WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermionic space reactors

  1. Thermionic reactors for space nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, W. G.; Merrill, M. H.; Holland, J. W.; Fisher, C. R.; Allen, D. T.

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic reactor designs for a variety of space power applications spanning the range from 5 kWe to 3 MWe are described. In all of these reactors, nuclear heat is converted directly to electrical energy in thermionic fuel elements (TFEs). A circulating reactor coolant carries heat from the core of TFEs directly to a heat rejection radiator system. The recent design of a thermionic reactor to meet the SP-100 requirements is emphasized. Design studies of reactors at other power levels show that the same TFE can be used over a broad range in power, and that design modifications can extend the range to many megawatts. The design of the SP-100 TFE is similar to that of TFEs operated successfully in test reactors, but with design improvements to extend the operating lifetime to seven years.

  2. System modeling for the advanced thermionic initiative single cell thermionic space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Lewis, B.R.; Klein, A.C.; Pawlowski, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Incore thermionic space reactor design concepts which operate in a nominal power output range of 20 to 40 kWe are described. Details of the neutronics, thermionic, shielding, and heat rejection performance are presented. Two different designs, ATI-Driven and ATI-Driverless, are considered. Comparison of the core overall performance of these two configurations are described. The comparison of these two cores includes the overall conversion efficiency, reactor mass, shield mass, and heat rejection mass. An overall system design has been developed to model the advanced incore thermionic energy conversion based nuclear reactor systems for space applications in this power range

  3. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  4. System modeling and reactor design studies of the Advanced Thermionic Initiative space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Abdul-Hamid, S.; Klein, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    In-core thermionic space reactor design concepts that operate at a nominal power output range of 20 to 50 kW(electric) are described. Details of the neutronic, thermionic, thermal hydraulics, and shielding performance are presented. Because of the strong absorption of thermal neutrons by natural tungsten and the large amount of natural tungsten within the reactor core, two designs are considered. An overall system design code has been developed at Oregon State University to model advanced in-core thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor systems for space applications. The results show that the driverless single-cell Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI) configuration, which does not have driver fuel rods, proved to be more efficient than the driven core, which has driver rods. The results also show that the inclusion of the true axial and radial power distribution decrease the overall conversion efficiency. The flattening of the radial power distribution by three different methods would lead to a higher efficiency. The results show that only one TFE works at the optimum emitter temperature; all other TFEs are off the optimum performance and result in a 40% decrease of the efficiency of the overall system. The true axial profile is significantly different as there is a considerable amount of neutron leakage out of the top and bottom of the reactor. The analysis reveals that the axial power profile actually has a chopped cosine shape. For this axial profile, the reactor core overall efficiency for the driverless ATI reactor version is found to be 5.84% with a total electrical power of 21.92 kW(electric). By considering the true axial power profile instead of the uniform power profile, each TFE loses ∼80 W(electric)

  5. NUCLEAR THERMIONIC SPACE POWER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, R. C.; Rasor, N. S.

    1963-03-15

    The various concepts for utilizing thermionic conversion in space reactor power plants are described and evaluated. The problems (and progress toward their solution) of the in-core concept, particularly, are considered. Progress in thermionic conversion technology is then reviewed from both the hardware and research points of view. Anticipated progress in thermionic conversion and the possible consequences for the performance of electrical propulsion systems are summarized. 46 references. (D.C.W.)

  6. Development of a thermionic-reactor space-power system. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    Initial experimental work led to the award of the first AEC thermionic contract on May 1, 1962, for the development of fission heated thermionic cells with an operating life of 10,000 hours or more. Two types of converters were fabricated: (1) electrically heated, and (2) fission heated where the fuel was either uranium carbide or uranium oxide. Competition between GGA and GE was climaxed on July 1, 1970 by the award to GGA of a contract to develop an in-core thermionic reactor. This report is divided into the following: thermionic research, materials technology, thermionic fuel element development, reactor technology, and systems technology

  7. Low-temperature thermionics in space nuclear power systems with the safe-type fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Yarygin, V.I.; Lazarenko, G.E.; Zabudko, A.N.; Ovcharenko, M.K.; Pyshko, A.P.; Mironov, V.S.; Kuznetsov, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    The potentialities of the use of the low-temperature thermionic converters (TIC) with the emitter temperature ≤ 1500 K in the space nuclear power system (SNPS) with the SAFE-type (Safe Affordable Fission Engine) fast reactor proposed and developed by common efforts of American experts have been considered. The main directions of the 'SAFE-300-TEG' SNPS (300 kW(thermal)) design update by replacing the thermoelectric converters with the low-temperature high-performance thermionic converters (with the barrier index V B ≤ 1.9 eV and efficiency ≥ 10%) meant for a long-term operation (5 years at least) as the components of the SAFE-300-TIC SNPS for a Lunar base have been discussed. The concept of the SNPS with the SAFE-type fast reactor and low-temperature TICs with specific electric power of about 1.45 W/cm 2 as the components of the SAFE-300-TIC system meeting the Nasa's initial requirements to a Lunar base with the electric power demand of about 30 kW(electrical) for robotic mission has been considered. The results, involving optimization and mass-and-size estimation, show that the SAFE-300-TIC system meets the initial requirements by Nasa to the lunar base power supply. The main directions of the system update aimed at the output electric power increase up to 100 kW(electrical) have also been presented. (authors)

  8. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...

  9. The outlook for application of powerful nuclear thermionic reactor -powered space electric jet propulsion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semyonov, Y.P.; Bakanov, Y.A.; Synyavsky, V.V.; Yuditsky, V.D.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes main study results for application of powerful space electric jet propulsion unit (EJPUs) which is powered by Nuclear Thermionic Power Unit (NTPU). They are combined in Nuclear Power/Propulsion Unit (NPPU) which serves as means of spacecraft equipment power supply and spacecraft movement. Problems the paper deals with are the following: information satellites delivery and their on-orbit power supply during 10-15 years, removal of especially hazardous nuclear wastes, mining of asteroid resources and others. Evaluations on power/time/mass relationship for this type of mission are given. EJPU parameters are compatible with Russian existent or being under development launch vehicle. (author)

  10. Modeling transient thermal hydraulic behavior of a thermionic fuel element for nuclear space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kheliewi, A.S.; Klein, A.C.

    1994-01-01

    A transient code (TFETC) for determining the temperature distribution throughout the radial and axial positions of a thermionic fuel element (TFE) during changes in operating conditions has been successfully developed and tested. A fully implicit method is used to solve the system of equations for temperatures at each time step. Presently, TFETC has the ability to handle the following transients: startup, loss of flow accidents, and shutdown. The code has been applied to the startup of the ATI single cell configuration which appears to start up and shut down in an orderly and reasonable fashion. No unexpected transient features were observed. The TFE also appears to function robustly under loss of flow accident conditions. It appears hat sufficient time is available to shut the reactor down safely without melting point the fuel. The model shows that during a complete loss of flow accident (without shutdown) the coolant reaches its boiling point in approximately 35 seconds. The fuel may exceed its melting point after this time as the NaK coolant will boil if the reactor is not shut down. For 1/2, 1/3, and 1/4 pump failures, the fuel temperatures never exceed the fuel melting point even if the reactor is not shut down

  11. Thermionic conversion reactor technology assessment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    The in-core thermionic space nuclear power supply may be the only identified reactor-power concept that can meet the SP-100 size functional requirements with demonstrated state-of-the-art reactor system and space-qualified power system component temperatures. The SP-100 configuration limits provide a net 40 m 2 of primary non-deployed radiator area. If a reasonable 7-year degradation allowance of 15% to 20% is provided then the beginning of life (BOL) net power output requirement is about 120 kWe. Consequently, the SP-100 power system must produce a P/A of 2.7 kWe/m 2 . This non-deployed radiator area power density performance can only be reasonably achieved by the thermionic in-core convertr system, the potassium Rankine turbine system and the Stirling engine system. The purpose of this study is to examine past and current tests and data, and to assess the potential for successful development of suitable fueled-thermionic converters that will meet SP-100 and growth requirements. The basis for the assessment will be provided and the recommended key developments plan set forth

  12. Advanced thermionic reactor systems design code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.R.; Pawlowski, R.A.; Greek, K.J.; Klein, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    An overall systems design code is under development to model an advanced in-core thermionic nuclear reactor system for space applications at power levels of 10 to 50 kWe. The design code is written in an object-oriented programming environment that allows the use of a series of design modules, each of which is responsible for the determination of specific system parameters. The code modules include a neutronics and core criticality module, a core thermal hydraulics module, a thermionic fuel element performance module, a radiation shielding module, a module for waste heat transfer and rejection, and modules for power conditioning and control. The neutronics and core criticality module determines critical core size, core lifetime, and shutdown margins using the criticality calculation capability of the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon Transport Code System (MCNP). The remaining modules utilize results of the MCNP analysis along with FORTRAN programming to predict the overall system performance

  13. Oscillating thermionic conversion for high-density space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.L.; Morris, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The compactness, maneuverability, and productive weight utilization of space nuclear reactors benefit from the use of thermionic converters at high temperature. Nuclear-thermionic-conversion power requirements are discussed, and the role of oscillations in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) history is examined. Proposed TEC oscillations are addressed, and the results of recent studies of TEC oscillations are reviewed. The possible use of high-frequency TEC oscillations to amplify low-frequency ones is considered. The accomplishments of various programs studying the use of high-temperature thermionic oscillators are examined. 16 references

  14. Experimental investigation of high temperature high voltage thermionic diode for the space power nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onufriyev, Valery V.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that the rise of arc from the dense glow discharge is connected with the thermion and secondary processes on the cathode surface (Granovsky, 1971; Leob, 1953; Engel, 1935). First model of breakdown of the cathode layer is connected with the increase of the cathode temperature in consequence of the ion bombardment that leads to the grows its thermo-emissive current. Other model shows the main role of the secondary effects on the cathode surface-the increase of the secondary ion emission coefficient--γ i with the grows of glow discharge voltage. But the author of this investigation work of breakdown in Cs vapor (a transmission the glow discharge into self-maintaining arc discharge) discovered the next peculiarity: the value of breakdown voltage is constant when the values of vapor temperature (its pressure p cs ) and cathode temperature T k is constant too (U b =constant with T k =constant and p cs =constant) and it is not a statistical value (Onufryev, Grishin, 1996) (that was observed in gas glow discharges other authors (Granovsky, 1971; Leob, 1953; Engel, 1935)). The investigations of thermion high voltage high temperature diode (its breakdown characteristics in closed state and voltage-current characteristics in disclosed state) showed that the value of the breakdown voltage is depended on the vapor pressure in inter-electrode gap (IEG)-p cs and cathode temperature-T k and is independent on IEG length--Δ ieg . On this base it was settled that the main role in transition of glow discharge to self-maintaining arc discharge plays an ion cathode layer but more exactly--the region of excited atoms--''Aston glow.''

  15. Experimental investigation of high temperature high voltage thermionic diode for the space power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onufriyev, Valery. V.

    2001-02-01

    It is well known that the rise of arc from the dense glow discharge is connected with the thermion and secondary processes on the cathode surface (Granovsky, 1971; Leob, 1953; Engel, 1935). First model of breakdown of the cathode layer is connected with the increase of the cathode temperature in consequence of the ion bombardment that leads to the grows its thermo-emissive current. Other model shows the main role of the secondary effects on the cathode surface-the increase of the secondary ion emission coefficient-γi with the grows of glow discharge voltage. But the author of this investigation work of breakdown in Cs vapor (a transmission the glow discharge into self-maintaining arc discharge) discovered the next peculiarity: the value of breakdown voltage is constant when the values of vapor temperature (its pressure pcs) and cathode temperature Tk is constant too (Ub=constant with Tk=constant and pcs=constant) and it is not a statistical value (Onufryev, Grishin, 1996) (that was observed in gas glow discharges other authors (Granovsky, 1971; Leob, 1953; Engel, 1935)). The investigations of thermion high voltage high temperature diode (its breakdown characteristics in closed state and voltage-current characteristics in disclosed state) showed that the value of the breakdown voltage is depended on the vapor pressure in inter-electrode gap (IEG)-pcs and cathode temperature-Tk and is independent on IEG length-Δieg. On this base it was settled that the main role in transition of glow discharge to self-maintaining arc discharge plays an ion cathode layer but more exactly-the region of excited atoms-``Aston glow.'' .

  16. Thermionic integrated circuit technology for high power space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadavalli, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    Thermionic triode and integrated circuit technology is in its infancy and it is emerging. The Thermionic triode can operate at relatively high voltages (up to 2000V) and at least tens of amperes. These devices, including their use in integrated circuitry, operate at high temperatures (800 0 C) and are very tolerant to nuclear and other radiations. These properties can be very useful in large space power applications such as that represented by the SP-100 system which uses a nuclear reactor. This paper presents an assessment of the application of thermionic integrated circuitry with space nuclear power system technology. A comparison is made with conventional semiconductor circuitry considering a dissipative shunt regulator for SP-100 type nuclear power system rated at 100 kW. The particular advantages of thermionic circuitry are significant reductions in size and mass of heat dissipation and radiation shield subsystems

  17. Small ex-core heat pipe thermionic reactor concept (SEHPTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacox, M.G.; Bennett, R.G.; Lundberg, L.B.; Miller, B.G.; Drexler, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed an innovative space nuclear power concept with unique features and significant advantages for both Defense and Civilian space missions. The Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept was developed in response to Air Force needs for space nuclear power in the range of 10 to 40 kilowatts. This paper describes the SEHPTR concept and discusses the key technical issues and advantages of such a system

  18. Radioisotope thermionic converters for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskolczy, G.; Lieb, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The recent history of radioisotope thermionics is reviewed, with emphasis on the U.S. programs, and the prospects for the future are assessed. In radioisotope thermionic converters the emitter heat is generated by the decay of a radioactive isotope. The thermionic converter emitter is mounted directly on a capsule containing the isotope. The rest of the capsule is generally insulated to reduce thermal loss. The development of isotope-fueled thermionic power systems for space application has been pursued since the late 1950's. The U.S. effort was concentrated on modular systems with alpha emitters as the isotope heat source. In the SNAP-13 program, the heat sources were Cerium isotopes and each module produced about 100 watts. The converters were planar diodes and the capsule was insulated with multi-foil insulation

  19. A preliminary feasibility study of passive in-core thermionic reactors for highly compact space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Khan, E.U.; Frymire, R.; Negron, S.; Thomas, J.K.; Peddicord, K.L.

    1991-01-01

    Results of a preliminary feasibility study on a new concept for a highly compact space reactor power systems are presented. Notwithstanding the preliminary nature of the present study, the results which include a new space reactor configuration and its associated technologies indicate promising avenues for the devleopment of highly compact space reactors. The calculations reported in this study include a neutronic design trade-off study using a two-dimensioinal neutron transport model, as well as a simplified one-dimensional thermal analysis of the reactor core. In arriving at the most desirable configuration, various options have been considered and analyzed, and their advantages/disadvantages have been compared. However, because of space limitation, only the most favorable reactor configuration is presented in this summary

  20. Thermionic reactor power conditioner design for nuclear electric propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, A. S.; Tasca, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Consideration of the effects of various thermionic reactor parameters and requirements upon spacecraft power conditioning design. A basic spacecraft is defined using nuclear electric propulsion, requiring approximately 120 kWe. The interrelationships of reactor operating characteristics and power conditioning requirements are discussed and evaluated, and the effects on power conditioner design and performance are presented.

  1. Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

  2. The advanced thermionics initiative...program update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamp, T.R.; Donovan, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    The United States Air Force has had a long standing interest in thermionic space power dating back to the early 1960s when a heat pipe cooled thermionic converter was demonstrated through work at the predecessor to Wright Laboratory (WL). With the exception of the short hiatus in the mid-70s, Air Force thermionics work at Wright Laboratory has continued to the present time with thermionic technology programs including the burst power thermionic phase change concepts, heat pipe cooled planar diodes, and advanced in-core concept developments such as composite materials, insulators and oxygenation. The Advanced Thermionics Initiative (ATI) program was organized to integrate thermionic technology advances into a converter suitable for in-core reactor applications in the 10 to 40 kWe power range. As an advanced thermionics technology program, the charter and philosophy of the ATI program is to provide the needed advanced converter concepts in support of national thermionic space power programs

  3. Prospects for the use of thermionic nuclear power plants for interorbital transfers of space vehicles in near space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, P.V.; Zhabotinskii, E.E.; Nikonov, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    In a previous study the authors considered the use of thermionic nuclear power plants with a thermal reactor for interorbital transfers of space vehicles by electrojet propulsion systems (EJPSs), opening up broad prospects for putting payloads into a high orbit with relatively inexpensive means for a launch into a reference orbit, e.g., the Proton launch vehicle. This is of major importance for the commercial use of space technology, in particular, for erecting technological platforms for the production of various materials. In the work reported here the authors continue the study of interorbital transfers and explore the potentialities of thermionic NPPs with a thermal reactor and with a fast reactor. In boosted operation the electrical power of the latter may reach several hundred kilowatts. What type of NPP is desirable for testing an electrojet propulsion system in interorbital transfers from a reference orbit to a high orbit, providing that the time is limited, depends on the class of the launch vehicle characterized by the mass M o that the vehicle can carry into the reference orbit, where radiation safety conditions allow the NPP to be started up. Results of studies are presented that give an idea of the rational choice of type of thermionic NPP for the organization in interorbital transfers

  4. Advantages and implications of U233 fueled thermionic space power energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrell, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper two recent analyses are reported which demonstrate advantages of a U233 fueled thermionic fuel element (TFE) compared to 93 w/o U235, and that application (mission) has broad latitude in how space power reactor systems could or should be optimized. A reference thermionic reactor system was selected to provide the basis for the fuel comparisons. Both oxide and metal fuel forms were compared. Of special interest was to estimate the efficiencies of the four fuel forms to produce electrical power. A figure of merit (FOM) was defined which is directly proportional to the electrical average electrical power produced is proportional to the electrical power produced per unit uranium mass. In a TFE the average electrical power produced is proportional to the emitter surface area (Esa), hence the ratio Esa/Mu was selected as the FOM. Results indicate that the choice of fuel type and form leads to wide variations in critical and system masses FOM values, and system total power

  5. A50-kW(el) solar energy thermionic power generator for spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.

    1978-01-01

    The technical limits of thermionic reactors in space craft and the potentials of solar energy thermionic converters are discussed. The technical design of a solar energy thermionic generator for 50 kW(el) as a secondary energy source in unmanned space craft is presented. (GG) [de

  6. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  7. Fracture-resistant ultralloys for space-power systems: nuclear-thermionic-conversion implications of W,27Re

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraga, N.O.; Jacobsen, D.L.; Morris, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Rhenium (Re) added to tungsten (W) improves the creep strength, recrystallization resistance and ductility. W,27Re is a good workable ultra alloy for use in space nuclear reactor (SNR) systems and perhaps its most practical processing procedure is sintering. A promising SNR application for such ultralloys is very-high-temperature thermionic energy conversion. Therefore determinations of thermionic and thermal emissive characteristics for sintered W,27Re at temperatures near and above 2000 K in hard vacuum enable both scientific and pragmatic progress. Such research results comprise the data and interpretive presentations in this paper. These findings emphasize the fallacy of characterizing ultralloys similar to W,27Re with single-valued thermophysicochemical properties - such as the work function. They further stress the necessity for investigations of this type to determine and demonstrate effective prototypic ultralloy compositions and processing methods. (author)

  8. The measure system of thermion energy switch over in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xing

    1999-01-01

    The system is the application of VI in the field of reactor, to use LabWINDOW/CVI and currency PC collection card, the system can measure and analyse the speciality of V-I and temperature. It is perfectly and high rate performance system, it can be expand to 128 channels for get dissimilitude signal. It can be used in M and C of all kinds field

  9. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-01-01

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163

  10. DOD's advanced thermionics program an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) manages a congressionally mandated program in advanced thermionics research. Guided by congressional language to advance the state-of-the-art in the US and support the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) program, DSWA efforts concentrate on four areas: an electrically testable design of a high-performance, in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE), the ISUS program, a microminiature thermionic converter and several modeling efforts. The DSWA domestic program is augmented by several small contracts with Russian institutes, awarded under the former TOPAZ International Program that the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization transferred to DSWA. The design effort at General Atomics will result in an electrically testable, multi-cell TFE for in-core conversion, involving system design and advanced collector and emitter technologies. For the ISUS program, DSWA funded a portion of the engine ground demonstration, including development of the power management system and the planar diodes. Current efforts supporting ISUS include continued diode testing and developing an advanced planar diode. The MTC program seeks to design a mass producable, close-spaced thermionic converter using integrated circuit technologies. Modeling and analysis at DSWA involves development of the Reactor System Mass with Thermionics estimation model (RSMASS-T), developing a new thermionic theory, and reviewing applications for the MTC technology. The Russian deliverables include several reports and associated hardware that describe many of its state-of-the-art thermionic technologies and processes

  11. Mission operations for unmanned nuclear electric propulsion outer planet exploration with a thermionic reactor spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, R. J.; Prickett, W. Z.; Garate, J. A.; Firth, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    Mission operations are presented for comet rendezvous and outer planet exploration NEP spacecraft employing in-core thermionic reactors for electric power generation. The selected reference missions are the Comet Halley rendezvous and a Jupiter orbiter at 5.9 planet radii, the orbit of the moon Io. The characteristics of the baseline multi-mission NEP spacecraft are presented and its performance in other outer planet missions, such as Saturn and Uranus orbiters and a Neptune flyby, are discussed. Candidate mission operations are defined from spacecraft assembly to mission completion. Pre-launch operations are identified. Shuttle launch and subsequent injection to earth escape by the Centaur D-1T are discussed, as well as power plant startup and the heliocentric mission phases. The sequence and type of operations are basically identical for all missions investigated.

  12. Calculational models of close-spaced thermionic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Two new calculational models have been developed in conjunction with the SAVTEC experimental program. These models have been used to analyze data from experimental close-spaced converters, providing values for spacing, electrode work functions, and converter efficiency. They have also been used to make performance predictions for such converters over a wide range of conditions. Both models are intended for use in the collisionless (Knudsen) regime. They differ from each other in that the simpler one uses a Langmuir-type formulation which only considers electrons emitted from the emitter. This approach is implemented in the LVD (Langmuir Vacuum Diode) computer program, which has the virtue of being both simple and fast. The more complex model also includes both Saha-Langmuir emission of positive cesium ions from the emitter and collector back emission. Computer implementation is by the KMD1 (Knudsen Mode Diode) program. The KMD1 model derives the particle distribution functions from the Vlasov equation. From these the particle densities are found for various interelectrode motive shapes. Substituting the particle densities into Poisson's equation gives a second order differential equation for potential. This equation can be integrated once analytically. The second integration, which gives the interelectrode motive, is performed numerically by the KMD1 program. This is complicated by the fact that the integrand is often singular at one end point of the integration interval. The program performs a transformation on the integrand to make it finite over the entire interval. Once the motive has been computed, the output voltage, current density, power density, and efficiency are found. The program is presently unable to operate when the ion richness ratio β is between about .8 and 1.0, due to the occurrence of oscillatory motives

  13. The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET): Descriptions, limitations, and the involvement of the space nuclear power community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Project and test planning for the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Project began in August 1990. Since the formalization of the contract agreement two years ago, the TOPAZ-II testing hardware was delivered in May 1992. In the months since the delivery of the test hardware, Russians and Americans working side-by-side installed the equipment and are preparing to begin testing in early 1993. The procurement of the Russian TOPAZ-II unfueled thermionic space nuclear power system (SNP) provides a unique opportunity to understand a complete thermionic system and enhances the possibility for further study of this type of power conversion for space applications. This paper will describe the program and test article, facility and test article limitations, and how the government and industry are encouraged to be involved in the program

  14. Reflector drums as control mechanism for craft thermionic reactors with constant emitter heating containing U-233 as fuel and beryllium as moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, S.; Selvi, S.

    1980-01-01

    The suitability of borated reflector drums has been investigated and shown as a control mechanism for space craft thermionic reactors with constant emitter heating using U-233 as fuel and beryllium to be moderator, mainly due to their extremce compactness and their very soft neutron sepctrum. The achievable change in ksub(eff) allows long-term control operation with success. The use of reflector drums keeps the cone diameter and the mass of the radiation shield on minimum. The distortion of the emitter heating field remains under acceptable tolerances, mainly due to the enhanced neutron production at the outer core region and the remaining reflector part between the boron layer and the core. All neutron physics calculations have been carried out using the multigroup Ssub(N) methods. Three data groups for r-theta-calculations in S 4 -P 1 approximation (16 space angles) have been evaluated from a 123-energy-groups data library using transport theoretical methods. (orig.) [de

  15. Trade study for kWe class space reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Donald S.

    Recent interest by NASA and other government agencies in space reactor power systems with power levels in the 1 to 100 kWe range has prompted a review of earlier space reactor programs, as well as the ongoing SP-100 program, to identify a system that will best fulfill their needs. The candidate reactor types that were reviewed are listed. They are categorized according to the method of heat removal. The five types are: conduction cooled, heat pipe cooled, liquid metal cooled, in-core thermionic and gas cooled. The UZrH moderated reactor coupled with an organic Rankine cycle power conversion system provides an attractive system for multikilowatt, long lived missions. The reactor requires a minimum development because a similar reactor has already flown and the ORC is being developed for use in the Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) and on the Space Station.

  16. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  17. Alternative model of space-charge-limited thermionic current flow through a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanell, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    It is widely assumed that thermionic current flow through a plasma is limited by a "space-charge-limited" (SCL) cathode sheath that consumes the hot cathode's negative bias and accelerates upstream ions into the cathode. Here, we formulate a fundamentally different current-limited mode. In the "inverse" mode, the potentials of both electrodes are above the plasma potential, so that the plasma ions are confined. The bias is consumed by the anode sheath. There is no potential gradient in the neutral plasma region from resistivity or presheath. The inverse cathode sheath pulls some thermoelectrons back to the cathode, thereby limiting the circuit current. Thermoelectrons entering the zero-field plasma region that undergo collisions may also be sent back to the cathode, further attenuating the circuit current. In planar geometry, the plasma density is shown to vary linearly across the electrode gap. A continuum kinetic planar plasma diode simulation model is set up to compare the properties of current modes with classical, conventional SCL, and inverse cathode sheaths. SCL modes can exist only if charge-exchange collisions are turned off in the potential well of the virtual cathode to prevent ion trapping. With the collisions, the current-limited equilibrium must be inverse. Inverse operating modes should therefore be present or possible in many plasma devices that rely on hot cathodes. Evidence from past experiments is discussed. The inverse mode may offer opportunities to minimize sputtering and power consumption that were not previously explored due to the common assumption of SCL sheaths.

  18. Nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-06-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Lifetimes of 7 to 10 yr at full power, at converter operating temperatures of 1275 to 1675 0 K, are being studied. The systems are being designed such that no single-failure modes exist that will cause a complete loss of power. In fact, to meet the long lifetimes, highly redundant design features are being emphasized. Questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. ''Fail-safe'' means to prevent exposure of the population to radioactive material, meeting the environmental guidelines established by the U.S. Government have been and continue to be a necessary requirement for any space reactor program. The major safety feature to prevent prelaunch and launch radioactive material hazards is not operating the reactor before achieving the prescribed orbit. Design features in the reactor ensure that accidental criticality cannot occur. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit, where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. Orbits below 400 to 500 nautical miles are the ones where a safety issue is involved in case of satellite malfunction. The potential missions, the question of why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations will be discussed

  19. Status report on nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Increased questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. The potential missions, why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations are discussed

  20. Space nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damon, D.; Temme, M.; Brown, N.

    1990-01-01

    Definition of safety requirements and design features of the SP-100 space reactor power system has been guided by a mission risk analysis. The analysis quantifies risk from accidental radiological consequences for a reference mission. Results show that the radiological risk from a space reactor can be made very low. The total mission risk from radiological consequences for a shuttle-launched, earth orbit SP-100 mission is estimated to be 0.05 Person-REM (expected values) based on a 1 mREM/yr de Minimus dose. Results are given for each mission phase. The safety benefits of specific design features are evaluated through risk sensitivity analyses

  1. Impact of the use of low or medium enriched uranium on the masses of space nuclear reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The design process for determining the mass increase for the substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) for high-enriched uranium (HEU) in space nuclear reactor systems is an optimization process which must simultaneously consider several variables. This process becomes more complex whenever the reactor core operates on an in-core thermionic power conversion, in which the fissioning of the nuclear fuel is used to directly heat thermionic emitters, with the subsequent elimination of external power conversion equipment. The increased complexity of the optimization process for this type of system is reflected in the work reported herein, where considerably more information has been developed for the moderated in-core thermionic reactors

  2. Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koening, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MWth to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat-pipe temperature of 1675 K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum/lithium-vapor heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO2 pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber, and a BeO reflector containing boron-loaded control drums.

  3. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1993-08-11

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power.

  4. Summary of space nuclear reactor power systems, 1983--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes major developments in the last ten years which have greatly expanded the space nuclear reactor power systems technology base. In the SP-100 program, after a competition between liquid-metal, gas-cooled, thermionic, and heat pipe reactors integrated with various combinations of thermoelectric thermionic, Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling energy conversion systems, three concepts:were selected for further evaluation. In 1985, the high-temperature (1,350 K), lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectric conversion was selected for full scale development. Since then, significant progress has been achieved including the demonstration of a 7-y-life uranium nitride fuel pin. Progress on the lithium-cooled reactor with thermoelectrics has progressed from a concept, through a generic flight system design, to the design, development, and testing of specific components. Meanwhile, the USSR in 1987--88 orbited a new generation of nuclear power systems beyond the, thermoelectric plants on the RORSAT satellites. The US has continued to advance its own thermionic fuel element development, concentrating on a multicell fuel element configuration. Experimental work has demonstrated a single cell operating time of about 1 1/2-y. Technology advances have also been made in the Stirling engine; an advanced engine that operates at 1,050 K is ready for testing. Additional concepts have been studied and experiments have been performed on a variety of systems to meet changing needs; such as powers of tens-to-hundreds of megawatts and highly survivable systems of tens-of-kilowatts power

  5. Thermionic system evaluated test (TSET) facility description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Jerry F.; Koonmen, James P.; Thome, Frank V.

    1992-01-01

    A consortium of US agencies are involved in the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) which is being supported by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). The project is a ground test of an unfueled Soviet TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electrical heat. It is part of the United States' national thermionic space nuclear power program. It will be tested in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute complex by the Phillips Laboratoty, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the University of New Mexico. One of TSET's many objectives is to demonstrate that the US can operate and test a complete space nuclear power system, in the electrical heater configuration, at a low cost. Great efforts have been made to help reduce facility costs during the first phase of this project. These costs include structural, mechanical, and electrical modifications to the existing facility as well as the installation of additional emergency systems to mitigate the effects of utility power losses and alkali metal fires.

  6. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  7. Effects of irradiation on properties of refractory alloys with emphasis on space power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiffen, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The probable effects of irradiation on niobium and tungsten alloys in use as components of thermionic convertors in a space reactor were reviewed by the author in 1971. While considerably more data on refractory metals have been generated since that time, the data have not been reviewed with respect to space reactor applications. This paper attempts such a review. The approach used is to work from the most recently available review of irradiation effects for each alloy system (where such a review is available) and to discuss that review and more recent data judged to be the most useful in establishing likely behavior in high-temperature reactor service. 28 figures, 6 tables

  8. Development of high-current-density LAB6 thermionic emitters for a space-charge-limited electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herniter, M.E.; Getty, W.D.

    1987-01-01

    An electron gun has been developed for investigation of high current density, space charge limited operation of a lenthanum hexaboride (LaB 6 ) thermionic cathode. The 2.8 cm 2 cathode disk is heated by electron bombardment from a tungsten filament. For LaB 6 cathode temperatures greater than 1600 0 C it has been found that evaporation from the LaB 6 causes an increase in the tungsten filament emission, leading to an instability in the bombardment heating system. This instability has been investigated and eliminated by using a graphite disk in place of the LaB 6 cathode or by shielding the filament from the LaB 6 cathode by placing the LaB 6 in a graphite cup and bombarding the cup. The graphite disk has been heated to 1755 0 C with 755 W of heating power, and the shielded LaB 6 cathode has been heated to 1695 0 C. This temperature range is required for emission current densities in the 30 Acm 2 range. It is believed that the evaporation of lanthanum lowers the tungsten work function. In electron-gun use, the LaB 6 cathode has been operated up to 6.7 Acm 2 at 36 kV. A 120 kV Marx generator has been built to allow operation up to 40 Acm 2

  9. Unique features of space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on space reactors that are designed to meet a unique set of requirements; they must be sufficiently compact to be launched in a rocket to their operational location, operate for many years without maintenance and servicing, operate in extreme environments, and reject heat by radiation to space. To meet these restrictions, operating temperatures are much greater than in terrestrial power plants, and the reactors tend to have a fast neutron spectrum. Currently, a new generation of space reactor power plants is being developed. The major effort is in the SP-100 program, where the power plant is being designed for seven years of full power, and no maintenance operation at a reactor outlet operating temperature of 1350 K

  10. Isotopic Thermionic Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemot, M.; Devin, B.; Durand, J.P.

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the general design of a thermionic direct conversion space generator. The power source used is a radioisotope. Two radioisotopes are considered: Pu 238 and Cm 244. The system is made up of a heat pipe concentrating the thermal flux from the isotope to the emitter, and of a second heat pipe evacuating the waste heat from the collector to the outer wall used as radiating panel. Calculations are given in the particular case of a 100 electrical watts output power. (authors) [fr

  11. Space reactor preliminary mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis was performed on the SABRE reactor space power system to determine the effect of the number and size of heat pipes on the design parameters of the nuclear subsystem. Small numbers of thin walled heat pipes were found to give a lower subsystem mass, but excessive fuel swelling resulted. The SP-100 preliminary design uses 120 heat pipes because of acceptable fuel swelling and a minimum nuclear subsystem mass of 1875 kg. Salient features of the reactor preliminary design are: individual fuel modules, ZrO 2 block core mounts, bolted collar fuel module restraints, and a BeO central plug

  12. Selection of power plant elements for future reactor space electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Bennett, G.A.; Copper, K.

    1979-09-01

    Various types of reactor designs, electric power conversion equipment, and reject-heat systems to be used in nuclear reactor power plants for future space missions were studied. The designs included gas-cooled, liquid-cooled, and heat-pipe reactors. For the power converters, passive types such as thermoelectric and thermionic converters and dynamic types such as Brayton, potassium Rankine, and Stirling cycles were considered. For the radiators, heat pipes for transfer and radiating surface, pumped fluid for heat transfer with fins as the radiating surface, and pumped fluid for heat transfer with heat pipes as the radiating surface were considered. After careful consideration of weights, sizes, reliabilities, safety, and development cost and time, a heat-pipe reactor design, thermoelectric converters, and a heat-pipe radiator for an experimental program were selected

  13. Nuclear reactor refuelable in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Buden, D.; Mims, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a gas cooled nuclear reactor suitable for use in space. It comprises a lightweight structure comprising a plurality of at least three sections, each sector comprising a container for a reactor core separate and distinct from the reactor cores of the other sectors, each sector being capable of operating on its own and in cooperation with one or more of the other sectors and each sector having a common juncture with every other structure; and means associated with each sector independently introducing gas coolant into and extracting coolant from each sector to cool the core therein, wherein in event of failure of the cooling system of a core in a sector, one or more of the other sectors comprise means for conducting heat away from the failed sector core and means for convecting the heat away, and wherein operation of the one or more other sectors is maintained

  14. Thermionic photovoltaic energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, D. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A thermionic photovoltaic energy conversion device comprises a thermionic diode mounted within a hollow tubular photovoltaic converter. The thermionic diode maintains a cesium discharge for producing excited atoms that emit line radiation in the wavelength region of 850 nm to 890 nm. The photovoltaic converter is a silicon or gallium arsenide photovoltaic cell having bandgap energies in this same wavelength region for optimum cell efficiency.

  15. Present status of space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko

    1996-01-01

    USA and former USSR led space development, and had the experience of launching nuclear reactor satellites. In USA, the research and development of space nuclear reactor were advanced mainly by NASA, and in 1965, the nuclear reactor for power source ''SNAP-10A'' was launched and put on the orbit around the earth. Thereafter, the reactor was started up, and the verifying test at 500 We was successfully carried out. Also for developing the reactor for thermal propulsion, NERVA/ROVER project was done till 1973, and the technological basis was established. The space Exploration Initiative for sending mankind to other solar system planets than the earth is the essential point of the future projects. In former USSR, the ground experiment of the reactor for 800 We power source ''Romashka'', the development of the reactor for 10 kWe power source ''Topaz-1 and 2'', the flight of the artificial satellites, Cosmos 954 and Cosmos 1900, on which nuclear reactors were mounted, and the operation of 33 ocean-monitoring satellites ''RORSAT'' using small fast reactors were carried out. The mission of space development and the nuclear reactors as power source, the engineering of space nuclear reactors, the present status and the trend of space nuclear reactor development, and the investigation by the UN working group on the safety problem of space nuclear reactors are described. (K.I.)

  16. Space-time reactor kinetics for heterogeneous reactor structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1969-11-15

    An attempt is made to formulate time dependent diffusion equation based on Feinberg-Galanin theory in the from analogue to the classical reactor kinetic equation. Parameters of these equations could be calculated using the existing codes for static reactor calculation based on the heterogeneous reactor theory. The obtained kinetic equation could be analogues in form to the nodal kinetic equation. Space-time distribution of neutron flux in the reactor can be obtained by solving these equations using standard methods.

  17. Nuclear safety considerations in the conceptual design of a fast reactor for space electric power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.-M.; Koenig, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Some nuclear safety aspects of a 3.2 mWt heat pipe cooled fast reactor with out-of-core thermionic converters are discussed. Safety related characteristics of the design including a thin layer of B4C surrounding the core, the use of heat pipes and BeO reflector assembly, the elimination of fuel element bowing, etc., are highlighted. Potential supercriticality hazards and countermeasures are considered. Impacts of some safety guidelines of space transportation system are also briefly discussed, since the currently developing space shuttle would be used as the primary launch vehicle for the nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft.

  18. Application of a Systems Engineering Approach to Support Space Reactor Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Scott

    2005-01-01

    In 1992, approximately 25 Russian and 12 U.S. engineers and technicians were involved in the transport, assembly, inspection, and testing of over 90 tons of Russian equipment associated with the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility. The entire Russian Baikal Test Stand, consisting of a 5.79 m tall vacuum chamber and related support equipment, was reassembled and tested at the TSET facility in less than four months. In November 1992, the first non-nuclear operational test of a complete thermionic power reactor system in the U.S. was accomplished three months ahead of schedule and under budget. A major factor in this accomplishment was the application of a disciplined top-down systems engineering approach and application of a spiral development model to achieve the desired objectives of the TOPAZ International Program (TIP). Systems Engineering is a structured discipline that helps programs and projects conceive, develop, integrate, test and deliver products and services that meet customer requirements within cost and schedule. This paper discusses the impact of Systems Engineering and a spiral development model on the success of the TOPAZ International Program and how the application of a similar approach could help ensure the success of future space reactor development projects

  19. Space reactor fuels performance and development issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three compact reactor concepts are now under consideration by the US Space Nuclear Power Program (the SP-100 Program) as candidates for the first 100-kWe-class space reactor. Each of these reactor designs puts unique constraints and requirements on the fuels system, and raises issues of fuel systems feasibility and performance. This paper presents a brief overview of the fuel requirements for the proposed space reactor designs, a delineation of the technical feasibility issues that each raises, and a description of the fuel systems development and testing program that has been established to address key technical issues

  20. SP-100 thermionic technology program annual integrated technical progress report for the period ending September 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, J.W.

    1984-11-01

    The thermionic technology program addresses the feasibility issues of a seven-year-life thermionic fuel element (TFE) for the SP-100 Thermionic Reactor Space Power System. These issues relate to the extension of TFE lifetime from three to seven years, one of the SP-100 requirements. The technology to support three-year lifetimes was demonstrated in the earlier TFE development program conducted in the late-1960s and 1970s. Primary life-limiting factors were recognized to be thermionic emitter dimensional increases due to swelling of the nuclear fuel and electrical structural damage from fast neutrons. The 1984-85 technology program is investigating the fueled emitter and insulator lifetime issues, both experimentally and analytically. The goal is to analytically project the lifetime of the fueled emitter and insulator and to experimentally verify these projection methods. In 1984, the efforts were largely devoted to the design and building of fueled emitters for irradiation in 1985, validation of fuel-emitter models, development of irradiation-resistant metal-ceramic seal and sheath insulator, modeling of insulator lifetime, and development of wide-spread, high-performance thermionic converters

  1. Space reactors - past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.

    1983-01-01

    In the 1990s and beyond, advanced-design nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. Many sophisticated military and civilian space missions of the future will require first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. This paper reviews key technology developments that accompanied past US space nuclear power development efforts, describes on-going programs, and then explores reactor technologies that will satisfy megawatt power level needs and beyond

  2. Space reactors, a prospective for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlquist, E.; Voss, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The power requirements for future space missions are increasing and alternate power systems will be required to meet these needs. Therefore, in the early 1980's a tri-agency space reactor program, the SP-100, was initiated that is capable of meeting the higher power requirements. To understand the current space reactor program, it is important to review it in the context of past space nuclear programs - including radioisotopes, nuclear rockets and reactors. Initial effort on these programs began in the mid-1950's. Radioisotope generators have been flown on a variety of missions and are continuing to be used. The space reactor and nuclear rocket programs were technically successful but were both terminated in 1973. The current SP-100 program builds on those earlier programs

  3. Thermionic system evaluation test (TSET) facility construction: A United States and Russian effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, S.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of an unfueled Russian TOPAZ-II in-core thermionic space reactor powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the TOPAZ-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) complex in Albuquerque, NM. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment is the responsibility of International Scientific Products (ISP), a San Jose, CA, company and Inertek, a Russian corporation, with support provided by engineers and technicians from Phillips Laboratory (PL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the University of New Mexico (UNM). This test is the first test to be performed under the New Mexico Strategic Alliance agreement. This alliance consists of the PL, SNL, LANL, and UNM. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) with the PL responsible for project execution

  4. Thermionic phenomena the collected works of Irving Langmuir

    CERN Document Server

    Suits, C Guy

    1961-01-01

    Thermionic Phenomena is the third volume of the series entitled The Collected Works of Irving Langmuir. This volume compiles articles written during the 1920's and early 1930's, the period when the science of thermionics is beginning to be of importance. This text is divided into two parts. The first part discusses vacuum pumps, specifically examining the effect of space charge and residual gases on thermionic currents in high vacuum. This part also explains fundamental phenomena in electron tubes having tungsten cathodes and the use of high-power vacuum tubes. The second part of this text loo

  5. New generation of reactors for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreau, J.E.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    Space nuclear reactor power is expected to enable many new space missions that will require several times to several orders of magnitude anything flown in space to date. Power in the 100-kW range may be required in high earth orbit spacecraft and planetary exploration. The technology for this power system range is under development for the Department of Energy with the Los Alamos National Laboratory responsible for the critical components in the nuclear subsystem. The baseline design for this particular nuclear sybsystem technology is described in this paper; additionally, reactor technology is reviewed from previous space power programs, a preliminary assessment is made of technology candidates covering an extended power spectrum, and the status is given of other reactor technologies

  6. NASA thermionic-conversion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    NASA's program for applied research and technology (ART) in thermionic energy conversion (TEC) has made worthwhile contributions in a relatively short time: Many of these accomplishments are incremental, yet important. And their integration has yielded gains in performance as well as in the knowledge necessary to point productive directions for future work. Both promise and problems derive from the degrees of freedom allowed by the current programmatic emphasis on out-of-core thermionics. Materials and designs previously prohibited by in-core nucleonics and geometries now offer new potentialities. But as a result a major TEC-ART responsibility is the efficient reduction of the glitter of diverse possibilities to the hard glint of reality. As always high-temperature material effects are crucial to the level and duration of TEC performance: New electrodes must increase and maintain power output regardless of emitter-vapor deposition on collectors. They must also serve compatibly with hot-shell alloys. And while space TEC must face high-temperature vaporization problems externally as well as internally, terrestrial TEC must tolerate hot corrosive atmospheres outside and near-vacuum inside. Furthermore, some modes for decreasing interelectrode losses appear to require rather demanding converter geometries to produce practical power densities. In these areas and others significant progress is being made in the NASA TEC-ART Program

  7. Solar electron source and thermionic solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Yaghoobi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Common solar technologies are either photovoltaic/thermophotovoltaic, or use indirect methods of electricity generation such as boiling water for a steam turbine. Thermionic energy conversion based on the emission of electrons from a hot cathode into vacuum and their collection by an anode is also a promising route. However, thermionic solar conversion is extremely challenging as the sunlight intensity is too low for heating a conventional cathode to thermionic emission temperatures in a practical manner. Therefore, compared to other technologies, little has been done in this area, and the devices have been mainly limited to large experimental apparatus investigated for space power applications. Based on a recently observed “Heat Trap” effect in carbon nanotube arrays, allowing their efficient heating with low-power light, we report the first compact thermionic solar cell. Even using a simple off-the-shelf focusing lens, the device delivered over 1 V across a load. The device also shows intrinsic storage capacity.

