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Sample records for thermal wave non-destructive

  1. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10 −3 cm 2 /s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s 0.5 /cm 2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm 3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  2. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  3. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  4. Non-destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    Womble, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    Explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from innocuous substances. Furthermore, the major chemical elements in coal can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the non-destructive identification of chemical elements can be performed using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for the dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainers, and for the on-line coal bulk analysis. (orig.)

  5. Single frequency thermal wave radar: A next-generation dynamic thermography for quantitative non-destructive imaging over wide modulation frequency ranges.

    Melnikov, Alexander; Chen, Liangjie; Ramirez Venegas, Diego; Sivagurunathan, Koneswaran; Sun, Qiming; Mandelis, Andreas; Rodriguez, Ignacio Rojas

    2018-04-01

    Single-Frequency Thermal Wave Radar Imaging (SF-TWRI) was introduced and used to obtain quantitative thickness images of coatings on an aluminum block and on polyetherketone, and to image blind subsurface holes in a steel block. In SF-TWR, the starting and ending frequencies of a linear frequency modulation sweep are chosen to coincide. Using the highest available camera frame rate, SF-TWRI leads to a higher number of sampled points along the modulation waveform than conventional lock-in thermography imaging because it is not limited by conventional undersampling at high frequencies due to camera frame-rate limitations. This property leads to large reduction in measurement time, better quality of images, and higher signal-noise-ratio across wide frequency ranges. For quantitative thin-coating imaging applications, a two-layer photothermal model with lumped parameters was used to reconstruct the layer thickness from multi-frequency SF-TWR images. SF-TWRI represents a next-generation thermography method with superior features for imaging important classes of thin layers, materials, and components that require high-frequency thermal-wave probing well above today's available infrared camera technology frame rates.

  6. Single frequency thermal wave radar: A next-generation dynamic thermography for quantitative non-destructive imaging over wide modulation frequency ranges

    Melnikov, Alexander; Chen, Liangjie; Ramirez Venegas, Diego; Sivagurunathan, Koneswaran; Sun, Qiming; Mandelis, Andreas; Rodriguez, Ignacio Rojas

    2018-04-01

    Single-Frequency Thermal Wave Radar Imaging (SF-TWRI) was introduced and used to obtain quantitative thickness images of coatings on an aluminum block and on polyetherketone, and to image blind subsurface holes in a steel block. In SF-TWR, the starting and ending frequencies of a linear frequency modulation sweep are chosen to coincide. Using the highest available camera frame rate, SF-TWRI leads to a higher number of sampled points along the modulation waveform than conventional lock-in thermography imaging because it is not limited by conventional undersampling at high frequencies due to camera frame-rate limitations. This property leads to large reduction in measurement time, better quality of images, and higher signal-noise-ratio across wide frequency ranges. For quantitative thin-coating imaging applications, a two-layer photothermal model with lumped parameters was used to reconstruct the layer thickness from multi-frequency SF-TWR images. SF-TWRI represents a next-generation thermography method with superior features for imaging important classes of thin layers, materials, and components that require high-frequency thermal-wave probing well above today's available infrared camera technology frame rates.

  7. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    Lavers, C; Franklin, P; Franklin, P; Plowman, A; Sayers, G; Bol, J; Shepard, D; Fields, D

    2009-01-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  8. Non-destructive high-resolution thermal imaging techniques to evaluate wildlife and delicate biological samples

    Lavers, C; Franklin, P; Franklin, P; Plowman, A; Sayers, G; Bol, J; Shepard, D; Fields, D, E-mail: brnc-radarcomms1@nrta.mod.u [Sensors Team, Plymouth University at Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, Devon (United Kingdom) and Paignton Zoological Park, Paignton, Devon (United Kingdom); Thermal Wave Imaging, Inc., 845 Livernoise St, Ferndale, MI (United States); Buckfast Butterfly and Otter Sanctuary, Buckfast, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal imaging cameras now allows routine monitoring of dangerous yet endangered wildlife in captivity. This study looks at the potential applications of radiometrically calibrated thermal data to wildlife, as well as providing parameters for future materials applications. We present a non-destructive active testing technique suitable for enhancing imagery contrast of thin or delicate biological specimens yielding improved thermal contrast at room temperature, for analysis of sample thermal properties. A broad spectrum of animals is studied with different textured surfaces, reflective and emissive properties in the infra red part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Some surface features offer biomimetic materials design opportunities.

  9. Study of Lamb Waves for Non-Destructive Testing Behind Screens

    Kauffmann, P.; Ploix, M.-A.; Chaix, J.-F.; Gueudré, C.; Corneloup, G.; Baqué, F. AF(; )

    2018-01-01

    The inspection and control of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) is a major issue for the nuclear industry. Ultrasonic solutions are under study because of the opacity of liquid sodium. In this paper, the use of leaky Lamb waves is considered for non-destructive testing (NDT) on parallel and immersed structures assimilated as plates. The first phase of our approach involved studying the propagation properties of leaky Lamb waves. Equations that model the propagation of Lamb waves in an immersed plate were solved numerically. The phase velocity can be experimentally measured using a two dimensional Fourier transform. The group velocity can be experimentally measured using a short-time Fourier transform technique. Attenuation of leaky Lamb waves is mostly due to the re-emission of energy into the surrounding fluid, and it can be measured by these two techniques.

  10. Tone burst generator for a Non-Destructive Testing system based on ultrasonic guided waves

    Jiménez Sánchez, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    English: This PFC provides a design of a tested and specific tone-burst generator circuit for a Non-Destructive System based on ultrasonid guided waves. This circuit includes a complementary protection circuit for the NDT system working in a pulse-echo configuration. In this paper, a brief state f art about different driving circuits employed in distinct NDE systems is presented. Castellano: El PFC proporciona un diseño electrónico específico y probado de un circuito excitador de salvas (C...

  11. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic fibre composites characterized by non-destructive methods

    M. Dimitrijević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Alumina based ceramic fibres and alumina based ceramic were used to produce composite material. Behaviour of composite ceramics after thermal shock treatments was investigated. Thermal shock of the samples was evaluated using water quench test. Surface deterioration level of samples was monitored by image analysis before and after a number of quenching cycles. Ultrasonic measurements were done on samples after quench tests. Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity and strength degradation were calculated using measured values of ultrasonic velocities. Strengths deterioration was calculated using the non-destructive measurements and correlated to degradation of surface area and number of quenches. The addition of small amount of ceramic fibres improves the strengths and diminishes the loss of mechanical properties of samples during thermal shock experiments.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of thermal aging embrittlement of duplex stainless steels

    Yi, Y.S.; Tomobe, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Shoji, T.

    1993-01-01

    The non-destructive evaluation procedure for detecting thermal aging embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels has been investigated. As a novel measurement technique for the thermal aging embrittlement, an electrochemical method was used and anodic polarization behaviors were measured on new, service exposed, and laboratory aged materials and then were compared with the results of the mechanical tests and microstructural changes. During the polarization experiments performed in potassium hydroxide solution (KOH), M 23 C 6 carbides on phase boundary were preferentially dissolved, which was comfirmed by the SEM after polarization measurements. The preferential dissolution of M 23 C 6 carbides were obtained. Also, the non-destructive measurement and evaluation method of spinodal decomposition, which has been known as the primary mechanism of embrittlement inferrite phase, was reviewed. When the materials, where spinodal decomposition occurred, were polarized in an acetic acid solution (CH 3 COOH), larger critical anodic current densities were observed than those observed on new materials, and these results were consistent with the result of the microhardness measurement. Concerning these polarization results, a critical electric charge, which was required for stable passive films in passive metals, was defined and the relationship between the microstructural changes and this charge amount was reviewed under various polarization conditions in order to verify the polarization mechanism of the spinodally decomposed ferrite phase

  13. Laser ultrasound and simulated time reversal on bulk waves for non destructive control

    Diot, G; Walaszek, H; Kouadri-David, A; Guégan, S; Flifla, J

    2014-01-01

    Laser welding of aluminium generally creates embedded welding defects, such as porosities or cracks. Non Destructive Inspection (NDI) after processing may ensure an acceptable weld quality by defect detection. Nowadays, NDI techniques used to control the inside of a weld are mainly limited to X-Rays or ultrasonics. The current paper describes the use of a Laser Ultrasound (LU) technique to inspect porosities in 2 and 4-mm thick sheet lap welds. First experimentations resulted in the detection of 0.5-mm drilled holes in bulk aluminium sheets. The measurement of the depth of these defects is demonstrated too. Further experimentations shows the applicability of the LU technique to detect porosities in aluminium laser welds. However, as the interpretation of raw measures is limiting the detection capacity of this technique, we developed a signal processing using Time-Reversal capabilities to enhance detection capacities. Furthermore, the signal processing output is a geometrical image of the material's inner state, increasing the ease of interpretation. It is based on a mass-spring simulation which enables the back-propagation of the acquired ultrasound signal. The spring-mass simulation allows the natural generation of all the different sound waves and thus enables the back-propagation of a raw signal without any need of filtering or wave identification and extraction. Therefore the signal processing uses the information contained in the compression wave as well as in the shear wave

  14. Applying thermal neutron radiography to non-destructive assays of dynamic systems

    Silvani, Maria I.; Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Goncalves, Marcelo J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic processes or systems frequently can not have their behavior directly analyzed due to safety reasons or because they require destructive assays, which can not be always afforded when high-cost equipment, devices and components are involved. Under these circumstances, some kind of non-destructive technique should be applied to preserve the safety of the personnel performing the assay, as well as the integrity of the piece being inspected. Thermal neutrons are specially suited as a tool for this purpose, thanks to their capability to pass through metallic materials, which could be utterly opaque to X-rays. This paper describes the accomplishments achieved at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear / CNEN, Brazil, aiming at the development of an Image Acquisition System capable to perform non-destructive assays using thermal neutrons. It is comprised of a thermal neutron source provided by the Argonauta research reactor, a converter-scintillating screen, and a CCD-based video camera optically coupled to the screen through a dark chamber equipped with a mirror. The developed system has been used to acquire 2D neutron radiographic images of static devices to reveal their inner structure, as well as movies of running systems and working devices to verify its functioning and soundness. Radiographic images of objects taken at different angles would be later on used as projections to retrieve - through a proper unfolding software - their 3D images expressed as attenuation coefficients for thermal neutrons. A quantitative performance of the system has been assessed through its Modulation Transfer Function - MTF. In order to determine this curve, unique collimators designed to simulate different spatial frequencies have been manufactured. Besides that, images of some objects have been acquired with the system being developed as well as using the conventional radiographic film, allowing thus a qualitative comparison between them. (author)

  15. Non-destructive material investigation with thermal neutrons at the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna

    Bastuerk, M.; Boeck, H.; Zamani, B.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron tomography providing 3D information about interior of an object is a very efficient tool to visualize inner defects of the materials, non-destructively. In this study, some applications of neutron tomography in different fields such as geology, aerospace, civil engineering and archaeology were presented. Distribution of minerals in pumice and rock samples, visualization of inner defects within a new developed titan aluminum turbine blade, and distribution of silica gel as an important impregnating agent in construction and restoration of buildings were investigated. The measurements of tomography projections taken in the 0 to 180 o angle were performed with a thermal neutron flux of 10 5 at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Vienna, and the common filtered back projection method was used for the 3D image reconstruction. (author)

  16. Optical generation,detection and non-destructive testing applications of terahertz waves

    ZHANG; Weili; LIANG; Dachuan; TIAN; Zhen; HAN; Jiaguang; GU; Jianqiang; HE; Mingxia; OUYANG; Chunmei

    2016-01-01

    Optoelectronic terahertz generation and detection play a key role in the applications of non-destructive testing,which involves different areas such as physics,biological,material science,imaging,explosions detection,astronomy applications,semiconductor technology and superconductiong electronics. In this article,we present a reviewof the principle and performance of typical terahertz sources,detectors and non-destructive testing applications. On this basis,the newdevelopment and trends of terahertz radiation detectors are also discussed.

  17. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  18. Non-destructive testing of rocket fuse by thermal neutron radiography

    An Fulin; Li Furong

    1999-01-01

    A neutron radiography system in reactor horizontal hole of Tsinghua University was introduced, and its capability of neutron radiography was evaluated by theory and experiment, the non-destructive testing for rocket fuse is successful

  19. Non-Destructive Inspection of Impact Damage in Composite Aircraft Panels by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Statistical Processing

    Margherita Capriotti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a non-destructive evaluation (NDE technique for the detection of damage in composite aircraft structures following high energy wide area blunt impact (HEWABI from ground service equipment (GSE, such as heavy cargo loaders and other heavy equipment. The test structures typically include skin, co-cured stringers, and C-frames that are bolt-connected onto the skin with shear ties. The inspection exploits the waveguide geometry of these structures by utilizing ultrasonic guided waves and a line scan approach. Both a contact prototype and a non-contact prototype were developed and tested on realistic test panels subjected to impact in the laboratory. The results are presented in terms of receiver operating characteristic curves that show excellent probability of detection with low false alarm rates for defects located in the panel skin and stringers.

  20. Non-Destructive Inspection of Impact Damage in Composite Aircraft Panels by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Statistical Processing.

    Capriotti, Margherita; Kim, Hyungsuk E; Scalea, Francesco Lanza di; Kim, Hyonny

    2017-06-04

    This paper discusses a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for the detection of damage in composite aircraft structures following high energy wide area blunt impact (HEWABI) from ground service equipment (GSE), such as heavy cargo loaders and other heavy equipment. The test structures typically include skin, co-cured stringers, and C-frames that are bolt-connected onto the skin with shear ties. The inspection exploits the waveguide geometry of these structures by utilizing ultrasonic guided waves and a line scan approach. Both a contact prototype and a non-contact prototype were developed and tested on realistic test panels subjected to impact in the laboratory. The results are presented in terms of receiver operating characteristic curves that show excellent probability of detection with low false alarm rates for defects located in the panel skin and stringers.

  1. Compressed Sensing mm-Wave SAR for Non-Destructive Testing Applications Using Multiple Weighted Side Information

    Mathias Becquaert

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This work explores an innovative strategy for increasing the efficiency of compressed sensing applied on mm-wave SAR sensing using multiple weighted side information. The approach is tested on synthetic and on real non-destructive testing measurements performed on a 3D-printed object with defects while taking advantage of multiple previous SAR images of the object with different degrees of similarity. The tested algorithm attributes autonomously weights to the side information at two levels: (1 between the components inside the side information and (2 between the different side information. The reconstruction is thereby almost immune to poor quality side information while exploiting the relevant components hidden inside the added side information. The presented results prove that, in contrast to common compressed sensing, good SAR image reconstruction is achieved at subsampling rates far below the Nyquist rate. Moreover, the algorithm is shown to be much more robust for low quality side information compared to coherent background subtraction.

  2. Stress Wave Scattering: Friend or Enemy of Non Destructive Testing of Concrete?

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Shiotani, Tomoki; Philippidis, Theodore P.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    Cementitious materials are by definition inhomogeneous containing cement paste, sand, aggregates as well as air voids. Wave propagation in such a material is characterized by scattering phenomena. Damage in the form of micro or macro cracks certainly enhances scattering influence. Its most obvious manifestation is the velocity variation with frequency and excessive attenuation. The influence becomes stronger with increased mis-match of elastic properties of constituent materials and higher crack content. Therefore, in many cases of large concrete structures, field application of stress waves is hindered since attenuation makes the acquisition of reliable signals troublesome. However, measured wave parameters, combined with investigation with scattering theory can reveal much about the internal condition and supply information that cannot be obtained in any other way. The size and properties of the scatterers leave their signature on the dispersion and attenuation curves making thus the characterization more accurate in case of damage assessment, repair evaluation as well as composition inspection. In this paper, three indicative cases of scattering influence are presented. Namely, the interaction of actual distributed damage, as well as the repair material injected in an old concrete structure with the wave parameters. Other cases are the influence of light plastic inclusions in hardened mortar and the influence of sand and water content in the examination of fresh concrete. In all the above cases, scattering seems to complicate the propagation behavior but also offers the way for a more accurate characterization of the quality of the material.

  3. A non-destructive method to measure the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition

    Bin Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Frozen soils cover about 40% of the land surface on the earth and are responsible for the global energy balances affecting the climate. Measurement of the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition is important for analyzing the thermal transport process. Due to the involvement of phase transition, the thermal properties of frozen soils are rather complex. This paper introduces the uses of a multifunctional instrument that integrates time domain reflectometry (TDR sensor and thermal pulse technology (TPT to measure the thermal properties of soil during phase transition. With this method, the extent of phase transition (freezing/thawing was measured with the TDR module; and the corresponding thermal properties were measured with the TPT module. Therefore, the variation of thermal properties with the extent of freezing/thawing can be obtained. Wet soils were used to demonstrate the performance of this measurement method. The performance of individual modules was first validated with designed experiments. The new sensor was then used to monitor the properties of soils during freezing–thawing process, from which the freezing/thawing degree and thermal properties were simultaneously measured. The results are consistent with documented trends of thermal properties variations.

  4. Calculated and experimental substantiation of the thermal method for non-destructive testing of fuel elements

    Maksimov, N.M.; Soldatenko, V.A.; Petrovichev, V.I.; Salimov, S.E.; Aleksandrov, K.A.; Kurov, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The main systems and methods of thermal testing, their potentialities and advantages, thermal irradiation photodetectors are described. Possible fields of application of thermal testing in nuclear engineering are discussed. Calculations of the fuel element nonstationary temperature field in the three-dimensional geometry in the presence of such an effect as fuel exfaliation from cladding are presented. The developed method and equipment for fuel element thermal testing are described. Preliminary experimental data being in agreement with the calculated ones and opening the prospects for flaw detecting are presened

  5. Simulation of non-destructive inspections and acoustic emission measurements involving guided waves

    Baronian, V; Lhemery, A; Bonnet-BenDhia, A-S

    2009-01-01

    In a structure that guides elastic waves, a discontinuity (defect, shape variation) causes scattering (reflection, partial extinction or mode conversion). Two modal formulations have been developed to link separate models dealing with the calculation of the modal decomposition, with the generation and reception of guided waves (GW), with their scattering. The first concerns pulse-echo configurations (involving a single transducer), the other concerns pitch-catch configurations (two transducers involved). A new finite element (FE) method has been developed to compute the scattering by an arbitrary discontinuity, based on the modal decomposition of the field. Perfectly transparent boundary conditions (Dirichlet-to-Neuman boundaries) are developed, allowing the FE computation zone to be reduced to a minimum. A specific variational problem including these boundary conditions was obtained and solved using FE tools. By combining the modal formulations, the new FE scheme and tools for GW radiation, propagation and reception based on the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method, a new simulation tool has been developed. It can address almost arbitrary configurations of GW nondestructive testing. Moreover, a source inside the FE computation zone can be defined so that configurations of testing by acoustic emission can also be simulated. Examples of use of this tool are shown, some dealing with junctions of complex geometry between two guides, other with surface or bulk sources of acoustic emission.

  6. Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T.

    2013-01-01

    At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm −1 to 68 cm −1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

  7. Non-destructive Engineering

    Ko, Jin Hyeon; Ryu, Taek In; Ko, Jun Bin; Hwang, Yong Hwa

    2006-08-01

    This book gives descriptions of non-destructive engineering on outline of non-destructive test, weld defects, radiographic inspection radiography, ultrasonic inspection, magnetic particle testing, liquid penetrant testing, eddy current inspection method, strain measurement, acoustic emission inspection method, other non-destructive testing like leakage inspection method, and non-destructive mechanics for fault analysis such as Griffiths creaking theory, and stress analysis of creaking.

  8. Non-destructive assay of mechanical components using gamma-rays and thermal neutrons

    Souza, Erica Silvani; Avelino, Mila R. [PPG-EM/UERJ, R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracana - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. [IEN/CNEN, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    This work presents the results obtained in the inspection of several mechanical components through neutron and gamma-ray transmission radiography. The 4.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} thermal neutron flux available at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear has been used as source for the neutron radiographic imaging. The 412 keV {gamma}-ray emitted by {sup 198}Au, also produced in that reactor, has been used as interrogation agent for the gamma radiography. Imaging Plates - IP specifically designed to operate with thermal neutrons or with X-rays have been employed as detectors and storage devices for each of these radiations.

  9. Non-destructive studies of fuel pellets by neutron resonance absorption radiography and thermal neutron radiography

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vogel, S.C.; Mocko, M.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Yuan, V.; Nelson, R.O.; Brown, D.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Many isotopes in nuclear materials exhibit strong peaks in neutron absorption cross sections in the epithermal energy range (1–1000 eV). These peaks (often referred to as resonances) occur at energies specific to particular isotopes, providing a means of isotope identification and concentration measurements. The high penetration of epithermal neutrons through most materials is very useful for studies where samples consist of heavy-Z elements opaque to X-rays and sometimes to thermal neutrons as well. The characterization of nuclear fuel elements in their cladding can benefit from the development of high resolution neutron resonance absorption imaging (NRAI), enabled by recently developed spatially-resolved neutron time-of-flight detectors. In this technique the neutron transmission of the sample is measured as a function of spatial location and of neutron energy. In the region of the spectra that borders the resonance energy for a particular isotope, the reduction in transmission can be used to acquire an image revealing the 2-dimensional distribution of that isotope within the sample. Provided that the energy of each transmitted neutron is measured by the neutron detector used and the irradiated sample possesses neutron absorption resonances, then isotope-specific location maps can be acquired simultaneously for several isotopes. This can be done even in the case where samples are opaque or have very similar transmission for thermal neutrons and X-rays or where only low concentrations of particular isotopes are present (<0.1 atom% in some cases). Ultimately, such radiographs of isotope location can be utilized to measure isotope concentration, and can even be combined to produce three-dimensional distributions using tomographic methods. In this paper we present the proof-of-principle of NRAI and transmission Bragg edge imaging performed at Flight Path 5 (FP5) at the LANSCE pulsed, moderated neutron source of Los Alamos National Laboratory. A set of urania mockup

  10. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces

    Echarri, Víctor; Espinosa, Almudena; Rizo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100), air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions. PMID:29292781

  11. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces.

    Echarri, Víctor; Espinosa, Almudena; Rizo, Carlos

    2017-12-08

    Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100), air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions.

  12. Thermal Transmission through Existing Building Enclosures: Destructive Monitoring in Intermediate Layers versus Non-Destructive Monitoring with Sensors on Surfaces

    Víctor Echarri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Opaque enclosures of buildings play an essential role in the level of comfort experienced indoors and annual energy demand. The impact of solar radiation and thermal inertia of the materials that make up the multi-layer enclosures substantially modify thermal transmittance behaviour of the enclosures. This dynamic form of heat transfer, additionally affected by indoor HVAC systems, has a substantial effect on the parameters that define comfort. It also has an impact on energy demand within a daily cycle as well as throughout a one-year use cycle. This study describes the destructive monitoring of an existing block of flats located in Alicante. Once the enclosure was opened, sensors of temperature (PT100, air velocity, and relative humidity were located in the different layers of the enclosure, as well as in the interior and exterior surfaces. A pyranometer was also installed to measure solar radiation levels. A temperature data correction algorithm was drawn up to address irregularities produced in the enclosure. The algorithm was applied using a Raspberry Pi processor in the data collection system. The comparative results of temperature gradients versus non-destructive monitoring systems are presented, providing measures of the transmittance value, surface temperatures and indoor and outdoor air temperatures. This remote sensing system can be used in future studies to quantify and compare the energy savings of different enclosure construction solutions.

  13. Rapid, non-destructive and non-contact inspection of solid foods by means of photothermal radiometry; thermal effusivity and initial heating coefficient

    Gijsbertsen, A.; Bicanic, D.; Gielen, J. L. W.; Chirtoc, M.

    2004-03-01

    CO 2-laser photothermal radiometry (PTR) was demonstrated to be suitable for the non-destructive and non-contact characterization (both optical and thermal) of solid phase agricultural commodities (fresh vegetables, fruits) and confectionery products (candy). Proper interpretation of PTR signals enable one to calculate two parameters, i.e. the well known thermal effusivity e ( e= λρc p, where λ and ρcp are the thermal conductivity and the volume specific heat, respectively) and a newly introduced physical quantity termed 'initial heating coefficient' chi ( χ= β/( ρcp), β is the absorption coefficient). Obtained values for e are in a good agreement with data reported in the literature. PTR enables one to rapidly determine e via a single measurement. As opposed to this, the knowledge of two out of three thermophysical parameters (thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and volume specific heat) is a condition sine qua non for determining effusivity in the conventional manner.

  14. Non-destructive controls

    Nouvet, A.

    1978-01-01

    The non-destructive controls permit, while respecting their integrity, the direct and individual examination of parts or complete objects as they are manufactured, as well as to follow the evolution of their eventual defects while in operation. The choice of control methods depends on the manufacturing process and shapes of parts, on the physical properties of their components as well as the nature, position and size of the defects which are likely to be detected. Whether it is a question of controls by means of ionizing radiation, flux of neutrons, ultrasons, acoustic source, sweating, magnetoscopy. Foucault currents, thermography, detection of leaks or non-destructive metallography, each has a limited field of application such that they are less competitive than complementary [fr

  15. Infrared image processing devoted to thermal non-contact characterization-Applications to Non-Destructive Evaluation, Microfluidics and 2D source term distribution for multispectral tomography

    Batsale, Jean-Christophe; Pradere, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The cost of IR cameras is more and more decreasing. Beyond the preliminary calibration step and the global instrumentation, the infrared image processing is then one of the key step for achieving in very broad domains.Generally the IR images are coming from the transient temperature field related to the emission of a black surface in response to an external or internal heating (active IR thermography). The first applications were devoted to the so called thermal Non-Destructive Evaluation methods by considering a thin sample and 1D transient heat diffusion through the sample (transverse diffusion). With simplified assumptions related to the transverse diffusion, the in-plane diffusion and transport phenomena can be also considered.A general equation can be applied in order to balance the heat transfer at the pixel scale or between groups of pixels in order to estimate several fields of thermophysical properties (heterogeneous field of in-plane diffusivity, flow distributions, source terms).There is a lot of possible strategies to process the space and time distributed big amount of data (previous integral transformation of the images, compression, elimination of the non useful areas...), generally based on the necessity to analyse the derivative versus space and time of the temperature field. Several illustrative examples related to the Non-Destructive Evaluation of heterogeneous solids, the thermal characterization of chemical reactions in microfluidic channels and the design of systems for multispectral tomography, will be presented. (paper)

  16. Coupling of modal and finite elements methods for the diffraction of guided elastics waves: application to non destructive testing

    Baronian, V.

    2009-11-01

    A typical nondestructive examination based on guided elastic waves can be simulated by considering an elastic 2D (a plate) or 3D (a rod) guide that contains a defect (a crack, a local heterogeneity due to a weld etc.). Our aim is to solve numerically the problem of the scattering by a defect of a mode propagating in a guide. This has been achieved by developing a method that couples i) finite elements in the smallest possible region of the guide that contains the defect, with ii) the modal decomposition of waves outside this region. The main challenge consists in finding the right linking condition of both representations. A decisive tool is the obtaining of an orthogonality relation which makes it possible to project the finite element solution onto guided modes. For this, the problem is formulated in terms of hybrid vectors (displacement/stress) for which a bi-orthogonality relation exists, namely, the Fraser's relation. It is then possible to derive an exact (transparent) condition on the artificial boundaries of the finite element domain; the modal series taken into account being necessarily truncated, transparency is achieved only approximately. Eventually, this boundary condition is integrated in a variational approach (in terms of displacement) in order to develop a finite element method. The transparent boundary condition being expressed in terms of the hybrid vectors, the stress normal to the artificial boundary is introduced as a supplementary unknown, together with a mixed formulation. Both 2D and 3D isotropic guides with free boundary conditions have been considered numerically. Guided modes are computed thanks to an original modeling approach also based on the hybrid (displacement/stress) vectors; interestingly, bi-orthogonality relation expressed in a discrete form is preserved. The code implementing these methods leads to fast computations of the scattering matrix of a defect; once this matrix has been computed at various frequencies, the defect

  17. Development of non-destructive diagnosis technology for pipe internal in thermal power plants based on robotics

    Kim, Seungho; Kim, Changhoi; Seo, Yongchil; Lee, Sunguk; Jung, Seungho; Jung, Seyoung

    2011-11-15

    The Pipelines of power plants may have tiny crack by corrosion. Pipe safety inspection should be performed periodically and non-periodically to ensure their safety and integrity. It is difficult to inspection pipes inside defect since pipes of power plant is covered thermal insulation material. Normally pipes inspection was performed part of pipes on outside. A mobile robot was developed for the inspection of pipe of 100 mm inside diameter. The robot is adopted screw type drive mechanism in order to move vertical, horizontal pipes inside. The multi-laser and camera module, which is mounted in front of the robot, captures a sequence of 360 degree shapes of the inner surface of a pipe. The 3D inner shape of pipe is reconstructed from a multi laser triangulation techniques for the inspection of pipes.

  18. Innovation in Non Destructive Testing

    Wassink, C.H.P.

    2012-01-01

    In many established companies the pace of innovation is low. The Non-Destructive Testing sector is an example of a sector where the pace of innovation is very slow. Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) refers to the set of non-invasive activities used to determine the condition of objects or installations

  19. Mechanical and Non-Destructive Study of CFRP Adhesive Bonds Subjected to Pre-Bond Thermal Treatment and De-Icing Fluid Contamination

    Paweł H. Malinowski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials are commonly used in many branches of industry. One of the effective methods to join the carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP parts includes the use of adhesives. There is a search on effective methods for quality assurance of bonded parts. In the research here reported the influence of surface pre-bond modification on the adhesive bonds of CFRP plates has been analyzed. Adherends surface modifications, to include defects affecting the bonding quality, were obtained through surface thermal treatment, surface contamination with de-icing fluid and a combination of both the previously described treatments. Characterization of bonded joints was performed by means of mechanical testing, ultrasounds and electromechanical impedance (EMI measurements. The study here proposed has also the aim to evaluate the ability of different destructive and non-destructive techniques to assess the quality of the bonds. While mechanical tests were strongly affected by the surface modifications, results obtained ultrasound and EMI test have demonstrate only a limited ability of these techniques to differentiate between the different samples. In fact, ultrasounds did not show any changes in the bondline, due to pre-bond modifications. However, this technique was able to detect delamination in CFRP for one of the samples thermally treated at 280 °C. Electromechanical impedance (EMI measurements showed similar behavior as mechanical tests for samples thermally treated at 260 °C and 280 °C, and for the sample whose surface modification was made with a combination of thermally and de-icing fluid treatments.

  20. Miniaturized Time Domain Terahertz Non Destructive Evaluation for In-Orbit Inspection of Inflatable Habitats and Thermal Protection Systems, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picometrix's time-domain terahertz (TD-THz) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technology could be used to inspect space flight structures such as inflatable space...

  1. Miniaturized Time Domain Terahertz Non Destructive Evaluation for In-Orbit Inspection of Inflatable Habitats and Thermal Protection Systems, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picometrix's time-domain terahertz (TD-THz) non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technology could be used to inspect space flight structures such as inflatable space...

  2. Evaluation of non destructive testing to characterize the resistance of the prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level: permeability meter, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound, Schmidt sclerometer and metal detector

    Quesada Chacon, Dannell

    2014-01-01

    Non destructive testing are determined to be correlated with resistance to compression and flexion of elements belonging to prefabricated system of columns and floor tiles for single family homes of a level. The characteristics of the non destructive testing are described, such as: measurer of permeability, Schmidt sclerometer, determination of wave velocity by ultrasound and metal detector. The columns and floor tiles are elaborated with 2 mixtures of different resistances at 28 days. The first more than 30 MPa and the second less than 25 MPa are sampled together with the control cylinders necessary to obtain the actual resistance according to ASTM C39. Last resistance testings to compression and Schmidt sclerometer are realized to control cylinders to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Non destructive testings (permeability meter Torrent, Schmidt sclerometer and determination of wave velocity by ultrasound) are performed in columns and floor tiles to 1, 2, and 4 weeks after being cast. Last resistance testings to flexion is obtained by means of destructive tests of the columns and floor tiles sampled. The correlation of the data obtained is determined to derive values of compression resistance from non destructive testing [es

  3. Non-destructive inservice inspections

    Kauppinen, P.; Sarkimo, M.; Lahdenperae, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to assess the possible damages occurring in the components and structures of operating nuclear power plants during service the main components and structures are periodically inspected by non-destructive testing techniques. The reliability of non-destructive testing techniques applied in these inservice inspections is of major importance because the decisions concerning the needs for repair of components are mainly based on the results of inspections. One of the targets of this research program has been to improve the reliability of non-destructive testing. This has been addressed in the sub-projects which are briefly summarised here. (author)

  4. Opto-thermal transient emission radiometry for rapid, non-destructive and non-contact determination of hydration and hydration depth profile in the skin of a grape

    Guo, X.; Bicanic, D.D.; Keijser, K.; Imhof, R.

    2003-01-01

    .The concept of optothermal transient emission radiometry at a wavelength of 2.94 µm was applied to non-destructively determine the level of hydration and the profile of hydration in the skin of intact fresh grapes taken from top and bottom sections of the same bunch.

  5. Local defect resonance for sensitive non-destructive testing

    Adebahr, W.; Solodov, I.; Rahammer, M.; Gulnizkij, N.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasonic wave-defect interaction is a background of ultrasound activated techniques for imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and industrial components. The interaction, primarily, results in acoustic response of a defect which provides attenuation and scattering of ultrasound used as an indicator of defects in conventional ultrasonic NDT. The derivative ultrasonic-induced effects include e.g. nonlinear, thermal, acousto-optic, etc. responses also applied for NDT and defect imaging. These secondary effects are normally relatively inefficient so that the corresponding NDT techniques require an elevated acoustic power and stand out from conventional ultrasonic NDT counterparts for their specific instrumentation particularly adapted to high-power ultrasonic. In this paper, a consistent way to enhance ultrasonic, optical and thermal defect responses and thus to reduce an ultrasonic power required is suggested by using selective ultrasonic activation of defects based on the concept of local defect resonance (LDR). A strong increase in vibration amplitude at LDR enables to reliably detect and visualize the defect as soon as the driving ultrasonic frequency is matched to the LDR frequency. This also provides a high frequency selectivity of the LDR-based imaging, i.e. an opportunity of detecting a certain defect among a multitude of other defects in material. Some examples are shown how to use LDR in non-destructive testing techniques, like vibrometry, ultrasonic thermography and shearography in order to enhance the sensitivity of defect visualization.

  6. Non destructive testing of concrete nuclear containment plants with surface waves: Lab experiment on decimeter slabs and on the VeRCoRs mock-up

    Abraham, Odile; Legland, Jean-Baptiste; Durand, Olivier; Hénault, Jean-Marie; Garnier, Vincent

    2018-04-01

    The maintenance and evaluation of concrete nuclear containment walls is a major concern as they must, in case of an accident, ensure the confinement of the nuclear radiations and resist to the loads. A homemade multi-receiver multi-source dry contact linear probe to record ultrasonic surface waves on concrete in the frequency range [60 kHz - 200 kHz] has been used in this context. The measurement protocol includes the summation of up to 50 spatially distributed seismograms and the determination of the surface waves phase velocity dispersion curve. The probe has been tested against several concrete states under no loading (water saturation level, temperature damage). Then, the same measurements have been performed on sound and fire damaged slabs submitted to uniaxial loading (stress up to 30 % of the concrete compression resistance). It is shown that the robustness and precision of the surface waves measurement protocol make it possible to follow the stress level. In March 2017 a first experiment with this surface wave probe has been conducted on a reduced 1:3 scale nuclear containment plant (EDF VeRCoRs mock-up) under loading conditions that replicates that of decennial inspection. The surface wave phase velocity dispersion curves of each state are compared and cross-validated with other NDT results.

  7. Non-destructive controls in the steel tube industry

    Mondot, J.

    1978-01-01

    The main non-destructive control methods in the tube industry are reviewed: eddy currents, particularly well adapted to small tubes; magnetoscopic testing for weldless tubes; ultrasonic waves widely used for thick weldless tubes and weldings; radiography, to examine tube ends and the known questionable zones; measure of diameters by laser [fr

  8. Non-destructive controls in the mechanical industry

    Jarlan, L

    1978-12-01

    The sequence of operations implicating the mechanical industries from the suppliers to their customers is briefly recalled; a description of the field of application of non-destructive control methods in these industries is given. Follows a description of some recent typical applications of the principal methods: radiography, ultrasonic waves, magnetism, acoustic emission, sonic control, tracer techniques.

  9. Non-destructive testing of CFC/Cu joints

    Casalegno, V.; Ferraris, M.; Salvo, M.; Vesprini, R.; Merola, M.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable non-destructive tests (NDT) are fundamental for the manufacturing of ITER components, especially for high heat flux plasma facing components. NDT include various techniques, which allow inspection of a component without impairing serviceability; it's important to detect and characterize defects (type, size and position) as well as the set-up of acceptance standards in order to predict their influence on the component performance in service conditions. The present study shows a description of NDT used to assess the manufacturing quality of CFC (carbon fibre reinforced carbon matrix composites)/Cu/CuCrZr joints. In the ITER divertor, armor tiles made of CFC are joined to the cooling structure made of precipitation hardened copper alloy CuCrZr; a soft pure Cu interlayer is required between the heat sink and the armour in order to mitigate the stresses at the joint interface. NDT on CFC/Cu joint are difficult because of the different behavior of CFC and copper with regard to physical excitations (e.g. ultrasonic wave) used to test the component; furthermore the response to this input must be accurately studied to identify the detachment of CFC tiles from Cu alloy. The inspected CFC/Cu/CuCrZr joints were obtained through direct casting of pure Cu on modified CFC surface and subsequently through brazing of CFC/Cu joints to CuCrZr by a Cu-based alloy. Different non-destructive methods were used for inspecting these joints: lock-in thermography, ultrasonic inspections, microtomography and microradiography. The NDT tests were followed by metallographic investigation on the samples, since the reliability of a certain non destructive test can be only validated by morphological evidence of the detected defects. This study will undertake a direct comparison of NDT used on CFC/Cu joints in terms of real flaws presence. The purpose of this work is to detect defects at the joining interface as well as in the cast copper ( for instance voids). The experimental work was

  10. On the propagation of elastic waves in acoustically anisotropic austenitic materials and at their boundaries during non-destructive inspection with ultrasound

    Munikoti, V.K.

