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Sample records for thermally disordered lh2

  1. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  2. Thermal test of the insulation structure for LH 2 tank by using the large experimental apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, S.; Onishi, K.; Konshima, N.; Nishigaki, K.

    Conceptual designs of large mass LH 2 (liquid hydrogen) storage systems, whose capacity is 50,000 m3, have been studied in the Japanese hydrogen project, World Energy Network (WE-NET) [K. Fukuda, in: WE-NET Hydrogen Energy Symposium, 1999, P1-P41]. This study has concluded that their thermal insulation structures for the huge LH 2 tanks should be developed. Their actual insulation structures comprise not only the insulation material but also reinforced members and joints. To evaluate their thermal performance correctly, a large test specimen including reinforced members and joints will be necessary. After verifying the thermal performance of a developed large experimental apparatus [S. Kamiya, Cryogenics 40 (1) (2000) 35] for measuring the thermal conductance of various insulation structures, we tested two specimens, a vacuum multilayer insulation (MLI) with a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) support and a vacuum solid insulation (microtherm ®) with joints. The thermal background test for verifying the thermal design of the experimental apparatus showed that the background heat leak is 0.1 W, small enough to satisfy apparatus performance requirement. The thermal conductance measurements of specimens also showed that thermal heat fluxes of MLI with a GFRP support and microtherm ® are 8 and 5.4 W/m2, respectively.

  3. Thermal stratification in LH2 tank of cryogenic propulsion stage tested in ISRO facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, M.; Raj, R. Edwin; Narayanan, V.

    2017-02-01

    Liquid oxygen and hydrogen are used as oxidizer and fuel respectively in cryogenic propulsion system. These liquids are stored in foam insulated tanks of cryogenic propulsion system and are pressurized using warm pressurant gas supplied for tank pressure maintenance during cryogenic engine operation. Heat leak to cryogenic propellant tank causes buoyancy driven liquid stratification resulting in formation of warm liquid stratum at liquid free surface. This warm stratum is further heated by the admission of warm pressurant gas for tank pressurization during engine operation. Since stratified layer temperature has direct bearing on the cavitation free operation of turbo pumps integrated in cryogenic engine, it is necessary to model the thermal stratification for predicting stratified layer temperature and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation. These inputs are required for estimating the minimum pressure to be maintained by tank pressurization system. This paper describes configuration of cryogenic stage for ground qualification test, stage hot test sequence, a thermal model and its results for a foam insulated LH2 tank subjected to heat leak and pressurization with hydrogen gas at 200 K during liquid outflow at 38 lps for engine operation. The above model considers buoyancy flow in free convection boundary layer caused by heat flux from tank wall and energy transfer from warm pressurant gas etc. to predict temperature of liquid stratum and mass of stratified liquid in tank at the end of engine operation in stage qualification tests carried out in ISRO facility.

  4. A disordered polaron model for polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll antenna aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkunas, Gediminas; Freiberg, Arvi

    2006-01-01

    Excitonic polarons in antenna complexes are subject to static lattice disorder. A model has been developed to analyze polarized fluorescence excitation spectra of circular light-harvesting complexes from purple photosynthetic bacteria containing bacteriochlorophyll as the main photoactive pigment that includes both diagonal (energetic) and off-diagonal (structural) disorders. Essential differences of disorder realizations seem to exist between the core LH1 and peripheral LH2 complexes from the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The disorder in LH1 appears to be dominated by the structural disorder, while that in LH2, by energetic one. These differences may be due to relatively bigger size of the LH1 complex and, consequently, with its enhanced structural flexibility

  5. Molecular Level Design Principle behind Optimal Sizes of Photosynthetic LH2 Complex: Taming Disorder through Cooperation of Hydrogen Bonding and Quantum Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Rivera, Eva; Montemayor, Daniel

    2015-03-19

    The light harvesting 2 (LH2) antenna complex from purple photosynthetic bacteria is an efficient natural excitation energy carrier with well-known symmetric structure, but the molecular level design principle governing its structure-function relationship is unknown. Our all-atomistic simulations of nonnatural analogues of LH2 as well as those of a natural LH2 suggest that nonnatural sizes of LH2-like complexes could be built. However, stable and consistent hydrogen bonding (HB) between bacteriochlorophyll and the protein is shown to be possible only near naturally occurring sizes, leading to significantly smaller disorder than for nonnatural ones. Extensive quantum calculations of intercomplex exciton transfer dynamics, sampled for a large set of disorder, reveal that taming the negative effect of disorder through a reliable HB as well as quantum delocalization of the exciton is a critical mechanism that makes LH2 highly functional, which also explains why the natural sizes of LH2 are indeed optimal.

  6. Thermal Design of Vapor Cooling of Flight Vehicle Structures Using LH2 Boil-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Zoeckler, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Using hydrogen boil-off vapor to cool the structure of a flight vehicle cryogenic upper stage can reduce heat loads to the stage and increase the usable propellant in the stage or extend the life of the stage. The hydrogen vapor can be used to absorb incoming heat as it increases in temperature before being vented overboard. In theory, the amount of heat leaking into the hydrogen tank from the structure will be reduced if the structure is cooled using the propellant boil-off vapor. However, the amount of boil-off vapor available to be used for cooling and the reduction in heat leak to the propellant tank are dependent to each other. The amount of heat leak reduction to the LH2 tank also depends on the total heat load on the stage and the vapor cooling configurations.

  7. LH2 Airbus studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of work of the WP covers the 'Assessment of realistic prospects of LH 2 -usage in civil aviation', in detail: - Operational scenario for western Europe, - LH 2 cost development, - Investigations on a/c design and cryo systems, - Environmental impact of LH 2 -aircraft, - Cost estimate, - The way to a LH 2 fuelled aircraft. (orig.)

  8. Photovoltaic Performance and Characteristics of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Prepared with the N719 Thermal Degradation Products Ru(LH)(2)(NCS)(4-tert-butylpyridine) N(Bu)(4) and Ru(LH)(2)(NCS)(1-methylbenzimidazole) N(Bu)(4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, P. T.; Binh, X. T. L.; Andersen, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    The dye-sensitized solar cell N719 thermal degradation products [Ru(LH)(2)(NCS)(4-tert-butylpyridine)][N(Bu)(4)] (1) and [Ru(LH)(2)(NCS)(1-methylbenzimidazole)][N(Bu)(4)] (2) were synthesized from [Ru(LH)(2)(NCS)(2)][N(Bu)(4)](2) (N719), (L = 2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid) and characterized...

  9. Evidence of excited state localization and static disorder in LH2 investigated by 2D-polarization single-molecule imaging at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubasum, Sumera; Camacho, Rafael; Meyer, Matthias; Yadav, Dheerendra; Cogdell, Richard J; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2013-12-07

    Two-dimensional polarization fluorescence imaging of single light harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) of Rps. acidophila was carried out to investigate the polarization properties of excitation and fluorescence emission simultaneously, at room temperature. In two separate experiments we excited LH2 with a spectrally narrow laser line matched to the absorption bands of the two chromophore rings, B800 and B850, thereby indirectly and directly triggering fluorescence of the B850 exciton state. A correlation analysis of the polarization modulation depths in excitation and emission for a large number of single complexes was performed. Our results show, in comparison to B800, that the B850 ring is a more isotropic absorber due to the excitonic nature of its excited states. At the same time, we observed a strong tendency for LH2 to emit with dipolar character, from which preferential localization of the emissive exciton, stable for minutes, is inferred. We argue that the observed effects can consistently be explained by static energetic disorder and/or deformation of the complex, with possible involvement of exciton self-trapping.

  10. Static and Dynamic Disorder in Bacterial Light-Harvesting Complex LH2: A 2DES Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius

    2014-07-10

    Two-dimensional coherent electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is a powerful technique in distinguishing homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening contributions to the spectral line shapes of molecular transitions induced by environment fluctuations. Using an excitonic model of a double-ring LH2 aggregate, we perform simulations of its 2DES spectra and find that the model of a harmonic environment cannot provide a consistent set of parameters for two temperatures: 77 K and room temperature. This indicates the highly anharmonic nature of protein fluctuations for the pigments of the B850 ring. However, the fluctuations of B800 ring pigments can be assumed as harmonic in this temperature range.

  11. LH2 airport requirements study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  12. High Specific Power Motors in LN2 and LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Trudell, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    A switched reluctance motor has been operated in liquid nitrogen (LN2) with a power density as high as that reported for any motor or generator. The high performance stems from the low resistivity of Cu at LN2 temperature and from the geometry of the windings, the combination of which permits steady-state rms current density up to 7000 A/sq cm, about 10 times that possible in coils cooled by natural convection at room temperature. The Joule heating in the coils is conducted to the end turns for rejection to the LN2 bath. Minimal heat rejection occurs in the motor slots, preserving that region for conductor. In the end turns, the conductor layers are spaced to form a heat-exchanger-like structure that permits nucleate boiling over a large surface area. Although tests were performed in LN2 for convenience, this motor was designed as a prototype for use with liquid hydrogen (LH2) as the coolant. End-cooled coils would perform even better in LH2 because of further increases in copper electrical and thermal conductivities. Thermal analyses comparing LN2 and LH2 cooling are presented verifying that end-cooled coils in LH2 could be either much longer or could operate at higher current density without thermal runaway than in LN2.

  13. Anchored LH2 complexes in 2D polarization imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubasum, Sumera; Sakai, Shunsuke; Dewa, Takehisa; Sundström, Villy; Scheblykin, Ivan G; Nango, Mamoru; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2013-09-26

    Protein is a soft material with inherently large structural disorder. Consequently, the bulk spectroscopies of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes provide averaged information where many details are lost. Here we report spectroscopy of single light-harvesting complexes where fluorescence excitation and detection polarizations are both independently rotated. Two samples of peripheral antenna (LH2) complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila were studied. In one, the complexes were embedded in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film; in the other, they were anchored on the glass surface and covered by the PVA film. LH2 contains two rings of pigment molecules-B800 and B850. The B800 excitation polarization properties of the two samples were found to be very similar, indicating that orientation statistics of LH2s are the same in these two very different preparations. At the same time, we found a significant difference in B850 emission polarization statistics. We conclude that the B850 band of the anchored sample is substantially more disordered. We argue that both B800 excitation and B850 emission polarization properties can be explained by the tilt of the anchored LH2s due to the spin-casting of the PVA film on top of the complexes and related shear forces. Due to the tilt, the orientation statistics of two samples become similar. Anchoring is expected to orient the LH2s so that B850 is closer to the substrate. Consequently, the tilt-related strain leads to larger deformation and disorder in B850 than in B800.

  14. Structural Stability of Light-harvesting Protein LH2 Adsorbed on Mesoporous Silica Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Yuuta; Itoh, Tetsuji; Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the reversible thermal deformation of the membrane protein light-harvesting complex LH2 adsorbed on mesoporous silica (MPS) supports. The LH2 complex from Thermochromatium tepidum cells was conjugated to MPS supports with a series of pore diameter (2.4 to 10.6 nm), and absorption spectra of the resulting LH2/MPS conjugates were observed over a temperature range of 273 - 313 K in order to examine the structure of the LH2 adsorbed on the MPS support. The experimental results confirmed that a slight ellipsoidal deformation of LH2 was induced by adsorption on the MPS supports. On the other hand, the structural stability of LH2 was not perturbed by the adsorption. Since the pore diameter of MPS support did not influence the structural stability of LH2, it could be considered that the spatial confinement of LH2 in size-matches pore did not improve the structural stability of LH2.

  15. Dual fluorescence of single LH2 antenna nanorings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiberg, A.; Raetsep, M.; Timpmann, K.; Trinkunas, G.

    2004-01-01

    A dual nature of fluorescence from LH2 pigment-protein complexes, which is a part of the light harvesting system of purple bacteria, is confirmed by fluorescence-lifetime dependence on recording wavelength and spectrally selective spectroscopy. An analysis based on the Holstein molecular crystal model, modified by allowing diagonal disorder, suggests coexistence of large- and small-radius self-trapped excitons, which serve as the origin of the dual fluorescence

  16. LO2/LH2 propulsion for outer planet orbiter spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, P. W.; Sigurdson, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Galileo class orbiter missions (750-1500 kg) to the outer planets require a large postinjection delta-V for improved propulsion performance. The present investigation shows that a pump-fed low thrust LO2/LH2 propulsion system can provide a significantly larger net on-orbit mass for a given delta-V than a state-of-the-art earth storable, N2O4/monomethylhydrazine pressure-fed propulsion system. A description is given of a conceptual design for a LO2/LH2 pump-fed propulsion system developed for a Galileo class mission to the outer planets. Attention is given to spacecraft configuration, details regarding the propulsion system, the thermal control of the cryogenic propellants, and aspects of mission performance.

  17. Decreased expression of lysyl hydroxylase 2 (LH2) in skin fibroblasts from three Ehlers-Danlos patients does not result from mutations in either the coding or proximal promoter region of the LH2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L C; Teebi, A S; Marini, J C; De Paepe, A; Malfait, F; Atsawasuwan, P; Yamauchi, M; Yeowell, H N

    2004-12-01

    The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by tissue fragility, hyperelasticity of the skin and joint hypermobility. This phenotype, accompanied by kyphoscoliosis and/or ocular fragility, is present in patients with the autosomal recessive type VI form of EDS. These patients have significantly decreased levels of lysyl hydroxylase (LH) activity, due to mutations in the LH1 gene. LH hydroxylates specific lysine residues in the collagen molecule that are precursors for the formation of cross-links which provide collagen with its tensile strength. No disorder has been directly linked to decreased expression of LH2 and LH3, two other isoforms of LH. This study describes 3 patients with mixed phenotypes of EDS, who have significantly decreased mRNAs for LH2, but normal levels of LH1 and LH3 mRNAs, in their skin fibroblasts. In contrast to the effect of LH1 deficiency in EDS VI patients, the decreased expression of LH2 does not affect LH activity, bifunctional collagen cross-links (measured after reduction as dihydroxylysinonorleucine (DHLNL) and hydroxylysinonorleucine (HLNL)), or helical lysine hydroxylation in these cell lines. Sequence analysis of full length LH2 cDNAs and 1kb of the promoter region of LH2 does not show mutations that could explain the decreased expression of LH2. These results suggest that the deficiency of LH2 in these fibroblasts may be caused by changes in other factors required for the expression of LH2.

  18. Reusable LH2 tank technology demonstration through ground test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, C.; Greenberg, H. S.; Johnson, S. E.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the project plan to demonstrate, by March 1997, the reusability of an integrated composite LH2 tank structure, cryogenic insulation, and thermal protection system (TPS). The plan includes establishment of design requirements and a comprehensive trade study to select the most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank system (RHCTS) within the most suitable of 4 candidate structural configurations. The 4 vehicles are winged body with the capability to deliver 25,000 lbs of payload to a circular 220 nm, 51.6 degree inclined orbit (also 40,000 lbs to a 28.5 inclined 150 nm orbit). A prototype design of the selected RHCTS is established to identify the construction, fabrication, and stress simulation and test requirements necessary in an 8 foot diameter tank structure/insulation/TPS test article. A comprehensive development test program supports the 8 foot test article development and involves the composite tank itself, cryogenic insulation, and integrated tank/insulation/TPS designs. The 8 foot diameter tank will contain the integrated cryogenic insulation and TPS designs resulting from this development and that of the concurrent lightweight durable TPS program. Tank ground testing will include 330 cycles of LH2 filling, pressurization, body loading, depressurization, draining, and entry heating.

  19. Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU LH2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William U.

    2015-01-01

    When the technology associated with zero loss storage and transfer is implemented, NASA can reduce the LH2 losses and procurement costs by up to 30 compared to historical Shuttle numbers. This return on investment is based on the mission manifest and commodity use. LH2 densification can provide improved launch vehicle ascent performance by minimizing the size of the LH2 tanks or storing more mass of propellant in the given tank volume.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy of conformational changes of single LH2 complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutkauskas, D.; Novoderezhkin, V.; Cogdell, R.J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the energy landscape of the bacterial photosynthetic peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 of purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila by monitoring sequences of fluorescence spectra of single LH2 assemblies, at room temperature, with different excitation intensities as

  1. LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

  2. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals photosynthetic LH2 complexes switch between emissive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Wang, Quan; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Moerner, W E

    2013-07-02

    Photosynthetic organisms flourish under low light intensities by converting photoenergy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency and under high light intensities by safely dissipating excess photoenergy and deleterious photoproducts. The molecular mechanisms balancing these two functions remain incompletely described. One critical barrier to characterizing the mechanisms responsible for these processes is that they occur within proteins whose excited-state properties vary drastically among individual proteins and even within a single protein over time. In ensemble measurements, these excited-state properties appear only as the average value. To overcome this averaging, we investigate the purple bacterial antenna protein light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila at the single-protein level. We use a room-temperature, single-molecule technique, the anti-Brownian electrokinetic trap, to study LH2 in a solution-phase (nonperturbative) environment. By performing simultaneous measurements of fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and spectra of single LH2 complexes, we identify three distinct states and observe transitions occurring among them on a timescale of seconds. Our results reveal that LH2 complexes undergo photoactivated switching to a quenched state, likely by a conformational change, and thermally revert to the ground state. This is a previously unobserved, reversible quenching pathway, and is one mechanism through which photosynthetic organisms can adapt to changes in light intensities.

  3. High pressure near infrared study of the mutated light-harvesting complex LH2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure sensitivities of the near infrared spectra of the light-harvesting (LH2 complex and a mutant complex with a simplified BChl-B850 binding pocket were compared. In the mutant an abrupt change in the spectral properties occurred at 250 MPa, which was not observed with the native sample. Increased disorder due to collapse of the chromophore pocket is suggested.

  4. Risk Assessment and Scaling for the SLS LH2 ET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiychuk, Halyna; Ponizovskaya-Devine, Ekaterina; Luchinsky, Dmitry; Khasin, Michael; Osipov, Viatcheslav V.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.

    2012-01-01

    In this report the main physics processes in LH2 tank during prepress and rocket flight are studied. The goal of this investigation is to analyze possible hazards and to make risk assessment in proposed LH2 tank designs for SLS with 5 engines (the situation with 4 engines is less critical). For analysis we use the multinode model (MNM) developed by us and presented in a separate report and also 3D ANSYS simulations. We carry out simulation and theoretical analysis the physics processes such as (i) accumulation of bubbles in LH2 during replenish stage and their collapsing in the liquid during the prepress; (ii) condensation-evaporation at the liquid-vapor interface and tank wall, (iv) heating the liquid near the interface and wall due to condensation and environment heat, (v) injection of hot He during prepress and of hot GH2 during flight, (vi) mixing and cooling of the injected gases due to heat transfer between the gases, liquid and the tank wall. We analyze the effects of these physical processes on the thermo- and fluid gas dynamics in the ullage and on the stratification of temperature in the liquid and assess the associated hazards. A special emphasize is put on the scaling predictions for the larger SLS LH2 tank.

  5. Cost Beneftt Analysts of LH2 PadB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    This analysis is used to evaluate, from a cost and benefit perspective, potential outcomes when replacing the pressurization switches and the pressurization system to meet the needs of the LH2 storage system at Pad B. This also includes alternatives, tangible and intangible benefits, and the results of the analysis.

  6. A replacement LH2 recirculation line before installation in Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A spare four-inch diameter LH2 recirculation line (shown in photo) will be used to replace a damaged LH2 line in the orbiter Discovery. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. Workers noted a dent in the line during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The dent measures 12 inches long and about =-inch deep. Managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  7. LOX/LH2 vane pump for auxiliary propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminger, J. A.; Ulbricht, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive displacement pumps offer potential efficiency advantages over centrifugal pumps for future low thrust space missions. Low flow rate applications, such as space station auxiliary propulsion or dedicated low thrust orbiter transfer vehicles, are typical of missions where low flow and high head rise challenge centrifugal pumps. The positive displacement vane pump for pumping of LOX and LH2 is investigated. This effort has included: (1) a testing program in which pump performance was investigated for differing pump clearances and for differing pump materials while pumping LN2, LOX, and LH2; and (2) an analysis effort, in which a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code was developed and exercised. An overview of the theoretical framework of the performance analysis computer code is presented, along with a summary of analysis results. Experimental results are presented for pump operating in liquid nitrogen. Included are data on the effects on pump performance of pump clearance, speed, and pressure rise. Pump suction performance is also presented.

  8. Development and validation of cryogenic foam insulation for LH2 subsonic transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, F. M.; Colt, J. Z.; Helenbrook, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen foam insulation specimens were tested. Some were plain foam while others contained flame retardants, chopped fiberglass reinforcement and/or vapor barriers. The thermal performance of the insulation was determined by measuring the rate at which LH2 boiled from an aluminum tank insulated with the test material. The test specimens were approximately 50 mm (2 in.) thick. They were structurally scaled so that the test cycle would duplicate the maximum thermal stresses predicted for the thicker insulation of an aircraft liquid hydrogen fuel tank during a typical subsonic flight. The simulated flight cycle of approximately 10 minutes duration heated the other insulation surface to 316 K (110 F) and cooled it to 226 K (20 F) while the inner insulation surface remained at liquid hydrogen temperature of 20 K (-423 F). Two urethane foam insulations exceeded the initial life goal of 2400 simulated flight cycles and sustained 4400 cycles with only minor damage. The addition of fiberglass reinforcement of flame retardant materials to an insulation degraded thermal performance and/or the life of the foam material. Installation of vapor barriers enhanced the structural integrity of the material but did not improve thermal performance. All of the foams tested were available materials; none were developed specifically for LH2 service.

  9. Photosynthetic complex LH2 – Absorption and steady state fluorescence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapletal, David; Heřman, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, much effort is devoted to the study of photosynthesis which could be the basis for an ideal energy source in the future. To be able to create such an energy source – an artificial photosynthetic complex, the first step is a detailed understanding of the function of photosynthetic complexes in living organisms. Photosynthesis starts with the absorption of a solar photon by one of the LH (light-harvesting) pigment–protein complexes and transferring the excitation energy to the reaction center where a charge separation is initiated. The geometric structure of some LH complexes is known in great detail, e.g. for the LH2 complexes of purple bacteria. For understanding of photosynthesis first stage efficiency, it is necessary to study especially optical properties of LH complexes. In this paper we present simulated absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra for ring molecular system within full Hamiltonian model. Such system can model bacteriochlorophyll ring of peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila (Rhodoblastus acidophilus). Dynamic disorder (coupling with phonon bath) simultaneously with uncorrelated static disorder (transfer integral fluctuations) is used in our present simulations. We compare and discuss our new results with our previously published ones and of course with experimental data. - Highlights: • We model absorption and steady state fluorescence spectra for B850 ring from LH2. • Fluctuations of environment is modelled by static and dynamic disorder. • Full Hamiltonian model is compared with the nearest neighbour approximation one. • Simulated fluorescence spectrum is compared with experimental data

  10. [Construction and Characterization of B850-Only LH2 Energy Transfer System in Purple Bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Zhao, Chun-gui; Yue, Hui-ying; Yang, Su-ping; Qu, Yin-bo; Jiao, Nian-zhi

    2015-04-01

    To seek microscopic molecular mechanism of energy transfer and complex reconstitution in the photosynthesis, the conditions for construction of B850-only peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) and their properties were investigated using absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular sieve chromatography, ultrafiltration and sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) from the purple bacteria. The results indicated that bacteriochlorophylls (BChl) of B800 incubated in 10 mmo · L(-1) Tris-HCl (pH 8.0) buffer are selectively released from their binding sites of LH2 of Rhodobacter azotoformans (A-LH2) by 0.08% (W/V) SDS. B850-only A-LH2 was constructed after removing free BChl mixing with 10% methyl alcohol by ultrafiltration. B850 BChl was released after A-LH2 was incubated for 240 min in dark at room temperature (RT). While BChl of B800 incubated in pH 1.9 buffer were selectively released from their binding sites of LH2 of Rhodopseudomonas palustris (P-LH2). The authors acquired two components using molecular sieve chromatography. Free BChl of one component was not removed and self-assembled to P-LH2. The other removed free BChl and B850-only P-LH2 was constructed. B850 unchanged after P-LH2 was incubated. P-LH2 α and β subunits have different molecular weights, but those of A-LH2 are in the contrary. It is concluded that B850-only P-LH2 is more stable than A-LH2. The enigmatic split of the B800 absorption band was not observed in these LH2, but we acquired two kinds of B800-released LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The authors' results may provide a new light to separate homogeneous Apoprotein LH2.

  11. Dynamics of exciton relaxation in LH2 antenna probed by multipulse nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Cohen Stuart, Thomas A; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-04-28

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump-dump-probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen Stuart, M. Vengris, V. I. Novoderezhkin, R. J. Cogdell, C. N. Hunter, R. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump-dump-probe response is evaluated using the doorway-window approach in combination with the modified Redfield theory. We demonstrate that a simultaneous fit of linear spectra, pump-probe, and pump-dump-probe kinetics can be obtained at a quantitative level using the disordered exciton model, which is essentially the same as used to model the spectral fluctuations in single LH2 complexes (Novoderezhkin, V.; Rutkauskas, D.; van Grondelle, R. Biophys. J. 2006, 90, 2890). The present studies suggest that the observed relaxation rates are strongly dependent on the realization of the disorder. A big spread of the rates (exceeding 3 orders of magnitude) is correlated with the disorder-induced changes in delocalization length and overlap of the exciton wave functions. We conclude that the bulk kinetics reflect a superposition of many pathways corresponding to different physical limits of energy transfer, varying from sub-20 fs relaxation between delocalized and highly spatially overlapping exciton states to >20 ps jumps between states localized at the opposite sides of the ring.

  12. LH2 three-phase pump control circuit description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, W.

    1977-05-01

    A brief description and circuit drawings are given for a pump control system. The pump is used to circulate liquid hydrogen through the cell and heat exchanger of an LH 2 target. The pump is powered by three-phase 60 cycle power, and the control unit is powered from a positive and negative 24 V dc supply available in the NIM Bin. The control unit is packaged in a double-width NIM module. Drawings are given for the pump speed indicator, function generator, and power supply

  13. Protein dynamics revealed in the excitonic spectra of single LH2 complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkunas, Leonas; Janusonis, Julius; Rutkauskas, Danielis; Grondelle, Rienk van

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence emission spectrum of single peripheral light-harvesting (LH2) complexes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila exhibits remarkable dynamics on a time scale of several minutes. Often the spectral properties are quasi-stable; sometimes large spectral jumps to the blue or to the red are observed. To explain the dynamics, every pigment is proposed to be in two conformational substates with different excitation energies, which originate from the conformational state of the protein as a result of pigment-protein interaction. Due to the excitonic coupling in the ring of 18 pigments, the two-state assumption generates a substantial amount of distinct spectroscopic states, which reflect part of the inhomogeneous distributed spectral properties of LH2. To describe the observed dynamics, spontaneous and light-induced transitions are introduced between the two states. For each 'realization of the disorder', the spectral properties are calculated using a disordered exciton model combined with the modified Redfield theory to obtain realistic spectral line shapes. The single-molecule fluorescence peak (FLP) distribution, the distribution dependence on the excitation intensity, and the FLP time traces are well described within the framework of this model

  14. The MuCool/MICE LH2 Absorber Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, Mary Anne

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen absorber R and D for the MuCool Collaboration is actively pushing ahead on two parallel and complementary fronts. The continuing LH2 engineering and technical developments by the MuCool group, conducted by ICAR institutions (NIU, IIT and UIUC), the University of Mississippi and Oxford University in cooperation with Fermilab, are summarized here, including plans for the first tests of an absorber prototype from Osaka University and KEK cooled by internal convection at the newly constructed FNAL MuCool Test Area (MTA). Designs for the high-power test of another absorber prototype (employing external heat exchange) are complete and the system will be installed by summer 2004. A convection-cooled absorber design is being developed for the approved MICE cooling demonstration at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

  15. Analysis and design of insulation systems for LH2-fueled aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, G. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical program was conducted to evaluate the performance of 15 potential insulations for the fuel tanks of a subsonic LH2-fueled transport aircraft intended for airline service in the 1990-1995 time period. As a result, two candidate insulation systems are proposed for subsonic transport aircraft applications. Both candidates are judged to be the optimum available and should meet the design requirements. However, because of the long-life cyclic nature of the application and the cost sensitivity of airline operations, an experimental tank/insulation development or proof-of-concept program is recommended. This program should be carried out with a nearly full-scale system which would be subjected to the cyclic thermal and mechanical inputs anticipated in aircraft service.

  16. Close-in characteristics of LH2/LOX reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, W. A.; Ullian, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In deriving shock overpressures from space vehicles employing LH2 and LOX, separate methods of analyses and prediction are recommended, as a function of the distance. Three methods of treatment are recommended. For the Far Field - where the expected shock overpressure is less than 40 psi (lambda = 5) - use the classical PYRO approach to determine TNT yield, and employ classical ordnance (Kingery) curve to obtain the overall value. For the Close-In Range, a suggested limit is 3D, or a zone from a distance of three times the tank diameter to the tank wall. Rather than estimate a specific distance from the center of explosion to the target, it is only necessary to estimate whether this could be within one, two, or three diameters away from the wall; i.e., in the 1, 2, or 3D zone. Then assess whether mixing mode is by the PYRO CBGS (spill) mode or CBM (internal mixing) mode. From the zone and mixing mode, the probability of attaining various shock overpressures is determined from the plots provided herein. For the transition zone, between 40 psi and the 3D distance, it is tentatively recommended that both of the preceding methods be used, and to be conservative, the higher resulting value be used.

  17. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  18. Fluorescence spectral fluctuations of single LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutkauskas, D.; Novoderezkhin, V.; Cogdell, R.J.; van Grondelle, R.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the energy landscape of the bacterial photosynthetic peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 of purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila by monitoring sequences of fluorescence spectra of single LH2 assemblies, at room temperature, with different excitation intensities as

  19. Atomistic absorption spectra and non-adiabatic dynamics of the LH2 complex with a GPU-accelerated ab initio exciton model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, David

    Recently, we outlined an efficient multi-tiered parallel excitonic framework that utilizes time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) to calculate ground/excited state energies and gradients of large supramolecular complexes in atomistic detail. In this paper, we apply our ab initioexciton framework to the 27 coupled bacteriocholorophyll-a chromophores which make up the LH2 complex, using it to compute linear absorption spectra and short-time, on-the-fly nonadiabatic surface-hopping (SH) dynamics of electronically excited LH2. Our ab initio exciton model includes two key parameters whose values are determined by fitting to experiment: d, which is added to the diagonal elements, corrects for the error in TDDFT vertical excitation energies on a single chromophore; and e, which occurs on the off-diagonal matrix elements, describes the average dielectric screening of the inter-chromophore transition-dipole coupling. Using snapshots obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) of LH2, best-fit values of both d and e were obtained by fitting to the thermally broadened experimental absorption spectrum within the Frank-Condon approximation, providing a linear absorption spectrum that agrees reasonably well with the experimental observations. We follow the nonadiabatic dynamics using surface hopping to construct time-resolved visualizations of the EET dynamics in the sub-picosecond regime following photoexcitation. This provides some qualitative insight into the excitonic energy transfer (EET) that results from atomically resolved vibrational fluctuations of the chromophores. The dynamical picture that emerges is one of rapidly fluctuating eigenstates that are delocalized over multiple chromophores and undergo frequent crossing on a femtosecond timescale as a result of the underlying chromophore vibrational dynamics. The eigenstate fluctuations arise from disorder in both the diagonal chromophore site energies and the off-diagonal inter

  20. Characterisation of the LH2 spectral variants produced by the photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Kelly, Sharon; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Blankenship, Robert E; Shimizu, Yuuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    This study systematically investigated the different types of LH2 produced by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium, in response to variations in growth conditions. Three different spectral forms of LH2 were isolated and purified, the B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types, all of which exhibit an unusual split 800 peak in their low temperature absorption spectra. However, it is likely that more forms are also present. Relatively more B800-820 and B800-840 are produced under low light conditions, while relatively more B800-850 is produced under high light conditions. Polypeptide compositions of the three different LH2 types were determined by a combination of HPLC and TOF/MS. The B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types all have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition, containing multiple types of both α and β polypeptides, and differ in their precise polypeptide composition. They all have a mixed carotenoid composition, containing carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin series. In all cases the most abundant carotenoid is rhodopin; however, there is a shift towards carotenoids with a higher conjugation number in LH2 complexes produced under low light conditions. CD spectroscopy, together with the polypeptide analysis, demonstrates that these Alc. vinosum LH2 complexes are more closely related to the LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum than they are to the LH2 complexes from Rps. acidophila. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Environment-assisted Quantum Critical Effect for Excitation Energy Transfer in a LH2-type Trimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lan; Xu, Bo

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we are investigating excitation energy transfer (EET) in a basic unit cell of light-harvesting complex II (LH2), named a LH2-type trimer. Calculation of energy transfer efficiency (ETE) in the framework of non-Markovian environment is also implemented. With these achievements, we theoretically predict the environment-assisted quantum critical effect, where ETE exhibits a sudden change at the critical point of quantum phase transition (QPT) for the LH2-type trimer. It is found that highly efficient EET with nearly unit efficiency may occur in the vicinity of the critical point of QPT.

  2. Convection-type LH2 absorber R and D for muon ionization cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimoto, S.; Bandura, L.; Black, E.L.; Boghosian, M.; Cassel, K.W.; Cummings, M.A.; Darve, C.; Dyshkant, A.; Errede, D.; Geer, S.; Haney, M.; Hedin, D.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.J.; Kaplan, D.M.; Kubik, D.; Kuno, Y.; Majewski, S.; Popovic, M.; Reep, M.; Summers, D.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, K.

    2003-01-01

    A feasibility study on liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) absorbers for muon ionization cooling is reported. In muon ionization cooling, an LH 2 absorber is required to have a high cooling power greater than 100 W to cool heat deposited by muons passing through. That heat in LH 2 can be removed at either external or internal heat exchangers, which are cooled by cold helium gas. As one of the internal heat exchanger types, a convection-type absorber is proposed. In the convection-type absorber, heat is taken away by the convection of LH 2 in the absorber. The heat exchanger efficiency for the convection-type absorber is calculated. A possible design is presented

  3. Experimental study of temperature sensor for an ocean-going liquid hydrogen (LH2) carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, A.; Shimazaki, T.; Sekiya, M.; Shiozawa, H.; Aoyagi, A.; Ohtsuka, K.; Iwakiri, T.; Mikami, Z.; Sato, M.; Kinoshita, K.; Matsuoka, T.; Takayama, Y.; Yamamoto, K.

    2018-04-01

    The prototype temperature sensors for an ocean-going liquid hydrogen (LH2) carrier were manufactured by way of trial. All of the sensors adopted Platinum 1000 (PT-1000) resistance thermometer elements. Various configurations of preproduction temperature sensors were tested in AIST's LH2 test facility. In the experiments, a PT-1000 resistance thermometer, calibrated at the National Metrology Institute of Japan at AIST, was used as the standard thermometer. The temperatures measured by the preproduction sensors were compared with the temperatures measured by the standard thermometer, and the measurement accuracy of the temperature sensors in LH2 was investigated and discussed. It was confirmed that the measurement accuracies of the preproduction temperature sensors were within ±50 mK, which is the required measurement accuracy for a technical demonstration ocean-going LH2 carrier.

  4. The safe removal of frozen air from the annulus of an LH2 storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenn, A.; Starr, S.; Youngquist, R.; Nurge, M.; Sass, J.; Fesmire, J.; Cariker, C.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2015-12-01

    Large Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) storage tanks are vital infrastructure for NASA. Eventually, air may leak into the evacuated and perlite filled annular region of these tanks. Although the vacuum level is monitored in this region, the extremely cold temperature causes all but the helium and neon constituents of air to freeze. A small, often unnoticeable pressure rise is the result. As the leak persists, the quantity of frozen air increases, as does the thermal conductivity of the insulation system. Consequently, a notable increase in commodity boil-off is often the first indicator of an air leak. Severe damage can result from normal draining of the tank. The warming air will sublimate which will cause a pressure rise in the annulus. When the pressure increases above the triple point, the frozen air will begin to melt and migrate downward. Collection of liquid air on the carbon steel outer shell may chill it below its ductility range, resulting in fracture. In order to avoid a structural failure, as described above, a method for the safe removal of frozen air is needed. A thermal model of the storage tank has been created using SINDA/FLUINT modelling software. Experimental work is progressing in an attempt to characterize the thermal conductivity of a perlite/frozen nitrogen mixture. A statistical mechanics model is being developed in parallel for comparison to experimental work. The thermal model will be updated using the experimental/statistical mechanical data, and used to simulate potential removal scenarios. This paper will address methodologies and analysis techniques for evaluation of two proposed air removal methods.

  5. Empirical Profiling of Cold Hydrogen Plumes Formed from Venting Of LH2 Storage Vessels: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rivkin, Carl H [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schmidt, Kara [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hartmann, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wright, Hannah [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weidner, Eveline [Joint Research Centre, Petten, the Netherlands; Ciotti, Michael [H2 Fueling and CIP Markets Engineering

    2017-11-16

    Liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage is a viable approach to assuring sufficient hydrogen capacity at commercial fuelling stations. Presently, LH2 is produced at remote facilities and then transported to the end-use site by road vehicles (i.e., LH2 tanker trucks). Venting of hydrogen to depressurize the transport storage tank is a routine part of the LH2 delivery process. The behaviour of cold hydrogen plumes has not been well-characterized because empirical field data is essentially non-existent. The NFPA 2 Hydrogen Storage Safety Task Group, which consists of hydrogen producers, safety experts, and CFD modellers, has identified the lack of understanding of hydrogen dispersion during LH2 venting of storage vessel as a critical gap for establishing safety distances at LH2 facilities, especially commercial hydrogen fuelling stations. To address this need, the NREL sensor laboratory, in collaboration with the NFPA 2 Safety Task Group developed the Cold Hydrogen Plume Analyzer to empirically characterize the hydrogen plume formed during LH2 storage tank venting. A prototype Analyzer was developed and field-deployed at an actual LH2 venting operation with critical findings that included: - H2 being detected as much as 2 m lower than the release point, which is not predicted by existing models - A small and inconsistent correlation between oxygen depletion and the hydrogen concentration - A negligible to non-existent correlation between in-situ temperature and the hydrogen concentration The Analyzer is currently being upgraded for enhanced metrological capabilities including improved real-time spatial and temporal profiling of the plume and tracking of prevailing weather conditions. Additional deployments are planned to monitor plume behaviour under different wind, humidity, and temperatures. This data will be shared with the NFPA 2 Safety Task Group and ultimately will be used support theoretical models and code requirements prescribed in NFPA 2.

  6. Protein Structural Deformation Induced Lifetime Shortening of Photosynthetic Bacteria Light-Harvesting Complex LH2 Excited State

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xing-Hai; Zhang, Lei; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Du, Lu-Chao; Ye, Man-Ping; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Fujii, Ritsuko; Rondonuwu, Ferdy S.; Koyama, Yasushi; Wu, Yi-Shi; Zhang, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting antenna complex LH2 was immobilized on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The LH2/TiO2 assembly was investigated by the time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The excited-state lifetimes for carotenoid-containing and carotenoidless LH2 have been measured, showing a decrease in the excited-state lifetime of B850 when LH2 was immobilized on TiO2. The possibility that the decrease of the LH2 excited-state lifetime being caused by ...

  7. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I; Tong, Ashley L; Gordon, Samuel C; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E; Cao, Jianshu; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2018-03-28

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein-protein interactions and lipid-protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid-protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference to

  8. High-resolution AFM topographs of Rubrivivax gelatinosus light-harvesting complex LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Simon; Reiss-Husson, Francoise; Engel, Andreas; Rigaud, Jean-Louis; Ranck, Jean-Luc

    2001-01-01

    Light-harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) are the accessory antenna proteins in the bacterial photosynthetic apparatus and are built up of αβ-heterodimers containing three bacteriochlorophylls and one carotenoid each. We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate reconstituted LH2 from Rubrivivax gelatinosus, which has a C-terminal hydrophobic extension of 21 amino acids on the α-subunit. High-resolution topographs revealed a nonameric organization of the regularly packed cylindrical complexes incorporated into the membrane in both orientations. Native LH2 showed one surface which protruded by ∼6 Å and one that protruded by ∼14 Å from the membrane. Topographs of samples reconstituted with thermolysin-digested LH2 revealed a height reduction of the strongly protruding surface to ∼9 Å, and a change of its surface appearance. These results suggested that the α-subunit of R.gelatinosus comprises a single transmembrane helix and an extrinsic C-terminus, and allowed the periplasmic surface to be assigned. Occasionally, large rings (∼120 Å diameter) surrounded by LH2 rings were observed. Their diameter and appearance suggest the large rings to be LH1 complexes. PMID:11406579

  9. Direct visualization of exciton reequilibration in the LH1 and LH2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by multipulse spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, Thomas A; Vengris, Mikas; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I; Cogdell, Richard J; Hunter, C Neil; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2011-05-04

    The dynamics of the excited states of the light-harvesting complexes LH1 and LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are governed, mainly, by the excitonic nature of these ring-systems. In a pump-dump-probe experiment, the first pulse promotes LH1 or LH2 to its excited state and the second pulse dumps a portion of the excited state. By selective dumping, we can disentangle the dynamics normally hidden in the excited-state manifold. We find that by using this multiple-excitation technique we can visualize a 400-fs reequilibration reflecting relaxation between the two lowest exciton states that cannot be directly explored by conventional pump-probe. An oscillatory feature is observed within the exciton reequilibration, which is attributed to a coherent motion of a vibrational wavepacket with a period of ∼150 fs. Our disordered exciton model allows a quantitative interpretation of the observed reequilibration processes occurring in these antennas. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Directed formation of micro- and nanoscale patterns of functional light-harvesting LH2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Janusz, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Timney, John; Ducker, Robert E; Olsen, John D; Otto, Cees; Subramaniam, Vinod; Leggett, Graham J; Hunter, C Neil

    2007-11-28

    The precision placement of the desired protein components on a suitable substrate is an essential prelude to any hybrid "biochip" device, but a second and equally important condition must also be met: the retention of full biological activity. Here we demonstrate the selective binding of an optically active membrane protein, the light-harvesting LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, to patterned self-assembled monolayers at the micron scale and the fabrication of nanometer-scale patterns of these molecules using near-field photolithographic methods. In contrast to plasma proteins, which are reversibly adsorbed on many surfaces, the LH2 complex is readily patterned simply by spatial control of surface polarity. Near-field photolithography has yielded rows of light-harvesting complexes only 98 nm wide. Retention of the native optical properties of patterned LH2 molecules was demonstrated using in situ fluorescence emission spectroscopy.

  11. The organization of LH2 complexes in membranes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, John D; Tucker, Jaimey D; Timney, John A; Qian, Pu; Vassilev, Cvetelin; Hunter, C Neil

    2008-11-07

    The mapping of the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed a unique organization of arrays of dimeric reaction center-light harvesting I-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) core complexes surrounded and interconnected by light-harvesting LH2 complexes (Bahatyrova, S., Frese, R. N., Siebert, C. A., Olsen, J. D., van der Werf, K. O., van Grondelle, R., Niederman, R. A., Bullough, P. A., Otto, C., and Hunter, C. N. (2004) Nature 430, 1058-1062). However, membrane regions consisting solely of LH2 complexes were under-represented in these images because these small, highly curved areas of membrane rendered them difficult to image even using gentle tapping mode AFM and impossible with contact mode AFM. We report AFM imaging of membranes prepared from a mutant of R. sphaeroides, DPF2G, that synthesizes only the LH2 complexes, which assembles spherical intracytoplasmic membrane vesicles of approximately 53 nm diameter in vivo. By opening these vesicles and adsorbing them onto mica to form small, LH2-only membranes for the first time. The transition from highly curved vesicle to the planar sheet is accompanied by a change in the packing of the LH2 complexes such that approximately half of the complexes are raised off the mica surface by approximately 1 nm relative to the rest. This vertical displacement produces a very regular corrugated appearance of the planar membrane sheets. Analysis of the topographs was used to measure the distances and angles between the complexes. These data are used to model the organization of LH2 complexes in the original, curved membrane. The implications of this architecture for the light harvesting function and diffusion of quinones in native membranes of R. sphaeroides are discussed.