  8. Space nuclear reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Requirements for electrical and propulsion power for space are expected to increase dramatically in the 1980s. Nuclear power is probably the only source for some deep space missions and a major competitor for many orbital missions, especially those at geosynchronous orbit. Because of the potential requirements, a technology program on space nuclear power plant components has been initiated by the Department of Energy. The missions that are foreseen, the current power plant concept, the technology program plan, and early key results are described

  9. Space reactors - past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    The successful test flights of the Space Shuttle mark the start of a new era--an era of routine manned access into cislunar space. Human technical development at the start of the next Millenium will be highlighted by the creation of Man's extraterrestrial civilization with off-planet expansion of the human resource base. In the 1990s and beyond, advanced-design nuclear reactors could represent the prime source of both space power and propulsion. Many sophisticated military and civilian space missions of the future will require first kilowatt and then megawatt levels of power. This paper reviews key technology developments that accompanied past US space nuclear power development efforts, describes on-going programs, and then explores reactor technologies that will satisfy megawatt power level needs and beyond

  10. Thermionic cogeneration burner design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, G.; Goodale, D.; Moffat, A. L.; Morgan, D. T.

    Since thermionic converters receive heat at very high temperatures (approximately 1800 K) and reject heat at moderately high temperatures (approximately 800 K), they are useful for cogeneration applications involving high temperature processes. The electric power from thermionic converters is produced as a high amperage, low-voltage direct current. An ideal cogeneration application would be to utilize the reject heat at the collector temperature and the electricity without power conditioning. A cogeneration application in the edible oil industry fulfills both of these requirements since both direct heat and hydrogen gas are required in the hydrogenation of the oils. In this application, the low-voltage direct current would be used in a hydrogen electrolyzer.

  11. CID thermionic gun system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1981-10-01

    A new high-current thermionic gun has been installed on the CID injector at SLAC and brought into operation. The gun and pulser system generate three nanosecond pulses of about six amps peak which, when bunched in the subharmonic buncher system, produce in excess of 10 11 electrons in a single S-band accelerated bunch. Preliminary operation of the gun is described, and details of the avalanche cathode drive pulser are presented

  12. CID thermionic gun system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    A new high-current thermionic gun has been installed on the CID injector at SLAC and brought into operation. The gun and pulser system generate three nanosecond pulses of about six amps peak which, when bunched in the subharmonic buncher system, produce in excess of 10 11 electrons in a single S-band accelerated bunch. Preliminary operation of the gun is described, and details of the avalanche cathode drive pulser are presented

  13. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are available to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions

  14. Autonomous Control of Space Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya; K. Zhao; S.R.P. Perillo; Xiaojia Xu; M.G. Na

    2007-11-30

    Autonomous and semi-autonomous control is a key element of space reactor design in order to meet the mission requirements of safety, reliability, survivability, and life expectancy. Interrestrial nuclear power plants, human operators are avilable to perform intelligent control functions that are necessary for both normal and abnormal operational conditions.

  15. Thermionic energy conversion heat - electric power; Termojonisk energiomvandling vaerme-elektrisk energi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmlid, L; Svensson, R [Gothenburg Univ. and Chalmers Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    1993-09-15

    Research and development related to Thermionic Energy Converters (TEC) in Holland and Sweden is directed towards terrestrial applications, while the development work in Russia and the US primarily is directed towards thermionic nuclear reactor for use in space. We have during the project continued our work on the utilization of the so called Rydberg matter in converters. Our patented construction has very good (low) values of the barrier index (figure of merit for the converter), probably the lowest ones ever measured. International patents have been applied for as well. We can summarize the achievements of the project such that solutions to practically all the problems related to the inner function of thermionic converters have been found. During this year a large number of studies have been carried out concerning the properties of the Rydberg matter in the TEC, and related to the highly excited states of Cs which exist in the TEC, partially in cooperation with an American research company. An international conference within the TEC field has been arranged in Gothenburg. Two Ph.D. theses are also under completion within the project

  16. Thermionics basic principles of electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, J; Ashhurst, W

    2013-01-01

    Basic Principles of Electronics, Volume I : Thermionics serves as a textbook for students in physics. It focuses on thermionic devices. The book covers topics on electron dynamics, electron emission, and the themionic vacuum diode and triode. Power amplifiers, oscillators, and electronic measuring equipment are studied as well. The text will be of great use to physics and electronics students, and inventors.

  17. Status of CEA reactor studies for a 200 kWe turbo electric space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.; Schwartz, J.P.; Tilliette, Z.; Vrillon, B.

    1986-01-01

    The present European ARIANE space program will expand after 1995 in the development of the large ARIANE 5 launch vehicle. Considering, that the range of power needs (50 to 400 kWe) and operation times required for the space missions planned after the year 2000, are relevant to a nuclear power system, the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) invited in 1983 the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) to undertake preliminary studies on space power systems. The purpose of the present two year phase (mid 1984-mid 1986) is to identify key technologies for a space generator within the power range of interest and to estimate the development cost of such a project to be examined for commitment in 1986. This work mainly consists in the feasibility and cost assessment of a reference 200 kWe turboelectric space generator, selected for the maturity and availability of the conversion system and for its attractive specific mass compared to thermionics and thermoelectricity, considering the available radiator area afforded by the specific ARIANE 5 geometrical features. The system is basically composed of a fast neutron spectrum lithium cooled reactor, of a Brayton conversion loop and of a heat pipe radiator

  18. Cermet fuels for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Coomes, E.P.; Williford, R.E.; Neimark, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    A refractory-metal matrix, UN-fueled cermet is a very promising fuel candidate for a wide range of multi-megawatt space reactor systems, e.g., steady-state, flexible duty-cycle, or bimodal, single- or two-phase liquid-metal cooled reactors, or thermionic reactors. Cermet fuel is especially promising for reactor designs that require operational strategies which incorporate rapid power changes because of its anticipated capability to withstand thermal shock

  19. Status of CEA reactor studies for a 200 kWe turboelectric Space Power System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Gervaise, F.; Proust, E.; Schwartz, J.P.; Tilliette, Z.; Vrillon, B.

    1986-01-01

    A reference design for a 200 kWe Space Nuclear Power System has been developed by the CNES and CEA Agencies of the French Government in order to assess within a first study phase running from mid 1984 to mid 1986, the key feasibility issues and the development cost of a Space Power System compatible with the version of the European launcher (ARIANE V), that will be available after 1995, and with adequate power range and lifetime performances for the missions considered at that time. The heat from a fast spectrum lithium cooled reactor is converted by a turboelectric system, selected for its technological readiness and for its advantage over thermionics and thermoelectricity, of minimizing the total mass of 100 to 300 kWe power systems, considering the available radiator area afforded by the specific ARIANE V geometrical features. A heat pipe radiator is preferred to an equivalent gas cooled system, for the increased reliability brought by the large number of independent cooling elements. The successive topics addressed in the paper, include a description of the system main components and steady state operating conditions, and the present views about the start up procedure and the reactor control

  20. Concepts for space nuclear multi-mode reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myrabo, L.; Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A number of nuclear multi-mode reactor power plants are conceptualized for use with solid core, fixed particle bed and rotating particle bed reactors. Multi-mode systems generate high peak electrical power in the open cycle mode, with MHD generator or turbogenerator converters and cryogenically stored coolants. Low level stationkeeping power and auxiliary reactor cooling (i.e., for the removal of reactor afterheat) are provided in a closed cycle mode. Depending on reactor design, heat transfer to the low power converters can be accomplished by heat pipes, liquid metal coolants or high pressure gas coolants. Candidate low power conversion cycles include Brayton turbogenerator, Rankine turbogenerator, thermoelectric and thermionic approaches. A methodology is suggested for estimating the system mass of multi-mode nuclear power plants as a function of peak electric power level and required mission run time. The masses of closed cycle nuclear and open cycle chemical power systems are briefly examined to identify the regime of superiority for nuclear multi-mode systems. Key research and technology issues for such power plants are also identified

  1. Power conditioning for space nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Baruch

    1987-01-01

    This paper addresses the power conditioning subsystem for both Stirling and Brayton conversion of space nuclear reactor systems. Included are the requirements summary, trade results related to subsystem implementation, subsystem description, voltage level versus weight, efficiency and operational integrity, components selection, and shielding considerations. The discussion is supported by pertinent circuit and block diagrams. Summary conclusions and recommendations derived from the above studies are included.

  2. Photophysics of fullerenes: Thermionic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, R.N.; Tuinman, A.A.; Huang, J.

    1996-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization of fullerenes using long-pulse length lasers occurs mainly through vibrational autoionization. In many cases the laser ionization can be described as thermionic in analogy to the boiling off of electrons from a filament. Thermionic emission manifests itself as a delayed emission of electrons following pulsed laser excitation. Klots has employed quasiequilibrium theory to calculate rate constants for thermionic emission from fullerenes which seem to quantitatively account for the observed delayed emission times and the measured electron energy distributions. The theory of Klots also accounts for the thermionic emission of C 60 excited by a low power CW Argon Ion laser. Recently Klots and Compton have reviewed the evidence for thermionic emission from small aggregates where mention was also made of experiments designed to determine the effects of externally applied electric fields on thermionic emission rates. The authors have measured the fullerene ion intensity as a function of the applied electric field and normalized this signal to that produced by single photon ionization of an atom in order to correct for all collection efficiency artifacts. The increase in fullerene ion signal relative to that of Cs + is attributed to field enhanced thermionic emission. From the slope of the Schottky plot they obtain a temperature of approximately 1,000 K. This temperature is comparable to but smaller than that estimated from measurements of the electron kinetic energies. This result for field enhanced thermionic emission is discussed further by Klots and Compton. Thermionic emission from neutral clusters has long been known for autodetachment from highly excited negative ions. Similarly, electron attachment to C 60 in the energy range from 8 to 12 eV results in C 60 anions with lifetimes in the range of microseconds. Quasiequilibrium theory (QET) calculations are in reasonable accord with these measurements

  3. Photophysics of fullerenes: Thermionic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compton, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tuinman, A.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Huang, J. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Multiphoton ionization of fullerenes using long-pulse length lasers occurs mainly through vibrational autoionization. In many cases the laser ionization can be described as thermionic in analogy to the boiling off of electrons from a filament. Thermionic emission manifests itself as a delayed emission of electrons following pulsed laser excitation. Klots has employed quasiequilibrium theory to calculate rate constants for thermionic emission from fullerenes which seem to quantitatively account for the observed delayed emission times and the measured electron energy distributions. The theory of Klots also accounts for the thermionic emission of C{sub 60} excited by a low power CW Argon Ion laser. Recently Klots and Compton have reviewed the evidence for thermionic emission from small aggregates where mention was also made of experiments designed to determine the effects of externally applied electric fields on thermionic emission rates. The authors have measured the fullerene ion intensity as a function of the applied electric field and normalized this signal to that produced by single photon ionization of an atom in order to correct for all collection efficiency artifacts. The increase in fullerene ion signal relative to that of Cs{sup +} is attributed to field enhanced thermionic emission. From the slope of the Schottky plot they obtain a temperature of approximately 1,000 K. This temperature is comparable to but smaller than that estimated from measurements of the electron kinetic energies. This result for field enhanced thermionic emission is discussed further by Klots and Compton. Thermionic emission from neutral clusters has long been known for autodetachment from highly excited negative ions. Similarly, electron attachment to C{sub 60} in the energy range from 8 to 12 eV results in C{sub 60} anions with lifetimes in the range of microseconds. Quasiequilibrium theory (QET) calculations are in reasonable accord with these measurements.

  4. Nuclear thermionic power plant integration problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraas, A.P.

    1967-02-01

    The numerous boundary conditions to be met in preparing a well proportioned, properly integrated design for a thermionic cell reactor are discussed with the emphasis on materials and fabrication problems. Pertinent experience with fuel elements, tube header sheets, electric heaters, and pressure vessels is cited to highlight key limitations that have been encountered in structurally similar equipment. A reference design is presented to indicate how one might attempt to satisfy all of the many boundary conditions. The study indicates that it will be difficult to get a reactor core power density greater than about 35 w/cm 3 and that, while it is possible to minimize the ill effects of failures within individual cells by employing series-parallel connections, the study further indicates that there is inherently a high probability of leaks and electrical shorts and arcs within the reactor so that it is doubtful that good reliability can be obtained

  5. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  6. The unique safety challenges of space reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanes, S.J.; Marshall, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Compact reactor systems can provide high levels of power for extended periods in space environments. Their relatively low mass and their ability to operate independently of their proximity to the sun make reactor power systems high desirable for many civilian and military space missions. The US Department of Energy is developing reactor system technologies to provide electrical power for space applications. In addition, reactors are now being considered to provide thermal power to a hydrogen propellant for nuclear thermal rocketry. Space reactor safety issues differ from commercial reactor issues, in some areas, because of very different operating requirements and environments. Accidents similar to those postulated for commercial reactors must be considered for space reactors during their operational phase. Safety strategies will need to be established that account for the consequences of the loss of essential power

  7. Space reactor safety, 1985--1995 lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatic, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration

  8. Space reactor safety, 1985--1995 lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatic, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration.

  9. Mechanical characterization of superalloys for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, J.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work is the selection of structural materials that can be used in the temperature range 600-900 0 C for a gas cooled space reactor producing electricity. Superalloys fit best the temperature range required. Five nickel base alloys are chosen for their good mechanical behaviour: HAYNES 230, HASTELLOY S, HASTELLOY X, HASTELLOY XR and PYRAD 38D. Metallography, tensile and hardness tests are realized. Sample contraction is evidenced for some creep tests, under low stress: 20MPa at 800 0 C, on HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY X, probably related to the structural evolution of these materials corresponding to a decrease of the crystal parameter [fr

  10. Problems of space-time behaviour of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.

    1966-01-01

    This paper covers a review of literature and mathematical methods applied for space-time behaviour of nuclear reactors. The review of literature is limited to unresolved problems and trends of actual research in the field of reactor physics [sr

  11. SP-100 space reactor power system readiness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Matteo, D.N.; Bailey, H.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the SP-100 Space Reactor Power System which is being developed by GE, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, to provide electrical power in the range of 10's to 100's of kW. The system represents an enabling technology for a wide variety of earth orbital and interplanetary science missions, nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) stages, and lunar/Mars surface power for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). The technology and design is now at a state of readiness to support the definition of early flight demonstration missions. Of particular importance is that SP-100 meets the demanding U.S. safety performance, reliability and life requirements. The system is scalable and flexible and can be configured to provide 10's to 100's of kWe without repeating development work and can meet DoD goals for an early, low-power demonstration flight in the 1996-1997 time frame

  12. Study of space reactors for exploration missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliquet, Elisa; Ruault, Jean-Marc; Masson, Frederic, E-mail: elisa.cliquet@cnes.fr, E-mail: frederic.masson@cnes.fr [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Paris (France); Roux, Jean-Pierre; Paris, Nicolas; Cazale, Brice; Manifacier, Laurent, E-mail: jean-pierre.roux@areva.com [AREVA TA, Aix en Provence, (France); Poinot-Salanon, Christine, E-mail: christine.poinot@cea.fr [Comissariado a l' Energie Atomique et Aux Energies alternatives (CEA), Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been studied for many decades. The power density of nuclear fission is much higher than chemical process, and for missions to outer solar system requiring several hundred of kilowatts, or for flexible manned missions to Mars requiring several megawatts, nuclear electric propulsion might be the only option offering a reasonable mass in low earth orbit. Despite the existence of low power experiences - SNAP10 in the 60's or Buk/Topaz in the 60-80's - no high power reactor has been developed: investment cost, long term time frame, high technological challenges and radioactive hazards are the main challenges we must overtake. However, it seems reasonable to look at the technical challenges that have to be overcome for a next generation of nuclear electric systems for space exploration. This paper will present some recent studies going on in France, on space reactors for exploration. Three classes of power have been considered: 10kWe, 100kWe, and several megawatts. Available data from previous studies and developments performed in Russia, USA], and Europe, have been collected and gave us a large overview of potential technical solutions. This was the starting point of a trade-off analysis aiming at the selection of the best options, with regards to the technological readiness level in France and Europe. The resulting preliminary designs will be presented and critical technologies needing maturation activities will be highlighted. (author)

  13. Study of space reactors for exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cliquet, Elisa; Ruault, Jean-Marc; Masson, Frederic; Roux, Jean-Pierre; Paris, Nicolas; Cazale, Brice; Manifacier, Laurent; Poinot-Salanon, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been studied for many decades. The power density of nuclear fission is much higher than chemical process, and for missions to outer solar system requiring several hundred of kilowatts, or for flexible manned missions to Mars requiring several megawatts, nuclear electric propulsion might be the only option offering a reasonable mass in low earth orbit. Despite the existence of low power experiences - SNAP10 in the 60's or Buk/Topaz in the 60-80's - no high power reactor has been developed: investment cost, long term time frame, high technological challenges and radioactive hazards are the main challenges we must overtake. However, it seems reasonable to look at the technical challenges that have to be overcome for a next generation of nuclear electric systems for space exploration. This paper will present some recent studies going on in France, on space reactors for exploration. Three classes of power have been considered: 10kWe, 100kWe, and several megawatts. Available data from previous studies and developments performed in Russia, USA], and Europe, have been collected and gave us a large overview of potential technical solutions. This was the starting point of a trade-off analysis aiming at the selection of the best options, with regards to the technological readiness level in France and Europe. The resulting preliminary designs will be presented and critical technologies needing maturation activities will be highlighted. (author)

  14. The role of nuclear reactors in space exploration and development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipinski, R.J.

    2000-07-01

    The United States has launched more than 20 radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTGs) into space over the past 30 yr but has launched only one nuclear reactor, and that was in 1965. Russia has launched more than 30 reactors. The RTGs use the heat of alpha decay of {sup 238}Pu for power and typically generate <1 kW of electricity. Apollo, Pioneer, Voyager, Viking, Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini all used RTGs. Space reactors use the fission energy of {sup 235}U; typical designs are for 100 to 1000 kW of electricity. The only US space reactor launch (SNAP-10A) was a demonstration mission. One reason for the lack of space reactor use by the United States was the lack of space missions that required high power. But, another was the assumed negative publicity that would accompany a reactor launch. The net result is that all space reactor programs after 1970 were terminated before an operating space reactor could be developed, and they are now many years from recovering the ability to build them. Two major near-term needs for space reactors are the human exploration of Mars and advanced missions to and beyond the orbit of Jupiter. To help obtain public acceptance of space reactors, one must correct some of the misconceptions concerning space reactors and convey the following facts to the public and to decision makers: Space reactors are 1000 times smaller in power and size than a commercial power reactor. A space reactor at launch is only as radioactive as a pile of dirt 60 m (200 ft) across. A space reactor contains no plutonium at launch. It does not become significantly radioactive until it is turned on, and it will be engineered so that no launch accident can turn it on, even if that means fueling it after launch. The reactor will not be turned on until it is in a high stable orbit or even on an earth-escape trajectory for some missions. The benefits of space reactors are that they give humanity a stairway to the planets and perhaps the stars. They open a new

  15. The role of nuclear reactors in space exploration and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The United States has launched more than 20 radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTGs) into space over the past 30 yr but has launched only one nuclear reactor, and that was in 1965. Russia has launched more than 30 reactors. The RTGs use the heat of alpha decay of 238 Pu for power and typically generate 235 U; typical designs are for 100 to 1000 kW of electricity. The only US space reactor launch (SNAP-10A) was a demonstration mission. One reason for the lack of space reactor use by the United States was the lack of space missions that required high power. But, another was the assumed negative publicity that would accompany a reactor launch. The net result is that all space reactor programs after 1970 were terminated before an operating space reactor could be developed, and they are now many years from recovering the ability to build them. Two major near-term needs for space reactors are the human exploration of Mars and advanced missions to and beyond the orbit of Jupiter. To help obtain public acceptance of space reactors, one must correct some of the misconceptions concerning space reactors and convey the following facts to the public and to decision makers: Space reactors are 1000 times smaller in power and size than a commercial power reactor. A space reactor at launch is only as radioactive as a pile of dirt 60 m (200 ft) across. A space reactor contains no plutonium at launch. It does not become significantly radioactive until it is turned on, and it will be engineered so that no launch accident can turn it on, even if that means fueling it after launch. The reactor will not be turned on until it is in a high stable orbit or even on an earth-escape trajectory for some missions. The benefits of space reactors are that they give humanity a stairway to the planets and perhaps the stars. They open a new frontier for their children and their grandchildren. They pave the way for all life on earth to move out into the solar system. At one time, humans built

  16. Neutronics characteristics of space power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, W.; Barner, J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to describe the neutronic characteristics of a range of possible space reactor designs, and indicate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various designs. Fuel designs to be considered are cermets (i.e., ceramic particles embedded in a metal matrix) consisting of UO 2 or Nn ceramic particles in matrices of Nb, Mo, Ta, or W. These cermet fuels are compared to a UN pin-type design. UN was selected for the reference fuel material since it has a somewhat higher density than UO 2 (i.e., 14.32 versus 10.96 gm/cc), which allows a lower minimum critical mass for both ceramic and cermet designs

  17. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Current space nuclear power reactor safety issues are discussed with respect to the unique characteristics of these reactors. An approach to achieving adequate safety and a perception of safety is outlined. This approach calls for a carefully conceived safety program which makes uses of lessons learned from previous terrestrial power reactor development programs. This approach includes use of risk analyses, passive safety design features, and analyses/experiments to understand and control off-design conditions. The point is made that some recent accidents concerning terrestrial power reactors do not imply that space power reactors cannot be operated safety

  18. Thermophotovoltaic Energy Conversion in Space Nuclear Reactor Power Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Presby, Andrew L

    2004-01-01

    .... This has potential benefits for space nuclear reactor power systems currently in development. The primary obstacle to space operation of thermophotovoltaic devices appears to be the low heat rejection temperatures which necessitate large radiator areas...

  19. Solid-State Thermionic Nuclear Power for Megawatt Propulsion, Planetary Surface and Commercial Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermionic (TI) power conversion is a promising technology first investigated for power conversion in the 1960’s, and of renewed interest due to modern...

  20. ZrH reactor lattice spacing (heat transfer considerations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felten, L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Temperature calculations for a 295 element ZrH reactor at fuel element spacings from 0.010'' to 0.065'' showed a very small dependence of reactor temperature on element spacing. It was found that one variation in coolant channel area (2 zones) was sufficient to satisfactorily shape the radial flow profile for the core. (U.S.)

  1. Proposal of space reactor for nuclear electric propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Takaaki; Nagata, Hidetaka; Nakashima, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installed in spacecrafts is considered here. The nuclear reactor could stably provide an enough amount of electric power in deep space missions. Most of the nuclear reactors that have been developed up to now in the United States and the former Soviet Union have used uranium with 90% enrichment of 235 U as a fuel. On the other hand, in Japan, because the uranium that can be used is enriched to below 20%, the miniaturization of the reactor core is difficult. A Light-water nuclear reactor is an exception that could make the reactor core small. Then, the reactor core composition and characteristic are evaluated for the cases with the enrichment of the uranium fuel as 20%. We take up here Graphite reactor, Light-water reactor, and Sodium-cooled one. (author)

  2. Space Fission Reactor Structural Materials: Choices Past, Present and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T.; Leonard, Keith J.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear powered spacecraft will enable missions well beyond the capabilities of current chemical, radioisotope thermal generator and solar technologies. The use of fission reactors for space applications has been considered for over 50 years, although, structural material performance has often limited the potential performance of space reactors. Space fission reactors are an extremely harsh environment for structural materials with high temperatures, high neutron fields, potential contact with liquid metals, and the need for up to 15-20 year reliability with no inspection or preventative maintenance. Many different materials have been proposed as structural materials. While all materials meet many of the requirements for space reactor service, none satisfy all of them. However, continued development and testing may resolve these issues and provide qualified materials for space fission reactors.

  3. Materials for thermionic energy converters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, L.R.; Hermans, J.M.; Adriaansen, J.K.M.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Vincenzini, P.

    1987-01-01

    This paper deals with the design and construction of a combustion heated Thermionic Energy Converter (TEC). Main components of this TEC are: 1. A ''Hot Shell'' protecting the TEC from the combustion environment 2. A ''Ceramic Seal'' electrically insulating the emitter from the collector 3. A

  4. Liquid metal versus gas cooled reactor concepts for a turbo electric powered space vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Proust, E.; Schwartz, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Recent CNES/CEA prospective studies of an orbit transfer vehicule to be launched by ARIANE V, emphasize the advantage of the Brayton cycle over the thermionics and thermoelectricity, in minimizing the total mass of 100 to 300 kWsub(e) power systems under the constraint specific to ARIANE of a radiator area limited to 95 m 2 . The review of candidate reactor concepts for this application, finally recommends both liquid metal and gas cooled reactors, for their satisfactory adaptation to a reference Brayton cycle and for the available experience from the terrestrial operation of comparable systems

  5. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  6. Mechanical characterization of superalloys for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchesne, J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this work is the choice of materials usable between 600 and 900 0 C for nuclear space reactor structures. The main criterion of selection for these materials is their good creep behaviour. Consequently, macroscopic theories of creep and several extrapolation methods were described. Superalloys seem the best materials for the studied range of temperatures. Five of them, base nickel, ones unusual in nuclear industry were selected for their good mechanical properties. Three of them are industrial alloys: the first, HAYNES 230 is a recent one, HASTELLOY S and X are more standard materials. The last two, HASTELLOY XR and PYRAD 38 D are issued from special fabrications. Creep tests metallographic investigations, hardness and tensile tests were performed. A contraction of samples was observed during some creep tests under a low stress, 20MPa at 800 0 C, for HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY X. This could be due to a structural evolution of these materials connected to a decrease of the cristalline parameter. In addition, correlations were observed between certain characteristics determined from slow tensile tests and short duration creep tests. These correlations present a large interest because, at the present time, creep tests cannot be executed on irradiated materials in our laboratories. Consequently creep behaviour of irradiated materials seem may be deduced. Further studies are needed to explain and confirm the behaviour of the most interesting materials under low stresses: HAYNES 230 and HASTELLOY XR to anticipate their behaviour in working conditions [fr

  7. Assessment of nuclear reactor concepts for low power space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andrew C.; Gedeon, Stephen R.; Morey, Dennis C.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a preliminary small reactor concepts feasibility and safety evaluation designed to provide a first order validation of the nuclear feasibility and safety of six small reactor concepts are given. These small reactor concepts have potential space applications for missions in the 1 to 20 kWe power output range. It was concluded that low power concepts are available from the U.S. nuclear industry that have the potential for meeting both the operational and launch safety space mission requirements. However, each design has its uncertainties, and further work is required. The reactor concepts must be mated to a power conversion technology that can offer safe and reliable operation.

  8. Some thoughts on the commercial use of reactors in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illuminate the major regulatory issues associated with commercialization of space nuclear power. Currently, space reactors are government-owned and approved through the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel (INSRP) and the President while commercial reactors are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The commercial use of reactors in space will open a new regime of regulation; that is public intervenors could enter the space licensing process for the first time. The major issue is responsibility for licensing and operations, but related considerations involve controlling special nuclear materials from aborted launches or abandoned platforms, determining final shutdown and disposal tactics, and solving new design issues such as the need for longer life of space reactor power plants

  9. Soviet space nuclear reactor incidents - Perception versus reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Since the Soviet Union reportedly began flying nuclear power sources in 1965 it has had four publicly known accidents involving space reactors, two publicly known accidents involving radioisotope power sources and one close call with a space reactor (Cosmos 1900). The reactor accidents, particularly Cosmos 954 and Cosmos 1402, indicated that the Soviets had adopted burnup as their reentry philosophy which is consistent with the U.S. philosophy from the 1960s and 1970s. While quantitative risk analyses have shown that the Soviet accidents have not posed a serious risk to the world's population, concerns still remain about Soviet space nuclear safety practices.

  10. Space Propulsion via Spherical Torus Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Craig H.; Juhasz, Albert J.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 204 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 1630 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment were performed on all major systems including nuclear fusion reactor, magnetic nozzle, power conversion, fast wave plasma heating, fuel pellet injector, startup/re-start fission reactor and battery, and other systems. Detailed fusion reactor design included analysis of plasma characteristics, power balance and utilization, first wall, toroidal field coils, heat transfer, and neutron/X-ray radiation

  11. Space reactors - What is a kilogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J.; Ek, D.; Voss, S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of nuclear electric propulsion can triple the payloads to GEO for a single Shuttle launch. Life orbits of 300 years can be used to allow most of the fission and activation products to decay before a reactor reenters the biosphere. Enough radioactive materials remain with very long lifetimes to make it desirable to design the reactor to disperse upon reentry and little additional risk to the biosphere is introduced by initiating NEP operations from 300 km

  12. Space reactors: What is a kilogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. Jr.; Ek, D.; Voss, S.

    1984-01-01

    The use of nuclear electric propulsion can triple payloads to GEO for a single Shuttle launch. Life orbits of 300 years can be used to allow most of the fission and activation products to decay before a reactor reenters the biosphere. Enough radioactive materials remain with very long lifetimes to make it desirable to design the reactor to disperse upon reentry and little additional risk to the biosphere is introduced by initiating NEP operations from 300 km

  13. FBR and RBR particle bed space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Botts, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Compact, high-performance nuclear reactor designs based on High-Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) particulate fuel are investigated. The large surface area available with the small-diameter (approx. 500 microns) particulate fuel allows very high power densities (MW's/liter), small temperature differences between fuel and coolant (approx. 10 0 K), high coolant-outlet temperatures (1500 to 3000 0 K, depending on design), and fast reactor startup (approx. 2 to 3 seconds). Two reactor concepts are developed - the Fixed Bed Reactor (FBR), where the fuel particles are packed into a thin annular bed between two porous cylindrical drums, and the Rotating Bed Reactor (RBR), where the fuel particles are held inside a cold rotating (typically approx. 500 rpm) porous cylindrical drum. The FBR can operate steady-state in the closed-cycle He-cooled mode or in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode. The RBR will operate only in the open-cycle H 2 -cooled mode

  14. Fission fragment assisted reactor concept for space propulsion: Foil reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    The concept is to fabricate a reactor using thin films or foils of uranium, uranium oxide and then to coat them on substrates. These coatings would be made so thin as to allow the escaping fission fragments to directly heat a hydrogen propellant. The idea was studied of direct gas heating and direct gas pumping in a nuclear pumped laser program. Fission fragments were used to pump lasers. In this concept two substrates are placed opposite each other. The internal faces are coated with thin foil of uranium oxide. A few of the advantages of this technology are listed. In general, however, it is felt that if one look at all solid core nuclear thermal rockets or nuclear thermal propulsion methods, one is going to find that they all pretty much look the same. It is felt that this reactor has higher potential reliability. It has low structural operating temperatures, very short burn times, with graceful failure modes, and it has reduced potential for energetic accidents. Going to a design like this would take the NTP community part way to some of the very advanced engine designs, such as the gas core reactor, but with reduced risk because of the much lower temperatures

  15. SP-100 Program: space reactor system and subsystem investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    For a space reactor power system, a comprehensive safety program will be required to assure that no undue risk is present. This report summarizes the nuclear safety review/approval process that will be required for a space reactor system. The documentation requirements are presented along with a summary of the required contents of key documents. Finally, the aerospace safety program conducted for the SNAP-10A reactor system is summarized. The results of this program are presented to show the type of program that can be expected and to provide information that could be usable in future programs

  16. Heat transfer capability analysis of heat pipe for space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huaqi; Jiang Xinbiao; Chen Lixin; Yang Ning; Hu Pan; Ma Tengyue; Zhang Liang

    2015-01-01

    To insure the safety of space reactor power system with no single point failures, the reactor heat pipes must work below its heat transfer limits, thus when some pipes fail, the reactor could still be adequately cooled by neighbor heat pipes. Methods to analyze the reactor heat pipe's heat transfer limits were presented, and that for the prevailing capillary limit analysis was improved. The calculation was made on the lithium heat pipe in core of heat pipes segmented thermoelectric module converter (HP-STMC) space reactor power system (SRPS), potassium heat pipe as radiator of HP-STMC SRPS, and sodium heat pipe in core of scalable AMTEC integrated reactor space power system (SAIRS). It is shown that the prevailing capillary limits of the reactor lithium heat pipe and sodium heat pipe is 25.21 kW and 14.69 kW, providing a design margin >19.4% and >23.6%, respectively. The sonic limit of the reactor radiator potassium heat pipe is 7.88 kW, providing a design margin >43.2%. As the result of calculation, it is concluded that the main heat transfer limit of HP-STMC SRPS lithium heat pipe and SARIS sodium heat pipe is prevailing capillary limit, but the sonic limit for HP-STMC SRPS radiator potassium heat pipe. (authors)

  17. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  18. Space nuclear reactors: energy gateway into the next millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.A. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1981-01-01

    Power - reliable, abundant and economic - is the key to man's conquest of the Solar System. Space activities of the next few decades will be highlighted by the creation of the extraterrestrial phase of human civilization. Nuclear power is needed both to propel massive quantities of materials through cislunar and eventually translunar space, and to power the sophisticated satellites, space platforms, and space stations of tomorrow. To meet these anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100-kW(e) heat pipe nuclear reactor. The objectives of this program are to develop components for a space nuclear power plant capable of unattended operation for 7 to 10 years; having a reliability of greater than 0.95; and weighing less than 1910 kg. In addition, this heat pipe reactor is also compatible for launch by the US Space Transportation System

  19. Gas-cooled reactor for space power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.; Pearson, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Reactor characteristics based on extensive development work on the 500-MWt reactor for the Pluto nuclear ramjet are described for space power systems useful in the range of 2 to 20 MWe for operating times of 1 y. The modest pressure drop through the prismatic ceramic core is supported at the outlet end by a ceramic dome which also serves as a neutron reflector. Three core materials are considered which are useful at temperatures up to about 2000 K. Most of the calculations are based on a beryllium oxide with uranium dioxide core. Reactor control is accomplished by use of a burnable poison, a variable-leakage reflector, and internal control rods. Reactivity swings of 20% are obtained with a dozen internal boron-10 rods for the size cores studied. Criticality calculations were performed using the ALICE Monte Carlo code. The inherent high-temperature capability of the reactor design removes the reactor as a limiting condition on system performance. The low fuel inventories required, particularly for beryllium oxide reactors, make space power systems based on gas-cooled near-thermal reactors a lesser safeguard risk than those based on fast reactors

  20. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polansky, G.F.; Schmidt, G.L.; Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch

  1. Primary loop simulation of the SP-100 space nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1992 the SP-100 space nuclear reactor development project for electric power generation in a range of 100 to 1000 kWh was conducted in the USA. Several configurations were studied to satisfy different mission objectives and power systems. In this reactor the heat is generated in a compact core and refrigerated by liquid lithium, the primary loops flow are controlled by thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps (EMTE), and thermoelectric converters produce direct current energy. To define the system operation point for an operating nominal power, it is necessary the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic components of the space nuclear reactor. In this paper the BEMTE-3 computer code is used to EMTE pump design performance evaluation to a thermalhydraulic primary loop configuration, and comparison of the system operation points of SP-100 reactor to two thermal powers, with satisfactory results. (author)

  2. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  3. White Paper – Use of LEU for a Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclure, Patrick Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-11

    Historically space reactors flown or designed for the U.S. and Russia used Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) for fuel. HEU almost always produces a small and lighter reactor. Since mass increases launch costs or decreases science payloads, HEU was the natural choice. However in today’s environment, the proliferation of HEU has become a major concern for the U.S. government and hence a policy issue. In addition, launch costs are being reduced as the space community moves toward commercial launch vehicles. HEU also carries a heavy security cost to process, test, transport and launch. Together these issues have called for a re-investigation into space reactors the use Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

  4. Hybrid thermionic-photovoltaic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datas, A. [Instituto de Energía Solar, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-04

    A conceptual device for the direct conversion of heat into electricity is presented. This concept hybridizes thermionic (TI) and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion in a single thermionic-photovoltaic (TIPV) solid-state device. This device transforms into electricity both the electron and photon fluxes emitted by an incandescent surface. This letter presents an idealized analysis of this device in order to determine its theoretical potential. According to this analysis, the key advantage of this converter, with respect to either TPV or TI, is the higher power density in an extended temperature range. For low temperatures, TIPV performs like TPV due to the negligible electron flux. On the contrary, for high temperatures, TIPV performs like TI due to the great enhancement of the electron flux, which overshadows the photon flux contribution. At the intermediate temperatures, ∼1650 K in the case of this particular study, I show that the power density potential of TIPV converter is twice as great as that of TPV and TI. The greatest impact concerns applications in which the temperature varies in a relatively wide range, for which averaged power density enhancement above 500% is attainable.

  5. Some scoping experiments for a space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.A.; Ogden, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some scoping experiments were performed to evaluate fuel performance in a lithium heat pipe reactor operating at a nominal 1500K heat pipe temperature. Fuel-coolant and fuel-coolant-clad relationships showed that once a failed heat pipe occurs temperatures can rise high enough so that large concentrations of uranium can be transported by the vapor phase. Upon condensation this uranium would be capable of penetrating heat pipes adjacent to the failed pipe. The potential for propagation of failure exists with UO 2 and a lithium heat pipe. Changing the composition of the metal of the heat pipe would have only a second order effect on the kinetics of the failure mechanism. Uranium carbide and nitride were considered as potential fuels which are nonreactive in a lithium environment. At high temperatures the nitride would be favored because of its better compatibility with potential cladding materials. Compositions of UN with small additions of YN appear to offer very attractive properties for a compact high temperature high power density reactor

  6. Approach to developing reliable space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondt, J.F.; Shinbrot, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Reactor Power System Project is in the engineering development phase of a three-phase program. During Phase II, the Engineering Development Phase, the SP-100 Project has defined and is pursuing a new approach to developing reliable power systems. The approach to developing such a system during the early technology phase is described in this paper along with some preliminary examples to help explain the approach. Developing reliable components to meet space reactor power system requirements is based on a top down systems approach which includes a point design based on a detailed technical specification of a 100 kW power system

  7. Analysis of Topaz-II reactor performance using MCNP and TFEHX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Data reported by Russian scientist and engineers for the TOPAZ-II Space Nuclear Power is compared with analytical results calculated using the Monte Carlo Neutron and Photon (MCNP) and TFEHX computer codes. The results of these comparisons show good agreement with the TOPAZ-II neutronics, thermionic and thermal hydraulics performance. A detailed description of the TOPAZ-II reactor and of the TFE should enhance the performance of the both codes in modeling the reactor and TFE performances

  8. MATERIALS REQUIREMENTS FOR THERMIONIC ENERGY CONVERSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R. C.; Skeen, C. H.

    1963-03-15

    The fundamentals of the thermionic energy conversion and its potential applications are reviewed. Materials problems associated with thermionic emitters are considered in relation to the following: work function; emissivity; vaporization; thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties; chemical stability; permeation; and stability under nuclear radiation. Cesium purity and materials suitable for collectors, electrical leads, support structures, insulators, and seals are also discussed. Experimental work on problems involved is reviewed. It is concluded that significant developments have occurred recently in all areas of thermionic energy conversion. (40 references) (A.G.W.)

  9. Pellet bed reactor for multi-modal space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.; Williams, K.; Mast, P.; Mims, J.

    1987-01-01

    A review of forthcoming space power needs for both civil and military missions indicates that power requirements will be in the tens of megawatts. The electrical power requirements are envisioned to be twofold: long-duration lower power levels will be needed for station keeping, communications, and/or surveillance; short-duration higher power levels will be required for pulsed power devices. These power characteristics led to the proposal of a multi-modal space power reactor using a pellet bed design. Characteristics desired for such a multimegawatt reactor power source are standby, alert, and pulsed power modes; high-thermal output heat source (approximately 1000 MWt peak power); long lifetime station keeping power (10 to 30 years); high temperature output (1500 K to 1800 K); rapid-burst power transition; high reliability (above 95 percent); and stringent safety standards compliance. The proposed pellet bed reactor is designed to satisfy these characteristics

  10. Improved Nuclear Reactor and Shield Mass Model for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    New technologies are being developed to explore the distant reaches of the solar system. Beyond Mars, solar energy is inadequate to power advanced scientific instruments. One technology that can meet the energy requirements is the space nuclear reactor. The nuclear reactor is used as a heat source for which a heat-to-electricity conversion system is needed. Examples of such conversion systems are the Brayton, Rankine, and Stirling cycles. Since launch cost is proportional to the amount of mass to lift, mass is always a concern in designing spacecraft. Estimations of system masses are an important part in determining the feasibility of a design. I worked under Michael Barrett in the Thermal Energy Conversion Branch of the Power & Electric Propulsion Division. An in-house Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) is used for the design and performance analysis of closed-Brayton-cycle energy conversion systems for space applications. This program also calculates the system mass including the heat source. CCEP uses the subroutine RSMASS, which has been updated to RSMASS-D, to estimate the mass of the reactor. RSMASS was developed in 1986 at Sandia National Laboratories to quickly estimate the mass of multi-megawatt nuclear reactors for space applications. In response to an emphasis for lower power reactors, RSMASS-D was developed in 1997 and is based off of the SP-100 liquid metal cooled reactor. The subroutine calculates the mass of reactor components such as the safety systems, instrumentation and control, radiation shield, structure, reflector, and core. The major improvements in RSMASS-D are that it uses higher fidelity calculations, is easier to use, and automatically optimizes the systems mass. RSMASS-D is accurate within 15% of actual data while RSMASS is only accurate within 50%. My goal this summer was to learn FORTRAN 77 programming language and update the CCEP program with the RSMASS-D model.