    2001-03-01

    In this work the propagation behaviour of ultrasound in austenitic weld metal has been analyzed by the time-harmonic plane wave approach. Bounded beam and pulse propagation as occurring in ultrasonic testing can be sufficiently dealt with by this approach. More sophisticated approaches principally do not offer any improvements in the results of plane wave modeling except for diffraction and aperture effects and, therefore, the subject matter of this work has been limited to plane wave propagation in the bulk of the medium and at different types of interfaces. Inspite of the fact, that the individual columnar grains of the weld metal have cubic symmetry, the austenitic weld metal as a whole exhibits cylinder-symmetrical texture, as substantiated by metallurgical examination, and therefore has been treated as an anisotropic poly-crystalline medium with transverse isotropic symmetry. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird die Ultraschallausbreitung in akustisch anisotropen, homogenen Werkstoffen mit stengelkristalliner Textur wie austenitischen Plattierungen und Schweissverbindungen, austenitischem Guss oder geschweissten Komponenten aus austenitischem Guss modelliert. Wie die in dieser Arbeit referierten metallurgischen Untersuchungen gezeigt haben, koennen austenitisches Schweissgut und stengelkristallin erstarrter austenitischer Guss makroskopisch als polykristallines Medium mit zylindersymmetrischer Textur behandelt werden, also als Medium mit transversal isotroper Symmetrie, obwohl mikroskopisch die einzelnen Stengelkristallite kubische Symmetrie aufweisen. Die Schallausbreitung wird mit Hilfe des Ansatzes ebener Wellen modelliert. Obwohl bei der Ultraschallpruefung gepulste und begrenzte Schallbuendel verwendet werden, liefert dieser Ansatz die bei der Ultraschallpruefung beobachteten Wellenarten mit Geschwindigkeiten und Polarisationen, Schallbuendelablenkung und Reflexion und Brechnung nach Richtung und Amplitude, so dass ueber das Modell der ebenen

  11. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Kaczmarek, Łukasz Dominik; Dobak, Paweł Józef; Kiełbasiński, Kamil

    2017-12-01

    The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object's behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface's temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam's downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  12. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Kowalska Maria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object’s behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface’s temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam’s downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  13. Non-destructive testing at Chalk River

    Hilborn, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    In 1969 CRNL recognized the need for a strong group skilled in non-destructive test procedures. Within two years a new branch called Quality Control Branch was staffed and working. This branch engages in all aspects of non-destructive testing including development of new techniques, new applications of known technology, and special problems in support of operating reactors. (author)

  14. Non Destructive Thermal Analysis and In Situ Investigation of Creep Mechanism of Graphite and Ceramic Composites using Phase-sensitive THz Imaging & Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasonic Spectroscopy

    Zhang, XI-Cheng; Redo-Scanchez, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In this project, we conducted a comprehensive study on nuclear graphite properties with terahertz (THz) imaging. Graphite samples from Idaho National Laboratory were carefully imaged by continuous wave (CW) THz. The CW THz imaging of graphite shows that the samples from different billet with different fabricating conditions have different pore size and structure. Based on this result, we then used a phase sensitive THz system to study the graphite properties. In this exploration, various graphite were studied. By imaging nuclear graphite samples in reflection mode at nine different incident polarization angles using THz time-domain spectroscopy, we find that different domain distributions and levels of porosity will introduce polarization dependence in THz reflectivity. Sample with higher density is less porous and has a smaller average domain distribution. As a consequence, it is less polarization-dependent and the polarization-dependent frequency is higher. The results also show that samples oxidized at higher temperatures tend to be more polarization dependent. The graphite from the external billet is more polarization dependent compared to that from the center billet. In addition, we performed laser-based ultrasonic measurements on these graphite samples. The denser, unoxidized samples allow surface acoustic waves to propagate more rapidly than in the samples that had already undergone oxidation. Therefore, for the oxidized samples, the denser samples show less polarization-dependence, higher polarization-dependent frequency, and allow the surface acoustic waves propagate faster.

  15. Application of golay complementary coded excitation schemes for non-destructive testing of sandwich structures

    Arora, Vanita; Mulaveesala, Ravibabu

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, InfraRed Thermography (IRT) has become a widely accepted non-destructive testing technique to evaluate the structural integrity of composite sandwich structures due to its full-field, remote, fast and in-service inspection capabilities. This paper presents a novel infrared thermographic approach named as Golay complementary coded thermal wave imaging is presented to detect disbonds in a sandwich structure having face sheets from Glass/Carbon Fibre Reinforced (GFR/CFR) laminates and core of the wooden block.

  16. Photothermal Analysis Applied To Non-Destructive Evaluation Of Paint On Polymer Substrates

    Vergne, D.; Busse, G.

    1988-10-01

    The decoration and protection quality of coatings on polymers is of considerable interest for industrial applications. However, at present there is no non-destructive (NDE) method to monitor the quality of these coatings during the manufacturing process or while they are in use. As an approach for such a method we use photothermal analysis where the propagation and reflection of optically generated thermal waves is investigated. We found that one can monitor the drying process, the effect of surface temperature treatment, and coating thickness (accuracy + 2 μm in 50 μm thickness). The information obtained with this remote NDE method is adequate for most industrial applications, eg car manufacturing.

  17. Can non-destructive inspection be reliable

    Silk, M.G.; Stoneham, A.M.; Temple, J.A.G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper on inspection is based on the book ''The reliability of non-destructive inspection: assessing the assessment of structures under stress'' by the present authors (published by Adam Hilger 1987). Emphasis is placed on the reliability of inspection and whether cracks in welds or flaws in components can be detected. The need for non-destructive testing and the historical attitudes to non-destructive testing are outlined, along with the case of failure. Factors influencing reliable inspection are discussed, and defect detection trials involving round robin tests are described. The development of reliable inspection techniques and the costs of reliability and unreliability are also examined. (U.K.)

  18. Non-destructive assay employing 2D and 3D digital radiographic imaging acquired with thermal neutrons and reactor-produced radioisotopes

    Silvani, Maria Ines; Almeida, Gevaldo Lisboa de; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    The inner structure of some objects can only be visualized by using suitable techniques, when safety reasons or expensive costs preclude the application of invasive procedures. The kind of agent rendering an object partially transparent, unveiling thus its features, depends upon the object size and composition. As a rough rule of thumb, light materials are transparent to gamma and X-rays while the heavy ones are transparent to neutrons. When, after traversing an object, they hit a proper 2-D detector, a radiograph is produced representing a convoluted cross section, called projection, of that object. Taking a large number of such projections for different object attitudes, it is possible to obtain a 3-D tomography of the object as a map of attenuation coefficients. This procedure however, besides a time-consuming task, requires specially tailored equipment and software, not always available or affordable. Yet, in some circumstances it is feasible to replace the 3-D tomography by a stereoscopy, allowing one to visualize the spatial configuration of the object under analysis. In this work, 2-D and 3-D radiographic images have been acquired using thermal neutrons and reactor-produced radioisotopes and proper imaging plates as detectors. The stereographic vision has been achieved by taking two radiographs of the same object at different angles, from the detector point of view. After a treatment to render them red-white and green-white they were properly merged to yield a single image capable to be watched with red-green glasses. All the image treatment and rendering has been performed with the software ImageJ. (author)

  19. Non-destructive testing. V. 2

    Farley, J.M.; Nichols, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The book entitled 'Non-destructive Testing' Volume 2, contains the proceedings of the fourth European Conference, organized by the British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing and held in London, September 1987. The volume contains seven chapters which examine the reliability of NDT, the economics of NDT and the use of NDT in:- civil engineering; oil, gas, coal and petrochemical industries; iron and steel industries; aerospace industry; and the nuclear and electricity supply industries. The seven chapters contain 78 papers, of which 19 are selected for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  20. Non-destructive testing of electronic parts

    Widenhorn, G.

    1980-01-01

    The requirements on quality, safety, faultlessness and reliability of electric components increase because of the high complexity of the appliances in which they are used. By means of examples a survey is given on the common non-destructive testing methods, testing operation and evaluation of test results on electric components which must meet in their application high requirements on quality and reliability. Defective components, especially those with hidden failures are sorted out by non-destructive testing and the failure frequency of the appliances and plants in testing and operation is greatly reduced. (orig.) [de

  1. European Non Destructive Examination Forum (ENDEF)

    Deffrennes, M.; Engl, G.; Estorff, U. von

    1998-01-01

    Non destructive examination (NDE) during fabrication, Pre-service inspection (PSI) and In service inspection (ISI) are considered key issues for the safe use of nuclear energy. They are important elements of plant lifetime management which is a critical item in decision making on nuclear policies. The European non destructive examination forum (ENDEF) founded by European Commission provides a platform for open discussion between representatives of the European industries with the purpose to establish cooperation between EU, Central and Eastern European Countries and New Independent States in the field of NDE and ISI

  2. Non destructive testing of green parts in powder metallurgy

    Accary, A.

    1979-01-01

    The non destructive testing of green parts is potentially advantageous by making possible a lowering of the material and energy consumption as well as the production of parts with a 100% reliability. After a survey of the possible methods and of the defects to be detected it is shown that the goal can be achieved using a 'blind detection' method and that the difficulty of the problem depends on the size and shape of the part to be controled. The gravimetric, dimensional, γ absorption and thermal diffusivity methods are then examined. It is concluded that a unit control is paying only if it allows to enter the high reliability part market. Used statisticaly the non destructive testing of green parts can possibly lead to savings on materials and energy [fr

  3. Introduction to non-destructive testing of materials: part II

    Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves are mechanical vibrations that require a medium, which functions as carrier. Ultrasonics are widely used in non-destructive testing of materials in which high frequency sound waves are introduced into the material being inspected. If the frequency of sound waves in within the range 10 to 20,000 Hz, the sound is audible, i.e. the range of hearing, above 20,000 Hz, the sound waves are referred to as Ultrasound or Ultrasonics. Sound waves do not cause any permanent change in material although its transient presence is very noticeable. An energy transport through a sound wave is possible only when constituent particles are connected to each other by elastic forces. Liquids and Gases are also suitable media for the transmission of sound. In vacuum no matter exists and thus no sound transmission is possible. At the end of this article advantages and limitations of ultrasonic testing are also given. (A.B.)

  4. New tasks for non-destructive testing

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings contain 29 lectures and 43 posters which were presented in Trier at the annual meeting of the DGZfP in May 1990. The contributions report on further development of non-destructive testing methods towards more reliability, both of inspections and with regard to interpretation of the results. (MM) [de

  5. Utilization of radiation in non destructive tests

    Lopes, R.T.; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Junqueira, M.M.; Matos, J.A. de; Castello Branco, L.M.; Barros Junior, J.D.; Borges, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory from COPPE/UFRJ has been developed techniques for using nuclear radiations to obtain images for non-destructive materials testing and medicine. With this objective, some prototypes of transmission computerized tomography systems using parallel beans and fan beans, with computer automation, including the mathematical process of image reprocessing and presentation in videos or printers are constructed [pt

  6. Economic importance of non-destructive testing

    Loebert, P.

    1979-01-01

    On May 21 to 23, 1979, the annual meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefung took place in Lindau near the Bodensee lake. About 600 experts from Germany and abroad participated in the meeting, whose general subject was 'The Economic Importance of Non-Destructive Testing'. Theoretical problems and practical investigations were discussed in a number of papers on special subjects. Apart from the 33 papers, there was also a poster show with 53 stands with texts, drawings, diagrams, and figures where the authors informed those interested on the latest state of knowledge in testing. The short papers were read in six sessions under the headings of rentability of non-destructive testing, X-ray methods, electromagnetic methods, and ultrasonic methods 1 and 2. (orig.) [de

  7. Non-destructive control of castings

    Boutault, J.; Mascre, C.

    1978-01-01

    The object of non-destructive control in foundries is to verify the metal structure, the absence of unacceptable discontinuity, total tightness, etc. This leads to a range of very varied controls according to the importance of the series, the quality level required by the specifications, the nature of the alloy. The originality of the solutions which are imperative for castings is shown through examples: casting of high quality complex forms in short series; very thick unit parts; very large series of parts requiring on efficient automation of non-destructive control. Lastly the publishing of testing methods and interpretating rules, which are the base of a friendly understanding between constructors and founders are recalled [fr

  8. Non-destructive control in nuclear construction

    Banus; Barbier; Launay

    1978-01-01

    Having recalled the characteristics of the fundamental components of the main primary circuit of nuclear boilers (900 MW) and the means appropriated for their control, it is recalled that the 'French Electricity Board's specifications and control rules' often prescribe more severe criteria than those existing in the U.S.A. Then practical examples of non-destructive controls concerning the steam generator end plates, vessel stainless steel linings, pump attachements, steam generator pipes are given [fr

  9. Development of non-destructive testing. Turkey

    1991-01-01

    A National Scheme for the qualification and certification of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) personnel in various methods has been established as the first stage of implementation. Systematic training in such methods as radiography (RT), ultrasonics (UT), magnetic particles (MT), liquid penetrant (PT) and eddy currents (ET) at levels I, II and some at III has been initiated and should be continued. Direct link with the industry and continuous effort to extend practical applications is strongly recommended

  10. Non destructive testing of works of art by terahertz analysis

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Metayer, Jean-Jacques; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Detalle, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Improvements in technologies and the growing security needs in airport terminals lead to the development of non destructive testing devices using terahertz waves. Indeed, these waves have the advantage of being, on one hand, relatively penetrating. They also have the asset of not being ionizing. It is thus potentially an interesting contribution in the non destructive testing field. With the help of the VISIOM Company, the possibilities of this new industrial analysis method in assisting the restoration of works of art were then approached. The results obtained within this framework are presented here and compared with those obtained by infrared thermography. The results obtained show first that the THZ method, like the stimulated infrared thermography allows the detection of delamination located in murals paintings or in marquetries. They show then that the THZ method seems to allow detecting defects located relatively deeply (10 mm) and defects potentially concealed by other defects. It is an advantage compared to the stimulated infra-red thermography which does not make it possible to obtain these results. Furthermore, they show that the method does not seem sensitive to the various pigments constituting the pictorial layer, to the presence of a layer of "Japan paper" and to the presence of a layer of whitewash. It is not the case of the stimulated infrared thermography. It is another advantage of the THZ method. Finally, they show that the THZ method is limited in the detection of low-size defects. It is a disadvantage compared to the stimulated infrared thermography.

  11. Detection of thermal fatigue in composites by second harmonic Lamb waves

    Li, Weibin; Cho, Younho; Achenbach, Jan D

    2012-01-01

    Composite materials which are widely used in the aerospace industry, are usually subjected to frequent variation of temperature. Thermal cyclic loading may induce material degradation. Considering the long-term service of aircraft composites and the importance of safety in the aircraft industry, even a little damage that may be accumulative via thermal fatigue is often of great concern. Therefore, there is a demand to develop non-destructive approaches to evaluate thermal fatigue damage in an early stage. Due to the sensitivity of acoustic nonlinearity to micro-damage, the nonlinear ultrasonic technique has been explored as a promising tool for early detection of micro-damage. This paper investigates an experimental scheme for characterizing thermal fatigue damage in composite laminates using second harmonic Lamb waves. The present results show a monotonic increase of acoustic nonlinearity with respect to thermal fatigue cycles. The experimental observation of the correlation between the acoustic nonlinearity and thermal fatigue cycles in carbon/epoxy laminates verifies that nonlinear Lamb waves can be used to assess thermal fatigue damage rendering improved sensitivity over conventional linear feature based non-destructive evaluation techniques. Velocity and attenuation based ultrasonic studies are carried out for comparison with the nonlinear ultrasonic approach and it is found that nonlinear acoustic parameters are more promising indicators of thermal fatigue damage than linear ones. (paper)

  12. Safeguards and Non-destructive Assay

    Carchon, R.; Bruggeman, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on safeguards and non-destructive assay includes: (1) various activities to assure nuclear materials accountancy; (2) contributes to the implementation of Integrated Safeguards measures in Belgium and to assist the IAEA through the Belgian Support Programme; (3) renders services to internal and external customers in the field of safeguards; (4) improves passive neutron coincidence counting techniques for waste assay and safeguards verification measurements by R and D on correlation algorithms implemented via software or dedicated hardware; (5) improves gamma assay techniques for waste assay by implementing advanced scanning techniques and different correlation algorithms; and (6) develops numerical calibration techniques. Major achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  13. Non-destructive testing: significant facts

    Espejo, Hector; Ruch, Marta C.

    2006-01-01

    In the last fifty years different organisations, both public and private, have been assigned to the mission of introducing into the country the most relevant aspects of the modern technological discipline 'Non Destructive Testing' (NDT) through a manifold of activities, such as training and education, research, development, technical assistance and services, personnel qualification/certification and standardisation. A review is given of the significant facts in this process, in which the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, CNEA, played a leading part, a balance of the accomplishments is made and a forecast of the future of the activity is sketched. (author) [es

  14. Ionizing radiations for non-destructive evaluation

    Raj, Baldev; Venkataraman, B.

    1989-01-01

    A state of the art of major non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques based on ionising radiations is presented. These techniques are broadly classified into three categories, namely, radiography, radiation gaging and analytical applications. The basic principles behind each method are explained and salient features of each technique which make it suitable for a particular task are described. Several illustrative applications drawn from the nuclear industry are given. The monograph is intended to serve as an introductory guide to scientist and engineers engaged in NDT activities. (M.G.B.). 32 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Non-Destructive Testing for Concrete Structure

    Tengku Sarah Tengku Amran; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) is a technique to determine the integrity of a material, component or structure. It is essential in the inspection of alteration, repair and new construction in the building industry. There are a number of non-destructive testing techniques that can be applied to determine the integrity of concrete in a completed structure. Each has its own advantages and limitations. For concrete, these problems relate to strength, cracking, dimensions, delamination, and inhomogeneities. NDT is reasonably good and reliable tool to measure the property of concrete which also gives the fair indication of the compressive strength development. This paper discussed the concrete inspection using combined methods of NDT. (author)

  16. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S.V.; Thro, P.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed. (authors)

  17. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed.

  18. Non-destructive testing; Examenes no destructivos

    Calva, Mauricio; Loske, Achim [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1988-12-31

    The application of non-destructive testing (NDT) in several technical and industrial fields is pointed out, standing out its utilization in the detection of future failures without affecting the examined element. Likewise, the different types of NDTs and their processes, such as x-rays, ultrasoud, magnetic particles, induced currents, penetrating fluids, and optical means, are described. The Non-Destructive Tests Laboratory of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), plans to create new and more reliable systems independent from the operator`s capacity, to contribute to fulfill the inspection and quality control needs of the generating Mexican power plants. [Espanol] Se senala la aplicacion de los examenes no destructivos (END) a diversos campos tecnicos e industriales, destacando su utilizacion en la deteccion de futuras fallas sin afectar el elemento examinado. Asimismo, se describen los diferentes tipos de END y sus procesos, tales como radiografia, ultrasonido, particulas magneticas, corrientes inducidas, liquidos penetrantes y metodos opticos. El Laboratorio de Pruebas no Destructivas, del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), planea crear sistemas novedosos mas confiables, que no dependan de la capacidad del operador, para contribuir a satisfacer las necesidades de inspeccion y control de calidad que se presentan en las plantas generadoras de energia mexicanas.

  19. Developments in non-destructive beam diagnostics

    Fraser, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    With the large average beam currents being achieved in accelerators and storage rings, there is an increasing need for non-destructive beam diagnostic devices. For continuous beams, position monitors of the capacitive pick-up type are replaced by resonant devices that respond to the transverse displacement of the beam centroid. Bunch length monitors of the SLAC type using resonant cavities operating in the TM 010 mode can be used for continuous beams. The more detailed information derivable from beam profile scanners requires development of improved non-destructive devices. Profile monitors which scan the visible light produced by high current beams may be more reliable than ones using the residual ionization if the light intensity from gas molecules following nonionizing collisions with beam particles gives a measure of the beam current density independent of the local electron density. The intense Balmer series lines from neutral hydrogen beams have been used successfully to measure beam profiles. At CRNL and at LASL, beam light profile monitors are being developed for high average current accelerators. Three or more projections will be recorded to allow tomographic reconstruction of the two-dimensional beam current density. Light detection is either by intensified Reticons or ISIT vidicons. The use of three or more beam light monitors on a beam transport line will also permit estimates of the transverse emittance to be made through the reconstruction technique

  20. Non-destructive testing; Examenes no destructivos

    Calva, Mauricio; Loske, Achim [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    The application of non-destructive testing (NDT) in several technical and industrial fields is pointed out, standing out its utilization in the detection of future failures without affecting the examined element. Likewise, the different types of NDTs and their processes, such as x-rays, ultrasoud, magnetic particles, induced currents, penetrating fluids, and optical means, are described. The Non-Destructive Tests Laboratory of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), plans to create new and more reliable systems independent from the operator`s capacity, to contribute to fulfill the inspection and quality control needs of the generating Mexican power plants. [Espanol] Se senala la aplicacion de los examenes no destructivos (END) a diversos campos tecnicos e industriales, destacando su utilizacion en la deteccion de futuras fallas sin afectar el elemento examinado. Asimismo, se describen los diferentes tipos de END y sus procesos, tales como radiografia, ultrasonido, particulas magneticas, corrientes inducidas, liquidos penetrantes y metodos opticos. El Laboratorio de Pruebas no Destructivas, del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), planea crear sistemas novedosos mas confiables, que no dependan de la capacidad del operador, para contribuir a satisfacer las necesidades de inspeccion y control de calidad que se presentan en las plantas generadoras de energia mexicanas.

  1. Spatial and temporal control of thermal waves by using DMDs for interference based crack detection

    Thiel, Erik; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Active Thermography is a well-established non-destructive testing method and used to detect cracks, voids or material inhomogeneities. It is based on applying thermal energy to a samples' surface whereas inner defects alter the nonstationary heat flow. Conventional excitation of a sample is hereby done spatially, either planar (e.g. using a lamp) or local (e.g. using a focused laser) and temporally, either pulsed or periodical. In this work we combine a high power laser with a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) allowing us to merge all degrees of freedom to a spatially and temporally controlled heat source. This enables us to exploit the possibilities of coherent thermal wave shaping. Exciting periodically while controlling at the same time phase and amplitude of the illumination source induces - via absorption at the sample's surface - a defined thermal wave propagation through a sample. That means thermal waves can be controlled almost like acoustical or optical waves. However, in contrast to optical or acoustical waves, thermal waves are highly damped due to the diffusive character of the thermal heat flow and therefore limited in penetration depth in relation to the achievable resolution. Nevertheless, the coherence length of thermal waves can be chosen in the mmrange for modulation frequencies below 10 Hz which is perfectly met by DMD technology. This approach gives us the opportunity to transfer known technologies from wave shaping techniques to thermography methods. We will present experiments on spatial and temporal wave shaping, demonstrating interference based crack detection.

  2. Non destructive testing in amusement park

    Dominguez Marrero, Humberto; Hernandez Torres, Debora; Sendoya Puente, Felix; Herrera Palma, Victoria; Suarez Guerra, Yarelis; Moreno Hernandez, Eduardo; Lopez Hernandez, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 began the installation of Chinese amusement parks at several places in Havana City. Structural security is one of the principal tasks that should be done, since the beginning of the services of these installations. The use on Non Destructive Testing Techniques (NDT), has to be development and implemented in order to avoid the possibility of failure during services with a consequence threat to safety for the public presented. In this work it is shown the results of application of NDT techniques and recommendations for the quality control of the different welds and mechanical components presented. Techniques as Visual Examination, Liquid Penetrant and Ultrasonic have been used for these purposes in order to obtain a structural diagnostic in the amusement parks. There are also exposed the use and implementation of international recommendations and Standards, which are very rigorous in its applications for the case of recreation industry. This is a consequence to its social service fundamentally to children and teenage people. (Author)

  3. New technologies in electromagnetic non-destructive testing

    Huang, Songling

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces novel developments in the field of electromagnetic non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT/E). The topics include electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave testing, pulsed eddy current testing, remote field eddy current testing, low frequency eddy current testing, metal magnetic memory testing, and magnetic flux leakage testing. Considering the increasing concern about the safety maintenance of critical structures in various industries and everyday life, these topics presented here will be of particular interest to the readers in the NDT/E field. This book covers both theoretical researches and the engineering applications of the electromagnetic NDT technology. It could serve as a valuable reference for college students and relevant NDT technicians. It is also a useful material for qualification training and higher learning for nondestructive testing professionals.

  4. European Non Destructive Examination Forum (ENDEF)

    Deffrennes, M [EC, DG XVII, Nuclear Energy, Brussels (Belgium); Engl, G [Siemens AG Energieerzeugung KWU, Erlangen (Germany); Estorff, U von [EC, JRC/IAM, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-11-01

    ENDEF, an initiative of the European Commission, DG XVII (Energy) was well supported by the European industrial institutions working in assistance with nuclear industrial organisations in the CEEC`s (Central and Eastern European Countries) and NIS`s (New Independent States). This Forum provides effectively a platform for open discussion between representatives of industrial actors active in the NDE (Non Destructive Examination)/ISI (In Service Inspection) field with the purpose to establish a co-operation pattern between qualified representatives of the EU (European Union) industry to offer a better co-ordinated and well defined assistance to the CEEC`s and NIS in the field of NDE/ISI, and to lay the ground for further industrial co-operation. ENDEF developed a strategy to follow for the establishment of co-operation projects. This strategy is now used to understand the extent of past or present assistance projects and to identify the areas where more co-operation is needed. ENDEF encourages the creation in the NIS`s and CEEC`s of similar forums in order to increase the co-operation and co-ordination. ENDEF is also working in perfect agreement with the European Network ENIQ, piloted by the European plant operators. This identity of views lead to the leadership by the ENDEF co-ordinator of the ENIQ Task 3 involving Applications of the European Methodology for ISI qualification in the CEEC`s and NIS`s and presently fully integrated in ENDEF. (orig.)

  5. Non Destructive Analysis of Uranium by Radiometry

    Yusuf Nampira

    2007-01-01

    Uranium used in nuclear fuel development activity. the Substance use incurred by regulation safeguard. On that account in uranium acceptance conducted by verification of according to document by the specification of goods. Verification done by analysing performed uranium. The activity require by analyse method which simple and rapid analyses and has accurate result of analyses, is hence done by validation of non destructive uranium analysis that is with count gamma radiation from 235 U and product decay from 238 U. Quantitative analysis of uranium in substance determined by through count radiation-g at energy 185.72 keV and the use assess ratio of gamma radiation count from 235 U to 234 Pa to determine isotope content 235 U in substance. The result of analyses were given result of analysis with above correctness storey level 95% and have limit detect equivalent by 0.0174 mg U in U 3 O 8 . This method use at isotope uranium-235 analysis through count gamma radiation comparing method 235 U/ 234 Pa giving accuracy level 95% at sample equivalent uranium its content in 1 g uranium with isotope 235 U smaller than 75 weight percent. (author)

  6. European Non Destructive Examination Forum (ENDEF)

    Deffrennes, M.; Engl, G.; Estorff, U. von

    1998-01-01

    ENDEF, an initiative of the European Commission, DG XVII (Energy) was well supported by the European industrial institutions working in assistance with nuclear industrial organisations in the CEEC's (Central and Eastern European Countries) and NIS's (New Independent States). This Forum provides effectively a platform for open discussion between representatives of industrial actors active in the NDE (Non Destructive Examination)/ISI (In Service Inspection) field with the purpose to establish a co-operation pattern between qualified representatives of the EU (European Union) industry to offer a better co-ordinated and well defined assistance to the CEEC's and NIS in the field of NDE/ISI, and to lay the ground for further industrial co-operation. ENDEF developed a strategy to follow for the establishment of co-operation projects. This strategy is now used to understand the extent of past or present assistance projects and to identify the areas where more co-operation is needed. ENDEF encourages the creation in the NIS's and CEEC's of similar forums in order to increase the co-operation and co-ordination. ENDEF is also working in perfect agreement with the European Network ENIQ, piloted by the European plant operators. This identity of views lead to the leadership by the ENDEF co-ordinator of the ENIQ Task 3 involving Applications of the European Methodology for ISI qualification in the CEEC's and NIS's and presently fully integrated in ENDEF. (orig.)

  7. Combining data in non-destructive testing

    Lavayssiere, B.

    1994-03-01

    Non-destructive testing of some components requires quite often the use of several methods such as X-ray, ultrasonics, Eddy Currents. But the efficiency of a NDT method is highly dependent on the fact that the detectability of flaws in a specimen relies on the choice of the best method. Moreover a lot of inspection issues could benefit from the use of more than one test method, as each NDT method has its own physical properties and technological limits. Some questions still remain: how to combine data, at what level and for what functionality. Simple monomethod processes are well-known now. They include techniques like reconstruction which belongs to the so-called ill-posed problems in the field of mathematics. For NDT data processing, it has the ability to estimate real data from distorted ones coming from a probe. But, up to now there has been very few approaches for computer aided combination of results from different advanced techniques. This report presents the various mathematical fields involved towards that goal (statistical decision theory which allows the use of multiple hypothesis, non-linear decision theory for its capability to classify and to discriminate, graph theory to find the optimal path in an hypothesis graph and also fuzzy logic, multiple resolution analysis, artificial intelligence,...) and which combinations of methods are useful. Some images will illustrate this topic in which EDF is involved, and will explain what are the major goals of this work. Combining is not only an improvement of 3D visualisation which would allow to display simultaneously CAD or NDT data for example, but it consists in exploiting multisensor data collected via a variety of sophisticated techniques and presenting this information to the operator without overloading the operator/system capacities in order to reduce the uncertainty and to resolve the ambiguity inherent to mono method inspection. (author). 7 figs., 35 refs

  8. Non destructive evaluation of containment nuclear plants structures

    Garnier, V. [Aix Marseille Univ., Aix en Provence (France). LMA, CNRS UPR 7051, IUT; Verdier, J. [Toulouse Univ. (France). UPS, INSA, LMDC; Sbartai, Z.M. [Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). I2M; and others

    2015-07-01

    French Projects of Investment for the Future, called ''Research for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection'' have been initiated to further research on the causes, the management, the impact of the observed nuclear accidents and to propose and validate solutions to limit the risk and the consequences. In this context the ''Non Destructive Evaluation of nuclear plants containment'' project (ENDE) with eight partners (six research institutes and two industrials) supported by the ''National Agency of Research'', proposes a methodology for the Non Destructive Evaluation of the containment capacity to fulfil its two major functions: strength and leak tightness. The NDE measurements will be performed under conditions representing the specific solicitations of a decennial inspection, and after or during a reference accident. The project aims to develop NDEs, to combine them by data fusion and to select the most efficient combinations with quantitative criteria. The work is based on: - Structuring the knowledge and developing an experimental plan. - Evaluating the material in representative conditions of accidental solicitations (water saturation, porosity, strength, elastic modulus, stress) and the diffuse thermal damage (micro cracks) - Monitoring the transition from diffuse to continuous damage (cracks) and monitoring a crack under stress (opening and width). - Implementing ND Techniques on-site. The ND techniques retained after selection will be implemented on a containment mock-up on the 1/3 scale. This mock-up developed by EDF (Electricite de France) will be available in 2016. It will be comparable to those of real size containment regarding pressure and temperature conditions. The measures deduced from the NDEs will be introduced in another project (Macena) that aims to simulate the water and heat transfers as well as creep occurring in a reference accident. We will present the methodology and the results

  9. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components.

    Ciampa, Francesco; Mahmoodi, Pooya; Pinto, Fulvio; Meo, Michele

    2018-02-16

    Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters' primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  10. Recent Advances in Active Infrared Thermography for Non-Destructive Testing of Aerospace Components

    Francesco Ciampa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Active infrared thermography is a fast and accurate non-destructive evaluation technique that is of particular relevance to the aerospace industry for the inspection of aircraft and helicopters’ primary and secondary structures, aero-engine parts, spacecraft components and its subsystems. This review provides an exhaustive summary of most recent active thermographic methods used for aerospace applications according to their physical principle and thermal excitation sources. Besides traditional optically stimulated thermography, which uses external optical radiation such as flashes, heaters and laser systems, novel hybrid thermographic techniques are also investigated. These include ultrasonic stimulated thermography, which uses ultrasonic waves and the local damage resonance effect to enhance the reliability and sensitivity to micro-cracks, eddy current stimulated thermography, which uses cost-effective eddy current excitation to generate induction heating, and microwave thermography, which uses electromagnetic radiation at the microwave frequency bands to provide rapid detection of cracks and delamination. All these techniques are here analysed and numerous examples are provided for different damage scenarios and aerospace components in order to identify the strength and limitations of each thermographic technique. Moreover, alternative strategies to current external thermal excitation sources, here named as material-based thermography methods, are examined in this paper. These novel thermographic techniques rely on thermoresistive internal heating and offer a fast, low power, accurate and reliable assessment of damage in aerospace composites.

  11. Modelling, simulation and visualisation for electromagnetic non-destructive testing

    Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin; Abdul Razak Hamzah

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the art and the recent development of modelling, simulation and visualization for eddy current Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) technique. Simulation and visualization has aid in the design and development of electromagnetic sensors and imaging techniques and systems for Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (ENDT); feature extraction and inverse problems for Quantitative Non-Destructive Testing (QNDT). After reviewing the state-of-the art of electromagnetic modelling and simulation, case studies of Research and Development in eddy current NDT technique via magnetic field mapping and thermography for eddy current distribution are discussed. (author)

  12. Non-destructive examination of grouted waste

    Benny, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    This data report contains the results of ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and unconfined compressive strength (USC) measurements on a grouted simulant of 106AN tank waste. This testing program was conducted according to the requirements detailed in WHC-1993a. If successful, these methods could lead to a system for the remote verification of waste form quality. The objectives of this testing program were: to determine if a relationship exists between the velocity of ultrasonic compression waves and the unconfined compressive strength of simulated grouted waste, and if so, determine if the relationship is a valid method for grout quality assessment; and to determine if a relationship exists between the attenuation of wave amplitude and the age of test specimens. The first objective was met, in that a relationship between the UPV waves and USC was determined. This method appears to provide a valid measure of the quality of the grouted waste, as discussed in Sections 3.0 and 4.0. The second objective, to determine if the attenuation of UPV waves was related to the age of test specimens was partially met. A relationship does exist between wave amplitude and age, but it is doubtful that this method alone can be used to verify the overall quality of grouted waste. Section 2.0 describes the test methods, with the results detailed in Section 3.0. A discussion of the results are provided in Section 4.0

  13. Non-destructive NIR-FT-Raman analyses in practice. Part I. Analyses of plants and historic textiles.

    Andreev, G N; Schrader, B; Schulz, H; Fuchs, R; Popov, S; Handjieva, N

    2001-12-01

    Non-destructive analysis of natural substances in plants as well as of old dyed textiles by Raman spectroscopy has not been possible using conventional techniques. Exciting lines from the visible part of the spectrum produced photochemical and thermal decomposition of the objects as well as strong fluorescence. Using Nd:YAG laser excitation at 1,064 nm together with a special sample arrangement and interferometric recording, various polyacetylenes in Aethusa cynapium and in chamomile (Chamomilla recutita) and the main valuable substances in gentian species (Gentiana lutea and G. punctata), curcuma roots (Curcuma longa), cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), clove (Caryophyllus aromaticus), and ginger (Zingiber officinale) were analyzed non-destructively and discussed in comparison with the corresponding pure standard compounds. We further analyzed non-destructively the FT Raman spectra of collections of historical textiles and lakes used for dyeing. It is possible to distinguish the main dye component non-destructively by using Raman bands.