  12. Operational Issues in the Development of a Cost-Effective Reusable LOX/LH2 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: SLI initiated under NASA Research Announcement (NRA) 8-30. Strategic Objectives. Make spaceflight safer (1 in 10000 mission LOV). Make spaceflight cheaper ($1000/lb payload). Two prototype LOX/LH2 engine systems funded under Cycle-1 of NRA8-30. COBRA (Pratt & Whitney / Aerojet). RS-83 (Rocketdyne).

  13. Protein-induced geometric constraints and charge transfer in bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes in LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; Alia, A; Schaap, Roland G; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2008-12-14

    Bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes are ubiquitous in nature and are essential structural motifs supporting the conversion of solar energy into chemically useful compounds in a wide range of photosynthesis processes. A systematic density functional theory study of the NMR chemical shifts for histidine and for bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) is performed using the BLYP functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The computed chemical shift patterns are consistent with available experimental data for positive and neutral(tau) (N(tau) protonated) crystalline histidines. The results for the bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in LH2 provide evidence that the protein environment is stabilizing the histidine close to the Mg ion, thereby inducing a large charge transfer of approximately 0.5 electronic equivalent. Due to this protein-induced geometric constraint, the Mg-coordinated histidine in LH2 appears to be in a frustrated state very different from the formal neutral(pi) (N(pi) protonated) form. This finding could be important for the understanding of basic functional mechanisms involved in tuning the electronic properties and exciton coupling in LH2.

  14. Consideration of LH2 and LD2 cold neutron sources in heavy water reactor reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, I.A.; Serebrov, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    The reactor power, the required CNS dimensions and power of the cryogenic equipment define the CNS type with maximized cold neutron production. Cold neutron fluxes from liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and liquid deuterium (LD 2 ) cold neutron sources (CNS) are analyzed. Different CNS volumes, presents and absence of reentrant holes inside the CNS, different adjustment of beam tube and containment are considered. (orig.)

  15. Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer through vibronic coupling in LH2 from Phaeosprillum molischianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Lincoln, Craig N; Branchi, Federico; Cerullo, Giulio; Perlík, Václav; Šanda, František; Lokstein, Heiko; Hauer, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex (LH2) of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ideal testing ground for models of structure-function relationships due to its well-determined molecular structure and ultrafast energy deactivation. It has been the target for numerous studies in both theory and ultrafast spectroscopy; nevertheless, certain aspects of the convoluted relaxation network of LH2 lack a satisfactory explanation by conventional theories. For example, the initial carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer step necessary on visible light excitation was long considered to follow the Förster mechanism, even though transfer times as short as 40 femtoseconds (fs) have been observed. Such transfer times are hard to accommodate by Förster theory, as the moderate coupling strengths found in LH2 suggest much slower transfer within this framework. In this study, we investigate LH2 from Phaeospirillum (Ph.) molischianum in two types of transient absorption experiments-with narrowband pump and white-light probe resulting in 100 fs time resolution, and with degenerate broadband 10 fs pump and probe pulses. With regard to the split Q x band in this system, we show that vibronically mediated transfer explains both the ultrafast carotenoid-to-B850 transfer, and the almost complete lack of transfer to B800. These results are beyond Förster theory, which predicts an almost equal partition between the two channels.

  16. Dynamics of Exciton Relaxation in LH2 Antenna Probed by Multipulse Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Cohen Stuart, T.A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2011-01-01

    We explain the relaxation dynamics in the LH2-B850 antenna as revealed by multipulse pump - dump - probe spectroscopy (Th. A. Cohen StuartM. VengrisV. I. NovoderezhkinR. J. CogdellC. N. HunterR. van Grondelle, submitted). The theory of pump - dump - probe response is evaluated using the doorway -

  17. Solid propellant ignition motors for LH_2/LOX rocket engine system

    OpenAIRE

    ARAKI, Tetsuo; AKIBA, Ryojiro; HASHIMOTO, Yasunari; AIHARA, Kenji; TOMITA, Etsu; YASUDA, Seiichi; 荒木, 哲夫; 秋葉, 鐐二郎; 橋本, 保成; 相原, 賢二; 富田, 悦; 安田, 誠一

    1983-01-01

    Solid propellant ignition motors are used in the series of experiments of the 10 ton LH_2/LOX engine featured by the channel wall thrust chamber, This paper presents design specification, experiments and results obtained by actual applications of those ignition motors.

  18. Protein structural deformation induced lifetime shortening of photosynthetic bacteria light-harvesting complex LH2 excited state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing-Hai; Zhang, Lei; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Du, Lu-Chao; Ye, Man-Ping; Yang, Guo-Zhen; Fujii, Ritsuko; Rondonuwu, Ferdy S; Koyama, Yasushi; Wu, Yi-Shi; Zhang, J P

    2005-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting antenna complex LH2 was immobilized on the surface of TiO(2) nanoparticles in the colloidal solution. The LH2/TiO(2) assembly was investigated by the time-resolved spectroscopic methods. The excited-state lifetimes for carotenoid-containing and carotenoidless LH2 have been measured, showing a decrease in the excited-state lifetime of B850 when LH2 was immobilized on TiO(2). The possibility that the decrease of the LH2 excited-state lifetime being caused by an interfacial electron transfer reaction between B850 and the TiO(2) nanoparticle was precluded experimentally. We proposed that the observed change in the photophysical properties of LH2 when assembled onto TiO(2) nanoparticles is arising from the interfacial-interaction-induced structural deformation of the LH2 complex deviating from an ellipse of less eccentric to a more eccentric ellipse, and the observed phenomenon can be accounted by an elliptical exciton model. Experiment by using photoinactive SiO(2) nanoparticle in place of TiO(2) and core complex LH1 instead of LH2 provide further evidence to the proposed mechanism.

  19. Direct Visualization of Exciton Reequilibration in the LH1 and LH2 Complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by Multipulse Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, T.A.; Vengris, M.; Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Cogdell, R.J.; Hunter, C.N.; van Grondelle, R.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of the excited states of the light-harvesting complexes LH1 and LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are governed, mainly, by the excitonic nature of these ring-systems. In a pump-dump-probe experiment, the first pulse promotes LH1 or LH2 to its excited state and the second pulse dumps a

  20. Population and coherence dynamics in light harvesting complex II (LH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Hao; Zhu, Jing; Kais, Sabre

    2012-08-28

    The electronic excitation population and coherence dynamics in the chromophores of the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) B850 ring from purple bacteria (Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) have been studied theoretically at both physiological and cryogenic temperatures. Similar to the well-studied Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein, oscillations of the excitation population and coherence in the site basis are observed in LH2 by using a scaled hierarchical equation of motion approach. However, this oscillation time (300 fs) is much shorter compared to the FMO protein (650 fs) at cryogenic temperature. Both environment and high temperature are found to enhance the propagation speed of the exciton wave packet yet they shorten the coherence time and suppress the oscillation amplitude of coherence and the population. Our calculations show that a long-lived coherence between chromophore electronic excited states can exist in such a noisy biological environment.

  1. Study of fuel systems for LH2-fueled subsonic transport aircraft, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.; Davis, G. W.; Versaw, E. F.; Cunnington, G. R., Jr.; Riple, J. C.; Baerst, C. F.; Garmong, G.

    1978-01-01

    Several engine concepts examined to determine a preferred design which most effectively exploits the characteristics of hydrogen fuel in aircraft tanks received major emphasis. Many candidate designs of tank structure and cryogenic insulation systems were evaluated. Designs of all major elements of the aircraft fuel system including pumps, lines, valves, regulators, and heat exchangers received attention. Selected designs of boost pumps to be mounted in the LH2 tanks, and of a high pressure pump to be mounted on the engine were defined. A final design of LH2-fueled transport aircraft was established which incorporates a preferred design of fuel system. That aircraft was then compared with a conventionally fueled counterpart designed to equivalent technology standards.

  2. An Ab Initio Description of the Excitonic Properties of LH2 and Their Temperature Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupellini, Lorenzo; Jurinovich, Sandro; Campetella, Marco; Caprasecca, Stefano; Guido, Ciro A; Kelly, Sharon M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-11-10

    The spectroscopic properties of light-harvesting (LH) antennae in photosyntehtic organisms represent a fingerprint that is unique for each specific pigment-protein complex. Because of that, spectroscopic observations are generally combined with structural data from X-ray crystallography to obtain an indirect representation of the excitonic properties of the system. Here, an alternative strategy is presented which goes beyond this empirical approach and introduces an ab initio computational description of both structural and electronic properties and their dependence on the temperature. The strategy is applied to the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex (LH2) present in purple bacteria. By comparing this model with the one based on the crystal structure, a detailed, molecular level explanation of the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra and their temperature dependence is achieved. The agreement obtained with the experiments at both low and room temperature lays the groundwork for an atomistic understanding of the excitation dynamics in the LH2 system.

  3. Development of advanced materials composites for use as insulations for LH2 tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1973-01-01

    A study of thread-reinforced polyurethane foam and glass fabric liner, serving as internally bonded insulation for space shuttle LH2 tanks, is reported. Emphasis was placed on an insulation system capable of reentry and multiple reuse in the shuttle environment. The optimized manufacturing parameters associated with each element of the composite are established and the results, showing successful completion of subscale system evaluation tests using the shuttle flight environmental requirements, are given.

  4. Solvation effect of bacteriochlorophyll excitons in light-harvesting complex LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urboniene, V; Vrublevskaja, O; Trinkunas, G; Gall, A; Robert, B; Valkunas, L

    2007-09-15

    We have characterized the influence of the protein environment on the spectral properties of the bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) molecules of the peripheral light-harvesting (or LH2) complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The spectral density functions of the pigments responsible for the 800 and 850 nm electronic transitions were determined from the temperature dependence of the Bchl absorption spectra in different environments (detergent micelles and native membranes). The spectral density function is virtually independent of the hydrophobic support that the protein experiences. The reorganization energy for the B850 Bchls is 220 cm(-1), which is almost twice that of the B800 Bchls, and its Huang-Rhys factor reaches 8.4. Around the transition point temperature, and at higher temperatures, both the static spectral inhomogeneity and the resonance interactions become temperature-dependent. The inhomogeneous distribution function of the transitions exhibits less temperature dependence when LH2 is embedded in membranes, suggesting that the lipid phase protects the protein. However, the temperature dependence of the fluorescence spectra of LH2 cannot be fitted using the same parameters determined from the analysis of the absorption spectra. Correct fitting requires the lowest exciton states to be additionally shifted to the red, suggesting the reorganization of the exciton spectrum.

  5. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttles to Avoid Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfling, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Even before the first flight of the Space Shuttle, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) can have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs, which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. A throttling down of the SSME resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at a lower throttle setting. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of these additional capabilities. Currently the procedure, which for early Space Shuttle missions required a Return-to-Launch-Site abort, now would result in a nominal Main Engine Cut Off (MECO) and no loss of mission objectives.

  6. Airline view of LH2 as a fuel for commercial aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, K.G.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel for air transport is a particularly important matter, because it is an energy-intensive form of transport. Price and energy density are therefore correspondingly critical. Airlines views tend to be short term because there is no future if they do not survive tomorrow. Thus, although petroleum supply and price has been unstable since 1973, airlines' primary concern has been with economizing the use of fuel and specifying more fuel economic equipment for the future, rather than serious pursuit of more radical solutions. LH2 gives promise of being a serious candidate for the longer term, but there is not yet convincing proof that cheaper seat mile costs could be produced in today's circumstances. The situation could be changed by the realization of laminar flow by surface cooling at subsonic speeds. There is a strong case for a modest programme of carefully aimed research on an international basis to fill the most important gaps in our knowledge on the design of LH2 fueled aircraft. Future crises in energy supplies may well raise questions of transport fuel strategy which will heed this background for wise decision-making. Particular significance attaches to the place of nuclear power in world energy policy since this dominates the question of LH2 availability and price. 2 references, 2 figures.

  7. Dynamics of energy transfer from lycopene to bacteriochlorophyll in genetically-modified LH2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörvin Billsten, H; Herek, J L; Garcia-Asua, G; Hashøj, L; Polívka, T; Hunter, C N; Sundström, V

    2002-03-26

    LH2 complexes from Rb. sphaeroides were modified genetically so that lycopene, with 11 saturated double bonds, replaced the native carotenoids which contain 10 saturated double bonds. Tuning the S1 level of the carotenoid in LH2 in this way affected the dynamics of energy transfer within LH2, which were investigated using both steady-state and time-resolved techniques. The S1 energy of lycopene in n-hexane was determined to be approximately 12 500 +/- 150 cm(-1), by direct measurement of the S1-S2 transient absorption spectrum using a femtosecond IR-probing technique, thus placing an upper limit on the S1 energy of lycopene in the LH2 complex. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra demonstrated that energy can be transferred from lycopene to the bacteriochlorophyll molecules within this LH2 complex. The energy-transfer dynamics within the mutant complex were compared to wild-type LH2 from Rb. sphaeroides containing the carotenoid spheroidene and from Rs. molischianum, in which lycopene is the native carotenoid. The results show that the overall efficiency for Crt --> B850 energy transfer is approximately 80% in lyco-LH2 and approximately 95% in WT-LH2 of Rb. sphaeroides. The difference in overall Crt --> BChl transfer efficiency of lyco-LH2 and WT-LH2 mainly relates to the low efficiency of the Crt S(1) --> BChl pathway for complexes containing lycopene, which was 20% in lyco-LH2. These results show that in an LH2 complex where the Crt S1 energy is sufficiently high to provide efficient spectral overlap with both B800 and B850 Q(y) states, energy transfer via the Crt S1 state occurs to both pigments. However, the introduction of lycopene into the Rb. sphaeroides LH2 complex lowers the S1 level of the carotenoid sufficiently to prevent efficient transfer of energy to the B800 Q(y) state, leaving only the Crt S1 --> B850 channel, strongly suggesting that Crt S1 --> BChl energy transfer is controlled by the relative Crt S1 and BChl Q(y) energies.

  8. The electronically excited states of LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 studied by time-resolved spectroscopy and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. II. Homo-arrays of LH2 complexes reconstituted into phospholipid model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflock, Tobias J; Oellerich, Silke; Krapf, Lisa; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Ullmann, G Matthias; Köhler, Jürgen

    2011-07-21

    We performed time-resolved spectroscopy on homoarrays of LH2 complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. Variations of the fluorescence transients were monitored as a function of the excitation fluence and the repetition rate of the excitation. These parameters are directly related to the excitation density within the array and to the number of LH2 complexes that still carry a triplet state prior to the next excitation. Comparison of the experimental observations with results from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations for a model cluster of LH2 complexes yields qualitative agreement without the need for any free parameter and reveals the mutual relationship between energy transfer and annihilation processes.

  9. Self-trapped excitons in LH2 bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timpmann, K.; Ellervee, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Anatoli; Laisaar, Arlentin; Trinkunas, Gediminas; Freiberg, Arvi

    2003-01-01

    The absorption and emission spectra of excitons in LH2 antenna complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been studied under hydrostatic pressure. The measurements made between ambient pressure and 6 kbar over a broad temperature range reveal largely different rates of the pressure-induced shifts for the absorption and emission bands. Numerical calculations based on exciton polaron model provide evidence for the exciton self-trapping at ambient pressure as well as for the pressure stabilization of the self-trapped exciton states responsible for the emission, whereas the light absorbing states belong to nearly free excitons over the whole pressure and temperature ranges studied

  10. LOX/LH2 propulsion system for launch vehicle upper stage, test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, T.; Imachi, U.; Yuzawa, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Miyoshi, K.; Higashino, K.

    1984-01-01

    The test results of small LOX/LH2 engines for two propulsion systems, a pump fed system and a pressure fed system are reported. The pump fed system has the advantages of higher performances and higher mass fraction. The pressure fed system has the advantages of higher reliability and relative simplicity. Adoption of these cryogenic propulsion systems for upper stage of launch vehicle increases the payload capability with low cost. The 1,000 kg thrust class engine was selected for this cryogenic stage. A thrust chamber assembly for the pressure fed propulsion system was tested. It is indicated that it has good performance to meet system requirements.

  11. Self diffusion and spectral modifications of a membrane protein, the Rubrivivax gelatinosus LH2 complex, incorporated into a monoolein cubic phase.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsapis, N; Reiss-Husson, F; Ober, R; Genest, M; Hodges, R S; Urbach, W

    2001-01-01

    The light-harvesting complex LH2 from a purple bacterium, Rubrivivax gelatinosus, has been incorporated into the Q230 cubic phase of monoolein. We measured the self-diffusion of LH2 in detergent solution and in the cubic phase by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We investigated also the absorption and fluorescence properties of this oligomeric membrane protein in the cubic phase, in comparison with its beta-octyl glucoside solution. In these experiments, native LH2 and LH2 labeled ...

  12. Effects of aggregation on the excitation dynamics of LH2 from Thermochromatium tepidum in aqueous phase and in chromatophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang, Peng; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2011-06-23

    We carried out femtosecond magic-angle and polarized pump-probe spectroscopies for the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum in aqueous phase and in chromatophores. To examine the effects of LH2 aggregation on the dynamics of excitation energy transfer, dominant monodispersed and aggregated LH2s were prepared by controlling the surfactant concentrations. The aqueous preparations solubilized with different concentrations of n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) show similar visible-to-near-infrared absorption spectra, but distinctively different aggregation states, as revealed by using dynamic light scattering. The B800 → B850 intra-LH2 energy transfer time was determined to be 1.3 ps for isolated LH2, which, upon aggregation in aqueous phase or clustering in chromatophores, shortened to 1.1 or 0.9 ps, respectively. The light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) of this thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium contains bacteriochlorophyll a absorbing at 915 nm (B915), and the LH2(B850) → LH1(B915) intercomplex transfer time in chromatophores was found to be 6.6 ps. For chromatophores, a depolarization time of 21 ps was derived from the anisotropy kinetics of B850*, which is attributed to the migration of B850* excitation before being trapped by LH1. In addition, the B850* annihilation is accelerated upon LH2 aggregation in aqueous phase, but it is much less severe upon LH2 clustering in the intracytoplasmic membrane. These results are helpful in understanding the light-harvesting function of a bacterial photosynthetic membrane incorporating different types of antenna complexes.

  13. Peripheral Light-Harvesting LH2 Complex Can Be Assembled in Cells of Nonsulfur Purple Bacterium Rhodoblastus acidophilus without Carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol'shakov, M A; Ashikhmin, A A; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A

    2015-09-01

    The effect of carotenoids on the assembly of LH2 complex in cells of the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodoblastus acidophilus was investigated. For this purpose, the bacterial culture was cultivated with an inhibitor of carotenoid biosynthesis - 71 µM diphenylamine (DPA). The inhibitor decreased the level of biosynthesis of the colored carotenoids in membranes by ~58%. It was found that a large amount of phytoene was accumulated in them. This carotenoid precursor was bound nonspecifically to LH2 complex and did not stabilize its structure. Thermostability testing of the isolated LH2 complex together with analysis of carotenoid composition revealed that the population of this complex was heterogeneous with respect to carotenoid composition. One fraction of the LH2 complex with carotenoid content around 90% remains stable and was not destroyed under heating for 15 min at 50°C. The other fraction of LH2 complex containing on average less than one molecule of carotenoid per complex was destroyed under heating, forming a zone of free pigments (and polypeptides). The data suggest that a certain part of the LH2 complexes is assembled without carotenoids in cells of the nonsulfur bacterium Rbl. acidophilus grown with DPA. These data contradict the fact that the LH2 complex from nonsulfur bacteria cannot be assembled without carotenoids, but on the other hand, they are in good agreement with the results demonstrated in our earlier studies of the sulfur bacteria Allochromatium minutissimum and Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila. Carotenoidless LH2 complex was obtained from these bacteria with the use of DPA (Moskalenko, A. A., and Makhneva, Z. K. (2012) J. Photochem. Photobiol., 108, 1-7; Ashikhmin, A., et al. (2014) Photosynth. Res., 119, 291-303).

  14. Identification of the upper exciton component of the B850 bacteriochlorophylls of the LH2 antenna complex, using a B800-free mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolhaas, M.H.C.; Frese, R.N.; Fowler, G.J.S.; Bibby, T.S.; Georgakopoulou, S.; van der Zwan, G.; Hunter, C.N.; van Grondelle, R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we report the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of two types of LH2 -only mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In the first, only the wild type LH2 is present, while in the second, the B800 binding site of LH2 has been either destabilized or removed. For the first time, we have

  15. Function of membrane protein in silica nanopores: incorporation of photosynthetic light-harvesting protein LH2 into FSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Ippei; Hirata, Kotaro; Watanabe, Syoko; Shibata, Yutaka; Kajino, Tsutomu; Fukushima, Yoshiaki; Iwai, Satoshi; Itoh, Shigeru

    2006-01-26

    A high amount of functional membrane protein complex was introduced into a folded-sheet silica mesoporous material (FSM) that has nanometer-size pores of honeycomb-like hexagonal cylindrical structure inside. The photosynthetic light-harvesting complex LH2, which is a typical membrane protein, has a cylindrical structure of 7.3 nm diameter and contains 27 bacteriochlorophyll a and nine carotenoid molecules. The complex captures light energy in the anoxygenic thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum. The amount of LH2 adsorbed to FSM was determined optically and by the adsorption isotherms of N2. The FSM compounds with internal pore diameters of 7.9 and 2.7 nm adsorbed LH2 at 1.11 and 0.24 mg/mg FSM, respectively, suggesting the high specific affinity of LH2 to the interior of the hydrophobic nanopores with a diameter of 7.9 nm. The LH2 adsorbed to FSM showed almost intact absorption bands of bacteriochlorophylls, and was fully active in the capture and transfer of excitation energy. The LH2 complex inside the FSM showed increased heat stability of the exciton-type absorption band of bacteriochlorophylls (B850), suggesting higher circular symmetry. The environment inside the hydrophobic silica nanopores can be a new matrix for the membrane proteins to reveal their functions. The silica-membrane protein adduct will be useful for the construction of new probes and reaction systems.

  16. Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner Cracking Problem. Version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Cragg, Clinton H.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliot, Kenny B.; Madaras, Eric I.; Piascik, Robert S.; Halford, Gary R.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Bakhle, Milind A.

    2005-01-01

    In May of 2002, three cracks were found in the downstream flowliner at the gimbal joint in the LH2 feedline at the interface with the Low Pressure Fuel Turbopump (LPFP) of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) #1 of Orbiter OV-104. Subsequent inspections of the feedline flowliners in the other orbiters revealed the existence of 8 additional cracks. No cracks were found in the LO2 feedline flowliners. A solution to the cracking problem was developed and implemented on all orbiters. The solution included weld repair of all detectable cracks and the polishing of all slot edges to remove manufacturing discrepancies that could initiate new cracks. Using the results of a fracture mechanics analysis with a scatter factor of 4 on the predicted fatigue life, the orbiters were cleared for return to flight with a one-flight rationale requiring inspections after each flight. OV-104 flew mission STS-112 and OV-105 flew mission STS-113. The post-flight inspections did not find any cracks in the repaired flowliners. At the request of the Orbiter Program, the NESC conducted an assessment of the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner cracking problem with a team of subject matter experts from throughout NASA.

  17. Synchronous Measurement of Ultrafast Anisotropy Decay of the B850 in Bacterial LH2 Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yun-Peng; Du Lu-Chao; Zhu Gang-Bei; Wang Zhuan; Weng Yu-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast anisotropic decay is a prominent parameter revealing ultrafast energy and electron transfer; however, it is difficult to be determined reliably owing to the requirement of a simultaneous availability of the parallel and perpendicular polarized decay kinetics. Nowadays, any measurement of anisotropic decay is a kind of approach to the exact simultaneity. Here we report a novel method for a synchronous ultrafast anisotropy decay measurement, which can well determine the anisotropy, even at a very early time, as the rising phase of the excitation laser pulse. The anisotropic decay of the B850 in bacterial light harvesting antenna complex LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides in solution at room temperature with coherent excitation is detected by this method, which shows a polarization response time of 30 fs, and the energy transfer from the initial excitation to the bacteriochlorophylls in B850 ring takes about 70 fs. The anisotropic decay that is probed at the red side of the absorption spectrum, such as 880 nm, has an initial value of 0.4, corresponding to simulated emission, while the blue side with an anisotropy of 0.1 contributes to the ground-state bleaching. Our results show that the coherent excitation covering the whole ring might not be realized owing to the symmetry breaking of LH2: from C_9 symmetry in membrane to C_2 symmetry in solution. (atomic and molecular physics)

  18. LH2 Target Design & Position Survey Techniques for the MUSE experiment for Precise Proton Radius Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pottier, Luc; Roy, Pryiashee; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Raymond, Richard; Steinberg, Noah; Rossi de La Fuente, Erick; MUSE (MUon proton Scattering Experiment) Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The proton radius puzzle is a currently unresolved problem which has intrigued the scientific community, dealing with a 7 σ discrepancy between the proton radii determined from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron scattering measurements. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) aims to resolve this puzzle by performing the first simultaneous elastic scattering measurements of both electrons and muons on the proton, which will allow the comparison of the radii from the two interactions with reduced systematic uncertainties. The data from this experiment is expected to provide the best test of lepton universality to date. The experiment will take place at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland in 2018. An essential component of the experiment is a liquid hydrogen (LH2) cryotarget system. Our group at the University of Michigan is responsible for the design, fabrication and installation of this system. Here we present our LH2 target cell design and fabrication techniques for successful operation at 20 K and 1 atm, and our computer vision-based target position survey system which will determine the position of the target, installed inside a vacuum chamber, with 0.01 mm or better precision at the height of the liquid hydrogen target and along the beam direction during the experiment.

  19. Quantum coherence spectroscopy reveals complex dynamics in bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Elad; Engel, Gregory S

    2012-01-17

    Light-harvesting antenna complexes transfer energy from sunlight to photosynthetic reaction centers where charge separation drives cellular metabolism. The process through which pigments transfer excitation energy involves a complex choreography of coherent and incoherent processes mediated by the surrounding protein and solvent environment. The recent discovery of coherent dynamics in photosynthetic light-harvesting antennae has motivated many theoretical models exploring effects of interference in energy transfer phenomena. In this work, we provide experimental evidence of long-lived quantum coherence between the spectrally separated B800 and B850 rings of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria. Spectrally resolved maps of the detuning, dephasing, and the amplitude of electronic coupling between excitons reveal that different relaxation pathways act in concert for optimal transfer efficiency. Furthermore, maps of the phase of the signal suggest that quantum mechanical interference between different energy transfer pathways may be important even at ambient temperature. Such interference at a product state has already been shown to enhance the quantum efficiency of transfer in theoretical models of closed loop systems such as LH2.

  20. Synchronous Measurement of Ultrafast Anisotropy Decay of the B850 in Bacterial LH2 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Du, Lu-Chao; Zhu, Gang-Bei; Wang, Zhuan; Weng, Yu-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast anisotropic decay is a prominent parameter revealing ultrafast energy and electron transfer; however, it is difficult to be determined reliably owing to the requirement of a simultaneous availability of the parallel and perpendicular polarized decay kinetics. Nowadays, any measurement of anisotropic decay is a kind of approach to the exact simultaneity. Here we report a novel method for a synchronous ultrafast anisotropy decay measurement, which can well determine the anisotropy, even at a very early time, as the rising phase of the excitation laser pulse. The anisotropic decay of the B850 in bacterial light harvesting antenna complex LH2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides in solution at room temperature with coherent excitation is detected by this method, which shows a polarization response time of 30 fs, and the energy transfer from the initial excitation to the bacteriochlorophylls in B850 ring takes about 70 fs. The anisotropic decay that is probed at the red side of the absorption spectrum, such as 880 nm, has an initial value of 0.4, corresponding to simulated emission, while the blue side with an anisotropy of 0.1 contributes to the ground-state bleaching. Our results show that the coherent excitation covering the whole ring might not be realized owing to the symmetry breaking of LH2: from C9 symmetry in membrane to C2 symmetry in solution.

  1. Excitonic polarons in quasi-one-dimensional LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll a antenna aggregates from photosynthetic bacteria: A wavelength-dependent selective spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Raetsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kou; Trinkunas, Gediminas

    2009-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of the optically excited states in the ring-shaped quasi-one-dimensional aggregates comprising 18 and 32 tightly coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules have been investigated using selective spectroscopy methods and theoretical modelling of the data. Distinguished by the lowest electronic transition energies in the LH2 and LH1 antenna complexes these aggregates govern the functionally important ultrafast funneling of solar excitation energy in the photosynthetic membranes of purple bacteria. It was found by using a sophisticated differential fluorescence line narrowing method that exciton-phonon coupling in terms of the dimensionless Huang-Rhys factor is strong in these systems, justifying an excitonic polaron theoretical approach for the data analysis. Although we reached this qualitative conclusion already previously, in this work essential dependence of the exciton-phonon coupling strength and reorganization energy on excitation wavelength as well as on excitation light fluence has been established. We then show that these results corroborate with the properties of excitonic polarons in diagonally disordered ensembles of the aggregates. Furthermore, the weighted density of states of the phonon modes, which is an important characteristic of dynamical systems interacting with their surroundings, was derived. Its shape, being similar for all studied circular aggregates, deviates significantly from a reference profile describing local response of a protein to the Q y electronic transition in a single bacteriochlorophyll a molecule. Similarities of the data for regular and B800 deficient mutant LH2 complexes indicate that the B800 pigments have no direct influence on the electronic states of the B850 aggregate system. Consistent set of model parameters was determined, unambiguously implying that excitonic polarons, rather than bare excitons are proper lowest-energy optical excitations in the LH1 and LH2 antenna complexes

  2. Excitonic polarons in quasi-one-dimensional LH1 and LH2 bacteriochlorophyll a antenna aggregates from photosynthetic bacteria: A wavelength-dependent selective spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freiberg, Arvi [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Tartu, Riia 23, 51010 Tartu (Estonia)], E-mail: arvi.freiberg@ut.ee; Raetsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kou [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Trinkunas, Gediminas [Insitute of Physics, Savanoriu pr. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2009-02-23

    Spectral characteristics of the optically excited states in the ring-shaped quasi-one-dimensional aggregates comprising 18 and 32 tightly coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules have been investigated using selective spectroscopy methods and theoretical modelling of the data. Distinguished by the lowest electronic transition energies in the LH2 and LH1 antenna complexes these aggregates govern the functionally important ultrafast funneling of solar excitation energy in the photosynthetic membranes of purple bacteria. It was found by using a sophisticated differential fluorescence line narrowing method that exciton-phonon coupling in terms of the dimensionless Huang-Rhys factor is strong in these systems, justifying an excitonic polaron theoretical approach for the data analysis. Although we reached this qualitative conclusion already previously, in this work essential dependence of the exciton-phonon coupling strength and reorganization energy on excitation wavelength as well as on excitation light fluence has been established. We then show that these results corroborate with the properties of excitonic polarons in diagonally disordered ensembles of the aggregates. Furthermore, the weighted density of states of the phonon modes, which is an important characteristic of dynamical systems interacting with their surroundings, was derived. Its shape, being similar for all studied circular aggregates, deviates significantly from a reference profile describing local response of a protein to the Q{sub y} electronic transition in a single bacteriochlorophyll a molecule. Similarities of the data for regular and B800 deficient mutant LH2 complexes indicate that the B800 pigments have no direct influence on the electronic states of the B850 aggregate system. Consistent set of model parameters was determined, unambiguously implying that excitonic polarons, rather than bare excitons are proper lowest-energy optical excitations in the LH1 and LH2 antenna complexes.

  3. Development Potentials for LH2 Storage System with Advanced Boil-off Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Maemura; Takanobu Kamiya; Shuichi Kawasaki; Ryo Nakamura; Kenji Nakamichi

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes our R and D until 2004 for liquid hydrogen components and system, and current development status summary from 2005 for the LH2 storing, transporting, and refuelling system with the advanced boil-off management using 'slush hydrogen', sponsored by NEDO (domestic projects). The objectives of our study from 2005 are to prove the reduction of the evaporation loss (BOG loss) by utilizing the slush hydrogen, which is the mixture of solids and triple point liquid hydrogen. Use of slush hydrogen rather than atmospheric pressure liquid hydrogen provides the advantage in density and cooling capacity. Assuming a vehicle storage tank size such as 100 to 200 litter ones, the BOG rate can be reduced to 30 percent less than the atmospheric pressure liquid hydrogen is. Present execution plan is to develop, built, and test experimental equipments composed of a slush hydrogen generator, a transfer line, and a storage tank during three years from 2005 to 2007. (authors)

  4. Multilayer-MCTDH approach to the energy transfer dynamics in the LH2 antenna complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibl, Mohamed F; Al-Marri, Mohammed J; Schulze, Jan; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method is used to study the coupled exciton–vibrational dynamics in a high-dimensional nonameric model of the LH2 antenna complex of purple bacteria. The exciton–vibrational coupling is parametrized within the Huang–Rhys model according to phonon and intramolecular vibrational modes derived from an experimental bacteriochlorophyll spectral density. In contrast to reduced density matrix approaches, the Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly, giving access to the full wave function. This facilitates an unbiased analysis in terms of the coupled dynamics of excitonic and vibrational degrees of freedom. For the present system, we identify spectator modes for the B800 to B800 transfer and we find a non-additive effect of phonon and intramolecular vibrational modes on the B800 to B850 exciton transfer. (paper)

  5. Insight into the structure of photosynthetic LH2 aggregate from spectroscopy simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancova, Olga; Sulskus, Juozas; Abramavicius, Darius

    2012-07-12

    Using the electrostatic model of intermolecular interactions, we obtain the Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian parameters for the chlorophyll Qy band of a photosynthetic peripheral light harvesting complex LH2 of a purple bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila from structural data. The intermolecular couplings are mostly determined by the chlorophyll relative positions, whereas the molecular transition energies are determined by the background charge distribution of the whole complex. The protonation pattern of titratable residues is used as a tunable parameter. By studying several protonation state scenarios for distinct protein groups and comparing the simulated absorption and circular dichroism spectra to experiment, we determine the most probable configuration of the protonation states of various side groups of the protein.

  6. Multilayer-MCTDH approach to the energy transfer dynamics in the LH2 antenna complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibl, Mohamed F.; Schulze, Jan; Al-Marri, Mohammed J.; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    The multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method is used to study the coupled exciton-vibrational dynamics in a high-dimensional nonameric model of the LH2 antenna complex of purple bacteria. The exciton-vibrational coupling is parametrized within the Huang-Rhys model according to phonon and intramolecular vibrational modes derived from an experimental bacteriochlorophyll spectral density. In contrast to reduced density matrix approaches, the Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly, giving access to the full wave function. This facilitates an unbiased analysis in terms of the coupled dynamics of excitonic and vibrational degrees of freedom. For the present system, we identify spectator modes for the B800 to B800 transfer and we find a non-additive effect of phonon and intramolecular vibrational modes on the B800 to B850 exciton transfer.

  7. Theory of Excitonic Delocalization for Robust Vibronic Dynamics in LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Lim, James; Oviedo-Casado, Santiago; van Hulst, Niek F; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2018-06-11

    Nonlinear spectroscopy has revealed long-lasting oscillations in the optical response of a variety of photosynthetic complexes. Different theoretical models that involve the coherent coupling of electronic (excitonic) or electronic-vibrational (vibronic) degrees of freedom have been put forward to explain these observations. The ensuing debate concerning the relevance of either mechanism may have obscured their complementarity. To illustrate this balance, we quantify how the excitonic delocalization in the LH2 unit of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila purple bacterium leads to correlations of excitonic energy fluctuations, relevant coherent vibronic coupling, and importantly, a decrease in the excitonic dephasing rates. Combining these effects, we identify a feasible origin for the long-lasting oscillations observed in fluorescent traces from time-delayed two-pulse single-molecule experiments performed on this photosynthetic complex and use this approach to discuss the role of this complementarity in other photosynthetic systems.

  8. The electronically excited states of LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 studied by time-resolved spectroscopy and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. I. Isolated, non-interacting LH2 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflock, Tobias J; Oellerich, Silke; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Ullmann, G Matthias; Köhler, Jürgen

    2011-07-21

    We have employed time-resolved spectroscopy on the picosecond time scale in combination with dynamic Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the photophysical properties of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The variations of the fluorescence transients were studied as a function of the excitation fluence, the repetition rate of the excitation and the sample preparation conditions. Here we present the results obtained on detergent solubilized LH2 complexes, i.e., avoiding intercomplex interactions, and show that a simple four-state model is sufficient to grasp the experimental observations quantitatively without the need for any free parameters. This approach allows us to obtain a quantitative measure for the singlet-triplet annihilation rate in isolated, noninteracting LH2 complexes.

  9. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  10. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals that individual low-light LH2 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris 2.1.6. have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotosudarmo, Tatas H P; Kunz, Ralf; Böhm, Paul; Gardiner, Alastair T; Moulisová, Vladimíra; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2009-09-02

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris belongs to the group of purple bacteria that have the ability to produce LH2 complexes with unusual absorption spectra when they are grown at low-light intensity. This ability is often related to the presence of multiple genes encoding the antenna apoproteins. Here we report, for the first time to our knowledge, direct evidence that individual low-light LH2 complexes have a heterogeneous alphabeta-apoprotein composition that modulates the site energies of Bchl a molecules, producing absorption bands at 800, 820, and 850 nm. The arrangement of the Bchl a molecules in the "tightly coupled ring" can be modeled by nine alphabeta-Bchls dimers, such that the Bchls bound to six alphabeta-pairs have B820-like site energies and the remaining Bchl a molecules have B850-like site energies. Furthermore, the experimental data can only be satisfactorily modeled when these six alphabeta-pairs with B820 Bchl a molecules are distributed such that the symmetry of the assembly is reduced to C(3). It is also clear from the measured single-molecule spectra that the energies of the electronically excited states in the mixed B820/850 ring are mainly influenced by diagonal disorder.

  11. Phonon thermal conductance of disordered graphene strips with armchair edges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lipeng; Xiong Shijie

    2009-01-01

    Based on the model of lattice dynamics together with the transfer matrix technique, we investigate the thermal conductances of phonons in quasi-one-dimensional disordered graphene strips with armchair edges using Landauer formalism for thermal transport. It is found that the contributions to thermal conductance from the phonon transport near von Hove singularities is significantly suppressed by the presence of disorder, on the contrary to the effect of disorder on phonon modes in other frequency regions. Besides the magnitude, for different widths of the strips, the thermal conductance also shows different temperature dependence. At low temperatures, the thermal conductance displays quantized features of both pure and disordered graphene strips implying that the transmission of phonon modes at low frequencies are almost unaffected by the disorder

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 from Marichromatium purpuratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Laura J; Roszak, Aleksander W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    LH2 from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Marichromatium (formerly known as Chromatium) purpuratum is an integral membrane pigment-protein complex that is involved in harvesting light energy and transferring it to the LH1-RC `core' complex. The purified LH2 complex was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. The crystals diffracted to a resolution of 6 Å using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the tetragonal space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a=b=109.36, c=80.45 Å. The data appeared to be twinned, producing apparent diffraction symmetry I422. The tetragonal symmetry of the unit cell and diffraction for the crystals of the LH2 complex from this species reveal that this complex is an octamer.

  13. Singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation in light-harvesting LH2 complexes of purple phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenina, I B; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A; Gudkov, N D; Bolshakov, M A; Pavlova, E A; Proskuryakov, I I

    2014-03-01

    The current generally accepted structure of light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple phototrophic bacteria conflicts with the observation of singlet-triplet carotenoid excitation fission in these complexes. In LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum, a drop in the efficiency of carotenoid triplet generation is demonstrated, which correlates with the extent of selective photooxidation of bacteriochlorophylls absorbing at ~850 nm. We conclude that singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation proceeds with participation of these excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophylls. In the framework of the proposed mechanism, the contradiction between LH2 structure and photophysical properties of carotenoids is eliminated. The possibility of singlet-triplet excitation fission involving a third mediator molecule was not considered earlier.

  14. Conformational Complexity in the LH2 Antenna of the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum Revealed by Hole-Burning Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Adam; Jassas, Mahboobe; Acharya, Khem; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2017-06-15

    This work discusses the protein conformational complexity of the B800-850 LH2 complexes from the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, focusing on the spectral characteristics of the B850 chromophores. Low-temperature B850 absorption and the split B800 band shift blue and red, respectively, at elevated temperatures, revealing isosbestic points. The latter indicates the presence of two (unresolved) conformations of B850 bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), referred to as conformations 1 and 2, and two conformations of B800 BChls, denoted as B800 R and B800 B . The energy differences between average site energies of conformations 1 and 2, and B800 R and B800 B are similar (∼200 cm -1 ), suggesting weak and strong hydrogen bonds linking two major subpopulations of BChls and the protein scaffolding. Although conformations 1 and 2 of the B850 chromophores, and B800 R and B800 B , exist in the ground state, selective excitation leads to 1 → 2 and B800 R → B800 B phototransformations. Different static inhomogeneous broadening is revealed for the lowest energy exciton states of B850 (fwhm ∼195 cm -1 ) and B800 R (fwhm ∼140 cm -1 ). To describe the 5 K absorption spectrum and the above-mentioned conformations, we employ an exciton model with dichotomous protein conformation disorder. We show that both experimental data and the modeling study support a two-site model with strongly and weakly hydrogen-bonded B850 and B800 BChls, which under illumination undergo conformational changes, most likely caused by proton dynamics.

  15. Results of Semiscale Mod-2C small-break (5%) loss-of-coolant accident. Experiments S-LH-1 and S-LH-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Streit, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    Two experiments simulating small break (5%) loss-of-coolant accidents (5% SBLOCAs) were performed in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. These experiments were identical except for downcomer-to-upper-head bypass flow (0.9% in Experiment S-LH-1 and 3.0% in Experiment S-LH-2) and were performed at high pressure and temperature [15.6 MPa (2262 psia) system pressure; 37 K (67 0 F) core differential temperature; 595 K(610 0 F) hot leg fluid temperature]. From the experimental results, the signature response and transient mass distribution are determined for a 5% SBLOCA. The core thermal-hydraulic response is characterized, including core void distribution maps, and the effect of core bypass flow on transient severity is assessed. Comparisons are made between postexperiment RELAP5 calculations and the experimental results, and the capability of RELAP5 to calculate the phenomena is assessed. 115 figs

  16. Optimal fold symmetry of LH2 rings on a photosynthetic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Liam; Chen, Hang; Chuang, Chern; Silbey, Robert J; Cao, Jianshu

    2013-05-21

    An intriguing observation of photosynthetic light-harvesting systems is the N-fold symmetry of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of purple bacteria. We calculate the optimal rotational configuration of N-fold rings on a hexagonal lattice and establish two related mechanisms for the promotion of maximum excitation energy transfer (EET). (i) For certain fold numbers, there exist optimal basis cells with rotational symmetry, extendable to the entire lattice for the global optimization of the EET network. (ii) The type of basis cell can reduce or remove the frustration of EET rates across the photosynthetic network. We find that the existence of a basis cell and its type are directly related to the number of matching points S between the fold symmetry and the hexagonal lattice. The two complementary mechanisms provide selection criteria for the fold number and identify groups of consecutive numbers. Remarkably, one such group consists of the naturally occurring 8-, 9-, and 10-fold rings. By considering the inter-ring distance and EET rate, we demonstrate that this group can achieve minimal rotational sensitivity in addition to an optimal packing density, achieving robust and efficient EET. This corroborates our findings i and ii and, through their direct relation to S, suggests the design principle of matching the internal symmetry with the lattice order.

