔG of mixing, a phase diagram of the binary was obtained. The calculated UO{sub 2}–HfO{sub 2} binary forms extensive solid solution across the entire compositional range, but there are a variety of possible exsolution phenomena associated with the different HfO{sub 2} polymorphs. As the structure of the HfO{sub 2} end member adopts lower symmetry and becomes less similar to cubic UO{sub 2}, the miscibility gap of the phase diagram expands, accompanied by an increase in cell volume by 7–10% as the structure transforms from cubic to monoclinic. Close to the UO{sub 2} end member, which is relevant to the nuclear fuel, the isometric uranium-rich solid solutions exsolve as the fuel cools, and there is a tendency to form the monoclinic hafnium-rich phase in the matrix of the isometric, uranium-rich solid solution phase.

  1. Leveraging Environmental Correlations: The Thermodynamics of Requisite Variety

    Boyd, Alexander B.; Mandal, Dibyendu; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-06-01

    Key to biological success, the requisite variety that confronts an adaptive organism is the set of detectable, accessible, and controllable states in its environment. We analyze its role in the thermodynamic functioning of information ratchets—a form of autonomous Maxwellian Demon capable of exploiting fluctuations in an external information reservoir to harvest useful work from a thermal bath. This establishes a quantitative paradigm for understanding how adaptive agents leverage structured thermal environments for their own thermodynamic benefit. General ratchets behave as memoryful communication channels, interacting with their environment sequentially and storing results to an output. The bulk of thermal ratchets analyzed to date, however, assume memoryless environments that generate input signals without temporal correlations. Employing computational mechanics and a new information-processing Second Law of Thermodynamics (IPSL) we remove these restrictions, analyzing general finite-state ratchets interacting with structured environments that generate correlated input signals. On the one hand, we demonstrate that a ratchet need not have memory to exploit an uncorrelated environment. On the other, and more appropriate to biological adaptation, we show that a ratchet must have memory to most effectively leverage structure and correlation in its environment. The lesson is that to optimally harvest work a ratchet's memory must reflect the input generator's memory. Finally, we investigate achieving the IPSL bounds on the amount of work a ratchet can extract from its environment, discovering that finite-state, optimal ratchets are unable to reach these bounds. In contrast, we show that infinite-state ratchets can go well beyond these bounds by utilizing their own infinite "negentropy". We conclude with an outline of the collective thermodynamics of information-ratchet swarms.

  2. Thermodynamic Properties of a First-Generation Carbosilane Dendrimer with Terminal Phenylethyl Groups

    Sologubov, S. S.; Markin, A. V.; Smirnova, N. N.; Novozhilova, N. A.; Tatarinova, E. A.; Muzafarov, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    The heat capacity of a first-generation carbosilane dendrimer with terminal phenylethyl groups as a function of temperature in the range from 6 to 520 K is studied for the first time via precision adiabatic vacuum calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Physical transformations, such as low-temperature structural anomaly and glass transition are detected in the above-mentioned range of temperatures, and their standard thermodynamic characteristics are determined and analyzed. The standard thermodynamic functions of the studied dendrimer in the range of T → 0 to 520 K are calculated from the experimental data, as is the standard entropy in the devitrified state at T = 298.15 K. The standard thermodynamic characteristics of the carbosilane dendrimers studied in this work and earlier are compared.

  3. Thermodynamic DFT analysis of natural gas.

    Neto, Abel F G; Huda, Muhammad N; Marques, Francisco C; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Neto, Antonio M J C

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory was performed for thermodynamic predictions on natural gas, whose B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31+G(d), CBS-QB3, G3, and G4 methods were applied. Additionally, we carried out thermodynamic predictions using G3/G4 averaged. The calculations were performed for each major component of seven kinds of natural gas and to their respective air + natural gas mixtures at a thermal equilibrium between room temperature and the initial temperature of a combustion chamber during the injection stage. The following thermodynamic properties were obtained: internal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy and entropy, which enabled us to investigate the thermal resistance of fuels. Also, we estimated an important parameter, namely, the specific heat ratio of each natural gas; this allowed us to compare the results with the empirical functions of these parameters, where the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and G3/G4 methods showed better agreements. In addition, relevant information on the thermal and mechanic resistance of natural gases were investigated, as well as the standard thermodynamic properties for the combustion of natural gas. Thus, we show that density functional theory can be useful for predicting the thermodynamic properties of natural gas, enabling the production of more efficient compositions for the investigated fuels. Graphical abstract Investigation of the thermodynamic properties of natural gas through the canonical ensemble model and the density functional theory.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of sea air

    R. Feistel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Very accurate thermodynamic potential functions are available for fluid water, ice, seawater and humid air covering wide ranges of temperature and pressure conditions. They permit the consistent computation of all equilibrium properties as, for example, required for coupled atmosphere-ocean models or the analysis of observational or experimental data. With the exception of humid air, these potential functions are already formulated as international standards released by the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (IAPWS, and have been adopted in 2009 for oceanography by IOC/UNESCO.