  14. Ultrasonic transverse velocity calibration of standard blocks for use in non-destructive testing

    Silva, C E R; Braz, D S; Maggi, L E; Felix, R P B Costa

    2015-01-01

    Standard blocks are employed in the verification of the equipment used in Ultrasound Non-Destructive Testing. To assure the metrology reliability of all the measurement process, it is necessary to calibrate or certify these Standard blocks. In this work, the transverse wave velocity and main dimensions were assessed according to the specifications ISO Standards. For transverse wave velocity measurement, a 5 MHz transverse wave transducer, a waveform generator, an oscilloscope and a computer with a program developed in LabVIEW TM were used. Concerning the transverse wave velocity calibration, only two Standard blocks of the 4 tested is in accordance with the standard

  15. Advanced non-destructive methods for an efficient service performance

    Rauschenbach, H.; Clossen-von Lanken Schulz, M.; Oberlin, R.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the power generation industry's desire to decrease outage time and extend inspection intervals for highly stressed turbine parts, advanced and reliable Non-destructive methods were developed by Siemens Non-destructive laboratory. Effective outage performance requires the optimized planning of all outage activities as well as modern Non-destructive examination methods, in order to examine the highly stressed components (turbine rotor, casings, valves, generator rotor) reliably and in short periods of access. This paper describes the experience of Siemens Energy with an ultrasonic Phased Array inspection technique for the inspection of radial entry pinned turbine blade roots. The developed inspection technique allows the ultrasonic inspection of steam turbine blades without blade removal. Furthermore advanced Non-destructive examination methods for joint bolts will be described, which offer a significant reduction of outage duration in comparison to conventional inspection techniques. (authors)

  16. Development of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology in Pakistan

    Khan, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) techniques are being extensively used to improve and maintain the quality of manufactured goods as well as for proper maintenance of industrial plants and equipment. Typical industries that benefit most include Aerospace, Chemical, Heavy Mechanical Fabrication, Conventional and Nuclear Power Generation, Automobiles, Oil and Gas, Shipbuilding, Foundries, and Armaments, etc. As the name implies, with these techniques an industrial product is inspected mostly for defects in its structure without destroying it. Among the most widely used NDT techniques for the detection of internal defects are Radiographic and Ultrasonic Testing. For surface and just below the surface defects Magnetic Particle Testing, Penetrant Testing and Eddy Current Testing are commonly used. In addition to these, there are some NDT methods which have specific applications. These include Acoustic Emission, Thermal and Infrared Testing, Microwave Testing, Computer Tomography, Strain Gauging, Leak Testing and Holography, etc. This paper describes various phases through which the development of NDT technology passed and its present state of the art. It started with the undertaking of a nuclear technology programme and has matured along with it. As it stands we are fully competent to undertake various essential activities related to this technology, namely, (I) raining and certification of NDT personnel at various levels. (II) revision of NDT services to various industrial sectors including nuclear power during manufacture, fabrication, pre-service inspection (PSI) and in-service inspection (ISI). (author)

  17. Non-destructive control at the Kozloduy NPP; Nerazrushayushchij kontrol` v AEhS `Kozloduy`

    Mikhovsky, M [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Skordev, A [SIME-CONTROL, Sofia (Bulgaria); Nichev, V; Tsokov, P; Popova, N [Kombinat Atomna Energetika, Kozloduj (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    A program for technical diagnostics using non-destructive methods is being carried out at the Kozloduy NPP. The main target is to test mechanical equipment integrity (metal control, mechanical stress control, etc.) as well as electrical equipment. Computer methods and simulation are widely used in program implementation. Non-destructive testing is based on methods involving optical, radiation, ultrasonic and magnetic processes. Control procedures are standardised in special technological documents and one of them is described as an example. It refers to ultrasonic control of the austenitic steel welds of the WWER-440 piping system (DU-500). Graphic representing the microstructure of the welds, the distribution of surface ultrasonic wave and the longitudinal and vertically polarised perpendicular waves are presented. 6 refs. 8 figs.

  18. Thermal gravitational waves in accelerating universe

    B Ghayour

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gravitational waves are considered in thermal vacuum state. The amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves are found enhanced in thermal vacuum state compared to its zero temperature counterpart. Therefore, the allowed amount of enhancement depends on the upper bound of WMAP-5 and WMAP-7 for the amplitude and spectral energy density of gravitational waves. The enhancement of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves in thermal vacuum state is consistent with current accelerating phase of the universe. The enhancement feature of amplitude and spectral energy density of the waves is independent of the expansion model of the universe and hence the thermal effect accounts for it. Therefore, existence of thermal gravitational waves is not ruled out

  19. Geophysical Methods for Non-Destructive Testing in Civil Engineering

    Niederleithinger, E.

    2013-12-01

    Many non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for civil engineering (e. g. ultrasonics, radar) are similar to geophysical techniques. They just differ in scale, material under investigation and vocabulary used. In spite of the fact that the same principles of physics and mathematics apply to both fields, exchange has been limited in the past. But since a few years more and more geophysical knowledge is used in civil engineering. One of the focal points in research is to improve ultrasonic testing of concrete to be able to image the inside even of large, complex structures and to detect any deterioration as early as possible. One of the main issues is the heterogeneity of concrete, including aggregates, reinforcement, cracks and many other features. Our current research focuses on three points. One is the application of state of the art geophysical migration techniques as Reverse Time Migration (RTM) to image vertical faces or the backside of voids and ducts in thick concrete structures, which isn't possible with conventional techniques used in NDT. Second, we have started to use seismic interferometric techniques to interpolate ultrasonic traces, which can't be measured directly for technical reasons. Third, we are using coda wave interferometry to detect concrete degradation due to load, fatigue, temperature or other influences as early as possible. Practical examples of the application of these techniques are given and potential future research directions will be discussed. It will be shown, how a subset of these techniques can be used for innovative monitoring systems for civil infrastructure. Imaging the interior of a concrete body by ultrasonics and reverse time migration(simulated data).

  20. Development of hotcell non-destructive examination techniques

    Kim, Young Uhn; Yu, S. C.; Kang, B. S.; Byun, K. S. [Chungbuk National University, Chungju (Korea)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to establish non-destructive examination techniques which needs to determine the status of spent nuclear fuel and/or bundles. Through the project, we will establish an image reconstruction tomography which is a kind of non-destructive techniques in Hotcell. The tomography technique can be used to identify the 2-dimensional density distribution of fission products in the spent fuel rods and/or bundles. And form results of the measurement and analysis of magnetic properties of neutron irradiated material in the press vessel and reactor, we will develop some techniques to test its hardness and defects. In 2001, the first year, we have established mathematical background and necessary data and informations to develop the techniques. We will try to find some experimental results that are necessary in developing the Hotcell non-destructive examination techniques in the coming year. 14 refs., 65 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  1. Non destructive nuclear measurements for control and characterization purpose

    Lyoussi, Abdallah

    2002-01-01

    In this report for accreditation to supervise researches, the author proposes a large and rather precise overview of his research works which dealt with the upstream and downstream parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. After having discussed the different needs associated with non destructive nuclear measurements during the fuel cycle, the author describes his past research activities. In the following parts, he discusses control and characterization methods associated with the upstream and downstream parts of the fuel cycle: fuel density variation measurement, non destructive control of uranium-235 content of enriched uranium ingots, examination of induced photo-fissions in radioactive waste parcels, use of electron accelerator for simultaneous neutron and photon examination, measurement of the spatial distribution of the photonic component from the Mini Linatron, association of non destructive measurement techniques

  2. Evolution of supernova remnants. III. Thermal waves

    Chevalier, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of heat conduction on the evolution of supernova remnants is investigated. A thermal wave, or electron conduction front, can travel more rapidly than a shock wave during the first thousand years of the remnant's evolution. A self-similar solution describing this phase has been found by Barenblatt. Numerical computations verify the solution and give the evolution past the thermal wave phase. While shell formation is not impeded, the interior density and temperature profiles are smoothed by the action of conduction

  3. Non-destructive testing and evaluation for structural integrity

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Rao, B.P.C.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, a brief description of the physical concepts of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods and the physical/derived parameters that are used for assessing defects, stresses and microstructures are given. A few case studies highlighting the importance of non-destructive testing and evaluation for structural integrity assessment are also discussed based on the investigations carried out. Emerging concepts like intelligent processing of materials, expert systems, neural networks, use of multisensors with fusion of data and exploitation of signal analysis and imaging approaches are also addressed in this paper. (author). 92 refs., 1 tab

  4. Magnetic Non-destructive Testing of Plastically Deformed Mild Steel

    Jozef Pala

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Barkhausen noise analysis and coercive field measurement have been used as magnetic non-destructive testing methods for plastically deformed high quality carbon steel specimens. The strain dependence of root mean square value and power spectrum of the Barkhausen noise and the coercive field are explained in terms of the dislocation density. The specimens have been subjected to different magnetizing frequencies to show the overlapping nature of the Barkhausen noise. The results are discussed in the context of usage of magnetic non-destructive testing to evaluate the plastic deformation of high quality carbon steel products.

  5. A Monte Carlo approach applied to ultrasonic non-destructive testing

    Mosca, I.; Bilgili, F.; Meier, T.; Sigloch, K.

    2012-04-01

    Non-destructive testing based on ultrasound allows us to detect, characterize and size discrete flaws in geotechnical and architectural structures and materials. This information is needed to determine whether such flaws can be tolerated in future service. In typical ultrasonic experiments, only the first-arriving P-wave is interpreted, and the remainder of the recorded waveform is neglected. Our work aims at understanding surface waves, which are strong signals in the later wave train, with the ultimate goal of full waveform tomography. At present, even the structural estimation of layered media is still challenging because material properties of the samples can vary widely, and good initial models for inversion do not often exist. The aim of the present study is to combine non-destructive testing with a theoretical data analysis and hence to contribute to conservation strategies of archaeological and architectural structures. We analyze ultrasonic waveforms measured at the surface of a variety of samples, and define the behaviour of surface waves in structures of increasing complexity. The tremendous potential of ultrasonic surface waves becomes an advantage only if numerical forward modelling tools are available to describe the waveforms accurately. We compute synthetic full seismograms as well as group and phase velocities for the data. We invert them for the elastic properties of the sample via a global search of the parameter space, using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. Such a Monte Carlo approach allows us to perform a complete uncertainty and resolution analysis, but the computational cost is high and increases quickly with the number of model parameters. Therefore it is practical only for defining the seismic properties of media with a limited number of degrees of freedom, such as layered structures. We have applied this approach to both synthetic layered structures and real samples. The former contributed to benchmark the propagation of ultrasonic surface

  6. Non-destructive characterization of the materials for future nuclear reactors

    Snopek, J.; Slugen, V.

    2016-01-01

    For our experiments, we have used Barkhausen noise technique, which is powerful non-destructive method for monitoring stresses in lattices of magnetic materials. We have also used PAS, which is powerful non-destructive method for diagnosing vacancy defects in variable materials. We researched some ODS steels, which are primarily going to be used as fuel cladding or reactor pressure vessel internal components. This thesis describes the behavior of the microstructure of the oxide dispersion strengthened steels at intermediate temperature. Two, in principle, different techniques were used for the characterization of the microstructure of the oxide dispersion strengthened steels thermally aged at 475 grad C and 650 grad C. Both techniques, namely Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PAS) and Barkhausen noise (BN) measurements are very sensitive to metallurgical modifications and presence of nano-sized imperfections in the crystal lattice. Precipitation of the nano-sized α' phases shift the Barkhausen noise signal. (authors)

  7. Non-Destructive Testing of Semiconductors Using Surface Acoustic Wave.

    1983-12-31

    are thin film A). fingers (1 ;im) alternately connected to bus pads as shown in fig. 1.lb. An RF voltage applied to the transducer creates an...inversion 140 layer sets in (the deep depletion regime). This timing arrangement is not difficult to attain, due to the long minoritv carriler response

  8. Modelling and simulation of eddy current non-destructive testing

    Mansir, H.; Burais, N.; Nicolas, A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the practical configuration for detecting cracks in conducting materials by eddy current non destructive testing. An electromagnetic field formulation is proposed using Maxwell's relations. Geometrical and physical properties of the crack are taken into account by several models, particularly with a new finite element called ''crack element''. Modelisation is applied to sensor impedance calculation with classical numerical methods [fr

  9. Non-destructive testing of tubes by electromagnetic processes

    Kowarski, A.

    1979-01-01

    This article reviews and assesses the non destructive testing techniques used for locating defects in tubes by electromagnetic processes. These form the basis of many testing devices, the diversity of which results from various factors: range of materials, methods of fabrication, specific defects of the product. There are two distinct main families of devices utilising two different principles: dispersion flow and Foucault currents [fr

  10. Mathematical modelling of ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation

    Larissa Ju Fradkin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency asymptotics have been used at our Centre to develop codes for modelling pulse propagation and scattering in the near-field of the ultrasonic transducers used in NDE (Non-Destructive Evaluation, particularly of walls of nuclear reactors. The codes are hundreds of times faster than the direct numerical codes but no less accurate.

  11. Online Preventative Non-Destructive Evaluation in Automated Fibre Placement

    Tonnaer, R.; Shroff, S.; Groves, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    The strict quality requirements for aerospace composite struc- tures give rise to costly quality control procedures. In automated bre placement (AFP) these procedures rely heavily on manual work and inspection. This research aims at performing preventative non-destructive evaluation of composite

  12. NonDestructive Evaluation for Industrial & Development Applications

    Hunter, James F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Provide overview of weld inspection for Non-Destructive Testing at LANL. This includes radiography (RT/DR/CR/CT for x-ray & neutron sources), ultrasonic testing (UT/PAUT), dye penetrant inspection (PT), eddy current inspection (ET) and magnetic particle testing (MT). Facilities and capabilities for weld inspection will be summarized with examples.

  13. Laser plasma X-ray for non-destructive inspection

    Yagi, T.; Kusama, H.

    1995-01-01

    External electric field is applied to the laser produced plasma, and its found that plasma shape in soft X-ray region is changed due to the penetrating electric field. The plasma emits strong hard X-ray, which can be used as a compact light source for non-destructive inspection. (author)

  14. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Mørch, Troels

    2013-01-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit...

  15. Non-destructive testing of electronic component packages

    Anderle, C.

    1975-01-01

    A non-destructive method of investigating packaged parts of semiconductor components by X radiation is described and the relevant theoretical relations limiting this technique are derived. The application of the technique is demonstrated in testing several components. The described method is iNsimple and quick. (author)

  16. Training Guidelines in Non-destructive Testing Techniques. 2013 Edition

    2014-12-01

    The IAEA promotes industrial applications of radiation technology, including non-destructive testing (NDT), through activities such as Technical Cooperation Projects (national and regional) and Coordinated Research Projects. Through this cooperation, Member States have initiated national programmes for the training and certification of NDT personnel. National certifying bodies have also been established based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards. As part of these efforts, the IAEA has been actively involved in developing training materials. Consequently, IAEA-TECDOC-407, Training Guidelines in Non-destructive Testing Techniques, was published in 1987, then revised and expanded as IAEA-TECDOC-628 in 1991. Revisions of IAEA-TECDOC-628 were considered essential to meet the demands of end-user industries in Member States, and revised and expanded versions were issued in 2002 and 2008. These latter versions included work conducted by the International Committee for Non-Destructive Testing (ICNDT) and many national NDT societies. It is one of the publications referred to in ISO 9712:2005, Non-destructive Testing: Qualification and Certification of Personnel, which in turn is an internationally accepted standard, revised as ISO 9712:2012, Non-destructive Testing: Qualification and Certification of NDT Personnel. This publication is an updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-628. The content of which has been revised following the changes of ISO 9712 converging with EN 473 and becoming EN ISO 9712:2012, based on the experience of experts and comments from end-user industries. The details of the topics on each subject have been expanded to include the latest developments in the respective methods. The incorporated changes will assist the end-user industries to update their NDT qualification and certification schemes and course materials. This publication, like the previous versions, will continue to play an important role in international harmonization

  17. Non-destructive evaluation on mechanical properties of nuclear graphite with porous structure

    Shibata, Taiju; Hanawa, Satoshi; Sumita, Junya; Tada, Tatsuya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Iyoku, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    As a research subjects of 'Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' we started the study of development of non-destructive evaluation methods for mechanical properties of graphite components. The micro-indentation and ultrasonic wave methods are focused to evaluate the degradation of graphite components in VHTR core. For the micro-indentation method, the test apparatus was designed for the indentation test on graphite specimens with some stress levels. It is expected the stress condition is evaluated by the indentation load-depth characteristics and hardness. For the ultrasonic wave method, ultrasonic wave testing machine and probes were prepared for experiments. It is expected that the stress and inner porous conditions are evaluated by the wave propagation characteristics with wave-pore interaction model. R and D plan to develop the non-destructive evaluation method for graphite is presented in this paper. (This study is the result of contract research in the fiscal year of 2004, Research and development for advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor fuels and graphite components,' which is entrusted to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.) (author)

  18. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass.We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass.The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation.It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected,which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux.Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory.For larger thermal perturbation,however,the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model,i.e.the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition,is eliminated by the general heat conduction law,which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  19. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    HU RuiFeng; CAO BingYang

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass. We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass. The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation. It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected, which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux. Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory. For larger thermal perturbation, however, the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model, i.e. the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition, is eliminated by the general heat conduction law, which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  20. Non-destructive investigations at the Dionisiac Frieze in the Villa of Mysteries, Pompeii

    Cristiano, Luigia; Erkul, Ercan; Jepsen, Kalle; Meier, Thomas; Vanacore, Stefano; Stefani, Grete

    2014-05-01

    The Villa of Mysteries with its Dionisiac Frieze is one of the well-known buildings of ancient Pompeii. It has been excavated in the early 20th century. Since then many initiatives have been taken for its preservation. Currently, the Frieze is investigated in detail and tests have been made to clean the wall paintings. Non-destructive investigations as infrared thermography (IR), Ground penetrating radar (GPR), and ultrasonic measurements have been performed in order to test if these methods are well suited to reveal the walls' and paintings' structure and to identify the detachments or cracks. IR, GPR and ultrasonic measurements have different penetration capabilities and resolution in depths. So, using these three methods simultaneously can improve the knowledge of the investigated structures at several depths from millimetres and centimetres to metres. It has been tested if detachments of the paintings, cracks, or alterations of the paintings can be detected by passive and active IR measurements. 6 passive and 3 active measurements have been conducted on the Dionisiac Frieze. Lateral temperature differences present at the Frieze are mapped by passive measurements. Here, we show that temperature differences up to about 0.3°C are present and detectable. These small changes in temperature may be related to detachments, cracks, or wet areas. By active IR measurements the paintings are artificially heated by about 1°C and the cooling to normal temperature is observed and analyzed. Lateral differences in the heating and cooling behavior are related to variability in the heat absorption properties and in thermal conductivity. It is shown that detachments as well as restorative treatments are associated with changes in the thermal behavior. In order to image the construction and the condition of the investigated walls, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was measured with a 2 GHz antenna. Each profile was 1.2 m long, the spacing cross-line was 3 cm and in-line 1 mm. The

  1. Non-destructive microstructural analysis with depth resolution

    Zolotoyabko, E. E-mail: zloto@tx.technion.ac.il; Quintana, J.P

    2003-01-01

    A depth-sensitive X-ray diffraction technique has been developed with the aim of studying microstructural modifications in inhomogeneous polycrystalline materials. In that method, diffraction profiles are measured at different X-ray energies varied by small steps. X-rays at higher energies probe deeper layers of material. Depth-resolved structural information is retrieved by comparing energy-dependent diffraction profiles. The method provides non-destructive depth profiling of the preferred orientation, grain size, microstrain fluctuations and residual strains. This technique is applied to the characterization of seashells. Similarly, energy-variable X-ray diffraction can be used for the non-destructive characterization of different laminated structures and composite materials.

  2. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  3. Non-destructive elecrochemical monitoring of reinforcement corrosion

    Nygaard, Peter Vagn

    been widely accepted as a non-destructive ”state of the art” technique for detection of corrosion in concrete structures. And, over the last decade, the trend in corrosion monitoring has moved towards quantitative non-destructive monitoring of the corrosion rate of the steel reinforcement. A few...... corrosion rate measurement instruments have been developed and are commercially available. The main features of these instruments are the combined use of an electrochemical technique for determining the corrosion rate and a so-called ”confinement technique”, which in principle controls the polarised surface...... area of the reinforcement, i.e. the measurement area. Both on-site investigations and laboratory studies have shown that varying corrosion rates are obtained when the various commercially available instruments are used. And in the published studies, conflicting explanations are given illustrating...

  4. Non-destructive examination system of vitreous body

    Shibata, Takuma; Gong, Jin; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Masato, Makino; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Nishitsuka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Eyeball plays a quite important role in acquiring the vision. Vitreous body occupies the largest part of the eyeball and consists of biological, elastic, transparent, gel materials. In the present medical examination, the non-destructive examination method of the vitreous body has not been well established. Here, we focus on an application of dynamic light scattering to this topic. We tried to apply our lab-made apparatus, scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS), which was specially designed for observing the nanometer-scale network structure in gel materials. In order to examine the vitreous body using SMILS method, a commercial apparatus, nano Partica (Horiba Co. Ltd.) was also customized. We analyzed vitreous body using both the SMILS and the customized nano Partica. We successfully examined the vitreous bodies of healthy pigs in non-destructive way.

  5. Advanced uses of radiation in non-destructive evaluation

    Baldev Raj; Viswanathan, B.; Venkataraman, B.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing demand for newer materials and stringency of specifications, have expanded the scope of advanced uses of radiation in non-destructive evaluation of materials and industrial components. This paper highlights the application of some of the advanced techniques of radiography and residual stress measurements, using x-ray diffraction, for materials characterisation and testing, based on the results obtained at the author's laboratory. The application of positron annihilation techniques based on the use of radioisotopes and high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy, is introduced as non-destructive tools for materials characterisation. Selective examples of significant results obtained using this technique, on the radiation damage and early stages of fatigue damage in technologically important steels are reviewed from recent works at the author's laboratory and elsewhere. The scope of application of charge particle based thin layer activation method is briefly outlined. (author)

  6. The non-destructive control, a major constituent of quality

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    The number of continuous research and development works about non-destructive control in all sectors of activity is justified by the increasing need for high quality materials without anomalies. This paper gives a overview of the state of the art and of the recent trends in non-destructive testing researches in different sectors: aeronautics, nuclear industry, automotive industry. New studies and techniques are presented: ultrasonic testing of welds on large diameter pipes, automated applications of ultrasonic testing, ultrasound/computer-aided design coupling, pressure vessels inspection using acoustic emission testing (leaks detection, application to composite materials), numerical radiography (image visualisation and processing), magnetic testing (steel damage detection using Barkhausen noise testing), 'shearography' (detection of the loss of thickness in pipes due to corrosion), X-ray tomography (density measurement of sintered steels, fluid flow calculations in automobile parts). (J.S.)

  7. A non-destructive DNA sampling technique for herbarium specimens.

    Shepherd, Lara D

    2017-01-01

    Herbarium specimens are an important source of DNA for plant research but current sampling methods require the removal of material for DNA extraction. This is undesirable for irreplaceable specimens such as rare species or type material. Here I present the first non-destructive sampling method for extracting DNA from herbarium specimens. DNA was successfully retrieved from robust leaves and/or stems of herbarium specimens up to 73 years old.

  8. Non-destructive tests of capsules for JMTR irradiation examination

    Tanaka, Hidetaka; Nagao, Yoshiharu; Sato, Masashi; Osawa, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    Irradiation examination are increasing in advanced irradiation research for accurate prediction control and evaluation of irradiation parameter such as neutron fluence, etc. by using JMTR. Irradiation capsule internals are therefore structurally complicated recently. This report described the procedure of non destructive tests such as radiographic test, penetrant test, ultrasonic test, etc. for inspection of irradiation capsules in JMTR, and the result of Test-case of confirmation procedure for internal parts of irradiation capsules. (author)

  9. Non destructive testing and neutron radiography in 1994

    Bayon, G.

    1994-01-01

    Neutron radiography has been considered for a long time as a promising technique; however it plays a minor part in the world of non destructive testing today, due to the lack of suitable neutron sources and lack of new industrial applications. This paper reviews the present status of neutron sources, neutron radiography activities, especially in France (such as the neutron-capture-issued secondary radiation spectrometry), in nuclear, aerospace, aeronautical and metallurgical sectors, and the last applications of neutron dynamic imaging. 9 refs

  10. Guidebook on non-destructive testing of concrete structures

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has been active in the promotion of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology for many years. NDT is an important component of a number of IAEA regional projects. This guidebook deals with NDT of concrete. This book covers a wide range of NDT methods including industrial radiography, ultrasonic testing, electromagnetic testing, infrared thermography, etc. Codes, standards, specifications and procedures are also covered

  11. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  12. Laser photothermal non-destructive metrology of cracks in un-sintered powder metallurgy manufactured automotive transmission sprockets

    Tolev, J; Mandelis, A

    2010-01-01

    A non-contact and non-intrusive method of revealing crack presence in un-sintered (green) automotive transmission parts (sprockets), manufactured by means of a powder metallurgy technology based on analysis of photo-thermal radiometric (PTR) signals and their statistical analysis was developed. The inspection methodology relies on the interaction of a modulated laser generated thermal wave with the potential crack and the resulting change in amplitude and phase of the detected signal [1-5]. The crack existence at points in high stress regions of a group of green (unsintered) sprockets was evaluated through frequency scans. The results were validated by independent destructive cross-sectioning of the sprockets following sintering and polishing. Examination of the sectioned sprockets under a microscope at the locations where signal changes was used for correlation with the PTR signals. Statistical analysis confirmed the capabilities of the method to detect the presence of hairline cracks (∼5 - 10 μm size) with excellent sensitivity (91%) and good accuracy (78%) and specificity (61%). This measurement technique and the associated statistical analysis can be used as a simple and reliable on-line inspection methodology of industrial powder metallurgy manufactured steel products for non-destructive quality and feedback control of the parts forming process.

  13. A study of non destructive integrity assessment method for structural materials of nuclear reactor. Part 2

    Totsuka, Nobuo; Matsuzaki, Akihiro

    2011-01-01

    The hardness measurement is one of the most effective way for non destructive integrity assessment evaluating structural materials of nuclear power plants before and after suffering an earthquake. Then an actual evaluation method and effectiveness of the method using portable hardness tester has been reported in the previous Journal. In this study, the developing method which can evaluate more accurately the amount of plastic deformation of the material caused by an earthquake has been reported, based on the experimental results about the hardness change of the material considering the thermal aging due to the plant operation and the cyclic deformation suffered by an earthquake. (author)

  14. Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks

    Kosek, Jacek; Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide; Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix

    2014-01-01

    In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes

  15. Non-destructive automated express method for determining the inclination of chromium-nickel steels IGC

    Nazarov, A.A.; Kamenev, Yu.B.; Kuusk, L.V.; Kormin, E.G.; Vasil'ev, A.N.; Sumbaeva, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of automated control of 18-10-type steel inclination to IGC are developed and a corresponding automated testing complex (ATS) is created. 08Kh18N10T steel samples had two variants of thermal treatment: 1) 1200 deg (5 h), 600 deg (50 h); 2) 1200 deg (5 h). Methods of non-destructive automated control of 18-10-type steel inclination to IGC are developed on the basis of potentiodynamic reactivation (PR) principle. Automated testing complex is developed, which has undergone experimental running and demonstrated a high confidence of results, reliability and easy operation

  16. Non-destructive qualification tests for ITER cryogenic axial insulating breaks

    Kosek, Jacek [Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland and CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lopez, Roberto; Tommasini, Davide [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211 (Switzerland); Rodriguez-Mateos, Felix [CERN, Geneva 23,CH-1211, Switzerland and ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2014-01-29

    In the ITER superconducting magnets the dielectric separation between the CICC (Cable-In-Conduit Conductors) and the helium supply pipes is made through the so-called insulating breaks (IB). These devices shall provide the required dielectric insulation at a 30 kV level under different types of stresses and constraints: thermal, mechanical, dielectric and ionizing radiations. As part of the R and D program, the ITER Organization launched contracts with industrial companies aimed at the qualification of the manufacturing techniques. After reviewing the main functional aspects, this paper describes and discusses the protocol established for non-destructive qualification tests of the prototypes.

  17. Interactive ultrasonic field simulations for complex non-destructive testing configurations

    Chouh, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    In order to fulfill increasing reliability and safety requirements, non-destructive testing techniques are constantly evolving and so does their complexity. Consequently, simulation is an essential part of their design. We developed a tool for the simulation of the ultrasonic field radiated by any planar probes into non-destructive testing configurations involving meshed geometries without prominent edges, isotropic and anisotropic, homogeneous and heterogeneous materials, and wave trajectories that can include reflections and transmissions. We approximate the ultrasonic wave fronts by using polynomial interpolators that are local to ultrasonic ray pencils. They are obtained using a surface research algorithm based on pencil tracing and successive subdivisions. Their interpolators enable the computation of the necessary quantities for the impulse responses on each point of a sampling of the transducer surface that fulfills the Shannon criterion. By doing so, we can compute a global impulse response which, when convolved with the excitation signal of the transducer, results in the ultrasonic field. The usage of task parallelism and of SIMD instructions on the most computationally expensive steps yields an important performance boost. Finally, we developed a tool for progressive visualization of field images. It benefits from an image reconstruction technique and schedules field computations in order to accelerate convergence towards the final image. (author) [fr

  18. Non-destructive evaluation of timber structures in a historical building of Tiradentes , MG

    Luciana Barbosa de Abreu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to the durability of wood are commonly found in historical buildings structures. Preservation and conservation resolutions must be adopted, in order to avoid losses and substitutions, which mischaracterize buildings. Non-destructive methods for detecting deterioration should be used in order to substantiate decisions and increase the longevity of historical heritage. This work was carried out in order to perform non-destructive essays to infer about the integrity of a beam and a pillar of the original construction of the Sobrado Ramalho, a historical building of the city of Tiradentes, MG. The equipments utilized were the Stress Wave Timer and resistograph. Samples of the elements were taken for analysis of density. The results showed that, in both structures, to calculate the dynamic modulus of elasticity, there was no significant difference for the application of stress wave timer on the alignments studied. There was no significant difference between the directions of application of the resistograph on the pillar, due to its apparent entirety and regular sessions, practically square, and to not being loaded eccentrically. In the case of the beam, there was significant difference, presumably because it has cracks in its traction line. The equipments, unknown by professionals of heritage conservation allow promising methodologies for inspection of timber structures in service.

  19. Isotope techniques in non-destructive testing of dynamic systems

    Singh, Gursharan; Pant, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    A few applications of gamma scanning and radiotracer techniques for Non-destructive Testing (NDT) of dynamic systems in chemical and petrochemical industries are briefly discussed in this paper. Examples of gamma scanning inspections carried out for troubleshooting of various types of columns such as vacuum, extraction, separator and rectifier, with trays and packed beds and having diameters from 1 meter to 8.4 meters are given. Radiotracer applications for Residence Time Distribution (RTD) studies on different systems like an aniline production reactor in a chemical industry and a laboratory scale solid-liquid fluidized bed column are mentioned. (author)

  20. Non-destructive testing and radiation in industry

    Woodford, C; Ashby, P.

    2001-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is a little known discipline which uses non-invasive and passive techniques to investigate the condition of materials and structures. Some of these techniques employ the use of radioisotopes. The penetrating radiations produced by these materials are applied in various ways to obtain the required information. This presentation is an overview of the application of radioisotopes within the scope of NDT. Notwithstanding the well established use of traditional materials, new forms of radioisotopes are being developed which will extend their capabilities

  1. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  2. Non-destructive beam profile monitor at HIMAC

    Sato, S.; Araki, N.; Hosaka, M.

    1995-01-01

    Non-destructive profile monitors (NDPM), based on micro-channel plate (MCP), have been developed and installed in both the synchrotron ring and high-energy beam transport (HEBT) line at HIMAC. Beam test using these monitors have been carried out since April of 1995 to investigate a change of vertical beam size in synchrotron and a possibility of observing beam with high energy by one pass. In this paper the measurement system is mainly reported, and the preliminary results are also briefly presented. (author)

  3. Recent Trends in Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Sensing

    Klara Capova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with material electromagnetic non-destructive testing (eNDT with emphasize on eddy current testing (ECT. Various modifications of ECT sensing are compared and discussed from the desired detected signal characteristics point of view. Except of the optimization of usual probe coils arrangements for the concrete applications, the new magnetic sensors as giant magneto-resistance (GMR and spin dependent tunneling (SDT are presented. The advanced ECT sensors are characterized by their sensitivity, frequency range and sensor dimensions

  4. Augmented reality application for industrial non-destructive inspection training

    Amza, Catalin Gheorghe; Zapciu, Aurelian; Teodorescu, Octav

    2018-02-01

    Such a technology - Augmented Reality (AR) has great potential of use, especially for training purposes of new operators on using expensive equipment. In this context, the paper presents an augmented reality training system developed for phased-array ultrasonic non-destructive testing (NDT) equipment. The application has been developed using Unity 5.6.0 game-engine platform integrated with Vuforia sdk toolkit for devices with Android operating system. The test results performed by several NDT operators showed good results, thus proving the potential of using the application in the industrial field.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of UV pulse laser-induced damage performance of fused silica optics.

    Huang, Jin; Wang, Fengrui; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Jiang, Xiaodong; Sun, Laixi; Ye, Xin; Li, Qingzhi; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo; Sun, Dunlu

    2017-11-24

    The surface laser damage performance of fused silica optics is related to the distribution of surface defects. In this study, we used chemical etching assisted by ultrasound and magnetorheological finishing to modify defect distribution in a fused silica surface, resulting in fused silica samples with different laser damage performance. Non-destructive test methods such as UV laser-induced fluorescence imaging and photo-thermal deflection were used to characterize the surface defects that contribute to the absorption of UV laser radiation. Our results indicate that the two methods can quantitatively distinguish differences in the distribution of absorptive defects in fused silica samples subjected to different post-processing steps. The percentage of fluorescence defects and the weak absorption coefficient were strongly related to the damage threshold and damage density of fused silica optics, as confirmed by the correlation curves built from statistical analysis of experimental data. The results show that non-destructive evaluation methods such as laser-induced fluorescence and photo-thermal absorption can be effectively applied to estimate the damage performance of fused silica optics at 351 nm pulse laser radiation. This indirect evaluation method is effective for laser damage performance assessment of fused silica optics prior to utilization.

  6. Training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques

    1987-02-01

    With the conclusion in 1979 of a successful Agency executed UNDP project in Argentina, whose aim was the establishment of a national non-destructive testing centre, the Agency was asked by other countries in the Latin American and Caribbean Region to evaluate the possibility of transferring this success to the whole region. In 1982, with the financial cooperation of UNFSSTD and UNIDO, a regional project was started with the principal objective of assisting the countries in the region to reinforce autonomous NDT capability through regional cooperation. One essential component of this project has been the harmonization of training through the development and use of course syllabi by the 17 countries now participating in the project. To this end, a Regional Working Group was formed and one of its tasks is the development of these syllabi for the more common NDT methods. This publication is a collection of the training programmes elaborated to date which have so far been followed by some 10,000 persons in the region who have received training in NDT as a direct result of the project. These syllabi take into account the development work done by the International Committee for Non-destructive Testing and many national training programmes, and are meant to be an objective guide to assist in the formation of NDT personnel

  7. Potential development of non-destructive assay for nuclear safeguards

    Benoit, R.; Cuypers, M.; Guardini, S.

    1983-01-01

    After a brief summary on the role of non-destructive assay in safeguarding the nuclear fuel cycle, its evolution from NDA methods development to other areas is illustrated. These areas are essentially: a) the evaluation of the performances of NDA techniques in field conditions; b) introduction of full automation of measurement instrument operation, using interactive microprocessors and of measurement data handling evaluation and retrieval features; c) introduction of the adequate link and compatibility to assure NDA measurement data transfer in an integrated safeguards data evaluation scheme. In this field, the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) is developing and implementing a number of techniques and methodologies allowing an integrated and rational treatment of the large amount of safeguards data produced. In particular for the non-destructive assay measurements and techniques, the JRC has studied and tested methodologies for the automatic generation and validation of data of inventory verification. In order to apply these techniques successfully in field, the JRC has studied the design requirements of NDA data management and evaluation systems. This paper also discusses the functional requirements of an integrated system for NDA safeguards data evaluation

  8. Non-destructive nuclear forensics of radioactive samples

    Rogge, R.B. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Alexander, Q.; Bentoumi, G.; Dimayuga, F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Flacau, R. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Li, G.; Li, L.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    It is a matter of public safety and security to be able to examine suspicious packages of unknown origin. If the package is radioactive and sealed (i.e., the radioactive materials contained in the package, including their chemical and physical forms, are unknown), there is a significant risk on how to handle the package and eventually safely dispose of its contents. Within the context of nuclear security, nuclear forensics helps address the key issue of identifying the nature and origin of radioactive and nuclear material in order to improve physical protection measures and prevent future theft or diversion of these materials. Nuclear forensics utilizes analytical techniques, destructive and non-destructive, developed for applications related to nuclear fuel cycles. This paper demonstrates the non-destructive examination techniques that can be used to inspect encapsulated radioactive samples. Results of γ spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, neutron imaging, neutron diffraction, and delayed neutron analysis as applied to an examination of sealed capsules containing unknown radioactive materials are presented. The paper also highlights the value of these techniques to the overall nuclear forensic investigation to determine the origin of these unknown radioactive materials. (author)

  9. Challenges of Non-Destructive Assay Waste Measurement

    Shull, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Historically, the Savannah River Site (SRS) routinely produced special nuclear material (SNM), which provided stable measurement conditions for the non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. However, the main mission of SRS has changed from the production of SNM to the processing of waste and material stabilization. Currently, the purpose of processing is to recover the SNM from the waste and stabilization materials, much of which is from other DOE facilities. These missions are usually of a short duration, but require non-destructive assay (NDA) accountability measurements on materials of varying composition and geometric configuration. These missions usually have cost and time constraints, which sometimes require re-application of existing NDA methods to waste measurements. Usually, each new material or re-application of the NDA method to a different SNM campaign requires new standards and timely re-calibration of the method. These constraints provide numerous challenges for the NDA methods, particularly in the area of measurement uncertainty. This paper will discuss the challenges of these situations, mainly from a measurement and statistical point of view and provide some possible solutions to the problems encountered. Specific examples will be discussed for the segmented gamma scanner (SGS), neutron multiplicity counter (NMC) and passive neutron coincidence counter (PNCC), which are some of the most common NDA instruments at SRS

  10. Comparative study of destructive and non-destructive methods in the activation analysis of rocks

    Vasconcellos, M.B.A.