  17. Intermolecular Modes between LH2 Bacteriochlorophylls and Protein Residues: The Effect on the Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, André; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten

    2017-06-08

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) executes the primary processes of photosynthesis in purple bacteria; photon absorption, and energy transportation to the reaction center. A detailed mechanistic insight into these operations is obscured by the complexity of the light-harvesting systems, particularly by the chromophore-environment interaction. In this work, we focus on the effects of the protein residues that are ligated to the bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and construct potential energy surfaces of the ground and first optically excited state for the various BChl-residue systems where we in each case consider two degrees of freedom in the intermolecular region. We find that the excitation energies are only slightly affected by the considered modes. In addition, we see that axial ligands and hydrogen-bonded residues have opposite effects on both excitation energies and oscillator strengths by comparing to the isolated BChls. Our results indicate that only a small part of the chromophore-environment interaction can be associated with the intermolecular region between a BChl and an adjacent residue, but that it may be possible to selectively raise or lower the excitation energy at the axial and planar residue positions, respectively.

  18. LH2 tank pressure control by thermodynamic vent system (TVS) at zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Z. C.; Wu, J. Y.; Li, P.; Sun, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is employed for pressure control of propellant tanks at zero gravity. An analytical lumped parameter model is developed to predict pressure variation in an 18.09 m3 liquid hydrogen tank equipped with TVS. Mathematical simulations are carried out assuming tank is filled up to 75% volume (liquid mass equals to 945 kg) and is subjected to heat flux of 0.76 W/m2. Tank pressure controls at 165.5-172.4, 165.5-179.3 and 165.5-182.2 kPa are compared with reference to number of vent cycles, vent duration per cycle and loss of hydrogen. Analysis results indicate that the number of vent cycles significantly decreases from 62 to 21 when tank pressure control increases from 6.9 to 20.4 kPa. Also, duration of vent cycle increases from 63 to 152 and cycle duration decreases from 3920 to 3200 s. Further, the analysis result suggests that LH2 evaporation loss per day decreases from 0.17 to 0.14%. Based on the results of analysis, TVS is found effective in controlling the propellant tank pressure in zero gravity.

  19. Two dimensional crystals of LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oling, Frank; Boekema, EJ; deZarate, IO; Visschers, R; vanGrondelle, R; Keegstra, W; Brisson, A; Picorel, R

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 (B800-850) light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp, and Rhodobacter capsulatus were obtained by reconstitution of purified protein into phospholipid vesicles and characterized by electron microscopy. The size of the crystals was up to several

  20. In silico predictions of LH2 ring sizes from the crystal structure of a single subunit using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosi, Lorant; Keer, Harindar; Cogdell, Richard J; Ritz, Thorsten; Kosztin, Ioan

    2011-07-01

    Most of the currently known light-harvesting complexes 2 (LH2) rings are formed by 8 or 9 subunits. As of now, questions like "what factors govern the LH2 ring size?" and "are there other ring sizes possible?" remain largely unanswered. Here, we investigate by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and stochastic modeling the possibility of predicting the size of an LH2 ring from the sole knowledge of the high resolution crystal structure of a single subunit. Starting with single subunits of two LH2 rings with known size, that is, an 8-ring from Rs. moliscianum (MOLI) and a 9-ring from Rps. acidophila (ACI), and one with unknown size (referred to as X), we build atomic models of subunit dimers corresponding to assumed 8-, 9-, and 10-ring geometries. After inserting each of the dimers into a lipid-water environment, we determine the preferred angle between the corresponding subunits by three methods: (1) energy minimization, (2) free MD simulations, and (3) potential of mean force calculations. We find that the results from all three methods are consistent with each other, and when taken together, it allows one to predict with reasonable level of confidence the sizes of the corresponding ring structures. One finds that X and ACI very likely form a 9-ring, while MOLI is more likely to form an 8-ring than a 9-ring. Finally, we discuss both the merits and limitations of all three prediction methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Energy transfer in LH2 of Rhodospirillum Molischianum, studied by subpicosecond spectroscopy and configuration interaction excition calculations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ihalainen, J.A.; Linnanto, J.; Myllyperkiö, P.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Ücker, B.; Scheer, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Two color transient absorption measurements were performed on a LH2 complex from Rhodospirillum molischianum by using several excitation wavelengths (790, 800, 810, and 830 nm) and probing in the spectral region from 790 to 870 nm at room temperature. The observed energy transfer time of ∼1.0 ps

  2. Fluorescence polarization measures energy funneling in single light-harvesting antennas--LH2 vs conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Rafael; Tubasum, Sumera; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Sforazzini, Giuseppe; Anderson, Harry L; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2015-10-19

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to mimic natural photosynthesis using artificial antenna systems, such as conjugated polymers (CPs), dendrimers, and J-aggregates. As a result, there is a need to characterize and compare the excitation energy transfer (EET) properties of various natural and artificial antennas. Here we experimentally show that EET in single antennas can be characterized by 2D polarization imaging using the single funnel approximation. This methodology addresses the ability of an individual antenna to transfer its absorbed energy towards a single pool of emissive states, using a single parameter called energy funneling efficiency (ε). We studied individual peripheral antennas of purple bacteria (LH2) and single CP chains of 20 nm length. As expected from a perfect antenna, LH2s showed funneling efficiencies close to unity. In contrast, CPs showed lower average funneling efficiencies, greatly varying from molecule to molecule. Cyclodextrin insulation of the conjugated backbone improves EET, increasing the fraction of CPs possessing ε = 1. Comparison between LH2s and CPs shows the importance of the protection systems and the protein scaffold of LH2, which keep the chromophores in functional form and at such geometrical arrangement that ensures excellent EET.

  3. Fluorescence polarization measures energy funneling in single light-harvesting antennas—LH2 vs conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Rafael; Tubasum, Sumera; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J.; Sforazzini, Giuseppe; Anderson, Harry L.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Scheblykin, Ivan G.

    2015-10-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to mimic natural photosynthesis using artificial antenna systems, such as conjugated polymers (CPs), dendrimers, and J-aggregates. As a result, there is a need to characterize and compare the excitation energy transfer (EET) properties of various natural and artificial antennas. Here we experimentally show that EET in single antennas can be characterized by 2D polarization imaging using the single funnel approximation. This methodology addresses the ability of an individual antenna to transfer its absorbed energy towards a single pool of emissive states, using a single parameter called energy funneling efficiency (ɛ). We studied individual peripheral antennas of purple bacteria (LH2) and single CP chains of 20 nm length. As expected from a perfect antenna, LH2s showed funneling efficiencies close to unity. In contrast, CPs showed lower average funneling efficiencies, greatly varying from molecule to molecule. Cyclodextrin insulation of the conjugated backbone improves EET, increasing the fraction of CPs possessing ɛ = 1. Comparison between LH2s and CPs shows the importance of the protection systems and the protein scaffold of LH2, which keep the chromophores in functional form and at such geometrical arrangement that ensures excellent EET.

  4. Energy transfer in LH2 of Rhodospirillum Molischianum, studied by subpicosecond spectroscopy and configuration interaction exciton calculations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ihalainen, J.A.; Linnanto, J.; Myllyperkio, P.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; Ucker, B.; Scheer, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Two color transient absorption measurements were performed on a LH2 complex from Rhodospirillum molischianum by using several excitation wavelengths (790, 800, 810, and 830 nm) and probing in the spectral region from 790 to 870 nm at room temperature. The observed energy transfer time of ∼1.0 ps

  5. Thermal conductivity at a disordered quantum critical point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Ramirez, David M.; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Strongly disordered and strongly interacting quantum critical points are difficult to access with conventional field theoretic methods. They are, however, both experimentally important and theoretically interesting. In particular, they are expected to realize universal incoherent transport. Such disordered quantum critical theories have recently been constructed holographically by deforming a CFT by marginally relevant disorder. In this paper we find additional disordered fixed points via relevant disordered deformations of a holographic CFT. Using recently developed methods in holographic transport, we characterize the thermal conductivity in both sets of theories in 1+1 dimensions. The thermal conductivity is found to tend to a constant at low temperatures in one class of fixed points, and to scale as T"0"."3 in the other. Furthermore, in all cases the thermal conductivity exhibits discrete scale invariance, with logarithmic in temperature oscillations superimposed on the low temperature scaling behavior. At no point do we use the replica trick.

  6. [Influence of LDAO on the conformation and release of bacteriochlorophyll of peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) from Rhodobacter azotoformans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gen-gui; Dong, Yan-min; Yang, Su-ping; Jiao, Nian-zhi; Qu, Yin-bo

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the interaction relationships between lauryl dimethylamine N-oxide (LDAO) and peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) as well as the influence of LDAO on structure and function of LH2. In the present work, the effects of LDAO on the conformation and release processes of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) of LH2 when incubated under different temperature and pH in the presence and absence of LDAO were investigated by spectroscopy. The results indicated that (1) the presence of LDAO resulted in alterations in the conformation, alpha-helix content, and spectra of Tyr and B850 band of LH2 at room temperature and pH 8.0. Moreover, energy transfer efficiency of LH2 was enhanced markedly in the presence of LDAO. (2) At 60 degrees C, both the B800 and B850 band of LH2 were released and transited into free BChl at pH 8.0. However, the release rates of bacteriochlorophylls of B800 and B850 band from LH2 were slowed down and the release processes were changed when incubated in the presence of LDAO. Hence, the stability of LH2 was improved in the presence of LDAO. (3) The accelerated release processes of bacteriochlorophylls of B800 and B850 band of LH2 were induced to transform into bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) and free BChl by LDAO in strong acid and strong alkalic solution at room temperature. However, the kinetic patterns of the B800 and B850 band were remarkably different. The release and self-assemble processes of B850 in LH2 were observed in strong acid solution without LDAO. Therefore, the different release behaviors of B800 and B850 of LH2 are induced by LDAO under different extreme environmental conditions.

  7. Static and dynamic protein impact on electronic properties of light-harvesting complex LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerlauskiene, O; Trinkunas, G; Gall, A; Robert, B; Urboniene, V; Valkunas, L

    2008-12-11

    A comparative analysis of the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of the LH2 complexes from different species of photosynthetic bacteria, i.e., Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodoblastus acidophilus, and Phaeospirillum molischianum, was performed in the temperature range from 4 to 300 K. Qualitatively, the temperature dependence is similar for all of the species studied. The spectral bandwidths of both B800 and B850 bands increases with temperature while the band positions shift in opposite directions: the B800 band shifts slightly to the red while the B850 band to the blue. These results were analyzed using the modified Redfield theory based on the exciton model. The main conclusion drawn from the analysis was that the spectral density function (SDF) is the main factor underlying the strength of the temperature dependence of the bandwidths for the B800 and B850 electronic transitions, while the bandwidths themselves are defined by the corresponding inhomogeneous distribution function (IDF). Slight variation of the slope of the temperature dependence of the bandwidths between species can be attributed to the changes of the values of the reorganization energies and characteristic frequencies determining the SDF. To explain the shift of the B850 band position with temperature, which is unusual for the conventional exciton model, a temperature dependence of the IDF must be postulated. This dependence can be achieved within the framework of the modified (dichotomous) exciton model. The slope of the temperature dependence of the B850 bandwidth is then defined by the value of the reorganization energy and by the difference between the transition energies of the dichotomous states of the pigment molecules. The equilibration factor between these dichotomous states mainly determines the temperature dependence of the peak shift.

  8. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Technology Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromski, Jason; Majamaki, Annik; Chianese, Silvio; Weinstock, Vladimir; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of future lander missions. To meet lander requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202 engine. The TR202 is a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two series of pintle injector testing. The first series of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at discrete points throughout the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second series was conducted with calorimeter chambers and demonstrated injector performance at discrete points throughout the throttle range as well as chamber heat flow adequate to power an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program, describing the different phases and key milestones. It describes how test data was correlated to the engine conceptual design. The test data obtained has created a valuable database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology, a technology that is readily scalable in thrust level.

  9. Operational Issues in the Development of a Cost-Effective Reusable LOX/LH2 Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) was initiated in early 2001 to conduct technology development and to reduce the business and technical risk associated with developing the next-generation reusable launch system. In the field of main propulsion, two LOXLH2 rocket engine systems, the Pratt & Whitney / Aerojet Joint Venture (JV) COBRA and the Rocketdyne RS-83, were funded to develop a safe, economical, and reusable propulsion system. Given that a large-thrust reusable rocket engine program had not been started in the U.S. since 1971, with the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), this provided an opportunity to build on the experience developed on the SSME system, while exploiting advances in technology that had occurred in the intervening 30 years. One facet of engine development that was identified as being especially vital in order to produce an optimal system was in the areas of operability and maintainability. In order to achieve the high levels of performance required by the Space Shuttle, the SSME system is highly complex with very tight tolerances and detailed requirements. Over the lifetime of the SSME program, the engine has required a high level of manpower to support the performance of inspections, maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) and operations (prelaunch and post-flight). As a consequence, the labor- intensive needs of the SSME provide a significant impact to the overall cost efficiency of the Space Transportation System (STS). One of the strategic goals of the SLI is to reduce cost by requiring the engine(s) to be easier (Le. less expensive) to operate and maintain. The most effective means of accomplishing this goal is to infuse the operability and maintainability features into the engine design from the start. This paper discusses some of the operational issues relevant to a reusable LOx/LH2 main engine, and the means by which their impact is mitigated in the design phase.

  10. Transient absorption study of two-photon excitation mechanism in the LH2 complex from purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Ilya; Kompanetz, Viktor; Makhneva, Zoya; Chekalin, Sergey; Moskalenko, Andrei; Razjivin, Andrei

    2012-03-08

    The mechanism of two-photon excitation of a peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 (B800-850) from purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was explained on the basis of femtosecond transient absorption data. Fast bleaching of the B850 absorption band was measured under two-photon excitation by 1350 nm femtosecond pulses, showing fast subpicosecond arrival of excitation energy to B850 circular aggregates. Any spectral changes connected with the B800 absorption band of B800-BChl molecules were absent. A similar picture was observed under one-photon excitation of the LH2 complex by 675 nm femtosecond pulses. We believe these effects may be attributed to direct excitation of high-energy excitonic states of a B850 circular aggregate or its vibrational manifold in accordance with the model of Abe [Chem. Phys. 2001, 264, 355-363].

  11. KEA-144: Final Results of the Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William; Fesmire, James; Swanger, Adam; Jumper, Kevin; Johnson, Wesley; Tomsik, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    GODU-LH2 system has successfully met all test objectives at the 33%, 67%, and 100% tank fill level. Complete control over the state of the fluid has been demonstrated using Integrated Refrigeration and Storage (IRAS). Almost any desired point along the H2saturation curve can essentially be "dialed in" and maintained indefinitely. System can also be used to produce densified hydrogen in large quantities to the triple point. Exploring multiple technology infusion paths. Studying implementation of IRAS technology into new LH2sphere for EM-2 at LC39B. Technical interchange also occurring with STMD, LSP, ULA, DoE, KIST, Kawasaki, Shell Oil, SpaceX, US Coast Guard, and Virgin Galactic.

  12. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Project Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromski, J.; Majamaki, A. N.; Chianese, S. G.; Weinstock, V. D.; Kim, T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of the Exploration Initiative, with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Project. To meet Altair requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the lunar descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202, a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two phases of pintle injector testing. The first phase of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at several power levels across the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second phase of testing was performed on a calorimeter chamber and demonstrated injector performance at various power levels (75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 7.5%) across the throttle range as well as chamber heat flux to show that the engine can close an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program. It describes the different phases of the program with the key milestones of each phase. It then shows when those milestones were met. Next, it describes how the test data was used to update the conceptual design and how the test data has created a database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology that is readily scaleable and can be used to again update the design once the Altair program's requirements are firm. The final section of the paper describes the path forward, which includes

  13. Spectral dynamics in the B800 band of LH2 from Rhodospirillum molischianum: a single-molecule study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Clemens; Aartsma, Thijs J; Michel, Hartmut; Koehler, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    The BChl a absorptions in the B800 spectrum of individual LH2 complexes from Rhodospirillum molischianum show sudden, reversible spectral jumps between a finite number of spectral positions. From our data, we conclude that these fluctuations result from conformational changes of the protein backbone in close vicinity of the chromophores which provides a sensitive tool to monitor local modulations of the pigment-protein interaction

  14. The LH2 complexes are assembled in the cells of purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila with inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashikhmin, Aleksandr; Makhneva, Zoya; Moskalenko, Andrey

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the inhibitor of carotenoid (Car) biosynthesis, diphenylamine (DPA), on the cells of the purple sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira (Ect.) haloalkaliphila has been studied. There occurs an inhibition of the biosynthesis of colored Cars (≥99 %) at 71 μM DPA. Considering "empty" Car pockets (Moskalenko and Makhneva 2012) the content of Cars in the DPA-treated samples is first calculated more correctly. The total content of the colored Cars in the sample at 71 μM DPA does not exceed 1 % of the wild type. In the DPA-treated cells (membranes) a complete set of pigment-protein complexes is retained. The LH2 complex at 71 μM DPA is isolated, which is identical to the LH2 complex of the wild type in near IR absorption spectra. This suggests that the principles for assembling this LH2 complex in vivo in the absence of colored Cars remain the same. These results are in full agreement with the data obtained earlier for Allochromatium (Alc.) minutissimum (Moskalenko and Makhneva 2012). They are as follows: (1) DPA almost entirely inhibits the biosynthesis of the colored Cars in Ect. haloalkaliphila cells. (2) In the DPA-treated samples non-colored Cars are detected at 53.25 μM DPA (as traces) and at 71 μM DPA. (3) DPA may affect both phytoene synthase (at ≤71 μM DPA) and phytoene desaturase (at ≥53.25 μM DPA). (4) The assembly of LH2 complex does occur without any colored Cars.

  15. Evidence for high-pressure-induced rupture of hydrogen bonds in LH2 photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangur, L; Leiger, K; Freiberg, A

    2008-01-01

    The bacteriochlorophyll a-containing LH2 light harvesting complex is an integral membrane protein that catalyzes the photosynthetic process in purple photosynthetic bacteria. The LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides show characteristic strong absorbance at 800 and 850 nm due to the bacteriochlorophyll a molecules confined in two separate areas of the protein. Using these cofactors as intrinsic probes to monitor changes in membrane protein structure, we investigate the response to high hydrostatic pressure up to 2.1 GPa of LH2 complexes embedded into natural membrane environment or extracted with detergent. We demonstrate that high pressure does induce significant alterations to the tertiary structure of the protein in proximity of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, including breakage of the hydrogen bond they are involved in. The membrane-embedded complexes appear more resilient to damaging effects of the compression than the complexes extracted into detergent environment. This difference has tentatively been explained by more compact structure of the membrane-embedded complexes

  16. Evidence for high-pressure-induced rupture of hydrogen bonds in LH2 photosynthetic antenna pigment-protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangur, L; Leiger, K; Freiberg, A [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Riia 142, Tartu 51014 (Estonia)

    2008-07-15

    The bacteriochlorophyll a-containing LH2 light harvesting complex is an integral membrane protein that catalyzes the photosynthetic process in purple photosynthetic bacteria. The LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides show characteristic strong absorbance at 800 and 850 nm due to the bacteriochlorophyll a molecules confined in two separate areas of the protein. Using these cofactors as intrinsic probes to monitor changes in membrane protein structure, we investigate the response to high hydrostatic pressure up to 2.1 GPa of LH2 complexes embedded into natural membrane environment or extracted with detergent. We demonstrate that high pressure does induce significant alterations to the tertiary structure of the protein in proximity of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophyll a molecules, including breakage of the hydrogen bond they are involved in. The membrane-embedded complexes appear more resilient to damaging effects of the compression than the complexes extracted into detergent environment. This difference has tentatively been explained by more compact structure of the membrane-embedded complexes.

  17. Heterogeneity of carotenoid content and composition in LH2 of the purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum grown under carotenoid-biosynthesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhneva, Zoya; Bolshakov, Maksim; Moskalenko, Andrey

    2008-01-01

    The effects brought about by growing Allochromatium (Alc.) minutissimum in the presence of different concentrations of the carotenoid (Car) biosynthetic inhibitor diphenylamine (DPA) have been investigated. A decrease of Car content (from approximately 70% to >5%) in the membranes was accompanied by an increase of the percentage of (immature) Cars with reduced numbers of conjugated C=C bonds (from neurosporene to phytoene). Based on the obtained results and the analysis of literature data, the conclusion is reached that accumulation of phytoene during inhibition did not occur. Surprisingly, DPA inhibited phytoene synthase instead of phytoene desaturase as generally assumed. The distribution of Cars in peripheral antenna (LH2) complexes and their effect on the stability of LH2 has been investigated using absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. Heterogeneity of Car composition and contents in the LH2 pool is revealed. The Car contents in LH2 varied widely from control levels to complete absence. According to common view, the assembly of LH2 occurs only in the presence of Cars. Here, we show that the LH2 can be assembled without any Cars. The presence of Cars, however, is important for structural stability of LH2 complexes.

  18. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering investigation on integral membrane protein light-harvesting complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacterium rhodopseudomonas acidophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Luchao; Weng Yuxiang; Hong Xinguo; Xian Dingchang; Kobayashi Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2. (authors)

  19. Carotenoid stoichiometry in the LH2 crystal: no spectral evidence for the presence of the second molecule in the alpha/beta-apoprotein dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Andrew; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Robert, Bruno

    2006-07-10

    In this work we have investigated the carotenoid-protein interactions in LH2 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila both in "free in solution" mixed-micelles and in three-dimensional crystals by Raman spectroscopy in resonance with the carotenoid (Car) molecules. We show that the Car molecules when bound to their binding pockets show no significant differences when the complexes are "free in solution" or packed in crystalline arrays. Furthermore, there is no significant wavelength dependence in the Raman spectrum of the Car molecules of LH2. This indicates that there is only one Car configuration in LH2 and thus only one molecule per alpha/beta-heterodimer.

  20. Ultrafast time-resolved carotenoid to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 complexes from photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; LaFountain, Amy M; Kelsh, Rhiannon M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2008-08-28

    Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic investigations have been carried out at 293 and 10 K on LH2 pigment-protein complexes isolated from three different strains of photosynthetic bacteria: Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides G1C, Rb. sphaeroides 2.4.1 (anaerobically and aerobically grown), and Rps. acidophila 10050. The LH2 complexes obtained from these strains contain the carotenoids, neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, and rhodopin glucoside, respectively. These molecules have a systematically increasing number of pi-electron conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence excitation experiments have revealed that the total efficiency of energy transfer from the carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll is independent of temperature and nearly constant at approximately 90% for the LH2 complexes containing neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, but drops to approximately 53% for the complex containing rhodopin glucoside. Ultrafast transient absorption spectra in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the purified carotenoids in solution have revealed the energies of the S1 (2(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited-state transitions which, when subtracted from the energies of the S0 (1(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) transitions determined by steady-state absorption measurements, give precise values for the positions of the S1 (2(1)Ag-) states of the carotenoids. Global fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets have revealed the dynamics of the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states. The pathways include energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll, population of the so-called S* state of the carotenoids, and formation of carotenoid radical cations (Car*+). The investigation has found that excitation energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll is partitioned through the S1 (1(1)Ag-), S2 (1(1)Bu+), and S* states of the different carotenoids to varying degrees. This is understood through a consideration of the

  1. A Computational Method for Determining the Equilibrium Composition and Product Temperature in a LH2/LOX Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozen, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    In what follows, the model used for combustion of liquid hydrogen (LH2) with liquid oxygen (LOX) using chemical equilibrium assumption, and the novel computational method developed for determining the equilibrium composition and temperature of the combustion products by application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics will be described. The modular FORTRAN code developed as a subroutine that can be incorporated into any flow network code with little effort has been successfully implemented in GFSSP as the preliminary runs indicate. The code provides capability of modeling the heat transfer rate to the coolants for parametric analysis in system design.

  2. Tracing of backward energy transfer from LH1 to LH2 in photosynthetic membranes grown under high and low irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanzani G.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available By introducing derivative transient absorption spectroscopy, we obtain rate constants for backward and forward energy transfer between LH1 and LH2 complexes in purple bacterial membranes. We find that backward energy transfer is strongly reduced in membranes grown under low irradiation conditions, compared to high light grown ones. We conclude that backward energy transfer is managed actively by the bacteria to avoid LH1 exciton deactivation under high irradiation conditions. The analytical method is generally applicable to excitonically coupled systems.

  3. Quick look report for Semiscale Mod-2C experiments S-LH-1 and S-LH-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Streit, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    Results from a preliminary analysis of Semiscale Tests S-LH-1 and S-LH-2 are presented. Both experiments were 5%, cold leg, centerline pipe break, loss-of-coolant accident simulations with only the downcomer to upper head bypass flow different. Test S-LH-1 had a bypass flow of 0.9% of core flow and Test S-LH-2 had a 3% bypass flow. Phenomena of interest included two core liquid level depressions with minor core rod temperature excursions. The first liquid level depression was induced by a manometric balance formed by a liquid seal in the pump suctions of both loops and the second level depletion was due to core liquid boiloff. Pump suction seal clearing mitigated the first core heatup and accumulator flow refilled the core to terminate the second core heatup. Comparisons are made between a pretest RELAP5 calculation and S-LH-1 data. RELAP5 calculated the manometric core level depression but not the core rod heatups

  4. Design and development of polyphenylene oxide foam as a reusable internal insulation for LH2 tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Material specification and fabrication process procedures for foam production are presented. The properties of mechanical strength, modulus of elasticity, density and thermal conductivity were measured and related to foam quality. Properties unique to the foam such as a gas layer insulation, density gradient parallel to the fiber direction, and gas flow conductance in both directions were correlated with foam quality. Inspection and quality control tests procedures are outlined and photographs of test equipment and test specimens are shown.

  5. Theory of thermal conductivity in the disordered electron liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwiete, G., E-mail: schwiete@uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Spin Phenomena Interdisciplinary Center (SPICE) and Institut für Physik (Germany); Finkel’stein, A. M. [Texas A& M University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We study thermal conductivity in the disordered two-dimensional electron liquid in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. We describe a microscopic analysis of the problem using the partition function defined on the Keldysh contour as a starting point. We extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for thermal transport in the disordered Fermi liquid and include scattering processes induced by the long-range Coulomb interaction in the sub-temperature energy range. For the thermal conductivity, unlike for the electrical conductivity, these scattering processes yield a logarithmic correction that may compete with the RG corrections. The interest in this correction arises from the fact that it violates the Wiedemann–Franz law. We checked that the sub-temperature correction to the thermal conductivity is not modified either by the inclusion of Fermi liquid interaction amplitudes or as a result of the RG flow. We therefore expect that the answer obtained for this correction is final. We use the theory to describe thermal transport on the metallic side of the metal–insulator transition in Si MOSFETs.

  6. Theory of thermal conductivity in the disordered electron liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwiete, G.; Finkel’stein, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    We study thermal conductivity in the disordered two-dimensional electron liquid in the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions. We describe a microscopic analysis of the problem using the partition function defined on the Keldysh contour as a starting point. We extend the renormalization group (RG) analysis developed for thermal transport in the disordered Fermi liquid and include scattering processes induced by the long-range Coulomb interaction in the sub-temperature energy range. For the thermal conductivity, unlike for the electrical conductivity, these scattering processes yield a logarithmic correction that may compete with the RG corrections. The interest in this correction arises from the fact that it violates the Wiedemann–Franz law. We checked that the sub-temperature correction to the thermal conductivity is not modified either by the inclusion of Fermi liquid interaction amplitudes or as a result of the RG flow. We therefore expect that the answer obtained for this correction is final. We use the theory to describe thermal transport on the metallic side of the metal–insulator transition in Si MOSFETs.

  7. LH2 on-orbit storage tank support trunnion design and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Fester, D.A.; Toth, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    A subcritical liquid hydrogen orbital storage and transfer experiment is being designed for flight in the shuttle cargo bay. The Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility (CFMF) includes a liquid hydrogen storage tank supported in a vacuum jacket by two fiberglass epoxy composite trunnion mounts. The capability of the CFMF to meet a seven mission requirement is extremely sensitive to the fatigue life of the composite trunnions at cryogenic temperatures. An E-glass/S-glass epoxy composite material was selected for the trunnions since it provided desirable strength, weight and thermal characteristics. Because of the limited extent of analytical or experimental treatment of the fatigue life of this composite at cryogenic temperature, an experimental program was conducted to provide verification of the trunnion design and performance capability at ambient and liquid hydrogen temperatures. Basic material fatigue property data were obtained for the laminate of interest using specifically prepared test specimens. Full-scale trunnions were manufactured and subjected to cyclic load testing to verify fatigue life. An analytical evaluation of the thermal performance of the trunnions was conducted, and a test setup is being manufactured to correlate analytical predictions with test results

  8. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttles to Avoid Excessively Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfling, Rick

    2011-01-01

    In the late 1970s, years before the Space Shuttle flew its maiden voyage, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) could have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition, which at extremely low levels can result in cavitation of SSME turbomachinery. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs (via the Pilot s Speedbrake/Throttle Controller), which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. Manually throttling the SSME to a lower power level resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at the lower throttle setting. Early in the Space Shuttle Program s history, the relevant Flight Rule for the Booster flight controllers in Mission Control did not distinguish between ET and Orbiter MPS failures and the same crew action was taken for both. However, after a review of all Booster operational techniques following the Challenger disaster in the late 1980s, it was determined manually throttling the SSME to a lower power was only effective for Orbiter MPS failures and the Flight Rule was updated to reflect this change. The Flight Rule and associated crew actions initially called for a single throttle step to minimum power level when a low threshold for NPSP was met. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of the additional capabilities. This paper will examine the evolution of the Flight rule and associated procedure and how increases in knowledge about the SSME and the Space Shuttle vehicle as a whole have helped shape their development. What once was a single throttle step when NPSP decreased to a

  9. The Evolution of Utilizing Manual Throttling to Avoid Excessively Low LH2 NPSP at the SSME Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfling, Rick

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1970s, years before the Space Shuttle flew its maiden voyage, it was understood low liquid hydrogen (LH2) Net Positive Suction Pressure (NPSP) at the inlet to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) could have adverse effects on engine operation. A number of failures within both the External Tank (ET) and the Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS) could result in a low LH2 NPSP condition, which at extremely low levels can result in cavitation of SSME turbomachinery. Operational workarounds were developed to take advantage of the onboard crew s ability to manually throttle down the SSMEs (via the Pilot s Speedbrake/Throttle Controller), which alleviated the low LH2 NPSP condition. Manually throttling the SSME to a lower power level resulted in an increase in NPSP, mainly due to the reduction in frictional flow losses while at the lower throttle setting. Early in the Space Shuttle Program s history, the relevant Flight Rule for the Booster flight controller in Mission Control did not distinguish between ET and Orbiter MPS failures and the same crew action was taken for both. However, after a review of all Booster operational techniques following the Challenger disaster in the late 1980s, it was determined manually throttling the SSME to a lower power was only effective for Orbiter MPS failures and the Flight Rule was updated to reflect this change. The Flight Rule and associated crew actions initially called for a single throttle step to minimum power level when a low threshold for NPSP was met. As engineers refined their understanding of the NPSP requirements for the SSME (through a robust testing program), the operational techniques evolved to take advantage of the additional capabilities. This paper will examine the evolution of the Flight rule and associated procedure and how increases in knowledge about the SSME and the Space Shuttle vehicle as a whole have helped shape their development. What once was a single throttle step when NPSP decreased to a

  10. Molecular dynamics study of thermal disorder in a bicrystal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.; Ho, P.S.; Kwok, T.; Yip, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper studies a (310) θ = 36.86 degrees left-angle 001 right-angle symmetrical-tilt bicrystal model using an Embedded Atom Method aluminum potential. Based on explicit results obtained from the simulations regarding structural order, energy, and mobility, the authors find that their bicrystal model shows no evidence of pre-melting. Both the surface and the grain-boundary interface exhibit thermal disorder at temperatures below T m , with complete melting occurring only at, or very near, T m . Concerning the details of the onset of melting, the data show considerable disordering in the interfacial region starting at about 0.93 T m . The interfaces exhibit metastable behavior in this temperature range, and the temperature variation of the interfacial thickness suggests that the disordering induced by the interface is a continuous transition, a behavior that has been predicted by a theoretical analysis

  11. Two-photon excitation spectroscopy of carotenoid-containing and carotenoid-depleted LH2 complexes from purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Ilya; Kompanetz, Viktor; Makhneva, Zoya; Chekalin, Sergey; Moskalenko, Andrei; Razjivin, Andrei

    2009-08-27

    We applied two-photon fluorescence excitation spectroscopy to LH2 complex from purple bacteria Allochromatium minutissimum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides . Bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence was measured under two-photon excitation of the samples within the 1200-1500 nm region. Spectra were obtained for both carotenoid-containing and -depleted complexes of each bacterium to allow their direct comparison. The depletion of carotenoids did not alter the two-photon excitation spectra of either bacteria. The spectra featured a wide excitation band around 1350 nm (2x675 nm, 14,800 cm(-1)) which strongly resembled two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of similar complexes published by other authors. We consider obtained experimental data to be evidence of direct two-photon excitation of bacteriochlorophyll excitonic states in this spectral region.

  12. Single-shot ultrabroadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Elad; Long, Phillip D; Engel, Gregory S

    2011-05-01

    Here we present two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectra of the light-harvesting complex LH2 from purple bacteria using coherent pulses with bandwidth of over 100 nm FWHM. This broadband excitation and detection has allowed the simultaneous capture of both the B800 and B850 bands using a single light source. We demonstrate that one laser pulse is sufficient to capture the entire 2D electronic spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio. At a waiting time of 800 fs, we observe population transfer from the B800 to B850 band as manifested by a prominent cross peak. These results will enable observation of the dynamics of biological systems across both ultrafast (1 ms) timescales simultaneously.

  13. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below.

  14. High efficiency light harvesting by carotenoids in the LH2 complex from photosynthetic bacteria: unique adaptation to growth under low-light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Greco, Jordan A; Gardiner, Alastair T; Carey, Anne-Marie; Cogdell, Richard J; Gibson, George N; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2014-09-25

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions.

  15. Extension of Light-Harvesting Ability of Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) through Ultrafast Energy Transfer from Covalently Attached Artificial Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yusuke; Noji, Tomoyasu; Katayama, Tetsuro; Mizutani, Naoto; Komori, Daisuke; Nango, Mamoru; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Shigeru; Nagasawa, Yutaka; Dewa, Takehisa

    2015-10-14

    Introducing appropriate artificial components into natural biological systems could enrich the original functionality. To expand the available wavelength range of photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila 10050), artificial fluorescent dye (Alexa Fluor 647: A647) was covalently attached to N- and C-terminal Lys residues in LH2 α-polypeptides with a molar ratio of A647/LH2 ≃ 9/1. Fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopies revealed that intracomplex energy transfer from A647 to intrinsic chromophores of LH2 (B850) occurs in a multiexponential manner, with time constants varying from 440 fs to 23 ps through direct and B800-mediated indirect pathways. Kinetic analyses suggested that B800 chromophores mediate faster energy transfer, and the mechanism was interpretable in terms of Förster theory. This study demonstrates that a simple attachment of external chromophores with a flexible linkage can enhance the light harvesting activity of LH2 without affecting inherent functions of energy transfer, and can achieve energy transfer in the subpicosecond range. Addition of external chromophores, thus, represents a useful methodology for construction of advanced hybrid light-harvesting systems that afford solar energy in the broad spectrum.

  16. Resonance Raman and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectra of LH2 antenna complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp. excited in the Qx and Qy transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanov, G; Picorel, R; Ortiz de Zarate, I; Cotton, T M; Seibert, M

    2000-05-01

    Well-resolved vibrational spectra of LH2 complex isolated from two photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Ectothiorhodospira sp., were obtained using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) exciting into the Qx and the Qy transitions of bacteriochlorophyll a. High-quality SERRS spectra in the Qy region were accessible because the strong fluorescence background was quenched near the roughened Ag surface. A comparison of the spectra obtained with 590 nm and 752 nm excitation in the mid- and low-frequency regions revealed spectral differences between the two LH2 complexes as well as between the LH2 complexes and isolated bacteriochlorophyll a. Because peripheral modes of pigments contribute mainly to the low-frequency spectral region, frequencies and intensities of many vibrational bands in this region are affected by interactions with the protein. The results demonstrate that the microenvironment surrounding the pigments within the two LH2 complexes is somewhat different, despite the fact that the complexes exhibit similar electronic absorption spectra. These differences are most probably due to specific pigment-pigment and pigment-protein interactions within the LH2 complexes, and the approach might be useful for addressing subtle static and dynamic structural variances between pigment-protein complexes from different sources or in complexes altered chemically or genetically.

  17. Distribution of rhodopin and spirilloxanthin between LH1 and LH2 complexes when incorporating carotenoid mixture into the membrane of purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshakov, M A; Ashikhmin, A A; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A

    2016-11-01

    Carotenoid mixture enriched by rhodopin and spirilloxanthin was incorporated in LH2 and LH1 complexes from Allochromatium (Alc.) minutissimum in vitro. The maximum incorporating level was ~95%. Rhodopin (56.4%) and spirilloxanthin (13.8%) were incorporated into the LH1 complex, in contrast to the control complex, which contained primarily spirilloxanthin (66.8%). After incorporating, the LH2 complex contained rhodopin (66.7%) and didehydrorhodopin (14.6%), which was close to their content in the control (67.4 and 20.5%, respectively). Thus, it was shown that carotenoids from the total pool are not selectively incorporated into LH2 and LH1 complexes in vitro in the proportion corresponding to the carotenoid content in the complexes in vivo.

  18. Monomeric RC-LH1 core complexes retard LH2 assembly and intracytoplasmic membrane formation in PufX-minus mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter G; Mothersole, David J; Ng, Irene W; Olsen, John D; Hunter, C Neil

    2011-09-01

    In the model photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides domains of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes surround and interconnect dimeric reaction centre-light-harvesting 1-PufX (RC-LH1-PufX) 'core' complexes, forming extensive networks for energy transfer and trapping. These complexes are housed in spherical intracytoplasmic membranes (ICMs), which are assembled in a stepwise process where biosynthesis of core complexes tends to dominate the early stages of membrane invagination. The kinetics of LH2 assembly were measured in PufX mutants that assemble monomeric core complexes, as a consequence of either a twelve-residue N-terminal truncation of PufX (PufXΔ12) or the complete removal of PufX (PufX(-)). Lower rates of LH2 assembly and retarded maturation of membrane invagination were observed for the larger and less curved ICM from the PufX(-) mutant, consistent with the proposition that local membrane curvature, initiated by arrays of bent RC-LH1-PufX dimers, creates a favourable environment for stable assembly of LH2 complexes. Transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution atomic force microscopy were used to examine ICM morphology and membrane protein organisation in these mutants. Some partitioning of core and LH2 complexes was observed in PufX(-) membranes, resulting in locally ordered clusters of monomeric RC-LH1 complexes. The distribution of core and LH2 complexes in the three types of membrane examined is consistent with previous models of membrane curvature and domain formation (Frese et al., 2008), which demonstrated that a combination of crowding and asymmetries in sizes and shapes of membrane protein complexes drives membrane organisation. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct observation of thermal disorder and decomposition of black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Jo; Kim, Heejin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical research has been devoted to reveal the properties of black phosphorus as a two-dimensional nanomaterial, but little attention has been paid for the experimental characterization. In this study, the thermal disorder and decomposition of black phosphorus were examined using in situ heating transmission electron microscopy experiments. We observed that the breaking of crystallographic symmetry begins at 380 °C under vacuum condition, followed by the phosphorus evaporates after long-term heating at 400 °C. This decomposition process can be initiated by the surficial vacancy and proceeds toward both interlayer ([010]) and intralayer ([001]) directions. The results on the thermal behavior of black phosphorus provide useful guidance for thin film deposition and fabrication processes with black phosphorus.

  20. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  1. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  2. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex

  3. Effect of metal nanoparticles on energy spectra and optical properties of peripheral light-harvesting LH2 complexes from photosynthetic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goliney, I.Yu.; Sugakov, V.I.; Valkunas, L.; Vertsimakha, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Excitons of light-harvesting complexes (LH2) hybridize with plasmon modes. ► Light absorption of LH2 is enhanced by a metal nanoparticle. ► Using nanoshells allows reaching resonance between molecular and plasmons. ► Metal nanoparticles introduce additional channel of excitation decay. ► Light-harvesting may gain from the proper positioning of nanoshells. -- Abstract: The paper explores the theoretical possibility of affecting optical spectra and the quantum yield of the energy transfer in the peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from photosynthetic bacteria by placing a metal nanoparticle or a nanoshell nearby. An increased probability of the excitonic transition in the LH2 arises due to the borrowing of the oscillator strength from surface plasmons of the metal particle or the nanoshell. While both absorption and quenching of the excitations increase in the vicinity to a metal nanoparticle, having opposite effects, the total yield of the excitation transfer to reaction centers is shown to grow in the certain range of parameters.

  4. Effect of metal nanoparticles on energy spectra and optical properties of peripheral light-harvesting LH2 complexes from photosynthetic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goliney, I.Yu., E-mail: igoliney@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 47 Nauki pr., 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sugakov, V.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 47 Nauki pr., 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Valkunas, L. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Department of Theoretical Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9, Build. 3, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vertsimakha, G.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 47 Nauki pr., 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Excitons of light-harvesting complexes (LH2) hybridize with plasmon modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light absorption of LH2 is enhanced by a metal nanoparticle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using nanoshells allows reaching resonance between molecular and plasmons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticles introduce additional channel of excitation decay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light-harvesting may gain from the proper positioning of nanoshells. -- Abstract: The paper explores the theoretical possibility of affecting optical spectra and the quantum yield of the energy transfer in the peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) from photosynthetic bacteria by placing a metal nanoparticle or a nanoshell nearby. An increased probability of the excitonic transition in the LH2 arises due to the borrowing of the oscillator strength from surface plasmons of the metal particle or the nanoshell. While both absorption and quenching of the excitations increase in the vicinity to a metal nanoparticle, having opposite effects, the total yield of the excitation transfer to reaction centers is shown to grow in the certain range of parameters.