    In this paper, we derive a collection of formulas for important quantities expressed in terms of the thermodynamic potentials, valid for typical phase transitions and composite systems of humid air and water/ice/seawater. Particular attention is given to equilibria between seawater and humid air, referred to as "sea air" here. In a related initiative, these formulas will soon be implemented in a source-code library for easy practical use. The library is primarily aimed at oceanographic applications but will be relevant to air-sea interaction and meteorology as well.

    The formulas provided are valid for any consistent set of suitable thermodynamic potential functions. Here we adopt potential functions from previous publications in which they are constructed from theoretical laws and empirical data; they are briefly summarized in the appendix. The formulas make use of the full accuracy of these thermodynamic potentials, without additional approximations or empirical coefficients. They are expressed in the temperature scale ITS-90 and the 2008 Reference-Composition Salinity Scale.

  5. Functional capacity and mental state of patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Bruna Corrêa

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are a serious public health problem in Brazil. Myocardial revascularization surgery (MRS as well as cardiac valve replacement and repair are procedures indicated to treat them. Thus, extracorporeal circulation (ECC is still widely used in these surgeries, in which patients with long ECC times may have greater neurological deficits. Neurological damage resulting from MRS can have devastating consequences such as loss of independence and worsening of quality of life. Objective: To assess the effect of cardiac surgery on a patient’s mental state and functional capacity in both the pre- and postoperative periods. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with convenience sampling of subjects undergoing MRS and valve replacement. Participants were administered the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE and the Duke Activity Status Index (DASI in the pre- and postoperative periods, as well as before their hospital discharge. Results: This study assessed nine patients (eight males aged 62.4 ± 6.3 years with a BMI of 29.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2. There was a significant decrease in DASI scores and VO2 from preoperative to postoperative status (p = 0.003 and p = 0.003, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed a loss of cognitive and exercise capacity after cardiac surgery. A larger sample however is needed to consolidate these findings.

  6. Biochemical thermodynamics: applications of Mathematica.

    Alberty, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The most efficient way to store thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions is to use matrices of species properties. Since equilibrium in enzyme-catalyzed reactions is reached at specified pH values, the thermodynamics of the reactions is discussed in terms of transformed thermodynamic properties. These transformed thermodynamic properties are complicated functions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength that can be calculated from the matrices of species values. The most important of these transformed thermodynamic properties is the standard transformed Gibbs energy of formation of a reactant (sum of species). It is the most important because when this function of temperature, pH, and ionic strength is known, all the other standard transformed properties can be calculated by taking partial derivatives. The species database in this package contains data matrices for 199 reactants. For 94 of these reactants, standard enthalpies of formation of species are known, and so standard transformed Gibbs energies, standard transformed enthalpies, standard transformed entropies, and average numbers of hydrogen atoms can be calculated as functions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. For reactions between these 94 reactants, the changes in these properties can be calculated over a range of temperatures, pHs, and ionic strengths, and so can apparent equilibrium constants. For the other 105 reactants, only standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation and average numbers of hydrogen atoms at 298.15 K can be calculated. The loading of this package provides functions of pH and ionic strength at 298.15 K for standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation and average numbers of hydrogen atoms for 199 reactants. It also provides functions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength for the standard transformed Gibbs energies of formation, standard transformed enthalpies of formation, standard transformed entropies of formation, and average numbers of hydrogen atoms for 94