    1978-01-01

    A comparative study between non-destructive thermal neutron activation analysis and activation analysis with radiochemical group separation is made Both methods are applied to the determination of trace elements minor and major elements in rocks. The treatment of the rocks, with special reference to the problems related to grinding and contamination by foreign elements is described. The choice of standards for multielement trace activation analysis is discussed. Two types of computer programs for the evalution of data obtained through Ge-li detector counting are used. All the phases of the destructive and non destructive analysis are described. In the destructive analysis, an adaptation of the group separation scheme developed by Morrison et al for the activation analysis of geological samples is made. The changes introduced make the radiochemical separation simpler and more rapid. Both destructive and non destructive methods are tested by means of the analysis of the United States Geological Survey standard rock AGV-1, which has been analysed by many authors. The same procedure is then applied to some alcaline rocks taken from the apatite mine of Jacupiranga, in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The knowledge of the trace element concentration in these rocks is important for geochemical studies. A detailed study of the possible interferences encountered in the neutron activation analysis of these rocks is made, considering the interferences due to major activities, and to the proximity of the several gamma ray energies of the radioisotopes produced. Finally, the comparative study between the two methods is presented, using statistical tests for the quantitative evalution of results. (Author) [pt

  11. Non-destructive Testing of Wood Defects Based on Discriminant Analysis Method

    Wenshu LIN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The defects of wood samples were tested by the technique of stress wave and ultrasonic technology, and the testing results were comparatively analyzed by using the Fisher discriminant analysis in the statistic software of SPSS. The differences of defect detection sensitivity and accuracy for stress wave and ultrasonic under different wood properties and defects were concluded. Therefore, in practical applications, according to different situations the corresponding wood non- destructive testing method should be used, or the two detection methods are applied at the same time in order to compensate for its shortcomings with each other to improve the ability to distinguish the timber defects. The results can provide a reference for further improvement of the reliability of timber defects detection.

  12. Microwave Metamaterial Absorber for Non-Destructive Sensing Applications of Grain

    Yin Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a metamaterial absorber at microwave frequencies with significant sensitivity and non-destructive sensing capability for grain samples. This absorber is composed of cross-resonators periodically arranged on an ultrathin substrate, a sensing layer filled with grain samples, and a metal ground. The cross-resonator array is fabricated using the printed circuit board process on an FR-4 board. The performance of the proposed metamaterial is demonstrated with both full-wave simulation and measurement results, and the working mechanism is revealed through multi-reflection interference theory. It can serve as a non-contact sensor for food quality control such as adulteration, variety, etc. by detecting shifts in the resonant frequencies. As a direct application, it is shown that the resonant frequency displays a significant blue shift from 7.11 GHz to 7.52 GHz when the mass fraction of stale rice in the mixture of fresh and stale rice is changed from 0% to 100%. In addition, the absorber shows a distinct difference in the resonant absorption frequency for different varieties of grain, which also makes it a candidate for a grain classification sensor. The presented scheme could open up opportunities for microwave metamaterial absorbers to be applied as efficient sensors in the non-destructive evaluation of agricultural and food product quality.

  13. Design of an electron-accelerator-driven compact neutron source for non-destructive assay

    Murata, A.; Ikeda, S.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2017-09-01

    The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism remains one of the greatest challenges to international security, and the threat is constantly evolving. In order to prevent nuclear terrorism, it is important to avoid unlawful import of nuclear materials, such as uranium and plutonium. Development of technologies for non-destructive measurement, detection and recognition of nuclear materials is essential for control at national borders. At Tokyo Institute of Technology, a compact neutron source system driven by an electron-accelerator has been designed for non-destructive assay (NDA). This system is composed of a combination of an S-band (2.856 GHz) RF-gun, a tungsten target to produce photons by bremsstrahlung, a beryllium target, which is suitable for use in generating neutrons because of the low threshold energy of photonuclear reactions, and a moderator to thermalize the fast neutrons. The advantage of this system can accelerate a short pulse beam with a pulse width less than 1 μs which is difficult to produce by neutron generators. The amounts of photons and neutron produced by electron beams were simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS 2.82. When the RF-gun is operated with an average electron beam current of 0.1 mA, it is expected that the neutron intensities are 1.19 × 109 n/s and 9.94 × 109 n/s for incident electron beam energies of 5 MeV and 10 MeV, respectively.

  14. Models on reliability of non-destructive testing

    Simola, K.; Pulkkinen, U.

    1998-01-01

    The reliability of ultrasonic inspections has been studied in e.g. international PISC (Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components) exercises. These exercises have produced a large amount of information on the effect of various factors on the reliability of inspections. The information obtained from reliability experiments are used to model the dependency of flaw detection probability on various factors and to evaluate the performance of inspection equipment, including the sizing accuracy. The information from experiments is utilised in a most effective way when mathematical models are applied. Here, some statistical models for reliability of non-destructive tests are introduced. In order to demonstrate the use of inspection reliability models, they have been applied to the inspection results of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) type flaws in PISC III exercise (PISC 1995). The models are applied to both flaw detection frequency data of all inspection teams and to flaw sizing data of one participating team. (author)

  15. Training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques. 1991 edition

    1991-10-01

    Non-destructive testing methods (NDT), by their very nature, allow components to be fully examined for properties or flaws without interfering with their usefulness. This grouping of inspection methods has grown from a handful of primitive techniques practised by artists to a widely known discipline which is an essential part of quality control, largely as a result of the standards demanded by the nuclear and aerospace industries. Recognizing the need for an international publication of NDT training syllabi, the IAEA Consultants Meeting on ''Qualification and Certification of NDT Personnel'' (Milan, 20-21 May 1986), recommended that the Agency publish the guidelines developed by Regional Working Group of the Latin America and Caribbean project. It was first issued in English in 1987 and has now been re-edited in English and Spanish and enlarged by the addition of programmes for other techniques

  16. Non-destructive evaluation of water ingress in photovoltaic modules

    Bora, Mihail; Kotovsky, Jack

    2017-03-07

    Systems and techniques for non-destructive evaluation of water ingress in photovoltaic modules include and/or are configured to illuminate a photovoltaic module comprising a photovoltaic cell and an encapsulant with at least one beam of light having a wavelength in a range from about 1400 nm to about 2700 nm; capture one or more images of the illuminated photovoltaic module, each image relating to a water content of the photovoltaic module; and determine a water content of the photovoltaic module based on the one or more images. Systems preferably include one or more of a light source, a moving mirror, a focusing lens, a beam splitter, a stationary mirror, an objective lens and an imaging module.

  17. Non-destructive study of iron gall inks in manuscripts

    Duh, Jelena; Krstić, Dragica; Desnica, Vladan; Fazinić, Stjepko

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to establish an effective procedure of iron gall ink characterization using complementary non-destructive methods. By this, it is possible to better understand correlation of chemical composition of the inks and the state of preservation of iron gall ink manuscripts, as well as the effects of conservation treatment performed upon them. This study was undertaken on a bound 16th century manuscript comprised of different types of paper and ink from the National and University Library in Zagreb. Analytical methods used included Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF). Paper fibers were identified by optical microscopy and the degradation state, as well as ink differentiation, transit metal migrations and detection of stains, with ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) photography. The techniques applied on original writing materials gave important information about paper and ink composition, its preservation state and efficiency of conservation treatment performed upon them.

  18. Non destructive Testing (NDT) of concrete containing hematite

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of Non-destructive ultrasonic and rebound hammer measurements on concrete containing hematite. Local hematite stones were used as aggregates to produce high density concrete for application in X-and gamma shielding. Concrete cube samples (150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm) containing hematite as coarse aggregates were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of fine aggregate. All samples were cured in water for 7 days and then tested after 28 days. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  19. Training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques

    1991-10-01

    Non-destructive testing methods (NDT), by their very nature, allow components to be fully examined for properties or flaws without interfering with their usefulness. This grouping of inspection methods has grown from a handful of primitive techniques practised by artists to a widely known discipline which is an essential part of quality control, largely as a result of the standards demanded by the nuclear and aerospace industries. Recognizing the need for an international publication of NDT training syllabi, the IAEA Consultants Meeting on ''Qualification and Certification of NDT Personnel'' (Milan, 20-21 May 1986), recommended that the Agency publish the guidelines developed by Regional Working Group of the Latin America and Caribbean project. It was first issued in English in 1987 and has now been re-edited in English and Spanish and enlarged by the addition of programmes for other techniques

  20. Data fusion: a new concept in non-destructive testing

    Georgel, B.; Lavayssiere, B.

    1995-01-01

    Non-destructive testing of some components (made of austenitic steel, or of a complex shape for example) requires quite often the use of several methods such as X-ray, ultrasonics, Eddy Currents. Then, a skilled operator is able to perform the expertise of the specimen. The main goal of this paper is to show that 3D diagnosis may be improved in term of reliability and precision by fusion of several NDT techniques. A data fusion algorithm is more that trying to improve the visualisation or the rendering of NDT data sets. It consists for each volume element, in computing a new value representing the combined information and in formulating a diagnosis on this basis. To achieve such a goal, know-how in modeling of physical phenomena and in applied mathematics is crucial. (authors). 4 refs., 2 figs

  1. Signal processing for non-destructive testing of railway tracks

    Heckel, Thomas; Casperson, Ralf; Rühe, Sven; Mook, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    Increased speed, heavier loads, altered material and modern drive systems result in an increasing number of rail flaws. The appearance of these flaws also changes continually due to the rapid change in damage mechanisms of modern rolling stock. Hence, interpretation has become difficult when evaluating non-destructive rail testing results. Due to the changed interplay between detection methods and flaws, the recorded signals may result in unclassified types of rail flaws. Methods for automatic rail inspection (according to defect detection and classification) undergo continual development. Signal processing is a key technology to master the challenge of classification and maintain resolution and detection quality, independent of operation speed. The basic ideas of signal processing, based on the Glassy-Rail-Diagram for classification purposes, are presented herein. Examples for the detection of damages caused by rolling contact fatigue also are given, and synergetic effects of combined evaluation of diverse inspection methods are shown.

  2. Efficiency evaluation test of waste non-destructive analysis device

    Maeda, Kouichi; Ogasawara, Kensuke; Nisizawa, Ichio

    2000-03-01

    A device for non-destructive analysis of plutonium in alpha solid waste has been installed in NUCEF; Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility. The device has been designed to determine the amount of radioisotopes in carton-boxes, 45 l steel cans and 200 l steel cans containing relatively low density waste. Considering the waste density and the heterogeneity of radio-sources, the proper distance between the detector and the waste, and the open degree of the collimator have been settled, because real waste may contain several kinds of material and the heterogeneity of radioactivity. It has been confirmed from the evaluation of the detect limit that plutonium of about 8 MBq can be determined with the accuracy of 10% and the device may be proper for the practical application. (author)

  3. Catalogue of test specimens for non-destructive examination

    1985-05-01

    One of the key elements in assuring the integrity of reactor primary circuits is the availability of trustworthy non-destructive methods for detecting dangerous defects that may be present. Various approaches to making such examinations are being developed, including the use of ultrasonic and radiographic techniques. To demonstrate their capability and reliability, they must be tested on steel specimens reproducing the various types of faults which may arise in real primary circuit vessels and piping. Such specimens are costly to fabricate. It is therefore clearly desirable that existing specimens should be made accessible to as many organisations as possible for testing. This catalogue contains detailed Information on forty-odd deliberately flawed plates, blocks, vessels, etc. which have been produced in OECD countries, along with the name of a contact person to whom inquiries should be directed in each case

  4. Non-destructive sampling of ancient insect DNA

    Thomsen, Philip Francis; Elias, Scott; Gilbert, Tom

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major challenge for ancient DNA (aDNA) studies on insect remains is that sampling procedures involve at least partial destruction of the specimens. A recent extraction protocol reveals the possibility of obtaining DNA from past insect remains without causing visual morphological...... of 77-204 base pairs (-bp) in size using species-specific and general insect primers. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The applied non-destructive DNA extraction method shows promising potential on insect museum specimens of historical age as far back as AD 1820, but less so on the ancient permafrost......-preserved insect fossil remains tested, where DNA was obtained from samples up to ca. 26,000 years old. The non-frozen sediment DNA approach appears to have great potential for recording the former presence of insect taxa not normally preserved as macrofossils and opens new frontiers in research on ancient...

  5. Electromagnetic non-destructive technique for duplex stainless steel characterization

    Rocha, João Vicente; Camerini, Cesar; Pereira, Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Duplex stainless steel (DSS) is a two-phase (ferrite and austenite) material, which exhibits an attractive combination of mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance, being commonly employed for equipment of petrochemical plants, refining units and oil & gas platforms. The best properties of DSS are achieved when the phases are in equal proportions. However, exposition to high temperatures (e.g. welding process) may entail undesired consequences, such as deleterious phases precipitation (e.g. sigma, chi) and different proportion of the original phases, impairing dramatically the mechanical and corrosion properties of the material. A detailed study of the magnetic behavior of DSS microstructure with different ferrite austenite ratios and deleterious phases content was accomplished. The non destructive method evaluates the electromagnetic properties changes in the material and is capable to identify the presence of deleterious phases into DSS microstructure.

  6. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  7. A new look at trends in non-destructive testing

    Forsten, J.

    1984-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) has been performed extensively for several decades. However, the NDT area is not in a static condition, as sophisticated equipment, improved procedures and new innovations keep development going on. Neither is the NDT field isolated from other fields, and this influences strongly the current situation, i.e.: The cost of electronics is decreasing and complex problems can now be solved; Safety requirements on products and components become more stringent; Quality requirements of the whole life span of a product or a component become more accentuated; Improved testing reliability is required; Quality assurance requirements must be imposed on NDT itself; New materials, e.g., fiber reinforced materials, and materials combinations, e.g., sandwich structures, will be used for special purposes; New production techniques, like glueing of metals, put new requirements on the NDT techniques

  8. Application of positron annihilation techniques in non-destructive testing

    Zeng Hui; Chen Zhiqiang; Jiang Jing; Xue Xudong; Wu Yichu; Liang Jianping; Liu Xiangbing; Wang Rongshan

    2014-01-01

    Background: The investigation of the material damage state is very important for industrial application. Most mechanical damage starts with a change in the microstructure of the material. Positron annihilation techniques are very sensitive probes for detecting defects and damage on an atomic scale in materials, which are of great concern in the engineering applications. Additionally they are apparatus of non-destruction, high-sensitivity and easy-use. Purpose: Our goal is to develop a system to exploit new non-destructive testing (NDT) methods using positron annihilation spectroscopy, a powerful tool to detect vacancy-type defects and their chemical environment. Methods: A positron NDT system was designed and constructed by modifying the 'sandwich structure' of sample-source-sample in conventional Doppler broadening and positron lifetime spectrometers. Doppler broadening and positron lifetime spectra of a single sample can be measured and analyzed by subtracting the contribution of a reference sample. Results: The feasibility and reliability of positron NDT system have been tested by analyzing nondestructively deformation and damage caused by mechanical treatment or by irradiation of metal alloys. This system can be used for detecting defects and damage in thick or large-size samples, as well as for measuring the two-dimension distribution of defects in portable, sensitive, fast way. Conclusion: Positron NDT measurement shows changes in real atomic-scale defects prior to changes in the mechanical properties, which are detectable by other methods of NDT, such as ultrasonic testing and eddy current testing. This system can be developed for use in both the laboratory and field in the future. (authors)

  9. Non-Destructive Testing for Building Diagnostics and Monitoring: Experience Achieved with Case Studies

    Tavukçuoğlu Ayşe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Building inspection on site, in other words in-situ examinations of buildings is a troublesome work that necessitates the use of non-destructive investigation (NDT techniques. One of the main concerns of non-destructive testing studies is to improve in-situ use of NDT techniques for diagnostic and monitoring studies. The quantitative infrared thermography (QIRT and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV measurements have distinct importance in that regard. The joint use of QIRT and ultrasonic testing allows in-situ evaluation and monitoring of historical structures and contemporary ones in relation to moisture, thermal, materials and structural failures while the buildings themselves remain intact. For instances, those methods are useful for detection of visible and invisible cracks, thermal bridges and damp zones in building materials, components and functional systems as well as for soundness assessment of materials and thermal performance assessment of building components. In addition, those methods are promising for moisture content analyses in materials and monitoring the success of conservation treatments or interventions in structures. The in-situ NDT studies for diagnostic purposes should start with the mapping of decay forms and scanning of building surfaces with infrared images. Quantitative analyses are shaped for data acquisition on site and at laboratory from representative sound and problem areas in structures or laboratory samples. Laboratory analyses are needed to support in-situ examinations and to establish the reference data for better interpretation of in situ data. Advances in laboratory tests using IRT and ultrasonic testing are guiding for in-situ materials investigations based on measurable parameters. The knowledge and experience on QIRT and ultrasonic testing are promising for the innovative studies on today’s materials technologies, building science and conservation/maintenance practices. Such studies demand a multi

  10. QUANTITATIVE NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION (QNDE) OF THE ELASTIC MODULI OF POROUS TIAL ALLOYS

    Yeheskel, O.

    2008-01-01

    The elastic moduli of γ-TiA1 were studied in porous samples consolidated by various techniques e.g. cold isostatic pressing (CIP), pressure-less sintering, or hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Porosity linearly affects the dynamic elastic moduli of samples. The results indicate that the sound wave velocities and the elastic moduli affected by the processing route and depend not only on the attained density but also on the consolidation temperature. In this paper we show that there is linear correlation between the shear and the longitudinal sound velocities in porous TiA1. This opens the way to use a single sound velocity as a tool for quantitative non-destructive evaluation (QNDE) of porous TiA1 alloys. Here we demonstrate the applicability of an equation derived from the elastic theory and used previously for porous cubic metals

  11. Laser ultrasonics for civil engineering : some applications in development for concrete non destructive testing

    Abraham, O; Cottineau, L-M; Durand, O; Popovics, J S

    2011-01-01

    Non destructive testing of civil engineering infrastructures is becoming of primary importance for their diagnosis, residual time life estimation and/or structural health monitoring. A particularity of civil engineering application is the large size of the survey zones and the expected low cost of inspection. In this context non contact ultrasonics may offer the possibility to built robots that can automatically scan large areas (or eventually be integrated in moving vehicles) to recover mechanical properties of material or to perform imagery for geometrical information recovery. In this paper we present two possible applications of in situ laser ultrasonics : one is the detection of voids in tendon duct with the impact echo method, the other is the use of surface waves to recover mechanical properties of the first centimetres of concrete structures (here after called cover concrete).

  12. An ultrasonic methodology to non-destructively estimate the grain orientation in an anisotropic weld

    Wirdelius Håkan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The initial step towards a non-destructive technique that estimates grain orientation in an anisotropic weld is presented in this paper. The purpose is to aid future forward simulations of ultrasonic NDT of this kind of weld to achieve a better result. A forward model that consists of a weld model, a transmitter model, a receiver model and a 2D ray tracing algorithm is introduced. An inversion based on a multi-objective genetic algorithm is also presented. Experiments are conducted for both P and SV waves in order to collect enough data used in the inversion. Calculation is conducted to fulfil the estimation with both the synthetic data and the experimental data. Concluding remarks are presented at the end of the paper.

  13. Thermographic Non-Destructive Evaluation for Natural Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates

    Hai Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers, including mineral and plant fibers, are increasingly used for polymer composite materials due to their low environmental impact. In this paper, thermographic non-destructive inspection techniques were used to evaluate and characterize basalt, jute/hemp and bagasse fibers composite panels. Different defects were analyzed in terms of impact damage, delaminations and resin abnormalities. Of particular interest, homogeneous particleboards of sugarcane bagasse, a new plant fiber material, were studied. Pulsed phase thermography and principal component thermography were used as the post-processing methods. In addition, ultrasonic C-scan and continuous wave terahertz imaging were also carried out on the mineral fiber laminates for comparative purposes. Finally, an analytical comparison of different methods was given.

  14. Practical Uses of Neutron Radiography for Non-Destructive Testing

    Middleton, M.F.; de Beer, F.; Pazsit, Imre; Li, Kewen; Hilson, Jodie

    2006-01-01

    Over the past nine years, a research collaboration has been developed around the use of neutron radiography in non-destructive testing of porous rocks and other materials. This paper is a review of that work, with a critical reflection on the future potential of the technique. Neutrons are ideal for detecting water concentration, due to the high attenuation of neutrons by hydrogen, in porous or semi-porous media. Problems, which involve the determination of water concentration in porous media, are particularly amenable for neutron radiography analysis. In this context, water concentration in porous media is important in groundwater studies, petroleum reservoir studies, studies of geothermal systems, the understanding of water absorption in building materials, and more recently in mineral exploration and processing applications. Beyond these applications, neutron analysis of flawed and corroded aircraft parts has emerged as a valuable tool to support conventional non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques. Such investigations, using neutron radiography of aircraft parts, have been active in the United States, Canada and South Africa for over two decades. In 2001, an Australian Research Council (ARC) grant enabled the informal collaboration to establish a semi-portable neutron imaging system in Australia. Preliminary results of that ongoing research will also be presented herein. In overview, neutron radiography presents a powerful non-destructive testing method, which in many new areas of application remains to be evaluated. It has proven to be most valuable where water detection, in quantities greater than approximately 0.1 percent of the total volume, is required. This concentration is not a limitation on the technique, but only current applications. It has been demonstrated to be powerful tool to detect natural substances containing bound-water and neutron-attenuating minerals, such as clay, Glauconite and the various water-rich iron-bearing minerals (e.g. Goethite

  15. Non-destructive methods of control of thermo-physical properties of fuel rods

    Kruglov, A B; Kruglov, V B; Kharitonov, V S; Struchalin, P G; Galkin, A G

    2017-01-01

    Information about the change of thermal properties of the fuel elements needed for a successful and safe operation of the nuclear power plant. At present, the existing amount of information on the fuel thermal conductivity change and “fuel-shell” thermal resistance is insufficient. Also, there is no technique that would allow for the measurement of these properties on the non-destructive way of irradiated fuel elements. We propose a method of measuring the thermal conductivity of the fuel in the fuel element and the contact thermal resistance between the fuel and the shell without damaging the integrity of the fuel element, which is based on laser flash method. The description of the experimental setup, implementing methodology, experiments scheme. The results of test experiments on mock-ups of the fuel elements and their comparison with reference data, as well as the results of numerical modeling of thermal processes that occur during the measurement. Displaying harmonization of numerical calculation with the experimental thermograms layout shell portions of the fuel cell, confirming the correctness of the calculation model. (paper)

  16. Training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques: 2008 ed

    2008-12-01

    This publication is a revision of IAEA-TECDOC-628/Rev.1 and provides the basic syllabus for systems for training and certification programmes of non-destructive testing (NDT) personnel in accordance with the requirements of international standard ISO 9712 (2005). The training guidelines developed to date have been used by Member States in formulating their national NDT programmes and to provide local end user industries with a skilled workforce. The present publication accommodates the latest advancements in technology and will continue to play an important role towards international harmonization in the field of NDT. This publication contains a body of knowledge for non-destructive testing. It was developed to provide guidelines for trainers, training organizations and certification bodies, detailing the subject matter and the content for each level of certification. It is general in nature but the contents of the training should be adapted to the needs, procedures, materials and products of the customer. The recommended training hours are consistent with the edition of the standard ISO 9712 in effect at the time of preparation. All formal training described in this publication contains a theoretical portion and a practical portion. Guidance is included on the range of equipment and materials needed for instruction in each method. There is a common core of material that is required by level 3 personnel in every method. This common material has been removed from the content for the particular method and included as a separate section. All training should end with an examination and can lead to a certification. Examination and certification are not covered by this publication, but detailed information about this can be found in ISO 9712. This publication is applicable for the following methods: eddy current testing, magnetic particle testing, liquid penetrant testing, radiographic testing, and ultrasonic testing. NDT methods are now widely used in civil engineering

  17. A non-destructive method for estimating onion leaf area

    Córcoles J.I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area is one of the most important parameters for characterizing crop growth and development, and its measurement is useful for examining the effects of agronomic management on crop production. It is related to interception of radiation, photosynthesis, biomass accumulation, transpiration and gas exchange in crop canopies. Several direct and indirect methods have been developed for determining leaf area. The aim of this study is to develop an indirect method, based on the use of a mathematical model, to compute leaf area in an onion crop using non-destructive measurements with the condition that the model must be practical and useful as a Decision Support System tool to improve crop management. A field experiment was conducted in a 4.75 ha commercial onion plot irrigated with a centre pivot system in Aguas Nuevas (Albacete, Spain, during the 2010 irrigation season. To determine onion crop leaf area in the laboratory, the crop was sampled on four occasions between 15 June and 15 September. At each sampling event, eight experimental plots of 1 m2 were used and the leaf area for individual leaves was computed using two indirect methods, one based on the use of an automated infrared imaging system, LI-COR-3100C, and the other using a digital scanner EPSON GT-8000, obtaining several images that were processed using Image J v 1.43 software. A total of 1146 leaves were used. Before measuring the leaf area, 25 parameters related to leaf length and width were determined for each leaf. The combined application of principal components analysis and cluster analysis for grouping leaf parameters was used to reduce the number of variables from 25 to 12. The parameter derived from the product of the total leaf length (L and the leaf diameter at a distance of 25% of the total leaf length (A25 gave the best results for estimating leaf area using a simple linear regression model. The model obtained was useful for computing leaf area using a non-destructive

  18. Project GRETE: evaluation of non destructive testing techniques for monitoring of material degradation

    Coste, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    The material aging of major critical components of nuclear installations due to in-service conditions may lead to a degradation of their mechanical characteristics. The early detection of material changes and their monitoring using innovative non destructive testing techniques would allow to plan actions in order to prevent the apparition of macroscopic damage (e.g. cracks). One major difficulty in using these particular techniques is to correlate the changes in the measured NDT signals to the microstructural changes in the material due to aging. This problem may be solved through careful microstructural examinations of the material damage. The objective of the project GRETE is to illustrate the potential use of NDT techniques for the monitoring of material degradation through two examples: neutron irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and thermal fatigue of piping. The purpose of this paper is to present the project and its programme of work. (author)

  19. Non-destructive evaluation methods to improve quality control in low enrichment MTR fuel plate production

    Milne, J.M.; Lidington, B.; Hawker, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarises some preliminary non-destructive measurements made recently at the Harwell Laboratory on a prototype low enrichment MTR fuel plate. The measurements were intended to indicate the potential of two different techniques for improving quality control in plate production. Pulse Video Thermography (PVT) is being considered as an alternative to ultrasound transmission measurements for the detection and sizing of lack of thermal bonding between the fuel and the clad layers, either to verify the indications from the established ultrasonic methods before destroying the plate or as a replacement method of inspection. High frequency pulse-echo ultrasonics is being considered for providing maps of clad layer thickness on each side of the plate. The measurements have indicated the potential for both methods, but more work is required, using a test plate containing controlled defects, to establish their capability. (orig.)

  20. Laser induced purely-thermal-wave interferometry (PTWI) using a novel photopyroelectric (PPE) instrument

    Wang, Chinhua

    A novel purely thermal-wave interferometric technique and its applications to non-contact and non-destructive evaluation of Ti:sapphire laser crystals, high-precision measurement of thermal diffusivity of gases, and high- sensitivity gas (hydrogen) sensors have been successfully developed both theoretically and experimentally. A comprehensive theoretical and experimental analysis of the system noise and detectivity has been conducted to consolidate the basis of the technique. Unlike the conventional single-ended photopyroelectric(PPE) technique, different thermal-wave interference patterns can be obtained by adjusting two incident beams (relative intensity and phase shift) and two thermal-wave cavities on both sides of a pyroelectric detector. It is found that the large base-line signal and large optical noise, which are encountered in the single- ended PPE scheme, can be coherently and completely suppressed in the fully destructive interferometric measurement. Differential surface absorptance, differential and absolute bulk absorption coefficient of Ti:sapphire laser crystals have been separately measured using an extended PPE-interference (PPEI) theory. Unlike the single-ended PPE method, in which thermal contributions from several optical parameters are always coupled together, the destructive interferometric: method provides a unique method for extracting precise values of one of these coupled parameters, without the need of equally precise knowledge of the values of others. The comparison measurement of thermal diffusivity of air using the single-ended PPE method and the PPEI method shows that the PPEI method enhances the measuring precision by one significant figure when compared with the single-beam method. The conventionally used concept of ``thermal-wave reflection coefficient'' has been extended to a more general case that is sample- thickness dependent. A novel hydrogen gas sensor has been initialized and developed based on the PPEI technique. It is

  1. Analysis of Radiation Accident of Non-destructive Inspection and Rational Preparing Bills

    Bae, Junwoo; Yoo, Donghan; Kim, Hee Reyoung

    2013-01-01

    After 2006, according to enactment of Non-destructive Inspection Promotion Act, the number of non-destructive inspection companies and corresponding accident is increased sharply. In this research, it includes characteristic analysis of field of the non-destructive inspection. And from the result of analysis, the purpose of this research is discovering reason for 'Why there is higher accident ratio in non-destructive inspection field, relatively' and preparing effective bill for reducing radiation accidents. The number of worker for non-destructive inspect is increased steadily and non-destructive inspect worker take highest dose. Corresponding to these, it must be needed to prepare bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers. By analysis of accident case, there are many case of carelessness that tools are too heavy to carry it everywhere workers go. And there are some cases caused by deficiency of education that less understanding of radiation and poor operation by less understanding of structure of tools. Also, there is no data specialized to non-destructive inspect field. So, it has to take information from statistical data. Because of this, it is hard to analyze nondestructive inspect field accurately. So, it is required to; preparing rational bills to protect non-destructive inspect workers nondestructive inspect instrument lightening and easy manual which can understandable for low education background people accurate survey data from real worker. To accomplish these, we needs to do; analyze and comprehend the present law about non-destructive inspect worker understand non-destructive inspect instruments accurately and conduct research for developing material developing rational survey to measuring real condition for non-destructive inspect workers

  2. Recent advances in seismic non-destructive testing of concrete plate like structures

    Ryden, N.; Kristensen, A.; Jovall, O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in seismic/acoustic non-destructive testing of concrete containment walls. The presented technique is focused on the characterization of the mean stiffness (seismic velocities) and thickness of the containment wall. The Impact Echo (IE) method is a well-established technique to measure the thickness of concrete plates or to locate defects in concrete plate like structures. The method relies on a good estimate of the mean velocity through the thickness of the plate and a precisely measured thickness resonant frequency. Recently the underlying theory of the IE method has been redefined and improved based on Lamb waves in a free plate. Based on this theory we have developed a new data processing technique where both propagating and standing Lamb waves are analysed in a combined manner using multichannel data. With this approach the mean velocity through the plate thickness is evaluated by using the fundamental mode Lamb wave dispersion curves. The accuracy and detection ability of the measured resonant frequency is improved by utilizing both amplitude and phase information from the multichannel record. The method has been tested on several nuclear power plants in Sweden and Finland and proved to be more robust compared to conventional IE and surface wave measurements

  3. Training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques. 2002 edition

    2002-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is a dynamic technology and progresses with time. Since the issuance of IAEA-TECDOC-628 in 1991, the technology has experienced numerous changes. Advancements in knowledge about the behaviour of materials have led to changes in the applicable NDT codes, standards and specifications. In addition, over the last ten years, as a result of extensive research and development activities worldwide, new NDT techniques and equipment have been developed which are accepted by engineering community. To accommodate the latest developments, modifications are required to training materials. The present publication is an updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-628. The modifications were made during an Advisory Group Meeting, held in Vienna from 25-29 June 2001. The content of the first edition of IAEA-TECDOC-628 has been revised based on the experience of the experts, as well as comments of the end-user industries. The time allotment for different topics has been changed without changing the total duration. The details of the topics on each subject have been expanded to include the latest developments in the individual fields. The incorporated changes will help end-the user industries to update their NDT qualification and certification schemes, and course material

  4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and non-destructive testing

    Migliori, A.; Darling, T. W.

    The use of mechanical resonances to test properties of materials is perhaps older than the industrial revolution. Early documented cases of British railroad engineers tapping the wheels of a train and using the sound to detect cracks perhaps mark the first real use of resonances to test the integrity of high-performance alloys. Attempts were made in the following years to understand the resonances of solids mathematically, based on the shape and composition. But Nobel Laureate Lord Rayleigh best summarized the state of affairs in 1894, stating 'the problem has, for the most part, resisted attack'. More recently, modern computers and electronics have enabled Anderson and co-workers with their work on minerals, and our work at Los Alamos on new materials and manufactured components to advance the use of resonances to a precision non-destructive testing tool that makes anisotropic modulus measurements, defect detection and geometry error detection routine. The result is that resonances can achieve the highest absolute accuracy for any dynamic modulus measurement technique, can be used on the smallest samples, and can also enable detection of errors in certain classes of precision manufactured components faster and more accurately than any other technique.

  5. Non-Destructive Radiological Characterisation Of Contaminated And Activated Concrete

    Cantrel, E.

    2005-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities leads to large quantities of concrete and building material wastes. Radioactivity in building structures arise from very different physical processes such as neutron activation (bioshield), diffusion of the contaminants in the material (primary coolant leakage, maintenance and fuel loading) or aerosol deposition. The variety of the building material also extends the range of faced radiological characteristics. Therefore the minimization of concrete waste generation requires extensive characterisations and the availability of different measurement tools and methods. Up to now, these measurements came from the coring and the radiological analysis of the concrete, which is a destructive, long and costly technique. Looking for alternative solutions, SCK-CEN has started to investigate in collaboration with EDF -research and development and CEA (France) several non destructive methods based on gamma spectroscopy and different spectral examinations using mathematical calibration and modelling tools available on the market. Information on in-depth activity distribution can be derived from in situ gamma spectra by modelling absorption laws (peak to peak ratios) and photons interactions (Compton front) in the bulk of the concrete. As they combine modelling and measurement, the different methodologies being evaluated involve a lot of uncertainty sources linked to the measurement environment, to the knowledge available on site (historical background, material composition), to the operator responsible for the data acquisition and to the performance of the equipment. Therefore a detailed sensitivity analysis is required to define the range of applicability and the performances of the different methods

  6. Non-destructive technique to verify clearance of pipes

    Savidou Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A semi-empirical, non-destructive technique to evaluate the activity of gamma ray emitters in contaminated pipes is discussed. The technique is based on in-situ measurements by a portable NaI gamma ray spectrometer. The efficiency of the detector for the pipe and detector configuration was evaluated by Monte Carlo calculations performed using the MCNP code. Gamma ray detector full-energy peak efficiency was predicted assuming a homogeneous activity distribution over the internal surface of the pipe for 344 keV, 614 keV, 662 keV, and 1332 keV photons, representing Eu-152, Ag-118m, Cs-137, and Co-60 contamination, respectively. The effect of inhomogeneity on the accuracy of the technique was also examined. The model was validated against experimental measurements performed using a Cs-137 volume calibration source representing a contaminated pipe and good agreement was found between the calculated and experimental results. The technique represents a sensitive and cost-effective technology for calibrating portable gamma ray spectrometry systems and can be applied in a range of radiation protection and waste management applications.

  7. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    Dai, Y.; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H. P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg3 safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of 22Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 1025 p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa.

  8. Complex Archaeological Prospection Using Combination of Non-destructive Techniques

    Faltýnová, M.; Pavelka, K.; Nový, P.; Šedina, J.

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the use of a combination of non-destructive techniques for the complex documentation of a fabulous historical site called Devil's Furrow, an unusual linear formation lying in the landscape of central Bohemia. In spite of many efforts towards interpretation of the formation, its original form and purpose have not yet been explained in a satisfactory manner. The study focuses on the northern part of the furrow which appears to be a dissimilar element within the scope of the whole Devil's Furrow. This article presents detailed description of relics of the formation based on historical map searches and modern investigation methods including airborne laser scanning, aerial photogrammetry (based on airplane and RPAS) and ground-penetrating radar. Airborne laser scanning data and aerial orthoimages acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre were used. Other measurements were conducted by our laboratory. Data acquired by various methods provide sufficient information to determine the probable original shape of the formation and proves explicitly the anthropological origin of the northern part of the formation (around village Lipany).

  9. Complex Archaeological Prospection Using Combination of Non-destructive Techniques

    M. Faltýnová

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the use of a combination of non-destructive techniques for the complex documentation of a fabulous historical site called Devil’s Furrow, an unusual linear formation lying in the landscape of central Bohemia. In spite of many efforts towards interpretation of the formation, its original form and purpose have not yet been explained in a satisfactory manner. The study focuses on the northern part of the furrow which appears to be a dissimilar element within the scope of the whole Devil’s Furrow. This article presents detailed description of relics of the formation based on historical map searches and modern investigation methods including airborne laser scanning, aerial photogrammetry (based on airplane and RPAS and ground-penetrating radar. Airborne laser scanning data and aerial orthoimages acquired by the Czech Office for Surveying, Mapping and Cadastre were used. Other measurements were conducted by our laboratory. Data acquired by various methods provide sufficient information to determine the probable original shape of the formation and proves explicitly the anthropological origin of the northern part of the formation (around village Lipany.

  10. Non-destructive evaluation of concrete using ultrasonic pulse velocity

    Lawson, I.