  11. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given

  12. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernsman, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW e space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW e TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution

  13. Simple model for the description of a thermionic Cs diode in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschersich, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    Because of the small voltage loss in the space between the electrodes, Cs is the most common work medium in thermionic diodes. With the model calculations of the processes in the space between the electrodes, the author aims to explain the formation of Cs ions and the current transport through the electrode gap at these low voltages. (RW/AK) [de

  14. Thermionic integrated circuits: electronics for hostile environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B.; MacRoberts, M.D.J.; Wilde, D.K.; Dooley, G.R.; Brown, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Thermionic integrated circuits combine vacuum tube technology with integrated circuit techniques to form integrated vacuum triode circuits. These circuits are capable of extended operation in both high-temperature and high-radiation environments

  15. Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S4) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S 4 ) reactor, developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures, is presented. The S 4 reactor has a Mo-14% Re solid core, loaded with uranium nitride fuel, cooled by He-30% Xe and sized to provide 550 kWth for 7 years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector of the S 4 reactor is designed to completely disassemble upon impact on water or soil. The potential of using Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials in different forms to ensure that the reactor remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident is investigated. Nine potential SSAs are considered in terms of their effect on the thickness of the radial reflector and on the combined mass of the reactor and the radiation shadow shield. The SSA materials are incorporated as a thin (0.1 mm) coating on the outside surface of the reactor core and as core additions in three possible forms: 2.0 mm diameter pins in the interstices of the core block, 0.25 mm thick sleeves around the fuel stacks and/or additions to the uranium nitride fuel. Results show that with a boron carbide coating and 0.25 mm iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks the S 4 reactor has a reflector outer diameter of 43.5 cm with a combined reactor and shadow shield mass of 935.1 kg. The S 4 reactor with 12.5 at.% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, resulting in a smaller total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 at.% europium-151 added to the fuel, along with europium-151 sesquioxide for the pins and coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively

  16. HEAT Sensor: Harsh Environment Adaptable Thermionic Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limb, Scott J. [Palo Alto Research Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This document is the final report for the “HARSH ENVIRONMENT ADAPTABLE THERMIONIC SENSOR” project under NETL’s Crosscutting contract DE-FE0013062. This report addresses sensors that can be made with thermionic thin films along with the required high temperature hermetic packaging process. These sensors can be placed in harsh high temperature environments and potentially be wireless and self-powered.

  17. A new concept of thermionic converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, G.

    1978-10-01

    The parameters of a new type of thermionic converter which has a number of concentric electrodes, is computed. The obtained theoretical efficiency of this new type of converter is nearly the efficiency of the ideal thermionic converter. The obtained results are explained by the reduction of the radiation loss from the emitter due to the electrode configuration. Efficiencies as high as 20% are expected from this type of converter now in construction. (author)

  18. Thermionic detector with multiple layered ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for analyzing specific chemical substances in a gaseous environment comprises a thermionic source formed of multiple layers of ceramic material composition, an electrical current instrumentality for heating the thermionic source to operating temperatures in the range of 100 0 C. to 1000 0 C., an instrumentality for exposing the surface of the thermionic source to contact with the specific chemical substances for the purpose of forming gas phase ionization of the substances by a process of electrical charge emission from the surface, a collector electrode disposed adjacent to the thermiomic source, an instrumentality for biasing the thermionic source at an electrical potential which causes the gas phase ions to move toward the collector, and an instrumentality for measuring the ion current arriving at the collector. The thermionic source is constructed of a metallic heater element molded inside a sub-layer of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with a metallic compound additive which is non-corrosive to the heater element during operation. The sub-layer is further covered by a surface-layer formed of hardened ceramic cement material impregnated with an alkali metal compound in a manner that eliminates corrosive contact of the alkali compounds with the heater element. The sub-layer further protects the heater element from contact with gas environments which may be corrosive. The specific ionization of different chemical substances is varied over a wide range by changing the composition and temperature of the thermionic source, and by changing the composition of the gas environment

  19. Nuclear reactor descriptions for space power systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccauley, E. W.; Brown, N. J.

    1972-01-01

    For the small, high performance reactors required for space electric applications, adequate neutronic analysis is of crucial importance, but in terms of computational time consumed, nuclear calculations probably yield the least amount of detail for mission analysis study. It has been found possible, after generation of only a few designs of a reactor family in elaborate thermomechanical and nuclear detail to use simple curve fitting techniques to assure desired neutronic performance while still performing the thermomechanical analysis in explicit detail. The resulting speed-up in computation time permits a broad detailed examination of constraints by the mission analyst.

  20. Space dependence of reactivity parameters on reactor dynamic perturbation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletti, R.; Ziegenbein, D.

    1985-01-01

    Practical application of reactor-dynamic perturbation measurements for on-power determination of differential reactivity weight of control rods and power coefficients of reactivity has shown a significant dependence of parameters on the position of outcore detectors. The space dependence of neutron flux signal in the core of a VVER-440-type reactor was measured by means of 60 self-powered neutron detectors. The greatest neutron flux alterations are located close to moved control rods and in height of the perturbation position. By means of computations, detector positions can be found in the core in which the one-point model is almost valid. (author)

  1. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified

  2. Cermet-fueled reactors for multimegawatt space power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Armijo, J.S.; Kruger, G.B.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomisson, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The cermet-fueled reactor has evolved as a potential power source for a broad range of multimegawatt space applications. In particular, the fast spectrum reactor concept can be used to deliver 10s of megawatts of electric power for continuous, long term, unattended operation, and 100s of megawatts of electric power for times exceeding several hundred seconds. The system can also be utilized with either a gas coolant in a Brayton power conversion cycle, or a liquid metal coolant in a Rankine power conversion cycle. Extensive testing of the cermet fuel element has demonstrated that the fuel is capable of operating at very high temperatures under repeated thermal cycling conditions, including transient conditions which approach the multimegawatt burst power requirements. The cermet fuel test performance is reviewed and an advanced cermet-fueled multimegawatt nuclear reactor is described in this paper

  3. Isotopic Thermionic Generator; Generateur thermoionique isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemot, M; Devin, B; Durand, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    This report describes the general design of a thermionic direct conversion space generator. The power source used is a radioisotope. Two radioisotopes are considered: Pu 238 and Cm 244. The system is made up of a heat pipe concentrating the thermal flux from the isotope to the emitter, and of a second heat pipe evacuating the waste heat from the collector to the outer wall used as radiating panel. Calculations are given in the particular case of a 100 electrical watts output power. (authors) [French] Ce rapport decrit la structure d'un generateur spatial d'electricite a conversion directe du type thermoionique. La source d'energie est un radioisotope. Deux isotopes sont envisages: le Pu 238 et le Cm 244. Le systeme comporte pour l'emetteur un caloduc concentreur de flux thermique et pour le collecteur, un caloduc evacuateur vers l'enveloppe du generateur utilise, en panneau rayonnant. Les calculs ont ete conduits dans le cas particulier d'une puissance convertie de 100 watts electriques. (auteurs)

  4. Enabling autonomous control for space reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R. T.

    2006-01-01

    The application of nuclear reactors for space power and/or propulsion presents some unique challenges regarding the operations and control of the power system. Terrestrial nuclear reactors employ varying degrees of human control and decision-making for operations and benefit from periodic human interaction for maintenance. In contrast, the control system of a space reactor power system (SRPS) employed for deep space missions must be able to accommodate unattended operations due to communications delays and periods of planetary occlusion while adapting to evolving or degraded conditions with no opportunity for repair or refurbishment. Thus, a SRPS control system must provide for operational autonomy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted an investigation of the state of the technology for autonomous control to determine the experience base in the nuclear power application domain, both for space and terrestrial use. It was found that control systems with varying levels of autonomy have been employed in robotic, transportation, spacecraft, and manufacturing applications. However, autonomous control has not been implemented for an operating terrestrial nuclear power plant nor has there been any experience beyond automating simple control loops for space reactors. Current automated control technologies for nuclear power plants are reasonably mature, and basic control for a SRPS is clearly feasible under optimum circumstances. However, autonomous control is primarily intended to account for the non optimum circumstances when degradation, failure, and other off-normal events challenge the performance of the reactor and near-term human intervention is not possible. Thus, the development and demonstration of autonomous control capabilities for the specific domain of space nuclear power operations is needed. This paper will discuss the findings of the ORNL study and provide a description of the concept of autonomy, its key characteristics, and a prospective

  5. Space reactor electric systems: system integration studies, Phase 1 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.; Harty, R.B.; Katz, B.; Keshishian, V.; Lillie, A.F.; Thomson, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of preliminary space reactor electric system integration studies performed by Rockwell International's Energy Systems Group (ESG). The preliminary studies investigated a broad range of reactor electric system concepts for powers of 25 and 100 KWe. The purpose of the studies was to provide timely system information of suitable accuracy to support ongoing mission planning activities. The preliminary system studies were performed by assembling the five different subsystems that are used in a system: the reactor, the shielding, the primary heat transport, the power conversion-processing, and the heat rejection subsystems. The subsystem data in this report were largely based on Rockwell's recently prepared Subsystem Technology Assessment Report. Nine generic types of reactor subsystems were used in these system studies. Several levels of technology were used for each type of reactor subsystem. Seven generic types of power conversion-processing subsystems were used, and several levels of technology were again used for each type. In addition, various types and levels of technology were used for the shielding, primary heat transport, and heat rejection subsystems. A total of 60 systems were studied

  6. Systems aspects of a space nuclear reactor power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    Various system aspects of a 300-kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been investigated. Special attention is given to the cases of a reusable OTV and a space-based radar. It is demonstrated that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design, and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly.

  7. Autonomous Control Capabilities for Space Reactor Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Richard T.; Neal, John S.; Brittain, C. Ray; Mullens, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Project Prometheus, the Nuclear Systems Program, is investigating a possible Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission, which would conduct in-depth studies of three of the moons of Jupiter by using a space reactor power system (SRPS) to provide energy for propulsion and spacecraft power for more than a decade. Terrestrial nuclear power plants rely upon varying degrees of direct human control and interaction for operations and maintenance over a forty to sixty year lifetime. In contrast, an SRPS is intended to provide continuous, remote, unattended operation for up to fifteen years with no maintenance. Uncertainties, rare events, degradation, and communications delays with Earth are challenges that SRPS control must accommodate. Autonomous control is needed to address these challenges and optimize the reactor control design. In this paper, we describe an autonomous control concept for generic SRPS designs. The formulation of an autonomous control concept, which includes identification of high-level functional requirements and generation of a research and development plan for enabling technologies, is among the technical activities that are being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Space Reactor Technology Program in support of the NASA's Project Prometheus. The findings from this program are intended to contribute to the successful realization of the JIMO mission

  8. Performance analysis of Brayton cycle system for space power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhi; Yang Xiaoyong; Zhao Gang; Wang Jie; Zhang Zuoyi

    2017-01-01

    The closed Brayton cycle system now is the potential choice as the power conversion system for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors because of its high energy conversion efficiency and compact configuration. The helium is the best working fluid for the system for its chemical stability and small neutron absorption cross section. However, the Helium has small mole mass and big specific volume, which would lead to larger pipes and heat exchanger. What's more, the big compressor enthalpy rise of helium would also lead to an unacceptably large number of compressor's stage. For space use, it's more important to satisfy the limit of the system's volume and mass, instead of the requirement of the system's thermal capacity. So Noble-Gas binary mixture of helium and xenon is presented as the working fluid for space Brayton cycle. This paper makes a mathematical model for space Brayton cycle system by Fortran language, then analyzes the binary mixture of helium and xenon's properties and effects on power conversion units of the space power reactor, which would be helpful to understand and design the space power reactor. The results show that xenon would lead to a worse system's thermodynamic property, the cycle's efficiency and specific power decrease as xenon's mole fraction increasing. On the other hand, proper amount of xenon would decrease the enthalpy changes in turbomachines, which would be good for turbomachines' design. Another optimization method – the specific power optimization is also proposed to make a comparison. (author)

  9. Specific power of liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-10-01

    Calculations of the core specific power for conceptual space-based liquid-metal-cooled reactors, based on heat transfer considerations, are presented for three different fuel types: (1) pin-type fuel; (2) cermet fuel; and (3) thermionic fuel. The calculations are based on simple models and are intended to provide preliminary comparative results. The specific power is of interest because it is a measure of the core mass required to produce a given amount of power. Potential problems concerning zero-g critical heat flux and loss-of-coolant accidents are also discussed because these concerns may limit the core specific power. Insufficient experimental data exists to accurately determine the critical heat flux of liquid-metal-cooled reactors in space; however, preliminary calculations indicate that it may be a concern. Results also indicate that the specific power of the pin-type fuels can be increased significantly if the gap between the fuel and the clad is eliminated. Cermet reactors offer the highest specific power because of the excellent thermal conductivity of the core matrix material. However, it may not be possible to take fuel advantage of this characteristic when loss-of-coolant accidents are considered in the final core design. The specific power of the thermionic fuels is dependent mainly on the emitter temperature. The small diameter thermionic fuels have specific powers comparable to those of pin-type fuels. 11 refs., 12 figs, 2 tabs

  10. State-space representation of the reactor dynamics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a novel formulation of the reactor space-independent kinetics equations. The intent is to present these equations in a form that is both compatible with modern control theory and mathematically rigorous. It is desired to write the kinetics equations in the standard state variable representation, x = Ax, where x is the state vector and A is the system matrix and, at the same time, avoid mathematical compromises such as the linearization of an equation about a particular operating point. The advantage to this proposed formulation is that it may allow the lateral transfer of existing control concepts, some that have been developed for other fields, to the operation of nuclear reactors. For example, sliding mode control has been developed to allow robots to function in a robust manner in the presence of changes in the system model. This is necessary because a robot is expected to be capable of picking up an object of unknown mass and moving that object along a specified trajectory. The variability of the object's mass introduces an uncertainty into the system model that is used to deduce the appropriate control action. Thus, the robot controller must be made robust against such variations. Sliding mode control is one means of accomplishing this. A reactor controller might benefit from the same concept if its objective were to cause the reactor power to move along a demanded trajectory despite the presence of some uncertainty in the net amount of reactivity that is present

  11. Neutronics Study of the KANUTER Space Propulsion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, Paolo; Nam, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yonghee

    2014-01-01

    The Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER) has been developed at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). This space propulsion system is unique in that it implements a HEU fuel with a thermal spectrum system. This allows the system to be designed with a minimal amount of fissile material and an incredibly small and light system. This then allows the implementation of the system in a cluster format which enables redundancy and easy scalability for different mission requirements. This combination of low fissile content, compact size, and thermalized spectrum contribute to an interesting and novel behavior of the reactor system. The two codes were both used for the burn up calculations in order to verify their validity while the static calculations and characterization of the core were done principally with MCNPX. The KANUTER space propulsion reactor is in the process of being characterized and improved. Its basic neutronic characteristics have been studied, and its behavior over time has been identified. It has been shown that this reactor will have difficulty operating as hoped in a bimodal configuration where it is able to provide both propulsion and power throughout mission to Mars. The reason for this has been identified as Xe 135 , and it is believed that a possible solution to this issue does exist, either in the form of an appropriately designed neutron spectrum or the building in of sufficient excess reactivity

  12. Neutronics Study of the KANUTER Space Propulsion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Nam, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER) has been developed at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). This space propulsion system is unique in that it implements a HEU fuel with a thermal spectrum system. This allows the system to be designed with a minimal amount of fissile material and an incredibly small and light system. This then allows the implementation of the system in a cluster format which enables redundancy and easy scalability for different mission requirements. This combination of low fissile content, compact size, and thermalized spectrum contribute to an interesting and novel behavior of the reactor system. The two codes were both used for the burn up calculations in order to verify their validity while the static calculations and characterization of the core were done principally with MCNPX. The KANUTER space propulsion reactor is in the process of being characterized and improved. Its basic neutronic characteristics have been studied, and its behavior over time has been identified. It has been shown that this reactor will have difficulty operating as hoped in a bimodal configuration where it is able to provide both propulsion and power throughout mission to Mars. The reason for this has been identified as Xe{sup 135}, and it is believed that a possible solution to this issue does exist, either in the form of an appropriately designed neutron spectrum or the building in of sufficient excess reactivity.

  13. Cermet-fueled reactors for advanced space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Taylor, I.N.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

    1987-12-01

    Cermet-fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high-performance advanced space power systems. The cermet consists of a hexagonal matrix of a refractory metal and a ceramic fuel, with multiple tubular flow channels. The high performance characteristics of the fuel matrix come from its high strength at elevated temperatures and its high thermal conductivity. The cermet fuel concept evolved in the 1960s with the objective of developing a reactor design that could be used for a wide range of mobile power generating sytems, including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests for the cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric as part of the 710 Project (General Electric 1966), and by Argonne National Laboratory in the Direct Nuclear Rocket Program (1965). Development programs for cermet fuel are currently under way at Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The high temperature qualification tests from the 1960s have provided a base for the incorporation of cermet fuel in advanced space applications. The status of the cermet fuel development activities and descriptions of the key features of the cermet-fueled reactor design are summarized in this paper

  14. 10 KWe dual-mode space nuclear power system for military and scientific applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malloy, J.; Westerman, K.; Rochow, R.; Scoles, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a 10 KWe dual-mode space power system concept which has been identified and is based on INEL's Small Externally-fueled Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept. This power system will enhance user capabilities by providing reliable electric power and by providing two propulsion systems; electric power for an arc-jet electric propulsion system and direct thrust by heating hydrogen propellant inside the reactor. The low thrust electric thrusters allow efficient station keeping and long-term maneuvering. This paper will focus on the nuclear power system design, including: the reactor with its UO 2 fuel in tungsten clad, 36 thermionic heat pipe modules (THPMs) which produce electricity within the reactor and remove waste heat, radiation shielding, waste heat radiators, and reactivity control systems. The use of non-vented fuel elements for short lifetime missions (under five years) will be described

  15. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  16. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper

  17. Recommendations for space reactor R ampersand D tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, R.L.; Marshall, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    A rationale was developed to determine which technologies a space nuclear reactor technology based program pursue based on the fact that budgets would be limited. A preliminary evaluation was conducted to identify key technical issues and to recommend a prioritized set of candidate research projects that could be undertaken as part of the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) program in the near term. The recommendations made have not been adopted formally by the DNA's Topaz International Program process. (TIP), but serve as inputs to the program plannin process

  18. Gridded thermionic gun and integral superconducting ballistic bunch compression cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, Thomas [Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medford, NY (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Electron-Ion colliders such as the Medium energy Electron Ion Collider (MEIC) being developed by JLAB require high current electrons with low energy spread for electron cooling of the collider ring. Accelerator techniques for improving bunch charge, average current, emittance, and energy spread are required for Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and Circulator Rings (CR) for next generation colliders for nuclear physics experiments. Example candidates include thermionic-cathode electron guns with RF accelerating structures. Thermionic cathodes are known to produce high currents and have excellent lifetime. The success of the IR and THz Free-Electron Laser (FEL) designed and installed by Advanced Energy Systems at the Fritz Haber Institute (FHI) of the Max Planck Society in Berlin [1,2] demonstrates that gridded thermionic cathodes and rf systems be considered for next generation collider technology. In Phase 1 Advanced Energy Systems (AES) developed and analyzed a design concept using a superconducting cavity pair and gridded thermionic cathode. Analysis included Beam Dynamics and thermal analysis to show that a design of this type is feasible. The latest design goals for the MEIC electron cooler were for electron bunches of 420 pC at a frequency of 952.6 MHz with a magnetic field on the cathode of 2kG. This field magnetizes the beam imparting angular momentum that provides for helical motion of the electrons in the cooling solenoid. The helical motion increases the interaction time and improves the cooling efficiency. A coil positioned around the cathode providing 2kG field was developed. Beam dynamics simulations were run to develop the particle dynamics near the cathode and grid. Lloyd Young added capability to Tstep to include space charge effects between two plates and include image charge effects from the grid. He also added new pepper-pot geometry capability to account for honeycomb grids. These additions were used to develop the beam dynamics for this gun. The

  19. Space reactors. Progress report, October 1981-March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranken, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in design studies and technology for the SP-100 Project - successor to the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Project - is reported for the period October 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982. The basis for selecting a high-temperature, UO 2 -fueled, heat-pipe-cooled reactor with a thermoelectric conversion system as the 100-kW/sub e/ reference design has been reviewed. Although no change has been made in the general concept, design studies have been done to investigate various reactor/conversion system coupling methods and core design modifications. Thermal and mechanical finite element modeling and three-dimensional Monte Carlo analysis of a core with individual finned fuel elements are reported. Studies of unrestrained fuel irradiation data are discussed that are relevant both to the core modeling work and to the design and fabrication of the first in-pile irradiation test, which is also reported. Work on lithium-filled core heat pipe development is described, including the attainment of 15.6 kW/sub t/ operation at 1525 K for a 2-m-long heat pipe with a 15.7-mm outside diameter. The successful operation of a 5.5-m-long, lightweight potassium/titanium heat pipe at 760 K is described, and test results of a thermoelectric module with GaP-modified SiGe thermoelectric elements are presented

  20. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  1. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  2. High temperature cogeneration with thermionic burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The thermionic cogeneration combustor was conceived to meet industrial requirements for high-temperature direct heat, typically in the form of gas at temperatures from 800 to 1900 K, while at the same time supplying electricity. The thermionic combustor is entirely self-contained, with heat from the combustion region absorbed by the emitters of thermionic converters to be converted to electric power and the high-temperature reject heat from the converters used to preheat the air used for combustion. Depending on the temperature of the process gas produced, energy savings of around 10% with respect to that used to produce the same amount of electricity and heat without cogeneration are possible with present technology, and savings of up to 20% may be possible with advanced converters. Possible thermionic combustor designs currently under investigation include a configuration in which heat is collected by heat pipes lining the periphery of the combustion region, and a fire-tube converter in which combustion occurs within the cylindrical emitter of each converter. Preliminary component tests of these designs have been encouraging

  3. High temperature cogeneration with thermionic burners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, G. O.; Britt, E. J.; Dick, R. S.

    The thermionic cogeneration combustor was conceived to meet industrial requirements for high-temperature direct heat, typically in the form of gas at temperatures from 800 to 1900 K, while at the same time supplying electricity. The thermionic combustor is entirely self-contained, with heat from the combustion region absorbed by the emitters of thermionic converters to be converted to electric power and the high-temperature reject heat from the converters used to preheat the air used for combustion. Depending on the temperature of the process gas produced, energy savings of around 10% with respect to that used to produce the same amount of electricity and heat without cogeneration are possible with present technology, and savings of up to 20% may be possible with advanced converters. Possible thermionic combustor designs currently under investigation include a configuration in which heat is collected by heat pipes lining the periphery of the combustion region, and a fire-tube converter in which combustion occurs within the cylindrical emitter of each converter. Preliminary component tests of these designs have been encouraging.

  4. Spacing grid intended for nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Flora, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    This invention concerns a new improved type of spacing grid that can be used in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. Under the invention a spacing grid is provided, preferably of the bimetallic type. This grid includes a set of flexible inconel strips positioned by structural 'zircalloy' fittings, having relatively low neutron absorption characteristics in comparison with systems where the flexible strips are welded in position, or where the spring forms an integral part of the structure. The openings for the fuel elements which are defined by the structural fittings intercrossing are fitted internally with bosses which work in conjunction with a spring directed downwards as from the flexible strip so as to position the individual fuel rods in their respective openings inside the grid structure. These flexible strips are arranged in rows extending in directions which depend on the particular design of the fuel asembly and which contain flexible components so distributed that the loads of the individual springs tend to equalize each other mutually. The reaction load exerting itself on the supporting structure is reduced to the minimum, and this results in a lesser distortion in the reactor and an equalisation of the spring loads [fr

  5. Brayton rotating units for space reactor power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Bruno M.; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies and Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Dept., The Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Designs and analyses models of centrifugal-flow compressor and radial-inflow turbine of 40.8kW{sub e} Brayton Rotating Units (BRUs) are developed for 15 and 40 g/mole He-Xe working fluids. Also presented are the performance results of a space power system with segmented, gas cooled fission reactor heat source and three Closed Brayton Cycle loops, each with a separate BRU. The calculated performance parameters of the BRUs and the reactor power system are for shaft rotational speed of 30-55 krpm, reactor thermal power of 120-471kW{sub th}, and turbine inlet temperature of 900-1149 K. With 40 g/mole He-Xe, a power system peak thermal efficiency of 26% is achieved at rotation speed of 45 krpm, compressor and turbine inlet temperatures of 400 and 1149 K and 0.93 MPa at exit of the compressor. The corresponding system electric power is 122.4kW{sub e}, working fluid flow rate is 1.85 kg/s and the pressure ratio and polytropic efficiency are 1.5% and 86.3% for the compressor and 1.42% and 94.1% for the turbine. For the same nominal electrical power of 122.4kW{sub e}, decreasing the molecular weight of the working fluid (15 g/mole) decreases its flow rate to 1.03 kg/s and increases the system pressure to 1.2 MPa. (author)

  6. Preliminary closed Brayton cycle study for a space reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine Nogueira Frutuoso; Carvalho, Ricardo Pinto de; Camillo, Giannino Ponchio

    2007-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) has started a preliminary design study for a Closed Brayton Cycle Loop (CBCL) aimed at a space reactor application. The main objectives of the study are to establish a starting concept for the CBCL components specifications, and to develop a demonstrative simulator of CBCL in nominal operation conditions. The ENU/IEAv preliminary design study is developing the CBCL around the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. The actual nuclear reactor study is being conducted independently. Because of that, a conventional heat source is being used for the CBCL, in this preliminary design phase. This paper describes the steady state simulator of the CBCL operating with NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. In principle, several gases are being considered as working fluid, as for instance: air, helium, nitrogen, CO2 and gas mixtures such as helium and xenon. At this moment the simulator is running with Helium as the working fluid. Simplified models of heat and mass transfer are being developed to simulate thermal components. Future efforts will focus on keeping track of the modifications being implemented at the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine in order to build the CBCL. (author)

  7. Preliminary closed Brayton cycle study for a space reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine Nogueira Frutuoso; Carvalho, Ricardo Pinto de [Institute for Advanced Studies, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br; Camillo, Giannino Ponchio [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: gianninocamillo@gmail.com

    2007-07-01

    The Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) has started a preliminary design study for a Closed Brayton Cycle Loop (CBCL) aimed at a space reactor application. The main objectives of the study are to establish a starting concept for the CBCL components specifications, and to develop a demonstrative simulator of CBCL in nominal operation conditions. The ENU/IEAv preliminary design study is developing the CBCL around the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. The actual nuclear reactor study is being conducted independently. Because of that, a conventional heat source is being used for the CBCL, in this preliminary design phase. This paper describes the steady state simulator of the CBCL operating with NOELLE 60290 turbo machine. In principle, several gases are being considered as working fluid, as for instance: air, helium, nitrogen, CO2 and gas mixtures such as helium and xenon. At this moment the simulator is running with Helium as the working fluid. Simplified models of heat and mass transfer are being developed to simulate thermal components. Future efforts will focus on keeping track of the modifications being implemented at the NOELLE 60290 turbo machine in order to build the CBCL. (author)

  8. Systems aspects of a space nuclear reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.

    1988-01-01

    Selected systems aspects of a 300 kW nuclear reactor power system for spacecraft have been studied. The approach included examination of two candidate missions and their associated spacecraft, and a number of special topics dealing with the power system design and operation. The missions considered were a reusable orbital transfer vehicle and a space-based radar. The special topics included: Power system configuration and scaling, launch vehicle integration, operating altitude, orbital storage, start-up, thawing, control, load following, procedures in case of malfunction, restart, thermal and nuclear radiation to other portions of the spacecraft, thermal stresses between subsystems, boom and cable designs, vibration modes, attitude control, reliability, and survivability. Among the findings are that the stowed length of the power system is important to mission design and that orbital storage for months to years may be needed for missions involving orbital assembly

  9. Thermionic emission from monolayer graphene, sheath formation and its feasibility towards thermionic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Shikha; Upadhyay Kahaly, M.; Mishra, S. K.

    2017-02-01

    A formalism describing the thermionic emission from a single layer graphene sheet operating at a finite temperature and the consequent formation of the thermionic sheath in its proximity has been established. The formulation takes account of two dimensional densities of state configuration, Fermi-Dirac (f-d) statistics of the electron energy distribution, Fowler's treatment of electron emission, and Poisson's equation. The thermionic current estimates based on the present analysis is found to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental observations (Zhu et al., Nano Res. 07, 1 (2014)). The analysis has further been simplified for the case where f-d statistics of an electron energy distribution converges to Maxwellian distribution. By using this formulation, the steady state sheath features, viz., spatial dependence of the surface potential and electron density structure in the thermionic sheath are derived and illustrated graphically for graphene parameters; the electron density in the sheath is seen to diminish within ˜10 s of Debye lengths. By utilizing the graphene based cathode in configuring a thermionic converter (TC), an appropriate operating regime in achieving the efficient energy conversion has been identified. A TC configured with the graphene based cathode (operating at ˜1200 K/work function 4.74 V) along with the metallic anode (operating at ˜400 K/ work function 2.0 V) is predicted to display ˜56% of the input thermal flux into the electrical energy, which infers approximately ˜84% of the Carnot efficiency.

  10. Space nuclear reactor system diagnosis: Knowledge-based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, Y.T.D.

    1990-01-01

    SP-100 space nuclear reactor system development is a joint effort by the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The system is designed to operate in isolation for many years, and is possibly subject to little or no remote maintenance. This dissertation proposes a knowledge based diagnostic system which, in principle, can diagnose the faults which can either cause reactor shutdown or lead to another serious problem. This framework in general can be applied to the fully specified system if detailed design information becomes available. The set of faults considered herein is identified based on heuristic knowledge about the system operation. The suitable approach to diagnostic problem solving is proposed after investigating the most prevalent methodologies in Artificial Intelligence as well as the causal analysis of the system. Deep causal knowledge modeling based on digraph, fault-tree or logic flowgraph methodology would present a need for some knowledge representation to handle the time dependent system behavior. A proposed qualitative temporal knowledge modeling methodology, using rules with specified time delay among the process variables, has been proposed and is used to develop the diagnostic sufficient rule set. The rule set has been modified by using a time zone approach to have a robust system design. The sufficient rule set is transformed to a sufficient and necessary one by searching the whole knowledge base. Qualitative data analysis is proposed in analyzing the measured data if in a real time situation. An expert system shell - Intelligence Compiler is used to develop the prototype system. Frames are used for the process variables. Forward chaining rules are used in monitoring and backward chaining rules are used in diagnosis

  11. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed PROMETHEUS Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory

  12. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  13. Photocathode operation of a thermionic RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorin, S.; Cutic, N.; Lindau, F.; Werin, S.; Curbis, F.

    2009-01-01

    The thermionic RF gun using a BaO cathode at the MAX-lab linac injector has been successfully commissioned for additional operation as a photocathode gun. By retaining the BaO cathode, lowering the temperature below thermal emission and illuminating it with a UV (263 nm) 9 ps laser pulse a reduced emittance and enhanced emission control has been achieved. Measurements show a normalised emittance of 5.5 mm mrad at 200 pC charge and a maximum quantum efficiency of 1.1x10 -4 . The gun is now routinely switched between storage ring injections in thermionic mode and providing a beam for the MAX-lab test FEL in photocathode mode.

  14. Thermionics. A bibliography with abstracts. Search period covered: 1970--Apr 1975. [190 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grooms, D.W.

    1975-04-01

    Research on thermionic power generation, power plant design, converter design, and basic research on thermionic materials are cited in the bibliography. Spacecraft applications are included. (Contains 190 abstracts).

  15. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borland, M.

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun's performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. ''State-of-the-art'' microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of e c · μm for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread ±10%. These emittances are for up to 5 x 10 9 e - per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically e · μm

  16. A high-brightness thermionic microwave electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borland, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-02-01

    In a collaborative effort by SSRL, AET Associates, and Varian Associates, a high-brightness microwave electron gun using a thermionic cathode has been designed, built, tested, and installed for use with the SSRL 150 MeV linear accelerator. This thesis discusses the physics behind the design and operation of the gun and associated systems, presenting predictions and experimental tests of the gun`s performance. The microwave gun concept is of increasing interest due to its promise of providing higher-current, lower-emittance electron beams than possible from conventional, DC gun technology. In a DC guns, accelerating gradients are less than 8 MV/m, while those in a microwave gun can exceed 100 MV/m, providing much more rapid initial acceleration, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of space-charge. Microwave guns produce higher momentum beams than DC guns, thus lessening space-charge effects during subsequent beam transport. Typical DC guns produce kinetic energies of 80--400 KeV, compared to 2--3 MeV for the SSRL microwave gun. ``State-of-the-art`` microwave gun designs employ laser-driven photocathodes, providing excellent performance but with greater complexity and monetary costs. A thermionic microwave gun with a magnetic bunching system is comparable in cost and complexity to a conventional system, but provides performance that is orders of magnitude better. Simulations of the SSRL microwave gun predict a normalized RMS emittance at the gun exist of < 10 π • mec • μm for a beam consisting of approximately 50% of the particles emitted from the gun, and having a momentum spread ±10%. These emittances are for up to 5 x 109e- per bunch. Chromatic aberrations in the transport line between the gun and linear accelerator increase this to typically < 30 π • me • μm.

  17. Temperature and Doppler coefficients of various space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Ludewig, H. Schmidt, E.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system

  18. Temperature and Doppler Coefficients of Various Space Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughabghab, Said F.; Ludewig, Hans; Schmidt, Eldon

    1994-07-01

    Temperature and Doppler feedback effects for a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designed to operate as a propulsion reactor are investigated. Several moderator types and compositions fuel enrichments and reactor sizes are considered in this study. From this study it could be concluded that a PBR can be configured which has a negative prompt feedback, zero coolant worth, and a small positive to zero moderator worth. This reactor would put the lowest demands on the control system.

  19. Ground test facility for nuclear testing of space reactor subsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two major reactor facilities at the INEL have been identified as easily adaptable for supporting the nuclear testing of the SP-100 reactor subsystem. They are the Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) and the Loss of Fluid Test Reactor (LOFT). In addition, there are machine shops, analytical laboratories, hot cells, and the supporting services (fire protection, safety, security, medical, waste management, etc.) necessary to conducting a nuclear test program. This paper presents the conceptual approach for modifying these reactor facilities for the ground engineering test facility for the SP-100 nuclear subsystem. 4 figs

  20. The direct conversion of heat into electricity in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devin, B.; Bliaux, J.; Lesueur, R.

    1964-01-01

    The direct conversion of heat into electricity by thermionic emission in an atomic reactor has been studied with the triple aim of its utilisation: as an energy source for a space device, at the head of a conventional conversion system in power installations, or finally in association with the thermoelectric conversion in very low power installations. The laboratory experiments were mainly orientated towards the electron extraction of metals and compounds and their behaviour at high temperatures. Converters furnishing up to 50 amps at 0. 4 volts with an efficiency close to 10 p. 100 have been constructed in the laboratory; the emitters were heated by electron bombardment and were composed of tungsten covered with an uranium carbide deposit or molybdenum covered with cesium. The main aspects of the coupling between the converter and the reactor have been covered from the point of view of electronics: the influence of the mismatching of the load on the temperature of the emitter and the influence of thermal flux density on the temperature of the emitter and the stability of the converter. Converters using uranium carbide as the electron emitter have been tested in reactors. Tests have been made under dynamic conditions in order to determine the dynamic characteristics. The load matching curves have been constructed and the overall performances of several cells coupled in such a way as to form a reactor rod have been deduced. This information is fundamental to the design of a control system for a thermionic conversion reactor. The problems associated with the reliability of thermionic converters connected in series in the same reactor rod have been examined theoretically. Finally, the absorption isotherms have been drawn at the ambient temperatures for krypton and xenon on activated carbon with the aim of investigating the escape of fission products in a converter. (author) [fr

  1. R-102, 1 Group Space-Independent Inverse Reactor Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganove, J.J.

    1966-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this program determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data. 2 - Method of solution: Time derivatives of neutron density are obtained by application of (a) five-point quartic, (b) three-point parabolic, (c) five-point least-mean-square cubic, (d) five-point least-mean-square parabolic, or (e) five-point least-mean-square linear formulae to the neutron density or to the natural logarithm of the neutron density. Between each data point the neutron density is assumed to be (a) exponential*(third-order polynomial), (b) exponential, or (c) linear. Changes in reactivity between data points are obtained algebraically from the kinetics equations, neutron density derivatives, and the algebraic representation of neutron density. First and second time derivatives of the reactivity are obtained by use of any of the formulae applicable to the neutron density. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of - 50 delay groups; 1000 data points; 99 data blocks (A data block is a sequence of input points characterized by a fixed time-interval between points, a smoothing option, and a number of repetitions of the smoothing option)

  2. Control for nuclear thermionic power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.C.; Sawyer, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    A control for a power source is described which includes nuclear fuel interspersed with thermionic converters, including a power regulator that maintains a substantially constant output voltage to a variable load, and a control circuit that drives a neutron flux regulator in accordance with the current supplied to the power regulator and the neutron flux density in the region of the converters. The control circuit generates a control signal which is the difference between the neutron flux density and a linear fucntion of the current, and which drives the neutron regulator in a direction to decrease or increase the neutron flux according to the polarity of the control signal

  3. Beam emittance measurement from CERN thermionic guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.; Rao, R.; Rinolfi, L.

    1992-01-01

    In the LEP Injector Linacs (LIL) a thermionic gun provides electron beams with different peak intensities at an energy of 80 keV. The beam emittances were estimated from the EGUN programme. Since the gun is of triode type, the main contribution to the emittance comes from the grid. The simulation programme does not model the real geometry by assuming a cylindrical symmetry, while the grid does not have such symmetry. A Gun Test Facility (GTF), allowing emittance measurements, based on the 3-gradients-method was installed. The experimental results are presented. (author) 6 refs.; 6 figs

  4. Progress in space nuclear reactor power systems technology development - The SP-100 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Activities related to the development of high-temperature compact nuclear reactors for space applications had reached a comparatively high level in the U.S. during the mid-1950s and 1960s, although only one U.S. nuclear reactor-powered spacecraft was actually launched. After 1973, very little effort was devoted to space nuclear reactor and propulsion systems. In February 1983, significant activities toward the development of the technology for space nuclear reactor power systems were resumed with the SP-100 Program. Specific SP-100 Program objectives are partly related to the determination of the potential performance limits for space nuclear power systems in 100-kWe and 1- to 100-MW electrical classes. Attention is given to potential missions and applications, regimes of possible space power applicability, safety considerations, conceptual system designs, the establishment of technical feasibility, nuclear technology, materials technology, and prospects for the future.

  5. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ∼60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ∼100 MW/L may be achievable

  6. Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todosow, Michael; Bezler, Paul; Ludewig, Hans; Kato, Walter Y.

    1993-01-01

    The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., is a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. Initial results suggests that full-scale PBR elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of ˜60-80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperture limit, average energy deposition of ˜100 MW/L may be achievable.

  7. A long term radiological risk model for plutonium-fueled and fission reactor space nuclear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, B.W.; Dougherty, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the optimization of the RISK III mathematical model, which provides risk assessment for the use of a plutonium-fueled, fission reactor in space systems. The report discusses possible scenarios leading to radiation releases on the ground; distinctions are made for an intact reactor and a dispersed reactor. Also included are projected dose equivalents for various accident situations. 54 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs

  8. A Sensitivity Study on the Radiation Shield of KSPR Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerba, S.; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hong Sik; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The idea of a space reactor was realised some decades ago and since that time several research activities have been performed into this field. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been developing a small fast reactor called as fission power system (FPS) for deep space mission, where highly enriched uranium (HEU) is used as fuel. On the other hand, other researchers have also surveyed a thermal reactor concept with low enriched uranium (LEU) for space applications. One of the main concerns in terms of a space reactor is the total size and the mass of the system including the reactor itself as well as the radiation shield. Since the reactor core is a source of neutrons and gamma photons of various energies, which may cause severe damage on the electronics of the space stations, the questions related to the development of a radiation shield should be address appropriately. The proposal of a radiation shield for a small space reactor is discussed in this paper. The requirements for the radiation shield have been addressed in terms of maximal absorbed doses and neutron flounces during 10 years of operation. In this study a radiation shield design for a small space reactor was investigated. All the presented calculations were performed using the multi-purpose stochastic MCNP code with temperature dependent continuous energy ENDF/B VII.0 neutron and photon cross section libraries. The aim of this study was to design a neutron and gamma shield that can meet the requirements of 250 Gy absorbed during 10 years of reactor operation. The comparison with a fast reactor design showed that high content of {sup 238}U strongly influences the shielding mass. This phenomenon is due to the higher photon production in case of the KSPR design and therefore the use of high {sup 235}U enrichments and the operation in fast neutron spectrum may be more desirable. In case if the KSPR space reactor the best shielding performance was achieved while utilizing a multi

  9. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW e and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k eff = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  10. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  11. Radionuclide inventories for short run-time space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coats, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Space Nuclear Reactor Systems, especially those used for propulsion, often have expected operation run times much shorter than those for land-based nuclear power plants. This produces substantially different radionuclide inventories to be considered in the safety analyses of space nuclear systems. This presentation describes an analysis utilizing ORIGEN2 and DKPOWER to provide comparisons among representative land-based and space systems. These comparisons enable early, conceptual considerations of safety issues and features in the preliminary design phases of operational systems, test facilities, and operations by identifying differences between the requirements for space systems and the established practice for land-based power systems. Early indications are that separation distance is much more effective as a safety measure for space nuclear systems than for power reactors because greater decay of the radionuclide activity occurs during the time to transport the inventory a given distance. In addition, the inventories of long-lived actinides are very low for space reactor systems

  12. Effects of space-dependent cross sections on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum space power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R.M.; Hanan, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of multigroup neutron cross section generation procedures on core physics parameters for compact fast spectrum reactors have been examined. Homogeneous and space-dependent multigroup cross section sets were generated in 11 and 27 groups for a representative fast reactor core. These cross sections were used to compute various reactor physics parameters for the reference core. Coarse group structure and neglect of space-dependence in the generation procedure resulted in inaccurate computations of reactor flux and power distributions and in significant errors regarding estimates of core reactivity and control system worth. Delayed neutron fraction was insensitive to cross section treatment, and computed reactivity coefficients were only slightly sensitive. However, neutron lifetime was found to be very sensitive to cross section treatment. Deficiencies in multigroup cross sections are reflected in core nuclear design and, consequently, in system mechanical design

  13. Reactor Start-up and Control Methodologies: Consideration of the Space Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Holloway, James Paul

    2004-01-01

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable the accomplishment of ambitious space exploration missions. The natural radiation environment in space provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Initial investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 reactor indicates a secondary neutron net current of 1.4x107 n/s at the core-reflector interface, with an incoming current of 3.4x106 n/s due to neutrons produced in the Be reflector alone. This neutron population could provide a reliable startup source for a space reactor. Additionally, this source must be considered in developing a reliable control strategy during reactor startup, steady-state operation, and power transients. An autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor startup, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location (altitude, latitude, position in solar system) or due to temporal variations in the radiation field, as may occur in the case of solar flares. One proposed application of a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle is in a tour of the Jovian system, where the time required for communication to Earth is significant. Hence, it is important that a reactor control system be designed with feedback mechanisms to automatically adjust to changes in reactor temperatures, power levels, etc., maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. This paper will evaluate the potential use of secondary neutrons produced by proton interactions in the reactor vessel as a startup source for a space reactor and will present a

  14. Mechanism of explosive emission excitation in thermionic energy conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulyga, A.V.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the mechanism of explosive electron emission in vacuum thermionic converters induced by thermionic currents in the case of the anomalous Richardson effect. The latter is associated with a spotted emitting surface and temperature fluctuations. In order to account for one of the components of the electrode potential difference, it is proposed that allowance be made for the difference between the polarization signal velocity in a dense metal electron gas and that in the electron-ion gas of the electrode gap. Ways to achieve explosive emission in real thermionic converters are discussed.