  7. Thermodynamics of nuclear materials

    1979-01-01

    Full text: The science of chemical thermodynamics has substantially contributed to the understanding of the many problems encountered in nuclear and reactor technology. These problems include reaction of materials with their surroundings and chemical and physical changes of fuels. Modern reactor technology, by its very nature, has offered new fields of investigations for the scientists and engineers concerned with the design of nuclear fuel elements. Moreover, thermodynamics has been vital in predicting the behaviour of new materials for fission as well as fusion reactors. In this regard, the Symposium was organized to provide a mechanism for review and discussion of recent thermodynamic investigations of nuclear materials. The Symposium was held in the Juelich Nuclear Research Centre, at the invitation of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany. The International Atomic Energy Agency has given much attention to the thermodynamics of nuclear materials, as is evidenced by its sponsorship of four international symposia in 1962, 1965, 1967, and 1974. The first three meetings were primarily concerned with the fundamental thermodynamics of nuclear materials; as with the 1974 meeting, this last Symposium was primarily aimed at the thermodynamic behaviour of nuclear materials in actual practice, i.e., applied thermodynamics. Many advances have been made since the 1974 meeting, both in fundamental and applied thermodynamics of nuclear materials, and this meeting provided opportunities for an exchange of new information on this topic. The Symposium dealt in part with the thermodynamic analysis of nuclear materials under conditions of high temperatures and a severe radiation environment. Several sessions were devoted to the thermodynamic studies of nuclear fuels and fission and fusion reactor materials under adverse conditions. These papers and ensuing discussions provided a better understanding of the chemical behaviour of fuels and materials under these

  8. Revealing topological organization of human brain functional networks with resting-state functional near infrared spectroscopy.

    Niu, Haijing; Wang, Jinhui; Zhao, Tengda; Shu, Ni; He, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The human brain is a highly complex system that can be represented as a structurally interconnected and functionally synchronized network, which assures both the segregation and integration of information processing. Recent studies have demonstrated that a variety of neuroimaging and neurophysiological techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion MRI and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography can be employed to explore the topological organization of human brain networks. However, little is known about whether functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), a relatively new optical imaging technology, can be used to map functional connectome of the human brain and reveal meaningful and reproducible topological characteristics. We utilized resting-state fNIRS (R-fNIRS) to investigate the topological organization of human brain functional networks in 15 healthy adults. Brain networks were constructed by thresholding the temporal correlation matrices of 46 channels and analyzed using graph-theory approaches. We found that the functional brain network derived from R-fNIRS data had efficient small-world properties, significant hierarchical modular structure and highly connected hubs. These results were highly reproducible both across participants and over time and were consistent with previous findings based on other functional imaging techniques. Our results confirmed the feasibility and validity of using graph-theory approaches in conjunction with optical imaging techniques to explore the topological organization of human brain networks. These results may expand a methodological framework for utilizing fNIRS to study functional network changes that occur in association with development, aging and neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  9. Altered thalamo-cortical resting state functional connectivity in smokers.

    Wang, Chaoyan; Bai, Jie; Wang, Caihong; von Deneen, Karen M; Yuan, Kai; Cheng, Jingliang

    2017-07-13

    The thalamus has widespread connections with the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and modulates communication between the striatum and PFC, which is crucial to the neural mechanisms of smoking. However, relatively few studies focused on the thalamic resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) patterns and their association with smoking behaviors in smokers. 24 young male smokers and 24 non-smokers were enrolled in our study. Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) was used to assess the nicotine dependence level. The bilateral thalamic RSFC patterns were compared between smokers and non-smokers. The relationship between neuroimaging findings and smoking behaviors (FTND and pack-years) were also investigated in smokers. Relative to nonsmokers, smokers showed reduced RSFC strength between the left thalamus and several brain regions, i.e. the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the bilateral caudate. In addition, the right thalamus showed reduced RSFC with the right dlPFC as well as the bilateral insula in smokers. Therefore, the findings in the current study revealed the reduced RSFC of the thalamus with the dlPFC, the ACC, the insula and the caudate in smokers, which provided new insights into the roles of the thalamus in nicotine addiction from a function integration perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. From Finite Time to Finite Physical Dimensions Thermodynamics: The Carnot Engine and Onsager's Relations Revisited

    Feidt, Michel; Costea, Monica

    2018-04-01

    Many works have been devoted to finite time thermodynamics since the Curzon and Ahlborn [1] contribution, which is generally considered as its origin. Nevertheless, previous works in this domain have been revealed [2], [3], and recently, results of the attempt to correlate Finite Time Thermodynamics with Linear Irreversible Thermodynamics according to Onsager's theory were reported [4]. The aim of the present paper is to extend and improve the approach relative to thermodynamic optimization of generic objective functions of a Carnot engine with linear response regime presented in [4]. The case study of the Carnot engine is revisited within the steady state hypothesis, when non-adiabaticity of the system is considered, and heat loss is accounted for by an overall heat leak between the engine heat reservoirs. The optimization is focused on the main objective functions connected to engineering conditions, namely maximum efficiency or power output, except the one relative to entropy that is more fundamental. Results given in reference [4] relative to the maximum power output and minimum entropy production as objective function are reconsidered and clarified, and the change from finite time to finite physical dimension was shown to be done by the heat flow rate at the source. Our modeling has led to new results of the Carnot engine optimization and proved that the primary interest for an engineer is mainly connected to what we called Finite Physical Dimensions Optimal Thermodynamics.