    2008-06-01

    Ultrasonic pulse velocity is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques used in the assessment of concrete properties. This thesis investigates the relationship between using ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) and the conventional compressive strength tests to determine concrete uniformity. The specimens used in the studies were made of concrete with a paste content of 18% and the constituents of the specimens varied in different water-cement ratios (w/c). The UPV measurement and compressive strength tests were carried out at the concrete age of 2, 7, 15 and 28 days. The UPV and the compressive strength of concrete increase with age, but the growth rate varies with mixture proportion. A relationship curve is drawn between UPV and compressive strength for concrete having different w/c from 0.35 to 0.7. Tests were also performed using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity Method (UPVM) in detecting discontinuity and determining its depth during the early age of concrete. The test results indicate that the UPVM can be used to assess the in-situ properties of concrete or for quality control on site. The accuracy of the UPVM in detecting discontinuities ranges from 55.75 to 98.70% for ages 3 to 28 (full strength) respectively. (au)

  11. The photothermal camera - a new non destructive inspection tool

    Piriou, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Photothermal Camera, developed by the Non-Destructive Inspection Department at AREVA NP's Technical Center, is a device created to replace penetrant testing, a method whose drawbacks include environmental pollutants, industrial complexity and potential operator exposure. We have already seen how the Photothermal Camera can work alongside or instead of conventional surface inspection techniques such as penetrant, magnetic particle or eddy currents. With it, users can detect without any surface contact ligament defects or openings measuring just a few microns on rough oxidized, machined or welded metal parts. It also enables them to work on geometrically varied surfaces, hot parts or insulating (dielectric) materials without interference from the magnetic properties of the inspected part. The Photothermal Camera method has already been used for in situ inspections of tube/plate welds on an intermediate heat exchanger of the Phenix fast reactor. It also replaced the penetrant method for weld inspections on the ITER vacuum chamber, for weld crack detection on vessel head adapter J-welds, and for detecting cracks brought on by heat crazing. What sets this innovative method apart from others is its ability to operate at distances of up to two meters from the inspected part, as well as its remote control functionality at distances of up to 15 meters (or more via Ethernet), and its emissions-free environmental cleanliness. These make it a true alternative to penetrant testing, to the benefit of operator and environmental protection. (author) [fr

  12. Digital transfer of non-destructive testing images

    Nelson, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper intends to address a possible avenue to assist the Non-Destructive Testing Industry in managing and transferring results to their clients in a more efficient way. Data is sent around the globe in various forms to a multitude of destinations. The problem has been twofold in any industry: how to get the data into a communication network and, how to manage and utilize this data. There are many types of scanners which can digitize the graph which can then be displayed on a computer screen via a software programme. The one presented in this paper has been jointly developed by a Melbourne company, Compu Medics and AGFA Australia. This system can also capture a video signal from Ultrasound Units and display on the screen. The author also explore what can be done with this data. Possibilities are endless and include: sending it via satellite or land line to a remote reader, saving or archiving for future reference and utilising the data base for education

  13. The impact of thermal wave characteristics on thermal dose distribution during thermal therapy: A numerical study

    Shih, T.-C.; Kou, H.-S.; Liauh, C.-T.; Lin, W.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the propagation speed of a thermal wave in terms of the thermal relaxation time on the temperature/thermal dose distributions in living tissue during thermal therapies. The temperature field in tissue was solved by the finite difference method, and the thermal dose was calculated from the formulation proposed by Sapareto and Dewey [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10, 787-800 (1984)]. Under the same total deposited energy, for a rapid heating process the time lagging behavior of the peak temperature became pronounced and the level of the peak temperature was decreased with increasing the thermal relaxation time. When the heating duration was longer than the thermal relaxation time of tissues, there was no significant difference between the thermal dose distributions with/without considering the effect of the thermal relaxation time. In other words, when the heating duration is comparable to or shorter than the thermal relaxation time of tissue, the results of the wave bioheat transfer equation (WBHTE) are fully different from that of the Pennes' bioheat transfer equation (PBHTE). Besides, for a rapid heating process the dimension of thermal lesion was still significantly affected by perfusion, because this is what is predicted by the WBHTE but not by the PBHTE, i.e., the wave feature of the temperature field cannot fully be predicted by the PBHTE

  14. Infrared thermography non-destructive evaluation of lithium-ion battery

    Wang, Zi-jun; Li, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Qiang

    2011-08-01

    The power lithium-ion battery with its high specific energy, high theoretical capacity and good cycle-life is a prime candidate as a power source for electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Safety is especially important for large-scale lithium-ion batteries, especially the thermal analysis is essential for their development and design. Thermal modeling is an effective way to understand the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion battery during charging and discharging. With the charging and discharging, the internal heat generation of the lithium-ion battery becomes large, and the temperature rises leading to an uneven temperature distribution induces partial degradation. Infrared (IR) Non-destructive Evaluation (NDE) has been well developed for decades years in materials, structures, and aircraft. Most thermographic methods need thermal excitation to the measurement structures. In NDE of battery, the thermal excitation is the heat generated from carbon and cobalt electrodes in electrolyte. A technique named "power function" has been developed to determine the heat by chemical reactions. In this paper, the simulations of the transient response of the temperature distribution in the lithium-ion battery are developed. The key to resolving the security problem lies in the thermal controlling, including the heat generation and the internal and external heat transfer. Therefore, three-dimensional modelling for capturing geometrical thermal effects on battery thermal abuse behaviour is required. The simulation model contains the heat generation during electrolyte decomposition and electrical resistance component. Oven tests are simulated by three-dimensional model and the discharge test preformed by test system. Infrared thermography of discharge is recorded in order to analyze the security of the lithium-ion power battery. Nondestructive detection is performed for thermal abuse analysis and discharge analysis.

  15. Non-destructive testing of the MEGAPIE target

    Dai, Y., E-mail: yong.dai@psi.ch; Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Hahl, S.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H.P.; Schwarz, R.; Spahr, A.; Zanini, L.; Kuster, D.; Gavillet, D.; Wagner, W.

    2016-01-15

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) is one important part of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the MEGAPIE target. It includes visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement of the beam window of the T91 LBE container and gamma mapping of the beam window of the AlMg{sub 3} safety-container. The visual inspection showed no visible failure in the proton beam window area of the T91 LBE container. The ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in the wall thickness of the T91 beam window, which implies no severe corrosion effect induced by flowing LBE during the four-month irradiation period. The gamma mapping provided the distribution of {sup 22}Na, a spallation product, in the proton beam window area of the AlMg{sub 3} safety-container. The result was used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. A maximum proton fluence of 1.9 × 10{sup 25} p/m2 was deduced. The corresponding displacement damage degree in the T91 beam window was 7.1 dpa. - Highlights: • MEGAPIE is to design, build, operate and explore a liquid lead–bismuth (LBE) spallation target for 1 MW of beam power. • NDT of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons was conducted. • There are no evident failures and corrosion effect of LBE in the T91 steel liquid metal container after irradiation to 7.1 dpa.

  16. Parallelization of ultrasonic field simulations for non destructive testing

    Lambert, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The Non Destructive Testing field increasingly uses simulation. It is used at every step of the whole control process of an industrial part, from speeding up control development to helping experts understand results. During this thesis, a fast ultrasonic field simulation tool dedicated to the computation of an ultrasonic field radiated by a phase array probe in an isotropic specimen has been developed. During this thesis, a simulation tool dedicated to the fast computation of an ultrasonic field radiated by a phased array probe in an isotropic specimen has been developed. Its performance enables an interactive usage. To benefit from the commonly available parallel architectures, a regular model (aimed at removing divergent branching) derived from the generic CIVA model has been developed. First, a reference implementation was developed to validate this model against CIVA results, and to analyze its performance behaviour before optimization. The resulting code has been optimized for three kinds of parallel architectures commonly available in workstations: general purpose processors (GPP), many-core co-processors (Intel MIC) and graphics processing units (nVidia GPU). On the GPP and the MIC, the algorithm was reorganized and implemented to benefit from both parallelism levels, multithreading and vector instructions. On the GPU, the multiple steps of field computing have been divided in multiple successive CUDA kernels. Moreover, libraries dedicated to each architecture were used to speedup Fast Fourier Transforms, Intel MKL on GPP and MIC and nVidia cuFFT on GPU. Performance and hardware adequation of the produced codes were thoroughly studied for each architecture. On multiple realistic control configurations, interactive performance was reached. Perspectives to address more complex configurations were drawn. Finally, the integration and the industrialization of this code in the commercial NDT platform CIVA is discussed. (author) [fr

  17. Fracture-mechanical results of non-destructive testing - function, goals, methods

    Herter, K.H.; Kockelmann, H.; Schuler, X.; Waidele, H.

    2004-01-01

    Non-destructive testing provides data for fracture-mechanical analyses, e.g. defect size and orientation. On the other hand, fracture-mechanical analyses may help to define criteria for non-destructive testing, e.g. sensitivity, inspection intervals and inspection sites. The criteria applied differ as a function of the safety relevance of a component. (orig.) [de

  18. Oxidation damage evaluation by non-destructive method for graphite components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Shibata, Taiju; Tada, Tatsuya; Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-01

    To develop non-destructive evaluation methods for oxidation damage on graphite components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs), the applicability of ultrasonic wave and micro-indentation methods were investigated. Candidate graphites, IG-110 and IG-430, for core components of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were used in this study. These graphites were oxidized uniformly by air at 500degC. The following results were obtained from this study. (1) Ultrasonic wave velocities with 1 MHz can be expressed empirically by exponential formulas to burn-off, oxidation weight loss. (2) The porous condition of the oxidized graphite could be evaluated with wave propagation analysis with a wave-pore interaction model. It is important to consider the non-uniformity of oxidized porous condition. (3) Micro-indentation method is expected to determine the local oxidation damage. It is necessary to assess the variation of the test data. (author)

  19. Assessment of hydrogen levels in Zircaloy-2 by non-destructive testing

    De, P.K.; John, J.T.; Banerjee, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Thavasimuthu, M.; Raj, B.

    1998-01-01

    A non-destructive assessment of Zircaloy-2 samples charged with hydrogen in the range of 50 to 1150 mg/kg has been made using ultrasonic and eddy current testing. It has been found that the ratio of the longitudinal to the shear wave velocity is a parameter which can be directly correlated with the hydrogen content up to a level of 100 to 200 mg/kg. This parameter together with the values of longitudinal and shear wave velocities can be utilized in a multi-parametric correlation approach for estimation of higher levels of the hydrogen content (up to 1150 mg/kg). The sensitivity at different ranges has been found to be acceptable. Ultrasonic attenuation measurements at higher frequencies and eddy current test parameter are also effective for estimation of hydrogen levels above 250 mg/kg in zirconium alloys. Microstructural characterization including TEM studies have been carried out for studying the influence of the type and the morphology of hydride precipitates on ultrasonic parameters. (orig.)

  20. Non-destructive testing of full-length bonded rock bolts based on HHT signal analysis

    Shi, Z. M.; Liu, L.; Peng, M.; Liu, C. C.; Tao, F. J.; Liu, C. S.

    2018-04-01

    Full-length bonded rock bolts are commonly used in mining, tunneling and slope engineering because of their simple design and resistance to corrosion. However, the length of a rock bolt and grouting quality do not often meet the required design standards in practice because of the concealment and complexity of bolt construction. Non-destructive testing is preferred when testing a rock bolt's quality because of the convenience, low cost and wide detection range. In this paper, a signal analysis method for the non-destructive sound wave testing of full-length bonded rock bolts is presented, which is based on the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). First, we introduce the HHT analysis method to calculate the bolt length and identify defect locations based on sound wave reflection test signals, which includes decomposing the test signal via empirical mode decomposition (EMD), selecting the intrinsic mode functions (IMF) using the Pearson Correlation Index (PCI) and calculating the instantaneous phase and frequency via the Hilbert transform (HT). Second, six model tests are conducted using different grouting defects and bolt protruding lengths to verify the effectiveness of the HHT analysis method. Lastly, the influence of the bolt protruding length on the test signal, identification of multiple reflections from defects, bolt end and protruding end, and mode mixing from EMD are discussed. The HHT analysis method can identify the bolt length and grouting defect locations from signals that contain noise at multiple reflected interfaces. The reflection from the long protruding end creates an irregular test signal with many frequency peaks on the spectrum. The reflections from defects barely change the original signal because they are low energy, which cannot be adequately resolved using existing methods. The HHT analysis method can identify reflections from the long protruding end of the bolt and multiple reflections from grouting defects based on mutations in the instantaneous

  1. Solitary wave and periodic wave solutions for the thermally forced gravity waves in atmosphere

    Li Ziliang

    2008-01-01

    By introducing a new transformation, a new direct and unified algebraic method for constructing multiple travelling wave solutions of general nonlinear evolution equations is presented and implemented in a computer algebraic system, which extends Fan's direct algebraic method to the case when r > 4. The solutions of a first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equation with a higher degree nonlinear term and Fan's direct algebraic method of obtaining exact solutions to nonlinear partial differential equations are applied to the combined KdV-mKdV-GKdV equation, which is derived from a simple incompressible non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equation with the influence of thermal forcing and is applied to investigate internal gravity waves in the atmosphere. As a result, by taking advantage of the new first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equation with a fifth-degree nonlinear term and an eighth-degree nonlinear term, periodic wave solutions associated with the Jacobin elliptic function and the bell and kink profile solitary wave solutions are obtained under the effect of thermal forcing. Most importantly, the mechanism of propagation and generation of the periodic waves and the solitary waves is analysed in detail according to the values of the heating parameter, which show that the effect of heating in atmosphere helps to excite westerly or easterly propagating periodic internal gravity waves and internal solitary waves in atmosphere, which are affected by the local excitation structures in atmosphere. In addition, as an illustrative sample, the properties of the solitary wave solution and Jacobin periodic solution are shown by some figures under the consideration of heating interaction

  2. Manufacturing of reliable actively cooled fusion components - a challenge for non-destructive inspections

    Reheis, N.; Zabernig, A.; Ploechl, L.

    1994-01-01

    Actively cooled in-vessel components like divertors or limiters require high quality and reliability to ensure safe operation during long term use. Such components are subjected to very severe thermal and mechanical cyclic loads and high power densities. Key requirements for materials in question are e.g. high melting point and thermal conductivity and low atomic mass number. Since no single material can simultaneously meet all of these requirements the selection of materials to be combined in composite components as well as of manufacturing and non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods is a particularly challenging task. Armour materials like graphite intended to face the plasma and help to maintain its desired properties, are bonded to metallic substrates like copper, molybdenum or stainless steel providing cooling and mechanical support. Several techniques such as brazing and active metal casting have been developed and successfully applied for joining materials with different thermophysical properties, pursuing the objective of sufficient heat dissipation from the hot, plasma facing surface to the coolant. NDI methods are an integral part of the manufacturing schedule of these components, starting in the design phase and ending in the final inspection. They apply all kinds of divertor types (monobloc and flat-tile concept). Particular focus is put on the feasibility of detecting small flaws and defects in complex interfaces and on the limits of these techniques. Special test pieces with defined defects acting as standards were inspected. Accompanying metallographic investigations were carried out to compare actual defects with results recorded during NDI

  3. Fluctuation and thermal energy balance for drift-wave turbulence

    Kim, Chang-Bae; Horton, W.

    1990-05-01

    Energy conservation for the drift-wave system is shown to be separated into the wave-energy power balance equation and an ambient thermal-energy transport equation containing the anomalous transport fluxes produced by the fluctuations. The wave energy equation relates the wave energy density and wave energy flux to the anomalous transport flux and the dissipation of the fluctuations. The thermal balance equation determines the evolution of the temperature profiles from the divergence of the anomalous heat flux, the collisional heating and cooling mechanisms and the toroidal pumping effect. 16 refs., 1 tab

  4. Fluctuation and thermal energy balance for drift-wave turbulence

    Changbae Kim; Horton, W.

    1991-01-01

    Energy conservation for the drift-wave system is shown to be separated into the wave-energy power balance equation and an ambient thermal-energy transport equation containing the anomalous transport fluxes produced by the fluctuations. The wave energy equation relates the wave energy density and wave energy flux to the anomalous transport flux and the dissipation of the fluctuations. The thermal balance equation determines the evolution of the temperature profiles from the divergence of the anomalous heat flux, the collisional heating and cooling mechanisms and the toroidal pumping effect. (author)

  5. Response of Wood Bars to Non-Destructive Impact

    Trnka, Jan; Buchar, J.; Stoklasová, Pavla; Nedomová, Š.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2016), s. 1387-1395 ISSN 0732-8818 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fourier transform * impact force * laser vibrometer * surface wave velocity Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.932, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291747-1567

  6. Determinação do módulo de elasticidade em madeira laminada colada por meio de ensaio não destrutivo (''stress wave timer'' Determination of the elasticity module in glulam through a non destructive assay (stress wave timer

    Alexsandro Bayestorff da Cunha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As vigas estruturais de madeira são formas racionais do emprego da madeira na construção de estruturas, sendo obtidas pela associação de peças serradas e permitindo a utilização de tábuas com seções e comprimentos variados, além de combinações com madeira de qualidade diferenciada. Para atingir a resistência máxima de uma viga de madeira laminada colada, pode-se utilizar a classificação mecânica das peças por meio dinâmico. O objetivo deste estudo foi estabelecer correlação entre os métodos estático e dinâmico de classificação de vigas de madeira laminada. O trabalho foi desenvolvido com o emprego de peças de madeira serrada de Pinus taeda e adesivo resorcina fenolformaldeído. O processo de fabricação das vigas envolveu a classificação das peças, usinagem de emendas, formação das lamelas, montagem e prensagem das vigas. Já os ensaios envolveram a determinação do módulo de elasticidade por meio do ''stress wave method'' e de uma máquina universal de ensaios. Os resultados foram analisados pela análise de regressão do estabelecimento da equação de ajuste de correlação. O sistema de classificação visual utilizado na seleção de peças foi insuficiente para se atingirem os valores máximos de módulo de elasticidade; o posicionamento correto das lamelas por meio do método dinâmico de classificação teve como consequência direta o aumento do módulo de elasticidade da viga, e houve baixa correlação entre as formas de obtenção do módulo de elasticidade das vigas, não sendo possível a elaboração de equação adequada entre os métodos testados.Structural wood beams are a form of rational use of wood in construction of structures; being obtained through the association of sawn pieces, and allowing the use of boards with various sections and lengths, as well as combinations with a differentiated quality wood. To achieve the maximum strength of a Glulam, you can use the mechanical

  7. Performance and non-destructive evaluation methods of airborne radome and stealth structures

    Panwar, Ravi; Ryul Lee, Jung

    2018-06-01

    In the past few years, great effort has been devoted to the fabrication of highly efficient, broadband radome and stealth (R&S) structures for distinct control, guidance, surveillance and communication applications for airborne platforms. The evaluation of non-planar aircraft R&S structures in terms of their electromagnetic performance and structural damage is still a very challenging task. In this article, distinct measurement techniques are discussed for the electromagnetic performance and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of R&S structures. This paper deals with an overview of the transmission line method and free space measurement based microwave measurement techniques for the electromagnetic performance evaluation of R&S structures. In addition, various conventional as well as advanced methods, such as millimetre and terahertz wave based imaging techniques with great potential for NDE of load bearing R&S structures, are also discussed in detail. A glimpse of in situ NDE techniques with corresponding experimental setup for R&S structures is also presented. The basic concepts, measurement ranges and their instrumentation, measurement method of different R&S structures and some miscellaneous topics are discussed in detail. Some of the challenges and issues pertaining to the measurement of curved R&S structures are also presented. This study also lists various mathematical models and analytical techniques for the electromagnetic performance evaluation and NDE of R&S structures. The research directions described in this study may be of interest to the scientific community in the aerospace sectors.

  8. Wavelet modeling of signals for non-destructive testing of concretes

    Shao, Zhixue; Shi, Lihua; Cai, Jian

    2011-01-01

    In a non-destructive test of concrete structures, ultrasonic pulses are commonly used to detect damage or embedded objects from their reflections. A wavelet modeling method is proposed here to identify the main reflections and to remove the interferences in the detected ultrasonic waves. This method assumes that if the structure is stimulated by a wavelet function with good time–frequency localization ability, the detected signal is a combination of time-delayed and amplitude-attenuated wavelets. Therefore, modeling of the detected signal by wavelets can give a straightforward and simple model of the original signal. The central time and amplitude of each wavelet represent the position and amplitude of the reflections in the detected structure. A signal processing method is also proposed to estimate the structure response to wavelet excitation from its response to a high-voltage pulse with a sharp leading edge. A signal generation card with a compact peripheral component interconnect extension for instrumentation interface is designed to produce this high-voltage pulse. The proposed method is applied to synthesized aperture focusing technology of concrete specimens and the image results are provided

  9. NON-DESTRUCTIVE LEAK DETECTION IN GALVANIZED IRON PIPE USING NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC MODULATION METHOD

    Gigih Priyandoko

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive testing is a wide group of analysis techniques used in science and industry to evaluate the properties of a structure without causing damage to it. The main objective of this project is to carry out experiment to detect leakage in pipeline using nonlinear acoustic modulation method. The nonlinear acoustic modulation approach with low frequency excitation and high frequency acoustic wave is used to reveal modulations in the presence of leak. The pipe used in this experiment was galvanized iron pipe. The experiment is started with the experiment of undamaged specimen and followed by the experiment of damaged specimen with manually applied leak. The results obtained are being observed and the difference between the specimen without leak and with leak can be distinguished. The distance of the leak and the distance of the outlet detected is nearly accurate to the exact location which is leak at 4.0 m and outlet at 6.0 m. Therefore, the results demonstrate that leakage can be detected using nonlinear acoustic modulation, and proved the objective of distinguish the difference between the results of specimen without leak and with leak has succeeded. The damage detection process can be eased with the knowledge on the signal features.

  10. Non-destructive evaluation of containment walls in nuclear power plants

    Garnier, V.; Payan, C.; Lott, M.; Ranaivomanana, N.; Balayssac, J. P.; Verdier, J.; Larose, E.; Zhang, Y.; Saliba, J.; Boniface, A.; Sbartai, Z. M.; Piwakowski, B.; Ciccarone, C.; Hafid, H.; Henault, J. M.; Buffet, F. Ouvrier

    2017-02-01

    Two functions are regularly tested on containment walls in order to anticipate a possible accident. The first is mechanical to resist a possible internal over-pressure and the second is to prevent leakage. The AAPR reference accident is the rupture of a pipe in the primary circuit of a nuclear plant. In this case, the pressure and temperature can reach 5 bar and 180°C in 20 seconds. The national project `Non-destructive testing of the containment structures of nuclear plants' aims at studying the non-destructive techniques capable to evaluate the concrete properties and its damaging and cracks. This 4-year-project is segmented into two parts. The first consists in developing and selecting the most relevant NDEs in the laboratory to reach these goals. These evaluations are developed in conditions representing the real conditions of the stresses generated during ten-yearly visits of the plants or those related to an accident. The second part consists in applying the selected techniques to two containment structures under pressure. The first structure is proposed by ONERA and the second is a mockup of a containment wall on a 1/3 scale made by EDF within the VeRCoRs project. Communication is focused on the part of the project that concerns the damage and crack process characterization by means of NDT. The tests are done in 3 or 4 points bending in order to study the cracks' generation, their propagation, as well as their opening and closing. The main ultrasonic techniques developed concern linear or non-linear acoustic: acoustic emission [1], Locadiff [2], energy diffusion, surface wave's velocity and attenuation, DAET [3]. The recorded data contribute to providing the mapping of the investigated parameters, either in volume, in surface or globally. Digital image correlation is an important additional asset to validate the coherence of the data. The spatial normalization of the data in the specimen space allows proposing algorithms on the combination of the

  11. Non destructive characterization of cracks in concrete by ultrasonic auscultation of civil engineering structures

    Quiviger, A.; Payan, C.; Chaix, J.F.; Zardan, J.P.; Garnier, V.; Salin, J.

    2011-01-01

    Concrete Non Destructive Characterisation is one of the important issues to evaluate the life duration in the present and future civil engineering structures. The damaging modes of the structures often imply the phases of the appearance and after growth of the cracks. We have to detect, identify and characterize them. The characterization result must lead to a diagnosis of the criticality of a crack regarding to the integrity of the structure and its ability to fulfill its function. The Non Destructive Evaluation techniques are numerous but the ultrasonic ones are able to give an answer to both the characterization and the follow-up of the defect on site. Yet if this method is potentially relevant to detect and identify the cracks in the concrete, we have today a certain amount of locks to remove in order to offer robust and reproducible industrial solutions. These locks range from research points like the description of the real propagation of linear or non linear ultrasonic waves in a heterogeneous material, to more industrial concepts such as the development of devices designed to be applied in the concrete control. For this purpose, we present our latest works on this topic. We develop an overview of the problem: first, to extract the most important theoretical solutions to analyse an unstopping and closed crack in concrete with an only one face access. Then we suggest a methodology to apply one of these solutions on site. A first step of this work after having chosen a solution is to check the ability of the technique to detect a crack, and its sensitivity to the length, depth and opening of the crack. We have developed an experimental plan based on theoretical concept to compare the linear and non linear survey on a set of specimens composed of concrete beams cracked to different depths. We describe the devices and give the latest results. The non linear technique is able to extract information on the size of the cracks. It is an important step to progress in

  12. Non destructive characterization of cracks in concrete by ultrasonic auscultation of civil engineering structures

    Quiviger, A.; Payan, C.; Chaix, J.F.; Zardan, J.P.; Garnier, V. [EDF, LCND (France); Salin, J. [EDF Paris (France)

    2011-07-01

    Concrete Non Destructive Characterisation is one of the important issues to evaluate the life duration in the present and future civil engineering structures. The damaging modes of the structures often imply the phases of the appearance and after growth of the cracks. We have to detect, identify and characterize them. The characterization result must lead to a diagnosis of the criticality of a crack regarding to the integrity of the structure and its ability to fulfill its function. The Non Destructive Evaluation techniques are numerous but the ultrasonic ones are able to give an answer to both the characterization and the follow-up of the defect on site. Yet if this method is potentially relevant to detect and identify the cracks in the concrete, we have today a certain amount of locks to remove in order to offer robust and reproducible industrial solutions. These locks range from research points like the description of the real propagation of linear or non linear ultrasonic waves in a heterogeneous material, to more industrial concepts such as the development of devices designed to be applied in the concrete control. For this purpose, we present our latest works on this topic. We develop an overview of the problem: first, to extract the most important theoretical solutions to analyse an unstopping and closed crack in concrete with an only one face access. Then we suggest a methodology to apply one of these solutions on site. A first step of this work after having chosen a solution is to check the ability of the technique to detect a crack, and its sensitivity to the length, depth and opening of the crack. We have developed an experimental plan based on theoretical concept to compare the linear and non linear survey on a set of specimens composed of concrete beams cracked to different depths. We describe the devices and give the latest results. The non linear technique is able to extract information on the size of the cracks. It is an important step to progress in

  13. Non-destructive system to evaluate critical properties of asphalt compaction : [research brief].

    2013-12-01

    The Wisconsin Highway Research Program sponsored a two-stage investigation to develop a non-destructive system to evaluate critical compaction properties and characteristics of asphalt pavements during the densification process. Stage One activities ...

  14. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a clear and well-identified need for rapid, efficient, non-destructive detection and isolation of radiation damaged cells. Available commercial technologies...

  15. Space Qualified Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Technology, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Encouraged by Phase I accomplishments, the proposed Phase II program will significantly mature and align the development of a Space Qualified Non-Destructive...

  16. Space Qualified Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Technology, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen Aeronautics is proposing an innovative space qualified non-destructive evaluation and health monitoring technology. The technology is built on concepts...

  17. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate key elements of feasibility for a high speed automated time domain terahertz computed axial tomography (TD-THz CT) non destructive...

  18. Time Domain Terahertz Axial Computed Tomography Non Destructive Evaluation, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Phase 2 project, we propose to develop, construct, and deliver to NASA a computed axial tomography time-domain terahertz (CT TD-THz) non destructive...

  19. Rapid and non-destructive discrimination of tea varieties by near ...

    Rapid and non-destructive discrimination of tea varieties by near infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy coupled with classification and regression trees. SM Tan, RM Luo, YP Zhou, H Gong, Z Tan ...

  20. Microwave Detection of Laser Ultrasonic for Non-Destructive Testing, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal, we describe a program to develop a high-performance, cost-effective and robust microwave receiver prototype for multi-purpose Non-Destructive...

  1. Reactive thermal waves in energetic materials

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Reactive thermal waves (RTWs) arise in several energetic material applications, including self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), high explosive cookoff, and the detonation of heterogeneous explosives. In this paper I exmaine ideal RTWs, by which I mean that (1) material motion is neglected, (2) the state dependence of reaction is Arrhenius in the temperature, and (3) the reaction rate is modulated by an arbitrary mass-fraction-based reaction progress function. Numerical simulations demonstrate that one's natural intuition, which is based mainly upon experience with inert materials and which leads one to expect diffusion processes to become relatively slow after a short time period, is invalid for high energy, state-sensitive reactive systems. Instead, theory predicts that RTWs can propagate at very high speeds. This result agrees with estimates for detonating heterogeneous explosives, which indicate that RTWs must spread from hot-spot nucleation sites at rates comparable to the detonation speed in order to produce experimentally-observed reaction zone thicknesses. Using dimensionless scaling and further invoking the high activation energy approximation, I obtain an analytic formula for the steady plane RTW speed from numerical calculations. I then compute the RTW speed for real explosives, and discuss aspects of their behavior.

  2. On the systems of automatic non-destructive control of NPP metallic structures

    Grebennik, V.S.; Lantukh, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    The main stages of developing automatic systems of non- destructive control (NC) of NPP metallic structures are pointed out. The main requirements for automatic NC systems are formulated. Recommendations on the use of the developed experimental automatic facilities for control of certain NPP components are given. It is noted that the present facilities may be used in the future in development of modular sets of non-destructive control systems [ru

  3. Application of ICT in the non-destructive inspection of explosive device

    Wang Zhe; Li Tiantuo; Liu Zhiqiang; Pei Zhihua; Wang Zhiping

    2003-01-01

    The inspection of explosive device is an important task in the store of the weapons. The technique of non-destructive examination with radial, especially the ICT, is an effective method. The paper mainly introduces the design and the theories on the inspection system and software system of the application of industrial ICT in the non-destructive examination of explosive device, and gives a reference to the work in such fields

  4. National seminar on non-destructive evaluation techniques: proceedings cum souvenir

    Dutta, N.G.; Kulkarni, P.G.; Purushotham, D.S.C.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains selected papers presented at the National Seminar on Non-Destructive Evaluation Techniques held at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai during December 8-9, 1994. The papers covered a wide spectrum of non-destructive evaluation activities including that for quality assurance of various nuclear components and structures with the focal theme being computerization and robotics. The papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Non-destructive control: technologies, applications and markets

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    A description of NDC - nondestructive controls - (acoustic emission, Eddy currents, infrared and thermal, liquid penetrants, magnetic particles, radiographic, ultrasonic, visual and optical techniques) is given with various industrial applications and market trends. Some research projects, contacts and a list of NDC systems main manufacturers are given. (A.B.). 37 figs. and tabs

  6. Training methods in non-destructive examination with ultrasonic testing

    Walte, F.

    1986-01-01

    German concept for inspection of LWR, leak before break, basic safety; General inspection methods; Ultrasonic inspection - basic principle, generation of ultrasound, bulk and surface waves, piezo electric and electromagnetic transducers, energy balance, scattering and adsorption, divergence; Ultra techniques in compliance with KTA-rules - pulse-echo, tandem, throughtransmission; Valuation of ultrasonic indications; Pre- and in-service inspection; Practical part - ultrasonic equipment, ultrasonic piezo electric transducers, wall thickness measurement, crack depth measurement with potential drop technique. (orig.)

  7. Qualifying program on Non-Destructive Testing, Visual Inspection of the welding (level 2)

    Shafee, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive testing is a wide group of analysis technique used in science and industry to evaluate the properties of a material, component or system without causing damage. Common Non-Destructive Testing methods include ultrasonic, magnetic-particle, liquid penetrate, radiographic, visual inspection and eddy-current testing. AAEA put the new book of the Non-Destructive Testing publication series that focused on Q ualifying program on Non-Destructive Testing, visual inspection of welding-level 2 . This book was done in accordance with the Arab standard certification of Non-Destructive Testing (ARAB-NDT-CERT-002) which is agreeing with the ISO-9712 (2005) and IAEA- TEC-DOC-487. It includes twenty one chapters dealing with engineering materials used in industry, the mechanical behavior of metals, metal forming equipments, welding, metallurgy, testing of welds, introduction to Non-Destructive Testing, defects in metals, welding defects and discontinuities, introduction to visual inspection theory, properties and tools of visual testing, visual testing, quality control regulations, standards, codes and specifications, procedures of welding inspections, responsibility of welding test inspector, qualification of Non-Destructive Testing inspector and health safety during working.

  8. Development of holographic interferometer for non-destructive testing

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Baik, Sung Hoon; Shin, Jang Soo; Cho, Jai Wan; Kim, Duk Hyeon; Hong, Suck Kyoung; Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Heon Jun; Park, Chang Jin

    1993-02-01

    This project sets the goal at development of holographic interferometer. In this interferometer, fringe localization and imaging of object are considered. And collimated beam and wedge are used for the high-speed recording and formation of carrier fringes, respectively. With this real-time holographic interferometer, not only experiments were conducted on natural convection and flame jet, but also on high speed flow phenomena such as shock wave propagation. Visualization of high-speed flow is recorded in high-speed camera with framing rate ∼ 35000f/s. And to analyze axis symmetric phase object, analysis program was developed. (Author)

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Kissing Bonds using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) Spectroscopy: A Simulation Study

    Delrue, S.; Tabatabaeipour, M.; Hettler, J.; Van Den Abeele, K.

    With the growing demand from industry to optimize and further develop existing Non-Destructive Testing & Evaluation (NDT&E) techniques or new methods to detect and characterize incipient damage with high sensitivity and increased quality, ample efforts have been devoted to better understand the typical behavior of kissing bonds, such as delaminations and cracks. Recently, it has been shown experimentally that the nonlinear ultrasonic response of kissing bonds could be enhanced by using Local Defect Resonance (LDR) spectroscopy. LDR spectroscopy is an efficient NDT technique that takes advantage of the characteristic fre- quencies of the defect (defect resonances) in order to provide maximum acoustic wave-defect interaction. In fact, for nonlinear methodologies, the ultrasonic excitation of the sample should occur at either multiples or integer ratios of the characteristic defect resonance frequencies, in order to obtain the highest signal-to-noise response in the nonlinear LDR spectroscopy. In this paper, the potential of using LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds is illustrated using a 3D simulation code for elastic wave propagation in materials containing closed but dynamically active cracks or delaminations. Using the model, we are able to define an appropriate method, based on the Scaling Subtraction Method (SSM), to determine the local defect resonance frequencies of a delamination in a composite plate and to illustrate an increase in defect nonlinearity due to LDR. The simulation results will help us to obtain a better understanding of the concept of LDR and to assist in the further design and testing of LDR spectroscopy for the detection, localization and characterization of kissing bonds.

  10. 2014 annual meeting of the German Society for Non-Destructive Testing (DGZfP). NDE in research development and application

    2014-01-01

    The proceedings of the 2014 annual meeting of the German Society for Non-Destructive Testing (DGZfP) includes contributions to the following issues: process control, methods for surface analysis, dimensional measuring methods, computerized tomography, materials characterization, construction engineering, energy engineering, adhesive joints, equipment condition monitoring, thermography, guided waves, simulation - reconstruction - imaging techniques, phased array methods, combination of test procedures, microwave-terahertz-methods, fiber-reinforced composites.

  11. Non-destructive analysis of spent nuclear fuel

    Popovic, D.

    1961-12-01

    Nondestructive analysis of fuel elements dealt with determining the isotope contents which provide information about the burnup level, quantities of fission products and neutron-multiplication properties of the irradiated fuel. Methods for determination of the isotope ratio of the spent fuel are both numerical and experimental. This report deals with the experimental method. This means development of the experimental methods for direct measurement of the isotope content. A number of procedures are described: measurements of α, β and γ activities of the isotopes; measurement of secondary effects of nuclear reactions with thermal neutrons and fast neutrons; measurement of cross sections; detection of prompt and delayed neutrons

  12. Stress description model by non destructive magnetic methods

    Flambard, C.; Grossiord, J.L.; Tourrenc, P.

    1983-01-01

    Since a few years, CETIM investigates analysis possibilities of materials, by developing a method founded on observation of ferromagnetic noise. By experiments, correlations have become obvious between state of the material and recorded signal. These correlations open to industrial applications to measure stresses and strains in elastic and plastic ranges. This article starts with a brief historical account and theoretical backgrounds of the method. The experimental frame of this research is described, and the main results are analyzed. Theoretically, a model was built up, and we present it. It seems in agreement with some experimental observations. The main results concerning stress application, thermal and surface treatments (decarbonizing) are presented [fr

  13. Non-destructive inspection technology using a magnetic transmission sensor; Jiki toka sensor wo mochiita hihakai kensa gijutsu

    Obama, H.

    1996-06-01

    A newly developed magnetic sensor for non-destructive inspection has acquired the U.S. patent. The starting point of the invention was an inspection of aluminum broth bags in cup-noodle containers with aluminum leaf cover, which was asked from a food maker. A method was developed, in which the microwave is transmitted through containers below their covers and the reflected wave is detected. Then, development of an inspection apparatus for spot welding parts used for automobiles was requested. Since welding is carried out using large current for the spot welding, magnetic characteristics change greatly, which is a remarkable phenomenon appearing especially for magnetic substances. This was found out to be the same phenomenon as the hardening of swords consisting of high temperature heating, pressurizing, and quenching. This substance with two changes can be considered as another material different from the base metal. Coils fitted to impressions were made, and their test pieces were measured. The correlation coefficient over 0.9 was obtained between measured values and results of tensile strength tests. This apparatus can be applied to the non-destructive inspection of internal defects of castings. 2 figs.

  14. Research on Non-Destructive Testing Technology in Conservation Repair Project of Ancestral Temple in Mukden Palace

    Yang, J.; Fu, M.