  15. Measuring neutron flux density in near-vessel space of a commercial WWER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodkin, G.I.; Eremin, A.N.; Lomakin, S.S.; Morozov, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of neutron flux density in two experimental channels on the reactor vessel external surface and in ionization chamber channel of a commercial WWER-1000 reactor, is measured by the activation detector technique. Azimuthal distributions of fast and thermal neutron fluxes and height distributions of fast neutron flux density within energy range >1.2 and 2.3 MeV are obtained. Conclusion is made, that reactor core state and its structural peculiarities in the measurement range essentially affect space and energy distribution of neutron field near the vessel. It should be taken into account when determining permissible neutron fluence for the reactor vessel

  16. Accident analysis of heat pipe cooled and AMTEC conversion space reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Yuan; Shan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Bin; Gou, Junli; Bo, Zhang; Lu, Tianyu; Ge, Li; Yang, Zijiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A transient analysis code TAPIRS for HPS has been developed. • Three typical accidents are analyzed using TAPIRS. • The reactor system has the self-stabilization ability under accident conditions. - Abstract: A space power with high power density, light weight, low cost and high reliability is of crucial importance to future exploration of deep space. Space reactor is an excellent candidate because of its unique characteristics of high specific power, low cost, strong environment adaptability and so on. Among all types of space reactors, heat pipe cooled space reactor, which adopts the passive heat pipe (HP) as core cooling component, is considered as one of the most promising choices and is widely studied all over the world. This paper develops a transient analysis code (TAPIRS) for heat pipe cooled space reactor power system (HPS) based on point reactor kinetics model, lumped parameter core heat transfer model, combined HP model (self-diffusion model, flat-front startup model and network model), energy conversion model of Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Conversion units (AMTEC), and HP radiator model. Three typical accidents, i.e., control drum failure, AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator are then analyzed using TAPIRS. By comparing the simulation results of the models and steady state with those in the references, the rationality of the models and the solution method is validated. The results show the following. (1) After the failure of one set of control drums, the reactor power finally reaches a stable value after two local peaks under the temperature feedback. The fuel temperature rises rapidly, however it is still under safe limit. (2) The fuel temperature is below a safe limit under the AMTEC failure and partial loss of the heat transfer area of radiator. This demonstrates the rationality of the system design and the potential applicability of the TAPIRS code for the future engineering application of

  17. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  18. Determination of noise sources and space-dependent reactor transfer functions from measured output signals only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; van Dam, H.; Kleiss, E.B.J.; van Uitert, G.C.; Veldhuis, D.

    1982-01-01

    The measured cross power spectral densities of the signals from three neutron detectors and the displacement of the control rod of the 2 MW research reactor HOR at Delft have been used to determine the space-dependent reactor transfer function, the transfer function of the automatic reactor control system and the noise sources influencing the measured signals. From a block diagram of the reactor with control system and noise sources expressions were derived for the measured cross power spectral densities, which were adjusted to satisfy the requirements following from the adopted model. Then for each frequency point the required transfer functions and noise sources could be derived. The results are in agreement with those of autoregressive modelling of the reactor control feed-back loop. A method has been developed to determine the non-linear characteristics of the automatic reactor control system by analysing the non-gaussian probability density function of the power fluctuations.

  19. Determination of noise sources and space-dependent reactor transfer functions from measured output signals only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The measured cross power spectral densities of the signals from three neutron detectors and the displacement of the control rod of the 2 MW research reactor HOR at Delft have been used to determine the space-dependent reactor transfer function, the transfer function of the automatic reactor control system and the noise sources influencing the measured signals. From a block diagram of the reactor with control system and noise sources expressions were derived for the measured cross power spectral densities, which were adjusted to satisfy the requirements following from the adopted model. Then for each frequency point the required transfer functions and noise sources could be derived. The results are in agreement with those of autoregressive modelling of the reactor control feed-back loop. A method has been developed to determine the non-linear characteristics of the automatic reactor control system by analysing the non-gaussian probability density function of the power fluctuations. (author)

  20. Analytic solutions of the multigroup space-time reactor kinetics equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.E.; Rottler, S.

    1986-01-01

    The development of analytical and numerical solutions to the reactor kinetics equations is reviewed. Analytic solutions of the multigroup space-time reactor kinetics equations are developed for bare and reflected slabs and spherical reactors for zero flux, zero current and extrapolated endpoint boundary conditions. The material properties of the reactors are assumed constant in space and time, but spatially-dependent source terms and initial conditions are investigated. The system of partial differential equations is reduced to a set of linear ordinary differential equations by the Laplace transform method. These equations are solved by matrix Green's functions yielding a general matrix solution for the neutron flux and precursor concentration in the Laplace transform space. The detailed pole structure of the Laplace transform matrix solutions is investigated. The temporally- and spatially-dependent solutions are determined from the inverse Laplace transform using the Cauchy residue theorem, the theorem of Frobenius, a knowledge of the detailed pole structure and matrix operators. (author)

  1. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model

  2. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    Efficiency and mass characteristics for four gas-cooled reactor power system configurations in the 2- to 20-MWe power range are modeled. The configurations use direct and indirect Brayton cycles with and without regeneration in the power conversion loop. The prismatic ceramic core of the reactor consists of several thousand pencil-shaped tubes made from a homogeneous mixture of moderator and fuel. The heat rejection system is found to be the major contributor to system mass, particularly at high power levels. A direct, regenerated Brayton cycle with helium working fluid permits high efficiency and low specific mass for a 10-MWe system

  3. Thermionic Power Cell To Harness Heat Energies for Geothermal Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    A unit thermionic power cell (TPC) concept has been developed that converts natural heat found in high-temperature environments (460 to 700 C) into electrical power for in situ instruments and electronics. Thermionic emission of electrons occurs when an emitter filament is heated to gwhite hot h temperatures (>1,000 C) allowing electrons to overcome the potential barrier and emit into the vacuum. These electrons are then collected by an anode, and transported to the external circuit for energy storage.

  4. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Fujita, T.; Grossman, M.; Bloomfield, H.; Heller, J.

    1988-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft are examined to determine system requirements for a 300 kWe space nuclear reactor power system. The spacecraft configuration and its orbit, launch vehicle, and propulsion are described. Mission profiles are addressed, and storage in assembly orbit is considered. Dynamics and attitude control and the problems of nuclear and thermal radiation are examined.

  5. Design and evaluation of materials for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A.A.; Vrillon, B.; Robert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The French programme envisages a 20 kWe reactor, project ERATO, with three technological options. The first option is a sodium cooled reactor, derived from the fast breeder reactor technology, (upper core outlet temperature of 700 0 C). The second option is based on the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technology (outlet temperature range 700 0 C-900 0 C). The third option is the reference solution, lithium cooled and UN fuelled fast spectrum reactor, (outlet temperature as high as 1200 0 C). The choice is essentially dominated by material considerations, and more specifically by the problems related to the compatibility with the cooling medium and to the high temperature creep resistance. For the first system limited work will be needed as the technology used is well experimented and there is a wealth of information on the austenitic stainless steel Type 316L-SPH. For the second system, most of the work has been concentrated on characterization of existing commercial alloys. This has included the preselection and the testing of a number of superalloys irradiated or not. The results obtained from high temperature tensile and creep tests have allowed selection of Haynes 230 as the primary candidate material and have also permitted calculation of allowable design stresses for this alloy. For the very high temperature system the French R and D programme has focused on Mo-Re alloys. The results obtained to this date from microstructural examinations and mechanical tests performed on different alloy compositions have allowed selection of Mo-25%Re for future optimization work. They have also shown the need for evaluation of creep properties at low stresses where microstructural instabilities are likely to occur as a result of long exposure to high temperature

  6. Using Multispectral Imaging to Measure Temperature Profiles and Emissivity of Large Thermionic Dispenser, Cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, D.F.; Fortgang, C.M.; Holtkamp, D.B.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic dispenser cathodes are widely used in modern high-power microwave tubes. Use of these cathodes has led to significant improvement in performance. In recent years these cathodes have been used in electron linear accelerators (LINACs), particularly in induction LINACs, such as the Experimental Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Relativistic Test Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For induction LINACs, the thermionic dispenser cathode provides greater reproducibility, longer pulse lengths, and lower emittance beams than does a field emission cathode. Los Alamos National Laboratory is fabricating a dual-axis X-ray radiography machine called dual-axis radiograph hydrodynamic test (DARHT). The second axis of DARHT consists of a 2-kA, 20-MeV induction LINAC that uses a 3.2-MeV electron gun with a tungsten thermionic-dispenser cathode. Typically the DARHT cathode current density is 10 A/cm 2 at 1050 C. Under these conditions current density is space-charge limited, which is desirable since current density is independent of temperature. At lower temperature (the temperature-limited regime) there are variations in the local current density due to a nonuniform temperature profile. To obtain the desired uniform current density associated with space-charge limited operation, the coolest area on the cathode must be at a sufficiently high temperature so that the emission is space-charge limited. Consequently, the rest of the cathode is emitting at the same space-charge-limited current density but is at a higher temperature than necessary. Because cathode lifetime is such a strong function of cathode temperature, there is a severe penalty for nonuniformity in the cathode temperature. For example, a temperature increase of 50 C means cathode lifetime will decrease by a factor of at least four. Therefore, we are motivated to measure the temperature profiles of our large-area cathodes

  7. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  8. DESIGN SAFETY PROBLEMS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS IN SPACE FOR ELECTRICAL POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickler, D A

    1963-06-15

    A general treatment is presented of some of the problems in the design safety of reactors which are to be operated in space. The basic requirements of these reachigh temperatures. The usual concept of a space reactor is described briefly, and the hazards of an assumed unmanned vehicle with an enriched-U-fueled reactor are examined during its launching, orbit, and reentry. Graphs are given for the dose vs distance downwind for an excursion of 100 Mw-sec, for the activity vs time after shutdown of a reactor which has been operated for 5 yr at 100 kw(t), and for the altitude vs orbital lifetime. Apparent conflicts between the basic requirements are discussed. (D.L.C.)

  9. Space nuclear-power reactor design based on combined neutronic and thermal-fluid analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.; Gido, R.G.; Brandon, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    The design and performance analysis of a space nuclear-power system requires sophisticated analytical capabilities such as those developed during the nuclear rocket propulsion (Rover) program. In particular, optimizing the size of a space nuclear reactor for a given power level requires satisfying the conflicting requirements of nuclear criticality and heat removal. The optimization involves the determination of the coolant void (volume) fraction for which the reactor diameter is a minimum and temperature and structural limits are satisfied. A minimum exists because the critical diameter increases with increasing void fraction, whereas the reactor diameter needed to remove a specified power decreases with void fraction. The purpose of this presentation is to describe and demonstrate our analytical capability for the determination of minimum reactor size. The analysis is based on combining neutronic criticality calculations with OPTION-code thermal-fluid calculations

  10. Space reactor/organic Rankine conversion - A near-term state-of-the-art solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggemann, R. E.; Lacey, D.

    The use of demonstrated reactor technology with organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power conversion can provide a low cost, minimal risk approach to reactor-powered electrical generation systems in the near term. Several reactor technologies, including zirconium hydride, EBR-II and LMFBR, have demonstrated long life and suitability for space application at the operating temperature required by an efficient ORC engine. While this approach would not replace the high temperature space reactor systems presently under development, it could be available in a nearer time frame at a low and predictable cost, allowing some missions requiring high power levels to be flown prior to the availability of advanced systems with lower specific mass. Although this system has relatively high efficiency, the heat rejection temperature is low, requiring a large radiator on the order of 3.4 sq m/kWe. Therefore, a deployable heat pipe radiator configuration will be required.

  11. Space nuclear reactor concepts for avoidance of a single point failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents three space nuclear reactor concepts for future exploration missions requiring electrical power of 10's to 100's kW, for 7-10 years. These concepts avoid a single point failure in reactor cooling; and they could be used with a host of energy conversion technologies. The first is lithium or sodium heat pipes cooled reactor. The heat pipes operate at a fraction of their prevailing capillary or sonic limit. Thus, when a number of heat pipes fail, those in the adjacent modules remove their heat load, maintaining reactor core adequately cooled. The second is a reactor with a circulating liquid metal coolant. The reactor core is divided into six identical sectors, each with a separate energy conversion loop. The sectors in the reactor core are neurotically coupled, but hydraulically decoupled. Thus, when a sector experiences a loss of coolant, the fission power generated in it will be removed by the circulating coolant in the adjacent sectors. In this case, however, the reactor fission power would have to decrease to avoid exceeding the design temperature limits in the sector with a failed loop. These two reactor concepts are used with energy conversion technologies, such as advanced Thermoelectric (TE), Free Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE), and Alkali Metal Thermal-to- Electric Conversion (AMTEC). Gas cooled reactors are a better choice to use with Closed Brayton Cycle engines, such as the third reactor concept to be presented in the paper. It has a sectored core that is cooled with a binary mixture of He-Xe (40 gm/mole). Each of the three sectors in the reactor has its own CBC and neutronically, but not hydraulically, coupled to the other sectors

  12. COSTANZA, 1-D 2 Group Space-Dependent Reactor Dynamics of Spatial Reactor with 1 Group Delayed Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazzi, A.; Gavazzi, C.; Vincenti, E.; Monterosso, R.

    1964-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The programme studies the spatial dynamics of reactor TESI, in the two group and one space dimension approximation. Only one group of delayed neutrons is considered. The programme simulates the vertical movement of the control rods according to any given movement law. The programme calculates the evolution of the fluxes and temperature and precursor concentration in space and time during the power excursion. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of lattice points is 100

  13. Nuclear Reactors for Space Power, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    The historical development of rocketry and nuclear technology includes a specific description of Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) programs. Solar cells and fuel cells are considered as alternative power supplies for space use. Construction and operation of space power plants must include considerations of the transfer of heat energy to…

  14. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  15. Problems of space-time behaviour of nuclear reactors; Problemi prostorno-vremenskog ponasanja nuklearnih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, D [Institut za nuklearne nauke ' Boris Kidric' , Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-07-01

    This paper covers a review of literature and mathematical methods applied for space-time behaviour of nuclear reactors. The review of literature is limited to unresolved problems and trends of actual research in the field of reactor physics. Dat je pregled literature i matematickih metoda koje se koriste prilikom tretiranja prostorno-vremenskog ponasanja nuklearnih reaktora. Pregled literature ogranicen je na jos neresene probleme i pravce u kojima su danas usmerena istrazivanja u ovoj oblasti fizike nuklearnih reaktora (author)

  16. Research on Monte Carlo improved quasi-static method for reactor space-time dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qi; Wang Kan; Li Shirui; Yu Ganglin

    2013-01-01

    With large time steps, improved quasi-static (IQS) method can improve the calculation speed for reactor dynamic simulations. The Monte Carlo IQS method was proposed in this paper, combining the advantages of both the IQS method and MC method. Thus, the Monte Carlo IQS method is beneficial for solving space-time dynamics problems of new concept reactors. Based on the theory of IQS, Monte Carlo algorithms for calculating adjoint neutron flux, reactor kinetic parameters and shape function were designed and realized. A simple Monte Carlo IQS code and a corresponding diffusion IQS code were developed, which were used for verification of the Monte Carlo IQS method. (authors)

  17. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-01-01

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs

  18. Space-time neutronic analysis of postulated LOCA's in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxat, J.C.; Frescura, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Space-time neutronic behaviour of CANDU reactors is of importance in the analysis and design of reactor safety systems. A methodology has been developed for simulating CANDU space-time neutronics with application to the analysis of postulated LOCA'S. The approach involves the efficient use of a set of computer codes which provide a capability to perform simulations ranging from detailed, accurate 3-dimensional space-time to low-cost survey calculations using point kinetics with some ''effective'' spatial content. A new, space-time kinetics code based upon a modal expansion approach is described. This code provides an inexpensive and relatively accurate scoping tool for detailed 3-dimensional space-time simulations. (author)

  19. Shield materials recommended for space power nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszubinski, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium hydride is recommended for neutron attenuation and depleted uranium is recommended for gamma ray attenuation. For minimum shield weights these materials must be arranged in alternate layers to attenuate the secondary gamma rays efficiently. In the regions of the shield near the reactor, where excessive fissioning occurs in the uranium, a tungsten alloy is used instead. Alloys of uranium such as either the U-0.5Ti or U-8Mo are available to accommodate structural requirements. The zone-cooled casting process is recommended for lithium hydride fabrication. Internal honeycomb reinforcement to control cracks in the lithium hydride is recommended.

  20. Plasma engineering analyses of tokamak reactor operating space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive method is presented for analyzing the potential physics operating regime of fusion reactor plasmas with detailed transport codes. Application is made to the tokamak Fusion Engineering Device (FED). The relationships between driven and ignited operation and supplementary heating requirements are examined. The reference physics models give a finite range of density and temperature over which physics objectives can be reached. Uncertainties in the confinement scaling and differences in supplementary heating methods can expand or contract this operating regime even to the point of allowing ignition with the more optimistic models

  1. Core reactivity estimation in space reactors using recurrent dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Tsai, Wei K.

    1991-01-01

    A recurrent multilayer perceptron network topology is used in the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems from only the input/output measurements. The identification is performed in the discrete time domain, with the learning algorithm being a modified form of the back propagation (BP) rule. The recurrent dynamic network (RDN) developed is applied for the total core reactivity prediction of a spacecraft reactor from only neutronic power level measurements. Results indicate that the RDN can reproduce the nonlinear response of the reactor while keeping the number of nodes roughly equal to the relative order of the system. As accuracy requirements are increased, the number of required nodes also increases, however, the order of the RDN necessary to obtain such results is still in the same order of magnitude as the order of the mathematical model of the system. It is believed that use of the recurrent MLP structure with a variety of different learning algorithms may prove useful in utilizing artificial neural networks for recognition, classification, and prediction of dynamic systems.

  2. Transient and steady-state analyses of an electrically heated Topaz-II Thermionic Fuel Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Xue, H.

    1992-01-01

    Transient and steady-state analyses of electrically heated, Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs) for Topaz-II space power system are performed. The calculated emitter and collector temperatures, load electric power and conversion efficiency are in good agreement with reported data. In this paper the effects or Cs pressure, thermal power input, and load resistance on the steady-state performance of the TFE are also investigated. In addition, the thermal response of the ZrH moderator during a startup transient and following a change in the thermal power input is examined

  3. Progress in radiation immune thermionic integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the results of a program directed at evaluating the thermionic integrated circuit (TIC) technology for applicability to military systems. Previous programs under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, have developed an initial TIC technology base and demonstrated operation in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The program described in this report has two parts: (1) a technical portion in which experiments and analyses were conducted to refine perceptions of near-term as well as ultimate performance levels of the TIC technology and (2) an applications portion in which the technical conclusions were to be evaluated against potential military applications. This report draws several conclusions that strongly suggest that (1) useful radiation-hard/high-temperature operable integrated circuits can be developed using the TIC technology; (2) because of their ability to survive and operate in hostile environments, a variety of potential military applications have been projected for this technology; and (3) based on the above two conclusions, an aggressive TIC development program should be initiated to provide the designers of future systems with integrated circuits and devices with the unique features of the TICs

  4. Progress in radiation immune thermionic integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, D.K.; McCormick, J.B. (comps.)

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the results of a program directed at evaluating the thermionic integrated circuit (TIC) technology for applicability to military systems. Previous programs under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, have developed an initial TIC technology base and demonstrated operation in high-temperature and high-radiation environments. The program described in this report has two parts: (1) a technical portion in which experiments and analyses were conducted to refine perceptions of near-term as well as ultimate performance levels of the TIC technology and (2) an applications portion in which the technical conclusions were to be evaluated against potential military applications. This report draws several conclusions that strongly suggest that (1) useful radiation-hard/high-temperature operable integrated circuits can be developed using the TIC technology; (2) because of their ability to survive and operate in hostile environments, a variety of potential military applications have been projected for this technology; and (3) based on the above two conclusions, an aggressive TIC development program should be initiated to provide the designers of future systems with integrated circuits and devices with the unique features of the TICs.

  5. Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, W. R.; Haley, V. F.

    1986-01-01

    Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested.

  6. Thermoelectric converter for SP-100 space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrill, W.R.; Haley, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Conductively coupling the thermoelectric converter to the heat source and the radiator maximizes the utilization of the reactor and radiator temperatures and thereby minimizes the power system weight. This paper presents the design for the converter and the individual thermoelectric cells that are the building block modules for the converter. It also summarizes progress on the fabrication of initial cells and the results obtained from the preparation of a manufacturing plan. The design developed for the SP-100 system utilizes thermally conductive compliant pads that can absorb the displacement and distortion caused by the combinations of temperatures and thermal expansion coefficients. The converter and cell designs provided a 100 kWe system which met the system requirements. Initial cells were fabricated and tested. The manufacturing plan showed that the chosen materials and processes are compatible with today's production techniques, that the production volume can readily be achieved and that the costs are reasonable

  7. Thermal radiation in gas core nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutz, S.A.; Gauntt, R.O.; Harms, G.A.; Latham, T.; Roman, W.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A diffusive model of the radial transport of thermal radiation out of a cylindrical core of fissioning plasma is presented. The diffusion approximation is appropriate because the opacity of uranium is very high at the temperatures of interest (greater than 3000 K). We make one additional simplification of assuming constant opacity throughout the fuel. This allows the complete set of solutions to be expressed as a single function. This function is approximated analytically to facilitate parametric studies of the performance of a test module of the nuclear light bulb gas-core nuclear-rocket-engine concept, in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. Our findings indicate that radiation temperatures in range of 4000-6000 K are attainable, which is sufficient to test the high specific impulse potential (approximately 2000 s) of this concept. 15 refs

  8. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Begg, L.L.; Koester, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed. 10 references

  9. Performance testing of refractory alloy-clad fuel elements for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Karnesky, R.A.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Two fast reactor irradiation tests, SP-1 and SP-2, provide a unique and self-consistent data set with which to evaluate the technical feasibility of potential fuel systems for the SP-100 space reactor. Fuel pins fabricated with leading cladding candidates (Nb-1Zr, PWC-11, and Mo-13Re) and fuel forms (UN and UO 2 ) are operated at temperatures typical of those expected in the SP-100 design. The first US fast reactor irradiated, refractory alloy clad fuel pins, from the SP-1 test, reached 1 at. % burnup in EBR-II in March 1985. At that time selected pins were discharged for interim examination. These examinations confirmed the excellent performance of the Nb-1Zr clad uranium oxide and uranium nitride fuel elements, which are the baseline fuel systems for two SP-100 reactor concepts

  10. A Spherical Torus Nuclear Fusion Reactor Space Propulsion Vehicle Concept for Fast Interplanetary Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig H.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Juhasz, Albert J.

    1998-01-01

    A conceptual vehicle design enabling fast outer solar system travel was produced predicated on a small aspect ratio spherical torus nuclear fusion reactor. Initial requirements were for a human mission to Saturn with a greater than 5% payload mass fraction and a one way trip time of less than one year. Analysis revealed that the vehicle could deliver a 108 mt crew habitat payload to Saturn rendezvous in 235 days, with an initial mass in low Earth orbit of 2,941 mt. Engineering conceptual design, analysis, and assessment was performed on all ma or systems including payload, central truss, nuclear reactor (including divertor and fuel injector), power conversion (including turbine, compressor, alternator, radiator, recuperator, and conditioning), magnetic nozzle, neutral beam injector, tankage, start/re-start reactor and battery, refrigeration, communications, reaction control, and in-space operations. Detailed assessment was done on reactor operations, including plasma characteristics, power balance, power utilization, and component design.

  11. Simulation of the preliminary General Electric SP-100 space reactor concept using the ATHENA computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of a space reactor using the ATHENA computer code is demonstrated. The fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of the preliminary General electric SP-100 design were modeled with ATHENA. Two demonstration transient calculations were performed simulating accident conditions. Calculated results are available for display using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer color graphics analysis tool in addition to traditional plots. ATHENA-calculated results appear reasonable, both for steady state full power conditions, and for the two transients. This analysis represents the first known transient thermal-hydraulic simulation using an integral space reactor system model incorporating heat pipes. 6 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  12. Solid-Core, Gas-Cooled Reactor for Space and Surface Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The solid-core, gas-cooled, Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S and 4) reactor is developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures. The Mo-14%Re reactor core is loaded with uranium nitride fuel in enclosed cavities, cooled by He-30%Xe, and sized to provide 550 kWth for seven years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector disassembles upon impact on water or soil. In addition to decreasing the reactor and shadow shield mass, Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials added to the reactor core ensure that it remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident. With a 0.1 mm thick boron carbide coating on the outside surface of the core block and 0.25 mm thick iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks, the reflector outer diameter is 43.5 cm and the combined reactor and shadow shield mass is 935.1 kg. With 12.5 atom% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide intersititial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating, the S and 4 reactor has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, and a total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 atom% europium-151 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter europium-151 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick europium-151 sesquioxide coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively

  13. Applying design principles to fusion reactor configurations for propulsion in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, S.A.; Deveny, M.E.; Schulze, N.R.

    1993-01-01

    The application of fusion power to space propulsion requires rethinking the engineering-design solution to controlled-fusion energy. Whereas the unit cost of electricity (COE) drives the engineering-design solution for utility-based fusion reactor configurations; initial mass to low earth orbit (IMLEO), specific jet power (kW(thrust)/kg(engine)), and reusability drive the engineering-design solution for successful application of fusion power to space propulsion. Three design principles (DP's) were applied to adapt and optimize three candidate-terrestrial-fusion-reactor configurations for propulsion in space. The three design principles are: provide maximum direct access to space for waste radiation, operate components as passive radiators to minimize cooling-system mass, and optimize the plasma fuel, fuel mix, and temperature for best specific jet power. The three candidate terrestrial fusion reactor configurations are: the thermal barrier tandem mirror (TBTM), field reversed mirror (FRM), and levitated dipole field (LDF). The resulting three candidate space fusion propulsion systems have their IMLEO minimized and their specific jet power and reusability maximized. A preliminary rating of these configurations was performed, and it was concluded that the leading engineering-design solution to space fusion propulsion is a modified TBTM that we call the Mirror Fusion Propulsion System (MFPS)

  14. An assessment of space reactor technology needs and recommendations for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Wiley, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    In order to provide a strategy for space reactor technology development, the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) has authorized a brief review of potential national needs that may be addressed by space reactor systems. A systematic approach was used to explore needs at several levels that are increasingly specific. sm-bullet Level 0 emdash General Trends and Issues sm-bullet Level 1 emdash Generic Space Capabilities to Address Trends sm-bullet Level 2 emdash Requirements to Support Capabilities sm-bullet Level 3 emdash System Types Capable of Meeting Requirements sm-bullet Level 4 emdash Generic Reactor System Types sm-bullet Level 5 emdash Specific Baseline Systems Using these findings, a strategy was developed to support important space reactor technologies within a limited budget. A preliminary evaluation identified key technical issues and provide a prioritized set of candidate research projects. The evaluation of issues and the recommended research projects are presented in a companion paper. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  16. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multi-Megawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samim Anghaie; Knight, Travis W.; Plancher, Johann; Gouw, Reza

    2004-01-01

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors

  17. Criticality-safety analyses of compacted and water-flooded. SP-100 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, D.I.; Sapir, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Reactivity calculations were performed to determine the sensitivity of three liquid metal-cooled, fast reactor designs to various accident environments. The concepts, proposed for the SP-100 Space Nuclear Power Program, included one thermionic and two fuel-pin designs. Numerous models of each core were developed to analyze the effect of core compaction and of water-flooded lattice spreading. Results indicate that those designs incorporating in-core control are least affected by core compaction and that the thermonic concept can best withstand expansion of the flooded fuel element array

  18. Lightweight power bus for a baseload nuclear reactor in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberly, C.E.; Massie, L.D.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Space environmental interactions with the power distribution/power processing subsystem can become a serious problem for power systems rated at 10's to 100's of kilowatts. Utilization of ceramic superconductors at 1000 A/cm/sup 2/, which has already been demonstrated at 77 K in a conductor configuration may eliminate both bus mass and distribution voltage problems in a high power satellite. The analytical results presented here demonstrate that a superconducting coaxial power transmission bus offers significant benefits in reduced distribution voltage and mass

  19. Thermodynamics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reck, Kasper; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) cells in which direct photon energy as well as thermal energy can be harvested have recently been suggested as a new candidate for high efficiency solar cells. Here, we present an analytic thermodynamical model for evaluation of the efficiency of PETE solar cells including an analysis of the entropy production due to thermionic emission of general validity. The model is applied to find the maximum efficiency of a PETE cell for given cathode and anode work functions and temperatures

  20. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-06-15

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles' exhaust momentum can be used directly to produce high Isp thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p-11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  1. Advanced Fusion Reactors for Space Propulsion and Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the methodology proposed for conversion of light elements into energy via fusion has made steady progress. Scientific studies and engineering efforts in advanced fusion systems designs have introduced some new concepts with unique aspects including consideration of Aneutronic fuels. The plant parameters for harnessing aneutronic fusion appear more exigent than those required for the conventional fusion fuel cycle. However aneutronic fusion propulsion plants for Space deployment will ultimately offer the possibility of enhanced performance from nuclear gain as compared to existing ionic engines as well as providing a clean solution to Planetary Protection considerations and requirements. Proton triggered 11Boron fuel (p- 11B) will produce abundant ion kinetic energy for In-Space vectored thrust. Thus energetic alpha particles "exhaust" momentum can be used directly to produce high ISP thrust and also offer possibility of power conversion into electricity. p- 11B is an advanced fusion plant fuel with well understood reaction kinematics but will require some new conceptual thinking as to the most effective implementation.

  2. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  3. Multidimensional space-time kinetics of a heavy water moderated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, W.G.; Baumann, N.P.; Jewell, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    Diffusion theory analysis of a series of multidimensional space-time experiments is appraised in terms of the final experiment of the series. In particular, TRIMHX diffusion calculations were examined for an experiment involving free-fall insertion of a 235 U-bearing rod into a heavy water moderated reactor with a large reflector. The experimental transient flux-tilts were accurately reproduced after cross section adjustments forced agreement between static diffusion calculations and static reactor measurements. The time-dependent features were particularly well modeled, and the bulk of the small discrepancies in space-dependent features should be removable by more refined cross-section adjustments. This experiment concludes a series of space-time experiments that span a wide range of delayed neutron holdback effects. TRIMHX calculations of these experiments demonstrate the accuracy of the modeling employed in the code

  4. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations

  5. DynMo: Dynamic Simulation Model for Space Reactor Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed; Tournier, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    A Dynamic simulation Model (DynMo) for space reactor power systems is developed using the SIMULINK registered platform. DynMo is modular and could be applied to power systems with different types of reactors, energy conversion, and heat pipe radiators. This paper presents a general description of DynMo-TE for a space power system powered by a Sectored Compact Reactor (SCoRe) and that employs off-the-shelf SiGe thermoelectric converters. SCoRe is liquid metal cooled and designed for avoidance of a single point failure. The reactor core is divided into six equal sectors that are neutronically, but not thermal-hydraulically, coupled. To avoid a single point failure in the power system, each reactor sector has its own primary and secondary loops, and each loop is equipped with an electromagnetic (EM) pump. A Power Conversion assembly (PCA) and a Thermoelectric Conversion Assembly (TCA) of the primary and secondary EM pumps thermally couple each pair of a primary and a secondary loop. The secondary loop transports the heat rejected by the PCA and the pumps TCA to a rubidium heat pipes radiator panel. The primary loops transport the thermal power from the reactor sector to the PCAs for supplying a total of 145-152 kWe to the load at 441-452 VDC, depending on the selections of the primary and secondary liquid metal coolants. The primary and secondary coolant combinations investigated are lithium (Li)/Li, Li/sodium (Na), Na-Na, Li/NaK-78 and Na/NaK-78, for which the reactor exit temperature is kept below 1250 K. The results of a startup transient of the system from an initial temperature of 500 K are compared and discussed

  6. Theoretical studies of thermionic conversion of solar energy with graphene as emitter and collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olawole, Olukunle C.; De, Dilip Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) using nanomaterials is an emerging field of research. It is known that graphene can withstand temperatures as high as 4600 K in vacuum, and it has been shown that its work function can be engineered from a high value (for monolayer/bilayer) of 4.6 eV to as low as 0.7 eV. Such attractive electronic properties (e.g., good electrical conductivity and high dielectric constant) make engineered graphene a good candidate as an emitter and collector in a thermionic energy converter for harnessing solar energy efficiently. We have used a modified Richardson-Dushman equation and have adopted a model where the collector temperature could be controlled through heat extraction in a calculated amount and a magnet can be attached on the back surface of the collector for future control of the space-charge effect. Our work shows that the efficiency of solar energy conversion also depends on power density falling on the emitter surface, and that a power conversion efficiency of graphene-based solar TEC as high as 55% can be easily achieved (in the absence of the space-charge effect) through proper choice of work functions, collector temperature, and emissivity of emitter surfaces. Such solar energy conversion would reduce our dependence on silicon solar panels and offers great potential for future renewable energy utilization.

  7. Spacing grids for a fuel pencil bundle in a nuclear reactor assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feutrel, Claude.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to the lattices forming the spacing of a bundle of clad fuel pencils in a nuclear reactor assembly, particularly in a water cooled or fast reactor, the purpose of such lattices being to maintain these pencils parallel with respect to each other and according to a given lattice arrangement, whilst also providing these pencils with a flexible support according to different successive areas apportioned with their length in order to present them from vibrating under the effect of the circulation of a liquid coolant environment flowing in contact with these pencils [fr

  8. Design of particle bed reactors for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Powell, J.R.; Todosow, M.; Maise, G.; Barletta, R.; Schweitzer, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the design for the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) that was considered for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program. The methods of analysis and their validation are outlined first. Monte Carlo methods were used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms were developed for the fluid dynamics, heat transfer and transient analysis; and commercial codes were used for the stress analysis. We carried out a critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR to validate the reactor physics; blowdown experiments with beds of prototypic dimensions were undertaken to validate the power-extraction capabilities from particle beds. In addition, materials and mechanical design concepts for the fuel elements were experimentally validated. (author)

  9. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  10. A thermionic energy converter with A molybdenum alumina cermet emitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Wolff, L.R.; Metselaar, R.; Yogi Goswami, D.

    1988-01-01

    The I-V characteristics of a thermionic converter equipped with a Mo-1w/o AI203 emitter and a Mo collector were measured. The conditions were varied over a limited range without, as well as with Cs. Work functions of Mo as well as Mo-1w/o AI203 were determined. Measurements were carried out in a

  11. Beta Radiation Enhanced Thermionic Emission from Diamond Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Croot

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-based thermionic emission devices could provide a means to produce clean and renewable energy through direct heat-to-electrical energy conversion. Hindering progress of the technology are the thermionic output current and threshold temperature of the emitter cathode. In this report, we study the effects on thermionic emission caused by in situ exposure of the diamond cathode to beta radiation. Nitrogen-doped diamond thin films were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on molybdenum substrates. The hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond was studied using a vacuum diode setup with a 63Ni beta radiation source-embedded anode, which produced a 2.7-fold increase in emission current compared to a 59Ni-embedded control. The emission threshold temperature was also examined to further assess the enhancement of thermionic emission, with 63Ni lowering the threshold temperature by an average of 58 ± 11 °C compared to the 59Ni control. Various mechanisms for the enhancement are discussed, with a satisfactory explanation remaining elusive. Nevertheless, one possibility is discussed involving excitation of preexisting conduction band electrons that may skew their energy distribution toward higher energies.

  12. Thermodynamics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) cells in which direct photon energy as well as thermal energy can be harvested have recently been suggested as a new candidate for high efficiency solar cells. Here, we present an analytic thermodynamical model for evaluation of the efficiency of PETE...

  13. Processes of preparation, deposition and analysis of thermionic emissive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romao, B.M. Verdelli; Muraro Junior, A.; Tessaroto, L.A.B.; Takahashi, J.

    1992-09-01

    This paper shows the results of the optimization of the process of preparation and deposition of thermionic emissive substances that are used in the oxide-cathodes which are utilized in the gun of the IEAv linear electron accelerator. (author). 5 refs., 5 figs

  14. Comparative assessment of out-of-core nuclear thermionic power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, W.C.; Koenig, D.R.; Prickett, W.Z.

    1975-01-01

    The hardware selections available for fabrication of a nuclear electric propulsion stage for planetary exploration were explored. The investigation was centered around a heat-pipe-cooled, fast-spectrum nuclear reactor for an out-of-core power conversion system with sufficient detail for comparison with the in-core system studies completed previously. A survey of competing power conversion systems still indicated that the modular reliability of thermionic converters makes them the desirable choice to provide the 240-kWe end-of-life power for at least 20,000 full power hours. The electrical energy will be used to operate a number of mercury ion bombardment thrusters with a specific impulse in the range of about 4,000-5,000 seconds. (Author)

  15. Space nuclear power systems, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    This volume, number two of three, contains the reviewed and edited papers were being presented at the Ninth Symposium in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 12--16 January 1992. The objective of the symposium, and hence these volumes, is to summarize the state of knowledge in the area of space nuclear power and propulsion and to provide a forum at which the most recent findings and important new developments can be presented and discussed. Topics included is this volume are: reactor and power systems control; thermionic energy conversion; space missions and power needs; key issues in nuclear and propulsion; nuclear thermal propulsion; manufacturing and processing; thermal management; space nuclear safety; and nuclear testing and production facilities

  16. Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactor research for multimegawatt power in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T.; Helmick, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    In the gaseous-fuel reactor concept, the fissile material is contained in a moderator-reflector cavity and exists in the form of a flowing gas or plasma separated from the cavity walls by means of fluid mechanical forces. Temperatures in excess of structural limitations are possible for low-specific-mass power and high-specific-impulse propulsion in space. Experiments have been conducted with a canister filled with enriched UF6 inserted into a beryllium-reflected cavity. A theoretically predicted critical mass of 6 kg was measured. The UF6 was also circulated through this cavity, demonstrating stable reactor operation with the fuel in motion. Because the flowing gaseous fuel can be continuously processed, the radioactive waste in this type of reactor can be kept small. Another potential of fissioning gases is the possibility of converting the kinetic energy of fission fragments directly into coherent electromagnetic radiation, the nuclear pumping of lasers. Numerous nuclear laser experiments indicate the possibility of transmitting power in space directly from fission energy. The estimated specific mass of a multimegawatt gaseous-fuel reactor power system is from 1 to 5 kg/kW while the companion laser-power receiver station would be much lower in specific mass.

  17. Adaptability of Brayton cycle conversion systems to fast, epithermal and thermal spectrum space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.P.

    1988-01-01

    The two French Government Agencies C.N.E.S. (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and C.E.A. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) are carrying out joint preliminary studies on space nuclear power systems for future ARIANE 5 launch vehicle applications. The Brayton cycle is the reference conversion system, whether the heat source is a liquid metal-cooled (NaK, Na or Li) reactor or a gas-cooled direct cycle concept. The search for an adequate utilization of this energy conversion means has prompted additional evaluations featuring the definition of satisfactory cycle conditions for these various kinds of reactor concepts. In addition to firstly studied fast and epithermal spectrum ones, thermal spectrum reactors can offer an opportunity of bringing out some distinctive features of the Brayton cycle, in particular for the temperature conditioning of the efficient metal hydrides (ZrH, Li/sub 7/H) moderators. One of the purposes of the paper is to confirm the potential of long lifetime ZrH moderated reactors associated with a gas cycle and to assess the thermodynamical consequences for both Nak(Na)-cooled or gas-cooled nuclear heat sources. This investigation is complemented by the definition of appropriate reactor arrangements which could be presented on a further occasion

  18. Thermo-mechanical behaviour of FBTR reactor vessel due to natural convection in cover gas space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Varadarajan, S.; Kapoor, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor is a 40 MW(t), loop type sodium cooled reactor, similar in design to Rapsodie. The Reactor Assembly, which is the heart of FBTR, comprises the Reactor Vessel (RV) housed in a safety vessel within a concrete cell (A1 Cell). The RV which supports the core is shielded at the top by two rotatable plugs which are stacked with layers of borated graphite and steel. The smaller plug (SRP), is mounted excentric to the larger one (LRP). A nominal annular gap of 16 mm is provided between RV and LRP and between LRP and SRP to enable free rotation of the plugs. Stainless Steel insulation is fixed inside the steel vessel, to avoid overheating of the A1 Cell concrete. The core is supported by the Grid Plate (GP), bolted to the RV. During preheating, sodium charging and isothermal runs upto 350 0 C, temperature asymmetries were noticed in the reactor vessel wall in the cover gas space. This was attributable to convection currents in the annulus between RV and LRP. The asymmetries also resulted in a lateral shift of the grid plate. This paper discusses our experience in suppressing these convection currents, and minimising the grid plate shift

  19. Thermofluid-neutronic stability of the rotating, fluidized bed, space-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Jones, O.C.; Becker, M.

    1993-01-01

    A rotating fluidized bed nuclear reactor has the potential of being a vary attractive option for ultra-high power space systems, especially for propulsion. Research has already examined fuel bed expansion due to variations in state variables, propellant flow rate, and rotational speed, and has also considered problems related to thermal stress. This paper describes the results of a coupled thermofluid-neutronic analysis where perturbations in fuel bed height caused by maneuvering changes in operating conditions alter power levels due to varying absorption of neutrons which would otherwise leak from the system, mainly through the nozzle. This first analysis was not a detailed stability analysis. Rather, it utilized simplified neutronic methods, and was intended to provide an order-of-magnitude assessment of the stability of the reactor with the intention to determine whether or not stability might be a 'concept killer'. Stability was compared with a fixed-fuel-bed reactor of identical geometry for three different cases comprising a set of small, medium and large sizes/powers from 250 MW to 5 GW. It was found that power fluctuations in the fluidized bed reactor were larger by 100 db or more than expected in a packed bed reactor of the same geometry, but never resulted in power excursions. Margins to unit gain in some cases, however, were sufficiently small that the approximations in this quasi-2-dimensional model may not be sufficiently accurate to preclude significant excursions. (orig.)

  20. Critical evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys for use in space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of this material are brought into focus. Even though pure molybdenum heat pipes have been built and tested, this metal's high ductile-brittle transition temperature and modest creep strength place significant design restrictions on a core heat pipe made from it. Molybdenum alloys are examined with regard to their promise as potential replacements for pure molybdenum. The properties of TZM and molybdenum-rhenium alloys are examined, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15 wt % rhenium offer the most advantage as an alternative to pure molybdenum in space reactor core heat pipes

  1. Design study on an independently-tunable-cells thermionic RF gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, H.; Tanaka, T.; Hinode, F.; Kawai, M.

    2006-01-01

    Characteristics of a thermionic RF gun have been studied by a 3-D simulation code developed using an FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method as a Maxwell's equations solver. The gun is consists of two independent power feeding cavities, so that we call it independently-tunable-cells (ITC)'-RF gun. The first cell is the cathode cell and the second one is an accelerating cell. The ITC gun can be operated at various modes of different RF-power ratio and phase between two cavities. Simulation study shows a velocity-bunching like effect may be occurred in the gun, so that the short pulse beam from the thermionic RF gun is a better candidate to produce the coherent THz synchrotron radiation. Expected bunch length with a total charge of ∼20 pC (1% energy width from the top energy) is around 200 fs (fwhm). Even the beam energy extracted from the gun is varied by which the input powers are changed, almost same shape of the longitudinal phase space can be produced by tuning the phase. (author)

  2. Direct Estimation of Power Distribution in Reactors for Nuclear Thermal Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemir, Tunc; Miller, Don W.; Burghelea, Andrei

    2004-02-01

    A recently proposed constant temperature power sensor (CTPS) has the capability to directly measure the local power deposition rate in nuclear reactor cores proposed for space thermal propulsion. Such a capability reduces the uncertainties in the estimated power peaking factors and hence increases the reliability of the nuclear engine. The CTPS operation is sensitive to the changes in the local thermal conditions. A procedure is described for the automatic on-line calibration of the sensor through estimation of changes in thermal .conditions.