  5. Relaxation dynamics of the LH2 complex from a photosynthetic purple bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica studied by the near-IR femtosecond pump-probe method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razjivin, A P; Pishchal'nikov, R Yu; Kozlovskii, V S; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2005-01-01

    Photoinduced changes in the absorption spectrum of the LH2 (B800-830-850) complex from a Thiorhodospira sibirica (Trs. sibirica) bacterium are studied by the pump-probe method. The complex has the anomalous absorption spectrum exhibiting three bands in the near-IR region at 793, 826.5, and 846.5 nm. At room temperature, the excitation energy transfer from the B800, B830, and B859 bands was detected with the time constants τ 1 ∼0.5 ps, τ 2 ∼2.5 ps, and τ 3 of the order of a few hundreds of picoseconds, respectively. A rapid energy transfer from the B830 band compared to energy transfer from the B850 band (τ 2 ||τ 3 ) suggests that all the three bands belong to the same complex (i.e., that the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica is homogeneous). A slower energy transfer (by three - five times) from the B830 band of the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica compared to energy transfer from the B800 band of the LH2 complexes (B800-850 and especially B800-820) from other purple bacteria suggests that the electronic structures of ensembles of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in these complexes are substantially different. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus investigated by electron microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oling, F.; Boekema, E.J.; Ortiz de Zarate, I.; Visschers, R.W.; van Grondelle, R.; Keegstra, W.; Brisson, A.; Picorel, R.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 (B800-850) light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus were obtained by reconstitution of purified protein into phospholipid vesicles and characterized by electron microscopy. The size of the crystals was up to several

  7. The mutation of carotenoids affects the energy transfer in LH2 light harvesting complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weimin; Liu Yuan; Guo Lijun; Xu Chunhe; Qian Shixiong

    2006-01-01

    Energy transfer in two kinds of peripheral antenna complexes LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides 601 was studied by absorption, fluorescence emission, time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy at room temperature. These two complexes are LH2 (RS601) and green carotenoid mutated LH2 (GM309). The obtained results demonstrate that: (a) compared with spheroidenes, which have ten carbon-carbon double bonds in native RS601, carotenoids in GM309 were identified as containing neurosporenes with nine carbon-carbon double bonds, which show a significant blue shift of ∼20 nm in the three absorption peaks because of the higher energy levels of neurosporene than those of spheroidene, (b) the higher energy levels of neurosporene in GM309 induce a lower B800 → B850 energy transfer rate and efficiency as compared to that in RS601 resulting from the relatively higher band gap between the donor of B800 and the bridge of the carotenoids (c) the same lifetime of the B850 excited singlet state is observed in these two LH2 complexes

  8. Phonon transmission and thermal conductance in one-dimensional system with on-site potential disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Songshan; Xu Hui; Deng Honggui; Yang Bingchu

    2011-01-01

    The role of on-site potential disorder on phonon transmission and thermal conductance of one-dimensional system is investigated. We found that the on-site potential disorder can lead to the localization of phonons, and has great effect on the phonon transmission and thermal conductance of the system. As on-site potential disorder W increases, the transmission coefficients decrease, and approach zero at the band edges. Corresponding, the thermal conductance decreases drastically, and the curves for thermal conductance exhibit a series of steps and plateaus. Meanwhile, when the on-site potential disorder W is strong enough, the thermal conductance decreases dramatically with the increase of system size N. We also found that the efficiency of reducing thermal conductance by increasing the on-site potential disorder strength is much better than that by increasing the on-site potential's amplitude. - Highlights: → We studied the effect of on-site potential disorder on thermal transport. → Increasing disorder will decrease thermal transport. → Increasing system size will also decrease its thermal conductance. → Increasing disorder is more efficient than other in reducing thermal conductance.

  9. Functional characteristics of spirilloxanthin and keto-bearing Analogues in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides with a genetically modified carotenoid synthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Dilbeck, Preston L; Tang, Qun; Mothersole, David J; Martin, Elizabeth C; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Hunter, C Neil

    2015-01-01

    Light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes from a genetically modified strain of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides were studied using static and ultrafast optical methods and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Carotenoid synthesis in the Rba. sphaeroides strain was engineered to redirect carotenoid production away from spheroidene into the spirilloxanthin synthesis pathway. The strain assembles LH2 antennas with substantial amounts of spirilloxanthin (total double-bond conjugation length N=13) if grown anaerobically and of keto-bearing long-chain analogs [2-ketoanhydrorhodovibrin (N=13), 2-ketospirilloxanthin (N=14) and 2,2'-diketospirilloxanthin (N=15)] if grown semi-aerobically (with ratios that depend on growth conditions). We present the photophysical, electronic, and vibrational properties of these carotenoids, both isolated in organic media and assembled within LH2 complexes. Measurements of excited-state energy transfer to the array of excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophyll a molecules (B850) show that the mean lifetime of the first singlet excited state (S1) of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids does not change appreciably between organic media and the protein environment. In each case, the S1 state appears to lie lower in energy than that of B850. The energy-transfer yield is ~0.4 in LH2 (from the strain grown aerobically or semi-aerobically), which is less than half that achieved for LH2 that contains short-chain (N≤11) analogues. Collectively, the results suggest that the S1 excited state of the long-chain (N≥13) carotenoids participates little if at all in carotenoid-to-BChl a energy transfer, which occurs predominantly via the carotenoid S2 excited state in these antennas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermally activated creep and fluidization in flowing disordered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabia, Samy; Detcheverry, François

    2016-11-01

    When submitted to a constant mechanical load, many materials display power law creep followed by fluidization. A fundamental understanding of these processes is still far from being achieved. Here, we characterize creep and fluidization on the basis of a mesoscopic viscoplastic model that includes thermally activated yielding events and a broad distribution of energy barriers, which may be lowered under the effect of a local deformation. We relate the creep exponent observed before fluidization to the width of barrier distribution and to the specific form of stress redistribution following yielding events. We show that Andrade creep is accompanied by local strain hardening driven by stress redistribution and find that the fluidization time depends exponentially on the applied stress. The simulation results are interpreted in the light of a mean-field analysis, and should help in rationalizing the creep phenomenology in disordered materials.

  11. Elimination of polarity in the carotenoid terminus promotes the exposure of B850-binding sites (Tyr 44, 45) and ANS-mediated energy transfer in LH2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Wu, Yongqiang; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-12-10

    Carotenoids in the peripheral light-harvesting complexes (LH2) of the green mutant (GM309) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides were identified as containing neurosporenes, which lack the polar CH(3)O group, compared to spheroidenes in native-LH2 of R. sphaeroides 601. After LH2 complexes were treated with 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS), new energy transfer pathways from ANS or tryptophan to carotenoids were discovered in both native- and GM309-LH2. The carotenoid fluorescence intensity of GM309-LH2 was greater than that of native-LH2 when bound with ANS, suggesting that the elimination of polarity in the neurosporene increases the energy transfer from ANS to carotenoid. The fact that two alpha-tyrosines (alpha-Tyr 44, 45, B850-binding sites) in each alpha-apoprotein of GM309-LH2 were more easily modified than those of native-LH2 by N-acetylimidazole (NAI) indicates that the elimination of polarity in the neurosporene terminus increases the exposure of these sites to solution.

  12. Fluorescence-excitation and emission spectra from LH2 antenna complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila as a function of the sample preparation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Ralf; Timpmann, Kõu; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen; Freiberg, Arvi

    2013-10-10

    The high sensitivity of optical spectra of pigment-protein complexes to temperature and pressure is well known. In the present study, we have demonstrated the significant influence of the environments commonly used in bulk and single-molecule spectroscopic studies at low temperatures on the LH2 photosynthetic antenna complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A transfer of this LH2 complex from a bulk-buffer solution into a spin-coated polymer film results in a 189 cm(-1) blue shift of the B850 excitonic absorption band at 5 K. Within the molecular exciton model, the origin of this shift could be disentangled into three parts, namely to an increase of the local site energies, a contraction of the exciton band, and a decrease of the displacement energy.

  13. Adaptation of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 7050 to growth at different light intensities: what are the benefits to changing the type of LH2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, A T; Niedzwiedzki, D M; Cogdell, R J

    2018-04-01

    Typical purple bacterial photosynthetic units consist of light harvesting one/reaction centre 'core' complexes surrounded by light harvesting two complexes. Factors such as the number and size of photosynthetic units per cell, as well as the type of light harvesting two complex that is produced, are controlled by environmental factors. In this paper, the change in the type of LH2 present in the Rhodopsuedomonas acidophila strain 7050 is described when cells are grown at a range of different light intensities. This species contains multiple pucBA genes that encode the apoproteins that form light-harvesting complex two, and a more complex mixture of spectroscopic forms of this complex has been found than was previously thought to be the case. Femto-second time resolved absorption has been used to investigate how the energy transfer properties in the membranes of high-light and low-light adapted cells change as the composition of the LH2 complexes varies.

  14. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  15. Spectroscopic studies of two spectral variants of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Bina, David; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Blankenship, Robert E; Holten, Dewey; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    Two spectral forms of the peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) from the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Allochromatium vinosum were purified and their photophysical properties characterized. The complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and multiple species of carotenoids. The composition of carotenoids depends on the light conditions applied during growth of the cultures. In addition, LH2 grown under high light has a noticeable split of the B800 absorption band. The influence of the change of carotenoid distribution as well as the spectral change of the excitonic absorption of the bacteriochlorophylls on the light-harvesting ability was studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved absorption at 77K. The results demonstrate that the change of the distribution of the carotenoids when cells were grown at low light adapts the absorptive properties of the complex to the light conditions and maintains maximum photon-capture performance. In addition, an explanation for the origin of the enigmatic split of the B800 absorption band is provided. This spectral splitting is also observed in LH2 complexes from other photosynthetic sulfur purple bacterial species. According to results obtained from transient absorption spectroscopy, the B800 band split originates from two spectral forms of the associated BChl a monomeric molecules bound within the same complex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic analysis and fine mapping of LH1 and LH2, a set of complementary genes controlling late heading in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Wang, Feng; Gao, Li Jun; Li, Jin Hua; Li, Rong Bai; Gao, Han Liang; Deng, Guo Fu; Yang, Jin Shui; Luo, Xiao Jin

    2012-12-01

    Heading date in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a critical agronomic trait with a complex inheritance. To investigate the genetic basis and mechanism of gene interaction in heading date, we conducted genetic analysis on segregation populations derived from crosses among the indica cultivars Bo B, Yuefeng B and Baoxuan 2. A set of dominant complementary genes controlling late heading, designated LH1 and LH2, were detected by molecular marker mapping. Genetic analysis revealed that Baoxuan 2 contains both dominant genes, while Bo B and Yuefeng B each possess either LH1 or LH2. Using larger populations with segregant ratios of 3 : 1, we fine-mapped LH1 to a 63-kb region near the centromere of chromosome 7 flanked by markers RM5436 and RM8034, and LH2 to a 177-kb region on the short arm of chromosome 8 between flanking markers Indel22468-3 and RM25. Some candidate genes were identified through sequencing of Bo B and Yuefeng B in these target regions. Our work provides a solid foundation for further study on gene interaction in heading date and has application in marker-assisted breeding of photosensitive hybrid rice in China.

  17. Design and development of polyphenylene oxide foam as a reusable internal insulation for LH2 tanks, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    PPO form was tested for mechanical strength, for the effects of 100 thermal cycles from 450 K (359 F) to 21 K (-423 F) and for gas flow resistance characteristics. PPO foam panels were investigated for density variations, methods for joining panels were studied and panel joint thermal test specimens were fabricated. The range of foam panel thickness under investigation was extended to include 7 mm (0.3 in) and 70 mm (2.8 in) panels which also were tested for thermal performance.

  18. Spectral diffusion and electron-phonon coupling of the B800 BChl a molecules in LH2 complexes from three different species of purple bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, J; Gabrielsen, M; Oellerich, S; Michel, H; van Heel, M; Cogdell, R J; Köhler, J

    2009-11-04

    We have investigated the spectral diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling of B800 bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 for three different species of purple bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum molischianum, and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. We come to the conclusion that B800 binding pockets for Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are rather similar with respect to the polarity of the protein environment but that the packaging of the alphabeta-polypeptides seems to be less tight in Rb. sphaeroides with respect to the other two species.

  19. Excitation energy transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll Soret band to carotenoids in the LH2 light-harvesting complex from Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila is negligible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razjivin, A P; Lukashev, E P; Kompanets, V O; Kozlovsky, V S; Ashikhmin, A A; Chekalin, S V; Moskalenko, A A; Paschenko, V Z

    2017-09-01

    Pathways of intramolecular conversion and intermolecular electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) in the photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria remain subject to debate. Here we experimentally tested the possibility of EET from the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) Soret band to the singlet S 2 level of carotenoids using femtosecond pump-probe measurements and steady-state fluorescence excitation and absorption measurements in the near-ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges. The efficiency of EET from the Soret band of BChl to S 2 of the carotenoids in light-harvesting complex LH2 from the purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila appeared not to exceed a few percent.

  20. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Cryogen System Engineering Checkout Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, A. D; Cady, E. C.; Jenkins, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    The Solar Thermal Upper Stage technology (STUSTD) program is a solar thermal propulsion technology program cooperatively sponsored by a Boeing led team and by NASA MSFC. A key element of its technology program is development of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage and supply system which employs multi-layer insulation, liquid acquisition devices, active and passive thermodynamic vent systems, and variable 40W tank heaters to reliably provide near constant pressure H2 to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity of space operation. The LH2 storage and supply system is designed to operate as a passive, pressure fed supply system at a constant pressure of about 45 psia. During operation of the solar thermal engine over a small portion of the orbit the LH2 storage and supply system propulsively vents through the enjoy at a controlled flowrate. During the long coast portion of the orbit, the LH2 tank is locked up (unvented). Thus, all of the vented H2 flow is used in the engine for thrust and none is wastefully vented overboard. The key to managing the tank pressure and therefore the H2 flow to the engine is to manage and balance the energy flow into the LH2 tank with the MLI and tank heaters with the energy flow out of the LH2 tank through the vented H2 flow. A moderate scale (71 cu ft) LH2 storage and supply system was installed and insulated at the NASA MSFC Test Area 300. The operation of the system is described in this paper. The test program for the LH2 system consisted of two parts: 1) a series of engineering tests to characterize the performance of the various components in the system: and 2) a 30-day simulation of a complete LEO and GEO transfer mission. This paper describes the results of the engineering tests, and correlates these results with analytical models used to design future advanced Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicles.

  1. Construction of hybrid photosynthetic units using peripheral and core antennae from two different species of photosynthetic bacteria: detection of the energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 to bacteriochlorophyll b in LH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Shimonaka, Shozo; Uchida, Naoko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Typical purple bacterial photosynthetic units consist of supra-molecular arrays of peripheral (LH2) and core (LH1-RC) antenna complexes. Recent atomic force microscopy pictures of photosynthetic units in intact membranes have revealed that the architecture of these units is variable (Scheuring et al. (2005) Biochim Bhiophys Acta 1712:109-127). In this study, we describe methods for the construction of heterologous photosynthetic units in lipid-bilayers from mixtures of purified LH2 (from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) and LH1-RC (from Rhodopseudomonas viridis) core complexes. The architecture of these reconstituted photosynthetic units can be varied by controlling ratio of added LH2 to core complexes. The arrangement of the complexes was visualized by electron-microscopy in combination with Fourier analysis. The regular trigonal array of the core complexes seen in the native photosynthetic membrane could be regenerated in the reconstituted membranes by temperature cycling. In the presence of added LH2 complexes, this trigonal symmetry was replaced with orthorhombic symmetry. The small lattice lengths for the latter suggest that the constituent unit of the orthorhombic lattice is the LH2. Fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy was applied to the set of the reconstituted membranes prepared with various proportions of LH2 to core complexes. Remarkably, even though the LH2 complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a, and the core complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll b, it was possible to demonstrate energy transfer from LH2 to the core complexes. These experiments provide a first step along the path toward investigating how changing the architecture of purple bacterial photosynthetic units affects the overall efficiency of light-harvesting.

  2. A quantum mechanical analysis of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple photosynthetic bacteria: insights into the electrostatic effects of transmembrane helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2011-02-01

    We perform a quantum mechanical study of the peptides that are part of the LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, a non-sulfur purple bacteria that has the ability of producing chemical energy from photosynthesis. The electronic structure calculations indicate that the transmembrane helices of these peptides are characterized by dipole moments with a magnitude of about 150D. When the full nonamer assembly made of 18 peptides is considered, then a macrodipole of magnitude 806D is built up from the vector sum of each monomer dipole. The macrodipole is oriented normal to the membrane plane and with the positive tip toward the cytoplasm thereby indicating that the electronic charge of the protein scaffold is polarized toward the periplasm. The results obtained here suggest that the asymmetric charge distribution of the protein scaffold contributes an anisotropic electrostatic environment which differentiates the absorption properties of the bacteriochlorophyll pigments, B800 and B850, embedded in the LH2 complex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-11-03

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation-bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.

  4. ASME Section VIII Recertification of a 33,000 Gallon Vacuum-jacketed LH2 Storage Vessel for Densified Hydrogen Testing at NASA Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Adam M.; Notardonato, William U.; Jumper, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Operations Demonstration Unit for Liquid Hydrogen (GODU-LH2) has been developed at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida. GODU-LH2 has three main objectives: zero-loss storage and transfer, liquefaction, and densification of liquid hydrogen. A cryogenic refrigerator has been integrated into an existing, previously certified, 33,000 gallon vacuum-jacketed storage vessel built by Minnesota Valley Engineering in 1991 for the Titan program. The dewar has an inner diameter of 9.5 and a length of 71.5; original design temperature and pressure ranges are -423 F to 100 F and 0 to 95 psig respectively. During densification operations the liquid temperature will be decreased below the normal boiling point by the refrigerator, and consequently the pressure inside the inner vessel will be sub-atmospheric. These new operational conditions rendered the original certification invalid, so an effort was undertaken to recertify the tank to the new pressure and temperature requirements (-12.7 to 95 psig and -433 F to 100 F respectively) per ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, Division 1. This paper will discuss the unique design, analysis and implementation issues encountered during the vessel recertification process.

  5. Ground-State Electronic Structure of RC-LH1 and LH2 Pigment Assemblies of Purple Bacteria via the EBF-MO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Kushal; Jakubikova, Elena

    2015-08-20

    Light-harvesting antennas are protein-pigment complexes that play a crucial role in natural photosynthesis. The antenna complexes absorb light and transfer energy to photosynthetic reaction centers where charge separation occurs. This work focuses on computational studies of the electronic structure of the pigment networks of light-harvesting complex I (LH1), LH1 with the reaction center (RC-LH1), and light-harvesting complex II (LH2) found in purple bacteria. As the pigment networks of LH1, RC-LH1, and LH2 contain thousands of atoms, conventional density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio calculations of these systems are not computationally feasible. Therefore, we utilize DFT in conjunction with the energy-based fragmentation with molecular orbitals method and a semiempirical approach employing the extended Hückel model Hamiltonian to determine the electronic properties of these pigment assemblies. Our calculations provide a deeper understanding of the electronic structure of natural light-harvesting complexes, especially their pigment networks, which could assist in rational design of artificial photosynthetic devices.

  6. Thermal conductivity of solid cyclohexane in orientationally ordered and disordered phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, V. A.; Revyakin, V. P.; Sagan, V. V.; Pursky, O. I.; Sysoev, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal conductivity Λ P of solid cyclohexane is measured at a pressure P = 0.1 MPa in the temperature range from 80 K to the melting point, which covers the ranges of low-temperature orientationally ordered phase II and high-temperature orientationally disordered phase I. Thermal conductivity Λ V is measured at a constant volume in orientationally disordered phase I. The thermal conductivity measured at atmospheric pressure decreases with increasing temperature as Λ P ∝ T −1.15 in phase II, whereas Λ P ∝ T −0.3 in phase I. As temperature increases, isochoric thermal conductivity Λ V in phase I increases gradually. The experimental data are described in terms of a modified Debye model of thermal conductivity with allowance for heat transfer by both phonons and “diffuse” modes.

  7. Impact of isotopic disorders on thermal transport properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tao [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kang, Wei [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: jxwang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-01-21

    We present a one-dimensional lattice model to describe thermal transport in isotopically doped nanotubes and nanowires. The thermal conductivities thus predicted, as a function of isotopic concentration, agree well with recent experiments and other simulations. Our results display that for any given concentration of isotopic atoms in a lattice without sharp atomic interfaces, the maximum thermal conductivity is attained when isotopic atoms are placed regularly with an equal space, whereas the minimum is achieved when they are randomly inserted with a uniform distribution. Non-uniformity of disorder can further tune the thermal conductivity between the two values. Moreover, the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanoscale feature size becomes weak at low temperature when disorder exists. In addition, when self-consistent thermal reservoirs are included to describe diffusive nanomaterials, the thermal conductivities predicted by our model are in line with the results of macroscopic theories with an interfacial effect. Our results suggest that the disorder provides an additional freedom to tune the thermal properties of nanomaterials in many technological applications including nanoelectronics, solid-state lighting, energy conservation, and conversion.

  8. Impact of isotopic disorders on thermal transport properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Tao; Kang, Wei; Wang, Jianxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a one-dimensional lattice model to describe thermal transport in isotopically doped nanotubes and nanowires. The thermal conductivities thus predicted, as a function of isotopic concentration, agree well with recent experiments and other simulations. Our results display that for any given concentration of isotopic atoms in a lattice without sharp atomic interfaces, the maximum thermal conductivity is attained when isotopic atoms are placed regularly with an equal space, whereas the minimum is achieved when they are randomly inserted with a uniform distribution. Non-uniformity of disorder can further tune the thermal conductivity between the two values. Moreover, the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the nanoscale feature size becomes weak at low temperature when disorder exists. In addition, when self-consistent thermal reservoirs are included to describe diffusive nanomaterials, the thermal conductivities predicted by our model are in line with the results of macroscopic theories with an interfacial effect. Our results suggest that the disorder provides an additional freedom to tune the thermal properties of nanomaterials in many technological applications including nanoelectronics, solid-state lighting, energy conservation, and conversion

  9. Vanadium Dioxide as a Natural Disordered Metamaterial: Perfect Thermal Emission and Large Broadband Negative Differential Thermal Emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Kats

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally demonstrate that a thin (approximately 150-nm film of vanadium dioxide (VO_{2} deposited on sapphire has an anomalous thermal emittance profile when heated, which arises because of the optical interaction between the film and the substrate when the VO_{2} is at an intermediate state of its insulator-metal transition (IMT. Within the IMT region, the VO_{2} film comprises nanoscale islands of the metal and dielectric phases and can thus be viewed as a natural, disordered metamaterial. This structure displays “perfect” blackbodylike thermal emissivity over a narrow wavelength range (approximately 40  cm^{-1}, surpassing the emissivity of our black-soot reference. We observe large broadband negative differential thermal emittance over a >10 °C range: Upon heating, the VO_{2}-sapphire structure emits less thermal radiation and appears colder on an infrared camera. Our experimental approach allows for a direct measurement and extraction of wavelength- and temperature-dependent thermal emittance. We anticipate that emissivity engineering with thin-film geometries comprising VO_{2} and other thermochromic materials will find applications in infrared camouflage, thermal regulation, and infrared tagging and labeling.

  10. Multi-Level, Multi Time-Scale Fluorescence Intermittency of Photosynthetic LH2 Complexes: A Precursor of Non-Photochemical Quenching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schörner, Mario; Beyer, Sebastian Reinhardt; Southall, June; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-11-05

    The light harvesting complex LH2 is a chromoprotein that is an ideal system for studying protein dynamics via the spectral fluctuations of the emission of its intrinsic chromophores. We have immobilized these complexes in a polymer film and studied the fluctuations of the fluorescence intensity from individual complexes over 9 orders of magnitude in time. Combining time-tagged detection of single photons with a change-point analysis has allowed the unambigeous identification of the various intensity levels due to the huge statistical basis of the data set. We propose that the observed intensity level fluctuations reflect conformational changes of the protein backbone that might be a precursor of the mechanism from which nonphotochemical quenching of higher plants has evolved.

  11. Impact of the lipid bilayer on energy transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic protein LH2† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04814a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogren, John I.; Tong, Ashley L.; Gordon, Samuel C.; Chenu, Aurélia; Lu, Yue; Blankenship, Robert E.; Cao, Jianshu

    2018-01-01

    Photosynthetic purple bacteria convert solar energy to chemical energy with near unity quantum efficiency. The light-harvesting process begins with absorption of solar energy by an antenna protein called Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2). Energy is subsequently transferred within LH2 and then through a network of additional light-harvesting proteins to a central location, termed the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. The energy transfer dynamics of LH2 are highly sensitive to intermolecular distances and relative organizations. As a result, minor structural perturbations can cause significant changes in these dynamics. Previous experiments have primarily been performed in two ways. One uses non-native samples where LH2 is solubilized in detergent, which can alter protein structure. The other uses complex membranes that contain multiple proteins within a large lipid area, which make it difficult to identify and distinguish perturbations caused by protein–protein interactions and lipid–protein interactions. Here, we introduce the use of the biochemical platform of model membrane discs to study the energy transfer dynamics of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes in a near-native environment. We incorporate a single LH2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into membrane discs that provide a spectroscopically amenable sample in an environment more physiological than detergent but less complex than traditional membranes. This provides a simplified system to understand an individual protein and how the lipid–protein interaction affects energy transfer dynamics. We compare the energy transfer rates of detergent-solubilized LH2 with those of LH2 in membrane discs using transient absorption spectroscopy and transient absorption anisotropy. For one key energy transfer step in LH2, we observe a 30% enhancement of the rate for LH2 in membrane discs compared to that in detergent. Based on experimental results and theoretical modeling, we attribute this difference

  12. Stability of integral membrane proteins under high hydrostatic pressure: the LH2 and LH3 antenna pigment-protein complexes from photosynthetic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangur, Liina; Timpmann, Kõu; Freiberg, Arvi

    2008-07-03

    The bacteriochlorophyll a-containing LH2 and LH3 antenna complexes are the integral membrane proteins that catalyze the photosynthetic process in purple photosynthetic bacteria. The LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides shows characteristic strong absorbance at 800 and 850 nm due to the pigment molecules confined in two separate areas of the protein. In the LH3 complex from Rhodopesudomonas acidophila the corresponding bands peak at 800 and 820 nm. Using the bacteriochlorophyll a cofactors as intrinsic probes to monitor local changes in the protein structure, we investigate spectral responses of the antenna complexes to very high hydrostatic pressures up to 2.5 GPa when embedded into natural membrane environment or extracted with detergent. We first demonstrate that high pressure does induce significant alterations to the tertiary structure of the proteins not only in proximity of the 800 nm-absorbing bacteriochlorophyll a molecules known previously (Gall, A.; et al. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 13019) but also of the 850 nm- and 820 nm-absorbing molecules, including breakage of the hydrogen bond they are involved in. The membrane-protected complexes appear more resilient to damaging effects of the compression compared with the complexes extracted into mixed detergent-buffer environment. Increased resistance of the isolated complexes is observed at high protein concentration resulting aggregation as well as when cosolvent (glycerol) is added into the solution. These stability variations correlate with ability of penetration of the surrounding polar solvent (water) into the hydrophobic protein interiors, being thus the principal reason of the pressure-induced denaturation of the proteins. Considerable variability of elastic properties of the isolated complexes was also observed, tentatively assigned to heterogeneous protein packing in detergent micelles. While a number of the isolated complexes release most of their bacteriochlorophyll a content under high pressure

  13. Plasmas pour la destruction de l'H2S et des mercaptans Plasmas for Destruction of H2s and Mercaptans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czernichowski A.

    2006-12-01

    media for an oxidation of H2S or CH3SH diluted in air, CO2 or steam in order to convert them into less malodorous SO2. The product can be then used as a reagent in a Claus-like process in presence of water to convert twice as much of initial pollutants into elemental sulfur. A particular attention is devoted to the gliding electrical discharges (GlidArc. These powerful discharges produce non-thermal plasma, which activates oxidation reactions. Most of experiments were performed using one and four-stage GlidArc-I reactors. Air-diluted sulfides at initial concentrations up to 1% (H2S or 0. 1% (CH3SH were processed at up to 70 m3(n/h flow rate and 5 kW power scale. The tests were done at 1 atm. Up to 100% clean-up was obtained at a quite low energy cost depending on initial pollutant concentration: roughly 1000 kWh per 1 kg of removed sulfur at 100 ppm of H2S, but only 10 kWh/kg for 1% initial H2S in air. Almost the same energies were needed in the case of CH3SH-air mixtures. Using a very simple washing column in which water saturates with the produced SO2 and so captures unprocessed H2S we cut these process energy by three, avoiding the SO2 emission and obtaining non-toxic sulfur. New development based on GlidArc-ll brush-like electric discharges is also presented. Preliminary tests are very promising as the energy expense is already cut down by a factor of two with respect to the GlidArc-I devices. Up to industrial scale tests can be therefore performed.

  14. Kinetics of Thermally Activated Physical Processes in Disordered Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Poumellec

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a framework for modeling the writing and erasure of thermally-distributed activated processes that we can specifically apply to UV-induced refractive index change, particularly in fibers. From experimental measurements (isochrons and/or isotherms, this framework allows to find the distribution function of the activation energy by providing only a constant, which can be determined by a simple variable change when a few assumptions are fulfilled. From this modeling, it is possible to know the complete evolution in time of the system. It is also possible to determine the annealing conditions for extending a lifetime. This approach can also be used for other physical quantities, such as photodarkening, stress relaxation, and luminescence decay, provided that it can be described by a distribution function.

  15. Normal processes of phonon-phonon scattering and thermal conductivity of germanium crystals with isotopic disorder

    CERN Document Server

    Kuleev, I G

    2001-01-01

    The effect of normal processes of the phonon-phonon scattering on the thermal conductivity of the germanium crystals with various isotopic disorder degrees is considered. The phonon pulse redistribution in the normal scattering processes both inside each oscillatory branch (the Simons mechanism) and between various phonon oscillatory branches (the Herring mechanism) is accounted for. The contributions of the longitudinal and cross-sectional phonons drift motion into the thermal conductivity are analyzed. It is shown that the pulse redistribution in the Herring relaxation mechanism leads to essential suppression of the longitudinal phonons drift motion in the isotopically pure germanium crystals. The calculations results of thermal conductivity for the Herring relaxation mechanism agree well with experimental data on the germanium crystals with various isotopic disorder degrees

  16. Modeling of Disordered Binary Alloys Under Thermal Forcing: Effect of Nanocrystallite Dissociation on Thermal Expansion of AuCu3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. W.; Cress, R. P.

    2016-11-01

    Disordered binary alloys are modeled as a randomly close-packed assembly of nanocrystallites intermixed with randomly positioned atoms, i.e., glassy-state matter. The nanocrystallite size distribution is measured in a simulated macroscopic medium in two dimensions. We have also defined, and measured, the degree of crystallinity as the probability of a particle being a member of nanocrystallites. Both the distribution function and the degree of crystallinity are found to be determined by alloy composition. When heated, the nanocrystallites become smaller in size due to increasing thermal fluctuation. We have modeled this phenomenon as a case of thermal dissociation by means of the law of mass action. The crystallite size distribution function is computed for AuCu3 as a function of temperature by solving some 12 000 coupled algebraic equations for the alloy. The results show that linear thermal expansion of the specimen has contributions from the temperature dependence of the degree of crystallinity, in addition to respective thermal expansions of the nanocrystallites and glassy-state matter.

  17. Thermal stability of disordered carbon negative-electrode materials prepared from peanut shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Izumi; Doi, Takayuki; Yamaki, Jun-ichi [Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Lin, Y.Y.; Fey, George Ting-Kuo [Department of Chemistry and Material Engineering, National Central University, Chungli 32054 (China)

    2008-01-21

    The thermal stability of electrochemically lithiated disordered carbon with a poly(vinylidene difluoride) binder and 1 mol dm{sup -3} LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in a mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and diethyl carbonate (DEC) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using a hermetically sealed pan. The disordered carbon used was prepared by pyrolyzing peanut shells with porogen at temperatures above 500 C. The disordered carbon gave much larger charge and discharge capacities than graphite when a weight ratio of porogen to peanut shells was set at 5. In DSC curves, several exothermic peaks were observed at temperatures ranging from 120 to 310 C. This behavior was similar to that for electrochemically lithiated graphite, except for an exothermic peak at around 250 C. However, the lithiated disordered carbon had a higher heat value, which was evaluated by integrating a DSC curve, compared to lithiated graphite. The heat values increased with an increase in accumulated irreversible capacities. These results suggest that heat generation at elevated temperatures should increase as an amount of irreversibly trapped lithium-ion increases. On the other hand, heat values per reversible capacities for disordered carbon, which showed larger capacities than graphite, were almost comparable to that for graphite. These results indicate that several types of disordered carbon showed larger capacity than graphite, while their thermal stability was lowered accordingly. (author)

  18. Electrical and thermal conductivity of low temperature CVD graphene: the effect of disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlassiouk, Ivan; Datskos, Panos; Smirnov, Sergei; Ivanov, Ilia; Hensley, Dale; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Fulvio, Pasquale F; Dai Sheng; Meyer, Harry; Chi Miaofang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a study of graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) under different conditions with the main emphasis on correlating the thermal and electrical properties with the degree of disorder. Graphene grown by CVD on Cu and Ni catalysts demonstrates the increasing extent of disorder at low deposition temperatures as revealed by the Raman peak ratio, I G /I D . We relate this ratio to the characteristic domain size, L a , and investigate the electrical and thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of L a . The electrical resistivity, ρ, measured on graphene samples transferred onto SiO 2 /Si substrates shows linear correlation with L a -1 . The thermal conductivity, K, measured on the same graphene samples suspended on silicon pillars, on the other hand, appears to have a much weaker dependence on L a , close to K ∼ L a 1/3 . It results in an apparent ρ ∼ K 3 correlation between them. Despite the progressively increasing structural disorder in graphene grown at lower temperatures, it shows remarkably high thermal conductivity (10 2 -10 3 W K -1 m -1 ) and low electrical (10 3 -3 x 10 5 Ω) resistivities suitable for various applications.

  19. Lattice thermal conductivity of disordered NiPd and NiPt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Aftab; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2006-01-01

    Numerical calculations of lattice thermal conductivity are reported for the binary alloys NiPd and NiPt. The present work is a continuation of an earlier paper by us (Alam and Mookerjee 2005 Phys. Rev. B 72 214207), which developed a theoretical framework for the calculation of configuration-averaged lattice thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in disordered alloys. The formulation was based on the augmented space theorem (Mookerjee 1973 J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 6 L205) combined with a scattering diagram technique. In this paper we shall show the dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity on a series of variables like phonon frequency, temperature and alloy composition. The temperature dependence of κ(T) and its relation to the measured thermal conductivity is discussed. The concentration dependence of κ appears to justify the notion of a minimum thermal conductivity as discussed by Kittel, Slack and others (Kittel 1948 Phys. Rev. 75 972, Brich and Clark 1940 Am. J. Sci. 238 613; Slack 1979 Solid State Physics vol 34, ed H Ehrenreich, F Seitz and D Turnbull (New York: Academic) p 1). We also study the frequency and composition dependence of the thermal diffusivity averaged over modes. A numerical estimate of this quantity gives an idea about the location of the mobility edge and the fraction of states in the frequency spectrum which is delocalized

  20. A comparative spectroscopic and kinetic study of photoexcitations in detergent-isolated and membrane-embedded LH2 light-harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, Arvi; Rätsep, Margus; Timpmann, Kõu

    2012-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins constitute more than third of the total number of proteins present in organisms. Solubilization with mild detergents is a common technique to study the structure, dynamics, and catalytic activity of these proteins in purified form. However beneficial the use of detergents may be for protein extraction, the membrane proteins are often denatured by detergent solubilization as a result of native lipid membrane interactions having been modified. Versatile investigations of the properties of membrane-embedded and detergent-isolated proteins are, therefore, required to evaluate the consequences of the solubilization procedure. Herein, the spectroscopic and kinetic fingerprints have been established that distinguish excitons in individual detergent-solubilized LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes from them in the membrane-embedded complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. A wide arsenal of spectroscopic techniques in visible optical range that include conventional broadband absorption-fluorescence, fluorescence anisotropy excitation, spectrally selective hole burning and fluorescence line-narrowing, and transient absorption-fluorescence have been applied over broad temperature range between physiological and liquid He temperatures. Significant changes in energetics and dynamics of the antenna excitons upon self-assembly of the proteins into intracytoplasmic membranes are observed, analyzed, and discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Linear-dichroism measurements on the LH2 antenna complex of Rhodopseudomonas Acidophila strain 10050 show that the transition dipole moment of the Carotenoid Rhodopin Glucoside us nit collinair with the long molecular axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgakopoulou, S.; Gogdell, R.J.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    We have applied linear-dichroism experiments to determine the orientation of the transition dipole moment, corresponding to the main absorption band of the carotenoid, rhodopin glucoside, in the light-harvesting complex LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050. The crystal structure of this

  2. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structure of [Cu2(LH2]•(ClO42. Influence of the weak Cu•••O(perchlorate interaction on the structure of Cu2N2O2 metallocycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diimine-dioxime ligand, 4,9-diaza-3,10-diethyl-3,9-dodecadiene-2,11-dione bisoxime (LH2, containing a N4 donor set was prepared by Schiff base condensation of 2-hydroxyimino-3-pentanone and 1,4-diaminobutane in two ways: in protic and in aprotic solvent. Higher yield of (LH2 imine was obtained when the synthesis was carried out using protic solvent (C2H5OH instead of aprotic benzene (78% and 30%, respectively. Cu(II metal complex of diimine-dioxime was synthesized in CH3OH from metal salt and LH2 in mole ratio 1:1. The isolated complex was characterized by the elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The structure of [Cu2(LH2]•(ClO42 was determined by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Comparison with the structurally related diimine-dioxime Cu(II complexes revealed the influence of the weak Cu•••O(perchlorate interaction on the geometry of the metallocycle. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 45015, br. 172013, br. 172065 i br. 172014

  3. Selective binding of carotenoids with a shorter conjugated chain to the LH2 antenna complex and those with a longer conjugated chain to the reaction center from Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakitani, Yoshinori; Fujii, Ritsuko; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kurahashi, Masahiro; Koyama, Yasushi; Harada, Jiro; Shimada, Keizo

    2007-06-19

    Rubrivivax gelatinosus having both the spheroidene and spirilloxanthin biosynthetic pathways produces carotenoids (Cars) with a variety of conjugated chains, which consist of different numbers of conjugated double bonds (n), including the C=C (m) and C=O (o) bonds. When grown under anaerobic conditions, the wild type produces Cars for which n = m = 9-13, whereas under semiaerobic conditions, it additionally produces Cars for which n = m + o = 10 + 1, 13 + 1, and 13 + 2. On the other hand, a mutant, in which the latter pathway is genetically blocked, produces only Cars for which n = 9 and 10 under anaerobic conditions and n = 9, 10, and 10 + 1 under semianaerobic conditions. Those Cars that were extracted from the LH2 complex (LH2) and the reaction center (RC), isolated from the wild-type and the mutant Rvi. gelatinosus, were analyzed by HPLC, and their structures were determined by mass spectrometry and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The selective binding of Cars to those pigment-protein complexes has been characterized as follows. (1) Cars with a shorter conjugated chain are selectively bound to LH2 whereas Cars with a longer conjugated chain to the RC. (2) Shorter chain Cars with a hydroxyl group are bound to LH2 almost exclusively. This rule holds either in the absence or in the presence of the keto group. The natural selection of shorter chain Cars by LH2 and longer chain Cars by the RC is discussed, on the basis of the results now available, in relation to the light-harvesting and photoprotective functions of Cars.

  4. Early detection of metabolic and energy disorders by thermal time series stochastic complexity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutaif, N.A. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Palazzo, R. Jr [Departamento de Telemática, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Gontijo, J.A.R. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-17

    Maintenance of thermal homeostasis in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with changes in their thermal balance. The thermodynamic relationship between heat dissipation and energy storage is altered by the ingestion of high-energy diet content. Observation of thermal registers of core temperature behavior, in humans and rodents, permits identification of some characteristics of time series, such as autoreference and stationarity that fit adequately to a stochastic analysis. To identify this change, we used, for the first time, a stochastic autoregressive model, the concepts of which match those associated with physiological systems involved and applied in male HFD rats compared with their appropriate standard food intake age-matched male controls (n=7 per group). By analyzing a recorded temperature time series, we were able to identify when thermal homeostasis would be affected by a new diet. The autoregressive time series model (AR model) was used to predict the occurrence of thermal homeostasis, and this model proved to be very effective in distinguishing such a physiological disorder. Thus, we infer from the results of our study that maximum entropy distribution as a means for stochastic characterization of temperature time series registers may be established as an important and early tool to aid in the diagnosis and prevention of metabolic diseases due to their ability to detect small variations in thermal profile.

  5. Early detection of metabolic and energy disorders by thermal time series stochastic complexity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutaif, N.A.; Palazzo, R. Jr; Gontijo, J.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of thermal homeostasis in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with changes in their thermal balance. The thermodynamic relationship between heat dissipation and energy storage is altered by the ingestion of high-energy diet content. Observation of thermal registers of core temperature behavior, in humans and rodents, permits identification of some characteristics of time series, such as autoreference and stationarity that fit adequately to a stochastic analysis. To identify this change, we used, for the first time, a stochastic autoregressive model, the concepts of which match those associated with physiological systems involved and applied in male HFD rats compared with their appropriate standard food intake age-matched male controls (n=7 per group). By analyzing a recorded temperature time series, we were able to identify when thermal homeostasis would be affected by a new diet. The autoregressive time series model (AR model) was used to predict the occurrence of thermal homeostasis, and this model proved to be very effective in distinguishing such a physiological disorder. Thus, we infer from the results of our study that maximum entropy distribution as a means for stochastic characterization of temperature time series registers may be established as an important and early tool to aid in the diagnosis and prevention of metabolic diseases due to their ability to detect small variations in thermal profile

  6. Thermal transport in isotopically disordered carbon nanotubes: a comparison between Green's functions and Boltzmann approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoltz, G; Lazzeri, M; Mauri, F

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of the phononic thermal conductivity of isotopically disordered carbon nanotubes. In particular, the behaviour of the thermal conductivity as a function of the system length is investigated, using Green's function techniques to compute the transmission across the system. The method is implemented using linear scaling algorithms, which allow us to reach systems of lengths up to L = 2.5 μm (with up to 200 000 atoms). As for 1D systems, it is observed that the conductivity diverges with the system size L. We also observe a dramatic decrease of the thermal conductance for systems of experimental sizes (roughly 80% at room temperature for L = 2.5 μm), when a large fraction of isotopic disorder is introduced. The results obtained with Green's function techniques are compared to results obtained with a Boltzmann description of thermal transport. There is a good agreement between both approaches for systems of experimental sizes, even in the presence of Anderson localization. This is particularly interesting since the computation of the transmission using Boltzmann's equation is much less computationally expensive, so that larger systems may be studied with this method.

  7. On Light-Induced Photoconversion of B800 Bacteriochlorophylls in the LH2 Antenna of the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell, Adam; Jassas, Mahboobe; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2017-11-02

    The B800-850 LH2 antenna from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum exhibits an unusual spectral splitting of the B800 absorption band; i.e., two bands are well-resolved at 5 K with maxima at 805 nm (B800 R ) and 792 nm (B800 B ). To provide more insight into the nature of the B800 bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a molecules, high-resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy is employed. Both white light illumination and selective laser excitations into B800 R or B800 B lead to B800 R → B800 B phototransformation. Selective excitation into B800 B leads to uncorrelated excitation energy transfer (EET) to B800 R and subsequent B800 R → B800 B phototransformation. The B800 B → B800 R EET time is 0.9 ± 0.1 ps. Excitation at 808.4 nm (into the low-energy side of B800 R ) shows that the lower limit of B800 R → B850 EET is about 2 ps, as the B800 R → B800 B phototransformation process could contribute to the corresponding zero-phonon hole width. The phototransformation of B800 R leads to a ∼ 200 cm -1 average blue-shift of transition energies, i.e., B800 R changes into B800 B . We argue that it is unlikely that B800-B850 excitonic interactions give rise to a splitting of the B800 band. We propose that the latter is caused by different protein conformations that can lead to both strong or weak hydrogen bond(s) between B800 pigments and the protein scaffolding. Temperature-dependent absorption spectra of B800, which revealed a well-defined isosbestic point, support a two-site model, likely with strongly and weakly hydrogen-bonded B800 BChls. Thus, BChls contributing to B800 R and B800 B could differ in the position of the proton in the BChl carbonyl-protein hydrogen bond, i.e., proton dynamics along the hydrogen bond may well be the major mechanism of this phototransformation. However, the effective tunneling mass is likely larger than the proton mass.