    2017-08-01

    Due to the use of wood and other non-permanent materials, traditional Chinese architecture is one of the most fragile constructions in various heritage objects today. With the increasing emphasis on the protection of cultural relics, the repair project of wooden structure has become more and more important. There are various kinds of destructions, which pose a hidden danger to the overall safety of the ancient buildings, caused not only by time and nature, but also by improper repairs in history or nowadays. Today, the use of digital technology is a basic requirement in the conservation of cultural heritage. Detection technology, especially non-destructive testing technology, could provide more accurate records in capturing detailed physical characteristics of structures such as geometric deformation and invisible damage, as well as prevent a man-made destruction in the process of repair project. This paper aims to interpret with a typical example, Ancestral Temple in Mukden Palace, along with a discussion of how to use the non-destructive testing technology with ground penetrating radar, stress wave, resistograph and so on, in addition to find an appropriate protection method in repair project of traditional Chinese wooden architecture.

  15. RESEARCH ON NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNOLOGY IN CONSERVATION REPAIR PROJECT OF ANCESTRAL TEMPLE IN MUKDEN PALACE

    J. Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the use of wood and other non-permanent materials, traditional Chinese architecture is one of the most fragile constructions in various heritage objects today. With the increasing emphasis on the protection of cultural relics, the repair project of wooden structure has become more and more important. There are various kinds of destructions, which pose a hidden danger to the overall safety of the ancient buildings, caused not only by time and nature, but also by improper repairs in history or nowadays. Today, the use of digital technology is a basic requirement in the conservation of cultural heritage. Detection technology, especially non-destructive testing technology, could provide more accurate records in capturing detailed physical characteristics of structures such as geometric deformation and invisible damage, as well as prevent a man-made destruction in the process of repair project. This paper aims to interpret with a typical example, Ancestral Temple in Mukden Palace, along with a discussion of how to use the non-destructive testing technology with ground penetrating radar, stress wave, resistograph and so on, in addition to find an appropriate protection method in repair project of traditional Chinese wooden architecture.

  16. Thermophysical instruments for non-destructive examination of tightness and internal gas pressure or irradiated power reactor fuel rods

    Pastoushin, V.V.; Novikov, A.Yu.; Bibilashvili, Yu.K.

    1998-01-01

    The developed thermophysical method and technical instruments for non-destructive leak-tightness and gas pressure inspection inside irradiated power reactor fuel rods and FAs under poolside and hot cell conditions are described. The method of gas pressure measuring based on the examination of parameters of thermal convection that aroused in gas volume of rod plenum by special technical instruments. The developed method and technique allows accurate value determination of not only one of the main critical rod parameters, namely total internal gas pressure, that forms rod mean life in the reactor core, but also the partial pressure of every main constituent of gaseous mixture inside irradiated fuel rod, that provides the feasibility of authentic and reliable leak-tightness detection. The described techniques were experimentally checked during the examination of all types power reactor fuel rods existing in Russia (WWER, BN, RBMK) and could form the basis for new technique development for non-destructive examination of PWR (and other) type rods and FAs having gas plenum filled with spring or another elements of design. (author)

  17. Numerical modeling for the electromagnetic non-destructive evaluation: application to the non-destructive evaluation of concrete

    Travassos, L.

    2007-06-01

    Concrete is the most common building material and accounts for a large part of the systems that are necessary for a country to operate smoothly including buildings, roads, and bridges. Nondestructive testing is one of the techniques that can be used to assess the structural condition. It provides non perceptible information that conventional techniques of evaluation unable to do. The main objective of this work is the numerical simulation of a particular technique of nondestructive testing: the radar. The numerical modeling of the radar assessment of concrete structures make it possible to envisage the behavior of the system and its capacity to detect defects in various configurations. To achieve this objective, it was implemented electromagnetic wave propagation models in concrete structures, by using various numerical techniques to examine different aspects of the radar inspection. First of all, we implemented the finite-difference time-domain method in 3D which allows to take into account concrete characteristics such as porosity, salt content and the degree of saturation of the mixture by using Debye models. In addition, a procedure to improve the radiation pattern of bow-tie antennas is presented. This approach involves the Moment Method in conjunction with the Multi objective Genetic Algorithm. Finally, we implemented imaging algorithms which can perform fast and precise characterization of buried targets in inhomogeneous medium by using three different methods. The performance of the proposed algorithms is confirmed by numerical simulations. (author)

  18. Thermal noise from optical coatings in gravitational wave detectors.

    Harry, Gregory M; Armandula, Helena; Black, Eric; Crooks, D R M; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Hough, Jim; Murray, Peter; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Sneddon, Peter; Fejer, Martin M; Route, Roger; Penn, Steven D

    2006-03-01

    Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity. These waves are created by massive objects, like neutron stars or black holes, oscillating at speeds appreciable to the speed of light. The detectable effect on the Earth of these waves is extremely small, however, creating strains of the order of 10(-21). There are a number of basic physics experiments around the world designed to detect these waves by using interferometers with very long arms, up to 4 km in length. The next-generation interferometers are currently being designed, and the thermal noise in the mirrors will set the sensitivity over much of the usable bandwidth. Thermal noise arising from mechanical loss in the optical coatings put on the mirrors will be a significant source of noise. Achieving higher sensitivity through lower mechanical loss coatings, while preserving the crucial optical and thermal properties, is an area of active research right now.

  19. Non-destructive inspection protocol for reinforced concrete barriers and bridge railings

    Chintakunta, Satish R. [Engineering and Software Consultants, Inc., 14123 Robert Paris Ct., Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Boone, Shane D. [Federal Highway Administration, Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center, 6300 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22101 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Reinforced concrete highway barriers and bridge railings serve to prevent errant vehicles from departing the travel way at grade separations. Despite the important role that they play in maintaining safety and their ubiquitous nature, barrier inspection rarely moves beyond visual inspection. In August 2008, a tractor-trailer fatally departed William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after it dislodged a section of the bridge barrier. Investigations following the accident identified significant corrosion of the anchor bolts attaching the bridge railing to the bridge deck. As a result of the information gathered during its investigation of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made recommendations to the Federal Highway Administration concerning Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of concrete bridge railings. The Center for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA is currently evaluating feasibility of using four technologies - ground penetrating radar (GPR), ultrasonic pulse-echo, digital radiography and infrared thermal imaging methods to develop bridge inspection methods that augment visual inspections, offer reliable measurement techniques, and are practical, both in terms of time and cost, for field inspection work. Controlled samples containing predefined corrosion levels in reinforcing steel were embedded at barrier connection points for laboratory testing. All four NDE techniques were used in the initial phase I testing. An inspection protocol for detecting and measuring the corrosion of reinforced steel embedded in the anchorage system will be developed as part of phase II research. The identified technologies shall be further developed for field testing utilizing a structure with a barrier in good condition and a structure with a barrier in poor condition.

  20. The use of portable Non-Destructive Techniques for material decay characterisation of palaeontological Geosites

    Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Ortega-Becerril, Jose A.; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Maestro, Adolfo

    2017-04-01

    The conservation of both natural and cultural heritage is regarded as a priority for humankind and it is therefore recognised by the UNESCO since the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage in 1972. The International Union of Geological Sciences launched in 1995 in collaboration with UNESCO the Global Geosites programme to create an inventory of geological heritage sites. Although the conservation of Geosites may face different issues to those of stone-built cultural heritage, much could be learnt from techniques initially used to characterise weathering and material decay in stone-built cultural heritage. This is especially the case for portable Non-Destructive Techniques (NDT). Portable NDT allow characterising on-site the degree of material decay and are, therefore, a good way to assess the state of conservation of certain Geosites whose relevance lies on localised features. Geosites chosen for the outstanding occurrence of dinosaur ichnites, such as those in the Cameros Massif (north-western part of the Iberian Range, Spain), are a good example of this. This communication explores the potential of portable NDT to characterise the state of decay and susceptibility to further decay of dinosaur ichnites in the Cameros Massif. These techniques included: Ultrasound Pulse Velocity determination, Leeb hardness rebound test, colour determination by means of a spectrophotometer and thermal imaging obtained with an infrared camera. Results will show the potential of these techniques to characterise differential weathering patterns in both individual ichnites as well as on tracks in addition to assessing the possible effects of conservation strategies on the long-term preservation of the mentioned Geosites. Research funded by Madrid's Regional Government project Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914

  1. Non-destructive inspection protocol for reinforced concrete barriers and bridge railings

    Chintakunta, Satish R.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-02-01

    Reinforced concrete highway barriers and bridge railings serve to prevent errant vehicles from departing the travel way at grade separations. Despite the important role that they play in maintaining safety and their ubiquitous nature, barrier inspection rarely moves beyond visual inspection. In August 2008, a tractor-trailer fatally departed William Preston Lane, Jr. Memorial Bridge after it dislodged a section of the bridge barrier. Investigations following the accident identified significant corrosion of the anchor bolts attaching the bridge railing to the bridge deck. As a result of the information gathered during its investigation of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) made recommendations to the Federal Highway Administration concerning Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of concrete bridge railings. The Center for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) at Turner Fairbank Highway Research Center in McLean, VA is currently evaluating feasibility of using four technologies - ground penetrating radar (GPR), ultrasonic pulse-echo, digital radiography and infrared thermal imaging methods to develop bridge inspection methods that augment visual inspections, offer reliable measurement techniques, and are practical, both in terms of time and cost, for field inspection work. Controlled samples containing predefined corrosion levels in reinforcing steel were embedded at barrier connection points for laboratory testing. All four NDE techniques were used in the initial phase I testing. An inspection protocol for detecting and measuring the corrosion of reinforced steel embedded in the anchorage system will be developed as part of phase II research. The identified technologies shall be further developed for field testing utilizing a structure with a barrier in good condition and a structure with a barrier in poor condition.

  2. Development of non-destructive Young's modulus measurement techniques in non-oriented CeF$_{3}$ crystals

    Pietroni, P; Lebeau, M; Majni, G; Rinaldi, D

    2005-01-01

    For a reliable mechanical assembly of scintillating crystals for the application to radiographic systems such as Positron Emission Tomographer (PET) and high-energy physics calorimeters (e.g. in CMS at CERN LHC), the evaluation of the monocrystal elastic constant (Young's modulus) is needed. Its knowledge is also essential in the photoelastic analysis for the determination of residual stresses. In this work non-destructive techniques based on elastic wave propagation are tested. They differ in the mechanical excitation device: instrumented hammer, traditional ultrasonic probes and laser- generated ultrasound. We have analysed three non-oriented cerium fluoride crystal samples produced for scintillation applications. Finally, we have validated the experimental results comparing them with the elastic constant calculated by using the stiffness matrix.

  3. Non-Destructive Detection of Rebar Buried in a Reinforced Concrete Wall with Wireless Passive SAW Sensor

    Fan, Yanping; Ji, Xiaojun; Cai, Ping; Lu, Qianhui

    2013-01-01

    In order to reduce the damage to the old reinforced concrete walls and work out the best construction scheme during the renovation of old buildings, it is often required to detect the position of rebar buried in concrete walls. In this paper, we propose a non-destructive method to detect the buried rebar by self-inductive sensor combined with surface acoustic wave resonator (SAWR). The proposed method has the advantages of wireless, passive and convenient operations. In our new design, the sensing element of self-inductance coil was made as a component of SAWR matching network. The distribution of rebar could be measured according to the system resonant frequency, using a signal demodulation device set. The depth of buried rebar and the deviation of output resonant frequency from inherent frequency of SAWR have an inverse relation. Finally, the validity of the method was verified in theoretical calculation and simulation.

  4. Development of non-destructive Young's modulus measurement techniques in non-oriented CeF3 crystals

    Pietroni, P.; Paone, N.; Lebeau, M.; Majni, G.; Rinaldi, D.

    2005-01-01

    For a reliable mechanical assembly of scintillating crystals for the application to radiographic systems such as Positron Emission Tomographer (PET) and high-energy physics calorimeters (e.g. in CMS at CERN LHC), the evaluation of the monocrystal elastic constant (Young's modulus) is needed. Its knowledge is also essential in the photoelastic analysis for the determination of residual stresses. In this work non-destructive techniques based on elastic wave propagation are tested. They differ in the mechanical excitation device: instrumented hammer, traditional ultrasonic probes and laser-generated ultrasound. We have analysed three non-oriented cerium fluoride crystal samples produced for scintillation applications. Finally, we have validated the experimental results comparing them with the elastic constant calculated by using the stiffness matrix

  5. Non-destructive examination of a time capsule recovered from the Gore Park excavations, Hamilton, Ontario

    MacDonald, B.L.; Vanderstelt, J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. We present a study that applied two techniques: x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a time capsule recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton. XRF analysis revealed the composition of the artifact, while n-radiography showed that its contents remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage. (author)

  6. Non-destructive analysis for the inspection and control of metalic monuments and historical manuscripts

    Faubel, W.; Heissler, S.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Willin, E.

    2003-01-01

    As a contribution to the increasing efforts to preserve cultural heritage of historical bronze monuments exposed to atmospheric corrosion as well as historical books and manuscripts non-destructive analytical methods are highly desirable enabling an in-situ examination of the surface status of an object. The development and application of novel non-destructive analytical methods based on the photoacoustic and photothermal deflection spectroscopy allowed to investigate the state of bronze patina as well as the effectiveness of conservation procedures for historical manuscripts. (orig.)

  7. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-04-01

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  8. Comparative analysis of non-destructive methods to control fissile materials in large-size containers

    Batyaev V.F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of various non-destructive methods to control fissile materials (FM in large-size containers filled with radioactive waste (RAW has been carried out. The difficulty of applying passive gamma-neutron monitoring FM in large containers filled with concreted RAW is shown. Selection of an active non-destructive assay technique depends on the container contents; and in case of a concrete or iron matrix with very low activity and low activity RAW the neutron radiation method appears to be more preferable as compared with the photonuclear one.

  9. Attributes identification of nuclear material by non-destructive radiation measurement methods

    Gan Lin

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The nuclear materials should be controlled under the regulation of National Safeguard System. The non-destructive analysis method, which is simple and quick, provide a effective process in determining the nuclear materials, nuclear scraps and wastes. The method play a very important role in the fields of nuclear material control and physical protection against the illegal removal and smuggling of nuclear material. The application of non-destructive analysis in attributes identification of nuclear material is briefly described in this paper. The attributes determined by radioactive detection technique are useful tolls to identify the characterization of special nuclear material (isotopic composition, enrichment etc.). (author)

  10. Comparative analysis of non-destructive methods to control fissile materials in large-size containers

    Batyaev, V. F.; Sklyarov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of various non-destructive methods to control fissile materials (FM) in large-size containers filled with radioactive waste (RAW) has been carried out. The difficulty of applying passive gamma-neutron monitoring FM in large containers filled with concreted RAW is shown. Selection of an active non-destructive assay technique depends on the container contents; and in case of a concrete or iron matrix with very low activity and low activity RAW the neutron radiation method appears to be more preferable as compared with the photonuclear one. Note to the reader: the pdf file has been changed on September 22, 2017.

  11. Contribution of expert systems to data processing in non-destructive control

    Augendre, H.; Perron, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    The increase of non-destructive control in industrial applications requires the development of new data processing methods. The expert system approach is able to provide signal modelling means which are closer to the human behaviour. Such methods used in more traditional programs lead to substantial improvements. These investigations come within our design to apply sophisticated methods to industrial non-destructive control. For defect characterization purposes in ultrasonic control, various supervised learning methods have been investigated in an experimental study. The traditional approach is concerned with statistics based methods, whereas the second one lies in learning logical decision rules valid within a numerical description space [fr

  12. The Combine Use of Semi-destructive and Non-destructive Methods for Tiled Floor Diagnostics

    Štainbruch, Jakub; Bayer, Karol; Jiroušek, Tomáš; Červinka, Josef

    2017-04-01

    -destructive resistivity drilling, and non-destructive georadar, and the results were compared. Floors were measured by 3D laser scanning technology and captured by the camera before reconstruction work. Using SFM photogrammetry were achieved results: ortomozaik (0.3 mm / pix) and DEM (0.6 mm / pix). These results were a basis for restoration work and also allow comparisons with the original state at any stage of the project. Drilling resistance measurement is used for indirect determination of strength profile based on resistance to drilling depending on into the depth. The observed resistance to drilling correlates with the strength and toughness of the measured material. The method is referred as a micro- or semi-invasive, since sampling is not necessary and but the drilling diameter is usually 3-5 mm. The ultrasonic measurement consists in the measuring of the longitude as well as the transverse waves - velocity, shape, amplitude. The propagation velocity is a characteristic values for the material influenced by its composition and compactness. Georadar (GPR) is a high frequency electromagnetic pulse method. For measurement the GPR RAMAC system coupled with 1600 MHz shielded antenna was used. Two tiles (one with defects and one in relatively good condition) were surveyed in a regular grid of perpendicular lines 5 cm separated. Data were processed by means of ReflexW software and performed in the form of cross sections and amplitude maps. The map of the amplitude summed over a time window 1 - 1,4 ns (representing the intensity of the reflection from the tiles bottom) gave good result. The areas of registered relatively high amplitudes correspond with the position of airgaps. A correlation was observed between the results of different survey methods.

  13. Aging material evaluation and studies by non-destructive techniques (AMES-NDT) - a European network project

    Dobmann, Gerd; Debarberis, Luigi; Coste, Jean-Francois

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results obtained in a round-robin action organized in a concerted action of ten partners in the EURATOM program of the European Community. The objective of the research was to document the state of the art of available non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques in order to characterize material aging phenomena based on a reduction of Charpy-V energy and a shift in the fracture appearance transition temperature. Therefore, samples from the Japanese nuclear reactor pressure vessel JRQ-steel (ASMT Standard A533-B Class 1) have been thermally treated at 700 deg. C for 18 h with a subsequent water quenching. Besides micromagnetic and electromagnetic NDT, the positron annihilation technique, ultrasonic reverberation by using Laser ultrasonics and the thermo-electrical power have been applied to characterize the aged material states

  14. Lamb Wave Assessment of Fatigue and Thermal Damage in Composites

    Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.; Prosser, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    Among the various techniques available, ultrasonic Lamb waves offer a convenient method of evaluating composite materials. Since the Lamb wave velocity depends on the elastic properties of a structure, an effective tool exists to monitor damage in composites by measuring the velocity of these waves. Lamb wave measurements can propagate over long distances and are sensitive to the desired in-plane elastic properties of the material. This paper describes two studies which monitor fatigue damage and two studies which monitor thermal damage in composites using Lamb waves. In the fatigue studies, the Lamb wave velocity is compared to modulus measurements obtained using strain gage measurements in the first experiment and the velocity is monitored along with the crack density in the second. In the thermal damage studies, one examines samples which were exposed to varying temperatures for a three minute duration and the second includes rapid thermal damage in composites by intense laser beams. In all studies, the Lamb wave velocity is demonstrated to be an excellent method to monitor damage in composites.

  15. Non destructive analysis apparatus by eddy currents for non magnetic metallic products

    Coutanceau-Monteil, N.; Billy, F.; Bernard, A.

    1993-01-01

    The device for non destructive testing of nonmagnetic metallic surfaces uses eddy currents with two independent receptors at different positions around the emitting coil which is fed with current impulses and whose axis is parallel to the surface under study. 4 figs

  16. Non-Destructive Metallic Materials Testing—Recent Research and Future Perspectives

    João Manuel R. S. Tavares

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive testing (NDT has become extremely important formicrostructural characterization, mainly by allowing the assessment of metallic material properties in an effective and reasonable manner, in addition to maintaining the integrity of the evaluated metallic samples and applicability in service in many cases [...

  17. Characterisation of nuclear dispersion fuels. The non-destructive examination of silicon carbide by selenium immersion

    Ambler, J.F.R.; Ferguson, I.F.

    1974-07-15

    The non-destructive microscopic examination of silicon-carbide-coated spheres containing uranium carbide, which involves immersing the coated spheres in selenium, is particularly suited for the examination of flaws in the coats but it is not possible to measure coating thicknesses by this method. Some coats are found to be opaque and this is related to their porosity. (auth)

  18. A spatially offset Raman spectroscopy method for non-destructive detection of gelatin-encapsulated powders

    Non-destructive subsurface detection of encapsulated, coated, or seal-packaged foods and pharmaceuticals can help prevent distribution and consumption of counterfeit or hazardous products. This study used a Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) method to detect and identify urea, ibuprofen, and...

  19. An improved technique for non-destructive measurement of the stem ...

    It was concluded that the standard volume model based on the non-destructive measurement technique meets the requirements for precision in forest surveys. The precision of the standard volume model for L. gmelinii (a coniferous tree) was superior to that of the model for P. tomentosa (a broad-leaved tree). The electronic ...

  20. Non-destructive digital imaging in poplar allows detailed analysis of adventitious rooting dynamics

    R.J. Kodrzycki; R.B. Michaels; A.L. Friend; R.S. Zalesny; Ch.P. Mawata; D.W. McDonald

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of root formation are difficult to observe directly over time without disturbing the rooting environment. A novel system for a non-destructive, non-invasive root analysis (RootViz FS, Phenotype Screening Corp.) was evaluated for its ability to analyze root formation from cuttings over a 32 day period in three poplar genotypes (DN70, P. Deltoides x...

  1. A non-destructive approach for assessing decay in preservative treated wood

    Machek, L.; Edlund, M.L.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Militz, H.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the suitability of the non-destructive vibration-impulse excitation technique to assess the attack of preservative-treated wood in contact with the ground. Small stakes (10×5×100 mm3) of treated and untreated Scots pine sapwood were exposed to decay in laboratory-scale

  2. The use of computers for the performance and analysis of non-destructive testing

    Edelmann, X.; Pfister, O.

    1988-01-01

    Examples of the use of computers in non-destructive testing are related. Ultrasonic testing is especially addressed. The employment of computers means improvements for the user, the possibility of registering the reflector position, storage of test data and help with documentation. The test can be automated. The introduction of expert systems is expected for the future. 8 figs., 12 refs

  3. The non-destructive identification of early Chinese porcelain by PIXE

    Cheng, H.S.; Zhang, Z.Q.; Zhang, B.; Yang, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    PIXE is used for the non-destructive differentiation of early precious Chinese blue and white porcelain made in Yuan (AD 1206-1368), Ming (AD 1368-1644) Dynasty in Jingdezhen from imitations. Also, ancient celadon made in Song Dynasty (AD 960-1279) is identified by measuring the trace elements contained in the glazes

  4. Fast and Accurate Non-destructive Testing System for Inspection of Canning Tubes

    Gundtoft, Hans Erik; Nielsen, E.

    1973-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an inspection bench for the non-destructive examination of canning tubes. The bench is original in that the internal diameter is calculated from exact measurement of the outer diameter and the wall thickness. The transducers for inspection and control are r...

  5. Measurement of mango firmness by non-destructive limited compression technique

    Penchaiya, P.; Uthairatanakij, A.; Srilaong, V.; Kanlayanarat, S.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Tansakul, A.

    2015-01-01

    Thai mango 'Nam Dok Mai Si-Thong' has an attractive golden yellow skin colour even in immature fruit, not ready for consumption. Firmness becomes an important quality attribute to assess the ripening stage of the fruit during storage. In this study, the possibility of a non-destructive method

  6. Evaluation of the MIT-Scan-T2 for non-destructive PCC pavement thickness determination.

    2008-07-01

    The MIT-Scan-T2 device is marketed as a non-destructive way to determine pavement thickness on both : HMA and PCC pavements. PCC pavement thickness determination is an important incentivedisincentive : measurement for the Iowa DOT and contractors. Th...

  7. The non-destructive identification of early Chinese porcelain by PIXE

    Cheng, H. S.; Zhang, Z. Q.; Zhang, B.; Yang, F. J.

    2004-06-01

    PIXE is used for the non-destructive differentiation of early precious Chinese blue and white porcelain made in Yuan (AD 1206-1368), Ming (AD 1368-1644) Dynasty in Jingdezhen from imitations. Also, ancient celadon made in Song Dynasty (AD 960-1279) is identified by measuring the trace elements contained in the glazes.

  8. Non-destructive methods and means for quality control of structural products

    Dmitriev, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    Progressive non-destructive methods (acoustic, magnetic, radiation with liquid penetrants) and means of control of structural product quality, allowing to determine the state of products and structures not only immediately after their production but directly at the erected or reconstructed objects are described

  9. Using lamb waves tomonitor moisture absorption thermally fatigues composite laminates

    Lee, Jae Sun; Cho, Youn Ho [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Nondestructive evaluation for material health monitoring is important in aerospace industries. Composite laminates are exposed to heat cyclic loading and humid environment depending on flight conditions. Cyclic heat loading and moisture absorption may lead to material degradation such as matrix breaking, debonding, and delamination. In this paper, the moisture absorption ratio was investigated by measuring the Lamb wave velocity. The composite laminates were manufactured and subjected to different thermal aging cycles and moisture absorption. For various conditions of these cycles, not only changes in weight and also ultrasonic wave velocity were measured, and the Lamb wave velocity at various levels of moisture on a carbon-epoxy plate was investigated. Results from the experiment show a linear correlation between moisture absorption ratio and Lamb wave velocity at different thermal fatigue stages. The presented method can be applied as an alternative solution in the online monitoring of composite laminate moisture levels in commercial flights.

  10. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  11. Periodic heat wave determination of thermal diffusivity of clays ...

    The responses of Ankaful, Tetegu (# 1 & 2) and Mamfe clays to periodic heat waves were analyzed to deter-mine the thermal diffusivity values. The temperature amplitude attenuated with depth of penetration, while the phase shift increased. The thermal diffusivity values ranged from 3.0 - 9.5 x 10P-7P mP2P/s by amplitude ...

  12. Thermal noise reduction for present and future gravitational wave detectors

    Amico, P.; Bosi, L.; Gammaitoni, L.; Losurdo, G.; Marchesoni, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Punturo, M. E-mail: michele.punturo@pg.infn.it; Stanga, R.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Vetrano, F.; Vocca, H

    2004-02-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension is and will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave detectors currently under construction. The technical solutions, adopted in the Virgo detector, optimize the current suspension scheme, but new materials and new designs are needed to further reduce the suspension thermal noise. Silicon fibers are promising candidates both for room temperature advanced detectors and for future cryogenic interferometric detectors.

  13. Response of thermal ions to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves generated by 10 - 50 keV protons in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere will interact with the ambient low-energy ions also found in this region. We examine H(+) and He(+) distribution functions from approx. equals 1 to 160 eV using the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment instrument on AMPTE/CCE to investigate the thermal ion response to the waves. A total of 48 intervals were chosen on the basis of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave activity: 24 with prevalent EMIC waves and 24 with no EMIC waves observed on the orbit. There is a close correlation between EMIC waves and perpendicular heated ion distributions. For protons the perpendicular temperature increase is modest, about 5 eV, and is always observed at 90 deg pitch angles. This is consistent with a nonresonant interaction near the equator. By contrast, He(+) temperatures during EMIC wave events averaged 35 eV and sometimes exceeded 100 eV, indicating stronger interaction with the waves. Furthermore, heated He(+) ions have X-type distributions with maximum fluxes occurring at pitch angles intermediate between field-aligned and perpendicular directions. The X-type He(+) distributions are consistent with a gyroresonant interaction off the equator. The concentration of He(+) relative to H(+) is found to correlate with EMIC wave activity, but it is suggested that the preferential heating of He(+) accounts for the apparent increase in relative He(+) concentration by increasing the proportion of He(+) detected by the ion instrument.

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-01-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-energy delayed gamma rays from 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241 Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239 Pu. The 241 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235 U data set. De-convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-rate LaBr 3 detectors was investigated as a potential alternative to HPGe detectors. Modeling capabilities were added to an

  15. Using photons for non-destructive testing of thick materials: a simulation study

    Oishi, Ryutaro; Nagai, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy using positron annihilation lifetimes has been successfully studied for non-destructive material testing. A positron inspection probe is annihilated with an electron at the front of the material. The application of the positron lifetime method is restricted to thin materials. A photon with energy exceeding 1.02MeV reaches the materials' depth and can produce a positron through γ-conversion. Such a photon-produced positron is a probe for thick materials. The probability of γ-conversion, however, is low. The method of photon-produced positron annihilation lifetimes is restricted by statistics. We estimated the expected number of events and the statistical uncertainties of the lifetime measurements for a non-destructive test, such as an SUS316 fatigue monitoring, to construct a fatigue-monitoring system

  16. Human and organisational factors in the reliability of non-destructive testing (NOT)

    Norros, L.

    1998-01-01

    Non-destructive testing used in in-service inspections can be seen as a complicated activity system including three mutually related sub-activities: (1) definition of inspection programs and necessary resources, (2) carrying out diagnostic inspections, and (3) interpretation of the results from the view of plant safety and corrective measures. Various studies to investigate and measure the NDT performance have produced disappointing result. No clear correlations between single human factors and performance have been identified even though general agreement exists concerning the significance of human factors to the reliability of testing. Another incentive for our studies has been to test and evaluate the applicability of the international results in the Finnish circumstances. Three successive studies have thus been carried out on the human and organisational factors in non-destructive testing. (author)

  17. PANDA-A novel instrument for non-destructive sample analysis

    Turunen, Jani; Peraejaervi, Kari; Poellaenen, Roy; Toivonen, Harri

    2010-01-01

    An instrument known as PANDA (Particles And Non-Destructive Analysis) for non-destructive sample analysis has been designed and built at the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). In PANDA the measurement techniques and instruments designed for the basic research are applied to the analysis of environmental samples. PANDA has two vacuum chambers, one for loading samples and the other for measurements. In the measurement chamber there are two individual measurement positions. Currently the first one hosts an HPGe gamma detector and a position-sensitive alpha detector. The second measurement position is intended for precise characterization of found particles. PANDA's data are recorded in event mode and events are timestamped. In the present article the technical design of PANDA is presented in detail. In addition, its performance using depleted uranium particles and an air filter is demonstrated.

  18. Homogeneity test of the ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative

    Li Li; Fong Songlin; Zhu Jihao; Feng Xiangqian; Xie Guoxi; Yan Lingtong

    2010-01-01

    In order to study elemental composition of ancient porcelain samples, we developed a set of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. In this paper,homogeneity of Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe contents in the ceramic reference materials is investigated by EDXRF. The F test and the relative standard deviation are used to treat the normalized net counts by SPSS. The results show that apart from the DY2 and JDZ4 reference materials, to which further investigation would be needed, homogeneity of the DH, DY3, JDZ3, JDZ6, GY1, RY1, LQ4, YJ1, YY2 and JY2 meets the requirements of ceramic reference materials for non-destructive quantitative analysis. (authors)

  19. Study on personnel qualification for non-destructive tests in the field of reactor safety

    Trusch, K.; Wuestenberg, H.

    1977-01-01

    The training system for non-destructive testing is described, and the available and necessary personnel is analyzed; the personnel required for reactor safety problems is treated separately. On this basis, the subjects discussed in the study - available personnel, personnel requirements, training, training requirements, and suggestions for realisation - are treated in a general manner to begin with and afterwards with a view to specific problems of reactor safety. The methods employed are adapted to this situation. To obtain the necessary empirical data, questionnaires were set up and distributed, and experts in selected business companies and institutions were interviewed who work in the field of reactor safety or do same training in non-destructive testing. (orig.) [de

  20. Analysis of a Single Hot Particle by a Combination of Non-Destructive Analytical Methods

    Hrnecek, E.; Aldave de las Heras, L.; Bielewski, M.; Carlos, R. [EC JRC Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Betti, M. [IAEA Environment Laboratories (Monaco)

    2013-07-15

    Radioactive substances are often released to the environment in the form of particles. The determination of their chemical composition is a key factor in the overall understanding of their environmental behaviour. The aim of this investigation was to identify the source of one single radioactive particle collected from the Irish Sea and to understand its fate in the environment and in human body fluids. As the particle was supposed to be analysed for its dissolution behaviour in humans after ingestion, it was necessary to gain as much information as possible beforehand on the chemical and isotopic composition by means of non-destructive analysis such as SEM, SIMS, {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES. In this paper, an overview of the different non-destructive methods applied for the analysis of this particle and the results obtained is given. Additionally, the dissolution behaviour in human digestive solutions is discussed. (author)

  1. Human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing. An international literary survey

    Kettunen, J.; Norros, L.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of the study is to chart human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing (NDT). The emphasis will be in ultrasonic testing (UT) and in the planning and execution of in-service inspections during nuclear power plant maintenance outages. Being a literary survey this study is mainly based on the foreign and domestic research available on the topic. In consequence, the results presented in this report reflect the ideas of international research community. In addition to this, Finnish nuclear power plant operators (Imatran Voima Oy and Teollisuuden Voima Oy), independent inspection organisations and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety have provided us with valuable information on NDT theory and practice. Especially, a kind of 'big picture' of non-destructive testing has been pursued in the study. (6 figs., 2 tabs.)

  2. Visualization of Tooth for Non-Destructive Evaluation from CT Images

    Gao, Hui; Chae, Ok Sam [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This paper reports an effort to develop 3D tooth visualization system from CT sequence images as a part of the non-destructive evaluation suitable for the simulation of endodontics, orthodontics and other dental treatments. We focus on the segmentation and visualization for the individual tooth. In dental CT images teeth are touching the adjacent teeth or surrounded by the alveolar bones with similar intensity. We propose an improved level set method with shape prior to separate a tooth from other teeth as well as the alveolar bones. Reconstructed 3D model of individual tooth based on the segmentation results indicates that our technique is a very conducive tool for tooth visualization, evaluation and diagnosis. Some comparative visualization results validate the non-destructive function of our method.

  3. Effectiveness Analysis of a Non-Destructive Single Event Burnout Test Methodology

    Oser, P; Spiezia, G; Fadakis, E; Foucard, G; Peronnard, P; Masi, A; Gaillard, R

    2014-01-01

    It is essential to characterize power MosFETs regarding their tolerance to destructive Single Event Burnouts (SEB). Therefore, several non-destructive test methods have been developed to evaluate the SEB cross-section of power devices. A power MosFET has been evaluated using a test circuit, designed according to standard non-destructive test methods discussed in the literature. Guidelines suggest a prior adaptation of auxiliary components to the device sensitivity before the radiation test. With the first value chosen for the de-coupling capacitor, the external component initiated destructive events and affected the evaluation of the cross-section. As a result, the influence of auxiliary components on the device cross-section was studied. This paper presents the obtained experimental results, supported by SPICE simulations, to evaluate and discuss how the circuit effectiveness depends on the external components.

  4. 234Th distributions in coastal and open ocean waters by non-destructive β-counting

    Miller, L.A.; Svaeren, I.

    2003-01-01

    Non-destructive β-counting analyses of particulate and dissolved 234 Th activities in seawater are simpler but no less precise than traditional radioanalytical methods. The inherent accuracy limitations of the non-destructive β-counting method, particularly in samples likely to be contaminated with anthropogenic nuclides, are alleviated by recounting the samples over several half-lives and fitting the counting data to the 234 Th decay curve. Precision (including accuracy, estimated at an average of 3%) is better than 10% for particulate or 5% for dissolved samples. Thorium-234 distributions in the Skagerrak indicated a vigorous, presumably biological, particle export from the surface waters, and while bottom sediment resuspension was not an effective export mechanism, it did strip thorium from the dissolved phase. In the Greenland and Norwegian Seas, we saw clear evidence of particulate export from the surface waters, but at 75 m, total 234 Th activities were generally in equilibrium with 238 U. (author)

  5. Post-Irradiation Non-Destructive Analyses of the AFIP-7 Experiment

    Williams, W. J.; Robinson, A. B.; Rabin, B. H.

    2017-12-01

    This article reports the results and interpretation of post-irradiation non-destructive examinations performed on four curved full-size fuel plates that comprise the AFIP-7 experiment. These fuel plates, having a U-10 wt.%Mo monolithic design, were irradiated under moderate operating conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor to assess fuel performance for geometries that are prototypic of research reactor fuel assemblies. Non-destructive examinations include visual examination, neutron radiography, profilometry, and precision gamma scanning. This article evaluates the qualitative and quantitative data taken for each plate, compares corresponding data sets, and presents the results of swelling analyses. These characterization results demonstrate that the fuel meets established irradiation performance requirements for mechanical integrity, geometric stability, and stable and predictable behavior.

  6. Proceedings of the national workshop on non destructive evaluation of structures

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the care and best efforts to improve the quality of structures, problems do occur, raising alarm. This makes doubtful about the understanding. Distresses in the structures start immediately after construction and these are often concealed under the external finishes. A defect takes time to manifest itself. To add further, structures remain unattended for several years. As it is uneconomical to replace the assets before the intended service life by another capital investment, it is essential to periodically monitor the health of structures throughout its life. Success of both, the construction and restoration work depends on right diagnosis of the problem thorough proper testing techniques. Non destructive evaluation is one of the reliable methods for the scientific assessment of health and prediction of residual service life of structure. The workshop shall provide a platform to students, engineers and professionals for acquaintance with the current state of art technology of non-destructive evaluation techniques. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Nonconventional concrete hollow blocks evaluation by destructive and non-destructive testing

    M.S. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate cementitious matrices properties by partial replacement of Portland cement by silica fume (SF or by rice husk ash (RHA, and their application in nonbearing hollow blocks, tested by destructive and non-destructive methods. The following mixtures were produced: reference (100% of Portland cement and Portland cement replacement (10% by mass with SF or RHA. The non-destructive testing showed that the highest values of UPV were obtained for SF-based blocks and RHA-based blocks. The destructive test showed better results for SF-based blocks, but there was no statistical difference between the RHA-based and control ones.

  8. Quality parameters of mango and potential of non-destructive techniques for their measurement- a review

    Jha, S.N.; Narsaiah, K.; Sharma, A.D.; Singh, M.; Bansal, S.; Kumar, R.