  3. Nuclear reactor power as applied to a space-based radar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, L.; Fujita, T.; Beatty, R.; Bhandari, P.; Chow, E.; Deininger, W.; Ewell, R.; Grossman, M.; Kia, T.; Nesmith, B.

    1988-01-01

    The SP-100 Project was established to develop and demonstrate feasibility of a space reactor power system (SRPS) at power levels of 10's of kilowatts to a megawatt. To help determine systems requirements for the SRPS, a mission and spacecraft were examined which utilize this power system for a space-based radar to observe moving objects. Aspects of the mission and spacecraft bearing on the power system were the primary objectives of this study; performance of the radar itself was not within the scope. The study was carried out by the Systems Design Audit Team of the SP-100 Project.

  4. Heat-electricity convertion systems for a Brazilian space micro nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Marcelino, Natalia B.; Placco, Guilherme M.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Borges, Eduardo M., E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: lamartine.guimaraes@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: jamil@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: jalnsgf@outlook.com, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com, E-mail: ecorborges@hotmail.com, E-mail: ivayolini@gmail.com, E-mail: guilherme_placco@ig.com.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Barrios Junior, Ary Garcia, E-mail: arygarcia89@yahoo.com [Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco (FATESF), Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This contribution will discuss the evolution work in the development of thermal cycles to allow the development of heat-electricity conversion for the Brazilian space micro nuclear Reactor. Namely, innovative core and nuclear fuel elements, Brayton cycle, Stirling engine, heat pipes, passive multi-fluid turbine, among others. This work is basically to set up the experimental labs that will allow the specification and design of the space equipment. Also, some discussion of the cost so far, and possible other applications will be presented. (author)

  5. Simplified methodology for control cell constant calculations of the reactor cores for the space kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Rubens Souza dos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques

    2002-01-01

    In this work is presented a methodology which focuses the distribution of neutron absorber rods in nuclear reactor power plants, for utilizing in space kinetic calculations, principally in the cluster ejection transients of control rods. A numerical model for macroscopic constant calculations based on the knowledge of the neutron flux without the control rods is proposed, as alternative to the analytical models, based on the hypothesis of the null current on the cell super boundaries. The proposed model in this work has itself showed adequate to deal with problems with strong space dependence, once that the model showed consistence in the global average built in the analytical model. (author)

  6. Heat-electricity convertion systems for a Brazilian space micro nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Marcelino, Natalia B.; Placco, Guilherme M.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Barrios Junior, Ary Garcia

    2013-01-01

    This contribution will discuss the evolution work in the development of thermal cycles to allow the development of heat-electricity conversion for the Brazilian space micro nuclear Reactor. Namely, innovative core and nuclear fuel elements, Brayton cycle, Stirling engine, heat pipes, passive multi-fluid turbine, among others. This work is basically to set up the experimental labs that will allow the specification and design of the space equipment. Also, some discussion of the cost so far, and possible other applications will be presented. (author)

  7. Technical Bases to Consider for Performance and Demonstration Testing of Space Fission Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, Laurie L.; Houts, Michael G.; Clement, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Performance and demonstration testing are critical to the success of a space fission reactor program. However, the type and extent to which testing of space reactors should be performed has been a point of discussion within the industry for many years. With regard to full power ground nuclear tests, questions such as 'Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Are there equivalent alternatives? Can a test facility be constructed (or modified) in a reasonable amount of time? Will the test article accurately represent the flight system? Are the costs too restrictive?' have been debated for decades. There are obvious benefits of full power ground nuclear testing such as obtaining systems integrated reliability data on a full-scale, complete end-to-end system. But these benefits come at some programmatic risk. In addition, this type of testing does not address safety related issues. This paper will discuss and assess these and other technical considerations essential in deciding which type of performance and demonstration testing to conduct on space fission reactor systems. (authors)

  8. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-01-01

    Any reactor that utilizes fuel consisting of a fissile material in a gaseous state may be referred to as a gaseous core reactor (GCR). Studies on GCRs have primarily been limited to the conceptual phase, mostly due to budget cuts and program cancellations in the early 1970's. A few scientific experiments have been conducted on candidate concepts, primarily of static pressure fissile gas filling a cylindrical or spherical cavity surrounded by a moderating shell, such as beryllium, heavy water, or graphite. The main interest in this area of nuclear power generation is for space applications. The interest in space applications has developed due to the promise of significant enhancement in fuel utilization, safety, plant efficiency, special high-performance features, load-following capabilities, power conversion optimization, and other key aspects of nuclear power generation. The design of a successful GCR adapted for use in space is complicated. The fissile material studied in the pa st has been in a fluorine compound, either a tetrafluoride or a hexafluoride. Both of these molecules have an impact on the structural material used in the making of a GCR. Uranium hexafluoride as a fuel allows for a lower operating temperature, but at temperatures greater than 900K becomes essentially impossible to contain. This difficulty with the use of UF6 has caused engineers and scientists to use uranium tetrafluoride, which is a more stable molecule but has the disadvantage of requiring significantly higher operating temperatures. Gas core reactors have traditionally been studied in a steady state configuration. In this manner a fissile gas and working fluid are introduced into the core, called a cavity, that is surrounded by a reflector constructed of materials such as Be or BeO. These reactors have often been described as cavity reactors because the density of the fissile gas is low and criticality is achieved only by means of the reflector to reduce neutron leakage from the core

  9. Generation of multi-branch beam with thermionic gun for the Japan linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Akemoto, M.; Matsumonto, H.; Urakawa, J.; Yoshioka, M.; Akiyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    We report on the development of a thermionic gun that is capable of producing multi-bunch beam to be used at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility for the Japan Linear Collider project. Two types of grid pulse generators have been developed. One is an avalanche pulse generator. A Y-646E cathode was successfully operated to generate double-bunch beam with a pulse width shorter than 700 ps, bunch spacing 1.4 ns, and a peak current 4.3 A. The other grid pulse generator is a fast ECL circuit with an RF power amplifier. Generation of 20-pulse trains with 2.1 ns time spacing has been demonstrated. (Author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  10. Space and Terrestrial Power System Integration Optimization Code BRMAPS for Gas Turbine Space Power Plants With Nuclear Reactor Heat Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2007-01-01

    In view of the difficult times the US and global economies are experiencing today, funds for the development of advanced fission reactors nuclear power systems for space propulsion and planetary surface applications are currently not available. However, according to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 the U.S. needs to invest in developing fission reactor technology for ground based terrestrial power plants. Such plants would make a significant contribution toward drastic reduction of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions and associated global warming. To accomplish this goal the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project (NGNP) has been established by DOE under the Generation IV Nuclear Systems Initiative. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was designated as the lead in the development of VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) and HTGR (High Temperature Gas Reactor) technology to be integrated with MMW (multi-megawatt) helium gas turbine driven electric power AC generators. However, the advantages of transmitting power in high voltage DC form over large distances are also explored in the seminar lecture series. As an attractive alternate heat source the Liquid Fluoride Reactor (LFR), pioneered at ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) in the mid 1960's, would offer much higher energy yields than current nuclear plants by using an inherently safe energy conversion scheme based on the Thorium --> U233 fuel cycle and a fission process with a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The power plants are to be sized to meet electric power demand during peak periods and also for providing thermal energy for hydrogen (H2) production during "off peak" periods. This approach will both supply electric power by using environmentally clean nuclear heat which does not generate green house gases, and also provide a clean fuel H2 for the future, when, due to increased global demand and the decline in discovering new deposits, our supply of liquid fossil fuels will have been used up. This is

  11. CVD refractory metals and alloys for space nuclear power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Gulden, T.D.; Watson, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    CVD technology has made significant contributions to the development of space nuclear power systems during the period 1962 to 1972. For the in-core thermionic concept, CVD technology is essential to the fabrication of the tungsten electron emitter. For the liquid metal cooled fuel pin using uranium nitride as fuel and T-111 and Nb-1 Zr as cladding, a tungsten barrier possibly produced by CVD methods is essential to the fuel-cladding compatibility at the designed operating temperature. Space power reactors may use heat pipes to transfer heat from the reactor core to the conversion system. CVD technology has been used for fabricating the heat pipe used as cross-flow heat exchanger, including the built-in channels on the condenser wall for liquid lithium return. 28 references, 17 figures

  12. Flow of ideal fluid through a central region of a nuclear reactor wire-spaced fuel subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, J.

    1991-04-01

    The results are given of calculations of the flow of an ideal fluid through the central region of a nuclear reactor wire-spaced fuel subassembly. The computer code used is briefly described. (author). 10 figs., 4 refs

  13. Verification of codes used for the nuclear safety assessment of the small space heterogeneous reactors with zirconium hydride moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, E.S.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompaniets, G.V.

    1994-01-01

    Computer codes used for assessment of nuclear safety for space NPP are compared taking as an example small-sized heterogeneous reactor with zirconium hydride moderator of the Topaz-2 facility. The code verifications are made for five different variants

  14. Preliminary neutronic design of spock reactor: A nuclear system for space power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgio, N.; Santagata, A.; Cumo, M.; Fasano, A.; Frullini, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to preliminary investigates the neutronic features of an upgrade of the MAUS [1] nuclear reactor whose core will be able to supply a thermoelectric converter in order to generate 30 kW of electricity for space applications. The neutronic layout of SPOCK (Space Power Core Ka) is a compact, MOX fuelled, liquid metal cooled and totally reflected fast reactor with a control system based on neutron absorption. Spock, that during the heart and launch operation must be maintained in sub-critical state, has to start up in the outer space at 40 K temperatures with the coolant in a solid state and it will reach the operating steady condition at the maximum temperature of 1300 K with the coolant in the liquid state. The main design goal is to maintains, in the operating conditions of a typical space mission, the control of the appropriate criticality margin versus temperature and coolant physical state. For this purpose, a neutronic/thermal-hydraulic calculation chain able to assists the entire design process must be set up. As preliminary recognition, MCNPX 2.5.0 and FLUENT calculations were carried out. The emerging key features of SPOCK are: an equilateral triangular mesh of 91 cylindrical UO 2 fuel rods with a Molybdenum clad ensured by two grids of the same material, cooled by liquid Sodium and contained in an AISI 316 L vessel. The core is totally wrapped by a Beryllium reflector that hosts six absorber (B 4 C) rotating control rods. The reactor shape is cylindrical (radius = 30 cm and height = 60 cm) with a total mass of 275 kg. The excess reactivity was of 5000 PCM at 1300 K. A preliminary evaluation of the control rods worth and a power spatial distribution were also discussed. Through the definition of an ideal reference K e ff value at 300 K for the actual SPOCK configuration, a sensitivity analysis on various cross sections data and material physical properties was performed for the given mission temperature range, allowing consideration on

  15. Advanced micro-reactor for space and deep sea exploration: a scientific Brazilian vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ono, Shizuca; Lobo, Paulo D.C.

    2011-01-01

    Humankind is at the point to initiate a new adventure in its evolutionary journey, the colonization of other planets of our solar system and space travels. Also, there is still another frontier where the human presence is scarce, the oceans and the Earth seabed. To have success in the exploration of these new frontiers a fundamental requirement must be satisfied: secure availability of energy for life support and others processes. This work deals with the establishment of a basis for a Brazilian nuclear research and development (R and D) program to develop micro-reactor (MR) technologies that may be used in the seabed, the space or another hostile environment on Earth. The work presents a set of basic requirements that is used to define the best reactor type to be used in these environments. Also, the limits and dimensions that define the class of micro-reactors are discussed. The fast neutron spectrum was chosen as the best for the MR and the limits for the active core volume and thermal power are 30 liters and 5 MW. (author)

  16. Mini-cavity plasma core reactors for dual-mode space nuclear power/propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, S.

    1976-01-01

    A mini-cavity plasma core reactor is investigated for potential use in a dual-mode space power and propulsion system. In the propulsive mode, hydrogen propellant is injected radially inward through the reactor solid regions and into the cavity. The propellant is heated by both solid driver fuel elements surrounding the cavity and uranium plasma before it is exhausted out the nozzle. The propellant only removes a fraction of the driver power, the remainder is transferred by a coolant fluid to a power conversion system, which incorporates a radiator for heat rejection. In the power generation mode, the plasma and propellant flows are shut off, and the driver elements supply thermal power to the power conversion system, which generates electricity for primary electric propulsion purposes

  17. Analysis and evaluation of ZPPR critical experiments for a 100 kilowatt-electric space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, H.F.; Collins, P.J.; Carpenter, S.G.; Olsen, D.N.; Smith, D.M.; Schaefer, R.W.; Doncals, R.A.; Andre, S.V.; Porter, C.A.; Cowan, C.L.; Stewart, S.L.; Protsik, R.

    1990-01-01

    ZPPR critical experiments were used for physics testing the reactor design of the SP-100, a 100-kW thermoelectric LMR that is being developed to provide electrical power for space applications. These tests validated all key physics characteristics of the design, including the ultimate safety in the event of a launch or re-entry accident. Both the experiments and the analysis required the use of techniques not previously needed for fast reactor designs. A few significant discrepancies between the experimental and calculated results leave opportunities for further reductions in the mass of the SP-100. An initial investigation has been made into application of the ZPPR-20 results, along with those of other relevant integral data, to the SP-100 design

  18. Analysis of space-time core dynamics on reactor accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Makoto; Shindo, Ryuichi; Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    1987-05-01

    Regarding reactor accident at Chernobyl in USSR, core dynamics has been analyzed by COMIC code which solves space-time dependent diffusion equation in three-dimension taking spatial thermohydraulic effect into account. The code was originally developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR), however, has been modified to include light water as coolant, instead of helium, for analysis of the accident. In the analysis, emphasis is placed on spatial effects on core dynamics. The analyses are performed for the cases of modeling the core fully and partially where 6 fuel channels surround one control rod channel. The result shows that the speed of applying void reactivity averaged over the core depends on the power and coolant flow distributions. Therefore, these distributions have potential to influence on the value and the time of peak power estimated by calculation. (author)

  19. Fabrication and testing of uranium nitride fuel for space power reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, R. B.; Chidester, K. M.; Hoth, C. W.; Mason, R. E.; Petty, R. L.

    1988-02-01

    Uranium nitride fuel was selected for previous space power reactors because of its attractive thermal and physical properties; however, all UN fabrication and testing activities were terminated over ten years ago. An accelerated irradiation test, SP-1, was designed to demonstrate the irradiation performance of Nb-1 Zr clad UN fuel pins for the SP-100 program. A carbothermic-reduction/nitriding process was developed to synthesize UN powders. These powders were fabricated into fuel pellets by conventional cold-pressing and sintering. The pellets were loaded into Nb-1 Zr cladding tubes, irradiated in a fast-test reactor, and destructively examined after 0.8 at% burnup. Preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results show that the fuel pins behaved as designed. Fuel swelling, fission-gas release, and microstructural data are presented, and suggestions to enhance the reliability of UN fuel pins are discussed.

  20. New features of the MAX IV thermionic pre-injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, J., E-mail: joel.andersson@maxiv.lu.se; Olsson, D., E-mail: david.olsson@maxiv.lu.se; Curbis, F.; Malmgren, L.; Werin, S.

    2017-05-21

    The MAX IV facility in Lund, Sweden consists of two storage rings for production of synchrotron radiation. The smaller 1.5 GeV ring is presently under construction, while the larger 3 GeV ring is being commissioned. Both rings will be operating with top-up injections from a full-energy injector. During injection, the electron beam is first delivered to the main injector from a thermionic pre-injector which consists of a thermionic RF gun, a chopper system, and an energy filter. In order to reduce losses of high-energy electrons along the injector and in the rings, the electron beam provided by the thermionic pre-injector should have the correct time structure and energy distribution. In this paper, the design of the MAX IV thermionic pre-injector with all its sub components is presented. The electron beam delivered by the pre-injector and its dependence on parameters such as optics, cathode temperature, and RF power are studied. Measurements are here compared with simulation results obtained by particle tracking and electromagnetic codes. The chopper system is described in detail, and different driving schemes that optimize the injection efficiency for the two storage rings are investigated. During operation, it was discovered that the structure of the beam delivered by the gun is affected by mode beating between the accelerating and a low-order mode. This mode beating is also studied in detail. Finally, initial measurements of the electron beam delivered to the 3 GeV ring during commissioning are presented.

  1. THERMIONIC EMISSION ENHANCEMENT FROM CESIUM COATED RHENIUM IN ELECTRIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Steese, J. G.; Zollweg, R. J.

    1963-04-15

    The plasma-anode technique was used to observe anomalously high thermionic emission from a rhenium surface with small cesium coverage, where the work function of the composite surface is greater than the ionization potential of cesium. Data suggest that emission enhancement is caused by increased cesium coverage because of cesiumion trapping near the emitter surface under the influence of an ion-rich sheath. (auth)

  2. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Dooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    A class of devices known as integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 0 C is described. The evolution of the ITC concept is discussed. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Recent experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits have successfully operated in 500 0 C environments for extended periods of time

  3. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Application of data mining in three-dimensional space time reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Botao; Zhao Fuyu

    2011-01-01

    A high-fidelity three-dimensional space time nodal method has been developed to simulate the dynamics of the reactor core for real time simulation. This three-dimensional reactor core mathematical model can be composed of six sub-models, neutron kinetics model, cay heat model, fuel conduction model, thermal hydraulics model, lower plenum model, and core flow distribution model. During simulation of each sub-model some operation data will be produced and lots of valuable, important information reflecting the reactor core operation status could be hidden in, so how to discovery these information becomes the primary mission people concern. Under this background, data mining (DM) is just created and developed to solve this problem, no matter what engineering aspects or business fields. Generally speaking, data mining is a process of finding some useful and interested information from huge data pool. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a new technique of data mining appeared in recent years, and SVR is a transformed method of SVM which is applied in regression cases. This paper presents only two significant sub-models of three-dimensional reactor core mathematical model, the nodal space time neutron kinetics model and the thermal hydraulics model, based on which the neutron flux and enthalpy distributions of the core are obtained by solving the three-dimensional nodal space time kinetics equations and energy equations for both single and two-phase flows respectively. Moreover, it describes that the three-dimensional reactor core model can also be used to calculate and determine the reactivity effects of the moderator temperature, boron concentration, fuel temperature, coolant void, xenon worth, samarium worth, control element positions (CEAs) and core burnup status. Besides these, the main mathematic theory of SVR is introduced briefly next, on the basis of which SVR is applied to dealing with the data generated by two sample calculation, rod ejection transient and axial

  5. Nuclear power in space. Use of reactors and radioactive substances as power sources in satellites and space probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoestbaeck, Lars

    2008-11-01

    Today solar panels are the most common technique to supply power to satellites. Solar panels will work as long as the power demand of the satellite is limited and the satellite can be equipped with enough panels, and kept in an orbit that allows enough sunlight to hit the panels. There are various types of space missions that do not fulfil these criteria. With nuclear power these types of missions can be powered regardless of the sunlight and as early as 1961 the first satellite with a nuclear power source was placed in orbit. Out of seventy known space missions that has made use of nuclear power, ten have had some kind of failure. In no case has the failure been associated with the nuclear technology used. This report discusses to what degree satellites with nuclear power are a source for potential radioactive contamination of Swedish territory. It is not a discussion for or against nuclear power in space. Neither is it an assessment of consequences if radioactive material from a satellite would reach the earth's surface. Historically two different kinds of Nuclear Power Sources (NPS) have been used to generate electric power in space. The first is the reactor where the energy is derived from nuclear fission of 235 U and the second is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) where electricity is generated from the heat of naturally decaying radionuclides. NPS has historically only been used in space by United States and the Soviet Union (and in one failing operation Russia). Nuclear Power Sources have been used in three types of space objects: satellites, space probes and moon/Mars vehicles. USA has launched one experimental reactor into orbit, all other use of NPS by the USA has been RTG:s. The Soviet Union, in contrast, only launched a few RTG:s but nearly forty reactors. The Soviet use of NPS is less transparent than the use in USA and some data published on Soviet systems are more or less well substantiated assessments. It is likely that also future

  6. Current transmission and nonlinear effects in un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Harris, J. R. [Air Force Weapons Lab

    2017-05-03

    Un-gated thermionic cathode RF guns are well known as a robust source of electrons for many accelerator applications. These sources are in principle scalable to high currents without degradation of the transverse emittance due to control grids but they are also known for being limited by back-bombardment. While back-bombardment presents a significant limitation, there is still a lack of general understanding on how emission over the whole RF period will affect the nature of the beams produced from these guns. In order to improve our understanding of how these guns can be used in general we develop analytical models that predict the transmission efficiency as a function of the design parameters, study how bunch compression and emission enhancement caused by Schottky barrier lowering affect the output current profile in the gun, and study the onset of space-charge limited effects and the resultant virtual cathode formation leading to a modulation in the output current distribution.

  7. Communication: Effects of thermionic-gun parameters on operating modes in ultrafast electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Kieft

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast electron microscopes with thermionic guns and LaB6 sources can be operated in both the nanosecond, single-shot and femtosecond, single-electron modes. This has been demonstrated with conventional Wehnelt electrodes and absent any applied bias. Here, by conducting simulations using the General Particle Tracer code, we define the electron-gun parameter space within which various modes may be optimized. The properties of interest include electron collection efficiency, temporal and energy spreads, and effects of laser-pulse duration incident on the LaB6 source. We find that collection efficiencies can reach 100% for all modes, despite there being no bias applied to the electrode.

  8. Shock and vibration tests of uranium mononitride fuel pellets for a space power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    Shock and vibration tests were conducted on cylindrically shaped, depleted, uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pellets. The structural capabilities of the pellets were determined under exposure to shock and vibration loading which a nuclear reactor may encounter during launching into space. Various combinations of diametral and axial clearances between the pellets and their enclosing structures were tested. The results of these tests indicate that for present fabrication of UN pellets, a diametral clearance of 0.254 millimeter and an axial clearance of 0.025 millimeter are tolerable when subjected to launch-induced loads.

  9. Startup thaw concept for the SP-100 space reactor power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpich, A.; Das, A.; Choe, H.; Mcnamara, E.; Switick, D.; Bhandari, P.

    1990-01-01

    A thaw concept for a space reactor power system which employs lithium as a circulant for both the heat-transport and the heat-rejection fluid loops is presented. An exemplary thermal analysis for a 100-kWe (i.e., SP-100) system is performed. It is shown that the design of the thaw system requires a thorough knowledge of the various physical states of the circulant throughout the system, both spatially and temporally, and that the design has to provide adequate margins for the system to avoid a structural or thermally induced damage.

  10. Low work-function thermionic emission and orbital-motion-limited ion collection at bare-tether cathodic contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xin, E-mail: xin.chen@upm.es; Sanmartín, J. R., E-mail: juanr.sanmartin@upm.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza Cardenal Cisneros, 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    With a thin coating of low-work-function material, thermionic emission in the cathodic segment of bare tethers might be much greater than orbital-motion-limited (OML) ion collection current. The space charge of the emitted electrons decreases the electric field that accelerates them outwards, and could even reverse it for high enough emission, producing a potential hollow. In this work, at the conditions of high bias and relatively low emission that make the potential monotonic, an asymptotic analysis is carried out, extending the OML ion-collection analysis to investigate the probe response due to electrons emitted by the negatively biased cylindrical probe. At given emission, the space charge effect from emitted electrons increases with decreasing magnitude of negative probe bias. Although emitted electrons present negligible space charge far away from the probe, their effect cannot be neglected in the global analysis for the sheath structure and two thin layers in between sheath and the quasineutral region. The space-charge-limited condition is located. It is found that thermionic emission increases the range of probe radius for OML validity and is greatly more effective than ion collection for cathodic contact of tethers.

  11. High power densities from high-temperature material interactions. [in thermionic energy conversion and metallic fluid heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) and metallic-fluid heat pipes (MFHPs), offering unique advantages in terrestrial and space energy processing by virtue of operating on working-fluid vaporization/condensation cycles that accept great thermal power densities at high temperatures, share complex materials problems. Simplified equations are presented that verify and solve such problems, suggesting the possibility of cost-effective applications in the near term for TEC and MFHP devices. Among the problems discussed are: the limitation of alkali-metal corrosion, protection against hot external gases, external and internal vaporization, interfacial reactions and diffusion, expansion coefficient matching, and creep deformation.

  12. Determining space-energy distribution of thermal neutrons in heterogeneous cylindrically symmetric reactor cell, Master Thesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M. V.

    1966-06-01

    A combination of multigroup method and P 3 approximation of spherical harmonics method was chosen for calculating space-energy distribution of thermal neutron flux in elementary reactor cell. Application of these methods reduced solution of complicated transport equation to the problem of solving an inhomogeneous system of six ordinary firs-order differential equations. A procedure is proposed which avoids numerical solution and enables analytical solution when applying certain approximations. Based on this approach, computer codes were written for ZUSE-Z-23 computer: SIGMA code for calculating group constants for a given material; MULTI code which uses results of SIGMA code as input and calculates spatial ana energy distribution of thermal neutron flux in a reactor cell. Calculations of thermal neutron spectra for a number of reactor cells were compared to results available from literature. Agreement was satisfactory in all the cases, which proved the correctness of the applied method. Some possibilities for improving the precision and acceleration of the calculation process were found during calculation. (author)

  13. Loss of coolant accident mitigation for liquid metal cooled space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgevich, Vladimir; Best, Frederick; Erdman, Carl

    1989-01-01

    A loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a liquid metal-cooled space reactor system has been considered as a possible accident scenario. Development of new concepts that will prevent core damage by LOCA caused elevated temperatures is the primary motivation of this work. Decay heat generated by the fission products in the reactor core following shutdown is sufficiently high to melt the fuel unless energy can be removed from the pins at a sufficiently rapid rate. There are two major reasons that prevent utilization of traditional emergency cooling methods. One is the absence of gravity and the other is the vacuum condition outside the reactor vessel. A concept that overcomes both problems is the Saturated Wick Evaporation Method (SWEM). This method involves placing wicking structures at specific locations in the core to act as energy sinks. One of its properties is the isothermal behaviour of the liquid in the wick. The absorption of energy by the surface at the isothermal temperature will direct the energy into an evaporation process and not in sensible heat addition. The use of this concept enables establishment of isothermal positions within the core. A computer code that evaluates the temperature distribution of the core has been developed and the results show that this design will prevent fuel meltdown. (author)

  14. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment

  15. Space and time optimization of nuclear reactors by means of the Pontryagin principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, V.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical method is being presented for solving space dependent optimization problems concerning a functional for one dimensional geometries in the few group diffusion approximation. General dimensional analysis was applied to derive relations for the maximum of a functional and the limiting values of the constraints. Two procedures were given for calculating the anisotropic diffusion coefficients in order to improve the results of the diffusion approximation. In this work two procedures were presented for collapsing the microscopic multigroup cross sections, one general and another specific to the space dependent optimization problems solved by means of the Pontryagin maximum principle. Neutron spectrum optimization is performed to ensure the burnup of Pu 239 isotope produced in a thermal nuclear reactor. A procedure is also given for the minimization of finite functional set by means of the Pontryagin maximum principle. A method for determining the characteristics of fission Pseudo products is formulated in one group and multigroup cases. This method is applied in the optimization of the burnup in nuclear reactors with fuel electric cells. A procedure to mjnimze the number of the fuel burnup equations is described. The optimization problems presented and solved in this work point to the efficiency of the maximum principle. Each problem on method presented in the various chapters is accompanied by considerations concerning dual problems and possibilities of further research development. (author)

  16. A feasibility assessment of nuclear reactor power system concepts for the NASA Growth Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Heller, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility assessment of the integration of reactor power system concepts with a projected growth Space Station architecture was conducted to address a variety of installation, operational, disposition and safety issues. A previous NASA sponsored study, which showed the advantages of Space Station - attached concepts, served as the basis for this study. A study methodology was defined and implemented to assess compatible combinations of reactor power installation concepts, disposal destinations, and propulsion methods. Three installation concepts that met a set of integration criteria were characterized from a configuration and operational viewpoint, with end-of-life disposal mass identified. Disposal destinations that met current aerospace nuclear safety criteria were identified and characterized from an operational and energy requirements viewpoint, with delta-V energy requirement as a key parameter. Chemical propulsion methods that met current and near-term application criteria were identified and payload mass and delta-V capabilities were characterized. These capabilities were matched against concept disposal mass and destination delta-V requirements to provide a feasibility of each combination.

  17. A feasibility assessment of nuclear reactor power system concepts for the NASA growth Space Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.; Heller, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility assessment of the integration of reactor power system concepts with a projected growth space station architecture was conducted to address a variety of installation, operational, disposition and safety issues. A previous NASA sponsored study, which showed the advantages of space station related concepts, served as the basis for this study. A study methodology was defined and implemented to assess compatible combinations of reactor power installation concepts, disposal destinations, and propulsion methods. Three installation concepts that met a set of integration criteria were characterized from a configuration and operational viewpoint, with end-of-life disposal mass identified. Disposal destinations that met current aerospace nuclear safety criteria were identified and characterized from an operational and energy requirements viewpoint, with delta-V energy requirement as a key parameter. Chemical propulsion methods that met current and near-term application criteria were identified and payload mass and delta-V capabilities were characterized. These capabilities were matched against concept disposal mass and destination delta-V requirements to provide a feasibility of each combination

  18. Modified parity space averaging approaches for online cross-calibration of redundant sensors in nuclear reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moath Kassim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To maintain safety and reliability of reactors, redundant sensors are usually used to measure critical variables and estimate their averaged time-dependency. Nonhealthy sensors can badly influence the estimation result of the process variable. Since online condition monitoring was introduced, the online cross-calibration method has been widely used to detect any anomaly of sensor readings among the redundant group. The cross-calibration method has four main averaging techniques: simple averaging, band averaging, weighted averaging, and parity space averaging (PSA. PSA is used to weigh redundant signals based on their error bounds and their band consistency. Using the consistency weighting factor (C, PSA assigns more weight to consistent signals that have shared bands, based on how many bands they share, and gives inconsistent signals of very low weight. In this article, three approaches are introduced for improving the PSA technique: the first is to add another consistency factor, so called trend consistency (TC, to include a consideration of the preserving of any characteristic edge that reflects the behavior of equipment/component measured by the process parameter; the second approach proposes replacing the error bound/accuracy based weighting factor (Wa with a weighting factor based on the Euclidean distance (Wd, and the third approach proposes applying Wd,TC,andC, all together. Cold neutron source data sets of four redundant hydrogen pressure transmitters from a research reactor were used to perform the validation and verification. Results showed that the second and third modified approaches lead to reasonable improvement of the PSA technique. All approaches implemented in this study were similar in that they have the capability to (1 identify and isolate a drifted sensor that should undergo calibration, (2 identify a faulty sensor/s due to long and continuous missing data range, and (3 identify a healthy sensor. Keywords: Nuclear Reactors

  19. Evidence for cluster shape effects on the kinetic energy spectrum in thermionic emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, F; Lépine, F; Baguenard, B; Pagliarulo, F; Concina, B; Bordas, C; Parneix, P

    2007-11-28

    Experimental kinetic energy release distributions obtained for the thermionic emission from C(n) (-) clusters, 10theory, these different features are analyzed and interpreted as the consequence of contrasting shapes in the daughter clusters; linear and nonlinear isomers have clearly distinct signatures. These results provide a novel indirect structural probe for atomic clusters associated with their thermionic emission spectra.

  20. DEXTER: A one-dimensional code for calculating thermionic performance of long converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    A versatile code is described for computing the coupled thermionic electric-thermal performance of long thermionic converters in which the temperature and voltage variations cannot be neglected. The code is capable of accounting for a variety of external electrical connection schemes, coolant flow paths and converter failures by partial shorting. Example problem solutions are included along with a user's manual.

  1. Dexter - A one-dimensional code for calculating thermionic performance of long converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes a versatile code for computing the coupled thermionic electric-thermal performance of long thermionic converters in which the temperature and voltage variations cannot be neglected. The code is capable of accounting for a variety of external electrical connection schemes, coolant flow paths and converter failures by partial shorting. Example problem solutions are given.

  2. Determination of space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell and calculation of resonance integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmijarevic, I.

    1980-01-01

    Space-energy distribution of resonance neutrons in reactor lattice cell was determined by solving the Boltzmann equation by spherical harmonics method applying P-3 approximation. Computer code SPLET used for these calculations is described. Resonance absorption and calculation of resonance integrals are described as well. Effective resonance integral values for U-238 resonance at 6.7 Ev are calculated for heavy water reactor cell with metal, oxide and carbide fuel elements

  3. Off-design temperature effects on nuclear fuel pins for an advanced space-power-reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory out-of-reactor investigation was made of the effects of short-time temperature excursions above the nominal operating temperature of 990 C on the compatibility of advanced nuclear space-power reactor fuel pin materials. This information is required for formulating a reliable reactor safety analysis and designing an emergency core cooling system. Simulated uranium mononitride (UN) fuel pins, clad with tungsten-lined T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) showed no compatibility problems after heating for 8 hours at 2400 C. At 2520 C and above, reactions occurred in 1 hour or less. Under these conditions free uranium formed, redistributed, and attacked the cladding.

  4. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Opanasenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  5. Near-field enhanced thermionic energy conversion for renewable energy recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghashami, Mohammad; Cho, Sung Kwon; Park, Keunhan

    2017-09-01

    This article proposes a new energy harvesting concept that greatly enhances thermionic power generation with high efficiency by exploiting the near-field enhancement of thermal radiation. The proposed near-field enhanced thermionic energy conversion (NETEC) system is uniquely configured with a low-bandgap semiconductor cathode separated from a thermal emitter with a subwavelength gap distance, such that a significant amount of electrons can be photoexcited by near-field thermal radiation to contribute to the enhancement of thermionic current density. We theoretically demonstrate that the NETEC system can generate electric power at a significantly lower temperature than the standard thermionic generator, and the energy conversion efficiency can exceed 40%. The obtained results reveal that near-field photoexcitation can enhance the thermionic power output by more than 10 times, making this hybrid system attractive for renewable energy recycling.

  6. Nano-textured W shows improvement of thermionic emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barmina, E.V.; Serkov, A.A.; Shafeev, G.A. [General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stratakis, E. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, (IESL-FORTH), Heraklion (Greece); University of Crete, Materials Science and Technology Department, Heraklion (Greece); Fotakis, C. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, (IESL-FORTH), Heraklion (Greece); University of Crete, Physics Department, Heraklion (Greece); Stolyarov, V.N.; Stolyarov, I.N. [Roentgenprom, Protvino, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-15

    Laser-assisted nano-texturing of W substrates cathodes via ablation in liquid environment is experimentally realized. Two laser sources are used, either a Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser or a Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 350 ps. Laser exposure of W results in the formation of hemi-spherical nanostructures situated on top of periodic ripples. Nano-textured thermionic W cathode demonstrates the decrease of the efficient work function by 0.3 eV compared to pristine surface. (orig.)

  7. Design and operation of a thermionic converter in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L.; Smith, J.N. Jr.; Geller, C.B.; Kallnowski, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed, built and successfully tested in air. Several unique features were incorporated in this converter: an integral cesium reservoir, innovative ceramic-to-metal seals, a heat rejection system coupling the collector to a low temperature heat sink and an innovative cylindrical heater filament. The converter was operated for extended periods of time with the emitter at about 1900 K. the collector at about 700 K, and a power density of over 2 w(e)/sq. cm. Input power transients were run between 50% and 100% thermal power, at up to 1% per second, without instabilities in performance

  8. Multi-channel pulser for the SLC thermionic electron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, M.J.; Clendenin, J.E.; Corredoura, P.L.; Jobe, R.K.; Koontz, R.F.; Sodja, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new pulser developed for the SLC thermionic gun has been operational since September 1984. It consists of two planar triode amplifiers with a common output triode driving the gun cathode to produce two independent pulses of up to 9A with a 3 nsec FWHM pulse width. Three long-pulse amplifiers are also connected to the cathode to produce pulses with widths controllable between 100 nsec and 1.6 μsec. Each amplifier has independent timing and amplitude control through a fiber optic link to the high voltage plane of the gun cathode-grid structure. The pulser and its operating characteristics are described. 15 refs., 3 figs

  9. The TERRA project, a space nuclear micro-reactor case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Lobo, Paulo D. Castro, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: jamil@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.br [Divisao de Energia Nuclear. Instituto de Estudos Avancados, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Placco, Guilherme M.; Barrios Junior, Ary G. [Faculdade de Tecnologia Sao Francisco (FATESF), Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The TEcnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados project, also known as TERRA Project is been conducted by the Institute for Advanced Studies IEAv. The TERRA project has a general objective of understanding and developing the key technologies that will allow (Brazil) the use of nuclear technology to generate electricity in space. This electricity may power several space systems and/or a type of plasma based engine. Also, the type of reactor intended for space may be used for power generation in very inhospitable environment such as the ocean floor. Some of the mentioned technologies may include: Brayton cycles, Stirling engines, heat pipes and its coupled systems, nuclear fuel technology, new materials and several others. Once there is no mission into which apply this technology, at this moment, this research may be conducted in many forms and ways. The fact remains that when this technology becomes needed there will be no way that we (Brazilians) will be able to buy it from. This technology, in this sense, is highly strategic and will be the key to commercially explore deep space. Therefore, there is the need to face the development problems and solve them, to gain experience with our own rights and wrongs. This paper will give a brief overview of what has been done so far, on experimental facilities and hardware that could support space system development, including a Brayton cycle test facility, Tesla turbine testing, and Stirling engine development and modeling. Our great problem today is lack of human resources. To attend that problem we are starting a new graduate program that will allow overcoming that, given the proper time frame. (author)

  10. The TERRA project, a space nuclear micro-reactor case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Nascimento, Jamil A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Lobo, Paulo D. Castro; Placco, Guilherme M.; Barrios Junior, Ary G.

    2011-01-01

    The TEcnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados project, also known as TERRA Project is been conducted by the Institute for Advanced Studies IEAv. The TERRA project has a general objective of understanding and developing the key technologies that will allow (Brazil) the use of nuclear technology to generate electricity in space. This electricity may power several space systems and/or a type of plasma based engine. Also, the type of reactor intended for space may be used for power generation in very inhospitable environment such as the ocean floor. Some of the mentioned technologies may include: Brayton cycles, Stirling engines, heat pipes and its coupled systems, nuclear fuel technology, new materials and several others. Once there is no mission into which apply this technology, at this moment, this research may be conducted in many forms and ways. The fact remains that when this technology becomes needed there will be no way that we (Brazilians) will be able to buy it from. This technology, in this sense, is highly strategic and will be the key to commercially explore deep space. Therefore, there is the need to face the development problems and solve them, to gain experience with our own rights and wrongs. This paper will give a brief overview of what has been done so far, on experimental facilities and hardware that could support space system development, including a Brayton cycle test facility, Tesla turbine testing, and Stirling engine development and modeling. Our great problem today is lack of human resources. To attend that problem we are starting a new graduate program that will allow overcoming that, given the proper time frame. (author)

  11. Nuclear reactor power for a space-based radar. SP-100 project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Harvey; Heller, Jack; Jaffe, Leonard; Beatty, Richard; Bhandari, Pradeep; Chow, Edwin; Deininger, William; Ewell, Richard; Fujita, Toshio; Grossman, Merlin

    1986-01-01

    A space-based radar mission and spacecraft, using a 300 kWe nuclear reactor power system, has been examined, with emphasis on aspects affecting the power system. The radar antenna is a horizontal planar array, 32 X 64 m. The orbit is at 61 deg, 1088 km. The mass of the antenna with support structure is 42,000 kg; of the nuclear reactor power system, 8,300 kg; of the whole spacecraft about 51,000 kg, necessitating multiple launches and orbital assembly. The assembly orbit is at 57 deg, 400 km, high enough to provide the orbital lifetime needed for orbital assembly. The selected scenario uses six Shuttle launches to bring the spacecraft and a Centaur G upper-stage vehicle to assembly orbit. After assembly, the Centaur places the spacecraft in operational orbit, where it is deployed on radio command, the power system started, and the spacecraft becomes operational. Electric propulsion is an alternative and allows deployment in assembly orbit, but introduces a question of nuclear safety.

  12. Integrated design support systems for conceptual design of a space power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Takeoka, Satoshi; Nagamatsu, Takashi; Ishizaki, Hiroaki

    1999-01-01

    In the process of conceptual design of large and complex engineering systems such as a nuclear power reactor, there must be various human works by several fields of engineers on each stage of design, analysis and evaluation. In this study, we have rearranged the design information to reduce the human workloads and have studied an efficient method to support the conceptual design works by new information technologies. For this purpose, we have developed two design support environments for conceptual design of a space power reactor as a concrete design target. When constructing an integrated design support environment, VINDS, which employs virtual reality(VR) technology, we focused on visualization of physical structure, functional organization and analysis calculation with full usage of easy perception and direct manipulation of VR. On the other hand, when constructing another asynchronous and distributed design support environment, WINDS, which employs WWW technology, we improved the support functions for cooperative design works among various fields of experts. In this paper, the basic concepts, configurations and functions of the design support environments are first described, then the future improvement is surveyed by their intercomparison. (author)

  13. Parametric study of sodium aerosols in the cover-gas space of sodium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheth, A.

    1975-03-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the behavior of sodium aerosols in the cover-gas space of a sodium-cooled reactor. A review of the literature was first made to examine methods of aerosol generation, mathematical expressions representing aerosol behavior, and pertinent experimental investigations of sodium aerosols. In the development of the model, some terms were derived from basic principles and other terms were estimated from available correlations. The model was simulated on a computer, and important parameters were studied to determine their effects on the overall behavior of sodium aerosols. The parameters studied were sodium pool temperature, source and initial size of particles, film thickness at the sodium pool/cover gas interface, wall plating parameters, cover-gas flow rate, and type of cover gas (argon and helium). The model satisfactorily describes the behavior of sodium aerosol in argon, but not in helium. Possible reasons are given for the failure of the model with helium, and further experimental work is recommended. The mathematical model, with appropriate modifications to describe the behavior of sodium aerosols in helium, would be very useful in designing traps to remove aerosols from the cover gas of sodium-cooled reactors. (U.S.)

  14. Two-phase reduced gravity experiments for a space reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-08-01

    Future space missions envision the use of large nuclear reactors utilizing either a single or a two-phase alkali-metal working fluid. The design and analysis of such reactors require state-of-the-art computer codes that can properly treat alkali-metal flow and heat transfer in a reduced-gravity environment. New flow regime maps, models, and correlations are required if the codes are to be successfully applied to reduced-gravity flow and heat transfer. General plans are put forth for the reduced-gravity experiments which will have to be performed, at NASA facilities, with benign fluids. Data from the reduced-gravity experiments with innocuous fluids are to be combined with normal gravity data from two-phase alkali-metal experiments. Because these reduced-gravity experiments will be very basic, and will employ small test loops of simple geometry, a large measure of commonality exists between them and experiments planned by other organizations. It is recommended that a committee be formed, to coordinate all ongoing and planned reduced gravity flow experiments

  15. Summary of particle bed reactor designs for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1993-09-01

    A summary report of the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designs considered for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program has been prepared. The first chapters outline the methods of analysis, and their validation. Monte Carlo methods are used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms are used for the fluid dynamics heat transfer and engine system analysis, and commercially available codes are used for the stress analysis. A critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR was used for the physics validation, and blowdown experiments using fuel beds of prototypic dimensions were used to validate the power extraction capabilities from particle beds. In all four different PBR rocket reactor designs were studied to varying degrees of detail. They varied in power from 400 MW to 2000 MW. These designs were all characterized by a negative prompt coefficient, due to Doppler feedback, and the feedback due to moderator heat up varied from slightly negative to slightly positive. In all practical cases, the coolant worth was positive, although core configurations with negative coolant worth could be designed. In all practical cases the thrust/weight ratio was greater than 20.