  8. Thermal conduction mechanisms in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    We present first principles studies which determine dominant effects limiting the heat conduction in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes [1]. Using an ab initio atomistic Green's function approach, we demonstrate that localization cannot be observed in the thermal conductivity measurements [1], and that diffusive scattering is the dominant mechanism which reduces the thermal conductivity [2]. We also give concrete predictions of the magnitude of the isotope effect on the thermal conductivities of carbon and boron nitride single-walled nanotubes [2]. We furthermore show that intershell scattering is not the main limiting mechanism for the heat flow through multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes [1], and that heat conduction restricted to a few shells leads to the low thermal conductivities experimentally measured [1]. We consequently successfully compare the results of our calculations [3] with the experimental measurements [1]. [1] C. W. Chang, A. M. Fennimore, A. Afanasiev, D. Okawa, T. Ikuno, H. Garcia, D. Li, A. Majumdar, A. Zettl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 085901. [2] I. Savic, N. Mingo, D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 165502. [3] I. Savic, D. A. Stewart, N. Mingo, to be published.

  9. Stark absorption spectroscopy on the carotenoids bound to B800-820 and B800-850 type LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Phaeospirillum molischianum strain DSM120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horibe, Tomoko; Qian, Pu; Hunter, C Neil; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2015-04-15

    Stark absorption spectroscopy was applied to clarify the structural differences between carotenoids bound to the B800-820 and B800-850 LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium Phaeospirillum (Phs.) molischianum DSM120. The former complex is produced when the bacteria are grown under stressed conditions of low temperature and dim light. These two LH2 complexes bind carotenoids with similar composition, 10% lycopene and 80% rhodopin, each with the same number of conjugated CC double bonds (n=11). Quantitative classical and semi-quantum chemical analyses of Stark absorption spectra recorded in the carotenoid absorption region reveal that the absolute values of the difference dipole moments |Δμ| have substantial differences (2 [D/f]) for carotenoids bound to either B800-820 or B800-850 complexes. The origin of this striking difference in the |Δμ| values was analyzed using the X-ray crystal structure of the B800-850 LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum DSM119. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations predict structural deformations of the major carotenoid, rhodopin, bound within the B800-820 complex. We propose that simultaneous rotations around neighboring CC and CC bonds account for the differences in the 2 [D/f] of the |Δμ| value. The plausible position of the rotation is postulated to be located around C21-C24 bonds of rhodopin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emission lineshapes of the B850 band of light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex in purple bacteria: a second order time-nonlocal quantum master equation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen; Jang, Seogjoo

    2013-04-07

    The emission lineshape of the B850 band in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria is calculated by extending the approach of 2nd order time-nonlocal quantum master equation [S. Jang and R. J. Silbey, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 9312 (2003)]. The initial condition for the emission process corresponds to the stationary excited state density where exciton states are entangled with the bath modes in equilibrium. This exciton-bath coupling, which is not diagonal in either site excitation or exciton basis, results in a new inhomogeneous term that is absent in the expression for the absorption lineshape. Careful treatment of all the 2nd order terms are made, and explicit expressions are derived for both full 2nd order lineshape expression and the one based on secular approximation that neglects off-diagonal components in the exciton basis. Numerical results are presented for a few representative cases of disorder and temperature. Comparison of emission line shape with the absorption line shape is also made. It is shown that the inhomogeneous term coming from the entanglement of the system and bath degrees of freedom makes significant contributions to the lineshape. It is also found that the perturbative nature of the theory can result in negative portion of lineshape in some situations, which can be removed significantly by inclusion of the inhomogeneous term and completely by using the secular approximation. Comparison of the emission and absorption lineshapes at different temperatures demonstrates the role of thermal population of different exciton states and exciton-phonon couplings.

  11. Small quartz silica spheres induced disorder in octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystals: A thermal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinelli, M.; Ghosh, A. K.; Mercuri, F.

    2001-01-01

    A photopyroelectric technique has been applied to the study of specific heat and thermal conductivity of homeotropically aligned mixtures of small quartz spheres (aerosil) and octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) with concentration 0≤ρ s ≤0.04g/cm 3 . Thermal conductivity data show that, even at these very low concentrations, an annealing of the disorder introduced by the aerosil takes place on cooling at the smectic-A - nematic (Sm-A - N) phase transition and not only at the nematic-isotropic (N-I) one. This means that there is some elastic strain in the nematic phase of the sample which is not quenched. Accordingly the suppression of the N-I transition temperature as a function of ρ s does not fit a random field with a random dilution model that accounts for random quenched disorder only. High resolution specific heat measurements at the A-N and N-I transition show the effect of the aerosil is not the same. While in the first case its peak is suppressed with increasing concentration, in the second case there are some indications that outside the two-phase coexistence region it is enhanced. The effect of surface-induced alignment is also discussed to explain some discrepancies between our data and the ones reported in literature. It is concluded that the amount of disorder in the sample does not depend on ρ s only, but also on other variables such as external fields. Finally, a relaxation phenomenon in the aerosil network that partially compensate the disordering effect of the particles is suggested to explain the concentration dependence of the transition temperatures

  12. Deficits in pain perception in borderline personality disorder: results from the thermal grill illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Chung, Boo Young; Richter, Ingmarie; Wicking, Manon; Foell, Jens; Mancke, Falk; Schmahl, Christian; Flor, Herta

    2015-10-01

    It is well documented that borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by reduced pain sensitivity, which might be related to nonsuicidal self-injury and dissociative experiences in patients with BPD. However, it remains an open question whether this insensitivity relies at least partly on altered sensory integration or on an altered evaluation of pain or a combination of both. In this study, we used the thermal grill illusion (TGI), describing a painful sensation induced by the application of alternating cold and warm nonnoxious stimuli, in patients with either current or remitted BPD as well as matched healthy controls. Two additional conditions, applying warm or cold temperatures only, served as control. We further assessed thermal perception, discrimination, and pain thresholds. We found significantly reduced heat and cold pain thresholds for the current BPD group, as well as reduced cold pain thresholds for the remitted BPD group, as compared with the HC group. Current BPD patients perceived a less-intense TGI in terms of induced pain and unpleasantness, while their general ability to perceive this kind of illusion seemed to be unaffected. Thermal grill illusion magnitude was negatively correlated with dissociation and traumatization only in the current BPD patients. These results indicate that higher-order pain perception is altered in current BPD, which seems to normalize after remission. We discuss these findings against the background of neurophysiological evidence for the TGI in general and reduced pain sensitivity in BPD and suggest a relationship to alterations in N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmission.

  13. Synthesis, thermal behavior and thermoelectric properties of disordered tellurides with structures derived from the rocksalt type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Thorsten

    2014-06-17

    GeBi{sub 2}Te{sub 4} is proposed as phase-change material. Nanostructures in metastable GeBi{sub 2}Te{sub 4} were obtained by high-pressure synthesis and thermal quenching, - depending on temperature and pressure different modifications were found. The differences in the electrical characteristics can be attributed to the variation of grain boundary concentration and the grain size distribution. Two synthesis approaches were used to prepare Ag{sub 3.4}In{sub 3.7}Sb{sub 76.4}Te{sub 16.5} bulk samples and studied with respect to their transport and thermal properties. A high pressure route to prepare thermoelectrics with low thermal conductivity was developed for AgIn{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x}Te{sub 2}. Disorder and and transport studies on In{sub 3}SbTe{sub 2} were performed using X-ray, neutron and electron diffraction measurements. Nanostructures in Te/Sb/Ge/Ag (TAGS) thermoelectric materials were induced by phase transitions associated with vacancy ordering. Further studies concerned solid solution series (GeTe){sub x}(LiSbTe{sub 2}){sub 2} (1 smaller or equal x smaller or equal 11) and their thermoelectric properties.

  14. Electrical, thermal and electrochemical properties of disordered carbon prepared from palygorskite and cane molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Edelio Danguillecourt, E-mail: edelioalvarez42@gmail.com [Instituto Superior Minero Metalúrgico (ISMM), Moa 83300 (Cuba); Laffita, Yodalgis Mosqueda, E-mail: yodalgis@imre.uh.cu [Institute of Materials Science and Technology-Havana University, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Montoro, Luciano Andrey, E-mail: landrey.montoro@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901 (Brazil); Della Santina Mohallem, Nelcy, E-mail: nelcydsm@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais 31270-901 (Brazil); Cabrera, Humberto, E-mail: hcabrera@ictp.it [SPIE-ICTP Anchor Research in Optics Program Laboratory, International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Centro Multidisciplinario de Ciencias, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), 5101 Mérida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pérez, Guillermo Mesa, E-mail: guille@ceaden.edu.cu [National Center for Technological Research (CEADEN), La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Frutis, Miguel Aguilar, E-mail: mafrutis@yahoo.es [CICATA-IPN, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, Del., Miguel Hidalgo CP 11500 (Mexico); Cappe, Eduardo Pérez, E-mail: cappe@imre.uh.cu [Institute of Materials Science and Technology-Havana University, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2017-02-15

    We have synthesized and electrochemically tested a carbon sample that was suitable as anode for lithium secondary battery. The synthesis was based on the use of the palygorskite clay as template and sugar cane molasses as carbon source. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) measurements and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) analysis showed that the nanometric carbon material has a highly disordered graphene-like wrinkled structure and large specific surface area (467 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). The compositional characterization revealed a 14% of heteroatoms-containing groups (O, H, N, S) doping the as-prepared carbon. Thermophysical measurements revealed the good thermal stability and an acceptable thermal diffusivity (9·10{sup −7} m{sup 2} s{sup −1}) and conductivity (1.1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}) of this carbon. The electrical properties showed an electronic conductivity of hole-like carriers of approximately one S/cm in a 173–293 K range. The testing of this material as anodes in a secondary lithium battery displayed a high specific capacity and excellent performance in terms of number of cycles. A high reversible capacity of 356 mA h g{sup −1} was reached. - Graphical abstract: TEM image and electrochemistry behavior of a new graphene oxide-like carbon. - Highlights: • A high disordered graphene oxide-like conducting carbon is reported. • The synthesis was based on palygorskite and sugar cane molasses as precursors. • The disordered conducting carbon is composed of doped- graphene heterogeneous domains. • This material combines a large specific surface area and high electric conductivity. • The thermophysical and electrochemical properties of this material reveal adequate behavior.

  15. Electrical, thermal and electrochemical properties of disordered carbon prepared from palygorskite and cane molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Edelio Danguillecourt; Laffita, Yodalgis Mosqueda; Montoro, Luciano Andrey; Della Santina Mohallem, Nelcy; Cabrera, Humberto; Pérez, Guillermo Mesa; Frutis, Miguel Aguilar; Cappe, Eduardo Pérez

    2017-01-01

    We have synthesized and electrochemically tested a carbon sample that was suitable as anode for lithium secondary battery. The synthesis was based on the use of the palygorskite clay as template and sugar cane molasses as carbon source. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) measurements and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) analysis showed that the nanometric carbon material has a highly disordered graphene-like wrinkled structure and large specific surface area (467 m 2 g −1 ). The compositional characterization revealed a 14% of heteroatoms-containing groups (O, H, N, S) doping the as-prepared carbon. Thermophysical measurements revealed the good thermal stability and an acceptable thermal diffusivity (9·10 −7 m 2 s −1 ) and conductivity (1.1 W m −1 K −1 ) of this carbon. The electrical properties showed an electronic conductivity of hole-like carriers of approximately one S/cm in a 173–293 K range. The testing of this material as anodes in a secondary lithium battery displayed a high specific capacity and excellent performance in terms of number of cycles. A high reversible capacity of 356 mA h g −1 was reached. - Graphical abstract: TEM image and electrochemistry behavior of a new graphene oxide-like carbon. - Highlights: • A high disordered graphene oxide-like conducting carbon is reported. • The synthesis was based on palygorskite and sugar cane molasses as precursors. • The disordered conducting carbon is composed of doped- graphene heterogeneous domains. • This material combines a large specific surface area and high electric conductivity. • The thermophysical and electrochemical properties of this material reveal adequate behavior.

  16. Application of Infrared Thermal Imaging in a Violinist with Temporomandibular Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, M; Coimbra, D; Silva, A; Aguiar Branco, C; Pinho, J C

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) consist of a group of pathologies that affect the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints (TMJ), and/or related structures. String instrumentalists, like many orchestra musicians, can spend hours with head postures that may influence the biomechanical behavior of the TMJ and the muscles of the craniocervicomandibular complex (CCMC). The adoption of abnormal postures acquired during performance by musicians can lead to muscular hyperactivity of the head and cervical muscles, with the possible appearance of TMD. Medical infrared thermography is a non-invasive procedure that can monitor the changes in the superficial tissue related to blood circulation and may serve as a complement to the clinical examination. The objective of this study was to use infrared thermography to evaluate, in one subject, the cutaneous thermal changes adjacent to the CCMC that occur before, during, and after playing a string instrument.

  17. Electrical, thermal and electrochemical properties of disordered carbon prepared from palygorskite and cane molasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Edelio Danguillecourt; Laffita, Yodalgis Mosqueda; Montoro, Luciano Andrey; Della Santina Mohallem, Nelcy; Cabrera, Humberto; Pérez, Guillermo Mesa; Frutis, Miguel Aguilar; Cappe, Eduardo Pérez

    2017-02-01

    We have synthesized and electrochemically tested a carbon sample that was suitable as anode for lithium secondary battery. The synthesis was based on the use of the palygorskite clay as template and sugar cane molasses as carbon source. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM) analysis showed that the nanometric carbon material has a highly disordered graphene-like wrinkled structure and large specific surface area (467 m2 g-1). The compositional characterization revealed a 14% of heteroatoms-containing groups (O, H, N, S) doping the as-prepared carbon. Thermophysical measurements revealed the good thermal stability and an acceptable thermal diffusivity (9·10-7 m2 s-1) and conductivity (1.1 W m-1 K-1) of this carbon. The electrical properties showed an electronic conductivity of hole-like carriers of approximately one S/cm in a 173-293 K range. The testing of this material as anodes in a secondary lithium battery displayed a high specific capacity and excellent performance in terms of number of cycles. A high reversible capacity of 356 mA h g-1 was reached.

  18. Drastic fall-off of the thermal conductivity for disordered lattices in the limit of weak anharmonic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huveneers, François

    2013-01-01

    We study the thermal conductivity, at fixed positive temperature, of a disordered lattice of harmonic oscillators, weakly coupled to each other through anharmonic potentials. The interaction is controlled by a small parameter ϵ > 0. We rigorously show, in two slightly different setups, that the conductivity has a non-perturbative origin. This means that it decays to zero faster than any polynomial in ϵ as ϵ → 0. It is then argued that this result extends to a disordered chain studied by Dhar and Lebowitz (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 134301), and to a classic spin chain recently investigated by Oganesyan, Pal and Huse (2009 Phys. Rev. B 80 115104). (paper)

  19. The influence of the disordered dipole subsystem on the thermal conductivity of the CO solid at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumarokov, V.; Jezowski, A.; Stachowiak, P.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of solid CO is investigated in the temperature range 1-20 K. The experimental temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of solid CO is described using the time-relaxation method within the Debye model. The comparison of the experimental temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity of N 2 and CO shows that in the case of CO there is an additional large phonon scattering at temperatures near the maximum. Analysis of the experimental data indicates that this scattering is caused by the frozen disordered dipole subsystem, similar to a dipole glass. The scattering is described by resonant phonon scattering on tunneling states and on low-energy quasi-harmonic oscillations within the soft potential model

  20. Effect of lattice disorder on the thermal conductivity of ZnBeSe, ZnMgSe and ZnBeMgSe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strzałkowski, K.

    2015-01-01

    Zn 1−x−y Be x Mg y Se mixed crystals investigated in this work were grown from the melt by the high pressure high temperature modified Bridgman method in the range of composition 0 < x,y < 0.33. Photopyroelectric (PPE) calorimetry in the back (BPPE) and front (FPPE) configuration was applied for thermal investigation of solid samples. The thermal diffusivity and effusivity of investigated crystals were derived from the experimental data. Since dynamic thermal parameters are connected with each other, thermal conductivity of the specimens was calculated from theoretical dependencies between them. The influence of the beryllium (x) and magnesium (y) content on thermal properties of these crystals have been presented and discussed. Order-disorder effects observed for these materials previously have been also taken into account. Finally, thermal diagrams, i.e. thermal conductivity versus composition were presented and discussed applying model given by Sadao Adachi. - Highlights: • Investigated II–VI crystals were obtained by a high pressure modified Bridgman method. • A complete thermal characterization of Zn 1−x−y Be x Mg y Se semiconductors was carried out. • The effect of lattice disorder on thermal properties was presented and discussed. • Obtained data were analyzed applying lattice thermal conductivity model. • Contribution to thermal resistivity arising from lattice disorder was calculated

  1. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Past, Present, and a Look Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    2014-01-01

    NTR: High thrust high specific impulse (2 x LOXLH2 chemical) engine uses high power density fission reactor with enriched uranium fuel as thermal power source. Reactor heat is removed using H2 propellant which is then exhausted to produce thrust. Conventional chemical engine LH2 tanks, turbo pumps, regenerative nozzles and radiation-cooled shirt extensions used -- NTR is next evolutionary step in high performance liquid rocket engines.

  2. Low-temperature protein dynamics of the B800 molecules in the LH2 light-harvesting complex: spectral hole burning study and comparison with single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Daniel; Herascu, Nicoleta; Reinot, Tõnu; Jankowiak, Ryszard; Zazubovich, Valter

    2010-03-18

    Previously published and new spectral hole burning (SHB) data on the B800 band of LH2 light-harvesting antenna complex of Rps. acidophila are analyzed in light of recent single photosynthetic complex spectroscopy (SPCS) results (for a review, see Berlin et al. Phys. Life Rev. 2007, 4, 64.). It is demonstrated that, in general, SHB-related phenomena observed for the B800 band are in qualitative agreement with the SPCS data and the protein models involving multiwell multitier protein energy landscapes. Regarding the quantitative agreement, we argue that the single-molecule behavior associated with the fastest spectral diffusion (smallest barrier) tier of the protein energy landscape is inconsistent with the SHB data. The latter discrepancy can be attributed to SPCS probing not only the dynamics of of the protein complex per se, but also that of the surrounding amorphous host and/or of the host-protein interface. It is argued that SHB (once improved models are developed) should also be able to provide the average magnitudes and probability distributions of light-induced spectral shifts and could be used to determine whether SPCS probes a set of protein complexes that are both intact and statistically relevant. SHB results are consistent with the B800 --> B850 energy-transfer models including consideration of the whole B850 density of states.

  3. Stability and properties of quasi-stable conformational states in the LH2 light-harvesting complex of Rbl. acidophilus bacteria formed by hexacoordination of bacteriochlorophyll a magnesium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Aleksandr S.; Khokhlov, Daniil V.; Glebov, Ilya O.; Poddubnyy, Vladimir V.; Eremin, Vadim V.

    2017-06-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopic experiments on several light-harvesting complexes revealed the existence of a set of metastable conformational states with different spectroscopic properties and lifetimes spanning from milliseconds to tens of seconds. In the absence of explicit structural data, a number of probable structural changes underlying the observed spectroscopic shifts were proposed. We examine the donor-acceptor interaction between the magnesium atom and the acetyl group of the adjacent bacteriochlorophylls a as a possible origin of metastable conformational states in the LH2 light-harvesting complex of Rbl. acidophilus bacteria. The results of QM/MM and molecular dynamics simulations show that such ligation can occur at room temperature and leads to one metastable coordination bond per pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the B850 ring. According to the results of Poisson-TrESP modeling, such coordination lowers the energies of the excited states of the complex by up to 163 cm-1 which causes red spectral shift of the B850 band.

  4. Order and disorder in Ca2ND0.90H0.10-A structural and thermal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T.S.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of calcium nitride hydride and its deuterided form has been re-examined at room temperature and studied at high temperature using neutron powder diffraction and thermal analysis. When synthesised at 600 deg. C, a mixture of both ordered and disordered Ca 2 ND 0.90 H 0.10 phases results. The disordered phase is the minor component and has a primitive rocksalt structure (spacegroup Fm3m) with no ordering of D/N on the anion sites and the ordered phase is best described using the rhombohedral spacegroup R-3m with D and N arranged in alternate layers in (111) planes. This mixture of ordered and disordered phases exists up to 580 deg. C, at which the loss of deuterium yields Ca 2 ND 0.85 with the disappearance of the disordered phase. In the new ordered phase there exists a similar content of vacancies on both anion sites; to achieve this balance, a little N transfers onto the D site, whereas there is no indication of D transferring onto the N-sites. These observations are thought to indicate that the D/N ordering is difficult to achieve with fully occupied anion sites. It has previously been reported that Ca 2 ND has an ordered cubic cell with alternating D and N sites in the [100] directions ; however, for the samples studied herein, there were clearly two coexisting phases with apparent broadening/splitting of the primitive peaks but not for the ordered peaks. The rhombohedral phase was in fact metrically cubic; however, all the observed peaks were consistent with the rhombohedral unit cell with no peaks requiring the larger ordered cubic unit cell to be utilised. Furthermore this rhombohedral cell displays the same form of N-D ordering as the Sr and Ba analogues, which are metrically rhombohedral. - Graphical abstract: Ca 2 ND 0.90 H 0.10 forms a mixture of ordered and disordered phases when synthesised at 600 deg. C. The ordered phase disappears at high temperature upon release of structural deuterium/hydrogen, leaving a single, partially disordered

  5. Si diffusion in compositional disordering of Si-implanted GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices induced by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, Masashi; Yanagawa, Fumihiko

    1988-01-01

    The Si diffusion in Si-implanted GaAs/Al 0.5 Ga 0.5 As superlattices intermixed in the disrodering process induced by rapid thermal annealing (RTA), is investigated by means of secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The SIMS profiles indicate that no fast Si diffusion occurs during the disordering, and the disordering occurs when the Si concentration exceeds 1 x 10 19 cm -3 , which is about three times larger than the threshold value for the disordering by furnace annealing (FA). The number of Si atoms which are allowed to pass through the heterointerface is considered to be essential for disordering. (author)

  6. Hysteresis in magnetic materials: the role of structural disorder, thermal relaxation, and dynamic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertotti, G.; Basso, V.; Beatrice, C.; LoBue, M.; Magni, A.; Tiberto, P.

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the present understanding of hysteresis phenomena in magnetic materials. The problem is addressed from three approximate viewpoints: the connection between rate-independent hysteresis and micromagnetics; the modifications brought into this picture by thermal relaxation effects; the role of rate-dependent magnetization mechanisms, like eddy-current-damped domain wall motion

  7. Investigation of thermally induced anion disorder in fluorites using neutron scattering techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, M T; Clausen, Kurt Nørgaard; Dickens, M H

    1984-01-01

    Some materials with the fluorite structures show a pronounced specific heat anomaly well below their melting temperature. This anomaly is a consequence of lattice disorder and is associated with the onset of fast-ion conduction. This paper presents the results of a series of experiments in which...

  8. Effect of Thermal and Structural Disorder on the Electronic Structure of Hybrid Perovskite Semiconductor CH3NH3PbI3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shivam; Li, Cheng; Panzer, Fabian; Narasimhan, K L; Graeser, Anna; Gujar, Tanaji P; Köhler, Anna; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Huettner, Sven; Kabra, Dinesh

    2016-08-04

    In this Letter, we investigate the temperature dependence of the optical properties of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3 = CH3NH3PbI3) from room temperature to 6 K. In both the tetragonal (T > 163 K) and the orthorhombic (T photoluminescence (PL) measurements) decreases with decrease in temperature, in contrast to what is normally seen for many inorganic semiconductors, such as Si, GaAs, GaN, etc. We show that in the perovskites reported here, the temperature coefficient of thermal expansion is large and accounts for the positive temperature coefficient of the band gap. A detailed analysis of the exciton line width allows us to distinguish between static and dynamic disorder. The low-energy tail of the exciton absorption is reminiscent of Urbach absorption. The Urbach energy is a measure of the disorder, which is modeled using thermal and static disorder for both the phases separately. The static disorder component, manifested in the exciton line width at low temperature, is small. Above 60 K, thermal disorder increases the line width. Both these features are a measure of the high crystal quality and low disorder of the perovskite films even though they are produced from solution.

  9. The role of order and disorder in thermal and material sciences part 2: Scientific world and new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šesták Jaroslav

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of heat is thoroughly analyzed and its historical links are search particularly with relation to both the Greek philosophy (Mile in print sians Pythagoreans, atomists, etc and the in the present day thermal physics. Fluctuation, spontaneity and chaos is discussed. Thermodynamics is reviewed in the relation to both the traditional development and the modern description of disequilibria (open systems. Effect of dissipation is shown often to provide new, self-organized structures. Exploitation of fire and its conscious use as a manufacturing power are analyzed in terms of generalized engines to act in the sense of as the information transducers. The part 2 reveals the impact of mathematics as explained on some simple cases showing development of basic ideas (vibration, topology, bifurcations etc. Earth thermal environment is discussed in relation to the existence of life (antropy principles. Alternative theory of reaction-diffusion model of the space-time is put in contrast with big bang hypothesis and related to the herewith-discussed specialty of self-catalyzed chemical reactions. The text gives a consistent view to various historical and modern concepts that emerged during the gradual understanding of order and disorder.

  10. Theory of the disordered ν =5/2 quantum thermal Hall state: Emergent symmetry and phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Biao; Wang, Juven

    2018-04-01

    Fractional quantum Hall (FQH) system at Landau level filling fraction ν =5 /2 has long been suggested to be non-Abelian, either Pfaffian (Pf) or antiPfaffian (APf) states by numerical studies, both with quantized Hall conductance σx y=5 e2/2 h . Thermal Hall conductances of the Pf and APf states are quantized at κx y=7 /2 and κx y=3 /2 , respectively, in a proper unit. However, a recent experiment shows the thermal Hall conductance of ν =5 /2 FQH state is κx y=5 /2 . It has been speculated that the system contains random Pf and APf domains driven by disorders, and the neutral chiral Majorana modes on the domain walls may undergo a percolation transition to a κx y=5 /2 phase. In this paper, we do perturbative and nonperturbative analyses on the domain walls between Pf and APf. We show the domain wall theory possesses an emergent SO(4) symmetry at energy scales below a threshold Λ1, which is lowered to an emergent U (1 )×U (1) symmetry at energy scales between Λ1 and a higher value Λ2, and is finally lowered to the composite fermion parity symmetry Z2F above Λ2. Based on the emergent symmetries, we propose a phase diagram of the disordered ν =5 /2 FQH system and show that a κx y=5 /2 phase arises at disorder energy scales Λ >Λ1 . Furthermore, we show the gapped double-semion sector of ND compact domain walls contributes nonlocal topological degeneracy 2ND-1, causing a low-temperature peak in the heat capacity. We implement a nonperturbative method to bootstrap generic topological 1 +1 D domain walls (two-surface defects) applicable to any 2 +1 D non-Abelian topological order. We also identify potentially relevant spin topological quantum field theories (TQFTs) for various ν =5 /2 FQH states in terms of fermionic version of U (1) ±8 Chern-Simons theory ×Z8 -class TQFTs.

  11. Order-disorder-reorder process in thermally treated dolomite samples: a combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchini, A.; Comodi, P.; Katerinopoulou, A.; Balic-Zunic, T.; McCammon, C.; Frondini, F.

    2012-04-01

    A combined powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] heated to 1,200°C at 3 GPa was made to study the order-disorder-reorder process. The order/disorder transition is inferred to start below 1,100°C, and complete disorder is attained at approximately 1,200°C. Twinned crystals characterized by high internal order were found in samples annealed over 1,100°C, and their fraction was found to increase with temperature. Evidences of twinning domains combined with probable remaining disordered portions of the structure imply that reordering processes occur during the quench. Twin domains are hereby proposed as a witness to thermally induced intra-layer-type cation disordering.

  12. Magnetic behavior of MnPS3 phases intercalated by [Zn2L]2+ (LH2: macrocyclic ligand obtained by condensation of 2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-benzenedicarbaldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spodine, E.; Valencia-Galvez, P.; Fuentealba, P.; Manzur, J.; Ruiz, D.; Venegas-Yazigi, D.; Paredes-Garcia, V.; Cardoso-Gil, R.; Schnelle, W.; Kniep, R.

    2011-01-01

    The intercalation of the cationic binuclear macrocyclic complex [Zn 2 L] 2+ (LH 2 : macrocyclic ligand obtained by the template condensation of 2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-benzenedicarbaldehyde and 1,2-diaminobenzene) was achieved by a cationic exchange process, using K 0.4 Mn 0.8 PS 3 as a precursor. Three intercalated materials were obtained and characterized: (Zn 2 L) 0.05 K 0.3 Mn 0.8 PS 3 (1), (Zn 2 L) 0.1 K 0.2 Mn 0.8 PS 3 (2) and (Zn 2 L) 0.05 K 0.3 Mn 0.8 PS 3 (3), the latter phase being obtained by an assisted microwave radiation process. The magnetic data permit to estimate the Weiss temperature θ of ∼-130 K for (1); ∼-155 K for (2) and ∼-130 K for (3). The spin canting present in the potassium precursor remains unperturbed in composite (3), and spontaneous magnetization is observed under 50 K in both materials. However composites (1) and (2) do not present this spontaneous magnetization at low temperatures. The electronic properties of the intercalates do not appear to be significantly altered. The reflectance spectra of the intercalated phases (1), (2) and (3) show a gap value between 1.90 and 1.80 eV, lower than the value observed for the K 0.4 Mn 0.8 PS 3 precursor of 2.8 eV. -- Graphical Abstract: Microwave assisted synthesis was used to obtain an intercalated MnPS 3 phase with a binuclear Zn(II) macrocyclic complex. A comparative magnetic study of the composites obtained by assisted microwave and traditional synthetic methods is reported. Display Omitted Highlights: → A rapid and efficient preparation of intercalated MnPS 3 composites by assisted microwave synthesis is described. → The exchange of potassium ions of the precursor by the macrocyclic Zn(II) complex is partial. → The composite obtained by assisted microwave synthesis retains the spontaneous magnetization, observed in the low temperature range of the magnetic susceptibility of the potassium precursor. → The materials obtained by the conventional method loose the spontaneous

  13. Preliminary thermal design of the COLD-SAT spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Hugh

    1991-01-01

    The COLD-SAT free-flying spacecraft was to perform experiments with LH2 in the cryogenic fluid management technologies of storage, supply and transfer in reduced gravity. The Phase A preliminary design of the Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) for the spacecraft exterior and interior surfaces and components of the bus subsystems is described. The TCS was composed of passive elements which were augmented with heaters. Trade studies to minimize the parasitic heat leakage into the cryogen storage tanks are described. Selection procedure for the thermally optimum on-orbit spacecraft attitude was defined. TRASYS-2 and SINDA'85 verification analysis was performed on the design and the results are presented.

  14. Thresholds and perception of cold pain, heat pain, and the thermal grill illusion in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Michael Karl; Grossmann, David; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The thermal grill illusion (TGI) in which interlacing cold and warm bars create the illusion of a painful sensation has been suggested as an experimental model for central pain states and pain processing. The aim of this study was to use this technique to gain further insights into the altered pain perception in major depressive disorder (MDD). In 18 unmedicated patients with MDD, cold and heat pain thresholds (CPT/HPT) as well as the perception of the TGI were examined and compared with 18 matched controls. CPT and HPT were significantly increased in patients (7.9°C and 47.5°C) compared with controls (15.9°C and 45.2°C, respectively; p painful by controls, the patients did not indicate painful sensations, thereby indicating a shift of the stimulus-response curve of TGI pain perception toward higher stimulus intensities, that is, greater temperature differentials between cold and warm bars (11.5°C for controls, 16.7°C for patients). The patients rated the pain intensity perceived at the respective pain thresholds (CPT and HPT) in tendency higher than did the controls, whereas they perceived the TGI less painful despite increased stimulus intensities. Unpleasantness ratings were similar between groups. CPT, HPT and temperature differentials for the perception of the TGI, were increased in patients with MDD as compared with controls. Pain intensity, however, was rated differently for CPT and HPT, where patients indicated higher ratings in tendency, and for the TGI stimulation, where pain was perceived less intense.

  15. Growth, thermal properties and laser operation of a novel disordered Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 laser crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhongben; Cai, Huaqiang; Huang, Hui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Wang, Jiyang

    2014-10-01

    A high quality disordered Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 laser crystal has been successfully grown by the Czochralski method. The complete set of anisotropic thermal properties were systematically measured for the first time. In addition, continuous-wave laser along the three crystallographic axis were obtained. Passively Q-switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber, the laser yielded an average output power of 0.47 W with a slope efficiency of 7.6% for the first time. The generated pulse energy, duration, and peak power were 94 μJ, 33 ns, and 2.85 KW, respectively. We believe that the reliability and stability of these lasers makes the disordered Yb:Ca3La2(BO3)4 crystal of considerable interest for future applications.

  16. The emergence of nonbulk properties in supported metal clusters: negative thermal expansion and atomic disorder in Pt nanoclusters supported on gamma-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Bram, Ariella; Kang, Joo H; Small, Matthew W; Nuzzo, Ralph G; Frenkel, Anatoly I

    2009-05-27

    The structural dynamics-cluster size and adsorbate-dependent thermal behaviors of the metal-metal (M-M) bond distances and interatomic order-of Pt nanoclusters supported on a gamma-Al(2)O(3) are described. Data from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies reveal that these materials possess a dramatically nonbulklike nature. Under an inert atmosphere small, subnanometer Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3) clusters exhibit marked relaxations of the M-M bond distances, negative thermal expansion (NTE) with an average linear thermal expansion coefficient alpha = (-2.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(-5) K(-1), large static disorder and dynamical bond (interatomic) disorder that is poorly modeled within the constraints of classical theory. The data further demonstrate a significant temperature-dependence to the electronic structure of the Pt clusters, thereby suggesting the necessity of an active model to describe the cluster/support interactions mediating the cluster's dynamical structure. The quantitative dependences of these nonbulklike behaviors on cluster size (0.9 to 2.9 nm), ambient atmosphere (He, 4% H(2) in He or 20% O(2) in He) and support identity (gamma-Al(2)O(3) or carbon black) are systematically investigated. We show that the nonbulk structural, electronic and dynamical perturbations are most dramatically evidenced for the smallest clusters. The adsorption of hydrogen on the clusters leads to an increase of the Pt-Pt bondlengths (due to a lifting of the surface relaxation) and significant attenuation of the disorder present in the system. Oxidation of these same clusters has the opposite effect, leading to an increase in Pt-Pt bond strain and subsequent enhancement in nonbulklike thermal properties. The structural and electronic properties of Pt nanoclusters supported on carbon black contrast markedly with those of the Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3) samples in that neither NTE nor comparable levels of atomic disorder are observed. The Pt

  17. Thermal properties of halogen-ethane glassy crystals: Effects of orientational disorder and the role of internal molecular degrees of freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovichenko, G. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A. [B. Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of NAS Ukraine, 47 Lenin Ave., 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Tamarit, J. Ll., E-mail: josep.lluis.tamarit@upc.edu; Pardo, L. C.; Rovira-Esteva, M. [Grup de Caracterització de Materials, Departament de Física i Enginyeria Nuclear, ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Bermejo, F. J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hassaine, M.; Ramos, M. A. [Laboratorio de Bajas Temperaturas, Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Nicolás Cabrera, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Francisco Tomás y Valiente 7, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-28

    The thermal conductivity, specific heat, and specific volume of the orientational glass former 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CCl{sub 2}F–CClF{sub 2}, F-113) have been measured under equilibrium pressure within the low-temperature range, showing thermodynamic anomalies at ca. 120, 72, and 20 K. The results are discussed together with those pertaining to the structurally related 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane (CCl{sub 2}F–CCl{sub 2}F, F-112), which also shows anomalies at 130, 90, and 60 K. The rich phase behavior of these compounds can be accounted for by the interplay between several of their degrees of freedom. The arrest of the degrees of freedom corresponding to the internal molecular rotation, responsible for the existence of two energetically distinct isomers, and the overall molecular orientation, source of the characteristic orientational disorder of plastic phases, can explain the anomalies at higher and intermediate temperatures, respectively. The soft-potential model has been used as the framework to describe the thermal properties at low temperatures. We show that the low-temperature anomaly of the compounds corresponds to a secondary relaxation, which can be associated with the appearance of Umklapp processes, i.e., anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering, that dominate thermal transport in that temperature range.

  18. Thermal properties of halogen-ethane glassy crystals: Effects of orientational disorder and the role of internal molecular degrees of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovichenko, G. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Tamarit, J. Ll.; Pardo, L. C.; Rovira-Esteva, M.; Bermejo, F. J.; Hassaine, M.; Ramos, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, specific heat, and specific volume of the orientational glass former 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CCl 2 F–CClF 2 , F-113) have been measured under equilibrium pressure within the low-temperature range, showing thermodynamic anomalies at ca. 120, 72, and 20 K. The results are discussed together with those pertaining to the structurally related 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane (CCl 2 F–CCl 2 F, F-112), which also shows anomalies at 130, 90, and 60 K. The rich phase behavior of these compounds can be accounted for by the interplay between several of their degrees of freedom. The arrest of the degrees of freedom corresponding to the internal molecular rotation, responsible for the existence of two energetically distinct isomers, and the overall molecular orientation, source of the characteristic orientational disorder of plastic phases, can explain the anomalies at higher and intermediate temperatures, respectively. The soft-potential model has been used as the framework to describe the thermal properties at low temperatures. We show that the low-temperature anomaly of the compounds corresponds to a secondary relaxation, which can be associated with the appearance of Umklapp processes, i.e., anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering, that dominate thermal transport in that temperature range

  19. Thermal properties of halogen-ethane glassy crystals: Effects of orientational disorder and the role of internal molecular degrees of freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vdovichenko, G. A.; Krivchikov, A. I.; Korolyuk, O. A.; Tamarit, J. Ll.; Pardo, L. C.; Rovira-Esteva, M.; Bermejo, F. J.; Hassaine, M.; Ramos, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal conductivity, specific heat, and specific volume of the orientational glass former 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CCl2F-CClF2, F-113) have been measured under equilibrium pressure within the low-temperature range, showing thermodynamic anomalies at ca. 120, 72, and 20 K. The results are discussed together with those pertaining to the structurally related 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane (CCl2F-CCl2F, F-112), which also shows anomalies at 130, 90, and 60 K. The rich phase behavior of these compounds can be accounted for by the interplay between several of their degrees of freedom. The arrest of the degrees of freedom corresponding to the internal molecular rotation, responsible for the existence of two energetically distinct isomers, and the overall molecular orientation, source of the characteristic orientational disorder of plastic phases, can explain the anomalies at higher and intermediate temperatures, respectively. The soft-potential model has been used as the framework to describe the thermal properties at low temperatures. We show that the low-temperature anomaly of the compounds corresponds to a secondary relaxation, which can be associated with the appearance of Umklapp processes, i.e., anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering, that dominate thermal transport in that temperature range.

  20. External Tank (ET) Foam Thermal/Structural Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David F.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chang, Li C.; Malroy, Eric T.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    An independent study was performed to assess the pre-launch thermally induced stresses in the Space Shuttle External Tank Bipod closeout and Ice/Frost ramps (IFRs). Finite element models with various levels of detail were built that included the three types of foam (BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL 1034) and the underlying structure and bracketry. Temperature profiles generated by the thermal analyses were input to the structural models to calculate the stress levels. An area of high stress in the Bipod closeout was found along the aluminum tank wall near the phenolic insulator and along the phenolic insulator itself. This area of high stress might be prone to cracking and possible delamination. There is a small region of slightly increased stress in the NCFI 24-124 foam near its joint with the Bipod closeout BX-265 foam. The calculated stresses in the NCFI 24-124 acreage foam are highest at the NCFI 24-124/PDL 1034/tank wall interface under the LO2 and LH2 IFRs. The highest calculated stresses in the LH2 NCFI 24-124 foam are higher than in similar locations in the LO2 IFR. This finding is consistent with the dissection results of IFRs on ET-120.

  1. Strategy of ring-shaped aggregates in excitation energy transfer for removing disorder-induced shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tei, Go; Nakatani, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral light harvesting complex (LH2), which is found in photosynthetic antenna systems of purple photosynthetic bacteria, has important functions in the photosynthetic process, such as harvesting sunlight and transferring its energy to the photosynthetic reaction center. The key component in excitation energy transfer (EET) between LH2s is B850, which is a characteristic ring-shaped aggregate of pigments usually formed by 18 or 16 bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We theoretically study the strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure, which maximizes EET efficiency, by using the standard Frenkel exciton model and the self-consistent calculation method for the Markovian quantum master equation and Maxwell equation. As a result, we have revealed a simple but ingenious strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure. The combination of three key properties of the ring unit system maximizes the EET efficiency, namely the large dipole moment of aggregates causes the basic improvement of EET efficiency, and the isotropic nature and the large occupying area are critically effective to remove the disorder-induced shielding that inhibits EET in the presence of the randomness of orientation and alignment of carriers of excitation energy. (paper)

  2. Strategy of ring-shaped aggregates in excitation energy transfer for removing disorder-induced shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Go; Nakatani, Masatoshi; Ishihara, Hajime

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral light harvesting complex (LH2), which is found in photosynthetic antenna systems of purple photosynthetic bacteria, has important functions in the photosynthetic process, such as harvesting sunlight and transferring its energy to the photosynthetic reaction center. The key component in excitation energy transfer (EET) between LH2s is B850, which is a characteristic ring-shaped aggregate of pigments usually formed by 18 or 16 bacteriochlorophylls in LH2. We theoretically study the strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure, which maximizes EET efficiency, by using the standard Frenkel exciton model and the self-consistent calculation method for the Markovian quantum master equation and Maxwell equation. As a result, we have revealed a simple but ingenious strategy of the ring-shaped aggregate structure. The combination of three key properties of the ring unit system maximizes the EET efficiency, namely the large dipole moment of aggregates causes the basic improvement of EET efficiency, and the isotropic nature and the large occupying area are critically effective to remove the disorder-induced shielding that inhibits EET in the presence of the randomness of orientation and alignment of carriers of excitation energy.

  3. X-33 LH2 Tank Failure Investigation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Melinda

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the composite sandwich-honeycomb structure of the liquid hydrogen tank of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle, and describes why the the first pressure test to determine the tank's structural integrity failed. The presentation includes images of the tank before and after the failed test, including photomicrographs. It then reaches conclusions on the nature of the microcracks which caused the liquid hydrogen leakage.

  4. Design Study for A Low-Cost LH2 Turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japikse, David; Baines, Nicholas; Platt, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    A preliminary design study, focusing on potential component selections and design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMAR1) analysis, is presented in this study. The investigation focused on a nominal cost liquid hydrogen turbopump suitable for a private launch class vehicle. Utilizing a "turbocharger-like" design philosophy, preliminary feasibility studies of the basic pump design class, the rotordynamic design class, and the turbine design class were conducted with associated DFMA evaluations. Reasonable cost levels and sensible levels of product assurance have been established.

  5. A dented LH2 recirculation line is removed from Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the Payload Changeout Room, Launch Pad 39B, United Space Alliance and NASA workers look at the replacement main propulsion system liquid hydrogen recirculation line (left) to be installed in Shuttle Discovery's aft compartment. At right is the dented line that has been removed. The 12-inch-long dent was discovered during routine aft compartment inspections Tuesday, Dec. 7. The line recirculates hydrogen from the Shuttle main engines back to the external tank during prelaunch engine conditioning. The line is being replaced and managers expect the replacement work to take about 3 days, followed by system retests and final aft compartment close-outs. Preliminary assessments reflect a launch date of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-103 no earlier than Dec. 16. STS-103 is the third servicing mission for the Hubble Space Telescope.