    2010-01-01

    The king of fruits 'Mango' (Mangifera indica L.) is very nutritious and rich in carotenes. India produces about 50% of the total world's mango. Many researchers have reported the maturity indices and quality parameters for determination of harvesting time and eating quality. The methods currently used for determination of quality of mango are mostly based on the biochemical analysis, which leads to destruction of the fruits. Numerous works are being carried out to explore some non-destructive methods such as Near Infrared (NIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray and Computed Tomography (CT), electronic nose, machine vision and ultrasound for quality determination of fruits. This paper deals with some recent work reported on quality parameters, harvesting and post-harvest treatments in relation to quality of mango fruits and reviews on some of the potential non-destructive techniques that can be explored for quality determination of mango cultivars. (author)

  9. Mirage effect sensor with simple detector and with multiple detector: application to non destructive evaluation by photothermal excitation

    Charbonnier, Francois

    1990-01-01

    Local photothermal excitation of absorbing sample provides spatial and temporal temperature distribution inside this sample and its neighbouring medium. Optical, thermal and geometrical characteristics (thickness, presence of a defect...) modify surface temperature evolution. The realization of an optical instrument using mirage effect, sensitive and accurate, has came out of two industrial applications of non destructive evaluation: - automatic set-up for absolute measurement of thermal losses on concentrical pipes interface.- set up for quantitative measurement of optical absorption losses on multi coated laser mirrors. To obtain images and compensate acquisition slowness due to investigated thermal phenomenons, a synchronous integration signal process from a multi detector, is described. Experimental set-up using mirage effect detected by a linear CCD reading sensor is realized on this principle. Some examples prove feasibility of this parallel measurement along an excitation line. At last, high frequency parallel synchronous detection with sequential cut-out demodulation was tested and succeeded with a 50 kHz optical signal. (author) [fr

  10. Application of lock-in thermography non destructive technique to CFC armoured plasma facing components

    Escourbiac, F.; Constans, S.; Courtois, X.; Durocher, A.

    2007-01-01

    A non destructive testing technique - so called modulated photothermal thermography or lock-in thermography - has been set-up for plasma facing components examination. Reliable measurements of phase contrast were obtained on 8 mm carbon fiber composite (CFC) armoured W7-X divertor component with calibrated flaws. A 3D finite element analysis allowed the correlation of the measured phase contrast and showed that a 4 mm strip flaw can be detected at the CFC/copper interface

  11. Application of the Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy as Method of Non-Destructive Testing

    Somieski , B.; Krause-Rehberg , R.; Salz , H.; Meyendorf , N.

    1995-01-01

    In order to show the suitability of the Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (POLIS) as a method of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) several iron alloys / steels were mechanically damaged (tensile stress, fatigue, creeping). The positron annihilation parameters show clear changes during all applied kinds of damage. After tensile stress as well as after creeping a homogeneous distribution of damage in the sample was detected. During the very first elastic cycle of a fatigue experiment, a change in the ...

  12. Containment nuclear plant structures evaluation by non destructive testing: strategy and results

    GARNIER, Vincent; HENAULT, Jean-Marie; HAFID, Hamid; VERDIER, Jérôme; CHAIX, Jean François; ABRAHAM, Odile; SBARTAÏ, Zoubir Medhi; BALAYSSAC, Jean Pierre; PIWAKOWSKI, Bogdan; VILLAIN, Géraldine; DEROBERT, Xavier; PAYAN, Cédric; RAKOTONARIVO, Sandrine; LAROSE, Eric; SOGBOSSI, Hognon

    2016-01-01

    Containment nuclear plants structures are an ultimate barrier in the event of an accident. Mechanical resistance and tightness are the two functions that they are expected to provide. To evaluate their capacity to perform them, destructive testing cannot be used to characterize the material. Non-Destructive Tests then represent a relevant solution to test concrete and the struc- ture. The article positions NDT within the context of containment structures supervision and maintenance, and prese...

  13. Contributions to ultrasounds applications in non-destructive tests on materials used in nuclear technologies

    Stanica, V.

    1979-01-01

    The problems expounded in the paper, besides servjng the practical purpose generated by the need to perform quality tests on fuel element compounds by means of the ultrasounds method, are also interesting to ultrasounds non-destructive tests applied in all industry branches as they assert the necessity of passing from manual to automation tests carried out by installations which should record the signals caused by failures, both to increase the productivjty and especially to transform it into an objective, effective test. (author)

  14. Non destructive testing: a unique R and D platform in Europe in Saclay

    On, Dinhill

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the 'Gerim 2' R and D platform which is dedicated to non destructive testing (NDT) in the field of information and communication technology (ICT). It is the first of its kind in Europe and is located in Saclay. It possesses a wide spectrum of NDT technologies: contactless ultrasonic testing, ultrasonic adaptive imagery, automated and multi-resolution X-ray tomography, etc. Founded by public research institutions and industrial partners, this centre is dedicated only to research and development

  15. Non-destructive analysis in a study of the religious art objects

    Vornicu, Nicoleta; Bibire, Cristina; Geba, Maria

    2009-01-01

    The icon Descending of the Saint Spirit from Bucium Church, dating in the year 1814 and was done in tempera on wood technology. The characterization of cultural heritage materials is essential for the comprehension of their degradation mechanisms. The present study aims at identifying the pigments in the various layers, establishing the possible existence of an organic binder and scientifically evaluating the state of preservation. To this end, were used non-destructive methods, as: microscopic (SEM), XRF and spectroscopic (FTIR).

  16. Non-destructive control of cladding thickness of fuel elements for research reactors

    Karlov, Y.; Zhukov, Y.; Chashchin, S

    1997-07-01

    The control method of fuel elements for research reactors by means of measuring beta particles back scattering made it possible to perform complete automatic non-destructive control of internal and external claddings at our plant. This control gives high guarantees of the fuel element correspondence to the requirements. The method can be used to control the three-layer items of different geometry, including plates. (author)

  17. Acceptance criteria for non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    This supporting document provides requirements for acceptance of relevant indications found during non-destructive examination of double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford 200 areas. Requirements for evaluation of relevant indications are provided to determine acceptability of continued safe operation of the DSTs. Areas of the DSTs considered include the tank wall vapor space, liquid-vapor interface, wetted tank wall, sludge-liquid interface, and the knuckle region

  18. Role of research in non-destructive evaluation for nuclear technology

    Jayakumar, T.; Rao, B.P.C.; Raj, Baldev

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the role of research in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of microstructures and mechanical properties in materials, assessment of manufacturing quality and early detection of in-service damage in nuclear components and structures. A few applications and case studies are discussed based on the results of systematic research and developmental activities pursued in different NDE techniques at the authors' laboratory for three different types of Indian nuclear reactors. (author)

  19. Quality assurance and non-destructive testing for nuclear power plants

    Manlucu, F.A.

    1991-01-01

    This article discussed the quality assurance requirements which have been extensively applied in plant design, fabrication, construction and operation and has played a major role in the excellent safety record of nuclear power plants. The application of non-destructive testing techniques, plays a very important role during the in-service inspection (ISI) in order to prevent dangerous accident and to assure continuous safe operation of nuclear power plants. (IMA). 12 refs

  20. A Non-destructive and Continuous Measurement of Gelatinization of Rice in Rice Cooking Process

    Hagura, Yoshio; Suzuki, Kanichi

    2002-01-01

    A non-destructive and continuous method to measure gelatinization of rice samples in a rice-water system during rice cooking process was examined. An aluminum pot and a lid of a rice cooker were used as two electrode plates, and changes in dielectric properties (capacitance : C, and dielectric dissipation factor : tan δ) of the samples in the rice cooking process were measured by a capacitance meter. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure gelatinization enthalpy and to de...

  1. Method and equipment for the non-destructive analysis of nuclear fuels

    Michaelis, W.

    1975-01-01

    This is a method for the non-destructive analysis of the content of fissile isotopes in nuclear fuels. In this analysis a neutron beam is directed to the nuclear fuel which is to be analysed. The beam penetrates the nuclear fuel, thus causing a secondany radiation by nuclear reactions which reaches a space directly surrounding the nuclear fuel and is measuned there. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-04

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Questions of qualification exam for non-destructive testing and materials science - the first level

    Shaaban, H.I.; Addarwish, J.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The book contains seven chapters: Questions of qualification for magnetic particles testing method - Questions of qualification for liquids penetrant testing method - Questions of qualification for the visual inspection testing method - Questions of qualification for the ultrasonic testing method - Questions of qualification for the eddy current testing method - Questions of rehabilitation for industrial radiographic testing method - Qualification questions about materials science and manufacturing defects of castings and welding and comparison between non-destructive testing methods.

  4. Non-destructive testing. The current state of standards and qualification and certification for leak testing

    Tamura, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    Domestic standards of the leak testing are enacted as one of Japan Industrial Standards. The conformity is advanced between these domestic standards and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) standard. ISO9712 (Non-destructive testing-Qualification and certification of personnel) was revised to include the leak testing of qualification and certification in 2005. The preparation working group of qualification and certification for leak testing is planning start aiming at the system in one and a half years. (author)

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of welding part of stainless steels by phased array system

    Tatematsu, Nobuhiro; Matsumoto, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Recently, more accurate and convenient Non-Destructive Evaluation techniques are required for flaw inspection of structural materials. Phased array ultrasonic transducers are expected as such as NDE technique but there are many subjects to be solved. Furthermore, commercial phased array systems with conventional scanning and imaging techniques have not fulfilled their maximum potential. The purpose of this paper is to improve the phased array system to be applicable to the inhomogeneity evaluation of welding part of stainless steels. (author)

  6. The utilization of VUJE specialists non-destructive testing qualification at international cooperation with company TECNATOM

    Kuna, M.

    2006-01-01

    The utilization of VUJE specialists non-destructive testing qualification at cooperation with company TECNATOM. The obtain of QDA qualification for ET examination for possibility of qualified evaluation in the foreign NPP (USA, Brazil). The acquired practical experiences by evaluation of ET data from NPP Angra Brazil and Waltz Mill USA. The obtain of SNT-TC-1A and EPRI qualification for the UT evaluation of penetration tube welds measurements. The practical experience during the measurement on NPP Shearon Harris (Author)

  7. Automatic non-destructive system for quality assurance of welded elements in the aircraft industry

    Chady, Tomasz; Waszczuk, Paweł; Szydłowski, Michał; Szwagiel, Mariusz

    2018-04-01

    Flaws that might be a result of the welding process have to be detected, in order to assure high quality thus reliability of elements exploited in aircraft industry. Currently the inspection stage is conducted manually by a qualified workforce. There are no commercially available systems that could support or replace humans in the flaw detection process. In this paper authors present a novel non-destructive system developed for quality assurance purposes of welded elements utilized in the aircraft industry.

  8. Direct non-destructive observation of bulk nucleation in 30% deformed aluminum

    West, Stine; Schmidt, Søren; Sørensen, Henning Osholm

    2009-01-01

    A 30% deformed aluminum sample was mapped non-destructively using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) before and after annealing to nucleation of recrystallization. Nuclei appeared in the bulk of the sample. Their positions and volumes were determined, and the crystallographic orientations...... were compared with the orientations of the deformed grains. It was found that nuclei with new orientations can form and their orientations have been related to the dislocation structure in the deformed grains....

  9. Coded excitation for infrared non-destructive testing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

    Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Venkata Ghali, Subbarao

    2011-05-01

    This paper proposes a Barker coded excitation for defect detection using infrared non-destructive testing. Capability of the proposed excitation scheme is highlighted with recently introduced correlation based post processing approach and compared with the existing phase based analysis by taking the signal to noise ratio into consideration. Applicability of the proposed scheme has been experimentally validated on a carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimen containing flat bottom holes located at different depths.

  10. Characterization of legacy low level waste at the Svafo facility using gamma non-destructive assay and X-ray non-destructive examination techniques - 59289

    Halliwell, Stephen; Mottershead, Gary; Ekenborg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Over 7000 drums containing legacy, low level radioactive waste are stored at four SVAFO facilities on the Studsvik site which is located near Nykoeping, Sweden. The vast majority of the waste drums (>6000) were produced between 1969 and 1979. The remainder were produced from 1980 onwards. Characterization of the waste was achieved using a combination of non-destructive techniques via mobile equipment located in the AU building at the Studsvik site. Each drum was weighed and a dose rate measurement was recorded. Gamma spectroscopy was used to measure and estimate radionuclide content. Real time xray examination was performed to identify such prohibited items as free liquids. (authors)

  11. Non-destructive test of lock actuator component using neutron radiography technique

    Juliyanti; Setiawan; Sutiarso

    2012-01-01

    Non-destructive test of lock actuator using neutron radiography technique has been done. The lock actuator is a mechanical system which is controlled by central lock module consisting of electronic circuit which drives the lock actuator works accordingly to open and lock the vehicle door. The non-destructive test using neutron radiography is carried out to identify the type of defect is presence by comparing between the broken and the brand new one. The method used to test the lock actuator component is film method (direct method). The result show that the radiography procedure has complied with the ASTM standard for neutron radiography with background density of 2.2, 7 lines and 3 holes was seen in the sensitivity indicator (SI) and the quite good image quality was obtained. In the brand new actuator is seen that isolator part which separated the coils has melted. By this non-destructive test using neutron radiography technique is able to detect in early stage the type of component's defect inside the lock actuator without to dismantle it. (author)

  12. Multi-energy radiography for non-destructive testing of materials and structures for civil engineering

    Naydenov, S.V.; Ryzhikov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Development of the technological base of modern non-destructive testing require new methods allowing determination of specified properties of materials and structures under study. A traditional direction of works is determination of internal spatial structure of the materials and other constructions. Restoration of this geometrical information is of qualitative character, though provides for determination of technical parameters affecting physical properties of the system. Reconstruction of the chemical composition, density and atomic structure (effective atomic number) is an inverse problem of direct quantitative determination of properties starting from data obtained by means of non-destructive testing. In the present work, we propose the use of multi-energy radiography for reconstruction of the substantial structure of materials. In framework of simple theoretical model it is shown that, using multi-channel absorption of X-rays, important substantial characteristics of materials and multi-compound structures can be readily reconstructed. The results obtained show high efficiency of 2-energy radiography for non-destructive testing in civil engineering

  13. Evaluation of corrosion of prestressing steel in concrete using non-destructive techniques

    Ali, M.G.; Maddocks, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Use of high strength steel in pre-stressed concrete structures has been in use in Australia for many decades. Highway bridges, among other structures, have extensively used pre-stress-ing and post-tensioning techniques. Although prestressing offers many competitive edges to it's traditional rival reinforced concrete, the consequence of damage to prestressing tendons could be catastrophic. Periodic visual inspections of prestressed concrete bridges throughout the world have demonstrated the growing problem of deterioration of prestressing steel as a result of corrosion. Early detection of damage to prestressing steel therefore is of paramount importance. Unfortunately no reliable and practical non-destructive evaluation technique has been available for assessing the condition of prestressing steel within concrete although a number of techniques appear promising. The following inspection methods have been highlighted in recent literature for their use as non-destructive inspection methods for prestressed concrete structures. In addition to the techniques discussed, a number of destructive, or invasive techniques also exist for determination of the corrosion status of prestressing tendons in prestressed structures. The following non-destructive techniques are discussed in some detail: Radiography; Computed Tomography; Surface Penetrating Radar; Impact Echo; Acoustic Emission Monitoring; Magnetic Field Disturbance Technique; Remnant Magnetism Method; Linear Polarisation Method; Electrical Resistance and Surface Potential Survey. The portability, limitations and use in Australia of these techniques are summarised in a table

  14. Addition of magnetic markers for non-destructive evaluation of polymer composites

    Ana Paula Pereira Fulco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composite pipes are an appealing option as a substitute for conventional steel pipes, particularly due to their inherent corrosion resistance. However, the composite pipes currently used do not allow non-destructive evaluation (NDE using instrumented devices which operate with magnetic sensors. The present work aims at the development of polymer composites with the addition magnetic markers to allow the application non-destructive evaluation techniques which use magnetic sensors. Glass-polyester composite flat, circular plates were fabricated with the addition of ferrite particles (barium ferrite and strontium ferrite and four types of notches were introduced on the plates' surfaces. The influence of these notches on the measured magnetic properties of each material was measured. X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF and Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET nitrogen adsorption were used for the characterization of the ferrite particles. Particle dispersion in the polymer matrix was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. According to the results, a particular variation in magnetic field was detected over the region surrounding each type of notch. The results suggest that the proposed technique has great potential for damage detection in polymer composites using magnetic sensors and thus constitute a valuable contribution which may ultimately lead to the development of non-destructive evaluation techniques for assessing the structural integrity polymer composite pipes.

  15. Feasibility Study of Non-Destructive Techniques to Measure Corrosion in SAVY Containers

    Davenport, Matthew Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Stainless Steel SAVY containers are used to transport and store nuclear material. They are prone to interior corrosion in the presence of certain chemicals and a low-oxygen environment. SAVY containers also have relatively thin walls to reduce their weight, making their structural integrity more vulnerable to the effects of corrosion. A nondestructive evaluation system that finds and monitors corrosion within containers in use would improve safety conditions and preclude hazards. Non-destructive testing can determine whether oxidation or corrosion is occurring inside the SAVY containers, and there are a variety of non-destructive testing methods that may be viable. The feasibility study described will objectively decide which method best fits the requirements of the facility and the problem. To improve efficiency, the containers cannot be opened during the non-destructive examination. The chosen technique should also be user-friendly and relatively quick to apply. It must also meet facility requirements regarding wireless technology and maintenance. A feasibility study is an objective search for a new technology or product to solve a particular problem. First, the design, technical, and facility feasibility requirements are chosen and ranked in order of importance. Then each technology considered is given a score based upon a standard ranking system. The technology with the highest total score is deemed the best fit for a certain application.

  16. Current developments in mechanized non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants

    Zeilinger, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power plants require frequent in-service activities to be carried out conscientiously in areas potentially hazardous to human operators (because of the associated radiation exposure), such as non-destructive testing of pressurized components of the steam system. Locations to be inspected in this way include the reactor pressure vessel, core internals, steam generators, pressurizers, and pipes. The codes to be used as a basis of these inspections demand high absolute positioning and repeating accuracy. These requirements can be met by mechanized test procedures. Accordingly, many new applications of, mostly mobile, robots have been developed over the past few years. The innovative control and sensor systems for stationary and mobile robots now on the market offer a potential for economic application in a large number of new areas in inspection, maintenance and service in nuclear power plants. More progress in this area is expected for the near future. Areva NP founded the new NDT Center, NETEC (Non-destructive Examination Technical Center), as a global technical center for non-destructive materials testing. NETEC is to advance research and development of all basic NDT technologies, robotics included. For many years, intelligeNDT has offered solutions and products for a variety of inspection and testing purposes and locations in nuclear power plants and is involved in continuous further development of the experience collected in nuclear power plants on the spot. (orig.)

  17. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    Damhuji Rifai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper.

  18. Giant Magnetoresistance Sensors: A Review on Structures and Non-Destructive Eddy Current Testing Applications

    Rifai, Damhuji; Abdalla, Ahmed N.; Ali, Kharudin; Razali, Ramdan

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive eddy current testing (ECT) is widely used to examine structural defects in ferromagnetic pipe in the oil and gas industry. Implementation of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors as magnetic field sensors to detect the changes of magnetic field continuity have increased the sensitivity of eddy current techniques in detecting the material defect profile. However, not many researchers have described in detail the structure and issues of GMR sensors and their application in eddy current techniques for nondestructive testing. This paper will describe the implementation of GMR sensors in non-destructive testing eddy current testing. The first part of this paper will describe the structure and principles of GMR sensors. The second part outlines the principles and types of eddy current testing probe that have been studied and developed by previous researchers. The influence of various parameters on the GMR measurement and a factor affecting in eddy current testing will be described in detail in the third part of this paper. Finally, this paper will discuss the limitations of coil probe and compensation techniques that researchers have applied in eddy current testing probes. A comprehensive review of previous studies on the application of GMR sensors in non-destructive eddy current testing also be given at the end of this paper. PMID:26927123

  19. Fatigue crack growth monitoring: fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing requirements

    Williams, S.; Mudge, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    If a fatigue crack is found in a component in service, two options exist if plant integrity is to be maintained: first, the plant can be removed from service and repairs effected or replacements fitted; second, the growth of the crack can be monitored non-destructively until it is either considered to be too large to tolerate, in which case it must be repaired, or until a convenient down time when repair can be effected. The second option has obvious benefits for plant operators, but in such a situation it is essential that errors of the non-destructive estimate of defect size, which will undoubtedly exist, and uncertainties in the fatigue crack growth laws in operation must both be allowed for if a safe extension of service life is to be obtained; i.e. without failure by leakage or fast fracture arising from the fatigue crack. This paper analyses the accuracy required of non-destructive crack measurement techniques to permit the safe monitoring of crack growth by periodic inspection. It then demonstrates that it is possible to achieve adequate crack monitoring using conventional ultrasonic techniques. (author)

  20. Measurement of through-thickness thermal diffusivity of thermoplastics using thermal wave method

    Singh, R.; Mellinger, A.

    2015-04-01

    Thermo-physical properties, such as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat are important quantities that are needed to interpret and characterize thermoplastic materials. Such characterization is necessary for many applications, ranging from aerospace engineering to food packaging, electrical and electronic industry and medical science. In this work, the thermal diffusivity of commercially available polymeric films is measured in the thickness direction at room temperature using thermal wave method. The results obtained with this method are in good agreement with theoretical and experimental values.

  1. Application of advanced non-destructive testing to evaluate the foundation depth of the existing structures

    Nguyen Le Son; Nguyen Phuoc Lan; Pham The Hung; Vu Huy Thuc; Phan Chanh Vu; Bui Xuan Huy; Tran Thanh Luan; Nguyen Kien Chinh; Le Danh Chuan

    2004-01-01

    situations encountered in practice, e.g. a stiffer layer near the bottom of a deep foundation. Due to the signal attenuates beyond recognition, variation of compression wave velocity with depth and the uncertainty in the travel paths, the distance between the foundation and access hole less than 1.5 m should be selected. At greater distances, the interpretations of the compiled first arrival profiles become more difficult, especially in the conditions where subsurface conditions are unknown. A suggested combination of the parallel seismic technique with gamma logging can improve the reliability of interpreted depths for the complex soil strata. The acquired capabilities are valuable asset that can clearly be utilized as the effort to apply advanced non-destructive (NDT) technique - PSM to the rehabilitation investigations of existing structures. (author)

  2. Quantitative subsurface analysis using frequency modulated thermal wave imaging

    Subhani, S. K.; Suresh, B.; Ghali, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative depth analysis of the anomaly with an enhanced depth resolution is a challenging task towards the estimation of depth of the subsurface anomaly using thermography. Frequency modulated thermal wave imaging introduced earlier provides a complete depth scanning of the object by stimulating it with a suitable band of frequencies and further analyzing the subsequent thermal response using a suitable post processing approach to resolve subsurface details. But conventional Fourier transform based methods used for post processing unscramble the frequencies with a limited frequency resolution and contribute for a finite depth resolution. Spectral zooming provided by chirp z transform facilitates enhanced frequency resolution which can further improves the depth resolution to axially explore finest subsurface features. Quantitative depth analysis with this augmented depth resolution is proposed to provide a closest estimate to the actual depth of subsurface anomaly. This manuscript experimentally validates this enhanced depth resolution using non stationary thermal wave imaging and offers an ever first and unique solution for quantitative depth estimation in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging.

  3. Thermal Cracking in Westerly Granite Monitored Using Direct Wave Velocity, Coda Wave Interferometry, and Acoustic Emissions

    Griffiths, L.; Lengliné, O.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2018-03-01

    To monitor both the permanent (thermal microcracking) and the nonpermanent (thermo-elastic) effects of temperature on Westerly Granite, we combine acoustic emission monitoring and ultrasonic velocity measurements at ambient pressure during three heating and cooling cycles to a maximum temperature of 450°C. For the velocity measurements we use both P wave direct traveltime and coda wave interferometry techniques, the latter being more sensitive to changes in S wave velocity. During the first cycle, we observe a high acoustic emission rate and large—and mostly permanent—apparent reductions in velocity with temperature (P wave velocity is reduced by 50% of the initial value at 450°C, and 40% upon cooling). Our measurements are indicative of extensive thermal microcracking during the first cycle, predominantly during the heating phase. During the second cycle we observe further—but reduced—microcracking, and less still during the third cycle, where the apparent decrease in velocity with temperature is near reversible (at 450°C, the P wave velocity is decreased by roughly 10% of the initial velocity). Our results, relevant for thermally dynamic environments such as geothermal reservoirs, highlight the value of performing measurements of rock properties under in situ temperature conditions.

  4. Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in General Electric's nuclear fuel fabrication facility

    Stewart, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    Operational experience in the non-destructive assay of fissile material in a variety of forms and containers and incorporation of the assay devices into the accountability measurement system for General Electric's Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility measurement control programme is detailed. Description of the purpose and related operational requirements of each non-destructive assay system is also included. In addition, the accountability data acquisition and processing system is described in relation to its interaction with the various non-destructive assay devices and scales used for accountability purposes within the facility. (author)

  5. Overcoming thermal noise in non-volatile spin wave logic

    Dutta, Sourav; Nikonov, Dmitri; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian; Naeemi, Azad

    Spin waves are propagating disturbances in magnetically ordered materials. To compete as a promising candidate for beyond-CMOS application, the all-magnon based computing system must undergo the essential steps of careful selection of materials and demonstrate robustness with respect to thermal noise/variability. Here, we identify suitable materials and investigate two viable options for translating the theoretical idea of phase-dependent switching of the spin wave detector to a practical realization of a thermally reliable magnonic device by - (a) using the built-in strain in the ME cell, arising from the lattice mismatch and/or thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the film and the substrate, for compensation of the demagnetization, and (b) using an exchange-spring structure that exhibits a strong exchange-coupling between the ME cell and PMA SWB and provides a modification of the energy landscape of the ME cell magnet. A high switching success and error-free logic functionality can be ensured if the amplitude of the detected spin wave () remains higher than a threshold value of around 6°C and the detected phase falls within the window from 280°C through 0 to 20°C or from 100°C to 200°C with a maximum allowable ϕ range of around 100°C.

  6. Non-destructive assessment of the Ancient 'Tholos Acharnon' Tomb building geometry

    Santos-Assunçao, Sonia; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Konstantakis, Yiannis; Pérez-Gracia, Vega; Anagnostopoulou, Eirini; Solla, Mercedes; Lorenzo, Henrique

    2014-05-01

    Ancient Greek Monuments are considered glorious buildings that still remain on the modern times. Tombs were specifically built according to the architecture of respective epoch. Hence, the main function was to royal families in Greece and other countries. The lack of systematic preservation could promote the damage of the structure. Therefore, a correct maintenance can diminish the impact of the main causes of pathologies. Schist, limestone and sandstone have been the main geological building materials of the Greek Ancient tombs. In order to preserve several of these monumental tombs, in depth non-destructive evaluation by means of Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is proposed in a scientific mission with partners from Greece and Spain surveying with the 1 GHz and 2.3 GHz antennas. High frequency antennas are able to identify small size cracks or voids. Grandjean et al. [1] used the 300 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, obtaining 2 cm and 5 cm of resolution. Later on, Faize et al. [2] employed a 2.3 GHz antenna to detect anomalies and create a pathological model. The structure of this Mycenaean Tomb (14th - 13th c. BC) is composed by a corridor which is supported by irregular stones and the inner is 8.74 m high and 8.35 m diameter. The surface of the wall is composed by diverse geological materials of irregular shapes that enhance the GPR acquisition difficulty: 1) Passing the GPR antenna in a waved surface may randomly change the directivity of the emission. 2) The roof of the tomb is described by a pseudo-conical form with a decreasing radio for higher levels, with a particular beehive. If the roof of the Tomb is defined by a decreasing radius, innovative processes must be carried out with GPR to non constant radius structures. With GPR, the objective is to define the wall thickness, voids and/or cracks detection as well as other structural heterogeneities. Therefore, the aim is to create a three dimensional model based in the interpolation of the circular profiles. Three

  7. The Assessment of Cement Mortars after Thermal Degradation by Acoustic Non-destructive Methods

    Topolář, L.; Štefková, D.; Hoduláková, M.

    2017-10-01

    Thanks, the terrorist attacks on the worldwide interest in the design of structures for fire greatly increased. One of the advantages of concrete over other building materials is its inherent fire-resistive properties. The concrete structural components still must be able to withstand dead and live loads without collapse even though the rise in temperature causes a decrease in the strength and modulus of elasticity for concrete and steel reinforcement. In addition, fully developed fires cause expansion of structural components and the resulting stresses and strains must be resisted. This paper reports the results of measurements by Impact-echo method and measurement by ultrasound. Both methods are based on the acoustic properties of the material which are dependent on its condition. These acoustic methods allow identifying defects and are thus suitable for monitoring the building structure condition. The results are obtained in the laboratory during the degradation of composite materials based on cement by high-temperature.

  8. Materials processing issues for non-destructive laser gas sampling (NDLGS)

    Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-09

    The Non-Destructive Laser Gas Sampling (NDLGS) process essentially involves three steps: (1) laser drilling through the top of a crimped tube made of 304L stainles steel (Hammar and Svennson Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} = 1.55, produced in 1985); (2) gas sampling; and (3) laser re-welding of the crimp. All three steps are performed in a sealed chamber with a fused silica window under controlled vacuum conditions. Quality requirements for successful processing call for a hermetic re-weld with no cracks or other defects in the fusion zone or HAZ. It has been well established that austenitic stainless steels ({gamma}-SS), such as 304L, can suffer from solidification cracking if their Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} is below a critical value that causes solidification to occur as austenite (fcc structure) and their combined impurity level (%P+%S) is above {approx}0.02%. Conversely, for Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} values above the critical level, solidification occurs as ferrite (bcc structure), and cracking propensity is greatly reduced at all combined impurity levels. The consensus of results from studies of several researchers starting in the late 1970's indicates that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value is {approx}1.5 for arc welds. However, more recent studies by the author and others show that the critical Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} value increases to {approx}1 .6 for weld processes with very rapid thermal cycles, such as the pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam welding (LBW) process used here. Initial attempts at NDLGS using pulsed LBW resulted in considerable solidification cracking, consistent with the results of work discussed above. After a brief introduction to the welding metallurgy of {gamma}-SS, this presentation will review the results of a study aimed at developing a production-ready process that eliminates cracking. The solution to the cracking issue, developed at LANL, involved locally augmenting the Cr content by applying either Cr or a Cr-rich stainless steel (ER 312) to the top

  9. Theoretical and practical program in the non-destructive testing by eddy currents - the first level

    Shaaban, H.I.; Addarwish, J.M.A.

    2014-11-01

    The testing using eddy currents is one of the non-destructive tests that use electromagnetic property as a basis for testing procedures, and there are many other ways to use this principle, including Remote Field Testing and the Magnetic Flux Leakage test. Eddy currents are electrical currents moving in a circular path, and took the name eddy of eddies that form when a liquid or gas is moving in a circular path because of objection obstacles to its track. They are generated in the material using a variable magnetic field. Non-destructive testing by eddy currents is a technique used for the detection of defects and interruptions in a material and it is a process that relies on the generation of small eddy currents in the material of the part to be examined, provided that this part is of an electrically conducting material. This technique and its scientific basis are explained in this book. Also the devices used in this technique and how to use these devices in details are explained. The book contains Twelve chapters: Introduction to non destructive testing - Engineering materials and its mechanical characteristics - Electrical and magnetic characteristics of engineering materials - Introduction to testing by eddy currents - Factors affecting eddy currents - Basis of electrical circuits used in eddy currents testing devices - Probes of eddy currents testing - Eddy currents testing devices (Theoretical) - Analysis of the examination results of testing by eddy currents: techniques and applications - Applications of testing by eddy currents - Eddy currents testing devices (Application) - Practical lessons for the first level in testing by eddy currents.

  10. Updated thermal model using simplified short-wave radiosity calculations

    Smith, J.A.; Goltz, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    An extension to a forest canopy thermal radiance model is described that computes the short-wave energy flux absorbed within the canopy by solving simplified radiosity equations describing flux transfers between canopy ensemble classes partitioned by vegetation layer and leaf slope. Integrated short-wave reflectance and transmittance-factors obtained from measured leaf optical properties were found to be nearly equal for the canopy studied. Short-wave view factor matrices were approximated by combining the average leaf scattering coefficient with the long-wave view factor matrices already incorporated in the model. Both the updated and original models were evaluated for a dense spruce fir forest study site in Central Maine. Canopy short-wave absorption coefficients estimated from detailed Monte Carlo ray tracing calculations were 0.60, 0.04, and 0.03 for the top, middle, and lower canopy layers corresponding to leaf area indices of 4.0, 1.05, and 0.25. The simplified radiosity technique yielded analogous absorption values of 0.55, 0.03, and 0.01. The resulting root mean square error in modeled versus measured canopy temperatures for all layers was less than 1°C with either technique. Maximum error in predicted temperature using the simplified radiosity technique was approximately 2°C during peak solar heating. (author)

  11. Updated thermal model using simplified short-wave radiosity calculations

    Smith, J. A.; Goltz, S. M.

    1994-02-15

    An extension to a forest canopy thermal radiance model is described that computes the short-wave energy flux absorbed within the canopy by solving simplified radiosity equations describing flux transfers between canopy ensemble classes partitioned by vegetation layer and leaf slope. Integrated short-wave reflectance and transmittance-factors obtained from measured leaf optical properties were found to be nearly equal for the canopy studied. Short-wave view factor matrices were approximated by combining the average leaf scattering coefficient with the long-wave view factor matrices already incorporated in the model. Both the updated and original models were evaluated for a dense spruce fir forest study site in Central Maine. Canopy short-wave absorption coefficients estimated from detailed Monte Carlo ray tracing calculations were 0.60, 0.04, and 0.03 for the top, middle, and lower canopy layers corresponding to leaf area indices of 4.0, 1.05, and 0.25. The simplified radiosity technique yielded analogous absorption values of 0.55, 0.03, and 0.01. The resulting root mean square error in modeled versus measured canopy temperatures for all layers was less than 1°C with either technique. Maximum error in predicted temperature using the simplified radiosity technique was approximately 2°C during peak solar heating. (author)

  12. Shock wave collisions and thermalization in AdS5

    Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2011-01-01

    We study heavy ion collisions at strong 't Hooft coupling using AdS/CFT correspondence. According to the AdS/CFT dictionary heavy ion collisions correspond to gravitational shock wave collisions in AdS 5 . We construct the metric in the forward light cone after the collision perturbatively through expansion of Einstein equations in graviton exchanges. We obtain an analytic expression for the metric including all-order graviton exchanges with one shock wave, while keeping the exchanges with another shock wave at the lowest order. We read off the corresponding energy-momentum tensor of the produced medium. Unfortunately this energy-momentum tensor does not correspond to ideal hydrodynamics, indicating that higher order graviton exchanges are needed to construct the full solution of the problem. We also show that shock waves must completely stop almost immediately after the collision in AdS 5 , which, on the field theory side, corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. Finally, we perform trapped surface analysis of the shock wave collisions demonstrating that a bulk black hole, corresponding to ideal hydrodynamics on the boundary, has to be created in such collisions, thus constructing a proof of thermalization in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling. (author)

  13. Combined Non-destructive Testing (NDT) methods for evaluating concrete quality

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of combining Non-destructive measurements on concrete. Local crushed granite and hematite were used as coarse aggregates; mining sand and river sand were used as fine aggregates to produce various density and strength of concrete. Concrete samples (150 mm cubes and interlocked blocks) were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of aggregates. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  14. Use of non-destructive controls for the supervision of operating apparatus

    Ducrot, Bernard.

    1978-01-01

    The scope of application of this paper, that is standard apparatus whether pressure or not, is presented. Then the particular problem of the use of non-destructive controls for the supervision of operating apparatus is outlined. The subject of how to exercise that supervision is developed by replying to four questions: why, when, how, who. A summary of the main advantages and disadvantages of the different control techniquess used is given in a tabular form. A last part deals with a series of practical applications, which show at the same time the interest and difficulties of that type of control [fr

  15. Non-destructive measurement methods for large scale gaseous diffusion process equipment

    Mayer, R.L.; Hagenauer, R.C.; McGinnis, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    Two measurement methods have been developed to measure non-destructively uranium hold-up in gaseous diffusion plants. These methods include passive neutron and passive γ ray measurements. An additional method, high resolution γ ray spectroscopy, provides supplementary information about additional γ ray emitting isotopes, γ ray correction factors, 235 U/ 234 U ratios and 235 U enrichment. Many of these methods can be used as a general purpose measurement technique for large containers of uranium. Measurement applications for these methods include uranium hold-up, waste measurements, criticality safety and nuclear accountability

  16. Non-destructive Assessment of Relief Marking Parameters of Heat Shrinkable Installation Parts for Aviation Technology

    Kondratov Aleksandr P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explains a new method of relief marking of heat-shrinkable tubing and sleeves made of polymer materials with “shape memory effect.” Method of instrument evaluation of relief marking stereometry of installation parts for aviation equipment, made of polyvinyl chloride, polyethyleneterephthalate and polystyrene was developed and the results were explained. Parameters of pin-point relief marking and compliance of point forms to the Braille font standard were determined with the use of the non-destructive method based on the color of interference pattern with precision of 0.02 mm.