  11. Functional MRI: Genesis, State of the art and the Sequel

    Bharath, Rose Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) grow from an interesting experimental imaging technique in the hands of some to a primary investigation of choice in the localization and lateralization of brain function prior to surgery. Developments in the field of computational neurosciences have transformed fMRI analysis from classical subtractive type analysis to dynamic casual modeling, and now to graph theory analysis. This has widened the scope of fMRI, and is therefore finding applications in understanding neural correlates of diseases like autism and Alzheimer's disease, prognostication of diseases like traumatic brain injury, and has the potential to direct therapy. It is unfortunately true that this widened ambit has not received the clinical attention it deserves, probably because fMRI is susceptible to artifacts from skull base and blood products and has reduced sensitivity in patients with vascular malformations, or because a change in medical practice usually lags behind the technological and scientific developments that make it possible. This review focuses on the developmental chronology of fMRI image analysis in the last 25 years with highlights on major milestones like developments in the field of paradigms, analysis methods, resting state fMRI, and functional connectivity. To make the statistical images of brain at work more colorful, the article starts with genesis of fMRI and ends with the hope of a promising bright future. Many inputs for this article are obtained from a series of 103 review articles edited by Bandettini et al., compiling personal experiences of pioneers in this field. Interested readers are encouraged to refer to these for a more complete overview.

  12. Functional imaging reveals movement preparatory activity in the vegetative state

    Tristan A Bekinschtein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vegetative State (VS is characterized by the absence of awareness of self or the environment and preserved autonomic functions. The diagnosis relies critically on the lack of consistent signs of purposeful behavior in response to external stimulation. Yet, given that patients with disorders of consciousness often exhibit fragmented movement patterns, voluntary actions may go unnoticed. Here we designed a simple motor paradigm that could potentially detect residual conscious awareness in VS patients with mild to severe brain damage by examining the neural correlates of motor preparation in response to verbal commands. Twenty-four patients who met the diagnostic criteria for VS were recruited for this study. Eleven of these patients showing preserved auditory evoked potentials underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test for basic speech processing. Five of these patients, who showed word related activity, were included in a second fMRI study aimed at detecting functional changes in premotor cortex elicited by specific verbal instructions to move either their left or their right hand. Despite the lack of overt muscle activity, two patients out of five activated the dorsal premotor cortex contralateral to the instructed hand, consistent with movement preparation. Given that movement preparation in response to a motor command is a sign of purposeful behavior, our results are consistent with residual conscious awareness in these patients. We believe that the identification of positive results with fMRI using this simple task, may complement the clinical assessment by helping attain a more precise diagnosis in patients with disorders of consciousness.

  13. QED corrections to Planck's radiation law and photon thermodynamics

    Partovi, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Leading corrections to Planck's radiation formula and other photon thermodynamic functions arising from the pair-mediated photon-photon interaction are calculated. This interaction is found to be attractive and to cause a small increase in occupation number for all modes and a corresponding correction to the equation of state. The results are valid for the range of temperatures well below T e =5.9 GK, the temperature equivalent to the electron mass, a range for which the photon gas is essentially free of pair-produced electrons and positrons. An interesting effect of these corrections is the behavior of the photon gas as an elastic medium and its ability to propagate density perturbations. It is found that the cosmic photon gas subsequent to electron-positron annihilation would have manifested these elastic properties were it not for the presence of the free electrons and their dominance of the photon thermodynamics

  14. Detecting resting-state functional connectivity in the language system using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    Zhang, Yu-Jin; Lu, Chun-Ming; Biswal, Bharat B.; Zang, Yu-Feng; Peng, Dan-Lin; Zhu, Chao-Zhe

    2010-07-01

    Functional connectivity has become one of the important approaches to understanding the functional organization of the human brain. Recently, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was demonstrated as a feasible method to study resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in the sensory and motor systems. However, whether such fNIRS-based RSFC can be revealed in high-level and complex functional systems remains unknown. In the present study, the feasibility of such an approach is tested on the language system, of which the neural substrates have been well documented in the literature. After determination of a seed channel by a language localizer task, the correlation strength between the low frequency fluctuations of the fNIRS signal at the seed channel and those at all other channels is used to evaluate the language system RSFC. Our results show a significant RSFC between the left inferior frontal cortex and superior temporal cortex, components both associated with dominant language regions. Moreover, the RSFC map demonstrates left lateralization of the language system. In conclusion, the present study successfully utilized fNIRS-based RSFC to study a complex and high-level neural system, and provides further evidence for the validity of the fNIRS-based RSFC approach.