  16. Reentry safety for the Topaz II Space Reactor: Issues and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, L.W.; Trost, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the reentry safety analyses conducted for the TOPAZ II Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). Scoping calculations were performed on the reentry aerothermal breakup and ground footprint of reactor core debris. The calculations were used to assess the risks associated with radiologically cold reentry accidents and to determine if constraints should be placed on the core configuration for such accidents. Three risk factors were considered: inadvertent criticality upon reentry impact, atmospheric dispersal of U-235 fuel, and the Special Nuclear Material Safeguards risks. Results indicate that the risks associated with cold reentry are very low regardless of the core configuration. Core configuration constraints were therefore not established for radiologically cold reentry accidents

  17. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-01-01

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection

  18. X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun at UTNL

    CERN Document Server

    Fukasawa, Atsushi; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Ebina, Futaro; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higo, Toshiyasu; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Kennichi; Ogino, Haruyuki; Sakae, Hisaharu; Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The X-band (11.424 GHz) linac for compact Compton scattering hard X-ray source are under construction at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. This linac designed to accelerate up to 35 MeV, and this electron beam will be used to produce hard X-ray by colliding with laser. It consists of a thermionic cathode RF gun, an alpha magnet, and a traveling wave tube. The gun has 3.5 cells (unloaded Q is 8250) and will be operated at pi-mode. A dispenser cathode is introduced. Since the energy spread of the beam from the gun is predicted to be broad due to the continuous emission from the thermionic cathode, a slit is placed in the alpha magnet to eliminate low energy electrons. The simulation on the injector shows the beam energy 2.9 MeV, the charge 23 pC/bunch, and the emittance less than 10 mm.mrad. The experiment on the gun is planed in the beginning of 2005, and the details will be discussed on the spot.

  19. Thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) technique for magnesium thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbag, M.Z., E-mail: zbalbag@ogu.edu.t [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Education Faculty, Primary Education, Meselik Campus, Eskisehir 26480 (Turkey); Pat, S.; Ozkan, M.; Ekem, N. [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Art and Science Faculty, Physics Department, Eskisehir 26480 (Turkey); Musa, G. [Ovidius University, Physics Department, Constanta (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    In this study, magnesium thin films were deposited on glass substrate by the Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) technique for the first time. We present a different technique for deposition of high-quality magnesium thin films. By means of this technique, the production of films is achieved by condensing the plasma of anode material generated using Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) under high vacuum conditions onto the surface to be coated. The crystal orientation and morphology of the deposited films were investigated by using XRD, EDX, SEM and AFM. The aim of this study is to search the use of TVA technique to coat magnesium thin films and to determine some of the physical properties of the films generated. Furthermore, this study will contribute to the scientific studies which search the thin films of magnesium or the compounds containing magnesium. In future, this study will be preliminary work to entirely produce magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) superconductor thin film with the TVA technique.

  20. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  1. Thermionic emission of cermets made of refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonow, G.W.; Bogomol, I.W.; Ochremtschuk, L.N.; Podtschernjajewa, I.A.; Fomenko, W.S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance to thermal variations of refractory carbides having good behavior for thermionic emission, they have been combined with transition metals d. Thermionic emission was studied with cermets in compact samples. Following systems were examined: TiC-Nb, TiC-Mo, TiC-W, ZrC-Nb, ZrC-Mo, ZrC-W, WC-Mo with compositions of: 75% M 1 C-25% M 2 , 50%M 1 C-50%M 2 , 25%M 1 C-75%M 2 . When following the variation of electron emission energy phi versus the composition, it appears that in the range of mixed crystals (M 1 M 2 )C, phi decreases and the resistance to thermal variations of these phases is higher than that of individual carbides. The study of obtained cermets shows that their resistance to thermal variations is largely superior to the one of starting carbides; TiC and ZrC carbides, combined with molybdenum and tungsten support the highest number of thermic cycles

  2. Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power Systems (MCNSPS) conceptual design and evaluation report. Volume 2, technologies 1: Reactors, heat transport, integration issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetch, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of the Megawatt Class Nuclear Space Power System (MCNSPS) study are summarized and candidate systems and subsystems are described. Particular emphasis is given to the heat rejection system and the space reactor subsystem.

  3. Thermionic and Photo-excited Electron Emission for Energy Conversion Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. McCarthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes advances in thermionic and photoemission materials and applications dating back to the work on thermionic emission by Guthrie in 1873 and the photoelectric effect by Hertz in 1887. Thermionic emission has been employed for electron beam generation from Edison’s work with the light bulb to modern day technologies such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The photoelectric effect has been utilized in common devices such as cameras and photocopiers while photovoltaic cells continue to be widely successful and further researched. Limitations in device efficiency and materials have thus far restricted large-scale energy generation sources based on thermionic and photoemission. However, recent advances in the fabrication of nanoscale emitters suggest promising routes for improving both thermionic and photo-enhanced electron emission along with newly developed research concepts, e.g., photonically enhanced thermionic emission. However, the abundance of new emitter materials and reduced dimensions of some nanoscale emitters increases the complexity of electron emission theory and engender new questions related to the dimensionality of the emitter. This work presents derivations of basic two and three-dimensional thermionic and photoemission theory along with comparisons to experimentally acquired data. The resulting theory can be applied to many different material types regardless of composition, bulk and surface structure.

  4. Thermionic and Photo-Excited Electron Emission for Energy-Conversion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Patrick T. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Reifenberger, Ronald G. [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Fisher, Timothy S., E-mail: tsfisher@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-12-09

    This article describes advances in thermionic and photo-emission materials and applications dating back to the work on thermionic emission by Guthrie (1873) and the photoelectric effect by Hertz (1893). Thermionic emission has been employed for electron beam generation from Edison’s work with the light bulb to modern day technologies such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The photoelectric effect has been utilized in common devices such as cameras and photocopiers while photovoltaic cells continue to be widely successful and further researched. Limitations in device efficiency and materials have thus far restricted large-scale energy generation sources based on thermionic and photoemission. However, recent advances in the fabrication of nanoscale emitters suggest promising routes for improving both thermionic and photo-enhanced electron emission along with newly developed research concepts, e.g., photonically enhanced thermionic emission. However, the abundance of new emitter materials and reduced dimensions of some nanoscale emitters increases the complexity of electron-emission theory and engender new questions related to the dimensionality of the emitter. This work presents derivations of basic two and three-dimensional thermionic and photo-emission theory along with comparisons to experimentally acquired data. The resulting theory can be applied to many different material types regardless of composition, bulk, and surface structure.

  5. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  6. SPLET - A program for calculating the space-lethargy distribution of epithermal neutrons in a reactor lattice cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Zmijatevic, I.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure to solve the space-single-lethargy dependent transport equation for epithermal neutrons in a cylindricised multi-region reactor lattice cell has been developed and proposed in the earlier papers. Here, the computational algorithm is comprised and the computing program SPLET, which calculates the space-lethargy distribution of the spherical harmonics neutron flux moments, as well as the related integral quantities as reaction rates and resonance integrals, is described. (author)

  7. The Paucity Problem: Where Have All the Space Reactor Experiments Gone?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D.; Marshall, Margaret A.

    2016-10-01

    The Handbooks of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) together contain a plethora of documented and evaluated experiments essential in the validation of nuclear data, neutronics codes, and modeling of various nuclear systems. Unfortunately, only a minute selection of handbook data (twelve evaluations) are of actual experimental facilities and mockups designed specifically for space nuclear research. There is a paucity problem, such that the multitude of space nuclear experimental activities performed in the past several decades have yet to be recovered and made available in such detail that the international community could benefit from these valuable historical research efforts. Those experiments represent extensive investments in infrastructure, expertise, and cost, as well as constitute significantly valuable resources of data supporting past, present, and future research activities. The ICSBEP and IRPhEP were established to identify and verify comprehensive sets of benchmark data; evaluate the data, including quantification of biases and uncertainties; compile the data and calculations in a standardized format; and formally document the effort into a single source of verified benchmark data. See full abstract in attached document.

  8. Adherence of diamond films on refractory metal substrates for thermionic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, B.H.; Ramalingam, M.L.; Adams, S.F.; Cloyd, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    Diamond films are currently being considered as electrical insulation material for application in the thermionic fuel element of a power producing nuclear reactor system. The function of the diamond insulator in this application is to electrically isolate the collector of each cell in the TFE from the coolant and outer sheath. Deposition of diamond films on plane surfaces of Si/SiO 2 have already been demonstrated to be quite effective. However, the diamond films on refractory metal surfaces tend to spall off in the process of deposition revealing an inefficient adherence characteristic between the film and the substrate. This paper is geared towards explaining this deficiency by way of selected experimentation and the use of analytical tools to predict uncertainties such as the mismatch in coefficient of expansion, micrographic study of the interface between the film and the substrate and X-ray diffraction spectra. The investigation of the adherence characteristics of several diamond films on Mo and Nb substrates revealed that there was an allowable stress that resulted in the formation of the critical thickness for the diamond film

  9. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  10. The mechanism of explosive emission excitation in thermionic energy conversion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyga, A. V.

    A study has been made of the mechanism of explosive electron emission in vacuum thermionic converters induced by thermionic currents in the case of the anomalous Richardson effect. The latter is associated with a spotted emitting surface and temperature fluctuations. In order to account for one of the components of the electrode potential difference, it is proposed that allowance be made for the difference between the polarization signal velocity in a dense metal electron gas and that in the electron-ion gas of the electrode gap. Ways to achieve explosive emission in real thermionic converters are discussed.

  11. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  12. TERRA: a nuclear reactor to help explore space, deep ocean and difficult access locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimarães, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme Borges; Araújo, Élvis Falcão de; Braz Filho, Francisco Antônio; Leite, Valeria S.F.O.; Dias, Artur Flávio, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avançados (IEAv), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisão de Energia Nuclear; Nascimento, Jamil Alves do; Placco, Guilherme M. [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (PGCTE/ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Pós-Graduação em Ciência e Tecnologia Espacial

    2017-07-01

    The TERRA (Tecnologia de Reatores Rápidos Avançados) project, is a Brazilian effort to develop the enabling technologies to generate electric power in space. Those technologies are: an independent reactor core concept, a Stirling convertor to handle power in the range of 0.1 to 200 kW and a Brayton convertor to handle power in the range 200 to 1000 kW. Besides those technologies, it is also looked into heat pipes design and passive multi fluid turbines. The first reactor core concept was finish in 2016. A complete paper is being prepared and it is in the review process at this moment. A developed Stirling machine works quite reasonably. A second copy of this Stirling machine was built and is now undergoing testing. The Brayton cycle initial design project was intended to use a gas furnace to simulate the nuclear heat. A design retrofit was necessary and decision was made to change the furnace from gas to electric. A detail electric design project was requested to the market. This detail design was delivered august 2016. It is hoped that the 300 kW electric furnace will be procured in 2018. A couple of new APUs was received in November 2016. One of these APUs will be used in the actual Brayton cycle under construction. 18 kg of Mo13Re was acquired for materials testing. A copper/water thermosyphon was developed and it is the first step to produce heat pipes. A new workbench is under development to test the passive multi fluid turbine. A passive multi fluid turbine is an evolution of the Tesla turbine. All these developments will be presented at the conference with a little more of detail. (author)

  13. TERRA: a nuclear reactor to help explore space, deep ocean and difficult access locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimarães, Lamartine N.F.; Ribeiro, Guilherme Borges; Araújo, Élvis Falcão de; Braz Filho, Francisco Antônio; Leite, Valeria S.F.O.; Dias, Artur Flávio; Nascimento, Jamil Alves do; Placco, Guilherme M.

    2017-01-01

    The TERRA (Tecnologia de Reatores Rápidos Avançados) project, is a Brazilian effort to develop the enabling technologies to generate electric power in space. Those technologies are: an independent reactor core concept, a Stirling convertor to handle power in the range of 0.1 to 200 kW and a Brayton convertor to handle power in the range 200 to 1000 kW. Besides those technologies, it is also looked into heat pipes design and passive multi fluid turbines. The first reactor core concept was finish in 2016. A complete paper is being prepared and it is in the review process at this moment. A developed Stirling machine works quite reasonably. A second copy of this Stirling machine was built and is now undergoing testing. The Brayton cycle initial design project was intended to use a gas furnace to simulate the nuclear heat. A design retrofit was necessary and decision was made to change the furnace from gas to electric. A detail electric design project was requested to the market. This detail design was delivered august 2016. It is hoped that the 300 kW electric furnace will be procured in 2018. A couple of new APUs was received in November 2016. One of these APUs will be used in the actual Brayton cycle under construction. 18 kg of Mo13Re was acquired for materials testing. A copper/water thermosyphon was developed and it is the first step to produce heat pipes. A new workbench is under development to test the passive multi fluid turbine. A passive multi fluid turbine is an evolution of the Tesla turbine. All these developments will be presented at the conference with a little more of detail. (author)

  14. State-space model predictive control method for core power control in pressurized water reactor nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guo Xu; Wu, Jie; Zeng, Bifan; Wu, Wangqiang; Ma, Xiao Qian [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Zhibin [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Corporation, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    A well-performed core power control to track load changes is crucial in pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power stations. It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands for the safety demands of the PWR due to the sensitivity of nuclear reactors. In this paper, a state-space model predictive control (MPC) method was applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, the MPC model, and quadratic programming (QP). The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on neutron dynamic models, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The MPC model was presented in state-space model form, and QP was introduced for optimization solution under system constraints. Simulations of the proposed state-space MPC control system in PWR were designed for control performance analysis, and the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  15. Simulations of thermionic suppression during tungsten transient melting experiments.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Krieger, K.; Podolník, Aleš; Pitts, R.A.; Pánek, Radomír

    T170, December (2017), č. článku 014069. ISSN 0031-8949. [PFMC 2017: 16th International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. Düsseldorf, 16.05.2017-19.05.2017] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14228S; GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * thermionic emission * tungsten * melt * plasma-facing component Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 1.3 Physical sciences Impact factor: 1.280, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1402-4896/aa9209

  16. Development and computational simulation of thermoelectric electromagnetic pumps for controlling the fluid flow in liquid metal cooled space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Thermoelectric Electromagnetic (TEEM) Pumps can be used for controlling the fluid flow in the primary and secondary circuits of liquid metal cooled space nuclear reactor. In order to simulate and to evaluate the pumps performance, in steady-state, the computer program BEMTE has been developed to study the main operational parameters and to determine the system actuation point, for a given reactor operating power. The results for each stage of the program were satisfactory, compared to experimental data. The program shows to be adequate for the design and simulating of direct current electromagnetic pumps. (author)

  17. Overview of some projects of SNPS for global space communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Ghitaykin, V.; Ionkin, V.; Dubinin, A.; Pyshko, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this presentation we focused on three variants of prospective concepts of SNPS. They are intended to solve tasks of global space communication (GSC) as nearest future tasks in space. Modern concepts of the application of power technology in space believe in using an onboard source of energy for maintenance of self-transportation of the vehicle into geostationary orbit (GSO). There are three more prospective systems as follows: gas cooled nuclear reactor with hybrid thermal engine and machine power converter; nuclear reactor cooled by liquid metal and with a thermoelectric power generating system; nuclear reactor with Li cooling and a thermionic and thermoelectric power generator on board. The choice of a concept must fit strong requirements such as: space nuclear power unit is aimed to be used in a powerful mission; space power unit must be able to maintain the dual - mode regime of vehicle operation (self - transportation and long life in geosynchronous orbit [GEO]); nuclear rector of unit must be safety and it must be designed in such a way that it will ensure minimum size of the complete system; the elements of the considered technology can be used for the creation of NPPI and with other sources of heat (for example, radioisotope); the degree of technical and technological readiness of units of the thermal and power circuit of installation is estimated to be high and is defined by a number of technological developments in air, space and nuclear branches; nuclear reactor and heat transfer equipment should work in a normal mode, which can be very reliably confirmed for other high-temperature nuclear systems. Considering these concepts we practically consider one of possible strategy of developing of complex system of nuclear power engineering. It is the strategy of step-by-step development of space engineering with real application of them in commercial, scientific and other powerful missions in the nearest and deep space. As starting point of this activity is

  18. Independent Safety Assessment of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system (Revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The Independent Safety Assessment described in this study report was performed to assess the safety of the design and launch plans anticipated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in 1993 for a Russian-built, U.S.-modified, TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system. Its conclusions, and the bases for them, were intended to provide guidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) management in the event that the DOD requested authorization under section 91b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, for possession and use (including ground testing and launch) of a nuclear-fueled, modified TOPAZ-II. The scientists and engineers who were engaged to perform this assessment are nationally-known nuclear safety experts in various disciplines. They met with participants in the TOPAZ-II program during the spring and summer of 1993 and produced a report based on their analysis of the proposed TOPAZ-II mission. Their conclusions were confined to the potential impact on public safety and did not include budgetary, reliability, or risk-benefit analyses

  19. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Space structures, power, and power conditioning; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 11-13, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askew, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Various papers on space structures, power, and power conditioning are presented. Among the topics discussed are: heterogeneous gas core reaction for space nuclear power, pulsed gas core reactor for burst power, fundamental considerations of gas core reactor systems, oscillating thermionic conversion for high-density space power, thermoelectromagnetic pumps for space nuclear power systems, lightweight electrochemical converter for space power applications, ballistic acceleration by superheated hydrogen, laser-induced current switching in gaseous discharge, electron-beam-controlled semiconductor switches, laser-controlled semiconductor closing and opening switch. Also addressed are: semiconductor-metal eutectic composites for high-power switching, optical probes for the characterization of surface breakdown, 40 kV/20 kA pseudospark switch for laser applications, insulation direction for high-power space systems, state space simulation of spacecraft power systems, structural vibration of space power station systems, minimum-time control of large space structures, novel fusion reaction for space power and propulsion, repetition rate system evaluations, cryogenic silicon photoconductive switches for high-power lasers, multilevel diamondlike carbon capacitor structure, surface breakdown of prestressed insulators, C-Mo and C-Zr alloys for space power systems, magnetic insulation for the space environment

  1. New experimental space for irradiating samples by RA reactor fast neutron flux at temperatures up to 100 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.; Novakovic, M.; Zecevic, V.

    1961-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present adaptation of the RA reactor which would enable samples irradiation by fast neutrons and describe new experimental possibilities. New experimental space was achieved using hollow fuel elements which have been reconstructed to enable placement of irradiation capsules inside the tube. This paper includes thermal analysis and describes problems related to operation, safety and radiation protection issues which arise from using reconstructed fuel elements

  2. Surface properties of ceramic/metal composite materials for thermionic converter applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.R.; Bozack, M.J.; Swanson, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ceramic/metal composite electrode materials are of interest for thermionic energy conversion (TEC) applications for several reasons. These materials consist of submicron metal fibers or islands in an oxide matrix and therefore provide a basis for fabricating finely structured electrodes, with projecting or recessed metallic regions for more efficient electron emission or collection. Furthermore, evaporation and surface diffusion of matrix oxides may provide oxygen enhancement of cesium adsorption and work function lowering at both the collecting and emitting electrode surfaces of the TEC. Finally, the high work function oxide matrix or oxide-metal interfaces may provide efficient surface ionization of cesium for space-charge reduction in the device. The authors are investigating two types of ceramic/metal composite materials. One type is a directionally solidified eutectic consisting of a bulk oxide matrix such as UO 2 or stabilized ZrO 2 with parallel metal fibers (W) running through the oxide being exposed at the surface by cutting perpendicular to the fiber direction. The second type of material, called a surface eutectic, consists of a refractory substrate (Mo) with a thin layer of deposited and segregated material (Mo-Cr 2 O 3 -A1 2 O 3 ) on the surface. The final configuration of this layer is an oxide matrix with metallic islands scattered throughout

  3. Measuring current emission and work functions of large thermionic cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    As one component of the nations Stockpile Stewardship program, Los Alamos National Laboratory is constructing a 20 MeV, 2 kA (with a 4 kA upgrade capability), 3ps induction linac for doing x-ray radiography of explosive devices. The linac is one leg of a facility called the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT). The electron gun is designed to operate at 3.2 MV. The gun is a Pierce type design and uses a 6.5' cathode for 2 kA operation and an 8' cathode for 4 kA operation. We have constructed a small facility called the Cathode Test Stand (CTS) to investigate engineering and physics issues regarding large thermionic dispenser-cathodes. In particular, we have looked at the issues of temperature uniformity on the cathode surface and cathode quality as measured by its work function. We have done thermal imaging of both 8' and 6.5' cathodes. Here we report on measurements of the cathode work function, both the average value and how it vanes across the face of the cathode.

  4. Development and fabrication of insulator seals for thermionic diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, V. L.

    1972-01-01

    Eight different types of cermet seals for thermionic diodes were investigated: (1) 1 micron Al2O3 with Nb spheres; (2) 200 A Al2O3 with Nb spheres; (3) 1 micron Al2O3 with Nb 1% Zr spheres; (4) 200 A Al2O3 with Nb 1% Zr spheres; (5) Pure Y2O3 with Nb 1% Zr spheres; (6) Y2O3 3% ZrO2 with Nb 1% Zr spheres; (7) Y2O3 10% ZrO2 with Nb 1% Zr spheres; and (8) ZrO2 12% Y2O3 with Nb 1% Zr spheres. Investigations were made to determine the most favorable fabrication techniques and the effect of the bonding cycle, (length of bonding time and shutdown sequences). The analysis of the seals included tensile test, vacuum test, electrical test and metallurgical examination. At the conclusion of the development phase, 36 seals were fabricated for delivery for evaluation.

  5. Reference ZrH reactor power system for NASA space station post-operational reentry analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, R.D.

    1970-01-01

    The flight dynamic and heating of a spent ZrH reactor power system returning from orbit at the end of its useful life are analyzed. The results of this analysis indicate that the reactor with a large portion of the lithium shield still surrounding it will impact the earth at a velocity of from 660 to 820 ft/sec, depending upon whether it tumbles or becomes stabilized during the latter part of its trajectory. (U.S.)

  6. Comparison of Direct and Indirect Gas Reactor Brayton Systems for Nuclear Electric Space Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M Postlehwait; P DiLorenzo; S Belanger; J Ashcroft

    2005-01-01

    Gas reactor systems are being considered as candidates for use in generating power for the Prometheus-1 spacecraft, along with other NASA missions as part of the Prometheus program. Gas reactors offer a benign coolant, which increases core and structural materials options. However, the gas coolant has inferior thermal transport properties, relative to other coolant candidates such as liquid metals. This leads to concerns for providing effective heat transfer and for minimizing pressure drop within the reactor core. In direct gas Brayton systems, i.e. those with one or more Brayton turbines in the reactor cooling loop, the ability to provide effective core cooling and low pressure drop is further constrained by the need for a low pressure, high molecular weight gas, typically a mixture of helium and xenon. Use of separate primary and secondary gas loops, one for the reactor and one or more for the Brayton system(s) separated by heat exchanger(s), allows for independent optimization of the pressure and gas composition of each loop. The reactor loop can use higher pressure pure helium, which provides improved heat transfer and heat transport properties, while the Brayton loop can utilize lower pressure He-Xe. However, this approach requires a separate primary gas circulator and also requires gas to gas heat exchangers. This paper focuses on the trade-offs between the direct gas reactor Brayton system and the indirect gas Brayton system. It discusses heat exchanger arrangement and materials options and projects heat exchanger mass based on heat transfer area and structural design needs. Analysis indicates that these heat exchangers add considerable mass, but result in reactor cooling and system resiliency improvements

  7. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  8. Developments in modelling the effect of aerosol on the thermal performance of the Fast Reactor cover gas space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, I.J.; Clement, C.F.

    1990-03-01

    The sodium aerosol which forms in the cover gas space of a Fast Reactor couples the processes of heat and mass transfer to and from the bounding surfaces and affects the thermal performance of the cavity. This report describes extensions to previously separate models of heat transfer and aerosol formation and removal in the cover gas space, and the linking of the two calculations in a consistent manner. The extensions made to the theories include thermophoretic aerosol removal, radiative-driven redistribution in aerosol sizes, and the side-wall influence on the bulk cavity temperature. The link between aerosol properties and boundary layer saturations is also examined, especially in the far-from-saturated limit. The models can be used in the interpretation of cover gas space experiments and some example calculations are given. (author)

  9. Overview of some projects of SNPS for global space communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Ghitajkin, V.; Ionkin, V.; Dubinin, A.; Pyshko, A.

    2000-01-01

    Modem concepts of the application of power technology in space believe in using an onboard source of energy for maintenance of self-transportation of the vehicle into working geosynchronous orbit (GEO). This can result in reduction of the cost of all installation and the number of rocket starts. There we present several conceptual projects of nuclear power installations. Power units developed with, IPPE's participation are intended for long term supply of electricity to the vehicle in GEO and to maintain self-transportation of capabilities. Considered units include a tiny, fast neutron nuclear reactor, radiation shield, control system, cooling system (radiator) and power conversion system. Additionally, they must also include a rocket engine to maintain the dual-mode regime. This may be an electric-stationary ion jet (with Xe as working body) and a thermal engine such as hybrid or NRE. There are three more prospective systems as follows: (a) gas cooled nuclear reactor with hybrid thermal engine and machine power converter; (b) nuclear reactor cooled by liquid metal and with a thermoelectric power generating system; (c) nuclear reactor with Li cooling and a thermionic and thermoelectric power generator on board. All considered schemes have two thermal circuits and use thermal pipes in the radiator. Two final concepts are based on a Xe electric jet; these differ from first concept by having a lower working body mass but a longer transportation period from basic orbit into GEO. (authors)

  10. Mathematical foundation of the application of modal analysis to the investigation of space-time reactor behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.M.

    1970-01-01

    In recent years investigations in the field of kinetics and dynamics of nuclear reactors have been directed towards overcoming an insufficiently accurate point reactor model. For that purpose different mathematical approaches have been used. This thesis is devoted to modal analysis because, from the practical point of view, it is a very promising and, from the mathematical and physical point of view, a very interesting method. Some fundamental mathematical problems connected with the application of modal analysis to the investigations of the reactor space-time behaviour are still unsolved and accordingly our purpose is to solve some of these problems. The spectral properties of the diffusion and P 1 operators are studied in some detail applying the Krein-Rutman theory of the K-positive operators, the Krasnosel'skii theory of u 0 operators, and the Keldis theory of the operator families. The formal solution to the initial value problem (as an abstract Cauchy problem), associated with the diffusion and P 1 operators is also studied. Modal analysis is identified as a set of methods in the mathematical literature known as the Galerkin methods (or projection methods). Following this idea (using the results of the mathematical investigations of the Galerkin methods) and using our results of the investigations of the properties of the diffusion and P 1 operators, the applicability of modal analysis to the approximate solution of the diffusion and P 1 equations and of the eigenvalue problems associated with the diffusion and P 1 operators is established. As an example of the application of modal analysis the Bubnov and Galerkin method is applied to a multiregion thermal nuclear reactor for the determination of: (i) frequency response, (ii) eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the stationary diffusion operator, (iii) eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the non-stationary diffusion operators. On the basis of the expressions obtained the corresponding computer programmes for radial

  11. FORE-2, Thermohydraulics and Space-Independent Reactor Kinetics for Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, J.N.; Lawler, B.E.; Butz, H.R.; Heames, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FORE2 is a coupled thermal hydraulics-point kinetics digital computer code designed to calculate significant reactor parameters under steady-state conditions, or as functions of time during transients. The transients may result from a programmed reactivity insertion or a power change. Variable inlet coolant flow rate and temperature are considered. The code calculates the reactor power, the individual reactivity feedbacks, and the temperature of coolant, cladding, fuel, structure, and additional material for up to seven axial positions in three channel types which represent radial zones of the reactor. The heat of fusion, accompanying fuel melting, the liquid metal voiding reactivity, and the spatial and the time variation of the fuel cladding gap coefficient due to changes in gap size are considered. 2 - Method of solution: FORE2 input consists of property data, geometry, power and flow distribution factors, external time varying functions, experimental coefficients, and termination data. The differential equations for fluid flow, heat transfer, and point neutronics are solved by explicit finite-difference procedures. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Reactor excursions which can be calculated are restricted to those transients in which the reactor is not substantially destroyed. As a general rule, changes in reactor geometry and composition during an excursion are limited to those cases in which the reactivity effects of the changes may be considered as small perturbations of the initial system. Thus, accidents involving large-scale disassembly and bulk meltdown of a core are not covered by FORE2. FORE2 is valid only while the core retains its initial geometry

  12. SAFSIM: A computer program for engineering simulations of space reactor system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobranich, D.

    1992-01-01

    SAFSIM (System Analysis Flow SIMulator) is a FORTRAN computer program that provides engineering simulations of user-specified flow networks at the system level. It includes fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and reactor dynamics capabilities. SAFSIM provides sufficient versatility to allow the simulation of almost any flow system, from a backyard sprinkler system to a clustered nuclear reactor propulsion system. In addition to versatility, speed and robustness are primary goals of SAFSIM. The current capabilities of SAFSIM are summarized, and some illustrative example results are presented

  13. On thermionic emission from plasma-facing components in tokamak-relevant conditions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Cavalier, Jordan; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Podolník, Aleš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 9 (2017), č. článku 094002. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14228S; GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : thermionic * PIC * tungsten * tokamak * thermionic emission * plasma facing components * particle-in-cell Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6587/aa78c4/pdf

  14. Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study. Third quarterly technical progress report, April-June, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The specific tasks of this study are to mathematically model the thermionic cogeneration burner, experimentally confirm the projected energy flows in a thermal mock-up, make a cost estimate of the burner, including manufacturing, installation and maintenance, review industries in general and determine what groups of industries would be able to use the electrical power generated in the process, select one or more industries out of those for an in-depth study, including determination of the performance required for a thermionic cogeneration system to be competitive in that industry. Progress is reported. (WHK)

  15. Space nuclear reactor electric power. January 1972-May 1990 (A Bibliography from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base). Report for January 1972-May 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning studies and conceptual designs of nuclear space power reactors to generate electric power for space missions. The citations cover the technology, safety aspects, and policy considerations. (This updated bibliography contains 280 citations, 172 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  16. Fast Neutron Spectrum Potassium Worth for Space Power Reactor Design Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Marshall, Margaret A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Briggs, J. Blair [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tsiboulia, Anatoli [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mihalczo, John T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal (oralloy ) during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, one was performed that consisted of uranium metal annuli surrounding a potassium-filled, stainless steel can. The outer diameter of the annuli was approximately 13 inches (33.02 cm) with an inner diameter of 7 inches (17.78 cm). The diameter of the stainless steel can was 7 inches (17.78 cm). The critical height of the configurations was approximately 5.6 inches (14.224 cm). The uranium annulus consisted of multiple stacked rings, each with radial thicknesses of 1 inch (2.54 cm) and varying heights. A companion measurement was performed using empty stainless steel cans; the primary purpose of these experiments was to test the fast neutron cross sections of potassium as it was a candidate for coolant in some early space power reactor designs.The experimental measurements were performed on July 11, 1963, by J. T. Mihalczo and M. S. Wyatt (Ref. 1) with additional information in its corresponding logbook. Unreflected and unmoderated experiments with the same set of highly enriched uranium metal parts were performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in the 1960s and are evaluated in the International Handbook for Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) with the identifier HEU MET FAST 051. Thin

  17. Analytical treatment of space-energy neutron distribution in reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.

    1971-01-01

    Application of the analytical procedure described in this paper for study of fission spectrum evolution in the reactor cell gave results which enable complete understanding of neutron slowing down and transport p recesses and can be used for testing practical approximative methods. Heterogeneous system made of natural uranium and heavy water was used as an example

  18. Aerosol core nuclear reactor for space-based high energy/power nuclear-pumped lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prelas, M.A.; Boody, F.P.; Zediker, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    An aerosol core reactor concept can overcome the efficiency and/or chemical activity problems of other fuel-reactant interface concepts. In the design of a laser using the nuclear energy for a photon-intermediate pumping scheme, several features of the aerosol core reactor concept are attractive. First, the photon-intermediate pumping concept coupled with photon concentration methods and the aerosol fuel can provide the high power densities required to drive high energy/power lasers efficiently (about 25 to 100 kW/cu cm). Secondly, the intermediate photons should have relatively large mean free paths in the aerosol fuel which will allow the concept to scale more favorably. Finally, the aerosol core reactor concept can use materials which should allow the system to operate at high temperatures. An excimer laser pumped by the photons created in the fluorescer driven by a self-critical aerosol core reactor would have reasonable dimensions (finite cylinder of height 245 cm and radius of 245 cm), reasonable laser energy (1 MJ in approximately a 1 millisecond pulse), and reasonable mass (21 kg uranium, 8280 kg moderator, 460 kg fluorescer, 450 kg laser medium, and 3233 kg reflector). 12 references

  19. Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, G.L.

    2005-10-03

    This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

  20. Communication: IR spectroscopy of neutral transition metal clusters through thermionic emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapoutre, V. J. F.; Haertelt, M.; Meijer, G.; Fielicke, A.; Bakker, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The resonant multiple photon excitation of neutral niobium clusters using tunable infrared (IR) radiation leads to thermionic emission. By measuring the mass-resolved ionization yield as a function of IR wavenumber species selective IR spectra are obtained for Nb-n (n = 5-20) over the 200-350 cm(-1)

  1. Cesium-plasma-conductivity enhancement in the advanced thermionic energy converter. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikopoulos, C.N.

    Two methods of plasma conductivity enhancement in a cesium vapor thermionic energy converter have been studied. The first involved resonance photoabsorption of several cesium lines and the second utilized cesium plasma sustenance by application of microwave power. An extensive study of ionization processes in a cesium discharge in the presence of resonance ionization was made. Calculations were made of expected percentage excitation levels for several cesium resonance transitions for different values of neutral density and temperature as well as incident radiation power levels. The results of some of these computations were tabulated. Several ionization schemes were considered. A number of cesium transitions were investigated in the range of 799 to 870 nanometers for four different cesium reservoir temperatures, 467, 511, 550 and 591 K. The related absorption coefficients of the radiation lines in the plasma were deduced and tabulated. The resulting plasma conductivity increase was recorded and the associated ionization enhancement was deduced. A microwave cavity was built where the emitter and collector of a simple thermionic converter made up two of the cavity walls and resonant microwave power was externally applied. The I-V characteristics of the thermionic converter were studied under several microwave power levels in the range of 0 to 2 watts. Significant shifts to higher currents were observed as the microwave power levels were raised. In conclusion, both methods show promise as auxiliary ionization mechanisms for the thermionic energy converter, especially at low emitter temperatures

  2. A thermionic energy converter with a molybdenum-alumina cermet emitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, G.H.M.; Wolff, L.R.; Metselaar, R.

    1990-01-01

    A study is made of the properties of cermets as electrode materials for thermionic energy converters. For thermodynamic reasons it is expected that all cermets composed of pure Mo and refractory oxides have the same bare work function. From data on the work function of Mo in an oxygen atmosphere

  3. Numerical simulations of the thermionic electron gun for electron-beam welding and micromachining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jánský, Pavel; Zlámal, J.; Lencová, Bohumila; Zobač, Martin; Vlček, Ivan; Radlička, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 2 (2009), s. 357-362 ISSN 0042-207X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650805 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : Numerical simulation * Thermionic emission * Electron gun Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2009

  4. Measures to alleviate the back bombardment effect of thermionic rf electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.; Xie, J.

    1991-01-01

    Thermionic rf electron gun finds application as a high brightness electron source for rf linacs. However, cathode heating from back-bombardment effect causes a ramp in the macro-pulse beam current and limit the usable pulse width. Three methods: ring cathode, magnetic deflection and laser assisted heating are studied in theory and in experiment. The results of these studies are reported

  5. Preliminary Thermohydraulic Analysis of a New Moderated Reactor Utilizing an LEU-Fuel for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing an LEU fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is a non-proliferative and comparably efficient NTR engine with relatively low thrust levels of 40 - 50 kN for in-space transportation. The small modular engine can expand mission versatility, when flexibly used in a clustered engine arrangement, so that it can perform various scale missions from low-thrust robotic science missions to high-thrust manned missions. In addition, the clustered engine system can enhance engine redundancy and ensuing crew safety as well as the thrust. The propulsion system is an energy conversion system to transform the thermal energy of the reactor into the kinetic energy of the propellant to produce the powers for thrust, propellant feeding and electricity. It is mainly made up of a propellant Feeding System (PFS) comprising a Turbo-Pump Assembly (TPA), a Regenerative Nozzle Assembly (RNA), etc. For this core design study, an expander cycle is assumed to be the propulsion system. The EGS converts the thermal energy of the EHTGR in the idle operation (only 350 kW th power) to electric power during the electric power mode. This paper presents a preliminary thermohydraulic design analysis to explore the design space for the new reactor and to estimate the referential engine performance. The new non-proliferative NTR engine concept, KANUTER-LEU, is under designing to surmount the nuclear proliferation obstacles on allR and Dactivities and eventual commercialization for future generations. To efficiently implement a heavy LEU fuel for the NTR engine, its reactor design innovatively possesses the key characteristics of the high U density fuel with high heating and H 2 corrosion resistances, the thermal neutron spectrum core and also minimizing non-fission neutron loss, and the compact reactor design with protectively cooling capability. To investigate feasible design space for the moderated EHTGR-LEU and resultant engine performance, the preliminary design

  6. Preliminary Thermohydraulic Analysis of a New Moderated Reactor Utilizing an LEU-Fuel for Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing an LEU fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is a non-proliferative and comparably efficient NTR engine with relatively low thrust levels of 40 - 50 kN for in-space transportation. The small modular engine can expand mission versatility, when flexibly used in a clustered engine arrangement, so that it can perform various scale missions from low-thrust robotic science missions to high-thrust manned missions. In addition, the clustered engine system can enhance engine redundancy and ensuing crew safety as well as the thrust. The propulsion system is an energy conversion system to transform the thermal energy of the reactor into the kinetic energy of the propellant to produce the powers for thrust, propellant feeding and electricity. It is mainly made up of a propellant Feeding System (PFS) comprising a Turbo-Pump Assembly (TPA), a Regenerative Nozzle Assembly (RNA), etc. For this core design study, an expander cycle is assumed to be the propulsion system. The EGS converts the thermal energy of the EHTGR in the idle operation (only 350 kW{sub th} power) to electric power during the electric power mode. This paper presents a preliminary thermohydraulic design analysis to explore the design space for the new reactor and to estimate the referential engine performance. The new non-proliferative NTR engine concept, KANUTER-LEU, is under designing to surmount the nuclear proliferation obstacles on allR and Dactivities and eventual commercialization for future generations. To efficiently implement a heavy LEU fuel for the NTR engine, its reactor design innovatively possesses the key characteristics of the high U density fuel with high heating and H{sub 2} corrosion resistances, the thermal neutron spectrum core and also minimizing non-fission neutron loss, and the compact reactor design with protectively cooling capability. To investigate feasible design space for the moderated EHTGR-LEU and resultant engine performance, the

  7. ANCON, Space-Independent Reactor Kinetics with Linear or Nonlinear Thermal Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, John C.; Dugan, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ANCON solves the point-reactor kinetic equations including thermal feedback. Lump-type heat balance equations are used to represent the thermodynamics, and the heat capacity of each lump can vary with temperature. Thermal feedback can be either a linear or a non-linear function of lump temperature, and the impressed reactivity can be either a polynomial or sinusoidal function. 2 - Method of solution: In ANCON the system of coupled first-order differential equations is solved by a method based on continuous analytic continuation (references 2 and 3). The basic procedure consists of expanding all the dependent variables except reactivity in Taylor series, with a truncation error criterion, over successive intervals on the time axis. Variations of the basic procedure are used to increase the efficiency of the method in special situations. Automatic switching from the basic procedure to one of its variations (and vice-versa) may occur during the course of a transient. The method yields an analytic criterion for the magnitude of the time-step at any point in the transient. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is currently restricted to a maximum of six delayed neutron groups and a maximum of 56 lumps. Larger problems can be accommodated on a 65 K computer by increasing the dimensions of a few subscripted variables. Also, the code is currently restricted to a constant external transport delays, only the open-loop response of a reactor can be computed with ANCON

  8. Experimental study of space dependent nuclear reactor kinetics - Progress report; Eksperimentalno proucavanje prostorno zavisne kinetike nuklearnih reaktora - Izvestaj o napredovanju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, D; Petrovic, M [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    This paper describes experimental study of space-time behaviour of nuclear reactors by local complex-periodic perturbation of the absorption cross section and by measuring the local reactor response to this perturbation. Perturbation was done by BOR-1 fast oscillator. Cross correlation between the response and the perturbation was done numerically after completing the measurement by using digital computer. Obtained experimental results are preliminary and are measured with significant errors which were analysed in this paper. Results show qualitative agreement with those obtained by theoretical model. This paper is the first progress report in this field in our country. U radu je opisan eksperimentalni prilaz proucavanju prostorno-vremenskog ponasanja nuklearnih reaktora, vrseci lokalnu slozeno-periodicnu perturbaciju apsorpcionog preseka i mereci lokalni odziv reaktora na tu perturbaciju. Perturbacija je vrsena brzim oscilatorom BOR-1. Kroskorelacija izmedju odziva i perturbacije vrsena je numericki posle obavljenog merenja upotrebom digitalne racunske masine. Dobijeni eksperimentalni rezultati imaju preliminarni karakter i odredjeni su sa znatnim eksperimentalnim greskama koje su, u radu analizirane. Izlozeni rezultati pokazuju kvalitativna slaganja sa teorijski dobijenim modelom. Ovaj rad predstavlja prvi izvestaj o napredovanju na ovoj problematici kod nas (author)

  9. Solution of the two-dimensional space-time reactor kinetics equation by a locally one-dimensional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.S.; Christenson, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present some initial results from an investigation of the application of a locally one-dimensional (LOD) finite difference method to the solution of the two-dimensional, two-group reactor kinetics equations. Although the LOD method is relatively well known, it apparently has not been previously applied to the space-time kinetics equations. In this investigation, the LOD results were benchmarked against similar computational results (using the same computing environment, the same programming structure, and the same sample problems) obtained by the TWIGL program. For all of the problems considered, the LOD method provided accurate results in one-half to one-eight of the time required by the TWIGL program

  10. An Investigation of Power Stabilization and Space-Dependent Dynamics of a Nuclear Fluidized-Bed Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pain, Christopher C.; Eaton, Matthew D.; Gomes, Jefferson L.M.A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de; Umpleby, Adrian P.; Ziver, Kemal; Ackroyd, Ron T.; Miles, Bryan; Goddard, Antony J.H.; Dam, H. van; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Lathouwers, D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous work into the space-dependent kinetics of the conceptual nuclear fluidized bed has highlighted the sensitivity of fission power to particle movements within the bed. The work presented in this paper investigates a method of stabilizing the fission power by making it less sensitive to fuel particle movement. Steady-state neutronic calculations are performed to obtain a suitable design that is stable to radial and axial fuel particle movements in the bed. Detailed spatial/temporal simulations performed using the finite element transient criticality (FETCH) code investigate the dynamics of the new reactor design. A dual requirement of the design is that it has a moderate power output of ∼300 MW(thermal)

  11. Availability of niobium and tantalum-base alloy products for space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P.K.; Huber, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    In order to provide orbiting electrical power generators for use in Space, current US efforts are focusing on fast neutron flux nuclear power systems; these systems would generate in excess of 100 kW, yet be compact enough to be economically carried into Space by NASA's Space Shuttle. Considerable data on physical, mechanical and corrosion properties are available for the Nb and Ta-base alloys that are prime candidates for such structural components. However, most of these data pertain to the metallurgical state of the art of the 1965-1975 time period; therefore, they have to be reviewed and updated as appropriate to reflect present processing and manufacturing technology. This article summarizes this state of the art, making reasonable projections as well for ongoing improvements and their probable impact on alloy properties achievable in the 1990's

  12. Klystron - Space-charge limited flow, guns, Perveance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isagawa, S.