  6. Study of LH2 fueled subsonic passenger transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The potential of using liquid hydrogen as fuel in subsonic transport aircraft was investigated to explore an expanded matrix of passenger aircraft sizes. Aircraft capable of carrying 130 passengers 2,780 km (1500 n.mi.); 200 passengers 5,560 km (3000 n.mi.); and 400 passengers on a 9,265 km (5000 n.mi.) radius mission, were designed parametrically. Both liquid hydrogen and conventionally fueled versions were generated for each payload/range in order that comparisons could be made. Aircraft in each mission category were compared on the basis of weight, size, cost, energy utilization, and noise.

  7. Hybrid bearings for LH2 and LO2 turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butner, M. F.; Lee, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hybrid combinations of hydrostatic and ball bearings can improve bearing performance for liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen turbopumps. Analytic studies were conducted to optimize hybrid bearing designs for the SSME-type turbopump conditions. A method to empirically determine damping coefficients was devised. Four hybrid bearing configurations were designed, and three were fabricated. Six hybrid and hydrostatic-only bearing configurations will be tested for steady-state and transient performance, and quantification of damping coefficients. The initial tests were conducted with the liquid hydrogen bearing.

  8. Thermal characterization, crystal field analysis and in-band pumped laser performance of Er doped NaY(WO(4(2 disordered laser crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Serrano

    Full Text Available Undoped and Er-doped NaY(WO42 disordered single crystals have been grown by the Czochralski technique. The specific heat and thermal conductivity (κ of these crystals have been characterized from T = 4 K to 700 K and 360 K, respectively. It is shown that κ exhibits anisotropy characteristic of single crystals as well as a κ(T behavior observed in glasses, with a saturation mean free phonon path of 3.6 Å and 4.5 Å for propagation along a and c crystal axes, respectively. The relative energy positions and irreducible representations of Stark Er(3+ levels up to (4G(7/2 multiplet have been determined by the combination of experimental low (<10 K temperature optical absorption and photoluminescence measurements and simulations with a single-electron Hamiltonian including both free-ion and crystal field interactions. Absorption, emission and gain cross sections of the (4I(13/2↔(4I(15/2 laser related transition have been determined at 77 K. The (4I(13/2 Er(3+ lifetime (τ was measured in the temperature range of 77-300 K, and was found to change from τ (77K ≈ 4.5 ms to τ (300K ≈ 3.5 ms. Laser operation is demonstrated at 77 K and 300 K by resonantly pumping the (4I(13/2 multiplet at λ≈1500 nm with a broadband (FWHM≈20 nm diode laser source perfectly matching the 77 K crystal (4I(15/2 → (4I(13/2 absorption profile. At 77 K as much as 5.5 W of output power were obtained in π-polarized configuration with a slope efficiency versus absorbed pump power of 57%, the free running laser wavelength in air was λ≈1611 nm with the laser output bandwidth of 3.5 nm. The laser emission was tunable over 30.7 nm, from 1590.7 nm to 1621.4 nm, for the same π-polarized configuration.

  9. The Benefits of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) in an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Mccurdy, David R.

    2014-01-01

    NTR: High thrust high specific impulse (2 x LOXLH2chemical) engine uses high power density fission reactor with enriched uranium fuel as thermal power source. Reactor heat is removed using H2propellant which is then exhausted to produce thrust. Conventional chemical engine LH2tanks, turbopumps, regenerative nozzles and radiation-cooled shirt extensions used --NTR is next evolutionary step in high performance liquid rocket engines During the Rover program, a common fuel element tie tube design was developed and used in the design of the 50 klbf Kiwi-B4E (1964), 75 klbf Phoebus-1B (1967), 250 klbf Phoebus-2A (June 1968), then back down to the 25 klbf Pewee engine (Nov-Dec 1968) NASA and DOE are using this same approach: design, build, ground then flight test a small engine using a common fuel element that is scalable to a larger 25 klbf thrust engine needed for human missions

  10. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Registry Residents & Medical Students Residents Medical Students Patients & Families Mental Health Disorders/Substance Use Find a Psychiatrist Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ADHD Anxiety Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorder Bipolar Disorders Depression Eating Disorders Obsessive-Compulsive ...

  11. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play ...

  12. Schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or do not improve with treatment Thoughts of suicide or of harming others Alternative Names Mood disorder - schizoaffective disorder; Psychosis - schizoaffective disorder Images Schizoaffective disorder ...

  13. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  14. Novel load responsive multilayer insulation with high in-atmosphere and on-orbit thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, S.; Kopelove, A.; Mills, G. L.

    2012-04-01

    Aerospace cryogenic systems require lightweight, high performance thermal insulation to preserve cryopropellants both pre-launch and on-orbit. Current technologies have difficulty meeting all requirements, and advances in insulation would benefit cryogenic upper stage launch vehicles, LH2 fueled aircraft and ground vehicles, and provide capabilities for sub-cooled cryogens for space-borne instruments and orbital fuel depots. This paper reports the further development of load responsive multilayer insulation (LRMLI) that has a lightweight integrated vacuum shell and provides high thermal performance both in-air and on-orbit. LRMLI is being developed by Quest Product Development and Ball Aerospace under NASA contract, with prototypes designed, built, installed and successfully tested. A 3-layer LRMLI blanket (0.63 cm thick, 77 K cold, 295 K hot) had a measured heat leak of 6.6 W/m2 in vacuum and 40.6 W/m2 in air at one atmosphere. In-air LRMLI has an 18× advantage over Spray On Foam Insulation (SOFI) in heat leak per thickness and a 16× advantage over aerogel. On-orbit LRMLI has a 78× lower heat leak than SOFI per thickness and 6× lower heat leak than aerogel. The Phase II development of LRMLI is reported with a modular, flexible, thin vacuum shell and improved on-orbit performance. Structural and thermal analysis and testing results are presented. LRMLI mass and thermal performance is compared to SOFI, aerogel and MLI over SOFI.

  15. Kinetics of tetrataenite disordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, E.; Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Fillion, G.; Scorzelli, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrataenite is a chemically ordered L1 0 -type Fe 50 Ni 50 alloy detected for the first time in 1977 by 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy studies in iron meteorites. The thermal history of meteorites, in particular short thermal events like those associated to hypervelocity impacts, can be constrained by tracing the presence of tetrataenite or its disordering into taenite. The knowledge of the disordering kinetics of tetrataenite, that is associated with changes in its magnetic properties, is still very fragmentary so that the time–temperature history of these meteorites cannot be constrained in details. Furthermore, knowledge of disordering kinetics is important due to potential technological application of tetrataenite as a rare-earth free strong magnet. Thus, this work provides the first time–temperature data for disordering reaction of tetrataenite. We have shown that disordering is not an instantaneous process but is a kinetic limited reaction. It was shown that disordering may take place at any temperature above the order–disorder transition for L 10 superstructure phase (∼320 °C) when the appropriate time-scale is considered. This result means that the apparent Curie point for tetrataenite is not an absolute property in the sense that any estimate of this parameter should be referred to a given time-scale. - Highlights: • The first time–temperature data for tetrataenite disordering reaction is provided. • Previous works does not give a complete picture of tetrataenite disordering. • Apparent Curie temperature of tetrataenite should be referred to a time-scale. • Tetrataenite can be used as a probe to detect thermal/shock events recorded in meteorites

  16. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  17. [Clothing and heat disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2012-06-01

    The influence of the clothing material properties(like water absorbency and rapid dryness, water vapor absorption, water vapor permeability and air permeability) and the design factor of the clothing(like opening condition and fitting of clothing), which contributed to prevent heat disorder, was outlined. WBGT(wet-bulb globe temperature) is used to show a guideline for environmental limitation of activities to prevent heat disorder. As the safety function is more important than thermal comfort for some sportswear and protective clothing with high cover area, clothing itself increases the risk of heat disorder. WBGT is corrected by CAF (clothing adjustment factor) in wearing such kind of protective clothing.

  18. Optical and Hall conductivities of a thermally disordered two-dimensional spin-density wave: two-particle response in the pseudogap regime of electron-doped high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J.; Millis, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent longitudinal (σ xx ) and Hall (σ xy ) conductivities for two-dimensional metals with thermally disordered antiferromagnetism using a generalization of a theoretical model, involving a one-loop quasistatic fluctuation approximation, which was previously used to calculate the electron self-energy. The conductivities are calculated from the Kubo formula, with current vertex function treated in a conserving approximation satisfying the Ward identity. In order to obtain a finite dc limit, we introduce phenomenologically impurity scattering, characterized by a relaxation time τ. σ xx ((Omega)) satisfies the f-sum rule. For the infinitely peaked spin-correlation function, χ(q)∝(delta)(q-Q), we recover the expressions for the conductivities in the mean-field theory of the ordered state. When the spin-correlation length ζ is large but finite, both σ xx and σ xy show behaviors characteristic of the state with long-range order. The calculation runs into difficulty for (Omega) ∼ xx ((Omega)) and σ xy ((Omega)) are qualitatively consistent with data on electron-doped cuprates when (Omega) > 1/τ.

  19. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  20. Layered Thermal Insulation Systems for Industrial and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2015-01-01

    From the high performance arena of cryogenic equipment, several different layered thermal insulation systems have been developed for industrial and commercial applications. In addition to the proven areas in cold-work applications for piping and tanks, the new Layered Composite Insulation for Extreme Environments (LCX) has potential for broader industrial use as well as for commercial applications. The LCX technology provides a unique combination of thermal, mechanical, and weathering performance capability that is both cost-effective and enabling. Industry applications may include, for example, liquid nitrogen (LN2) systems for food processing, liquefied natural gas (LNG) systems for transportation or power, and chilled water cooling facilities. Example commercial applications may include commercial residential building construction, hot water piping, HVAC systems, refrigerated trucks, cold chain shipping containers, and a various consumer products. The LCX system is highly tailorable to the end-use application and can be pre-fabricated or field assembled as needed. Product forms of LCX include rigid sheets, semi-flexible sheets, cylindrical clam-shells, removable covers, or flexible strips for wrapping. With increasing system control and reliability requirements as well as demands for higher energy efficiencies, thermal insulation in harsh environments is a growing challenge. The LCX technology grew out of solving problems in the insulation of mechanically complex cryogenic systems that must operate in outdoor, humid conditions. Insulation for cold work includes equipment for everything from liquid helium to chilled water. And in the middle are systems for LNG, LN2, liquid oxygen (LO2), liquid hydrogen (LH2) that must operate in the ambient environment. Different LCX systems have been demonstrated for sub-ambient conditions but are capable of moderately high temperature applications as well.

  1. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  2. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  3. Energetic disorder and exciton states of individual molecular rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Pavel; Barvik, Ivan; Zapletal, David

    2006-01-01

    Exciton states in molecular rings (resembling, e.g. the B850 ring from LH2 complexes of purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) with strong intermolecular interaction are still a question of interest [V. Sundstrom, T. Pullerits, R. van Grondelle, J. Phys. Chem. B 103 (1999) 2327]. In our theoretical model we use the ring of two-level systems, simulating, e.g., the bacteriochlorophylls B850. The dynamical aspects in ensemble of rings are reflected in optical line shapes of electronic transitions. The observed linewidths reflect the combined influence of different types of static and dynamic disorder. To avoid the broadening of lines due to ensemble averaging one uses the single-molecule spectroscopy technique to obtain a fluorescence-excitation spectrum. For zero disorder the exciton manifold features two non-degenerate and eight pairwise degenerate states. In the presence of energetic disorder the degeneracy of the exciton states is lifted and oscillator strength is redistributed among the exciton states. A satisfactory understanding of the nature of static disorder in light-harvesting systems has not been reached [S. Jang, S.F. Dempster, R.J. Silbey, J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655]. In the local site basis, there can be present static disorder in both diagonal and off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix elements. Silbey et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655] pointed out several questions: is former enough or the latter should be included as well? If both are considered, then there remains a question about whether they are independent or correlated. The distribution of the energetic separation E(k=+/-1) and relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments has been recently investigated [S. Jang, et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 105 (2001) 6655; C. Hofmann, T.J. Aartsma, J. Koehler, Chem. Phys. Lett. 395 (2004) 373]. In our present contribution we have extended such a type of investigation to four models of noncorrelated static disorder: (A) Gaussian disorder in the

  4. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of-control eating Women are more likely than men to have eating disorders. They usually start in the teenage years and often occur along with depression, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse. Eating disorders can ...

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Small Business Research Labs at NIMH Labs at NIMH Home Research ... About Eating Disorders More Publications About Eating Disorders Research Results PubMed: Journal Articles about Eating Disorders Contact Us The National ...

  6. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders in Adults Data Sources Share Personality Disorders Definitions Personality disorders represent “an enduring pattern of inner ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  7. Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... variations in brain chemistry and structure. Risk factors Factors that increase the risk of developing schizoaffective disorder include: Having a close blood relative who has schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia or bipolar disorder Stressful events that trigger symptoms ...

  8. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  9. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  11. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  12. Somatic symptom disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related disorders; Somatization disorder; Somatiform disorders; Briquet syndrome; Illness anxiety disorder References American Psychiatric Association. Somatic symptom disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . ...

  13. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  14. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  15. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  16. Directed formation of micro- and nanoscale patterns of functional light-harvesting LH2 complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Nicholas P; Janusz, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Timney, John A; Ducker, Robert E; Olsen, John D; Otto, Cees; Subramaniam, Vinod; Leggett, Graham J; Hunter, C Neil

    2007-01-01

    The precision placement of the desired protein components on a suitable substrate is an essential prelude to any hybrid "biochip" device, but a second and equally important condition must also be met: the retention of full biological activity. Here we demonstrate the selective binding of an

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis for the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin C.

    2005-01-01

    In phase II, additional inducer rotations are simulated in order to understand the root cause of the flowliner crack problem. CFD results confirmed that there is a strong unsteady interaction between the backflow regions caused by the LPFTP inducer and secondary flow regions in the bellows cavity through the flowliner slots. It is observed that the swirl on the duct side of the downstream flowliner is stronger than on the duct side of the upstream flowliner. Due to this swirl, there are more significant unsteady flow interactions through the downstream slots than those observed in the upstream slots. Averaged values of the local velocity at the slots were provided to the NESC-ITA flow physics acoustics team to guide them in designing the acoustics experiment. A parametric study was performed to compare the flow field in the flowliner area when one upstream slot and one corresponding downstream slot were enlarged. No significant differences were observed between the flow field obtained from the enlarged slot configuration when compared with the original configuration. More cases must be analyzed with various enlarged slot configurations to generalize this observation. The flow through the A1 test stand and the flow through the orbiter fuel feedline manifold were simulated without the LPFTP. It was observed that incoming flow to the flowliner and inducer was more uniform in the A1 test stand then in the orbiter manifold. Additionally, each engine LPFTP in the orbiter receives significantly different velocity distributions. Because of the differences observed in the computed results, it is not possible for the A1 test stand to represent the three different engine feedlines simultaneously.

  18. LH2 Tank Composite Coverplate Development and Flight Qualification for the X-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Richard J.; Roule, Gerard M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the development history for the first cryogenic pressurized fuel tank coverplates is presented along with a synopsis of the development strategy and technologies which led to success on this program. Coverplates are the large access panels used to access launch vehicle fuel tanks. These structures incorporate all of the requirements for a pressure vessel as well as the added requirement to mount all of the miscellaneous access points required for a fuel management system. The first composite coverplates to meet the requirements for flight qualification were developed on the X-33 program. The X-33 composite coverplates went from an open requirement to successful finished flight hardware with multiple unique configurations, complete with verification testing, in less than eighteen months. Besides the rapid development schedule, these components introduced several new technologies previously unseen in cryogenic composites including solutions to cryogenic shrinkage, self-supporting sealing surfaces, and highly loaded composite bosses with precision sealing interfaces. These components were proven to seal liquid hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures under maximum loading and pressure conditions.

  19. Study of a LH2-fueled topping cycle engine for aircraft propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G. E.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a topping cycle aircraft engine system which uses a cryogenic fuel. This system consists of a main turboshaft engine which is mechanically coupled (by cross-shafting) to a topping loop which augments the shaft power output of the system. The thermodynamic performance of the topping cycle engine was analyzed and compared with that of a reference (conventional-type) turboshaft engine. For the cycle operating conditions selected, the performance of the topping cycle engine in terms of brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was determined to be about 12 percent better than that of the reference turboshaft engine. Engine weights were estimated for both the topping cycle engine and the reference turboshaft engine. These estimates were based on a common shaft power output for each engine. Results indicate that the weight of the topping cycle engine is comparable to that of the reference turboshaft engine. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34942

  20. Molecular origins and consequences of High-800 LH2 in Roseobacter denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesne, Katia; Blanchard, Cecile; Sturgis, James N

    2011-08-09

    Roseobacter denitrificans is a marine bacterium capable of using a wide variety of different metabolic schemes and in particular is an anoxygenic aerobic photosynthetic bacterium. In the work reported here we use a deletion mutant that we have constructed to investigate the structural origin of the unusual High-800 light-harvesting complex absorption in this bacterium. We suggest that the structure is essentially unaltered when compared to the usual nonameric complexes but that a change in the environment of the C(13:1) carbonyl group is responsible for the change in spectrum. We tentatively relate this change to the presence of a serine residue in the α-polypeptide. Surprisingly, the low spectral overlap between the peripheral and core light-harvesting systems appears not to compromise energy collection efficiency too severely. We suggest that this may be at the expense of maintaining a low antenna size. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Eliminating LH2 in LOX-collect space launchers - Key to on-demand capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leingang, J. L.; Carreiro, L. R.; Maurice, L. Q.

    1993-01-01

    Two air-breathing reusable two-stage space launch vehicle concepts are proposed, in which the first stage employs turboramjet propulsion and the second stage uses rockets, which are expected to provide very rapid response launch of 10,000 lb polar-orbit payloads. In both concepts, liquid oxygen (LOX) for the second stage is collected during first stage ascent, thus eliminating the need for LOX ground servicing facilities. In the first concept, liquid hydrogen in the amount just sufficient to condense and collect second state LOX is the only cryogenic fluid that is loaded on the vehicle at takeoff. The second concept uses the heat sink of conventional jet propulsion fuel and water coolant to drive a lightweight adaptation of the commercial LOX production process, eliminating all cryogenics at takeoff. Both concepts should permit true launch-on-demand capability with aircraftlike ground operations.

  2. Timescales of Coherent Dynamics in the Light Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-05-02

    The initial dynamics of energy transfer in the light harvesting complex 2 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional spectroscopy. This method allows only the coherent electronic motions to be observed revealing the timescale of dephasing among the excited states. We observe persistent coherence among all states and assign ensemble dephasing rates for the various coherences. A simple model is utilized to connect the spectroscopic transitions to the molecular structure, allowing us to distinguish coherences between the two rings of chromophores and coherences within the rings. We also compare dephasing rates between excited states to dephasing rates between the ground and excited states, revealing that the coherences between excited states dephase on a slower timescale than coherences between the ground and excited states.

  3. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Orbiter's LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacuse, Peter J. (Technical Monitor); Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.; Huyse, Luc; Chell, Graham; Lee, Yi-Der; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben; McClung, Craig; Gardner, Brian; Leverant, Gerald R.; hide

    2005-01-01

    Work performed by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) as part of an Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) for the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) is summarized. The ITA goal was to establish a flight rationale in light of a history of fatigue cracking due to flow induced vibrations in the feedline flowliners that supply liquid hydrogen to the space shuttle main engines. Prior deterministic analyses using worst-case assumptions predicted failure in a single flight. The current work formulated statistical models for dynamic loading and cryogenic fatigue crack growth properties, instead of using worst-case assumptions. Weight function solutions for bivariant stressing were developed to determine accurate crack "driving-forces". Monte Carlo simulations showed that low flowliner probabilities of failure (POF = 0.001 to 0.0001) are achievable, provided pre-flight inspections for cracks are performed with adequate probability of detection (POD)-specifically, 20/75 mils with 50%/99% POD. Measurements to confirm assumed POD curves are recommended. Since the computed POFs are very sensitive to the cyclic loads/stresses and the analysis of strain gage data revealed inconsistencies with the previous assumption of a single dominant vibrant mode, further work to reconcile this difference is recommended. It is possible that the unaccounted vibrational modes in the flight spectra could increase the computed POFs.

  4. Membrane Curvature Induced by Aggregates of LH2s and Monomeric LH1s

    OpenAIRE

    Chandler, Danielle E.; Gumbart, James; Stack, John D.; Chipot, Christophe; Schulten, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria is contained within organelles called chromatophores, which form as extensions of the cytoplasmic membrane. The shape of these chromatophores can be spherical (as in Rhodobacter sphaeroides), lamellar (as in Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Phaeospirillum molischianum), or tubular (as in certain Rb. sphaeroides mutants). Chromatophore shape is thought to be influenced by the integral membrane proteins Light Harvesting Complexes I and II (LH1 and ...

  5. High Fidelity Simulations for Unsteady Flow Through the Orbiter LH2 Feedline Flowliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Kwak, Dochan; Chan, William; Housman, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    High fidelity computations were carried out to analyze the orbiter M2 feedline flowliner. Various computational models were used to characterize the unsteady flow features in the turbopump, including the orbiter Low-Pressure-Fuel-Turbopump (LPFTP) inducer, the orbiter manifold and a test article used to represent the manifold. Unsteady flow originating from the orbiter LPFTP inducer is one of the major contributors to the high frequency cyclic loading that results in high cycle fatigue damage to the gimbal flowliners just upstream of the LPFTP. The flow fields for the orbiter manifold and representative test article are computed and analyzed for similarities and differences. An incompressible Navier-Stokes flow solver INS3D, based on the artificial compressibility method, was used to compute the flow of liquid hydrogen in each test article.

  6. LH2 on-orbit storage tank support trunnion design and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.; Toth, J. M., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed fatigue analysis was conducted to provide verification of the trunnion design in the reusable Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility for Shuttle flights and to assess the performance capability of the trunnion E-glass/S-glass epoxy composite material. Basic material property data at ambient and liquid hydrogen temperatures support the adequacy of the epoxy composite for seven-mission requirement. Testing of trunnions fabricated to the flight design has verified adequate strength and fatigue properties of the design to meet the requirements of seven Shuttle flights.

  7. Directed formation of micro- and nanoscale patterns of functional light-harvesting LH2 complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Nicholas P.; Janusz, Stefan; Escalante Marun, M.; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Timney, John; Ducker, Robert E.; Olsen, John D.; Otto, Cornelis; Subramaniam, Vinod; Leggett, Graham J.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2007-01-01

    The precision placement of the desired protein components on a suitable substrate is an essential prelude to any hybrid “biochip” device, but a second and equally important condition must also be met: the retention of full biological activity. Here we demonstrate the selective binding of an

  8. Study of LH2-fueled topping cycle engine for aircraft propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, G. E.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a topping cycle aircraft engine system which uses a cryogenic fuel. This system consists of a main turboshaft engine which is mechanically coupled (by cross-shafting) to a topping loop which augments the shaft power output of the system. The thermodynamic performance of the topping cycle engine was analyzed and compared with that of a reference (conventional-type) turboshaft engine. For the cycle operating conditions selected, the performance of the topping cycle engine in terms of brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was determined to be about 12 percent better than that of the reference turboshaft engine. Engine weights were estimated for both the topping cycle engine and the reference turboshaft engine. These estimates were based on a common shaft power output for each engine. Results indicate that the weight of the topping cycle engine is comparable to that of the reference turboshaft engine.

  9. A comparison of optimum JP and LH2 turbofan engines designed for two subsonic transport missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civinskas, K. C.

    1974-01-01

    The use of liquid hydrogen fuel instead of JP fuel for two subsonic commercial transports was examined. The following determinations which are important to meeting noise reduction requirements were calculated: (1) take off gross weight, (2) energy consumption, and (3) direct operating costs. The optimum engine cycles were found to be the same for both fuels.

  10. Nanoscale Confinement and Fluorescence Effects of Bacterial Light Harvesting Complex LH2 in Mesoporous Silicas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Tubasum, Sumera; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    Many key chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly in living cells, take place in confined space at the mesoscopic scale. Towards understanding of physicochemical nature of biomacromolecules confined in nanoscale space, in this work we have elucidated fluorescent effects of a light harvest...

  11. Numerical investigation of a new LH2 centrifugal pump concept used in space propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion MALAEL

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with efficiency increase of a centrifugal pump for liquid rocket propulsion by using an innovative concept. With this new pump design the axial length will be reduced by 60% and 20% mass weight towards a classic two stage centrifugal pump. To estimate the performances, the CFD methods were used. The CFD analysis will be performed on 3D domains with the CFD commercial code ANSYS CFX. The numerical solvers used are pressure based with the SIMPLE method for RANS. The domain discretization was done by using dedicated grid generators like TurboGrid and ICEM CFD. The results were compared with a classic configuration with two stages in series. Centrifugal pump characteristics, such as pressure inlet-outlet variation, velocity and streamline patterns are presented in the paper.

  12. External Tank Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Prepress Regression Analysis Independent Review Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie s.

    2009-01-01

    The request to conduct an independent review of regression models, developed for determining the expected Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) External Tank (ET)-04 cycle count for the Space Shuttle ET tanking process, was submitted to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center NESC on September 20, 2005. The NESC team performed an independent review of regression models documented in Prepress Regression Analysis, Tom Clark and Angela Krenn, 10/27/05. This consultation consisted of a peer review by statistical experts of the proposed regression models provided in the Prepress Regression Analysis. This document is the consultation's final report.

  13. Tuning thermal conductivity in molybdenum disulfide by electrochemical intercalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Gaohua; Liu, Jun; Zheng, Qiye; Zhang, Ruigang; Li, Dongyao; Banerjee, Debasish; Cahill, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) materials is of interest for energy storage, nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. Here, we report that the thermal conductivity of molybdenum disulfide can be modified by electrochemical intercalation. We observe distinct behaviour for thin films with vertically aligned basal planes and natural bulk crystals with basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. The thermal conductivity is measured as a function of the degree of lithiation, using time-domain thermoreflectance. The change of thermal conductivity correlates with the lithiation-induced structural and compositional disorder. We further show that the ratio of the in-plane to through-plane thermal conductivity of bulk crystal is enhanced by the disorder. These results suggest that stacking disorder and mixture of phases is an effective mechanism to modify the anisotropic thermal conductivity of 2D materials. PMID:27767030

  14. Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the death of a loved one or parents' divorce) and major life transitions (like moving to a ... Ways to Deal With Anxiety Dealing With Difficult Emotions Anxiety Disorders Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Fears and Phobias ...

  15. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  16. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  17. Personality Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personality disorders are a group of mental illnesses. They involve long-term patterns of thoughts and behaviors ... serious problems with relationships and work. People with personality disorders have trouble dealing with everyday stresses and ...

  18. Cephalic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... destructive lesions, but are sometimes the result of abnormal development. The disorder can occur before or after birth. Porencephaly most ... decade of life. SCHIZENCEPHALY is a rare developmental disorder characterized by abnormal slits, or clefts, in the cerebral hemispheres. Schizencephaly ...

  19. Oppositional defiant disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as possibilities: Anxiety disorders Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Bipolar disorder Depression Learning disorders Substance abuse disorders Treatment The best treatment for the child is to ...

  20. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health illnesses Alcoholism, substance abuse, and addictive behavior Anxiety disorders Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Bipolar disorder (manic depressive illness) Borderline personality disorder Depression Eating disorders Post-traumatic ...

  1. Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gucciardi, Enza; Celasun, Nalan; Ahmad, Farah; Stewart, Donna E

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Health Issue Eating disorders are an increasing public health problem among young women. Anorexia and bulimia may give rise to serious physical conditions such as hypothermia, hypotension, electrolyte imbalance, endocrine disorders, and kidney failure. Key Issues Eating disorders are primarily a problem among women. In Ontario in 1995, over 90% of reported hospitalized cases of anorexia and bulimia were women. In addition to eating disorders, preoccupation with weight, body image and...

  2. Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Melissa

    Bipolar disorder, a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, affects approximately one percent of the population. It commonly occurs in late adolescence and is often unrecognized. The diagnosis of bipolar disorder is made on the basis of symptoms, course of illness, and when possible, family history. Thoughts of suicide are…

  3. Differential scanning microcalorimetry of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is an indispensable thermophysical technique enabling to get direct information on enthalpies accompanying heating/cooling of dilute biopolymer solutions. The thermal dependence of protein heat capacity extracted from DSC data is a valuable source of information on intrinsic disorder level of a protein. Application details and limitations of DSC technique in exploration of protein intrinsic disorder are described.

  4. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  5. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  6. Speech disorders - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder; Voice disorders; Vocal disorders; Disfluency; Communication disorder - speech disorder; Speech disorder - stuttering ... evaluation tools that can help identify and diagnose speech disorders: Denver Articulation Screening Examination Goldman-Fristoe Test of ...

  7. Theory of thermal sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1977-01-01

    An energetic ion which is incident on a solid target causes a momentary temperature increase in the impact region, i.e., a so-called thermal spike occurs. Such spikes are capable of causing (or supplementing) disordering, precipitation, crystallization, electronic excitation, stoichiometry change, desorption, and sputtering, it being the contribution to sputtering that is considered here. The approach used is compatible with modern damage-distribution theory. Thus the temperature profile left by the incident ion is taken as a three-dimensional Gaussian with parameters appropriate to power-law scattering, and is used as the initial condition for solving the heat-conduction equation. Let us write this solution as T = T(t, y), where t is time and y is a dimension parallel to the target surface. The vaporization flux from a solid surface is taken as pnsup(1/2)(2π 2 >kT)sup(-1/2), where p, the equilibrium pressure of a vapor species containing n atoms, can be written as p 0 exp(-L/T), p 0 and L are constants largely independent of temperature, and 2 > is the mean mass per atom of target. An equation for the thermal sputtering coefficient is given: after integration the final result takes the form: Ssub(thermal)=pnsup(1/2)[2π 2 >k(Tsub(infinity)+cΔT 0 )]sup(-1/2)πlambda 2 tsub(eff.)atoms/ion, where Tsub(infinity) is the macroscopic target temperature, cΔT 0 is the maximum temperature increase at x = y = 0, p is to be evaluated at T = Tsub(infinity) + cΔT 0 , lambda is the mean atomic spacing of the target, and tsub(eff.) is a quantity with units of time. (author)

  8. Bipolar disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieta, Eduard; Berk, Michael; Schulze, Thomas G

    2018-01-01

    Bipolar disorders are chronic and recurrent disorders that affect >1% of the global population. Bipolar disorders are leading causes of disability in young people as they can lead to cognitive and functional impairment and increased mortality, particularly from suicide and cardiovascular disease...... and accurate diagnosis is difficult in clinical practice as the onset of bipolar disorder is commonly characterized by nonspecific symptoms, mood lability or a depressive episode, which can be similar in presentation to unipolar depression. Moreover, patients and their families do not always understand...... a bipolar disorder from other conditions. Optimal early treatment of patients with evidence-based medication (typically mood stabilizers and antipsychotics) and psychosocial strategies is necessary....

  9. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP): A Proven, Growth Technology for Fast Transit Human Missions to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    The "fast conjunction" long surface stay mission option was selected for NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study because it provided adequate time at Mars (approx. 540 days) for the crew to explore the planet's geological diversity while also reducing the "1-way" transit times to and from Mars to approx. 6 months. Short transit times are desirable in order to reduce the debilitating physiological effects on the human body that can result from prolonged exposure to the zero-gravity (0-gE) and radiation environments of space. Recent measurements from the RAD detector attached to the Curiosity rover indicate that astronauts would receive a radiation dose of approx. 0.66 Sv (approx. 66 rem)-the limiting value established by NASA-during their 1-year journey in deep space. Proven nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) technology, with its high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp approx. 900 s), can cut 1-way transit times by as much as 50 percent by increasing the propellant capacity of the Mars transfer vehicle (MTV). No large technology scale-ups in engine size are required for these short transit missions either since the smallest engine tested during the Rover program-the 25 klbf "Pewee" engine is sufficient when used in a clustered arrangement of three to four engines. The "Copernicus" crewed MTV developed for DRA 5.0 is a 0-gE design consisting of three basic components: (1) the NTP stage (NTPS); (2) the crewed payload element; and (3) an integrated "saddle truss" and LH2 propellant drop tank assembly that connects the two elements. With a propellant capacity of approx. 190 t, Copernicus can support 1-way transit times ranging from approx. 150 to 220 days over the 15-year synodic cycle. The paper examines the impact on vehicle design of decreasing transit times for the 2033 mission opportunity. With a fourth "upgraded" SLS/HLV launch, an "in-line" LH2 tank element can be added to Copernicus allowing 1-way transit times of 130 days. To achieve 100

  10. Mental disorders, brain disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Amongst DSM's most vocal 'insider' critics has been Thomas Insel, Director of the US National Institute of Mental Health. Insel has publicly criticised DSM's adherence to a symptom-based classification of mental disorder, and used the weight ...

  11. [Eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yoshie; Okamoto, Yuri; Jinnin, Ran; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2015-02-01

    Eating disorders are characterized by aberrant patterns of eating behavior, including such symptoms as extreme restriction of food intake or binge eating, and severe disturbances in the perception of body shape and weight, as well as a drive for thinness and obsessive fears of becoming fat. Eating disorder is an important cause for physical and psychosocial morbidity in young women. Patients with eating disorders have a deficit in the cognitive process and functional abnormalities in the brain system. Recently, brain-imaging techniques have been used to identify specific brain areas that function abnormally in patients with eating disorders. We have discussed the clinical and cognitive aspects of eating disorders and summarized neuroimaging studies of eating disorders.

  12. Cephalic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information sheet compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Patient Organizations Birth Defect Research for Children, Inc. 976 Lake Baldwin Lane Suite 104 Orlando ...

  13. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  14. Conduct disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitelaar, J.K.; Smeets, K.C.; Herpers, P.; Scheepers, F.; Glennon, J.; Rommelse, N.N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic

  15. Personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bosch, L.M.C.; Verheul, R.; Verster, J.C.; Brady, K.; Galanter, M.; Conrod, P.

    2012-01-01

    Subject of this chapter is the often found combination of personality disorders and ­substance abuse disorders. The serious nature of this comorbidity is shown through the discussion of prevalence and epidemiological data. Literature shows that the comorbidity, hampering the diagnostic process, is

  16. Personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrer, Peter; Mulder, Roger; Crawford, Mike

    2010-01-01

    and to society, and interferes, usually negatively, with progress in the treatment of other mental disorders. We now have evidence that personality disorder, as currently classified, affects around 6% of the world population, and the differences between countries show no consistent variation. We are also getting......Personality disorder is now being accepted as an important condition in mainstream psychiatry across the world. Although it often remains unrecognized in ordinary practice, research studies have shown it is common, creates considerable morbidity, is associated with high costs to services...... increasing evidence that some treatments, mainly psychological, are of value in this group of disorders. What is now needed is a new classification that is of greater value to clinicians, and the WPA Section on Personality Disorders is currently undertaking this task....

  17. Gambling disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, David C; Stea, Jonathan N; Grant, Jon E

    2011-11-26

    Gambling disorders, including pathological gambling and problem gambling, have received increased attention from clinicians and researchers over the past three decades since gambling opportunities have expanded around the world. This Seminar reviews prevalence, causes and associated features, screening and diagnosis, and treatment approaches. Gambling disorders affect 0·2-5·3% of adults worldwide, although measurement and prevalence varies according to the screening instruments and methods used, and availability and accessibility of gambling opportunities. Several distinct treatment approaches have been favourably evaluated, such as cognitive behavioural and brief treatment models and pharmacological interventions. Although promising, family therapy and support from Gamblers Anonymous are less well empirically supported. Gambling disorders are highly comorbid with other mental health and substance use disorders, and a further understanding is needed of both the causes and treatment implications of this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Autism spectrum disorder - childhood disintegrative disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  19. [Dissociative disorders and affective disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montant, J; Adida, M; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Pringuey, D; Da Fonseca, D; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    The phenomenology of dissociative disorders may be complex and sometimes confusing. We describe here two cases who were initially misdiagnosed. The first case concerned a 61 year-old woman, who was initially diagnosed as an isolated dissociative fugue and was actually suffering from severe major depressive episode. The second case concerned a 55 year-old man, who was suffering from type I bipolar disorder and polyvascular disease, and was initially diagnosed as dissociative fugue in a mooddestabilization context, while it was finally a stroke. Yet dissociative disorders as affective disorder comorbidity are relatively unknown. We made a review on this topic. Dissociative disorders are often studied through psycho-trauma issues. Litterature is rare on affective illness comorbid with dissociative disorders, but highlight the link between bipolar and dissociative disorders. The later comorbidity often refers to an early onset subtype with also comorbid panic and depersonalization-derealization disorder. Besides, unipolar patients suffering from dissociative symptoms have more often cyclothymic affective temperament. Despite the limits of such studies dissociative symptoms-BD association seems to correspond to a clinical reality and further works on this topic may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. Meeting Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Katzman, Jeffrey W

    2017-12-01

    Although meetings are central to organizational work, considerable time devoted to meetings in Academic Health Centers appears to be unproductively spent. The primary purposes of this article are to delineate and describe Meeting Disorders, pathological processes resulting in these inefficient and ineffective scenarios, and Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD), a clinical syndrome. The paper also offers preliminary approaches to remedies. The authors integrate observations made during tens of thousands of hours in administrative meetings in academic medical settings with information in the literature regarding the nature, causes and potential interventions for dysfunctional groups and meetings. Meeting Disorders, resulting from distinct pathologies of leadership and organization, constitute prevalent subgroups of the bureaucrapathologies, pathological conditions caused by dysfunctional bureaucratic processes that generate excesses of wasted time, effort, and other resources. These disorders also generate frustration and demoralization among participants, contributing to professional burnout. Meeting Fatigue Disorder (MFD) is a subjective condition that develops in individuals who overdose on these experiences and may reflect one manifestation of burnout. Meeting disorders and Meeting Fatigue Disorder occur commonly in bureaucratic life. Resources and potential remedies are available to help ameliorate their more deleterious effects.

  1. Thermalization of squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a thermal squeezed state defined as a conventional thermal state based on an appropriate Hamiltonian, we show how an important physical property, the signal-to-noise ratio, is degraded, and propose a simple model of thermalization (Kraus thermalization)

  2. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  3. Conduct disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop problems with drug abuse and the law. Depression and bipolar disorder may develop in the teen years and early adulthood. Suicide and violence toward others are also possible complications.

  4. Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the day, even if you have had enough sleep? You might have a sleep disorder. The most common kinds are Insomnia - a hard time falling or staying asleep Sleep apnea - breathing interruptions during sleep Restless legs syndrome - ...

  5. Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to control them. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) ARFID is a new term that some people think ... eating issues can also cause it. People with ARFID don't have anorexia or bulimia, but they ...

  6. Neurocutaneous Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Tena

    2018-02-01

    This article presents an up-to-date summary of the genetic etiology, diagnostic criteria, clinical features, and current management recommendations for the most common neurocutaneous disorders encountered in clinical adult and pediatric neurology practices. The phakomatoses are a phenotypically and genetically diverse group of multisystem disorders that primarily affect the skin and central nervous system. A greater understanding of the genetic and biological underpinnings of numerous neurocutaneous disorders has led to better clinical characterization, more refined diagnostic criteria, and improved treatments in neurofibromatosis type 1, Legius syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 2, Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines, tuberous sclerosis complex, Sturge-Weber syndrome, and incontinentia pigmenti. Neurologists require a basic knowledge of and familiarity with a wide variety of neurocutaneous disorders because of the frequent involvement of the central and peripheral nervous systems. A simple routine skin examination can often open a broad differential diagnosis and lead to improved patient care.

  7. Factitious Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... support their claims. Factitious disorder signs and symptoms may include: Clever and convincing medical or psychological problems Extensive knowledge of medical terms and diseases Vague or inconsistent symptoms Conditions that get worse for no apparent ...

  8. Neuromuscular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Multiple sclerosis Myasthenia ...

  9. Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objections runs away from home often truant from school Children who exhibit these behaviors should receive a comprehensive evaluation by an experience mental health professional. Many children with a conduct disorder may ...

  10. Amnestic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Savage, G.; Cautin, R.L.; Lilienfeld, S.O.

    2015-01-01

    Amnestic disorders may involve deficits in the encoding or storage of information in memory, or in retrieval of information from memory. Etiologies vary and include traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative disease, and psychiatric illness. Different forms of amnesia can be distinguished:

  11. Sleep Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    mediates circadian regulation of sleep. Misalignment with the rhythm of the sun results in circadian disorders and jet lag. The molecular basis of homeostatic sleep regulation is mostly unknown. A network of mutually inhibitory brain nuclei regulates sleep states and sleep-wake transitions. Abnormalities...... in these networks create sleep disorders, including rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, sleep walking, and narcolepsy. Physiological changes associated with sleep can be imbalanced, resulting in excess movements such as periodic leg movements during sleep or abnormal breathing in obstructive sleep apneas....... As every organ in the body is affected by sleep directly or indirectly, sleep and sleep-associated disorders are frequent and only now starting to be understood....

  12. TMJ Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aching pain in and around your ear Difficulty chewing or pain while chewing Aching facial pain Locking of the joint, making ... disorder. When to see a doctor Seek medical attention if you have persistent pain or tenderness in ...

  13. Autoimmune disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  14. Eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kontić Olga; Vasiljević Nadja; Trišović Marija; Jorga Jagoda; Lakić Aneta; Jašović-Gašić Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis...

  15. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antisocial behavior Impulse control problems Substance use disorder Suicide Many children and teens with ODD also have other mental health disorders, such as: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Conduct disorder Depression Anxiety Learning and communication disorders Treating these other ...

  17. Disorder in Protein Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarage, James Braun, II

    1990-01-01

    Methods have been developed for analyzing the diffuse x-ray scattering in the halos about a crystal's Bragg reflections as a means of determining correlations in atomic displacements in protein crystals. The diffuse intensity distribution for rhombohedral insulin, tetragonal lysozyme, and triclinic lysozyme crystals was best simulated in terms of exponential displacement correlation functions. About 90% of the disorder can be accounted for by internal movements correlated with a decay distance of about 6A; the remaining 10% corresponds to intermolecular movements that decay in a distance the order of size of the protein molecule. The results demonstrate that protein crystals fit into neither the Einstein nor the Debye paradigms for thermally fluctuating crystalline solids. Unlike the Einstein model, there are correlations in the atomic displacements, but these correlations decay more steeply with distance than predicted by the Debye-Waller model for an elastic solid. The observed displacement correlations are liquid -like in the sense that they decay exponentially with the distance between atoms, just as positional correlations in a liquid. This liquid-like disorder is similar to the disorder observed in 2-D crystals of polystyrene latex spheres, and similar systems where repulsive interactions dominate; hence, these colloidal crystals appear to provide a better analogy for the dynamics of protein crystals than perfectly elastic lattices.

  18. Disorders of body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Camilo R

    2014-01-01

    The human body generates heat capable of raising body temperature by approximately 1°C per hour. Normally, this heat is dissipated by means of a thermoregulatory system. Disorders resulting from abnormally high or low body temperature result in neurologic dysfunction and pose a threat to life. In response to thermal stress, maintenance of normal body temperature is primarily maintained by convection and evaporation. Hyperthermia results from abnormal temperature regulation, leading to extremely elevated body temperature while fever results from a normal thermoregulatory mechanism operating at a higher set point. The former leads to specific clinical syndromes with inability of the thermoregulatory mechanism to maintain a constant body temperature. Heat related illness encompasses heat rash, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, in order of severity. In addition, drugs can induce hyperthermia and produce one of several specific clinical syndromes. Hypothermia is the reduction of body temperature to levels below 35°C from environmental exposure, metabolic disorders, or therapeutic intervention. Management of disorders of body temperature should be carried out decisively and expeditiously, in order to avoid secondary neurologic injury. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of the thermal and magnetic paths on first order martensite transition of disordered Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 Heusler alloy exhibiting a giant magnetocaloric effect and magnetoresistance near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabri, T.; Ghosh, A.; Nair, Sunil; Awasthi, A. M.; Venimadhav, A.; Nath, T. K.