  15. Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium

    Fink, J.K.

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units

  16. Thermodynamics and heat power

    Granet, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental ConceptsIntroductionThermodynamic SystemsTemperatureForce and MassElementary Kinetic Theory of GasesPressureReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsWork, Energy, and HeatIntroductionWorkEnergyInternal EnergyPotential EnergyKinetic EnergyHeatFlow WorkNonflow WorkReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsFirst Law of ThermodynamicsIntroductionFirst Law of ThermodynamicsNonflow SystemSteady-Flow SystemApplications of First Law of ThermodynamicsReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsThe Second Law of ThermodynamicsIntroductionReversibility-Second Law of ThermodynamicsThe Carnot CycleEntropyReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsProperties of Liquids and GasesIntroductionLiquids and VaporsThermodynamic Properties of SteamComputerized PropertiesThermodynamic DiagramsProcessesReviewKey TermsEquations Developed in This ChapterQuestionsProblemsThe Ideal GasIntroductionBasic ConsiderationsSpecific Hea...

  17. The thermodynamic solar energy

    Rivoire, B.

    2002-04-01

    The thermodynamic solar energy is the technic in the whole aiming to transform the solar radiation energy in high temperature heat and then in mechanical energy by a thermodynamic cycle. These technic are most often at an experimental scale. This paper describes and analyzes the research programs developed in the advanced countries, since 1980. (A.L.B.)

  18. Quasiparticles and thermodynamical consistency

    Shanenko, A.A.; Biro, T.S.; Toneev, V.D.

    2003-01-01

    A brief and simple introduction into the problem of the thermodynamical consistency is given. The thermodynamical consistency relations, which should be taken into account under constructing a quasiparticle model, are found in a general manner from the finite-temperature extension of the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. Restrictions following from these relations are illustrated by simple physical examples. (author)

  19. Teaching elementary thermodynamics and energy conversion: Opinions

    Gaggioli, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation deals with innovation in teaching and understanding of thermodynamic principles. Key features of the approach being advocated are: (a) postulation of the existence of entropy, (b) explicitly associating energy transfers with other transports, (c) stating the 2nd Law in terms of Gibbs' available-energy, (d) systematic use of software such as EES. The paper outlines and elaborates upon an introductory course. Major headings in the course are: basic concepts: properties, additive properties and balances, primitive properties, energy, 1st Law. entropy, elementary academic applications of balances, available-energy, second law, exergy, thermostatic property relations, EES. Applications to processes, fluid flow, Heat transfer, thermochemical. Applications to devices, single-process, compound-process, systems (consisting of devices and processes functioning together).

  20. Thermodynamics of open, nonisothermal chemical systems far from equilibrium

    Yoshida, Nobuo

    1992-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of kinetic models based on a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) is studied in an attempt to seek general trends in the thermodynamic properties of open nonlinear systems. The models consist of two reversible reactions, A + nB rightleftharpoons (n + 1) B (n = 0,1,or 2) and B rightleftharpoons C, taking place in an adiabatic CSTR. The heat of reaction is incorporated, and the rate constants are assumed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. The models give rise to multiple stationary states and sustained oscillations (limit cycles). The entropy difference between stationary or oscillatory states and equilibrium and the rate of entropy production in the these states are calculated as a function of the residence time in the reactor. The entropy difference and entropy production may be taken, to some extent, as indicative of the influence of irreversible processes, which disappears at equilibrium. The results of the calculations reveal the following systematic trends: (I) The entropy difference or entropy production for stable states or both always increase as the residence time is shortened, namely, as the system is displaced further from equilibrium. (II) If stable and unstable states (stationary or oscillatory) coexist under identical conditions, then the stable state invariably has a smaller value of the entropy difference or entropy production or both than the corresponding unstable state. 26 refs., 3 figs