    1999-01-01

    This paper treats Thermionic emission, Cathode as an e - emitter, Space-charge limited effect and 3/2 power law, Perveance, Beam spread due to space charge, Pierce guns, Magnetically immersed guns, Method of gun design including simulations, and Examples, mainly treating E3786, which attendees will operate above 1 MW-CW in a practical exercise course at KEK. (author). 74 refs

  13. Load-carrying capabilities of refractory alloys for space reactor power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    To achieve sufficient thermodynamic efficiency, space nuclear power systems must operate above 1000 0 C. A quantitative evaluation of the existing mechanical properties data for the refractory alloys relevant to space nuclear power systems design lifetimes up to seven years at temperatures up to 1400 0 C is being conducted. The most important properties for space nuclear power systems are long-term high-temperature (>1000 0 C) creep strength and ductility, low-temperature ( 0 C) fracture toughness [including ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, (DBTT)], and ductility at high strain rates; of special concern are the above properties for weldments of refractory alloys, composition, applied stress, test temperature, test environment (e.g., vacuum, lithium), and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) history. Currently being evaluated are, in order of ascending mp, selected alloys of niobium (e.g., Nb-1% Zr, Nb-1% Zr-0.1% C), molybdenum (e.g., Mo-13% Re), tantalum (e.g., ASTAR-811C), and tungsten (e.g., CVD W and W-25% Re). Creep properties of these alloys have been correlated via Larson-Miller, Manson-Hafered, and other empirical parameters; creep equations have been developed from these correlations. 12 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  15. 3-D simulation study for a thermionic RF gun using an FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. E-mail: hama@lns.tohoku.ac.jp; Hinode, F.; Shinto, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Tanaka, T

    2004-08-01

    Beam dynamics in a thermionic RF gun for a new pre-injector in a future synchrotron radiation facility at Tohoku university has been studied by developing a 3-D Maxwell's equation solver. Backbombardment (BB) effect on a cathode, which is a crucial problem for performance of the thermionic RF gun, has been investigated. It is found that an external dipole magnetic field applying around the cathode is effective to reduce high-energy backstreaming electrons from the accelerating cell. However, the low-energy electrons coming back from the first cell inevitably hit the cathode, so that characteristics of the cathode material seems to be crucial for reduction of the BB effect.

  16. Non-equilibrium thermionic electron emission for metals at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech-Garret, J. L.; Tierno, S. P.; Conde, L.

    2015-08-01

    Stationary thermionic electron emission currents from heated metals are compared against an analytical expression derived using a non-equilibrium quantum kappa energy distribution for the electrons. The latter depends on the temperature decreasing parameter κ ( T ) , which decreases with increasing temperature and can be estimated from raw experimental data and characterizes the departure of the electron energy spectrum from equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics. The calculations accurately predict the measured thermionic emission currents for both high and moderate temperature ranges. The Richardson-Dushman law governs electron emission for large values of kappa or equivalently, moderate metal temperatures. The high energy tail in the electron energy distribution function that develops at higher temperatures or lower kappa values increases the emission currents well over the predictions of the classical expression. This also permits the quantitative estimation of the departure of the metal electrons from the equilibrium Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  17. Thermionic detection of the ionic fragments of continiuum-state pair absorption systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotop, R.; Niemax, K.; Richter, J.; Weber, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Using a thermionic diode we have detected the ionic fragments formed by associative ionization and dissociation after continuum-state pair absorption processes in Cs-Cs and Cs-K systems. Assuming an ionization probability of unity of the excited species and calibrating the pair absorption bands by taking into account the known photoionization cross section of the atoms we found excellent agreement with data from classical absorption measurements. (orig.)

  18. Energy balance measurements for the determination of physical and technical operation parameters of thermionic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, K.

    1975-01-01

    An introduction into the fundamental theoretical principles of the thermionic Cs converter is followed by the set-up of a special measuring converter as proposed by J. Bohdansky which permits the defined setting of the electrode distance under service conditions. Measurements thus carried out present quantitative data on efficiency, on energy transfer between the electrodes by means of radiation and heat transfer, and on the actual collector potential, the latter which surprisingly shows a distance dependency. (orig./GG) [de

  19. Evaluation of precision in measurements of uranium isotope ratio by thermionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de; Rodrigues, C.

    1977-01-01

    The parameters which affect the precision and accuracy of uranium isotopic ratios measurements by thermionic mass spectrometry are discussed. A statistical designed program for the analysis of the internal and external variances are presented. It was done an application of this statistical methods, in order to get mass discrimination factor, and its standard mean deviation, by using some results already published for 235 U/ 238 U ratio in NBS uranium samples, and natural uranium [pt

  20. Comparison between arc drops in ignited thermionic converters with and without ion reflections at the emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, L.

    1985-01-01

    The output performance of two thermionic energy converters is compared. One converter has a normal emitter, working with zero field at the emitter which is close to the optimum working point, and the other has a low work function emitter and ion reflection at the emitter. A simple model of the plasma and the sheaths shows that a converter working with a low work function emitter and ion reflections gives a worse performance than a similar converter with a normal emitter

  1. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C.C.; Lieb, D.P.

    1981-01-01

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air, the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh

  2. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C. C.; Lieb, D. P.; Margulies, A. E.; Fusegni, L. J.; Lovell, B. J.

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air; the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh.

  3. Work function and surface stability of tungsten-based thermionic electron emission cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ryan; Morgan, Dane; Booske, John

    2017-11-01

    Materials that exhibit a low work function and therefore easily emit electrons into vacuum form the basis of electronic devices used in applications ranging from satellite communications to thermionic energy conversion. W-Ba-O is the canonical materials system that functions as the thermionic electron emitter commercially used in a range of high-power electron devices. However, the work functions, surface stability, and kinetic characteristics of a polycrystalline W emitter surface are still not well understood or characterized. In this study, we examined the work function and surface stability of the eight lowest index surfaces of the W-Ba-O system using density functional theory methods. We found that under the typical thermionic cathode operating conditions of high temperature and low oxygen partial pressure, the most stable surface adsorbates are Ba-O species with compositions in the range of Ba0.125O-Ba0.25O per surface W atom, with O passivating all dangling W bonds and Ba creating work function-lowering surface dipoles. Wulff construction analysis reveals that the presence of O and Ba significantly alters the surface energetics and changes the proportions of surface facets present under equilibrium conditions. Analysis of previously published data on W sintering kinetics suggests that fine W particles in the size range of 100-500 nm may be at or near equilibrium during cathode synthesis and thus may exhibit surface orientation fractions well described by the calculated Wulff construction.

  4. High-efficiency thermionic power generator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary missions (e.g., Pioneer, Cassini, or Voyager) and applications with moderate power draw and increased mobility requirements (e.g., Curiosity) have...

  5. In-pile experimental device for Sirene thermionic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliaux, J.; Durand, J.; Lazare-Chopard, G.

    1969-01-01

    The irradiation device described here, was built for in pile life tests of 100 We SIRENE converters. The nuclear converter is located in a sealed vacuum chamber, which is plugged at the lower end of a coaxial tubing acting as electrical leads. The output power is available on a variable resistive load on the bank of the reactor pool. Thermal, electrical and neutronic parameters of the converter are recorded. Since 1967, two permanent devices allowed five experiments in the swimming pool TRITON (CEN-FAR) and the results, obtained till now, are presented. (authors) [fr

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  7. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis through transesterification of soybean oil with methanol on hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor over sulphated zinc oxide (SO42-/ZnO active acid catalyst was investigated. This research was aimed to study effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity (WHSV and the catalyst diameter on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel synthesis. The amount (20.2 g of active sulphated zinc oxide solid acid catalysts was loaded into discharge zone of the reactor. The WHSV and the catalyst diameter were varied between 0.89 to 1.55 min-1 and 3, 5, and 7 mm, respectively. The molar ratio of methanol to oil as reactants of 15:1 is fed to the reactor, while operating condition of the reactor was kept at reaction temperature of 65 oC and ambient pressure. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME component in biodiesel product was identified by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that the FAME yield decreases with increasing WHSV. It was found that the optimum FAME yield was achieved of 56.91 % at WHSV of 0.89 min-1 and catalyst diameter of 5 mm and reaction time of 1.25 min. It can be concluded that the biodiesel synthesis using the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor system exhibited promising the FAME yield. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 15th November 2016; Revised: 24th December 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2017. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 227-234 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234

  8. Advances in Thermionic Energy Conversion through Single-Crystal n-Type Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz A. M. Koeck

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermionic energy conversion, a process that allows direct transformation of thermal to electrical energy, presents a means of efficient electrical power generation as the hot and cold side of the corresponding heat engine are separated by a vacuum gap. Conversion efficiencies approaching those of the Carnot cycle are possible if material parameters of the active elements at the converter, i.e., electron emitter or cathode and collector or anode, are optimized for operation in the desired temperature range. These parameters can be defined through the law of Richardson–Dushman that quantifies the ability of a material to release an electron current at a certain temperature as a function of the emission barrier or work function and the emission or Richardson constant. Engineering materials to defined parameter values presents the key challenge in constructing practical thermionic converters. The elevated temperature regime of operation presents a constraint that eliminates most semiconductors and identifies diamond, a wide band-gap semiconductor, as a suitable thermionic material through its unique material properties. For its surface, a configuration can be established, the negative electron affinity, that shifts the vacuum level below the conduction band minimum eliminating the surface barrier for electron emission. In addition, its ability to accept impurities as donor states allows materials engineering to control the work function and the emission constant. Single-crystal diamond electrodes with nitrogen levels at 1.7 eV and phosphorus levels at 0.6 eV were prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition where the work function was controlled from 2.88 to 0.67 eV, one of the lowest thermionic work functions reported. This work function range was achieved through control of the doping concentration where a relation to the amount of band bending emerged. Upward band bending that contributed to the work function was attributed to

  9. Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Runyan, J.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Keddy, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500 0 K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm 2 . The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500 0 K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test

  10. Nb-base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The proposed use of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, the lead candidate has been Nb-1Zr due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less than optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. These gaps include potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 h of thermal aging at 1098, 1248 and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The development of intragranular and grain boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the 1248 K aged material, while ductile behavior occurred in material aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under and overaging of the grain boundary particles are believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged material

  11. Nb-Base FS-85 Alloy as a Candidate Structural Material for Space Reactor Applications: Effects of Thermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Busby, Jeremy T.; Hoelzer, David T.; Zinkle, Steven J.

    2009-04-01

    The proposed uses of fission reactors for manned or deep space missions have typically relied on the potential use of refractory metal alloys as structural materials. Throughout the history of these programs, a leading candidate has been Nb-1Zr, due to its good fabrication and welding characteristics. However, the less-than-optimal creep resistance of this alloy has encouraged interest in the more complex FS-85 (Nb-28Ta-10W-1Zr) alloy. Despite this interest, only a relatively small database exists for the properties of FS-85. Database gaps include the potential microstructural instabilities that can lead to mechanical property degradation. In this work, changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of FS-85 were investigated following 1100 hours of thermal aging at 1098, 1248, and 1398 K. The changes in electrical resistivity, hardness, and tensile properties between the as-annealed and aged materials are compared. Evaluation of the microstructural changes was performed through optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The development of intragranular and grain-boundary precipitation of Zr-rich compounds as a function of aging temperature was followed. Brittle tensile behavior was measured in the material aged at 1248 K, while ductile behavior occurred in samples aged above and below this temperature. The effect of temperature on the under- and overaging of the grain-boundary particles is believed to have contributed to the mechanical property behavior of the aged materials.

  12. Comparison of neutron diffusion theory codes in two and three space dimensions using a sodium cooled fast reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butland, A.T.D.; Putney, J.; Sweet, D.W.

    1980-04-01

    This report describes work performed to compare two UK neutron diffusion theory codes, TIGAR and SNAP, with published results for eight other codes available abroad. Both mesh edge and mesh centred finite difference diffusion theory codes as well as one axial synthesis code are included in the comparison and a range of iteration procedures are used by them. Comparison is made of calculations for a model of the sodium cooled fast reactor SNR-300 in both triangular and rectangular geometry and for a range of spatial meshes, enabling extrapolations to infinite mesh to be made. Calculated values of the effective multiplication constant, keff, for all the codes, agree very well when extrapolated to infinite mesh, indicating that no significant errors arising from the finite difference approximation but independent of mesh spacing are present in the calculations. The variation of keff with mesh area is found to be linear for the small meshes considered here, with the gradients for the mesh centred and mesh edged codes being of opposite sign. The results obtained using the mesh centred codes TIGAR, SNAP and CITATION agree closely with one another for all the meshes considered; the mesh edge codes agree less closely. (author)

  13. Reactor design for nuclear electric propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    Conceptual design studies of a nuclear power plant for electric propulsion of spacecrafts have been on going for several years. An attractive concept which has evolved from these studies and which has been described in previous publications, is a heat-pipe cooled, fast spectrum nuclear reactor that provides 3 MW of thermal energy to out-of-core thermionic converters. The primary motivation for using heat pipes is to provide redundancy in the core cooling system that is not available in gas or liquid-metal cooled reactors. Detailed investigation of the consequences of heat pipe failures has resulted in modifications to the basic reactor design and has led to consideration of an entirely different core design. The new design features an integral laminated core configuration consisting of alternating layers of UO 2 and molybdenum sheets that span the entire diameter of the core. Design characteristics are presented and compared for the two reactors

  14. 10- to 30-kWe space power system using the uranium-zirconium hydride reactor and organic Rankine power conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, W.R.; Bost, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The UZrH reactor-ORC power system has been reviewed to determine its feasibility issues and characterize the system size, mass, and efficiency in the 10- to 30-kWe power range. The major component technologies required for this concept were reviewed to determine their technology status rating for early deployment of the system on near-term missions. Dynamic Isotope Power System (DIPS) technology is directly applicable to the UZrH reactor-ORC concept in the areas of power system reliability and survivability. The UZrH reactor-ORC concept provides a truly state-of-the-art system for use in future military and civilian space power programs. 9 references

  15. A search for space energy alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Billman, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper takes a look at a number of schemes for converting radiant energy in space to useful energy for man. These schemes are possible alternatives to the currently most studied solar power satellite concept. Possible primary collection and conversion devices discussed include the space particle flux devices, solar windmills, photovoltaic devices, photochemical cells, photoemissive converters, heat engines, dielectric energy conversion, electrostatic generators, plasma solar collectors, and thermionic schemes. Transmission devices reviewed include lasers and masers.

  16. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  17. ZOCO VI - a computer code to calculate the time- and space-dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containments of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1974-12-01

    ZOCO VI is a computer code to investigate the time and space dependent pressure distribution in full pressure containment of water cooled nuclear power reactors following a loss-of-coolant accident, which is caused by the rupture of a main coolant or steam line. ZOCO VI is an improved version of the computer code ZOCO V with enlarged description of condensing events. (orig.) [de

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  19. High Efficiency Thermionics (HET-IV) and Converter Advancement (CAP) programs. Final reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, C.B.; Murray, C.S.; Riley, D.R. [Bettis Atomic Power Lab., West Mifflin, PA (United States); Desplat, J.L.; Hansen, L.K.; Hatch, G.L.; McVey, J.B.; Rasor, N.S. [Rasor Associates, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This report contains the final report of the High Efficiency Thermionics (HET-IV) Program, Attachment A, performed at Rasor Associates, Inc. (RAI); and the final report of the Converter Advancement Program (CAP), performed at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Attachment B. The phenomenology of cesium-oxygen thermionic converters was elucidated in these programs, and the factors that had prevented the achievement of stable, enhanced cesium-oxygen converter performance for the previous thirty years were identified. Based on these discoveries, cesium-oxygen vapor sources were developed that achieved stable performance with factor-of-two improvements in power density and thermal efficiency, relative to conventional, cesium-only ignited mode thermionic converters. Key achievements of the HET-IV/CAP programs are as follows: a new technique for measuring minute traces of oxygen in cesium atmospheres; the determination of the proper range of oxygen partial pressures for optimum converter performance--10{sup {minus}7} to 10{sup {minus}9} torr; the discovery, and analysis of the cesium-oxygen liquid migration and compositional segregation phenomena; the successful use of capillary forces to contain the migration phenomenon; the use of differential heating to control compositional segregation, and induce vapor circulation; the development of mechanically and chemically stable, porous reservoir structures; the development of precise, in situ oxygen charging methods; stable improvements in emitter performance, up to effective emitter bare work functions of 5.4 eV; stable improvements in barrier index, to value below 1.8 Volts; the development of detailed microscopic models for cesium-oxygen reservoir dynamics and collector work function behavior; and the discovery of new relationships between electrode geometry and Schock Instability.

  20. Analysis of thermionic DC electron gun for 125 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, K.; Sato, Isamu; Sato, K.

    2000-01-01

    The beam trace calculation for the 100 kV thermionic DC electron gun with EIMAC 646E cathode, which is currently used for the 125 MeV linac at Nihon University, has been performed using EGUN code. The result showed a strong focus of the beam at the exit of the anode. A better geometry of the gun has been investigated by varying the shape of the wehnelt electrode. Also the trace calculation has been performed for the case of EIMAC 646B, which showed a considerably small emittance compared with that estimated for the present gun. (author)

  1. Analysis of thermionic DC electron gun for 125 MeV linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, K. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan); Sato, Isamu; Sato, K. [Nihon Univ., Funabashi, Chiba (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The beam trace calculation for the 100 kV thermionic DC electron gun with EIMAC 646E cathode, which is currently used for the 125 MeV linac at Nihon University, has been performed using EGUN code. The result showed a strong focus of the beam at the exit of the anode. A better geometry of the gun has been investigated by varying the shape of the wehnelt electrode. Also the trace calculation has been performed for the case of EIMAC 646B, which showed a considerably small emittance compared with that estimated for the present gun. (author)

  2. The influences of noble gas on the volt-ampere characteristics of a thermionic Cs diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschersich, K.G.

    1975-10-01

    The influence of the distance between electrodes and of the partial pressure of added xenon on the voltage drop in the electrode gap is investigated by measuring current density-voltage curves on plane parallel thermionic test diodes. With unchanged diode parameters, an addition of xenon reduces the voltage drop when the product of Cs vapour pressure and electrode gap is smaller than an optimum value of about 5 x 10 -2 cm.Torr. The xenon influences the mobility and thus the duration of the Cs ions. These procedures are explained and discussed using a relatively simple mathematical model. (GG/LH) [de

  3. Observation of Repetition-Rate Dependent Emission From an Un-Gated Thermionic Cathode Rf Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P.; Sun, Y.; Harris, J.R.; Lewellen, J.W.

    2017-06-02

    Recent work at Fermilab in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source and members of other national labs, designed an experiment to study the relationship between the RF repetition rate and the average current per RF pulse. While existing models anticipate a direct relationship between these two parameters we observed an inverse relationship. We believe this is a result of damage to the barium coating on the cathode surface caused by a change in back-bombardment power that is unaccounted for in the existing theories. These observations shed new light on the challenges and fundamental limitations associated with scaling an ungated thermionic cathode RF gun to high average current.

  4. Theory of thermionic emission from a two-dimensional conductor and its application to a graphene-semiconductor Schottky junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushin, Maxim

    2018-04-01

    The standard theory of thermionic emission developed for three-dimensional semiconductors does not apply to two-dimensional materials even for making qualitative predictions because of the vanishing out-of-plane quasiparticle velocity. This study reveals the fundamental origin of the out-of-plane charge carrier motion in a two-dimensional conductor due to the finite quasiparticle lifetime and huge uncertainty of the out-of-plane momentum. The theory is applied to a Schottky junction between graphene and a bulk semiconductor to derive a thermionic constant, which, in contrast to the conventional Richardson constant, is determined by the Schottky barrier height and Fermi level in graphene.

  5. The direct conversion of heat into electricity in reactors; Conversion directe de la chaleur en electricite dans les piles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devin, B; Bliaux, J; Lesueur, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The direct conversion of heat into electricity by thermionic emission in an atomic reactor has been studied with the triple aim of its utilisation: as an energy source for a space device, at the head of a conventional conversion system in power installations, or finally in association with the thermoelectric conversion in very low power installations. The laboratory experiments were mainly orientated towards the electron extraction of metals and compounds and their behaviour at high temperatures. Converters furnishing up to 50 amps at 0. 4 volts with an efficiency close to 10 p. 100 have been constructed in the laboratory; the emitters were heated by electron bombardment and were composed of tungsten covered with an uranium carbide deposit or molybdenum covered with cesium. The main aspects of the coupling between the converter and the reactor have been covered from the point of view of electronics: the influence of the mismatching of the load on the temperature of the emitter and the influence of thermal flux density on the temperature of the emitter and the stability of the converter. Converters using uranium carbide as the electron emitter have been tested in reactors. Tests have been made under dynamic conditions in order to determine the dynamic characteristics. The load matching curves have been constructed and the overall performances of several cells coupled in such a way as to form a reactor rod have been deduced. This information is fundamental to the design of a control system for a thermionic conversion reactor. The problems associated with the reliability of thermionic converters connected in series in the same reactor rod have been examined theoretically. Finally, the absorption isotherms have been drawn at the ambient temperatures for krypton and xenon on activated carbon with the aim of investigating the escape of fission products in a converter. (author) [French] La conversion directe de chaleur en electricite par emission thermionique dans une

  6. Multimegawatt nuclear systems for space power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearien, J.A.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The conceptual design and performance capability requirements of multi-MW nuclear powerplants for SDI systems are considered. The candidate powerplant configurations encompass Rankine, Brayton, and thermionic cycles; these respectively provide the lightest to heaviest system masses, since reactor and shield masses represent only 10-30 percent of total closed power system weight for the Rankine and Brayton systems. Many of the gas reactor concepts entertained may be operated in dual mode, thereby furnishing both long term low power and high power for short periods. Heat rejection is identified as the most important technology, since about 50 percent of the total closed mass is constituted by the heat rejection system. 9 references

  7. Analysis of instability growth and collisionless relaxation in thermionic converters using 1-D PIC simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreh, B.B.

    1994-12-01

    This work investigates the role that the beam-plasma instability may play in a thermionic converter. The traditional assumption of collisionally dominated relaxation is questioned, and the beam-plasma instability is proposed as a possible dominant relaxation mechanism. Theory is developed to describe the beam-plasma instability in the cold-plasma approximation, and the theory is tested with two common Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. The theory is first confirmed using an unbounded plasma PIC simulation employing periodic boundary conditions, ES1. The theoretically predicted growth rates are on the order of the plasma frequencies, and ES1 simulations verify these predictions within the order of 1%. For typical conditions encountered in thermionic converters, the resulting growth period is on the order of 7 x 10 -11 seconds. The bounded plasma simulation PDP1 was used to evaluate the influence of finite geometry and the electrode boundaries. For this bounded plasma, a two-stream interaction was supported and resulting in nearly complete thermalization in approximately 5 x 10 -10 seconds. Since the electron-electron collision rate of 10 9 Hz and the electron atom collision rate of 10 7 Hz are significantly slower than the rate of development of these instabilities, the instabilities appear to be an important relaxation mechanism

  8. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  9. Performance review of thermionic electron gun developed for RF linear accelerators at RRCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanmode, Yashwant; Mulchandani, J.; Reddy, T.S.; Bhisikar, A.; Singh, H.G.; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2015-01-01

    RRCAT is engaged in development of RF electron linear accelerator for irradiation of industrial and agricultural products. Thermionic electron gun is primary source for this accelerator as beam current in the RF accelerator is modest and thermionic emission is most prevalent option for electron gun development. An electron gun has to meet high cathode emission capability, low filament power, good accessibility for cathode replacement and should provide short time for maintenance. Electron linear accelerator up to beam energy of 10 MeV require electron source of 45-50 keV beam energy and emission current of 1 A. Electron optics of gun and electron beam profile simulations were carried out using CST's particle tracking code and EGUN code. Triode type electron gun of cathode voltage 50 kV pulsed has been designed, developed and integrated with 10 MeV electron linear accelerators at RRCAT. Beam current of more than 600 mA has been measured with faraday cup in the test stand developed for characterizing the electron gun. Two accelerators one is imported and another one developed indigenously has been energized using this electron gun. Beam energy of 5-10 MeV has been achieved with beam current of 250-400 mA by integrating this electron gun with the linear accelerator. This paper reviews the performance of indigenously developed electron gun for both linear accelerators. (author)

  10. Design and implementation of a fs-resolved transmission electron microscope based on thermionic gun technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piazza, L., E-mail: luca.piazza@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Ultrafast Microscopy and Electron Scattering (LUMES), ICMP, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 455 Bolero Drive, Danville, CA 94526 (United States); LaGrange, T.; Reed, B.W. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-356, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Barwick, B. [Department of Physics, Trinity College, 300 Summit St., Hartford, CT 06106 (United States); Carbone, Fabrizio [Laboratory for Ultrafast Microscopy and Electron Scattering (LUMES), ICMP, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • We present the implementation of a femtosecond-resolved ultrafast TEM. • This is the first ultrafast TEM based on a thermionic gun geometry. • An additional condenser lens has been used to maximize the electron count. • We achieved a time resolution of about 300 fs and an energy resolution of 1 eV. - Abstract: In this paper, the design and implementation of a femtosecond-resolved ultrafast transmission electron microscope is presented, based on a thermionic gun geometry. Utilizing an additional magnetic lens between the electron acceleration and the nominal condenser lens system, a larger percentage of the electrons created at the cathode are delivered to the specimen without degrading temporal, spatial and energy resolution significantly, while at the same time maintaining the femtosecond temporal resolution. Using the photon-induced near field electron microscopy effect (PINEM) on silver nanowires the cross-correlation between the light and electron pulses was measured, showing the impact of the gun settings and initiating laser pulse duration on the electron bunch properties. Tuneable electron pulses between 300 fs and several ps can be obtained, and an overall energy resolution around 1 eV was achieved.

  11. Thermionic Properties of Carbon Based Nanomaterials Produced by Microhollow Cathode PECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, John R.; Wolinksy, Jason J.; Bailey, Paul S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Go, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Thermionic emission is the process in which materials at sufficiently high temperature spontaneously emit electrons. This process occurs when electrons in a material gain sufficient thermal energy from heating to overcome the material's potential barrier, referred to as the work function. For most bulk materials very high temperatures (greater than 1500 K) are needed to produce appreciable emission. Carbon-based nanomaterials have shown significant promise as emission materials because of their low work functions, nanoscale geometry, and negative electron affinity. One method of producing these materials is through the process known as microhollow cathode PECVD. In a microhollow cathode plasma, high energy electrons oscillate at very high energies through the Pendel effect. These high energy electrons create numerous radical species and the technique has been shown to be an effective method of growing carbon based nanomaterials. In this work, we explore the thermionic emission properties of carbon based nanomaterials produced by microhollow cathode PECVD under a variety of synthesis conditions. Initial studies demonstrate measureable current at low temperatures (approximately 800 K) and work functions (approximately 3.3 eV) for these materials.

  12. Synthesis, thermionic emission and magnetic properties of (NdxGd1–x)B6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Li-Hong; Zhang Jiu-Xing; Zhou Shen-Lin; Tegus

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline rare-earth hexaborides (Nd x Gd 1–x )B 6 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.6, 0.8, 1) were prepared by the reactive spark plasma sintering (SPS) method using mixed powder of GdH 2 , NdH 2 and B. The effects of Nd doping on the crystal structure, the grain orientation, the thermionic emission and the magnetic properties of the hexaboride were investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron backscattered diffraction and magnetic measurements. It is found that all the samples sintered by the SPS method exhibit high densities (> 95%) and high values of Vickers hardness (2319 kg/mm 2 ). The values are much higher than those obtained in the traditional method. With the increase of Nd content, the thermionic emission current density increases from 11 to 16.30 A/cm 2 and the magnetic phase transition temperature increases from 5.85 to 7.95 K. Thus, the SPS technique is a suitable method to synthesize the dense rare-earth hexaborides with excellent properties. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  13. SHOVAV-JUEL. A one dimensional space-time kinetic code for pebble-bed high-temperature reactors with temperature and Xenon feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabbi, R.; Meister, G.; Finken, R.; Haben, M.

    1982-09-01

    The present report describes the modelling basis and the structure of the neutron kinetics-code SHOVAV-Juel. Information for users is given regarding the application of the code and the generation of the input data. SHOVAV-Juel is a one-dimensional space-time-code based on a multigroup diffusion approach for four energy groups and six groups of delayed neutrons. It has been developed for the analysis of the transient behaviour of high temperature reactors with pebble-bed core. The reactor core is modelled by horizontal segments to which different materials compositions can be assigned. The temperature dependence of the reactivity is taken into account by using temperature dependent neutron cross sections. For the simulation of transients in an extended time range the time dependence of the reactivity absorption by Xenon-135 is taken into account. (orig./RW)

  14. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  15. A personal computer based console monitor for a TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieke, Phillip E.; Hood, William E.; Razvi, Junaid

    1990-01-01

    Numerous improvements have been made to the Mark F facility to provide a minimum reactor down time, giving a high reactor availability. A program was undertaken to enhance the monitoring capabilities of the instrumentation and control system on this reactor. To that end, a personal computer based console monitoring system has been developed, installed in the control room and is operational to provide real-time monitoring and display of a variety of reactor operating parameters. This system is based on commercially available hardware and an applications software package developed internally at the GA facility. It has (a) assisted the operator in controlling reactor parameters to maintain the high degree of power stability required during extended runs with thermionic devices in-core, and (b) provided data trending and archiving capabilities on all monitored channels to allow a post-mortem analysis to be performed on any of the monitored parameters

  16. Modeling and analysis of the disk MHD generator component of a gas core reactor/MHD Rankine cycle space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, G.E.; Dugan, E.T.; Lear, W.E. Jr.; Appelbaum, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    A gas core nuclear reactor (GCR)/disk magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator direct closed Rankine space power system concept is described. The GCR/disk MHD generator marriage facilitates efficient high electric power density system performance at relatively high operating temperatures. The system concept promises high specific power levels, on the order of 1 kW e /kg. An overview of the disk MHD generator component magnetofluiddynamic and plasma physics theoretical modeling is provided. Results from a parametric design analysis of the disk MHD generator are presented and discussed

  17. Determination of rare earth elements in high purity rare earth oxides by liquid chromatography, thermionic mass spectrometry and combined liquid chromatography/thermionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stijfhoorn, D.E.; Stray, H.; Hjelmseth, H.

    1993-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of rare earth elements in rocks has been modified and used for the determination of rare earth elements (REE) in high purity rare earth oxides. The detection limit was 1-1.5 ng or 2-3 mg/kg when a solution corresponding to 0.5 mg of the rare earth oxide was injected. The REE determination was also carried out by adding a mixture of selected REE isotopes to the sample and analysing the collected HPLC-fractions by mass spectrometry (MS) using a thermionic source. Since the matrix element was not collected, interference from this element during the mass spectrometric analysis was avoided. Detection limits as low as 0.5 mg/kg could then be obtained. Detection limits as low as 0.05 mg/kg were possible by MS without HPLC-pre-separation, but this approach could only be used for those elements that were not affected by the matrix. Commercial samples of high purity Nd 2 O 3 , Gd 2 O 3 and Dy 2 O 3 were analysed in this study, and a comparison of results obtained by HPLC, combined HPLC/MS and direct MS is presented. (Author)

  18. Analysis of loss-of-coolant accident for a fast-spectrum lithium-cooled nuclear reactor for space-power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G. E.; Petrik, E. J.; Kieffer, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    A two-dimensional, transient, heat-transfer analysis was made to determine the temperature response in the core of a conceptual space-power nuclear reactor following a total loss of reactor coolant. With loss of coolant from the reactor, the controlling mode of heat transfer is thermal radiation. In one of the schemes considered for removing decay heat from the core, it was assumed that the 4 pi shield which surrounds the core acts as a constant-temperature sink (temperature, 700 K) for absorption of thermal radiation from the core. Results based on this scheme of heat removal show that melting of fuel in the core is possible only when the emissivity of the heat-radiating surfaces in the core is less than about 0.40. In another scheme for removing the afterheat, the core centerline fuel pin was replaced by a redundant, constant temperature, coolant channel. Based on an emissivity of 0.20 for all material surfaces in the core, the calculated maximum fuel temperature for this scheme of heat removal was 2840 K, or about 90 K less than the melting temperature of the UN fuel.

  19. Assessment of the impact of neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupling on the design and performance of nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aithal, S.M.; Aldemir, T.; Vafai, K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of studies has been performed to investigate the potential impact of the coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics on the design and performance assessment of solid core reactors for nuclear thermal space propulsion, using the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept as an example system. For a given temperature distribution in the reactor, the k eff and steady-state core power distribution are obtained from three-dimensional, continuous energy Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP code. For a given core power distribution, determination of the temperature distribution in the core and hydrogen-filled annulus between the reflector and pressure vessel is based on a nonthermal equilibrium analysis. The results show that a realistic estimation of fuel, core size, and control requirements for PBRs using hydrogenous moderators, as well as optimization of the overall engine design, may require coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic studies. However, it may be possible to estimate the thermal safety margins and propellant exit temperatures based on power distributions obtained from neutronic calculations at room temperature. The results also show that, while variation of the hydrogen flow rate in the annulus has been proposed as a partial control mechanism for PBRs, such control mechanism may not be feasible for PBRs with high moderator-to-fuel ratios and hence soft core neutron spectra

  20. High performance emitter for thermionic diode obtained by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faron, R.; Bargues, M.; Durand, J.P.; Gillardeau, J.

    1973-01-01

    Vapor deposition process conditions presently known for tungsten and molybdenum (specifically the range of high temperatures and low pressures) permit the achievement of high performance thermionic emitters when used with an appropriate technology. One example of this uses the following series of successive vapor deposits, the five last vapor deposits constituting the fabrication of the emitting layer: Mo deposit for the formation of the nuclear fuel mechanical support; Mo deposit, which constitutes the sheath of the nuclear fuel; epitaxed Mo--W alloy deposit; epitaxed tungsten deposit; fine-grained tungsten deposit; and tungsten deposit with surface orientation according to plane (110)W. In accordance with vapor deposition techniques previously developed, such a sequence of deposits can easily be achieved with the same equipment, even without having to take out the part during the course of the process. (U.S.)

  1. Thermionic RF Gun and Linac Pre-Injector for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.

    2003-08-11

    Preparations are underway to upgrade the Spear2 to the third generation light source. Installation of all the subsystems will start in April 2003. Although the Spear3 RF system is entirely different from the present form, the pre-injector gun/linac and booster synchrotron will remain the same even after the upgrade. The thermionic rf gun reliability and stability are to be improved to inject 500 mA of stored current in shortest possible time. When a top-up mode is enforced, where the stored beam decay is replenished to maintain the constant current and thus constant light intensity, the Spear3 will take injection every few minutes. In that case the gun, linac, and booster must stay on at all times. In this report we will describe some improvements made on the gun and linac in the recent past, as well as their present performance and future upgrade to be made.

  2. Conceptual engineering design study of thermionic topping of fossil power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-02-15

    Primary objectives of this study are to investigate alternative design concepts of thermal coupling of thermionic energy converters (TECs) to the steam cycle and the mechanical and electrical aspects of integrating TEC design into the steam power station. The specific tasks include: (1) evaluate design concepts of TEC topping of solvent refined liquified coal-fired steam power plants, with main emphasis devoted to thermal, mechanical, and electrical design aspects. (2) Develop preliminary conceptual design of a modular TEC assembly. (3) Develop preliminary cost estimates of the design modification to a liquified coal-fired steam power plant with TEC topping. (4) Provide support to Thermo Electron Corporation in planning TEC hardware testing. Results are presented in detail.

  3. Photon-Enhanced Thermionic Emission in Cesiated p-Type and n-Type Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Dionigi, Fabio; Hansen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    electrons. Efficiencies above 60% have been predicted theoretically for high solar concentration systems. Silicon is an interesting absorber material for high efficiency PETE solar cells, partly due to its mechanical and thermal properties and partly due to its electrical properties, including a close......Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) is a relatively new concept for high efficiency solar cells that utilize not only the energy of electrons excited across the band gap by photons, as in conventional photovoltaic solar cells, but also the energy usual lost to thermalization of the excited...... to ideal band gap. The work function of silicon is, however, too high for practical PETE implementations. A well-known method for lowering the work function of silicon (and other materials) is to apply approximately a monolayer of cesium to the silicon surface. We present the first measurements of PETE...

  4. Life Testing and Diagnostics of a Planar Out-of-Core Thermionic Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Kevin L.; Ramalingam, Mysore L.; Young, Timothy J.; Lamp, Thomas R.

    1994-07-01

    This paper details the design and performance of an automated computer data acquisition system for a planar, out-of-core thermionic converter with CVD rhenium electrodes. The output characteristics of this converter have been mapped for emitter temperatures ranging from approximately 1700K to 2000K, and life testing of the converter is presently being performed at the design point of operation. An automated data acquisition system has been constructed to facilitate the collection of current density versus output voltage (J-V) and temperature data from the converter throughout the life test. This system minimizes the amount of human interaction necessary during the lifetest to measure and archive the data and present it in a usable form. The task was accomplished using a Macintosh Ilcx computer, two multiple-purpose interface boards, a digital oscilloscope, a sweep generator, and National Instrument's LabVIEW application software package.

  5. Thermionic cooling devices based on resonant-tunneling AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bescond, M.; Logoteta, D.; Michelini, F.; Cavassilas, N.; Yan, T.; Yangui, A.; Lannoo, M.; Hirakawa, K.

    2018-02-01

    We study by means of full quantum simulations the operating principle and performance of a semiconductor heterostructure refrigerator combining resonant tunneling filtering and thermionic emission. Our model takes into account the coupling between the electric and thermal currents by self-consistently solving the transport equations within the non-equilibrium Green’s function framework and the heat equation. We show that the device can achieve relatively high cooling power values, while in the considered implementation, the maximum lattice temperature drop is severely limited by the thermal conductivity of the constituting materials. In such an out-of-equilibrium structure, we then emphasize the significant deviation of the phonon temperature from its electronic counterpart which can vary over several hundred Kelvin. The interplay between those two temperatures and the impact on the electrochemical potential is also discussed. Finally, viable options toward an optimization of the device are proposed.

  6. Electric strength of metal-ceramic brazed units of thermionic energy converters in cesium vapours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belousenko, A.P.; Vasilchenko, A.V.; Nikolaev, Y.V.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation of electric strength characteristics of the hollow metal-ceramic brazed units of thermionic energy converters with the insulator 1 = 10-50 mm from polycrystal aluminum oxide at the temperature T = 450-750 degrees and the cesium vapour pressure P Cs = 10 - 1 -10 3 Pa has been carried out. The experimental dependencies of the break-down voltage of the brazed units on the temperature, parameter P Cs · 1 and the value of surface electric resistance of the insulators are given as well as the empiric equations obtained with the help of experimental data for calculating the break-down voltage. A mechanism of ceramic insulator influence on electric strength characteristics of the cesium gap is investigated. A breakdown model explaining this influence is proposed

  7. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boateng, A.A.; Mtui, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The Eulerarian-Eulerian multiphase model system described herein is a fluidized bed of sand externally heated to a predetermined temperature prior to introduction of agricultural biomass. We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis vapors, char and non-condensable (permanent) gases and confirm the observation that the kinetics are fast and that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds, and occupying two-thirds of the spatial volume of the reactor as widely reported in the open literature. The model could be advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors and their optimization to meet economic scales required for distributed or satellite units. - Highlights: ► We model the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed via CFD. ► We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis products. ► We confirm the experimental observation that the kinetics are fast. ► And that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds. ► The model is advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors.

  8. Nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F; George, B V; Baglin, C J

    1978-05-10

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given.

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  10. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  11. Reducing Energy Degradation Due to Back-bombardment Effect with Modulated RF Input in S-band Thermionic RF Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Toshiteru; Nakai, Yoko; Fukui, Toshio; Zen, Heishun; Kusukame, Kohichi; Okawachi, Norihito; Nakano, Masatsugu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Yamazaki, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Energy degradation due to back-bombardment effect is quite serious to produce high-brightness electron beam with long macro-pulse with thermionic rf gun. To avoid the back-bombardment problem, a laser photo cathode is used at many FEL facilities, but usually it costs high and not easy to operate. Thus we have studied long pulse operation of the rf gun with thermionic cathode, which is inexpensive and easy to operate compared to the photocathode rf gun. In this work, to reduce the energy degradation, we controlled input rf power amplitude by controlling pulse forming network of the power modulator for klystron. We have successfully increased the pulse duration up to 4 μs by increasing the rf power from 7.8 MW to 8.5 MW during the macro pulse.

  12. The design of a 3 GHz thermionic RF-gun and energy filter for MAX-lab

    CERN Document Server

    Anderberg, B; Demirkan, M; Eriksson, M; Malmgren, L; Werin, S

    2002-01-01

    A new pre-injector has been designed for the MAX-laboratory. It consists of an RF-gun and a magnetic energy filter. The newly designed RF-gun geometry will be operated at 3 GHz in the thermionic mode using a BaO cathode. The pre-injector will provide a 2.3 MeV electron beam in 3 ps micro pulses to a new injector system currently under construction.

  13. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Space dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corno, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical methods for Space Dynamics of fission reactors, are presented. It is shown how a few sample problems in space dynamics can be solved, within the one and two group diffusion model, by purely analytical tools, essentially based on Laplace transform and complex Green function techniques. A quite suggestive generalization of this approach, applicable to the fluid core reactors, whose fuel is undergoing a violent mixing, is reported and briefly discussed. (author)

  15. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Hatamiya, Shigeo; Kawasaki, Terufumi; Fukui, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Ryuhei; Murase, Michio; Naito, Masanori.

    1990-01-01

    In order to suppress the pressure elevation in a reactor container due to high temperature and high pressure steams jetted out upon pipeway rupture accidents in the reactor container, the steams are introduced to a pressure suppression chamber for condensating them in stored coolants. However, the ability for suppressing the pressure elevation and steam coagulation are deteriorated due to the presence of inactive incondensible gases. Then, there are disposed a vent channel for introducing the steams in a dry well to a pressure suppression chamber in the reactor pressure vessel, a closed space disposed at the position lower than a usual liquid level, a first channel having an inlet in the pressure suppression chamber and an exit in the closed space and a second means connected by way of a backflow checking means for preventing the flow directing to the closed space. The first paths are present by plurality, a portion of which constitutes a syphon. The incondensible gases and the steams are discharged to the dry well at high pressure by using the difference of the water head for a long cooling time after the pipeway rupture accident. Then, safety can be improved without using dynamic equipments as driving source. (N.H.)