    2018-05-01

    The existence of a first order martensite transition in off-stoichiometric Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 ferromagnetic shape memory Heusler alloy has been clearly observed by thermal, magnetic, and magneto-transport measurements. Field and thermal path dependence of the change in large magnetic entropy and negative magnetoresistance are observed, which originate due to the sharp change in magnetization driven by metamagnetic transition from the weakly magnetic martensite phase to the ferromagnetic austenite phase in the vicinity of the martensite transition. The noticeable shift in the martensite transition with the application of a magnetic field is the most significant feature of the present study. This shift is due to the interplay of the austenite and martensite phase fraction in the alloy. The different aspects of the first order martensite transition, e.g. broadening of the martensite transition and the field induced arrest of the austenite phase are mainly related to the dynamics of coexisting phases in the vicinity of the martensite transition. The alloy also shows a second order ferromagnetic  →  paramagnetic transition near the Curie temperature of the austenite phase. A noticeably large change in magnetic entropy (ΔS M   =  24 J kg‑1 K‑1 at 298 K) and magnetoresistance (=  ‑33% at 295 K) has been observed for the change in 5 and 8 T magnetic fields, respectively. The change in adiabatic temperature for the change in a magnetic field of 5 T is found to be  ‑3.8 K at 299 K. The low cost of the ingredients and the large change in magnetic entropy very near to the room temperature makes Ni45Mn44Sn9In2 alloy a promising magnetic refrigerant for real technological application.

  20. Kinetic coefficients in isotopically disordered crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhernov, Arkadii P; Inyushkin, Alexander V

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of the behavior of kinetic coefficients, like thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and thermoelectric power, in isotopically disordered materials are reviewed in detail. New experimental and theoretical results on the isotope effects in the thermal conductivity of diamond, Ge, and Si semiconductors are presented. The suppression effect of phonon-drag thermopower in the isotopically disordered Ge crystals is discussed. The influence of dynamic and static crystal lattice deformations on the electric conductivity of metals as well as on the ordinary phonon spectrum deformations is considered. (reviews of topical problems)

  1. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E; Cui, Y; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2010-01-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  2. Tic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Davide; Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-10-01

    Primary tic disorders are complex, multifactorial disorders in which tics are accompanied by other sensory features and an array of comorbid behavioral disorders. Secondary tics are proportionally much less frequent, but their etiology is diverse. This review aims to guide clinicians in the recognition of the phenomenology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these disorders. Advances include greater phenomenologic insights, particularly of nonmotor (sensory) features; increased knowledge of disease mechanisms, particularly coming from neuropsychological, functional imaging, pathologic, and animal model studies; growing evidence on the efficacy of alpha-2 agonists and the newer generation of dopamine-modulating agents; and recent strides in the evaluation of cognitive-behavioral therapy and deep brain stimulation surgery. The correct diagnostic approach to tic disorders requires accurate historical gathering, a thorough neurologic examination, and detailed definition of the patient's psychopathologic profile. Treatment should always begin with individualized psychoeducational strategies. Although pharmacologic treatments remain beneficial for most patients, cognitive-behavioral treatments have thus far shown promising efficacy. Deep brain stimulation surgery should still be limited to adult patients refractory to pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

  3. Phonon bottleneck identification in disordered nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2017-09-01

    Nanoporous materials are a promising platform for thermoelectrics in that they offer high thermal conductivity tunability while preserving good electrical properties, a crucial requirement for high-efficiency thermal energy conversion. Understanding the impact of the pore arrangement on thermal transport is pivotal to engineering realistic materials, where pore disorder is unavoidable. Although there has been considerable progress in modeling thermal size effects in nanostructures, it has remained a challenge to screen such materials over a large phase space due to the slow simulation time required for accurate results. We use density functional theory in connection with the Boltzmann transport equation to perform calculations of thermal conductivity in disordered porous materials. By leveraging graph theory and regressive analysis, we identify the set of pores representing the phonon bottleneck and obtain a descriptor for thermal transport, based on the sum of the pore-pore distances between such pores. This approach provide a simple tool to estimate phonon suppression in realistic porous materials for thermoelectric applications and enhance our understanding of heat transport in disordered materials.

  4. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForte, Shelly; Reddy, Krishna D; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins is overwhelming. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a series of reader’s digest type articles objectively representing the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the period of April, May, and June of 2013. The papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28516028

  5. Digested disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna D; DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2014-01-01

    The current literature on intrinsically disordered proteins grows fast. To keep interested readers up to speed with this literature, we continue a “Digested Disorder” project and represent a new issue of reader’s digest of the research papers and reviews on intrinsically disordered proteins. The only 2 criteria for inclusion in this digest are the publication date (a paper should be published within the covered time frame) and topic (a paper should be dedicated to any aspect of protein intrinsic disorder). The current digest issue covers papers published during the third quarter of 2013; i.e., during the period of June, July, and September of 2013. Similar to previous issues, the papers are grouped hierarchically by topics they cover, and for each of the included paper a short description is given on its major findings. PMID:28232877

  6. The thermal Virasoro formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Haruo

    1991-01-01

    The thermal stability of non-planar duality is described at any finite temperature through the new-fashioned four-tachyon tree amplitude of closed bosonic thermal strings within the dispersion theoretic approach based upon the thermofield dynamics. (author)

  7. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  8. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  9. Discrimination of thermal diffusivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Materials such as wood or metal which are at equal temperatures are perceived to be of different ‘coldness’ due to differences in thermal properties, such as the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of a material is a parameter that controls the rate with which heat is extracted from the

  10. Electric Motor Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Thermal management enables more efficient and cost-effective motors. This Annual Merit Review presentation describes the technical accomplishments and progress in electric motor thermal management R&D over the last year. This project supports a broad industry demand for data, analysis methods, and experimental techniques to improve and better understand motor thermal management.

  11. Economically optimal thermal insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, J.

    1978-10-01

    Exemplary calculations to show that exact adherence to the demands of the thermal insulation ordinance does not lead to an optimal solution with regard to economics. This is independent of the mode of financing. Optimal thermal insulation exceeds the values given in the thermal insulation ordinance.

  12. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenders, K.L.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  13. Penis Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Problems with the penis can cause pain and affect a man's sexual function and fertility. Penis disorders include Erectile dysfunction - inability to get or ... not go away Peyronie's disease - bending of the penis during an erection due to a hard lump ...

  14. Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one or other traumatic event Drug or alcohol abuse Complications Left untreated, bipolar disorder can result in serious problems that affect every area of your life, such as: Problems related to drug and alcohol use Suicide or suicide attempts Legal or financial problems Damaged ...

  15. Hoarding disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a reminder of happier times or representing beloved people or pets They feel safer when surrounded by the things ... that are part of hoarding disorder. Hoarding animals People who hoard animals may collect dozens or even hundreds of pets. Animals may be confined inside or outside. Because ...

  16. Anorectal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish S. C.; Bharucha, Adil E.; Chiarioni, Giuseppe; Felt-Bersma, Richelle; Knowles, Charles; Malcolm, Allison; Wald, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    This report defines criteria and reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of the following common anorectal disorders: fecal incontinence (FI), functional anorectal pain, and functional defecation disorders. FI is defined as the recurrent uncontrolled passage of fecal material for at least 3 months. The clinical features of FI are useful for guiding diagnostic testing and therapy. Anorectal manometry and imaging are useful for evaluating anal and pelvic floor structure and function. Education, antidiarrheals, and biofeedback therapy are the mainstay of management; surgery may be useful in refractory cases. Functional anorectal pain syndromes are defined by clinical features and categorized into 3 subtypes. In proctalgia fugax, the pain is typically fleeting and lasts for seconds to minutes. In levator ani syndrome and unspecified anorectal pain, the pain lasts more than 30 minutes, but in levator ani syndrome there is puborectalis tenderness. Functional defecation disorders are defined by ≥2 symptoms of chronic constipation or irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, and with ≥2 features of impaired evacuation, that is, abnormal evacuation pattern on manometry, abnormal balloon expulsion test, or impaired rectal evacuation by imaging. It includes 2 subtypes: dyssynergic defecation and inadequate defecatory propulsion. Pelvic floor biofeedback therapy is effective for treating levator ani syndrome and defecatory disorders. PMID:27144630

  17. Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Russell, Samantha; Rasor, Kaitlin

    2017-01-01

    Depression is among the most common mental disorders in the United States. Its diagnosis is often related to impairment of functioning across several domains, including how an individual thinks, feels, and participates in daily activities. Although depression has a relatively high prevalence among adults, the rate is alarmingly higher among…

  18. Eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders are considered chronic diseases of civilization. The most studied and well known are anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Anorexia is considered one of the most common psychiatric problems of girls in puberty and adolescence. Due to high mortality and morbidity as well as the increasing expansion of these diseases, it is clear why the amount of research on these diseases is growing worldwide. Eating disorders lead to numerous medical complications, mostly due to late diagnosis. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behavior in the nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, i.e. extreme dieting, or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are characteristic forms of compensatory behavior of patients with eating disorder. The most appropriate course of treatment is determined by evaluating the patient’s health condition, associated with behavior and eating habits, the experience of one’s own body, character traits of personality, and consequently the development and functioning of the individual. The final treatment plan is individual. Eating disorders are a growing medical problem even in this part of the world. Prevention should be planned in cooperation with different sectors so as to stop the epidemic of these diseases.

  19. Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vertigo. If you have additional problems with motor control, such as weakness, slowness, tremor, or rigidity, you can lose your ability to recover properly from imbalance. This raises the risk of falling and injury. What are some types of balance disorders? There are more than a dozen different ...

  20. Vascular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Vascular Disorders Email to a friend * required fields ...

  1. Autism and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    The Pervasive Developmental Disorders are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that include Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, Pervasive Developmental Disorder - Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS), Childhood Disintegrative Disorder (CDD), and Rett’s Disorder. All feature childhood onset with a constellation of symptoms spanning social interaction and communication and including atypical behavior patterns. The first three disorders (Autistic Disorder, Asperger’s Disorder, and PDD-NOS) are currently referred to as Autism Spectrum Disorders, reflecting divergent phenotypic and etiologic characteristics compared to Rett’s Disorder and CDD. This chapter reviews relevant research and clinical information relevant to appropriate medical diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22608634

  2. Thermal decomposition process of silver behenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianhao; Lu Shuxia; Zhang Jingchang; Cao Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition processes of silver behenate have been studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The TG-DTA and the higher temperature IR and XRD measurements indicated that complicated structural changes took place while heating silver behenate, but there were two distinct thermal transitions. During the first transition at 138 deg. C, the alkyl chains of silver behenate were transformed from an ordered into a disordered state. During the second transition at about 231 deg. C, a structural change took place for silver behenate, which was the decomposition of silver behenate. The major products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were metallic silver and behenic acid. Upon heating up to 500 deg. C, the final product of the thermal decomposition was metallic silver. The combined TG-MS analysis showed that the gas products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen, acetylene and some small molecule alkenes. TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the process of the formation and growth of metallic silver nanoparticles

  3. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    After the bad year of 2002, the european solar thermal market returned to double-digit growth rate in 2003: 22%. Nevertheless, the sector still has not recovered the growth rate it had in the early 2000 and European Commission targets are still far from being reached. This paper presents the thermal solar industry barometer. Data on the evolution of annually installed surfaces in the european union since 1993, the cumulated capacity of thermal collectors installed in the European Union, the estimation of the annual energy production associated to european solar thermal capacities and the main companies of the European Union thermal solar sector are presented and discussed. (A.L.B.)

  4. Thermal Management and Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Aqib

    2016-01-01

    During my internship in the Thermal Design Branch (ES3), I contributed to two main projects: i) novel passive thermal management system for future human exploration, ii) AVCOAT undercut thermal analysis. i) As NASA prepares to further expand human and robotic presence in space, it is well known that spacecraft architectures will be challenged with unprecedented thermal environments. Future exploration activities will have the need of thermal management systems that can provide higher reliability, mass and power reduction and increased performance. In an effort to start addressing the current technical gaps the NASA Johnson Space Center Passive Thermal Discipline has engaged in technology development activities. One of these activities was done through an in-house Passive Thermal Management System (PTMS) design for a lunar lander. The proposed PTMS, functional in both microgravity and gravity environments, consists of three main components: a heat spreader, a novel hybrid wick Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP), and a radiator. The aim of this PTMS is to keep electronics on a vehicle within their temperature limits (0 and 50 C for the current design) during all mission phases including multiple lunar day/night cycles. The VCHP was tested to verify its thermal performance. I created a thermal math model using Thermal Desktop (TD) and analyzed it to predict the PTMS performance. After testing, the test data provided a means to correlate the thermal math model. This correlation took into account conduction and convection heat transfer, representing the actual benchtop test. Since this PTMS is proposed for space missions, a vacuum test will be taking place to provide confidence that the system is functional in space environments. Therefore, the model was modified to include a vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen shroud while taking into account conduction and radiation heat transfer. Infrared Lamps were modelled and introduced into the model to simulate the sun

  5. Thermal neutron moderating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    In a thermal neutron moderating device, superconductive coils for generating magnetic fields capable of applying magnetic fields vertical to the longitudinal direction of a thermal neutron passing tube, and superconductive coils for magnetic field gradient for causing magnetic field gradient in the longitudinal direction of the thermal neutron passing tube are disposed being stacked at the outside of the thermal neutron passing tube. When magnetic field gradient is present vertically to the direction of a magnetic moment, thermal neutrons undergo forces in the direction of the magnetic field gradient in proportion to the magnetic moment. Then, the magnetic moment of the thermal neutrons is aligned with the direction vertical to the passing direction of the thermal neutrons, to cause the magnetic field gradient in the passing direction of the thermal neutrons. The speed of the thermal neutrons can be optionally selected and the wavelength can freely be changed by applying forces to the thermal neutrons and changing the extent and direction of the magnetic field gradient. Superconductive coils are used as the coils for generating magnetic fields and the magnetic field gradient in order to change extremely high energy of the thermal neutrons. (N.H.)

  6. Bipolar Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders is a well known concept. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is the most commonly seen comorbid anxiety disorder in bipolar patients. Some genetic variants, neurotransmitters especially serotonergic systems and second-messenger systems are thought to be responsible for its etiology. Bipolar disorder alters the clinical aspects of obsessive compulsive disorder and is associated with poorer outcome. The determination of comorbidity between bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder is quite important for appropriate clinical management and treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 429-437

  7. What Are Related Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Contact Us Donate Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ...

  8. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorder Among Adolescents Data Sources Share Panic Disorder Definition Panic Disorder is an anxiety disorder characterized by ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  9. Personality disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Sebastian; Heinskou, Torben; Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this naturalistic study, patients with personality disorders (N = 388) treated at Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Center, Mental Health Services, Capital Region of Denmark were allocated to two different kinds of treatment: a standardized treatment package with a preset number of treatment...... characteristics associated with clinicians' allocation of patients to the two different personality disorder services. METHODS: Patient characteristics across eight domains were collected in order to study whether there were systematic differences between patients allocated to the two different treatments....... Patient characteristics included measures of symptom severity, personality pathology, trauma and socio-demographic characteristics. Significance testing and binary regression analysis were applied to identify important predictors. RESULTS: Patient characteristics on fifteen variables differed...

  10. Ultrahigh thermal conductivity of isotopically enriched silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushkin, Alexander V.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Most of the stable elements have two and more stable isotopes. The physical properties of materials composed of such elements depend on the isotopic abundance to some extent. A remarkably strong isotope effect is observed in the phonon thermal conductivity, the principal mechanism of heat conduction in nonmetallic crystals. An isotopic disorder due to random distribution of the isotopes in the crystal lattice sites results in a rather strong phonon scattering and, consequently, in a reduction of thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present new results of accurate and precise measurements of thermal conductivity κ(T) for silicon single crystals having three different isotopic compositions at temperatures T from 2.4 to 420 K. The highly enriched crystal containing 99.995% of 28Si, which is one of the most perfect crystals ever synthesized, demonstrates a thermal conductivity of about 450 ± 10 W cm-1 K-1 at 24 K, the highest measured value among bulk dielectrics, which is ten times greater than the one for its counterpart natSi with the natural isotopic constitution. For highly enriched crystal 28Si and crystal natSi, the measurements were performed for two orientations [001] and [011], a magnitude of the phonon focusing effect on thermal conductivity was determined accurately at low temperatures. The anisotropy of thermal conductivity disappears above 31 K. The influence of the boundary scattering on thermal conductivity persists sizable up to much higher temperatures (˜80 K). The κ(T) measured in this work gives the most accurate approximation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of single crystal silicon which is determined solely by the anharmonic phonon processes and diffusive boundary scattering over a wide temperature range.

  11. A thermal ground cloak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Wu, Qinghe; Xu, Weikai; Liu, Di; Huang, Lujun; Chen, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The thermal cloak has been a long-standing scientific dream of researchers and engineers. Recently thermal metamaterials with man-made micro-structure have been presented based on the principle of transformation optics (TO). This new concept has received considerable attention, which is a powerful tool for manipulating heat flux in thermal imaging systems. However, the inherent material singularity has long been a captivation of experimental realization. As an alternative method, the scattering-cancellation-based cloak (or bi-layer thermal cloak) has been presented to remove the singularity for achieving the same cloaking performance. Nevertheless, such strategy needs prerequisite knowledge (geometry and conductivity) of the object to be cloaked. In this paper, a new thermal ground cloak is presented to overcome the limitations. The device is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the thermal cloaking performance. We experimentally show that the remarkably low complexity of the device can fully and effectively be manipulated using realizable transformation thermal devices. More importantly, this thermal ground cloak is designed to exclude heat flux without knowing the information of the cloaked object. - Highlights: • We present the first thermal carpet cloak. • The carpet can thermally cloak any shaped object without knowing the properties of the object to be cloaked. • Excellent agreements between simulation and experiment are observed.

  12. A Crewed Mission to Apophis Using a Hybrid Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, David R.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Burke, Laura M.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    A BNTEP system is a dual propellant, hybrid propulsion concept that utilizes Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion during high thrust operations, providing 10's of kilo-Newtons of thrust per engine at a high specific impulse (Isp) of 900 s, and an Electric Propulsion (EP) system during low thrust operations at even higher Isp of around 3000 s. Electrical power for the EP system is provided by the BNTR engines in combination with a Brayton Power Conversion (BPC) closed loop system, which can provide electrical power on the order of 100's of kWe. High thrust BNTR operation uses liquid hydrogen (LH2) as reactor coolant propellant expelled out a nozzle, while low thrust EP uses high pressure xenon expelled by an electric grid. By utilizing an optimized combination of low and high thrust propulsion, significant mass savings over a conventional NTR vehicle can be realized. Low thrust mission events, such as midcourse corrections (MCC), tank settling burns, some reaction control system (RCS) burns, and even a small portion at the end of the departure burn can be performed with EP. Crewed and robotic deep space missions to a near Earth asteroid (NEA) are best suited for this hybrid propulsion approach. For these mission scenarios, the Earth return V is typically small enough that EP alone is sufficient. A crewed mission to the NEA Apophis in the year 2028 with an expendable BNTEP transfer vehicle is presented. Assembly operations, launch element masses, and other key characteristics of the vehicle are described. A comparison with a conventional NTR vehicle performing the same mission is also provided. Finally, reusability of the BNTEP transfer vehicle is explored.

  13. Impact of vacancy ordering on thermal transport in crystalline phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, K S; Lange, F R L; Sittner, E R; Volker, H; Schlockermann, C; Siegrist, T; Wuttig, M

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal transport in solids is of paramount importance for many applications. Often thermal management is crucial for a device's performance, as it affects both reliability and power consumption. A number of intricate concepts have been developed to address this challenge, such as diamond-like coatings to enhance the thermal conductivity or low symmetry complex super-structures to reduce it. Here, a different approach is pursued, where we explore the potential of solids with a high yet controllable degree of disorder. Recently, it has been demonstrated that an unconventionally high degree of structural disorder characterizes a number of crystalline phase-change materials (PCMs). This disorder strongly impacts electronic transport and even leads to disorder induced localization (Anderson localization). This raises the question how thermal transport is affected by such conditions. Here thermal transport in highly disordered crystalline Ge-Sb-Te (GST) based PCMs is investigated. Glass-like thermal properties are observed for several crystalline PCMs, which are attributed to strong scattering by disordered point defects. A systematic study of different compounds along the pseudo-binary line between GeTe and Sb2Te3 reveals that disordered vacancies act as point defects responsible for pronounced phonon scattering. Annealing causes a gradual ordering of the vacancies and leads to a more 'crystal-like' thermal conductivity. While both vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom are affected by disorder, the consequences differ for different stoichiometries. This opens up a pathway to tune electrical and thermal transport by controlling the degree of disorder. Materials with tailored transport properties may not only help to improve power efficiency and scaling in upcoming phase-change memories but are also of fundamental interest in the field of thermoelectric materials.

  14. Impact of vacancy ordering on thermal transport in crystalline phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegert, K S; Lange, F R L; Sittner, E R; Volker, H; Schlockermann, C; Wuttig, M; Siegrist, T

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal transport in solids is of paramount importance for many applications. Often thermal management is crucial for a device's performance, as it affects both reliability and power consumption. A number of intricate concepts have been developed to address this challenge, such as diamond-like coatings to enhance the thermal conductivity or low symmetry complex super-structures to reduce it. Here, a different approach is pursued, where we explore the potential of solids with a high yet controllable degree of disorder. Recently, it has been demonstrated that an unconventionally high degree of structural disorder characterizes a number of crystalline phase-change materials (PCMs). This disorder strongly impacts electronic transport and even leads to disorder induced localization (Anderson localization). This raises the question how thermal transport is affected by such conditions. Here thermal transport in highly disordered crystalline Ge–Sb–Te (GST) based PCMs is investigated. Glass-like thermal properties are observed for several crystalline PCMs, which are attributed to strong scattering by disordered point defects. A systematic study of different compounds along the pseudo-binary line between GeTe and Sb 2 Te 3 reveals that disordered vacancies act as point defects responsible for pronounced phonon scattering. Annealing causes a gradual ordering of the vacancies and leads to a more ‘crystal-like’ thermal conductivity. While both vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom are affected by disorder, the consequences differ for different stoichiometries. This opens up a pathway to tune electrical and thermal transport by controlling the degree of disorder. Materials with tailored transport properties may not only help to improve power efficiency and scaling in upcoming phase-change memories but are also of fundamental interest in the field of thermoelectric materials. (key issues review)

  15. Josephson Thermal Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Solinas, Paolo; Braggio, Alessandro; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Giazotto, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting thermal memory device that exploits the thermal hysteresis in a flux-controlled temperature-biased superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID). This system reveals a flux-controllable temperature bistability, which can be used to define two well-distinguishable thermal logic states. We discuss a suitable writing-reading procedure for these memory states. The time of the memory writing operation is expected to be on the order of approximately 0.2 ns for a Nb-based SQUID in thermal contact with a phonon bath at 4.2 K. We suggest a noninvasive readout scheme for the memory states based on the measurement of the effective resonance frequency of a tank circuit inductively coupled to the SQUID. The proposed device paves the way for a practical implementation of thermal logic and computation. The advantage of this proposal is that it represents also an example of harvesting thermal energy in superconducting circuits.

  16. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  17. Total scattering of disordered crystalline functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamoto, Shin-Ichi; Kodama, Katsuaki; Iikubo, Satoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2009-01-01

    There are disorders in some modern functional materials. As an example, the crystalline phase of an optical recording material has low thermal conductivity but high electrical conductivity, simultaneously. This contradiction is a challenge to material scientists in designing good functional materials, which should have at least two types of crystallographic sites. One site limits thermal conductivity while the other site carries electrons or holes with high mobility. This problem exists with not only optical recording materials but also thermoelectric materials. The periodic boundary condition gets lost in the disordered parts. This therefore, makes atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis with a wide range of real space suitable for investigating the form and size of crystalline parts as well as disordered parts in the material. Pulsed neutron powder diffraction is one of the best tools for use in this new type of emerging research, together with synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and electron diffraction.

  18. Solid state thermal rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  19. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  20. Disordered eating practices in gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satherley, R; Howard, R; Higgs, S

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review evidence concerning disordered eating practices in dietary-controlled gastrointestinal conditions. Three key questions were examined: a) are disordered eating practices a feature of GI disorders?; b) what abnormal eating practices are present in those with GI disorders?; and c) what factors are associated with the presence of disordered eating in those with GI disorders? By exploring these questions, we aim to develop a conceptual model of disordered eating development in GI disease. Five key databases, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1900-2014) and MEDLINE (1950-2014), PubMed, PsycINFO (1967-2014) and Google Scholar, were searched for papers relating to disordered eating practices in those with GI disorders. All papers were quality assessed before being included in the review. Nine papers were included in the review. The majority of papers reported that the prevalence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls. Disordered eating patterns in dietary-controlled GI disorders may be associated with both anxiety and GI symptoms. Evidence concerning the correlates of disordered eating was limited. The presence of disordered eating behaviours is greater in populations with GI disorders than in populations of healthy controls, but the direction of the relationship is not clear. Implications for further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal comfort following immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéritée, Julien; Redortier, Bernard; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Unlike thermal comfort in air, little research has been undertaken exploring thermal comfort around water sports. We investigated the impact of swimming and cooling in air after swimming on thermal comfort. After 10 min of swimming-and-resting cycles in 28°C water, volunteers wearing two types of garments or in swim briefs, faced winds in 24°C air, at rest or when stepping. Thermal comfort was significantly higher during swimming than resting. Post-immersion, following maximum discomfort, in 45 of 65 tests thermal comfort improved although mean skin temperature was still cooling (0.26 [SD 0.19] °C·min(-1) - max was 0.89°C·min(-1)). When thermal comfort was re-established mean skin temperature was lower than at maximal discomfort in 39 of 54 tests (0.81 [SD 0.58] °C - max difference was 2.68°C). The reduction in thermal discomfort in this scenario could be due to the adaptation of thermoreceptors, or to reductions in cooling rates to levels where discomfort was less stimulated. The relief from the recent discomfort may explain why, later, thermal comfort returned to initial levels in spite of poorer thermal profiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Theory of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Bruno A

    1997-01-01

    Highly regarded text presents detailed discussion of fundamental aspects of theory, background, problems with detailed solutions. Basics of thermoelasticity, heat transfer theory, thermal stress analysis, more. 1985 edition.

  3. Mars Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  4. Space thermal control development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, M. J.; Grodzka, P. G.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations on a number of various phase change materials (PCMs) and PCMs in combination with metals and other materials are reported. The evaluations include the following PCM system performance characteristics: PCM and PCM/filler thermal diffusivities, the effects of long-term thermal cycling, PCM-container compatibility, and catalyst effectiveness and stability. Three PCMs demonstrated performance acceptable enough to be considered for use in prototype aluminum thermal control devices. These three PCMs are lithium nitrate trihydrate with zinc hydroxy nitrate catalyst, acetamide, and myristic acid. Of the fillers tested, aluminum honeycomb filler was found to offer the most increase in system thermal diffusivity.

  5. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Social Anxiety Disorder and Mood Disorders Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerrin Binbay

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Social Anxiety Disorder is a common disorder leading functional impairment. The comorbidity between mood disorders with social anxiety disorder is relatively common. This comorbidity impacts the clinical severity, resistance and functionality of patients. The systematic evaluation of the comorbidity in both patient groups should not be ignored and be carefully conducted. In general, social anxiety disorder starts at an earlier age than mood disorders and is reported to be predictor for subsequent major depression. The absence of comorbidity in patients with social anxiety disorder is a predictor of good response to treatment. In bipolar disorder patients with comorbid social anxiety disorder, there is an increased level of general psychopathology. Besides, they have poor outcome and increased risk of suicide. In this article, comorbidity between these two disorders has been evaluated in detail.

  7. Photovoltaic. Solar thermal. Solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The year 2008 was excellent for solar energy in the European Union. The growth of the installed capacity for photovoltaic was +159% (it means +4747.018 MW) to reach 9689.952 MW and that for solar thermal was +51.5% (it means +3172.5 MW) to reach 19982.7 MW. Worldwide concentrated solar thermal capacity stood at 679 MW in 2009, while this figure may seem low, the sector has a promising future ahead of it. (A.C.)

  8. Thermal conductivity of electron-irradiated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    We report results of a systematic analysis of thermal transport in electron-irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene sheets based on nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. We focus on the dependence of the thermal conductivity, k, of the irradiated graphene sheets on the inserted irradiation defect density, c, as well as the extent of defect passivation with hydrogen atoms. While the thermal conductivity of irradiated graphene decreases precipitously from that of pristine graphene, k0, upon introducing a low vacancy concentration, c reduction of the thermal conductivity with the increasing vacancy concentration exhibits a weaker dependence on c until the amorphization threshold. Beyond the onset of amorphization, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the vacancy concentration becomes significantly weaker, and k practically reaches a plateau value. Throughout the range of c and at all hydrogenation levels examined, the correlation k = k0(1 + αc)-1 gives an excellent description of the simulation results. The value of the coefficient α captures the overall strength of the numerous phonon scattering centers in the irradiated graphene sheets, which include monovacancies, vacancy clusters, carbon ring reconstructions, disorder, and a rough nonplanar sheet morphology. Hydrogen passivation increases the value of α, but the effect becomes very minor beyond the amorphization threshold.

  9. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...... sequence shown to disturb imprinted gene expression, and the correspondingly broad range of resultant clinical syndromes. At the same time, however, it has become clear that this diversity of IDs has common underlying principles, not only in shared molecular mechanisms, but also in interrelated clinical...

  10. Thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purs'kij, O.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the correlation between the thermal pressure and the isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 has been carried out. The temperature dependences of the thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity for samples with various molar volumes have been obtained. The isothermal pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 have been calculated. The form of the temperature dependence of the isochoric thermal conductivity taking the thermal pressure into account has been revealed. Behaviour of the isochoric thermal conductivity is explained by phonon-phonon interaction and additional influence of the thermal pressure

  11. Treatment of anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bandelow, Borwin; Michaelis, Sophie; Wedekind, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder/agoraphobia, social anxiety disorder, and others) are the most prevalent psychiatric disorders, and are associated with a high burden of illness. Anxiety disorders are often underrecognized and undertreated in primary care. Treatment is indicated when a patient shows marked distress or suffers from complications resulting from the disorder. The treatment recommendations given in this article are based on guidelines, meta-analyses...

  12. Conduct disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitelaar, Jan K; Smeets, Kirsten C; Herpers, Pierre; Scheepers, Floor; Glennon, Jeffrey; Rommelse, Nanda N J

    2013-02-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is a frequently occurring psychiatric disorder characterized by a persistent pattern of aggressive and non-aggressive rule breaking antisocial behaviours that lead to considerable burden for the patients themselves, their family and society. This review paper updates diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to CD in the light of the forthcoming DSM-5 definition. The diagnostic criteria for CD will remain unchanged in DSM-5, but the introduction of a specifier of CD with a callous-unemotional (CU) presentation is new. Linked to this, we discuss the pros and cons of various other ways to subtype aggression/CD symptoms. Existing guidelines for CD are, with few exceptions, already of a relatively older date and emphasize that clinical assessment should be systematic and comprehensive and based on a multi-informant approach. Non-medical psychosocial interventions are recommended as the first option for the treatment of CD. There is a role for medication in the treatment of comorbid syndromes and/or in case of insufficient response to psychosocial interventions and severe and dangerous aggressive and violent behaviours.

  13. Computational study of heat transport in compositionally disordered binary crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyver, John W.; Blaisten-Barojas, Estela

    2006-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of compositionally disordered binary crystals with atoms interacting through Lennard-Jones potentials has been studied as a function of temperature. The two species in the crystal differ in mass, hard-core atomic diameter, well depth and relative concentration. The isobaric Monte Carlo was used to equilibrate the samples at near-zero pressure. The isoenergy molecular dynamics combined with the Green-Kubo approach was taken to calculate the heat current time-dependent autocorrelation function and determine the lattice thermal conductivity of the sample. The inverse temperature dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity was shown to fail at low temperatures when the atomic diameters of the two species differ. Instead, the thermal conductivity was nearly a constant across temperatures for species with different atomic diameters. Overall, it is shown that there is a dramatic decrease of the lattice thermal conductivity with increasing atomic radii ratio between species and a moderate decrease due to mass disorder

  14. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow

  15. Power Electronics Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Thermal modeling was conducted to evaluate and develop thermal management strategies for high-temperature wide-bandgap (WBG)-based power electronics systems. WBG device temperatures of 175 degrees C to 250 degrees C were modeled under various under-hood temperature environments. Modeling result were used to identify the most effective capacitor cooling strategies under high device temperature conditions.

  16. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  17. Thermal solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.C.; Leal C, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some relative aspects to the development and current state of thermal solar energy are summarized, so much at domestic level as international. To facilitate the criteria understanding as the size of the facilities in thermal solar systems, topics as availability of the solar resource and its interactions with the matter are included. Finally, some perspectives for the development of this energetic alternative are presented

  18. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Conceptual thermal design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Present thermal design tools and methods insufficiently support the development of structural concepts engaged by typical practicing designers. Research described in this thesis identifies the main thermal design problems in practice. In addition, models and methods are developed that support an

  20. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  1. Outdoor thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Marialena

    2011-06-01

    A review of the various approaches in understanding outdoor thermal comfort is presented. The emphasis on field surveys from around the world, particularly across Europe, enables us to understand thermal perception and evaluate outdoor thermal comfort conditions. The consistent low correlations between objective microclimatic variables, subjective thermal sensation and comfort outdoors, internationally, suggest that thermophysiology alone does not adequate describe these relationships. Focusing on the concept of adaptation, it tries to explain how this influences outdoor comfort, enabling us to inhabit and get satisfaction from outdoor spaces throughout the year. Beyond acclimatization and behavioral adaptation, through adjustments in clothing and changes to the metabolic heat, psychological adaptation plays a critical role to ensure thermal comfort and satisfaction with the outdoor environment. Such parameters include recent experiences and expectations; personal choice and perceived control, more important than whether that control is actually exercised; and the need for positive environmental stimulation suggesting that thermal neutrality is not a pre-requisite for thermal comfort. Ultimately, enhancing environmental diversity can influence thermal perception and experience of open spaces.

  2. Thermal diffusion (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarechal, A.

    1963-01-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [fr

  3. Thermal Transport in Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Hu, Ming

    2018-03-01

    Phosphorene, a novel elemental 2D semiconductor, possesses fascinating chemical and physical properties which are distinctively different from other 2D materials. The rapidly growing applications of phosphorene in nano/optoelectronics and thermoelectrics call for comprehensive studies of thermal transport properties. In this Review, based on the theoretical and experimental progresses, the thermal transport properties of single-layer phosphorene, multilayer phosphorene (nanofilms), and bulk black phosphorus are summarized to give a general view of the overall thermal conductivity trend from single-layer to bulk form. The mechanism underlying the discrepancy in the reported thermal conductivity of phosphorene is discussed by reviewing the effect of different functionals and cutoff distances on the thermal transport evaluations. This Review then provides fundamental insight into the thermal transport in phosphorene by reviewing the role of resonant bonding in driving giant phonon anharmonicity and long-range interactions. In addition, the extrinsic thermal conductivity of phosphorene is reviewed by discussing the effects of strain and substrate, together with phosphorene based heterostructures and nanoribbons. This Review summarizes the progress of thermal transport in phosphorene from both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements, which would be of significance to the design and development of efficient phosphorene based nanoelectronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. LH2 pump component development testing in the electric pump room at test cell C inducer no. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, F. X.; Brunner, J. J.; Kirk, K. G.; Mathews, J. P.; Nishioka, T.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of a turbine pump for use with the nuclear engine for rocket vehicles are discussed. It was determined that the pump will be a two stage centrifugal pump with both stages having backswept impellers and an inducer upstream of the first stage impeller. The test program provided demonstration of the ability of the selected design to meet the imposed requirements.

  5. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A; Blankenship, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N=11) and spirilloxanthin (N=13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N=13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  6. Boiling heat transfer to LN2 and LH2 - Influence of surface orientation and reduced body forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merte, H., Jr.; Oker, E.; Littles, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The quantitative determination of the influence of heater surface orientation and gravity on nucleate pool boiling of liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen is described. A transient calorimeter technique, well suited for obtaining pool boiling data under reduced gravity and used earlier by Clark and Merte (1963), was employed after being adapted to flat a surface whose orientation could be varied. The obtained determination results are reviewed.

  7. Development of advanced material composites for use as internal insulation for LH2 tanks (gas layer concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A program is described that was conducted to develop an internal insulation system for potential application to the liquid hydrogen tanks of a reusable booster, where the tanks would be subjected to repeated high temperatures. The design of the internal insulation is based on a unique gas layer concept, in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer, within a cellular core structure, between the tank wall and the contained liquid hydrogen. Specific objectives were to select materials for insulation systems that would be compatible with wall temperatures of 350 F and 650 F during reentry into the earth's atmosphere, and to fabricate and test insulation systems under conditions simulating the operating environment. A materials test program was conducted to evaluate the properties of candidate materials at elevated temperatures and at the temperature of liquid hydrogen, and to determine the compatibility of the materials with a hydrogen atmosphere at the appropriate elevated temperature. The materials that were finally selected included Kapton polyimide films, silicone adhesives, fiber glass batting, and in the case of the 350 F system, Teflon film.

  8. STUDY ON THE STRUCTURAL BASIS OF PERIPHERAL LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEXES (LH2 IN PURPLE NON-SULPHUR PHOTOSYNTHETIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatas H.P. Brotosudarmo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis provides an example of a natural process that has been optimized during evolution to harness solar energy efficiently and safely, and finally to use it to produce a carbon-based fuel. Initially, solar energy is captured by the light harvesting pigment-protein complexes. In purple bacteria these antenna complexes are constructed on a rather simple modular basis. Light absorbed by these antenna complexes is funnelled downhill to reaction centres, where light drives a trans-membrane redox reaction. The light harvesting proteins not only provide the scaffolding that correctly positions the bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoid pigments for optimal energy transfer but also creates an environment that can modulate the wavelength at which different bacteriochlorophyll molecules absorb light thereby creating the energy funnel. How these proteins can modulate the absorption spectra of the bacteriochlorophylls will be discussed in this review.

  9. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  10. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  11. Tunable thermal link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  12. Oxytocin and Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Nur Say

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that plays critical role in mother-infant bonding, pair bonding and prosocial behaviors. Several neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, alcohol/substance addiction, aggression, suicide, eating disorders and personality disorders show abnormalities of oxytocin system. These findings have given rise to the studies searching therapeutic use of oxytocin for psychi-atric disorders. The studies of oxytocin interventions in psychiatric disorders yielded potentially promising findings. This paper reviews the role of oxytocin in emotions, behavior and its effects in psychiatric disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(2: 102-113

  13. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  14. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurogenetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beth Mann Dosier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic advances in the past three decades have transformed our understanding and treatment of many human diseases including neurogenetic disorders. Most neurogenetic disorders can be classified as “rare disease,” but collectively neurogenetic disorders are not rare and are commonly encountered in general pediatric practice. The authors decided to select eight relatively well-known neurogenetic disorders including Down syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Smith–Magenis syndrome, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, achondroplasia, mucopolysaccharidoses, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Each disorder is presented in the following format: overview, clinical characteristics, developmental aspects, associated sleep disorders, management and research/future directions.

  15. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration...SPAD) image sensors were used to demonstrate the new thermal management approach. Thermal management , integrated temperature sensors, Vt extractor

  16. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  17. Measurement of thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The 6-m long, 45-kG, warm-iron superconducting magnets envisioned for the Energy Doubler stage of the Fermilab accelerator require stiff supports with minimized thermal conductances in order to keep the refrigeration power reasonable. The large number of supports involved in the system required a careful study of their heat conduction from the room temperature wall to the intercepting refrigeration at 20 0 K and to the liquid helium. For this purpose the thermal conductance of this support was measured by comparing it with the thermal conductance of a copper strap of known geometry. An association of steady-state thermal analysis and experimental thermal conductivity techniques forms the basis of this method. An important advantage is the automatic simulation of the 20 0 K refrigeration intercept by the copper strap, which simplifies the apparatus considerably. This relative resistance technique, which uses electrical analogy as a guideline, is applicable with no restrictions for materials with temperature-independent thermal conductivity. For other materials the results obtained are functions of the specific temperature interval involved in the measurements. A comprehensive review of the literature on thermal conductivity indicates that this approach has not been used before. A demonstration of its self-consistency is stressed here rather than results obtained for different supports

  18. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  19. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  20. Casting thermal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuddin bin Sulaiman

    1994-01-01

    The whole of this study is concerned with process simulation in casting processes. This study describes the application of the finite element method as an aid to simulating the thermal design of a high pressure die casting die by analysing the cooling transients in the casting cycle. Two types of investigation were carried out to model the linear and non-linear cooling behavior with consideration of a thermal interface effect. The simulated cooling for different stages were presented in temperature contour form. These illustrate the successful application of the Finite Element Method to model the process and they illustrate the significance of the thermal interface at low pressure

  1. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  2. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) KidsHealth / For Parents / Posttraumatic Stress Disorder ( ... My Child? Looking Ahead Print What Is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Someone who is the victim of ( ...

  3. Pterins and affective disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Hoekstra (Rocco)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe pathophysiology of affective disorders is largely unknown. In patients with various affective disorders the activity of pterins and related amino acids were investigated before and after clinical treatment. In particular the bipolar affective disorder could be

  4. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  5. Social anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobia - social; Anxiety disorder - social; Social phobia; SAD - social anxiety disorder ... People with social anxiety disorder fear and avoid situations in which they may be judged by others. It may begin in ...

  6. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally your enzymes break carbohydrates down into glucose (a type of sugar). If ...

  7. Pituitary Gland Disorders Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal Disorders Osteoporosis and Bone Health Children and Teen Health Diabetes Heart Health Men's Health Rare Diseases Pituitary Disorders Thyroid Disorders Transgender Health Obesity and Weight Management Women's Health You and Your ...

  8. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  9. Eating disorder symptoms in affective disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, P N

    1991-01-01

    Patients with Major Affective Disorder (MAD), Secondary Depression, Panic Disorder, and bulimia with and without MAD, were given the Eating Disorder Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the General Behavior Inventory at presentation. It was found that patients with MAD have a triad of eating disorder symptoms: a disturbance in interoceptive awareness, the sense of ineffectiveness, and a tendency toward bulimia. The data supported the concept that the sense of ineffectiveness is secon...

  10. Thermal explosion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Tso Chin [Malaya Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon.

  11. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  12. GAPCON-THERMAL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.; Panisko, F.E.

    1979-01-01

    The fuel performance code GAPCON-THERMAL-3 has been expanded to include recent transient material deformation constitutive relations and the FLECHT heat transfer correlation. The modifications make it possible to compute the thermal and mechanical response of nuclear fuel to postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA). The numerical formulation has the capability of predicting both steady state and transient behavior of a fuel rod using a single analytical procedure. GAPCON-THERMAL-3 (G-T-3) uses a specialized finite element procedure for mechanics predictions and the method of weighted residuals and finite difference techniques to compute temperature and thermal behavior. Fuel behavior, gas release models, gas conductance models, and stored energy calculations are applicable to both steady state and transient conditions. The code has been used to perform scoping analysis for in-reactor LOCA simulation testing. (orig.)