  16. Annex VII - Diagrams: 1. Reactor operation (1960-1977); 2. Mean daily reactor power density in 1977; 3. Monthly reactor power for 1977; 4. percent of utilization of experimental space in 1977; Prilog VII - Dijagrami: 1. Rad reaktora (MWh) po godinama (1960-1977); 2. Srednja dnevna snaga reaktora u 1977. godini; 3. Rad reaktora (MWh) po mesecima za 1977. godinu i 4. Procenat iskoriscenja eksperimentalnog prostora u 1977. godini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-12-15

    This Annex includes the following diagrams: 1. Annual Reactor RA power production (MWh) for the period from 1960-1977; 2. Mean daily reactor power density MW in 1977; 3. Monthly reactor power production (MWh) for 1977; 4. percent of utilization of experimental space in 1977. [Serbo-Croat] Ovaj prilog sadrzi dijagrame: 1. Rad reaktora (MWh) po godinama (1960-1977); 2. Srednja dnevna snaga reaktora u 1977. godini; 3. Rad reaktora (MWh) po mesecima za 1977. godinu i 4. Procenat iskoriscenja eksperimentalnog prostora u 1977. godini.

  17. U.S.-Russian Cooperation in Science and Technology: A Case Study of the TOPAZ Space-Based Nuclear Reactor International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Richard S.

    2014-08-01

    The TOPAZ International Program (TIP) was the final name given to a series of projects to purchase and test the TOPAZ-II, a space-based nuclear reactor of a type that had been further developed in the Soviet Union than in the United States. In the changing political situation associated with the break-up of the Soviet Union it became possible for the United States to not just purchase the system, but also to employ Russian scientists, engineers and testing facilities to verify its reliability. The lessons learned from the TIP illuminate some of the institutional and cultural challenges to U.S. - Russian cooperation in technology research which remain true today.

  18. The determination of the space distribution, energy spectrum and dose parameters of thermal column beam resulting from swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Xie Jianlun; Leng Ruiping; Song Shushou; Su Jingling

    1991-01-01

    The axial and radial distribution, epithermal energy spectrum and dose equivalent rate of thermal column beam resulting from SPR have been determined in the Institute of Atomic Energy. The results show that the neutron fluence rate along the axial direction decreases as the distance increases outside the thermal column channel, and the trend of fluence rate attenuation follows approximately the inverse square law of a point source. When the reactor thermal power rate is 3 MW, at a distance of 50 cm to the channel, the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate are about 1.61 x 10 7 and 6.1 x 10 4 n/cm 2 · s respectively; dose equivalent rates are some 62 and 2.9 cSv/h respectively. At the end of the chennal, γ dose equivalent rate is 60 cSv/h or so

  19. Nuclear power in space. Use of reactors and radioactive substances as power sources in satellites and space probes; Kaernkraft i rymden. Anvaendningen av reaktorer och radioaktiva aemnen som kraftkaellor i satelliter och rymdsonder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoestbaeck, Lars

    2008-11-15

    Today solar panels are the most common technique to supply power to satellites. Solar panels will work as long as the power demand of the satellite is limited and the satellite can be equipped with enough panels, and kept in an orbit that allows enough sunlight to hit the panels. There are various types of space missions that do not fulfil these criteria. With nuclear power these types of missions can be powered regardless of the sunlight and as early as 1961 the first satellite with a nuclear power source was placed in orbit. Out of seventy known space missions that has made use of nuclear power, ten have had some kind of failure. In no case has the failure been associated with the nuclear technology used. This report discusses to what degree satellites with nuclear power are a source for potential radioactive contamination of Swedish territory. It is not a discussion for or against nuclear power in space. Neither is it an assessment of consequences if radioactive material from a satellite would reach the earth's surface. Historically two different kinds of Nuclear Power Sources (NPS) have been used to generate electric power in space. The first is the reactor where the energy is derived from nuclear fission of 235U and the second is the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) where electricity is generated from the heat of naturally decaying radionuclides. NPS has historically only been used in space by United States and the Soviet Union (and in one failing operation Russia). Nuclear Power Sources have been used in three types of space objects: satellites, space probes and moon/Mars vehicles. USA has launched one experimental reactor into orbit, all other use of NPS by the USA has been RTG:s. The Soviet Union, in contrast, only launched a few RTG:s but nearly forty reactors. The Soviet use of NPS is less transparent than the use in USA and some data published on Soviet systems are more or less well substantiated assessments. It is likely that also future

  20. The Properties of Binary and Ternary Ti Based Coatings Produced by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia Mandes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of the multicomponent thin films (binary: Ti-C; Ti-Ag and ternary: Ti-C-Ag; Ti-C-Al were fabricated by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA technology in order to study the wear resistance and the anticorrosion properties. The effects of Ti amount on the microstructure, tribological and morphological properties were subsequently investigated. TVA is an original deposition method using a combination of anodic arc and electron gun systems for the growth of films. The samples were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM and a transmission electron microscope (TEM accompanied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED. Tribological properties were studied by a ball-on-disc tribometer in the dry regime and the wettability was assessed by measuring the contact angle with the See System apparatus. Wear Rate results indicate an improved sliding wear behavior for Ti-C-Ag: 1.31 × 10−7 mm3/N m (F = 2 N compared to Ti-C-Al coating wear rate: 4.24 × 10−7 mm3/N m. On the other hand, by increasing the normal load to 3 N an increase to the wear rate was observed for Ti-C-Ag: 2.58 × 10−5 mm3 compared to 2.33 × 10−6 mm3 for Ti-C-Al coating.

  1. Characterization of sputter deposited thin film scandate cathodes for miniaturized thermionic converter applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadil, Kevin R.; Ruffner, Judith H.; King, Donald B.

    1999-01-01

    We have successfully developed a method for fabricating scandate-based thermionic emitters in thin film form. The primary goal of our effort is to develop thin film emitters that exhibit low work function, high intrinsic electron emissivity, minimum thermal activation properties and that can be readily incorporated into a microgap converter. Our approach has been to incorporate BaSrO into a Sc2O3 matrix using rf sputtering to produce thin films. Diode testing has shown the resulting films to be electron emissive at temperatures as low as 900 K with current densities of 0.1 mA.cm-2 at 1100 K and saturation voltages. We calculate an approximate maximum work function of 1.8 eV and an apparent emission constant (Richardson's constant, A*) of 36 mA.cm-2.K-2. Film compositional and structural analysis shows that a significant surface and subsurface alkaline earth hydroxide phase can form and probably explains the limited utilization and stability of Ba and its surface complexes. The flexibility inherent in sputter deposition suggests alternate strategies for eliminating undesirable phases and optimizing thin film emitter properties.

  2. Development of a thermionic magnicon amplifier at 11.4 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, S.H.; Hafizi, B.; Fliflet, A.W.; Kinkead, A.K.; True, R.

    1997-01-01

    The magnicon is a scanning-beam microwave amplifier tube that is being developed as an rf source for the proposed TeV Next Linear Collider. In it, a solid electron beam is spun up to high transverse momentum in a series of deflection cavities containing synchronously rotating TM modes, and then spun down again in an output cavity whose mode is synchronous with that of the deflection cavities. A recent magnicon experiment at NRL, using a ∼ 650 kV, 225 A, 5.5-mm-diam. electron beam produced from a cold cathode driven by a single-shot Marx generator, demonstrated 14 MW (±3 dB) at 11.12 GHz with 105 efficiency in the synchronous magnicon mode, but was limited by plasma loading in the deflection cavities to a regime in which the last cavity of the deflection system (the penultimate cavity) was unstable. A new 11.4 GHz rep-rated thermionic magnicon experiment is being assembled, using an advanced ultra-high-convergence electron gun driven by a 10 Hz, 1.5 microsecond modulator top produce a 500 kV, 210 A, 2-mm diameter electron beam. The magnicon circuit has been optimized for minimum surface rf fields and maximum efficiency, and will be engineered for high temperature bakeout and high vacuum operation. This experiment should begin operation in the Summer of 1997. The predicted power is 60 MW at ∼ 60% efficiency

  3. Development of a novel thermionic RF electron gun applied on a compact THz-FEL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T. N.; Pei, Y. J.; Qin, B.; Liu, K. F.; Feng, G. Y.

    2018-04-01

    The current requirements from civil and commercial applications lead to the development of compact free-electron laser (FEL)-based terahertz (THz) radiation sources. A picosecond electron gun plays an important role in an FEL-THz facility and attracts significant attention, as machine performance is very sensitive to initial conditions. A novel thermionic gun with an external cathode (EC) and two independently tunable cavities (ITCs) has been found to be a promising alternative to conventional electron sources due to its remarkable characteristics, and correspondingly an FEL injector can achieve a balance between a compact layout and high brightness benefitting from the velocity bunching properties and RF focusing effects in the EC-ITC gun. Nevertheless, the EC-ITC gun has not been extensively examined as part of the FEL injector in the past years. In this regard, to fill this gap, a development focusing on the experimental setup of an FEL injector based on an EC-ITC gun is described in detail. Before assembly, dynamic beam simulations were performed to investigate the optimal mounting position for the Linac associated with the focusing coils, and a suitable radio-frequency (RF) system was established based on a power coupling design and allocation. The testing bench proved to be fully functional through basic experiments using typical diagnostic approaches for estimating primary parameters. Associated with dynamic beam calculations, a performance evaluation for an EC-ITC gun was established while providing indirect testing results for an FEL injector.

  4. Some properties of low-vapor-pressure braze alloys for thermionic converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    Density, dc electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and linear thermal expansion are measured for arc-melted rod-shaped samples of binary eutectics of Zr, Hf, Ru, Nb, Ir, Mo, Ta, Os, Re, and W selected as very-low-pressure braze fillers for thermionic converters. The first two properties are measured at 296 K for Zr-21.7 at% Ru, Zr-13 wt% W, Zr-19 wt% W, Zr-22.3 at% Nb, Nb-66.9 at% Ru, Hf-25.3 wt% Re, Zr-25.7 at% Ta, Hf-22.5 at% W, and Nb-35 wt% Mo. The last property is measured from 293 K to 2/3 melting point for specified alloys of different compositions. Resistivities of 0.000055 to 0.000181 ohm-cm are observed with the alloys having resistivities about ten times that of the less resistive constituent metal and about three times that of the more resistive constituent metal, except for Zr-19 wt% W and Nb-35 wt% Mo (greater resistivities). Thermal expansion coefficients vary from 0.000006 to 0.0000105/K. All brazes exhibit linear thermal expansion near that of their constituent metals.

  5. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-01-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012 © . RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance

  6. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimjaem, S., E-mail: sakhorn.rimjaem@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012{sup ©}. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  7. Performance evaluation and parametric optimum design of a vacuum thermionic solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Tianjun; Chen, Xiaohang; Chen, Jincan; Lin, Bihong

    2016-01-01

    A model of the vacuum thermionic solar cell (VTSC) consisting of a solar concentrator, an emitter, and a collector is proposed, in which the various heat losses including the far- and near-field thermal radiation are taken into account. Formula for the overall efficiency of the system is analytically derived. For given values of the ratio of the front surface area of the absorber to that of the emitter and the vacuum gap between the emitter and the collector, the operating temperatures of the emitter and collector are determined by solving the energy balance equations. The maximum efficiency of the VTSC are calculated for given values of the work functions of the emitter and collector materials, and some key parameters such as the net current density of the VTSC, operating temperatures of the emitter and collector, vacuum gap between the emitter and the collector, and area ratio of the absorber to the emitter are optimally determined. Furthermore, the effects of the work functions and the concentration ratio of the solar irradiation on the performance of the VTSC are discussed and several parametric selection criteria are obtained

  8. RF study and 3-D simulations of a side-coupling thermionic RF-gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimjaem, S.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2014-02-01

    A thermionic RF-gun for generating ultra-short electron bunches was optimized, developed and used as a source at a linac-based THz radiation research laboratory of the Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The RF-gun is a π/2-mode standing wave structure, which consists of two S-band accelerating cells and a side-coupling cavity. The 2856 MHz RF wave is supplied from an S-band klystron to the gun through the waveguide input-port at the cylindrical wall of the second cell. A fraction of the RF power is coupled from the second cell to the first one via a side-coupling cavity. Both the waveguide input-port and the side-coupling cavity lead to an asymmetric geometry of the gun. RF properties and electromagnetic field distributions inside the RF-gun were studied and numerically simulated by using computer codes SUPERFISH 7.19 and CST Microwave Studio 2012©. RF characterizations and tunings of the RF-gun were performed to ensure the reliability of the gun operation. The results from 3D simulations and measurements are compared and discussed in this paper. The influence of asymmetric field distributions inside the RF-gun on the electron beam properties was investigated via 3D beam dynamics simulations. A change in the coupling-plane of the side-coupling cavity is suggested to improve the gun performance.

  9. Analysis of space and energy homogenization techniques for the solving of the neutron transport equation in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magat, Ph.

    1997-04-01

    Today neutron transport in PWR's core is routinely computed through the transport-diffusion(2 groups) scheme. This method gives satisfactory results for reactors operating in normal conditions but the 2 group diffusion approximation is unable to take into account interface effects or anisotropy. The improvement of this scheme is logically possible through the use of a simplified P N method (SP N ) for the modeling of the core. The comparison between S N calculations and SP N calculations shows an excellent agreement on eigenvalues as well as on power maps. We can notice that: -) it is no use extending the development beyond P 3 , there is no effect; -) the P 1 development is adequate; and -) the P 0 development is totally inappropriate. Calculations performed on the N4 core of the Chooz power plant have enabled us to compare diffusion operators with transport operators (SP 1 , SP 3 , SP 5 and SP 7 ). These calculations show that the implementation of the SP N method is feasible but the extra-costs in computation times and memory are important. We recommend: SP 5 P 1 calculations for heterogeneous 2-dimension geometry and SP 3 P 1 calculations for the homogeneous 3-dimension geometry. (A.C.)

  10. Close-Spaced High Temperature Knudsen Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-15

    study of discharge processes in Knudsen mode (collisionless), thermionic energy converters. Areas of research involve mechanism for reducing the...The mechanisms we have chosen to study are: reduction of space-charge through a very close inter- electrode gap (less than 10 microns); transport and...AD-AI4U 471 :NNTIM R~ A Rl M ,i; ,11 , i J)W R8 1070 1 I~ "i E~Hhhh IIt Ll ~ : RASOR ASSOCIATES, INC.- AFOSR.TR. 84-1070 NSR-22-2 CLOSE -SPACED HIGH

  11. The Markov chain method for solving dead time problems in the space dependent model of reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degweker, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    The discrete time Markov chain approach for deriving the statistics of time-correlated pulses, in the presence of a non-extending dead time, is extended to include the effect of space energy distribution of the neutron field. Equations for the singlet and doublet densities of follower neutrons are derived by neglecting correlations beyond the second order. These equations are solved by the modal method. It is shown that in the unimodal approximation, the equations reduce to the point model equations with suitably defined parameters. (author)

  12. RELAP5-3D version 4.0.3: installation and tests for applications to space reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Paulo D.C.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: plobo.a@uol.com.br, E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To attend the TERRA project (Tecnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados), currently conducted by the Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the IEAv, this work presents the RELAP5-3D, Version 4.0.3, prepared in July 12, 2012, also known as r3d403is, received recently by the IEAv from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This version of RELAP5-3D is configured for the International User Group source Code Group and is developed and maintained at the INL for the US Department of Energy. RELAP5-3D, the latest in the series of RELAP5 codes, is a highly generic code that, in addition to calculating the behavior of a reactor coolant system during a transient, can be used for simulation of a wide variety of hydraulic and thermal transients in both nuclear and nonnuclear systems involving mixtures of vapor, liquid, noncondensable gases, and nonvolatile solute. Enhancements include all features and models previously available in the ATHENA configuration version of the code which are as follows: addition of new work fluids and a magneto-hydrodynamic mode. Following the instructions from the README file, the RELAP5-3D, version 4.0.3 was installed creating the necessaries subdirectories, by using the LINUX platform and applying both Intel Fortran 95 and C-language compilers. Many input examples were executed and the same results were observed as compared to the received documentation. A sample of the Edwards-O'Brien test was evaluated to verify if the code could simulate a LOCA type accident properly. The test executed by the RELAP5-3D demonstrated good agreement with test data including a new output involving the mass flow during the test. (author)

  13. RELAP5-3D version 4.0.3: installation and tests for applications to space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Paulo D.C.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Borges, Eduardo M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2013-01-01

    To attend the TERRA project (Tecnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados), currently conducted by the Nuclear Energy Division (ENU) of the IEAv, this work presents the RELAP5-3D, Version 4.0.3, prepared in July 12, 2012, also known as r3d403is, received recently by the IEAv from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This version of RELAP5-3D is configured for the International User Group source Code Group and is developed and maintained at the INL for the US Department of Energy. RELAP5-3D, the latest in the series of RELAP5 codes, is a highly generic code that, in addition to calculating the behavior of a reactor coolant system during a transient, can be used for simulation of a wide variety of hydraulic and thermal transients in both nuclear and nonnuclear systems involving mixtures of vapor, liquid, noncondensable gases, and nonvolatile solute. Enhancements include all features and models previously available in the ATHENA configuration version of the code which are as follows: addition of new work fluids and a magneto-hydrodynamic mode. Following the instructions from the README file, the RELAP5-3D, version 4.0.3 was installed creating the necessaries subdirectories, by using the LINUX platform and applying both Intel Fortran 95 and C-language compilers. Many input examples were executed and the same results were observed as compared to the received documentation. A sample of the Edwards-O'Brien test was evaluated to verify if the code could simulate a LOCA type accident properly. The test executed by the RELAP5-3D demonstrated good agreement with test data including a new output involving the mass flow during the test. (author)

  14. Enhanced Thermionic Emission and Low 1/f Noise in Exfoliated Graphene/GaN Schottky Barrier Diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Kashid, Ranjit; Ghosh, Arindam; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    Temperature-dependent electrical transport characteristics of exfoliated graphene/GaN Schottky diodes are investigated and compared with conventional Ni/GaN Schottky diodes. The ideality factor of graphene/GaN and Ni/GaN diodes are measured to be 1.33 and 1.51, respectively, which is suggestive of comparatively higher thermionic emission current in graphene/GaN diode. The barrier height values for graphene/GaN diode obtained using thermionic emission model and Richardson plots are found to be 0.60 and 0.72 eV, respectively, which are higher than predicted barrier height ∼0.40 eV as per the Schottky-Mott model. The higher barrier height is attributed to hole doping of graphene due to graphene-Au interaction which shifts the Fermi level in graphene by ∼0.3 eV. The magnitude of flicker noise of graphene/GaN Schottky diode increases up to 175 K followed by its decrease at higher temperatures. This indicates that diffusion currents and barrier inhomogeneities dominate the electronic transport at lower and higher temperatures, respectively. The exfoliated graphene/GaN diode is found to have lower level of barrier inhomogeneities than conventional Ni/GaN diode, as well as earlier reported graphene/GaN diode fabricated using chemical vapor deposited graphene. The lesser barrier inhomogeneities in graphene/GaN diode results in lower flicker noise by 2 orders of magnitude as compared to Ni/GaN diode. Enhanced thermionic emission current, lower level of inhomogeneities, and reduced flicker noise suggests that graphene-GaN Schottky diodes may have the underlying trend for replacing metal-GaN Schottky diodes.

  15. Irradiation behaviour of UO2/Mo porous cermets for thermionic converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stora, J.P.; Kauffmann, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Two types of UO 2 Mo porous cernets have been fabricated and irradiated in a Cythere irradiation device. The first cermet is constituted by little bits of dense fuel in which the two constituants are finely dispersed. The whole open porosity is located between the granules. This type of cermet is called breche (33.4vol%UO 2 , 51vol%Mo, 14.8vol%porosity). At the end of the irradiation the burn up was 19000MWd/t(U) and neither swelling of the cermet nor deformation of the can were noted. On the contrary, a shrinkage of the emitter was observed attributed to a fuel densification under irradiation. The second type of cermet is called macrogranule (36vol%UO 2 , 49vol%Mo 15vol%porosity). UO 2 granules of 0.07cm mean diameter are dispersed in the molybdenum matrix. The porosity is regularly distributed all around the UO 2 kernels. The post irradiation metrology shows that the emitter is fairly stable. Only a slight ovalisation of about 0.5% was noted, but the granules of UO 2 were redistributed inside the molybdenum matrix, overlapping the metallic cavity by a condensation-evaporation process. The matrix has crept into the central void and consequently the volume has grown and the whole porosity has increased from about 15% to about 23%. This creeping is due to the fission gas pressure in the molybdenum cavities after 3000 hours of irradiation. In conclusion two types of cermets have shown good behaviour under irradiation and should allow lifetimes of several thousand hours of operation for thermionic fuel elements [fr

  16. Transition to chaos in periodically driven thermionic diodes at low pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, T.; Timm, R.; Piel, A.

    1992-01-01

    The static I(U) characteristic of thermionic diodes at mbar pressures shows a large hysteresis, which describes the transition from the 'anode-glow-mode' (AGM), with essentially negative plasma potential, to the 'temperature-limited-mode' (TLM), with positive plasma potential. Many features of these modes are also found in magnetic-box discharges with filament cathodes at pressures of 10 -2 -10 -1 Pa. Although these two pressure regimes are basically different concerning the transport properties (diffusion vs. free streaming), the elementary processes that establish the AGM in the low pressure regime are very similar to the high pressure regime. Ions are produced in that part of the anode sheath where the potential exceeds the ionization energy. The production rate is enhanced by multiple reflections of electrons between the magnetic fields of the permanent magnet array at the anode and the repulsive potential of the cathode plasma. Although the mean free path for charge exchange or elastic collisions substantially exceeds the anode-cathode distance, some few ions are stopped and trapped within the potential well of the virtual cathode. This accumulation of ions forms a cathodic plasma, which is essentially at cathode potential. Plasma formation in the anode sheath is suppressed as long as the ion production time is larger than the ion transit time through the sheath. These model ideas are supported by 1d-Particle-in-cell simulations using a modified PDP1-code. The AGM is attractive for studies of nonlinear dynamics because of its feedback processes and oscillations, which occur close to the hysteresis point. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  17. A program-management plan with critical-path definition for Combustion Augmentation with Thermionic Energy Conversion (CATEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.; Merrill, O. S.; Reddy, H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) is discussed. In recent TEC-topping analyses, overall plant efficiency (OPE) and cost of electricity (COE) improved slightly with current capabilities and substantially with fully matured technologies. Enhanced credibility derives from proven hot-corrosion protection for TEC by silicon-carbide clads in fossil fuel combustion products. Combustion augmentation with TEC (CATEC) affords minimal cost and plant perturbation, but with smaller OPE and COE improvements than more conventional topping applications. Risk minimization as well as comparative simplicity and convenience, favor CATEC for early market penetration. A program-management plan is proposed. Inputs, characteristics, outputs and capabilities are discussed.

  18. The effect of samarium doping on structure and enhanced thermionic emission properties of lanthanum hexaboride fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shenlin; Hu, Qianglin [College of Mathematics and Physics, Jinggangshan University, Jian (China); Zhang, Jiuxing; Liu, Danmin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Ministry of Education, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing (China); Huang, Qingzhen [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, MD (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Single-phase polycrystalline solid solutions (La{sub 1-x}Sm{sub x})B{sub 6} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1) are fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS). This study demonstrates a systematic investigation of structure-property relationships in Sm-doped LaB{sub 6} ternary rare-earth hexaborides. The microstructure, crystallographic orientation, electrical resistivity, and thermionic emission performance of these compounds are investigated. Analysis of the results indicates that samarium (Sm) doping has a noticeable effect on the structure and performance of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}). The analytical investigation of the electron backscatter diffraction confirms that (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} exhibits a clear (001) texture that results in a low work function. Work functions are determined by pulsed thermionic diode measurements at 1500-1873 K. The (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} possesses improved thermionic emission properties compared to LaB{sub 6}. The current density of (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} is 42.4 A cm{sup -2} at 1873 K, which is 17.5% larger than that of LaB{sub 6}. The values of Φ{sub R} for (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} and LaB{sub 6} are 1.98 ± 0.03 and 1.67 ± 0.03 eV, respectively. Furthermore, the Sm substitution of lanthanum (La) effectively increases the electrical resistivity. These results reveal that Sm doping lead to significantly enhanced thermionic emission properties of LaB{sub 6}. The compound (La{sub 0.6}Sm{sub 0.4})B{sub 6} appears most promising as a future emitter material. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF ELECTRON BACK-BOMBARDMENT INDUCED CURRENT INCREASE IN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Sun, Y. [Argonne; Harris, J. R. [AFRL, NM; Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    2016-09-28

    In this paper we derive analytical expressions for the output current of an un-gated thermionic cathode RF gun in the presence of back-bombardment heating. We provide a brief overview of back-bombardment theory and discuss comparisons between the analytical back-bombardment predictions and simulation models. We then derive an expression for the output current as a function of the RF repetition rate and discuss relationships between back-bombardment, fieldenhancement, and output current. We discuss in detail the relevant approximations and then provide predictions about how the output current should vary as a function of repetition rate for some given system configurations.

  20. A program-management plan with critical-path definition for Combustion Augmentation with Thermionic Energy Conversion (CATEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. F.; Merrill, O. S.; Reddy, H. K.

    Thermionic energy conversion (TEC) is discussed. In recent TEC-topping analyses, overall plant efficiency (OPE) and cost of electricity (COE) improved slightly with current capabilities and substantially with fully matured technologies. Enhanced credibility derives from proven hot-corrosion protection for TEC by silicon-carbide clads in fossil fuel combustion products. Combustion augmentation with TEC (CATEC) affords minimal cost and plant perturbation, but with smaller OPE and COE improvements than more conventional topping applications. Risk minimization as well as comparative simplicity and convenience, favor CATEC for early market penetration. A program-management plan is proposed. Inputs, characteristics, outputs and capabilities are discussed.

  1. Effect of the work function and emission of the collector on the parameters of thermionic converters (TC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaibyshev, V.Z.

    1986-01-01

    In the optimal, relative to the temperature of the collector, state of modern thermionic converters (TC) the emission of the electrons from it has a substantial effect on the voltage drop in the gap. This paper preents an analysis of the boundary conditions at the collector of the TC. Calculations are presented which show that with a constant current the plasma parameters at the boundary with the collector are virtually independent of the emission from the collector right up to vanishing of the potential jump. The optimal regime with respect to temperatuer and work function of the collector is examined. The collector with a nonuniform work function is discussed

  2. Design, construction and measurements of an alpha magnet as a solution for compact bunch compressor for the electron beam from Thermionic RF Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, A.; Jazini, J.; Fathi, M.; Sharifian, M.; Shokri, B.

    2018-03-01

    The beam produced by a thermionic RF gun has wide energy spread that makes it unsuitable for direct usage in photon sources. Here in the present work, we optimize the extracted beam from a thermionic RF gun by a compact economical bunch compressor. A compact magnetic bunch compressor (Alpha magnet) is designed and constructed. A comparison between simulation results and experimental measurements shows acceptable conformity. The beam dynamics simulation results show a reduction of the energy spread as well as a compression of length less than 1 ps with 2.3 mm-mrad emittance.

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  4. Space Synthetic Biology (SSB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project focused on employing advanced biological engineering and bioelectrochemical reactor systems to increase life support loop closure and in situ resource...

  5. Recovery of resources for advanced life support space applications: effect of retention time on biodegradation of two crop residues in a fed-batch, continuous stirred tank reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, R. F.; Finger, B. W.; Alazraki, M. P.; Cook, K.; Garland, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Bioreactor retention time is a key process variable that will influence costs that are relevant to long distance space travel or long duration space habitation. However. little is known about the effects of this parameter on the microbiological treatment options that are being proposed for Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. Two bioreactor studies were designed to examine this variable. In the first one, six retention times ranging from 1.3 to 21.3 days--were run in duplicate, 81 working-volume continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR) that were fed ALS wheat residues. Ash-free dry weight loss, carbon mineralization, soluble TOC reduction, changes in fiber content (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin), bacterial numbers, and mineral recoveries were monitored. At short retention times--1.33 days--biodegradation was poor (total: 16-20%, cellulose - 12%, hemicellulose - 28%) but soluble TOC was decreased by 75-80% and recovery of major crop inorganic nutrients was adequate, except for phosphorus. A high proportion of the total bacteria (ca. 83%) was actively respiring. At the longest retention time tested, 21.3 days, biodegradation was good (total: 55-60%, cellulose ca. 70%, hemicellulose - ca. 55%) and soluble TOC was decreased by 80%. Recovery of major nutrients, except phosphorus, remained adequate. A very low proportion of total bacteria was actively respiring (ca. 16%). The second bioreactor study used potato residue to determine if even shorter retention times could be used (range 0.25-2.0 days). Although overall biodegradation deteriorated, the degradation of soluble TOC continued to be ca. 75%. We conclude that if the goal of ALS bioprocessing is maximal degradation of crop residues, including cellulose, then retention times of 10 days or longer will be needed. If the goal is to provide inorganic nutrients with the smallest volume/weight bioreactor possible, then a retention time of 1 day (or less) is sufficient.

  6. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  7. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  8. Particle Simulations of a Thermionic RF Gun with Gridded Triode Structure for Reduction of Back-Bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Kusukame, K; Kii, T; Masuda, K; Nakai, Y; Ohgaki, H; Yamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, K; Zen, H

    2005-01-01

    Thermionic RF guns show advantageous features compared with photocathode ones such as easy operation and much higher repetition rate of micropulses, both of which are suitable for their application to high average power FELs. They however suffer from the back-bombardment effect [1], i.e., in conventional RF guns, electrons are extracted from cathode also in the latter half of accelerating phase and tend to back-stream to hit the cathode, and as a result the macropulse duration is limited down to severalμsec Against this adverse effect in thermionic RF guns, introduction of the triode structure has been proposed [2], where the accelerating phase and amplitude nearby the cathode can be controlled regardless of the phase of the first accelerating cell in the conventional RF gun. Our one-dimensional particle simulation results predict that the back-bombardment power can be reduced by 99 % only with 30-40 kW RF power fed to the grid in the present triode structure with an optimal phase difference from th...

  9. New experimental space for irradiating samples by RA reactor fast neutron flux at temperatures up to 100 deg C; Novi eksperimentalni prostori namenjeni ozracivanju uzoraka u fluksu brzih neutrona na temperaturama do 100{sup 0} C na reaktoru RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavicevic, M; Novakovic, M; Zecevic, V [Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences, Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to present adaptation of the RA reactor which would enable samples irradiation by fast neutrons and describe new experimental possibilities. New experimental space was achieved using hollow fuel elements which have been reconstructed to enable placement of irradiation capsules inside the tube. This paper includes thermal analysis and describes problems related to operation, safety and radiation protection issues which arise from using reconstructed fuel elements.

  10. Simplified methodology for control cell constant calculations of the reactor cores for the space kinetics; Metodologia simplificada para calculos das constantes das celulas de controles dos nucleos de reatores para a cinetica espacial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Rubens Souza dos [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Alvim, Antonio Carlos Marques [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In this work is presented a methodology which focuses the distribution of neutron absorber rods in nuclear reactor power plants, for utilizing in space kinetic calculations, principally in the cluster ejection transients of control rods. A numerical model for macroscopic constant calculations based on the knowledge of the neutron flux without the control rods is proposed, as alternative to the analytical models, based on the hypothesis of the null current on the cell super boundaries. The proposed model in this work has itself showed adequate to deal with problems with strong space dependence, once that the model showed consistence in the global average built in the analytical model. (author)

  11. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  12. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  13. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  14. Temperature dependence of photon-enhanced thermionic emission from GaAs surface with nonequilibrium Cs overlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, A.G. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Pr. Lavrentieva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova, 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Alperovich, V.L., E-mail: alper@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Pr. Lavrentieva, 13, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova, 2, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Electronic properties of Cs/GaAs surface are studied at elevated temperatures. • Heating to ∼100 °C strongly affects photoemission current and surface band bending. • For θ < 0.4 ML photoemission current relaxation is due to band bending. • A spectral proof of the PETE process is obtained at Cs/GaAs thermal cycling. - Abstract: The temperature influence on the Cs/GaAs surface electronic properties, which determine the photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE), is studied. It was found that heating to moderate temperatures of about 100 °C leads to substantial changes in the magnitude and shape of Cs coverage dependences of photoemission current and surface band bending, along with the changes of relaxation kinetics after Cs deposition. A spectral proof of the PETE process is obtained under thermal cycling of the Cs/GaAs surface with 0.45 monolayer (ML) of Cs.

  15. Sodium-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammers, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a sodium-cooled nuclear reactor, whose reactor tank contains the primary circuit, shielding surrounding the reactor core and a primary/secondary heat exchanger, particularly a fast breeder reactor on the module principle. In order to achieve this module principle it is proposed to have electromagnetic circulating pumps outside the reactor tank, where the heat exchanger is accomodated in an annular case above the pumps. This case has several openings at the top end to the space above the reactor core, some smaller openings in the middle to the same space and is connected at the bottom to an annular space between the tank wall and the reactor core. As a favoured variant, it is proposed that the annular electromagnetic pumps should be arranged concentrically to the reactor tank, where there is an annual duct on the inside of the reactor tank. In this way the sodium-cooled nuclear reactor is made suitable as a module with a large number of such elements. (orig.) [de

  16. Reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1992-01-01

    A cooling space having a predetermined capacity is formed between a reactor container and concrete walls. A circulation loop disposed to the outside of the concrete walls is connected to the top and the bottom of the cooling space. The circulation loop has a circulation pump and a heat exchanger, and a cooling water supply pipe is connected to the upstream of the circulation pump for introducing cooling water from the outside. Upon occurrence of loss of coolant accident, cooling water is introduced from the cooling water supply pipe to the cooling space between the reactor container and the concrete walls after shut-down of the reactor operation. Then, cooling water is circulated while being cooled by the heat exchanger, to cool the reactor container by cooling water flown in the cooling space. This can cool the reactor container in a short period of time upon occurrence of the loss of coolant accident. Accordingly, a repairing operation for a ruptured portion can be conducted rapidly. (I.N.)

  17. Nuclear reactor installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, W.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor installation includes a pressurized-water coolant reactor vessel and a concrete biological shield surrounding this vessel. The shield forms a space between it and the vessel large enough to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant therefrom in the event the vessel ruptures. Struts extend radially between the vessel and shield for a distance permitting normal radial thermal movement of the vessel, while containing the vessel in the event it ruptures, the struts being interspaced from each other to permit rapid escape of the pressurized-water coolant from the space between the shield and the vessel

  18. Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehan, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Support utilization of the RINSC reactor for student and faculty instructions and research. The Department of Energy award has provided financial assistance during the period 9/29/1995 to 5/31/2001 to support the utilization of the Rhode Island Nuclear Science Center (RINSC) reactor for student and faculty instruction and research by non-reactor owning educational institutions within approximately 300 miles of Narragansett, Rhode Island. Through the reactor sharing program, the RINSC (including the reactor and analytical laboratories) provided reactor services and laboratory space that were not available to the other universities and colleges in the region. As an example of services provided to the users: Counting equipment, laboratory space, pneumatic and in-pool irradiations, demonstrations of sample counting and analysis, reactor tours and lectures. Funding from the Reactor Sharing Program has provided the RINSC to expand student tours and demonstration programs that emphasized our long history of providing these types of services to the universities and colleges in the area. The funding have also helped defray the cost of the technical assistance that the staff has routinely provided to schools, individuals and researchers who have called on the RINSC for resolution of problems relating to nuclear science. The reactor has been featured in a Public Broadcasting System documentary on Pollution in the Arctic and how a University of Rhode Island Professor used Neutron Activation Analysis conducted at the RINSC to discover the sources of the ''Arctic Haze''. The RINSC was also featured by local television on Earth Day for its role in environmental monitoring

  19. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftergood, S.; Hafemeister, D.W.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Primack, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space

  20. Reactor-core-reactivity control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Teruo; Sakuranaga, Tomonobu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the reactor safety upon failures of control rod drives by adapting a control rod not to drop out accidentally from the reactor core but be inserted into the reactor core. Constitution: The control rod is entered or extracted as usual from the bottom of the pressure vessel. A space is provided above the reactor core within the pressure vessel, in which the moving scope of the control rod is set between the space above the reactor core and the reactor core. That is, the control rod is situated above the reactor core upon extraction thereof and, if an accident occurs to the control rod drive mechanisms to detach the control rod and the driving rod, the control rod falls gravitationally into the reactor core to improve the reactor safety. In addition, since the speed limiter is no more required to the control rod, the driving force can be decreased to reduce the size of the rod drive mechanisms. (Ikeda, J.)

  1. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  2. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  3. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  4. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  5. Calculation of neutron spectra in the reactor cell of the RA experimental reactor in Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.; Altiparmakov, D.; Marinkovic, N.

    1974-01-01

    In the frame of neutron properties of RA experimental reactor the study of energy neutron spectra in the reactor cell are planned. Complex reactor cell geometry, nine cylindrical regions causes high space-energy variations of neutron flux with a significant gradient both in energy and space variables. Treatment of such a complex problem needs adequate methodology which ensures reliable results and control of accuracy. This paper describes in detail the method for calculating group constants based on lattice cell calculation for the need of calculation of reactor core parameters. In 26 group approximation for the energy region from 0 - 10.5 MeV, values of neutron spectra are obtained in 18 space points chosen to describe, with high accuracy, integral reactor cell parameters of primary importance for the reactor core calculation. Obtained space-energy distribution of neutron flux in the reactor cell is up to now unique in the study of neutron properties of Ra reactor [sr

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  7. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  8. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  9. Injection of holes at indium tin oxide/dendrimer interface: An explanation with new theory of thermionic emission at metal/organic interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yingquan; Lu Feiping

    2006-01-01

    The traditional theory of thermionic emission at metal/inorganic crystalline semiconductor interfaces is no longer applicable for the interface between a metal and an organic semiconductor. Under the assumption of thermalization of hot carriers in the organic semiconductor near the interface, a theory for thermionic emission of charge carriers at metal/organic semiconductor interfaces is developed. This theory is used to explain the experimental result from Samuel group [J.P.J. Markham, D.W. Samuel, S.-C. Lo, P.L. Burn, M. Weiter, H. Baessler, J. Appl. Phys. 95 (2004) 438] for the injection of holes from indium tin oxide into the dendrimer based on fac-tris(2-phenylpyridyl) iridium(III)

  10. Development of a thermionic magnicon amplifier at 11.4 GHz. Technical progress report, 16 May 1994--31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, S.H.; Fliflet, A.W.; Manheimer, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This is a progress report on a four-year research program entitled 'Development of a Thermionic Magnicon Amplifier at 11.4 GHz', which is under way in the Plasma Physics Division of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE-AI02-94ER40681. This report covers the period 16 May 1994 through 31 December 1995. The magnicon is an advanced microwave tube with potential application to future high gradient linear accelerators such as TeV colliders. Under this program, NRL plans to build and test a thermionic magnicon amplifier tube powered by a 500 kV, 200 A, 10 Hz modulator with a 1 μsec pulse. However, the experiments that were carried out during the period covered by this report were driven by a single-shot Marx generator, and the electron beam was produced from a graphite plasma cathode

  11. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  12. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Responses and mechanisms of positive electron affinity molecules in the N2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector and the electron-capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Very little knowledge has been acquired in the past on the mechanistic pathway by which molecules respond in the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector. An attempt is made here to elucidate the response mechanism of the detector. The basic response mechanisms are known for the electron capture detector, and an attempt is made to identify the certain mechanism by which selected molecules respond. The resonance electron capture rate constant has been believed to be temperature independent, and investigations of the temperature dependence of electron capture responses are presented. Mechanisms for the N 2 mode of the thermionic ionization detector have been proposed by examining the detector response to positive electron affinity molecules and by measurement of the ions produced by the detector. Electron capture mechanisms for selected molecules have been proposed by examining their temperature dependent responses in the electron capture detector and negative ion mass spectra of the samples. In studies of the resonance electron capture rate constant, the relative responses of selected positive electron affinity molecules and their temperature dependent responses were investigated. Positive electron affinity did not guarantee large responses in the N 2 mode thermionic ionization detector. High mass ions were measured following ionization of samples in the detector. Responses in the electron capture detector varied with temperature and electron affinity

  14. Fermi level splitting and thermionic current improvement in low-dimensional multi-quantum-well (MQW) p-i-n structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varonides, Argyrios C.

    2006-01-01

    Photo-excitation and subsequent thermionic currents are essential components of photo-excited carrier transport in multi-quantum-well photovoltaic (hetero-PV) structures. p-i-n multi-quantum structures are useful probes for a better understanding of PV device properties. Illumination of the intrinsic region of p-i-n multi-structures causes carrier trapping in any of the quantum wells, and subsequent carrier recombination or thermal escape is possible. At the vicinity of a quantum well, we find that the (quasi) Fermi levels undergo an upward split by a small, but non-negligible, energy amount ΔE F in the order of 12 meV. We conclude this fact by comparing the photo-excited carriers trapped in a quantum well, under illumination, to the carrier concentrations under dark. Based on such a prediction, we subsequently relate thermionic current density dependence on Fermi level splitting, concluding that excess thermal currents may increase by a factor of the order of 2. We conclude that illumination causes (a) Fermi level separation and (b) an apparent increase in thermionic currents

  15. Development of a high temperature solar receiver for high-efficient thermionic conversion systems; Fukugo netsuden henkan system yo chokoon taiyo junetsuki no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeoka, T; Naito, H; Yugami, H; Arashi, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-27

    For thermionic conversion systems (TIC) using concentrated sunlight as heat source, the newly developed solar receiver was tested. Concentrated sunlight aims at the inner surface of the cavity type solar receiver. The emitter of TIC installed in the rear of the solar receiver is uniformly heated over 1700K by thermal radiation from the rear of the solar receiver, emitting thermion. Electric power is generated by collecting the thermion by collector. Mo is used as emitter material, however, because of poor heat absorption of Mo, high-absorptive TiC is used for heat absorption surface to heat Mo by thermal conduction from high-temperature TiC. Functionally gradient material (FGM) with an intermediate layer of gradient TiC/Mo ratios between TiC and Mo is used as emitter material. The emitter is thus uniformly heated at high temperatures of 1723{plus_minus}12K. As a result, the developed solar receiver is applicable to heat the emitter of TIC. Heat flux measurement at the graphite cavity clarified that cavity temperature of as high as 1780K and heat flow of 50W/cm{sup 2} are obtained at 4.7kW in input. 6 figs.

  16. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  17. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  18. Determining space-energy distribution of thermal neutrons in heterogeneous cylindrically symmetric reactor cell, Master Thesis; Odredjivanje prostorno energetske raspodele fluksa termalnih neutrona u heterogenoj cilindricno simetricnoj reaktorskoj celiji, Magistarski rad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matausek, M V [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1966-06-15

    A combination of multigroup method and P{sub 3} approximation of spherical harmonics method was chosen for calculating space-energy distribution of thermal neutron flux in elementary reactor cell. Application of these methods reduced solution of complicated transport equation to the problem of solving an inhomogeneous system of six ordinary firs-order differential equations. A procedure is proposed which avoids numerical solution and enables analytical solution when applying certain approximations. Based on this approach, computer codes were written for ZUSE-Z-23 computer: SIGMA code for calculating group constants for a given material; MULTI code which uses results of SIGMA code as input and calculates spatial ana energy distribution of thermal neutron flux in a reactor cell. Calculations of thermal neutron spectra for a number of reactor cells were compared to results available from literature. Agreement was satisfactory in all the cases, which proved the correctness of the applied method. Some possibilities for improving the precision and acceleration of the calculation process were found during calculation. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  20. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)