  13. Thermal explosion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso Chin Ping

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. (author)

  14. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...... a broader field of applications. Deploying this type of sensor in vision systems eliminates the illumination problems of normal greyscale and RGB cameras. This survey provides an overview of the current applications of thermal cameras. Applications include animals, agriculture, buildings, gas detection......, industrial, and military applications, as well as detection, tracking, and recognition of humans. Moreover, this survey describes the nature of thermal radiation and the technology of thermal cameras....

  15. Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a progressive wave tube test facility that is used to test structures for dynamic response and sonic fatigue due to...

  16. Compliant thermal microactuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsmann, Jacques; Sigmund, Ole; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Two dimensional compliant metallic thermal microactuators are designed using topology optimisation, and microfabricated using rapid prototyping techniques. Structures are characterised using advanced image analysis, yielding a very high precision. Characterised structures behave in accordance...

  17. Thermal soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.

    1999-01-01

    The environmental properties and business aspects of thermal soil remediation are described. Thermal soil remediation is considered as being the best option in cleaning contaminated soil for reuse. The thermal desorption process can remove hydrocarbons such as gasoline, kerosene and crude oil, from contaminated soil. Nelson Environmental Remediation (NER) Ltd. uses a mobile thermal desorption unit (TDU) with high temperature capabilities. NER has successfully applied the technology to target heavy end hydrocarbon removal from Alberta's gumbo clay in all seasons. The TDU consist of a feed system, a counter flow rotary drum kiln, a baghouse particulate removal system, and a secondary combustion chamber known as an afterburner. The technology has proven to be cost effective and more efficient than bioremediation and landfarming

  18. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  19. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  20. ACE: Health - Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about children reported to have ever been diagnosed with four different neurodevelopmental disorders: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), learning disabilities, autism, and intellectual disability.

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorders (Pervasive Developmental Disorders)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    This booklet focuses on classic autism, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), and Asperger syndrome, with brief descriptions of Rett syndrome and childhood disintegrative disorder. The booklet describes possible indicators of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), their diagnosis, available aids, treatment options, adults…

  2. Nanoscale thermal transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Ford, Wayne K.; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Merlin, Roberto; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2003-01-01

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime—experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  3. ThermalTracker Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-08-10

    The software processes recorded thermal video and detects the flight tracks of birds and bats that passed through the camera's field of view. The output is a set of images that show complete flight tracks for any detections, with the direction of travel indicated and the thermal image of the animal delineated. A report of the descriptive features of each detected track is also output in the form of a comma-separated value text file.

  4. Thermal conductivity of nonlinear waves in disordered chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. Vol. 77, No. ... Therefore deterministic chaos will lead to an incoherent spreading. ..... dependence, and a clear indication that the small-temperature conductivity drops faster than ... Thin solid lines guide the eye.

  5. Quantitative theory of thermal fluctuations and disorder in the vortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    described. To differentiate various phases, one should understand the nature of the ..... of Science and Technology of China (G1999064602) and National Nature Science ... [9] H Pastoriza, M F Goffman, A Arribêre and F de la Cruz, Phys. Rev.

  6. Thermal Mud Molecular Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Odabasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal mud (peloids, which are frequently used for thermal therapy purposes consist of organic and inorganic (minerals compounds in general. Organic structure is formed after a variety of chemical processes occurring in decades and comprise of a very complex structure. Stagnant water environment, herbal diversity, microorganism multiplicity and time are crucial players to form the structure. Data regarding description of organic compounds are very limited. Nowadays, it was clearly understood that a variety of compounds those are neglected in daily practice are found in thermal mud after GC-MS and similar methods are being frequently used. Those compounds which are biologically active are humic compounds, carboxylic acids, terpenoids, steroids and fatty acids. By comprising the thermal mud, these different compound groups which are related to divers areas from cosmetology to inflammation, make the thermal mud very meaningful in the treatment of human disease. In this review, it was tried to put forward the effects of several molecule groups those consisting of the thermal mud structure. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 257-264

  7. Battery Thermal Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-08

    The operating temperature is critical in achieving the right balance between performance, cost, and life for both Li-ion batteries and ultracapacitors. The chemistries of advanced energy-storage devices - such as lithium-based batteries - are very sensitive to operating temperature. High temperatures degrade batteries faster while low temperatures decrease their power and capacity, affecting vehicle range, performance, and cost. Understanding heat generation in battery systems - from the individual cells within a module, to the inter-connects between the cells, and across the entire battery system - is imperative for designing effective thermal-management systems and battery packs. At NREL, we have developed unique capabilities to measure the thermal properties of cells and evaluate thermal performance of battery packs (air or liquid cooled). We also use our electro-thermal finite element models to analyze the thermal performance of battery systems in order to aid battery developers with improved thermal designs. NREL's tools are used to meet the weight, life, cost, and volume goals set by the U.S. Department of Energy for electric drive vehicles.

  8. Local Thermal Insulating Materials For Thermal Energy Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal insulation is one of the most important components of a thermal energy storage system. In this paper the thermal properties of selected potential local materials which can be used for high temperature insulation are presented. Thermal properties of seven different samples were measured. Samples consisted of: ...

  9. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2018-05-29

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  10. Characterization of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) Materials for Return-to-Flight following the Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Doug

    2006-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation, it was determined that a large chunk of polyurethane insulating foam (= 1.67 lbs) on the External Tank (ET) came loose during Columbia's ascent on 2-1-03. The foam piece struck some of the protective Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the leading edge of Columbia's left wing in the mid-wing area. This impact damaged Columbia to the extent that upon re-entry to Earth, superheGed air approaching 3,000 F caused the vehicle to break up, killing all seven astronauts on board. A paper after the Columbia Accident Investigation highlighted thermal analysis testing performed on External Tank TPS materials (1). These materials included BX-250 (now BX-265) rigid polyurethane foam and SLA-561 Super Lightweight Ablator (highly-filled silicone rubber). The large chunk of foam from Columbia originated fiom the left bipod ramp of the ET. The foam in this ramp area was hand-sprayed over the SLA material and various fittings, allowed to dry, and manually shaved into a ramp shape. In Return-to-Flight (RTF) efforts following Columbia, the decision was made to remove the foam in the bipod ramp areas. During RTF efforts, further thermal analysis testing was performed on BX-265 foam by DSC and DMA. Flat panels of foam about 2-in. thick were sprayed on ET tank material (aluminum alloys). The DSC testing showed that foam material very close to the metal substrate cured more slowly than bulk foam material. All of the foam used on the ET is considered fully cured about 21 days after it is sprayed. The RTF culminated in the successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on 7-26-05. Although the flight was a success, there was another serious incident of foam loss fiom the ET during Shuttle ascent. This time, a rather large chunk of BX-265 foam (= 0.9 lbs) came loose from the liquid hydrogen (LH2) PAL ramp, although the foam did not strike the Shuttle Orbiter containing the crew. DMA testing was performed on foam samples taken fiom

  11. Comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Ruiz, Eva M; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders has not been studied in depth. In addition, clinical implications involved in the appearance of both disorders are very important. A systematic literature review of MEDLINE published up to September 2013 was performed, analyzing all the articles that studied the comorbidity of both conditions (bipolar disorder and eating disorders) and others research that studied the efficacy of pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy to improve these illnesses. In this review we found a high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders, especially of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Studies show that lithium and topiramate are 2 of the more effective pharmacological agents in the treatment of both disorders. There are a lot of studies that show evidence of comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders. However, further research is needed on assessment and treatment when these conditions co-exist, as well as study into the biopsychological aspects to determine the comorbid aetiology. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaginal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderberg, S F

    1986-05-01

    Chronic vaginitis is the most common vaginal disorder. Dogs with vaginitis show no signs of systemic illness but often lick at the vulva and have purulent or hemorrhagic vaginal discharges. Vaginitis is most commonly secondary to a noninfectious inciting factor such as congenital vaginal anomalies, clitoral hypertrophy, foreign bodies, trauma to the vaginal mucosa, or vaginal tumors. Inspection of the caudal vagina and vestibule both visually and digitally will often reveal the source of vaginal irritation. Vaginal cytology is used to establish the stage of the estrous cycle as well as distinguish uterine from vaginal sources of discharge. Vaginal cultures are used to establish the predominant offending organism associated with vaginal discharges and may be used as a guide for selection of a therapeutic agent. Vaginitis is best managed by removing the inciting cause and treating the area locally with antiseptic douches. Congenital malformations at the vestibulovaginal or vestibulovulvar junction may prevent normal intromission. Affected bitches may be reluctant to breed naturally because of pain. Such defects are detected best by digital examination. Congenital vaginal defects may be corrected by digital or surgical means. Prolapse of tissue through the lips of the vulva may be caused by clitoral hypertrophy, vaginal hyperplasia, or vaginal tumors. Enlargement of clitoral tissue is the result of endogenous or exogenous sources of androgens. Treatment of this condition includes removal of the androgen source and/or surgical removal of clitoral tissue. Vaginal hyperplasia is detected during proestrus or estrus of young bitches. Hyperplastic tissue will regress during diestrus. Tissue that is excessively traumatized and/or prolapse of the entire vaginal circumference may be removed surgically. Ovariohysterectomy may be used to prevent recurrence. Vaginal tumors are detected most often in older intact bitches. Such tumors are generally of smooth muscle or fibrous

  13. Microwave Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Kevin L. G.; Lambot, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We have conducted research in microwave thermal propulsion as part of the space exploration access technologies (SEAT) research program, a cooperative agreement (NNX09AF52A) between NASA and Carnegie Mellon University. The SEAT program commenced on the 19th of February 2009 and concluded on the 30th of September 2015. The DARPA/NASA Millimeter-wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) project subsumed the SEAT program from May 2012 to March 2014 and one of us (Parkin) served as its principal investigator and chief engineer. The MTLS project had no final report of its own, so we have included the MTLS work in this report and incorporate its conclusions here. In the six years from 2009 until 2015 there has been significant progress in millimeter-wave thermal rocketry (a subset of microwave thermal rocketry), most of which has been made under the auspices of the SEAT and MTLS programs. This final report is intended for multiple audiences. For researchers, we present techniques that we have developed to simplify and quantify the performance of thermal rockets and their constituent technologies. For program managers, we detail the facilities that we have built and the outcomes of experiments that were conducted using them. We also include incomplete and unfruitful lines of research. For decision-makers, we introduce the millimeter-wave thermal rocket in historical context. Considering the economic significance of space launch, we present a brief but significant cost-benefit analysis, for the first time showing that there is a compelling economic case for replacing conventional rockets with millimeter-wave thermal rockets.

  14. Thermal fatigue. Materials modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegele, D.; Fingerhuth, J.; Mrovec, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the ongoing joint research project 'Thermal Fatigue - Basics of the system-, outflow- and material-characteristics of piping under thermal fatigue' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) fundamental numerical and experimental investigations on the material behavior under transient thermal-mechanical stress conditions (high cycle fatigue V HCF and low cycle fatigue - LCF) are carried out. The primary objective of the research is the further development of simulation methods applied in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modeling of crack initiation and growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal loads are of particular interest. Therefore, three scientific working groups organized in three sub-projects of the joint research project are dealing with numerical modeling and simulation at different levels ranging from atomistic to micromechanics and continuum mechanics, and in addition corresponding experimental data for the validation of the numerical results and identification of the parameters of the associated material models are provided. The present contribution is focused on the development and experimental validation of material models and methods to characterize the damage evolution and the life cycle assessment as a result of thermal cyclic loading. The individual purposes of the subprojects are as following: - Material characterization, Influence of temperature and surface roughness on fatigue endurances, biaxial thermo-mechanical behavior, experiments on structural behavior of cruciform specimens and scatter band analysis (IfW Darmstadt) - Life cycle assessment with micromechanical material models (MPA Stuttgart) - Life cycle assessment with atomistic and damage-mechanical material models associated with material tests under thermal fatigue (Fraunhofer IWM, Freiburg) - Simulation of fatigue crack growth, opening and closure of a short crack under

  15. Thermal management of space stations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal management aims at making full use of energy resources available in the space station to reduce energy consumption, waste heat rejection and the weight of the station. It is an extension of the thermal control. This discussion introduces the concept and development of thermal management, presents the aspects of thermal management and further extends its application to subsystems of the space station.

  16. Conduct Disorder and Comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Nicole D.; Clarizio, Harvey F.

    1999-01-01

    Provides critical examination of research published during past ten years addressing Conduct Disorder (CD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and internalizing disorders. Concludes comorbidity varies with age, gender, informant, diagnostic criteria, and nature of the sample. Implications of comorbidity…

  17. Thermal conductivity of a quantum spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic chain with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zviagin, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    We present an exact theory that describes how magnetic impurities change the behavior of the thermal conductivity for the integrable Heisenberg antiferromagnetic quantum spin-1/2 chain. Single magnetic impurities and a large concentration of impurities with similar values of the couplings to the host chain (a weak disorder) do not change the linear-in-temperature low-T behavior of the thermal conductivity: Only the slope of that behavior becomes smaller, compared to the homogeneous case. The strong disorder in the distribution of the impurity-host couplings produces more rapid temperature growth of the thermal conductivity, compared to the linear-in-T dependence of the homogeneous chain and the chain with weak disorder. Recent experiments on the thermal conductivity in inhomogeneous quasi-one-dimensional quantum spin systems manifest qualitative agreement with our results

  18. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  19. Pressurized Thermal Shock, Pts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, C.

    2008-01-01

    Pressurized Thermal Shock (Pts) refers to a condition that challenges the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel. The root cause of this problem is the radiation embrittlement of the reactor vessel. This embrittlement leads to an increase in the reference temperature for nil ductility transition (RTNDT). RTNDT can increase to the point where the reactor vessel material can loose fracture toughness during overcooling events. The analysis of the risk of having a Pts for a specific plant is a multi-disciplinary problem involving probabilistic risk analysis (PRA), thermal-hydraulic analysis, and ultimately a structural and fracture analysis of the vessel wall. The PRA effort involves the postulation of overcooling events and ultimately leads to an integrated risk analysis. The thermal-hydraulic effort involves the difficult task of predicting the system behavior during a postulated overcooling scenario with a special emphasis on predicting the thermal and mechanic loadings on the reactor pressure vessel wall. The structural and fracture analysis of the reactor vessel wall relies on the thermal-hydraulic conditions as boundary conditions. The US experience has indicated that medium and large diameter primary system breaks dominate the risk of Pts along with scenarios that involve a stuck open valve (and associated system cooldown) that recloses resulting in system re-pressurization while the vessel wall is cool.

  20. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  1. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  2. Direct thermal dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Edward

    1990-07-01

    Direct thermal dyes are members of a class of compounds referred to in the imaging industry as color formers or leuco dyes. The oldest members of that class have simple triarylmethane structures, and have been employed for years in various dyeing applications. More complex triarylmethane compounds, such as phthalides and fluorans, are now used in various imaging systems to produce color. Color is derived from all of these compounds via the same mechanism, on a molecular level. That is, an event of activation produces a highly resonating cationic system whose interaction with incident light produces reflected light of a specific color. The activation event in the case of a direct thermal system is the creation of a melt on the paper involving dye and an acidic developer. The three major performance parameters in a thermal system are background color, image density, and image stability. The three major dye physical parameters affecting thermal performance are chemical constituency, purity, and particle size. Those dyes having the best combination of characteristics which can also be manufactured economically dominate the marketplace. Manufacturing high performance dyes for the thermal market involves multi-step, convergent reaction sequences performed on large scale. Intermediates must be manufactured at the right time, and at the right quality to be useful.

  3. Kertész line of thermally activated breakdown phenomena

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, Naoki

    2010-11-12

    Based on a fiber bundle model we substantially extend the phase-transition analogy of thermally activated breakdown of homogeneous materials. We show that the competition of breaking due to stress enhancement and due to thermal fluctuations leads to an astonishing complexity of the phase space of the system: varying the load and the temperature a phase boundary emerges, separating a Griffith-type regime of abrupt failure analogous to first-order phase transitions from disorder dominated fracture where a spanning cluster of cracks emerges. We demonstrate that the phase boundary is the Kertész line of the system along which thermally activated fracture appears as a continuous phase transition analogous to percolation. The Kertész line has technological relevance setting the boundary of safe operation for construction components under high thermal loads. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  4. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  5. Survey of thermal insulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Izumi

    1983-01-01

    Better thermal insulations have been developed to meet the growing demands of industry, and studies on thermal insulation at both high temperature and low temperature have been widely performed. The purpose of this survey is to summarize data on the performances and characteristics of thermal insulation materials and thermal insulation structures (for instance, gas cooled reactors, space vehicles and LNG storage tanks), and to discuss ravious problems regarding the design of thermal insulation structures of pool-type LMFBRs. (author)

  6. Adult onset tic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Chouinard, S.; Ford, B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tic disorders presenting during adulthood have infrequently been described in the medical literature. Most reports depict adult onset secondary tic disorders caused by trauma, encephalitis, and other acquired conditions. Only rare reports describe idiopathic adult onset tic disorders, and most of these cases represent recurrent childhood tic disorders.
OBJECTIVE—To describe a large series of patients with tic disorders presenting during adulthood, to compare cl...

  7. BIPOLAR DISORDER: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Pathan Dilnawaz N; Ziyaurrahaman A.R; Bhise K.S.

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric disorder that results in poor global functioning, reduced quality of life and high relapse rates. Research finds that many adults with bipolar disorder identify the onset of symptoms in childhood and adolescence, indicating the importance of early accurate diagnosis and treatment. Accurate diagnosis of mood disorders is critical for treatment to be effective. Distinguishing between major depression and bipolar disorders, especially the depressed p...

  8. Concepts in Thermal Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Blundell, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    This modern introduction to thermal physics contains a step-by-step presentation of the key concepts. The text is copiously illustrated and each chapter contains several worked examples. - ;An understanding of thermal physics is crucial to much of modern physics, chemistry and engineering. This book provides a modern introduction to the main principles that are foundational to thermal physics, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. The key concepts are carefully presented in a clear way, and new ideas are illustrated with copious worked examples as well as a description of the historical background to their discovery. Applications are presented to subjects as. diverse as stellar astrophysics, information and communication theory, condensed matter physics, and climate change. Each chapter concludes with detailed exercises. -

  9. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions.

  10. Thermal stress and seismogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huilan; Wei Dongping

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, the Fourier stress method was applied to deal with the problem of plane thermal stress, and a computing formula was given. As an example, we set up a variate temperature field to describe the uplifted upper mantle in Bozhong area of China, and the computing results shows that the maximum value of thermal plane shear stress is up to nearly 7x10 7 P α in two regions of this area. Since the Bohai earthquake (18 July, 1969, M s = 7.4) occurred at the edge of one of them and Tangshan earthquake (28 July, 1976, M s = 7.8) within another, their occurrences can be related reasonably to the thermal stress. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  11. Thermally actuated linkage arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable thermally actuated linkage arrangement includes a first link member having a longitudinal bore therein adapted to receive at least a portion of a second link member therein, the first and second members being sized to effect an interference fit preventing relative movement there-between at a temperature below a predetermined temperature. The link members have different coefficients of thermal expansion so that when the linkage is selectively heated by heating element to a temperature above the predetermined temperature, relative longitudinal and/or rotational movement between the first and second link members is enabled. Two embodiments of a thermally activated linkage are disclosed which find particular application in actuators for a grapple head positioning arm in a nuclear reactor fuel handling mechanism to facilitate back-up safety retraction of the grapple head independently from the primary fuel handling mechanism drive system. (author)

  12. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  13. Thermal Diffusivity Measurements in Edible Oils using Transient Thermal Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, R. Carbajal.; Pérez, J. L. Jiménez.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Martín-Martínez, E. San.

    2006-11-01

    Time resolved thermal lens (TL) spectrometry is applied to the study of the thermal diffusivity of edible oils such as olive, and refined and thermally treated avocado oils. A two laser mismatched-mode experimental configuration was used, with a He Ne laser as a probe beam and an Ar+ laser as the excitation one. The characteristic time constant of the transient thermal lens was obtained by fitting the experimental data to the theoretical expression for a transient thermal lens. The results showed that virgin olive oil has a higher thermal diffusivity than for refined and thermally treated avocado oils. This measured thermal property may contribute to a better understanding of the quality of edible oils, which is very important in the food industry. The thermal diffusivity results for virgin olive oil, obtained from this technique, agree with those reported in the literature.

  14. WORKSHOP: Thermal field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-04-15

    The early history of the Universe is a crucial testing ground for theories of elementary particles. Speculative ideas about the constituents of matter and their interactions are reinforced if they are consistent with what we suppose happened near the beginning of time and discarded if they are not. The cosmological consequences of these theories are usually deduced using a general statistical approach called thermal field theory. Thus, 75 physicists from thirteen countries met in Cleveland, Ohio, last October for the first 'Workshop on Thermal Field Theories and their Applications'.

  15. Thermal transfer recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Fukushima, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Shinozuka, M.; Seikohsha, K. K. Suwa

    1988-08-01

    The recording media consist of more than or one coloring layer and a layer containing a flame retardant to ensure noncombustibility and good thermal transfer. Thus, a PET film was coated on a side with a compound containing Vylon 290 (polyester resin), AFR-1021 (decabromodiphenyl oxide) 8 and Polysafe 60 (Sb oxide), and coated on the other side with a compound containing carnauba wax, HNP-9 (paraffin wax), EV-410 (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer), and Cu phthalocyanine to give a thermal transfer recording medium which showed good noncombustibility and antiblocking properties, and provided high quality images.

  16. Thermal Nanosystems and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Volz, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer laws for conduction, radiation and convection change when the dimensions of the systems in question shrink. The altered behaviours can be used efficiently in energy conversion, respectively bio- and high-performance materials to control microelectronic devices. To understand and model those thermal mechanisms, specific metrologies have to be established. This book provides an overview of actual devices and materials involving micro-nanoscale heat transfer mechanisms. These are clearly explained and exemplified by a large spectrum of relevant physical models, while the most advanced nanoscale thermal metrologies are presented.

  17. Thermal test options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1993-02-01

    Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods

  18. Thermal management of batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, H. F.; Chen, C.-C.

    Control of the internal temperature during high rate discharge or charge can be a major design problem for large, high energy density battery systems. A systematic approach to the thermal management of such systems is described for different load profiles based on: thermodynamic calculations of internal heat generation; calorimetric measurements of heat flux; analytical and finite difference calculations of the internal temperature distribution; appropriate system designs for heat removal and temperature control. Examples are presented of thermal studies on large lead-acid batteries for electrical utility load levelling and nickel-zinc and lithium-iron sulphide batteries for electric vehicle propulsion.

  19. Anxiety Disorders and the Family: How families affect psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hunsley, John

    1991-01-01

    Family functioning and anxiety disorders, the most prevalent forms of psychiatric disorder, influence one another. The empirical literature on family studies of anxiety disorder (ie, aggregration of disorders within families), on parent-child relationships and anxiety disorders, and on marriage and anxiety disorders is reviewed. Finally, the challenges for patients and their families of post-traumatic stress disorder are discussed.

  20. Comorbidity bipolar disorder and personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Sedlackova, Jana; Ociskova, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Outcome in bipolar patients can be affected by comorbidity of other psychiatric disorders. Comorbid personality disorders are frequent and may complicate the course of bipolar illness. We have much information about treating patients with uncomplicated bipolar disorder (BD) but much less knowledge about possibilities for patients with the comorbidity of BD and personality disorder. We conducted a series of literature searches using, as key words or as items in indexed fields, bipolar disorder and personality disorder or personality traits. Articles were obtained by searching MEDLINE from 1970 to 2012. In addition, we used other papers cited in articles from these searches, or cited in articles used in our own work. Tests of personality traits indicated that euthymic bipolar patients have higher scores on harm avoidance, reward dependence, and novelty seeking than controls. Elevation of novelty seeking in bipolar patients is associated with substance abuse comorbidity. Comorbidity with personality disorders in BD patients is associated with a more difficult course of illness (such as longer episodes, shorter time euthymic, and earlier age at onset) and an increase in comorbid substance abuse, suicidality and aggression. These problems are particularly pronounced in comorbidity with borderline personality disorder. Comorbidity with antisocial personality disorder elicits a similar spectrum of difficulties; some of the antisocial behavior exhibited by patients with this comorbidity is mediated by increased impulsivity.

  1. Thermal Stability of Rhodopsin and Progression of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Monica Yun; Liu, Jian; Mehrotra, Devi; Liu, Yuting; Guo, Ying; Baldera-Aguayo, Pedro A.; Mooney, Victoria L.; Nour, Adel M.; Yan, Elsa C. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Over 100 point mutations in the rhodopsin gene have been associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a family of inherited visual disorders. Among these, we focused on characterizing the S186W mutation. We compared the thermal properties of the S186W mutant with another RP-causing mutant, D190N, and with WT rhodopsin. To assess thermal stability, we measured the rate of two thermal reactions contributing to the thermal decay of rhodopsin as follows: thermal isomerization of 11-cis-retinal and hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base linkage between the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and opsin protein. We used UV-visible spectroscopy and HPLC to examine the kinetics of these reactions at 37 and 55 °C for WT and mutant rhodopsin purified from HEK293 cells. Compared with WT rhodopsin and the D190N mutant, the S186W mutation dramatically increases the rates of both thermal isomerization and dark state hydrolysis of the Schiff base by 1–2 orders of magnitude. The results suggest that the S186W mutant thermally destabilizes rhodopsin by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the receptor's active site. The decrease in the thermal stability of dark state rhodopsin is likely to be associated with higher levels of dark noise that undermine the sensitivity of rhodopsin, potentially accounting for night blindness in the early stages of RP. Further studies of the thermal stability of additional pathogenic rhodopsin mutations in conjunction with clinical studies are expected to provide insight into the molecular mechanism of RP and test the correlation between rhodopsin's thermal stability and RP progression in patients. PMID:23625926

  2. Shape memory thermal conduction switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu (Inventor); Notardonato, William U. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A thermal conduction switch includes a thermally-conductive first member having a first thermal contacting structure for securing the first member as a stationary member to a thermally regulated body or a body requiring thermal regulation. A movable thermally-conductive second member has a second thermal contacting surface. A thermally conductive coupler is interposed between the first member and the second member for thermally coupling the first member to the second member. At least one control spring is coupled between the first member and the second member. The control spring includes a NiTiFe comprising shape memory (SM) material that provides a phase change temperature <273 K, a transformation range <40 K, and a hysteresis of <10 K. A bias spring is between the first member and the second member. At the phase change the switch provides a distance change (displacement) between first and second member by at least 1 mm, such as 2 to 4 mm.

  3. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  4. Binge Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Turan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Binge Eating Disorder, characterized by frequent and persistent overeating episodes that are accompanied by feeling of loss of control over eating without regular compensatory behaviors and was identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition as a new eating disorder category. Binge Eating Disorder is the most common eating disorder among adults. Binge Eating Disorder is associated with significant morbidity, including medical complications related to obesity, eating disorder psychopathology, psychiatric comorbidity; reduced quality of life, and impaired social functioning. Current treatments of Binge Eating Disorder include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy and bariatric surgery. In this review, the definition, epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, and also mainly treatment of Binge Eating Disorder are discussed.

  5. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  6. Next generation thermal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marche, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    The best design of high performance thermal imagers for the 1990s will use horizontal quasi-linear arrays with focal plane processing associated with a simple vertical mechanical scanner. These imagers will have performance that is greatly improved compared to that of present-day devices (50 to 100 percent range and resolution improvement). 5 references

  7. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, the European solar thermal market put on a strong spurt only to mark time in 2009 with about 4.2 million m 2 installed, which is 450000 m 2 less year-on-year. The main reasons of the decrease is the financial crisis and the low oil price, other reasons more specific to the country exist, for instance the property crisis has dragged the Spanish market down. In 2009, the solar thermal collector surface area in service in the European Union is of the magnitude of 32.6 million m 2 , equivalent to a capacity of 22.8 GWTh. The solar thermal sector is one of the renewable sectors that creates the highest number of jobs and wealth, partly because the vast majority of the system components sold in Europe are produced in Europe and partly because the sale, installation fitting and maintenance are labour-intensive. In 2009, there were 50000 direct or indirect jobs in the European solar thermal sector. The main European actors in this sector are GREENoneTEC, Bosch-Thermotechnik, Viessmann, Vaillant and Solvis. No clear recovery is expected before 2011. (A.C.)

  8. Thermal Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods

  9. Solar thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnatbaum, L.

    2009-01-01

    The solar thermal power plant technology, the opportunities it presents and the developments in the market are outlined. The focus is on the technology of parabolic trough power plants, a proven technology for solar power generation on a large scale. In a parabolic trough power plant, trough-shaped mirrors concentrate the solar irradiation onto a pipe in the focal line of the collector. The thermal energy thus generated is used for electricity generation in a steam turbine. Parabolic trough plants can be combined with thermal storage and fossil or biomass fired heat exchangers to generate electricity even when the sun is not shining. Solar Millennium AG in Erlangen has developed the first power plant of this kind in Europe. After two years of construction the plant started operation in Southern Spain in 2008. This one and its sister projects are important steps leading the way for the whole market. The paper also covers the technological challenges, the key components used and the research and development activities concerning this technology. Solar thermal power plants are ideal for covering peak and medium loads in power grids. In hybrid operation they can also cover base-load. The Solar Chimney power plant, another striking technology for the conversion of solar into electric energy, is described briefly. The paper concludes with a look at the future - the import of solar energy from the deserts of North Africa to central Europe. (author)

  10. Thermal neutron polarisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satya Murthy, N.S.; Madhava Rao, L.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle for the production of polarised thermal neutrons is discussed and the choice of various crystal monochromators surveyed. Brief mention of broad-spectrum polarisers is made. The application of polarised neutrons to the study of magnetisation density distributions in magnetic crystals, the dynamic concept of polarisation, principle and use of polarisation analysis, the neutron spin-echo technique are discussed. (author)

  11. Thermal plasmas: fundamental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchais, P.

    2005-01-01

    This article treats of thermal plasmas, i.e. mainly produced by electric arcs and RF discharges. Their main characteristic is that they are generated at a pressure close to the atmospheric pressure (between 10 4 and 10 6 Pa) and refer to the classical kinetics of the Boltzmann equation. Because of the pressure, the collisions between particles are numerous and ionization is mainly due to a thermal effect. They correspond to electron densities between 10 20 and 10 24 m -3 and temperatures between 6000 and 25000 K. In these plasmas, the electric fields and the average free trajectories are too weak to generate a ionization state by direct inelastic collision. Ionization is thus essentially a thermal phenomenon due to elastic collisions. This article presents: 1 - the particles present in a plasma: definition, energy states; 2 - characteristic data: collisions, average free path and collision cross-section, distribution function, ionization types, charged particles mobility inside an electric field, scattering, Debye length; 3 - plasmas at the thermodynamical equilibrium: conditions of equilibrium, calculation of composition, thermodynamic properties, transport properties, radiation; 4 - thermal plasmas away from equilibrium: conditions of non-equilibrium, calculation of plasma composition, calculation of transport properties, quenching phenomenon. (J.S.)

  12. Thermal reactor strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This statement sets down briefly the CEGB's views on the requirement for nuclear power and outlines current progress in the implementation of the CEGB's thermal reactor strategy. The programme is traced historically, together with statements of Government policy. The place of Magnox, AGR, SGHWR, PWR and fast breeder reactors is discussed. Advantages and problems associated with the various types are outlined. (U.K.)

  13. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  14. Solar Thermal Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniels, David K.

    The different approaches to the generation of power from solar energy may be roughly divided into five categories: distributed collectors; central receivers; biomass; ocean thermal energy conversion; and photovoltaic devices. The first approach (distributed collectors) is the subject of this module. The material presented is designed to…

  15. Composting or Thermal valorisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutgen, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    It is shown how thermal valorisation of organic wastes it is much more promising, from the economical and environmental points of view, than composting. Obviously, it implies that the incineration should be done under very controlled conditions. With examples taken from Europe. The author argues for this affirmation

  16. Thermal dielectric function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneta, M.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal dielectric functions ε(k,ω) for homogeneous electron gas were determined and discussed. The ground state of the gas is described by the Fermi-Dirac momentum distribution. The low and high temperature limits of ε(k,ω) were related to the Lindhard dielectric function and to ε(k, omega) derived for Boltzmann and for classical momentum distributions, respectively. (author)

  17. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  18. Calorimeter for thermal sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shai, I.; Shaham, Ch.; Barnea, I.

    1978-12-01

    A calorimeter was built, enabling the thermal power of radioactive sources to be measured in the range of 50 to 120 mW. The system was calibrated with an electrical heater. The calibration curves serve to determine the power of radioactive sources with a reasonable accuracy

  19. Thermal Testing Measurements Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Wagner

    2002-09-26

    The purpose of the Thermal Testing Measurements Report (Scientific Analysis Report) is to document, in one report, the comprehensive set of measurements taken within the Yucca Mountain Project Thermal Testing Program since its inception in 1996. Currently, the testing performed and measurements collected are either scattered in many level 3 and level 4 milestone reports or, in the case of the ongoing Drift Scale Test, mostly documented in eight informal progress reports. Documentation in existing reports is uneven in level of detail and quality. Furthermore, while all the data collected within the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Thermal Testing Program have been submitted periodically to the Technical Data Management System (TDMS), the data structure--several incremental submittals, and documentation formats--are such that the data are often not user-friendly except to those who acquired and processed the data. The documentation in this report is intended to make data collected within the YMP Thermal Testing Program readily usable to end users, such as those representing the Performance Assessment Project, Repository Design Project, and Engineered Systems Sub-Project. Since either detailed level 3 and level 4 reports exist or the measurements are straightforward, only brief discussions are provided for each data set. These brief discussions for different data sets are intended to impart a clear sense of applicability of data, so that they will be used properly within the context of measurement uncertainty. This approach also keeps this report to a manageable size, an important consideration because the report encompasses nearly all measurements for three long-term thermal tests. As appropriate, thermal testing data currently residing in the TDMS have been reorganized and reformatted from cumbersome, user-unfriendly Input-Data Tracking Numbers (DTNs) into a new set of Output-DTNs. These Output-DTNs provide a readily usable data structure

  20. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  1. Low-temperature thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter discusses the thermal expansion of insulators and metals. Harmonicity and anharmonicity in thermal expansion are examined. The electronic, magnetic, an other contributions to low temperature thermal expansion are analyzed. The thermodynamics of the Debye isotropic continuum, the lattice-dynamical approach, and the thermal expansion of metals are discussed. Relative linear expansion at low temperatures is reviewed and further calculations of the electronic thermal expansion coefficient are given. Thermal expansions are given for Cu, Al and Ti. Phenomenologic thermodynamic relationships are also discussed

  2. Bipolar disorder in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Melissa; Wagner, Karen Dineen

    2013-08-01

    Bipolar disorder is a serious psychiatric condition that may have onset in childhood. It is important for physicians to recognize the symptoms of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents in order to accurately diagnose this illness early in its course. Evidence regarding the efficacy of various treatments is necessary to guide the management of bipolar disorder in youth. For example, several medications commonly used for adults with bipolar disorder have not shown efficacy for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. This article reviews the prevalence, diagnosis, course, and treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents and provides physicians with information that will aid in diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Effect of Interface Structure on Thermal Boundary Conductance by using First-principles Density Functional Perturbation Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xue; ZHANG Yue; SHANG Jia-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We choose a Si/Ge interface as a research object to investigate the infiuence of interface disorder on thermal boundary conductance. In the calculations, the diffuse mismatch model is used to study thermal boundary conductance between two non-metallic materials, while the phonon dispersion relationship is calculated by the first-principles density functional perturbation theory. The results show that interface disorder limits thermal transport. The increase of atomic spacing at the interface results in weakly coupled interfaces and a decrease in the thermal boundary conductance. This approach shows a simplistic method to investigate the relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity.%We choose a Si/Ge interface as a research object to investigate the influence of interface disorder on thermal boundary conductance.In the calculations,the diffuse mismatch model is used to study thermal boundary conductance between two non-metallic materials,while the phonon dispersion relationship is calculated by the first-principles density functional perturbation theory.The results show that interface disorder limits thermal transport.The increase of atomic spacing at the interface results in weakly coupled interfaces and a decrease in the thermal boundary conductance.This approach shows a simplistic method to investigate the relationship between microstructure and thermal conductivity.It is well known that interfaces can play a dominant role in the overall thermal transport characteristics of structures whose length scale is less than the phonon mean free path.When heat flows across an interface between two different materials,there exists a temperature jump at the interface.Thermal boundary conductance (TBC),which describes the efficiency of heat flow at material interfaces,plays an importance role in the transport of thermal energy in nanometerscale devices,semiconductor superlattices,thin film multilayers and nanocrystalline materials.[1

  4. [Obsessive-compulsive disorder. A hidden disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsson, Magnús

    2015-02-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a common and often chronic psychiatric illness that significantly interferes with the patient´s functioning and quality of life. The disorder is characterized by excessive intrusive and inappropriate anxiety evoking thoughts as well as time consuming compulsions that cause significant impairment and distress. The symptoms are often accompanied by shame and guilt and the knowledge of the general public and professional community about the disorder is limited. Hence it is frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed late. There are indications that the disorder is hereditary and that neurobiological processes are involved in its pathophysiology. Several psychological theories about the causes of obsessive-compulsive disorder are supported by empirical evidence. Evidence based treatment is either with serotoninergic medications or cognitive behavioral therapy, particularly a form of behavioral therapy called exposure response prevention. Better treatment options are needed because almost a third of people with obsessive-compulsive disorder respond inadequatly to treatment. In this review article two cases of obsessive-compulsive disorder are presented. The former case is a young man with typical symptoms that respond well to treatment and the latter is a middle aged lady with severe treatment resistant symptoms. She underwent stereotactic implantation of electrodes and received deep brain stimulation, which is an experimental treatment for severe obsessive-compulsive disorder that does not respond to any conventional treatment. Landspitali University Hospital, Division of Psychiatry. Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland.

  5. Thermal fluctuation based study of aqueous deficient dry eyes by non-invasive thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azharuddin, Mohammad; Bera, Sumanta Kr; Datta, Himadri; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we have studied the thermal fluctuation patterns occurring at the ocular surface of the left and right eyes for aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) patients and control subjects by thermal imaging. We conducted our experiment on 42 patients (84 eyes) with aqueous deficient dry eyes and compared with 36 healthy volunteers (72 eyes) without any history of ocular surface disorder. Schirmer's test, Tear Break-up Time, tear Meniscus height and fluorescein staining tests were conducted. Ocular surface temperature measurement was done, using an FL-IR thermal camera and thermal fluctuation in left and right eyes was calculated and analyzed using MATLAB. The time series containing the sum of squares of the temperature fluctuation on the ocular surface were compared for aqueous deficient dry eye and control subjects. Significant statistical difference between the fluctuation patterns for control and ADDE was observed (p eyes are significantly correlated in controls but not in ADDE subjects. The possible origin of such correlation in control and lack of correlation in the ADDE subjects is discussed in the text. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Autism spectrum disorder - Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  7. Quantum thermal rectification to design thermal diodes and transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younes; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose [Univ. de Poitiers, Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France). Inst. Pprime, CNRS

    2017-05-01

    We study in this article how heat can be exchanged between two-level systems, each of them being coupled to a thermal reservoir. Calculations are performed solving a master equation for the density matrix using the Born-Markov approximation. We analyse the conditions for which a thermal diode and a thermal transistor can be obtained as well as their optimisation.

  8. Strong disorder RG approach of random systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igloi, Ferenc; Monthus, Cecile

    2005-01-01

    There is a large variety of quantum and classical systems in which the quenched disorder plays a dominant ro-circumflex le over quantum, thermal, or stochastic fluctuations: these systems display strong spatial heterogeneities, and many averaged observables are actually governed by rare regions. A unifying approach to treat the dynamical and/or static singularities of these systems has emerged recently, following the pioneering RG idea by Ma and Dasgupta and the detailed analysis by Fisher who showed that the Ma-Dasgupta RG rules yield asymptotic exact results if the broadness of the disorder grows indefinitely at large scales. Here we report these new developments by starting with an introduction of the main ingredients of the strong disorder RG method. We describe the basic properties of infinite disorder fixed points, which are realized at critical points, and of strong disorder fixed points, which control the singular behaviors in the Griffiths-phases. We then review in detail applications of the RG method to various disordered models, either (i) quantum models, such as random spin chains, ladders and higher dimensional spin systems, or (ii) classical models, such as diffusion in a random potential, equilibrium at low temperature and coarsening dynamics of classical random spin chains, trap models, delocalization transition of a random polymer from an interface, driven lattice gases and reaction diffusion models in the presence of quenched disorder. For several one-dimensional systems, the Ma-Dasgupta RG rules yields very detailed analytical results, whereas for other, mainly higher dimensional problems, the RG rules have to be implemented numerically. If available, the strong disorder RG results are compared with another, exact or numerical calculations

  9. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  10. Low-temperature properties of a superconducting disordered metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graebner, J.E.; Golding, B.; Schutz, R.J.; Hsu, F.S.L.; Chen, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    Specific heat C/sub p/ and thermal conductivity kappa measurements between 0.1 and 10 K on the superconducting (T/sub c/ = 2.53 K) and structurally disordered metal Zr/sub 0.7/Pd/sub 0.3/ exhibit an approximately linear term in C/sub p/ and a T/sup 1.9/ dependence of kappa below T/sub c/. The magnitudes of these terms are close to those found for insulating glasses, thereby suggesting that disorder-induced localized excitations exist at similar densities in very different classes of disordered solids

  11. Tic Disorder and ADHD

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    The behavioral and neuropsychological characteristics of tic disorder, with or without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), were examined in 78 children followed at Seoul National University College of Medicine, Korea.

  12. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  13. Co-Occurring Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring Disorders and ... 500 Montgomery Street, Suite 820 Alexandria, VA 22314 Phone (703) 684.7722 Toll Free (800) 969.6642 ...

  14. Sleep and Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kelly C; Spaeth, Andrea; Hopkins, Christina M

    2016-10-01

    Insomnia is related to an increased risk of eating disorders, while eating disorders are related to more disrupted sleep. Insomnia is also linked to poorer treatment outcomes for eating disorders. However, over the last decade, studies examining sleep and eating disorders have relied on surveys, with no objective measures of sleep for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa, and only actigraphy data for binge eating disorder. Sleep disturbance is better defined for night eating syndrome, where sleep efficiency is reduced and melatonin release is delayed. Studies that include objectively measured sleep and metabolic parameters combined with psychiatric comorbidity data would help identify under what circumstances eating disorders and sleep disturbance produce an additive effect for symptom severity and for whom poor sleep would increase risk for an eating disorder. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia may be a helpful addition to treatment of those with both eating disorder and insomnia.

  15. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  16. Speech and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to being completely unable to speak or understand speech. Causes include Hearing disorders and deafness Voice problems, ... or those caused by cleft lip or palate Speech problems like stuttering Developmental disabilities Learning disorders Autism ...

  17. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... in "crossed eyes" or "walleye." Nystagmus - fast, uncontrollable movements of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some ...

  18. Overview of Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Delirium Additional Content Medical News Overview of Movement Disorders By Hector A. Gonzalez-Usigli, MD, Professor ... Neurology, HE UMAE Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente; Movement Disorders Clinic, Neurology at IMSS Alberto Espay, MD, ...

  19. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Autism Spectrum Disorder Fact Sheet What is autism spectrum disorder? What are some ... of mutations in individual genes but rather spontaneous coding mutations across many genes. De novo mutations may ...

  20. What Are Reading Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and language-based learning disabilities are commonly called dyslexia . These disorders are present from a young age ... information about these problems. Types of Reading Disorders Dyslexia is a brain-based type of learning disability ...