  17. Enhancing the capabilities of eddy current techniques for non-destructive evaluation of austenitic stainless steels

    Rao, B.P.C.; Thirunavukkarasu, S.; Sasi, B.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    2010-01-01

    Eddy current non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques find many applications during fabrication and in-service inspection of components made of stainless steel. In recent years, concurrent developments in electromagnetic field detection sensors such as giant magneto-resistive (GMR), giant-magneto impedance (GMI) and SQUIDs sensors, computers, microelectronics, and incorporating advanced signal and image processing techniques, have paved the way for enhancing the capabilities of existing eddy current (EC) techniques for examination of austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates, tubes and other geometries and several innovative methodologies have been developed. This paper highlights a few such applications in EC testing to austenitic stainless steel components used in fast reactors. (author)

  18. Analysis of unbalanced sensor in eddy current method of non destructive testing

    Chegodaev, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    Different types of sensors are used in eddy current method of non-destructive testing. The choosing of sensor type depends on control object. Different types of sensors can have the same schemes of cut-in in device for formation of information signal. The most common scheme of sensor cut-in is presented. The calculation of output voltage when the sensor is on a segment of the control object, which has not defect is made. The conditions of balancing are adduced and it was shown that the balancing of sensor is very difficult. The methods of compensation or account of voltage of an imbalance are indicated. (author)

  19. Development of a non-destructive method to identify different grades of stainless steel

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2003-01-01

    One of the non-destructive methods used for the identification and verification of metals is by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. EDXRF analysis provides several important advantages such as simultaneous determination of the elements present, enable to analyse a very wide concentration range, fast analysis with no sample preparation. The paper shows how this technique is developed and applied in the identification and verification of different grades of stainless steels. Comparison of the results for certified reference standards obtained from this analysis and that of its certified value shows very small differences between them. (Author)

  20. Development of a non-destructive method to identify different grades of stainless steel

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2004-01-01

    One of the non-destructive methods used for the identification and verification of metals is by the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. EDXRF analysis provides several important advantages such as simultaneous determination of the elements present, enable to analyze a very wide concentration range, fast analysis with no tedious sample preparation. The paper shows how this technique is developed and applied in the identification and verification of different grades of stainless steels. Comparison of the results obtained from this analysis with certified reference standards show very small differences between them. (Author)

  1. A NEW METHOD FOR NON DESTRUCTIVE ESTIMATION OF Jc IN YBaCuO CERAMIC SAMPLES

    Giancarlo Cordeiro Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new method for estimation of Jc as a bulk characteristic of YBCO blocks. The experimental magnetic interaction force between a SmCo permanent magnet and a YBCO block was compared to finite element method (FEM simulations results, allowing us to search a best fitting value to the critical current of the superconducting sample. As FEM simulations were based on Bean model , the critical current density was taken as an unknown parameter. This is a non destructive estimation method. since there is no need of breaking even a little piece of the sample for analysis.

  2. Additive Manufacturing (AM) Activities and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) at GSFC

    Jones, Justin S.

    2017-01-01

    NASA personnel will be meeting with a delegation from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) at Langley Research Center on 2217 through 3217. The purpose of the meeting is a technical interchange between NASA and JAXA to discuss Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Additive Manufacturing (AM) parts and the HALT process (relates to accelerated life testing). The visitors will be a small group of Japanese citizens. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been asked to participate in the meeting, either in person or via teleconference. This presentation covers NDE efforts at GSFC and provides a cursory overview of AM and lab capabilities.

  3. Impact of the 'non-destructive' multiple-readout on the Lorentzian noise

    Guazzoni, C.; Gatti, E.; Geraci, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effect of 'non-destructive' multiple-readout on the Lorentzian noise. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such interaction is investigated. We have studied the peculiarities of the shape of the optimum weighting function for the multiple-readout technique in the presence of Lorentzian noise and other noise sources. The impact of the Lorentzian noise on the resolution achievable with the multiple-readout technique is analyzed in detail with respect to the interaction between the oscillation time and the characteristic time constant of the Lorentzian noise

  4. Non-destructive isotopic uranium assay by multiple delayed neutron measurements

    Papadopoulos, N.N.; Tsagas, N.F.

    1991-01-01

    The high accuracy and precision required in nuclear safeguards measurements can be achieved by an improved neutron activation technique based on multiple delayed fission neutron counting under various experimental conditions. For the necessary ultrahigh counting statistics required, cyclic activation of multiple subsamples has been applied. The home-made automated flexible analytical system with neutron flux and spectrum differentiation by irradiation position adjustment and cadmium screening, permits the non-destructive determination of the U235 abundance and the total U element concentration needed in nuclear safeguards sample analysis, with a high throughout and a low operational cost. Careful experimental optimization led to considerable improvement of the results

  5. Non-destructive measurement of Xe filling pressure in mercury-free metal halide lamp

    Motomura, Hideki; Enoki, Kyosuke; Jinno, Masafumi

    2010-01-01

    Mercury-free metal halide lamps (MHLs) for automotive purposes have been developing in the market. When mercury is not used, the electric and emission characteristics of the lamp strongly depend on the xenon filling pressure. Therefore a non-destructive gas pressure estimation technique is required to obtain stable performance of the lamps as commercial products. The authors have developed an estimation method by which the gas pressure is estimated from the current peak value at the initial stage of ignition under pulsed operation. It is shown that accuracy of the order of ±(0.1-0.3) atm is obtained using an empirical formula.

  6. Non-Destructive Investigation on Short Circuit Capability of Wind-Turbine-Scale IGBT Power Modules

    Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Wang, Huai

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive investigation on the short circuit capability of wind-turbine-scale IGBT power modules by means of a 6 kA/1.1 kV non-destructive testing system. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) supervising unit is adpoted to achieve an accurate time control for short...... circuit test, which enables to define the driving signals with an accuracy of 10 ns. Thanks to the capability and the effectiveness of the constructed setup, oscillations appearing during short circuits of the new-generation 1.7 kV/1 kA IGBT power modules have been evidenced and characterized under...

  7. Non-destructive synchrotron X-ray diffraction mapping of a Roman painting

    Dooryhee, E.; Anne, M.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Martinetto, P.; Rondot, S.; Bardies, I.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    The history and the properties of materials are deduced not only from their elemental and molecular signatures, but also from their exact phase compositions, and from the structures and the defects of their constituents. Here we implement a non-destructive synchrotron X-ray based method, which combines both the quantitative structural content of diffraction and the imaging mode. As a demonstration case, the pigments of a Roman wall painting are examined. The joined elemental and mineral maps mimic the major features of the painting. Different structural phases made of common atomic elements are differentiated. Textures and graininess are measured and related to the artist's know-how. (orig.)

  8. Non-destructive radiometry inspection technique for locating reinforcements and void/porosity in bridge bearings

    Yahaya bin Jafar; Jaafar bin Abdullah; Mohamad Azmi bin Ismail.

    1989-01-01

    Defects detection in bridge bearings is very important in controlling quality and safety. Typical manufacturing defects include misalligned or bent steel plates and the presence of voids/porosity within the rubber. A non-destructive radiometry inspection technique was used to locate steel plates position and the presence of voids/porosity in bridge bearing samples provided by the Rubber Research Institute of Malaysia (RRIM). Preliminary studies show that the mentioned defects can readily be determined by this technique. Some of the results are also presented. (author)

  9. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  10. Topics in acoustics, non destructive testing, and thermo-mechanics of continua

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-03-01

    A small scale physical model of a granular porous medium was studied .Osmosis, filtration and fracture were considered, both experimentally and mathematically.Longitudinal ultrasonic pulse velocity was measured in slender timber and concrete bodies in order to characterized the geometric dispersion effects.A mathematical model is developed to described geometric dispersion in reinforced concrete.A sequential method for non destructive testing of structures by mechanicals vibrations is proposed and theoretically considered.Some simple examples are fully developed from a theoretical stand point

  11. Yucca Mountain project container fabrication, closure and non-destructive evaluation development activities

    Russell, E.W.; Nelson, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    In this presentation, container fabrication, closure, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) process development activities are described. All of these activities are interrelated, and will contribute to the metal barrier selection activity. The plan is to use a corrosion-resistant material in the form of a cylinder with a wall thickness of ∼1cm (2cm for pure copper.) The materials under consideration include the three austenitic alloys: stainless steel-304L, stainless steel-316L and alloy 825, as well as the three copper alloys: CDA 102, CDA 613, and CDA 715. This document reviews the recommended procedures and processes for fabricating, closing and evaluating each of the candidate materials

  12. Non-destructive study of ancient documents and books by means of ion beams

    Ruvalcaba S, J.L.; Monroy, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a non destructive methodology for the analysis of ancient manuscripts and books using an external beam system and the techniques Particle Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (PIXE) and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) is presented. This application shows the analytical features of the particle accelerator based techniques for the characterization of this kind of historical materials. This methodology was used for the analysis of inks of an European book from XVII century. This is the first study in Mexico of an ancient book using simultaneously PIXE and RBS non-vacuum techniques. (Author) 21 refs., 9 figs

  13. Application of magnetic resonance imaging to non-destructive void detection in watermelon

    Saito, K.; Miki, T.; Hayashi, S.; Kajikawa, H.; Shimada, M.; Kawate, Y.; Nishizawa, T.; Ikegaya, D.; Kimura, N.; Takabatake, K.; Sugiura, N.; Suzuki, M.

    A novel application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is described. The possibility of utilizing MRI for non-destructive quality evaluation of watermelons was studied. In this study, we applied MRI to the detection of internal voids in watermelons. In order to increase the measurement rate, we employed a one-dimensional projection profile method instead of observing a two-dimensional cross-sectional image. The void detection was carried out with this technique over 30 samples and 28 samples were correctly evaluated. The measurement rate was 900 ms per sample, which is an acceptable speed for a sorting machine in the agricultural field.

  14. Survey of EEC solid waste arisings and performance of non-destructive assay systems

    Bremner, W.B.; Adaway, D.W.; Yates, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the work carried out during an one-year contract which surveyed the radioactive solid waste arisings in EEC Member States and also tabulated information on the performance of the non-destructive assay (NDA) system used. The work was jointly carried out with CEA partners at Cadarache and Paris. The tabulated data give information on types, packaging, associated activity, and NDA capability of the utilities or research organisations. Some short comings in NDA capabilities are identified and possible solutions are given

  15. Pipe robots for internal inspection, non-destructive testing and machining of pipelines

    Reiss, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Inspector Systems is a specialist in manufacturing of tethered self-propelled pipe robots for internal inspection, non-destructive testing and machining of pipeline systems. Our industrial sectors, which originates from 30 year experience in the nuclear industry, are Gas and Oil (On-/Offshore, Refineries), Chemical, Petrochemical, Water etc. The pipe robots are able to get inserted through poor access points (e.g. valves) and to pass in bi-directional travelling vertical sections and numerous bends with small arc radius. The paper describes the system concept and performance of the pipe robot technology. A modular construction allows to equip the robots with different operational elements for the respective application.

  16. Application of the positron lifetime spectroscopy as method of non-destructive testing

    Somieski, B.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Salz, H.; Meyendorf, N.

    1995-01-01

    In order to show the suitability of the Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy (POLIS) as a method of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) several iron alloys/steels were mechanically damaged (tensile stress, fatigue, creeping). The positron annihilation parameters show clear changes during all applied kinds of damage. After tensile stress as well as after creeping a homogeneous distribution of damage in the sample was detected. During the very first elastic cycle of a fatigue experiment, a change in the defect structure occurs in well annealed materials. A modified spectrometer for in the field mapping is presented. (orig.)

  17. Guidebook for the fabrication of non-destructive testing (NDT) test specimens

    2001-01-01

    Non-destructive testing (NDT) test specimens constitute a very important part of training and certification of NDT personnel and are important for carrying out actual inspection and testing, and for achieving international harmonization of NDT practices. The IAEA organized an advisory group of experts to develop a Guidebook for Fabrication of NDT Test Specimens. The experts consulted the ISO/FDIS 9712-1999 requirements for training and certification of personnel and the suitability of various types of NDT test specimens that are needed to meet such requirements This guidebook presents a set of NDT test specimens, and the methodology and procedures for their fabrication

  18. A new facility for non-destructive assay using a 252Cf source.

    Stevanato, L; Caldogno, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Hao, Xin; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Nebbia, G; Pesente, S; Pino, F; Sajo-Bohus, L; Viesti, G

    2013-03-01

    A new laboratory facility for non-destructive analysis (NDA) using a time-tagged (252)Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 20 × 25 cm(2), the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously total and energy dependent transmission of neutrons and gamma rays. The equipment technical characteristics and performances of the NDA system are presented, exploring also limits due to the sample thickness. Some recent applications in the field of cultural heritage are presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Non-destructive detection research for hollow heart of potato based on semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging and SVM].

    Huang, Tao; Li, Xiao-yu; Xu, Meng-ling; Jin, Rui; Ku, Jing; Xu, Sen-miao; Wu, Zhen-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The quality of potato is directly related to their edible value and industrial value. Hollow heart of potato, as a physiological disease occurred inside the tuber, is difficult to be detected. This paper put forward a non-destructive detection method by using semi-transmission hyperspectral imaging with support vector machine (SVM) to detect hollow heart of potato. Compared to reflection and transmission hyperspectral image, semi-transmission hyperspectral image can get clearer image which contains the internal quality information of agricultural products. In this study, 224 potato samples (149 normal samples and 75 hollow samples) were selected as the research object, and semi-transmission hyperspectral image acquisition system was constructed to acquire the hyperspectral images (390-1 040 nn) of the potato samples, and then the average spectrum of region of interest were extracted for spectral characteristics analysis. Normalize was used to preprocess the original spectrum, and prediction model were developed based on SVM using all wave bands, the accurate recognition rate of test set is only 87. 5%. In order to simplify the model competitive.adaptive reweighed sampling algorithm (CARS) and successive projection algorithm (SPA) were utilized to select important variables from the all 520 spectral variables and 8 variables were selected (454, 601, 639, 664, 748, 827, 874 and 936 nm). 94. 64% of the accurate recognition rate of test set was obtained by using the 8 variables to develop SVM model. Parameter optimization algorithms, including artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA), genetic algorithm (GA) and grid search algorithm, were used to optimize the SVM model parameters: penalty parameter c and kernel parameter g. After comparative analysis, AFSA, a new bionic optimization algorithm based on the foraging behavior of fish swarm, was proved to get the optimal model parameter (c=10. 659 1, g=0. 349 7), and the recognition accuracy of 10% were obtained for the AFSA

  20. Investigation and development of a non-destructive system to evaluate critical properties of asphalt pavements during the compaction process.

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present findings from a two-stage investigation to develop a non-destructive system to : evaluate critical properties and characteristics of asphalt pavements during the compaction process. The first stage aligned : c...

  1. Synthesis & Studies of New Non-Destructive Read-Out Materials for Optical Storage and Optical Switches

    Rentzepis, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    .... The optical, chemical and spectroscopic properties of this non-destructive write/read/erase computer memory material have been studied This organic storage system consists of two different molecular...

  2. Quality assurance in ceramic materials and components. High-resolution non-destructive testing especially of ceramic surfaces

    Reiter, H.; Hoffmann, B.; Morsch, A.; Arnold, W.; Schneider, E.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the influence of defects on the failure behavior of ceramic materials under four-point bending stress. In this connection various Si 3 N 4 and SiC materials with and without artificially introduced defect particles (Fe, WC, Si, pores) were examined by the following non-destructive test methods: photoacoustic microscopy, scanning laser acoustic microscopy, microfocus roentgenoscopy and ultrasound transit-time measurements. Finally, a four-point bending test and a fracture-mechanical evaluation of the fracture-incuding defects were carried out at the Institute for reliability and failure studies in mechanical engineering of the University of Karlsruhe. According to the type of stress the samples predominantly failed in the case of defects in the surface zone of the side in tension. Among the ndt methods applied the photoacoustic microscopy as a typical surface testing method could predict most of the fracture-inducing defects (30-50 %) without causing destruction. In this connection a different detection sensitivity which corresponds to the thermal reflection factors became apparent according to the type of defect. Furthermore the reports describes the results of some preliminary tests on ndt of green ceramics. In these investigations both the microfocus roentgenoscopy test and the roentgen computed tomography showed a high potential of detecting inhomogeneities and defects in green Si 3 N 4 and SiC components. (orig.) [de

  3. Investigation of selective corrosion resistance of aged lean duplex stainless steel 2101 by non-destructive electrochemical techniques

    Gao Juan; Jiang Yiming; Deng Bo; Zhang Wei; Zhong Cheng; Li Jin

    2009-01-01

    Lean duplex stainless steel 2101 (LDX2101) shows wide application potential due to its better corrosion performance and lower cost than traditional 304 austenite steel. This paper investigates the effects of thermal aging treatments at 700 deg. C for various aging times up to 100 h on the selective corrosion resistance of LDX2101 by two non-destructive electrochemical measurements: double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The evolution of microstructure was examined by optical microscopy, SEM microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques (XRD). The results showed that the two applied electrochemical measurements agreed very well. Both methods were able to reveal the relationship between microstructure and selective corrosion resistance, which was related to the formation of chromium- and molybdenum-depleted zones around the precipitates, especially the σ phase, during aging. Nevertheless, more information could be obtained using EIS methods, including the interfacial charge transfer reaction and the corrosion product adsorption process. The results suggest that the susceptibility of the aged alloy to selective corrosion is presumably codetermined by the formation of chromium- and molybdenum-depleted areas, as well as by the replenishment of them, in these areas from the bulk during aging.

  4. Rapid determination of fluorine in coral skeletons by non-destructive neutron activation analysis using 20F

    Ramos, A.A.; Ohde, S.; Sirirattanachai, S.; Snidvongs, A.

    2003-01-01

    A rapid non-destructive technique has been proposed for the determination of fluorine in coral skeletons by thermal neutron activation analysis, using the short half-life 20 F nuclide (11.0 s). About 0.2-0.5 g samples were irradiated for 10 seconds in a Triga Mark II Reactor. Soon after the irradiation (25-35 s), measurements of γ-rays were performed with each sample and standard. The method has the drawback of low sensitivity (∼20 ppm of F), and the manual operation employed in the cooling step could lead to less precise measurements. Fluorine in coral standards was determined within ∼8% of analytical precision. The result obtained for the dolomite standard was fairly consistent with literature values, but those for the limestone standard showed to be considerably higher than the reported values. The present method was applied for the determination of fluorine in modern corals from Khang Khao Island, Thailand and Okinawa, Japan. Two core samples of an ancient reef from Funafuti Atoll were measured for fluorine to compare with modern samples. In order to understand the environmental media in which coral grew, the partition of fluorine between seawater and coral skeletons is also discussed. (author)

  5. Non-destructive characterization of refractories by mirage effect and photothermal microscopy

    Savignat, G.; Boch, P.; Pottier, L.; Vandembroucq, D.; Fournier, D.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we will demonstrate how thermal waves have turned out to be a good probe for the thermal parameter determination, at various spatial scales for heterogeneous materials such as ceramics. After the detailed description of the two setups we have used (mirage and photothermal microscope), we will explain how to proceed to achieve theoretical calculations either in a 1D geometry or in a 3D one. Then, we will illustrate our purpose with examples of refractory studies. Because these samples are porous and multiphase materials, they have to be investigated at macroscopic scale as well as at a microscopic scale. Finally, we will show results on the temporal behaviour of heat diffusion which can reveal how heat diffuses inside the sample. (orig.)

  6. Non-destructive testing of high heat flux components of fusion devices by infrared thermography: modeling and signal processing

    Cismondi, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    In Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) the joint of the CFC armour material onto the metallic CuCrZr heat sink needs to be significant defects free. Detection of material flaws is a major issue of the PFCs acceptance protocol. A Non-Destructive Technique (NDT) based upon active infrared thermography allows testing PFCs on SATIR tests bed in Cadarache. Up to now defect detection was based on the comparison of the surface temperature evolution of the inspected component with that of a supposed 'defect-free' one (used as a reference element). This work deals with improvement of thermal signal processing coming from SATIR. In particular the contributions of the thermal modelling and statistical signal processing converge in this work. As for thermal modelling, the identification of a sensitive parameter to defect presence allows improving the quantitative estimation of defect Otherwise Finite Element (FE) modeling of SATIR allows calculating the so called deterministic numerical tile. Statistical approach via the Monte Carlo technique extends the numerical tile concept to the numerical population concept. As for signal processing, traditional statistical treatments allow a better localization of the bond defect processing thermo-signal by itself, without utilising a reference signal. Moreover the problem of detection and classification of random signals can be solved by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio. Two filters maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio are optimized: the stochastic matched filter aims at detects detection and the constrained stochastic matched filter aims at defects classification. Performances are quantified and methods are compared via the ROC curves. (author)

  7. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R. L.

    2012-02-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14C dating.

  8. Non-Destructive Techniques in the Tacis and Phare Nuclear Safety Programmes

    Bieth, Michel

    2002-01-01

    Decisions regarding the verification of design plant lifetime and potential license renewal periods involve a determination of the component and circuit condition. In Service Inspection of key reactor components becomes a crucial consideration for continued safe plant operation. The determination of the equipment properties by Non Destructive Techniques during periodic intervals is an important aspect of the assessment of fitness-for-service and safe operation of nuclear power plants The Tacis and Phare were established since 1991 by the European Union as support mechanisms through which projects could be identified and addressed satisfactorily. In Nuclear Safety, the countries mainly concerned are Russia, Ukraine, Armenia, and Kazakhstan for the Tacis programme, and Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovak Republic, Lithuania, Romania and Slovenia for the Phare programme. The Tacis and Phare programs concerning the Nuclear Power Plants consist of: - On Site Assistance and Operational Safety, - Design Safety, - Regulatory Authorities, - Waste management, and are focused on reactor safety issues, contributing to the improvement in the safety of East European reactors and providing technology and safety culture transfer. The main parts of these programmes are related to the On-Site Assistance and to the Design Safety of VVER and RBMK Nuclear power plants where Non Destructive Techniques for In Service Inspection of the primary circuit components are addressed. (authors)

  9. Dam safety review using non-destructive methods for reinforced concrete structure

    Philibert, Alain; Saint-Pierre, Francois; Turcotte, Bernard [Le Groupe S.M. International Inc., Sherbrooke, (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Dams built at the beginning of the twentieth century include concrete structures that were put in under rehabilitation works. In some cases, the details of the structures are not well documented. In other cases, concrete damage can be hidden under new layers of undamaged material. This requires that the dam safety review in a real investigation gather the information necessary for carrying out the hydraulic and stability studies required by the Dam Safety Act. This paper presented the process of dam safety review using non-destructive methods for reinforced concrete structures. Two reinforced concrete dams built in the 1900's, the Eustic dam on the Coaticook River and the Frontenac dam on the Magog River near Sherbrooke, were evaluated by S.M. International using non-destructive methods such as sonic and ground penetrating radar methods. The studies allowed mapping of concrete damage and provided geometric information on some non visible structure elements that were part of previous reinforcement operations.

  10. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    MacDonald, B. L.; Vanderstelt, J.; O'Meara, J.; McNeill, F. E.

    2016-01-01

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  11. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Beck, L., E-mail: lucile.beck@cea.fr [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cuif, J.-P. [UMR IDES 8148, Universite Paris XI-Orsay, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Pichon, L. [C2RMF - UMR171 CNRS, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai Francois Mitterrand, 75001 Paris (France); Vaubaillon, S. [CEA, INSTN, Laboratoire JANNUS, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Dambricourt Malasse, A. [Departement de Prehistoire, Museum national d' Histoire naturelle, UMR 7194 - CNRS, Institut de Paleontologie Humaine, 1, rue Rene Panhard, 75013 Paris (France); Abel, R.L. [The Natural History Museum, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by {sup 14}C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before {sup 14}C dating.

  12. Checking collagen preservation in archaeological bone by non-destructive studies (Micro-CT and IBA)

    Beck, L.; Cuif, J.-P.; Pichon, L.; Vaubaillon, S.; Dambricourt Malassé, A.; Abel, R.L.

    2012-01-01

    The material to be studied is a piece of human skull discovered (1999) in Pleistocene sediments from the Orsang river (Gujarat state, India). From anatomical view point, this skull is highly composite: modern Homo sapiens characters are associated to undoubtedly more ancient features. Absolute dating by 14 C is critical to understand this discovery. Prior to dating measurements, non-destructive studies have been carried out. Micro-CT reconstruction (X-ray microtomography) and Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) have been undertaken to check the structural preservation of the fossil and the collagen preservation. PIXE elemental map was used to select well-preserved bone area. RBS/EBS and NRA were used for light element quantification, in particular C, N and O contents. We also demonstrate that the PIXE-RBS/EBS combination is a effective tool for the whole characterization of archaeological and recent bones by analysing in one experiment both mineral and organic fractions. We have shown that the archaeological bone, a fragment of the potentially oldest modern Indian, is enough preserved for radiocarbon dating. We propose that Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) using 3 MeV protons could be a good non destructive alternative to conventional CHN method using Carbon–Hydrogen–Nitrogen analyzer for measuring C and N before 14 C dating.

  13. Design of eddy current probes and signal inversion for non-destructive testing

    Ravat, C.

    2008-01-01

    Non destructive testing is widely used in aerospace industry and nuclear industry. The growing complexity of industrial processes and manufactured parts, the increasing need of safety in service and the will of life span optimization, require more and more complex quality evaluations to be set up. Among the different anomalies to consider, sub-millimetric breaking surface notches have to be subject to special care. Indeed, it often constitutes a start to larger notches, which can cause the destruction of parts. Penetrant testing is nowadays widely used for that kind of defect, owing to its good performances. Nevertheless, it should be eventually dropped because of environmental norms. Among the possible substitution solutions, the use of eddy currents (EC) for conductive parts is a reliable, fast and inexpensive alternative. The study is about the conception and the use of multi-elements EC probe structures featuring microsensors for non destructive testing of surface breaking defects. A methodology has been established in order to develop such structures and to compare their performances within the framework of sub-millimetric surface breaking notch research. These structures has been employed for calibrated notches evaluation with a specific acquisition bench. Original detection and defect characterization algorithms have been designed and implemented on acquired signals. The most efficient structure has been determined, the notch detection quality has been quantified, and the geometric characteristics of notches has been estimated. (author)

  14. A Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy Method for Non-Destructive Detection of Gelatin-Encapsulated Powders

    Kuanglin Chao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-destructive subsurface detection of encapsulated, coated, or seal-packaged foods and pharmaceuticals can help prevent distribution and consumption of counterfeit or hazardous products. This study used a Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS method to detect and identify urea, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen powders contained within one or more (up to eight layers of gelatin capsules to demonstrate subsurface chemical detection and identification. A 785-nm point-scan Raman spectroscopy system was used to acquire spatially offset Raman spectra for an offset range of 0 to 10 mm from the surfaces of 24 encapsulated samples, using a step size of 0.1 mm to obtain 101 spectral measurements per sample. As the offset distance was increased, the spectral contribution from the subsurface powder gradually outweighed that of the surface capsule layers, allowing for detection of the encapsulated powders. Containing mixed contributions from the powder and capsule, the SORS spectra for each sample were resolved into pure component spectra using self-modeling mixture analysis (SMA and the corresponding components were identified using spectral information divergence values. As demonstrated here for detecting chemicals contained inside thick capsule layers, this SORS measurement technique coupled with SMA has the potential to be a reliable non-destructive method for subsurface inspection and authentication of foods, health supplements, and pharmaceutical products that are prepared or packaged with semi-transparent materials.

  15. Non-destructive investigation of a time capsule using neutron radiography and X-ray fluorescence

    MacDonald, B.L., E-mail: macdonbl@mcmaster.ca [McMaster University, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton (Canada); Vanderstelt, J., E-mail: joshv@nray.ca [Nray Services Inc., 56A Head Street, Dundas, ON (Canada); O’Meara, J. [University of Guelph, Department of Physics, Guelph (Canada); McNeill, F.E. [McMaster University, Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, Hamilton (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Non-destructive analytical techniques are becoming increasingly important for the study of objects of cultural heritage interest. This study applied two techniques: X-ray fluorescence and neutron radiography, for the investigation of a capped, tubular metal object recovered from an urban construction site in Gore Park, Hamilton, Canada. The site is an urban park containing a World War I commemorative monument that underwent renovation and relocation. Historical documentation suggested that the object buried underneath the monument was a time capsule containing a paper document listing the names of 1800 Canadians who died during WWI. The purpose of this study was to assess the condition of the object, and to verify if it was what the historical records purported. XRF analysis was used to characterize the elemental composition of the metal artifact, while neutron radiography revealed that its contents were congruent with historical records and remained intact after being interred for 91 years. Results of this study demonstrate the value of non-destructive techniques for the analysis and preservation of cultural heritage.

  16. Non destructive examination of UN / U-Si fuel pellets using neutrons (preliminary assessment)

    Bourke, Mark Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Voit, Stewart Lancaster [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Losko, Adrian S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tremsin, Anton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Tomographic imaging and diffraction measurements were performed on nine pellets; four UN/ U Si composite formulations (two enrichment levels), three pure U3Si5 reference formulations (two enrichment levels) and two reject pellets with visible flaws (to qualify the technique). The U-235 enrichments ranged from 0.2 to 8.8 wt.%. The nitride/silicide composites are candidate compositions for use as Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF). The monophase U3Si5 material was included as a reference. Pellets from the same fabrication batches will be inserted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho during 2016. The goal of the Advanced Non-destructive Fuel Examination work package is the development and application of non-destructive neutron imaging and scattering techniques to ceramic and metallic nuclear fuels. Data reported in this report were collected in the LANSCE run cycle that started in September 2015 and ended in March 2016. Data analysis is ongoing; thus, this report provides a preliminary review of the measurements and provides an overview of the characterized samples.

  17. Non-Destructive Thermography Analysis of Impact Damage on Large-Scale CFRP Automotive Parts

    Maier, Alexander; Schmidt, Roland; Oswald-Tranta, Beate; Schledjewski, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Laminated composites are increasingly used in aeronautics and the wind energy industry, as well as in the automotive industry. In these applications, the construction and processing need to fulfill the highest requirements regarding weight and mechanical properties. Environmental issues, like fuel consumption and CO2-footprint, set new challenges in producing lightweight parts that meet the highly monitored standards for these branches. In the automotive industry, one main aspect of construction is the impact behavior of structural parts. To verify the quality of parts made from composite materials with little effort, cost and time, non-destructive test methods are increasingly used. A highly recommended non-destructive testing method is thermography analysis. In this work, a prototype for a car’s base plate was produced by using vacuum infusion. For research work, testing specimens were produced with the same multi-layer build up as the prototypes. These specimens were charged with defined loads in impact tests to simulate the effect of stone chips. Afterwards, the impacted specimens were investigated with thermography analysis. The research results in that work will help to understand the possible fields of application and the usage of thermography analysis as the first quick and economic failure detection method for automotive parts. PMID:28788464

  18. Non-destructive sampling of rock-dwelling microbial communities using sterile adhesive tape.

    Cutler, Nick A; Oliver, Anna E; Viles, Heather A; Whiteley, Andrew S

    2012-12-01

    Building stone provides a habitat for an array of microorganisms, many of which have been demonstrated to have a deleterious effect on the appearance and/or structural integrity of stone masonry. It is essential to understand the composition and structure of stone-dwelling (lithobiontic) microbial communities if successful stone conservation strategies are to be applied, particularly in the face of global environmental change. Ideally, the techniques used to sample such assemblages should be non-destructive due to the sensitive conservation status of many stone buildings. This paper quantitatively assesses the performance of sterile adhesive tape as a non-destructive sampling technique and compares the results of tape sampling with an alternative, destructive, sampling method. We used DNA fingerprinting (TRFLP) to characterise the algal, fungal and bacterial communities living on a stone slab. Our results demonstrate that tape sampling may be used to collect viable quantities of microbial DNA from environmental samples. This technique is ideally suited to the sampling of microbial biofilms, particularly when these communities are dominated by green algae. It provides a good approximation of total community diversity (i.e. the aggregate diversity of epilithic and endolithic communities). Tape sampling is straightforward, rapid and cost effective. When combined with molecular analytical techniques, this sampling method has the potential to make a major contribution to efforts to understand the structure of lithobiontic microbial communities and our ability to predict the response of such communities to future environmental change. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-destructive examination of the bonding interface in DEMO divertor fingers

    Richou, Marianne; Missirlian, Marc; Vignal, Nicolas; Cantone, Vincent; Hernandez, Caroline; Norajitra, Prachai; Spatafora, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • SATIR tests on DEMO divertor fingers (integrating or not He cooling system). • Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured. • Detectability of millimeter size artificial defects was evaluated. • SATIR can detect defect in DEMO divertor fingers. • Simulations are well correlated to SATIR tests. -- Abstract: Plasma facing components (PFCs) with tungsten (W) armor materials for DEMO divertor require a high heat flux removal capability (at least 10 MW/m 2 in steady-state conditions). The reference divertor PFC concept is a finger with a tungsten tile as a protection and sacrificial layer brazed to a thimble made of tungsten alloy W – 1% La 2 O 3 (WL10). Defects may be located at the W thimble to W tile interface. As the number of fingers is considerable (>250,000), it is then a major issue to develop a reliable control procedure in order to control with a non-destructive examination the fabrication processes. The feasibility for detecting defect with infrared thermography SATIR test bed is presented. SATIR is based on the heat transient method and is used as an inspection tool in order to assess component heat transfer capability. SATIR tests were performed on fingers integrating or not the complex He cooling system (steel cartridge with jet holes). Millimeter size artificial defects were manufactured and their detectability was evaluated. Results of this study demonstrate that the SATIR method can be considered as a relevant non-destructive technique examination for the defect detection of DEMO divertor fingers

  20. Influence of Kaolin in Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Concrete: Destructive and Non-Destructive Testing

    Yahya, Z.; Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Ramli, N. Mohd; Burduhos-Nergis, D. D.; Razak, R. Abd

    2018-06-01

    Development of geopolymer concrete is mainly to reduce the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) that adverse the natural effect. Fly ash is a by-product collected from electrical generating power plant which resulted from burning pulverized coal. Since fly ash is waste materials, it can be recycled for future advantages particularly as pozzolanic materials in construction industry. This study focused on the feasibility of fly ash based geopolymer concrete to which kaolin has been added. The main constituents of geopolymer production for this study were class F fly ash, sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. The concentration of NaOH solution was fixed at 12 Molar, ratio of fly ash/alkaline activator and sodium silicate/NaOH fixed at 1.5 and 2.5, respectively. Kaolin was added in range 5% to 15% from the mass of fly ash and all the samples were cured at room temperature. Destructive and non-destructive test were performed on geopolymer concrete to evaluate the best mix proportions that yield the highest strength as well as the quality of the concrete. Compressive strength, flexural strength, rebound hammer and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) result have been obtained. It shown that 5% replacement of kaolin contributed to maximum compressive strength and flexural strength of 40.4 MPa and 12.35 MPa at 28 days. These result was supported by non-destructive test for the same mix proportion.

  1. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  2. Non-destructive screening method for radiation hardened performance of large scale integration

    Zhou Dong; Xi Shanbin; Guo Qi; Ren Diyuan; Li Yudong; Sun Jing; Wen Lin

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment could induce radiation damage on the electronic devices. As the performance of commercial devices is generally superior to that of radiation hardened devices, it is necessary to screen out the devices with good radiation hardened performance from the commercial devices and applying these devices to space systems could improve the reliability of the systems. Combining the mathematical regression analysis with the different physical stressing experiments, we investigated the non-destructive screening method for radiation hardened performance of the integrated circuit. The relationship between the change of typical parameters and the radiation performance of the circuit was discussed. The irradiation-sensitive parameters were confirmed. The pluralistic linear regression equation toward the prediction of the radiation performance was established. Finally, the regression equations under stress conditions were verified by practical irradiation. The results show that the reliability and accuracy of the non-destructive screening method can be elevated by combining the mathematical regression analysis with the practical stressing experiment. (authors)

  3. Comparisons of non-destructive examination standards in the framework of fracture mechanics approach

    Reale, S.; Corvi, A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of the various Engineering Standards related to Non-destructive Examination (NDE) is to identify and limit some characteristics of defects in a structure, since the degree of damage of a structure can be associated with these defect characteristics. One way that the damage level can be evaluated is by means of Fracture Mechanics. The objective of the present paper is to compare and identify the differences in the flaw acceptance criteria of national NDE Standards so as to suggest some guidelines for a future common European Standard. This paper examines the Standards adopted in France (RCC-MR), Germany (DIN), Italy (ASME) and the UK (BSI). It concentrates on both ultrasonic and radiographic inspection methods. The flaw acceptance criteria in these standards relating to non-destructive tests performed on a component during manufacturing are compared and evaluated by the Fracture Mechanics CEGB R6 procedure. General guidelines and results supporting the significance of the Fracture Mechanics approach are given. (Author)

  4. Early non-destructive biofouling detection and spatial distribution: Application of oxygen sensing optodes

    Farhat, Nadia

    2015-06-11

    Biofouling is a serious problem in reverse osmosis/nanofiltration (RO/NF) applications, reducing membrane performance. Early detection of biofouling plays an essential role in an adequate anti-biofouling strategy. Presently, fouling of membrane filtration systems is mainly determined by measuring changes in pressure drop, which is not exclusively linked to biofouling. Non-destructive imaging of oxygen concentrations (i) is specific for biological activity of biofilms and (ii) may enable earlier detection of biofilm accumulation than pressure drop. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar O2 optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for early non-destructive biofouling detection. This biofouling detection is done by mapping the two-dimensional distribution of O2 concentrations and O2 decrease rates inside a membrane fouling simulator (MFS). Results show that at an early stage, biofouling development was detected by the oxygen sensing optodes while no significant increase in pressure drop was yet observed. Additionally, optodes could detect spatial heterogeneities in biofouling distribution at a micro scale. Biofilm development started mainly at the feed spacer crossings. The spatial and quantitative information on biological activity will lead to better understanding of the biofouling processes, contributing to the development of more effective biofouling control strategies.

  5. In-situ Non-destructive Studies on Biofouling Processes in Reverse Osmosis Membrane Systems

    Farhat, Nadia

    2016-12-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane systems are high-pressure membrane filtration processes that can produce high quality drinking water. Biofouling, biofilm formation that exceeds a certain threshold, is a major problem in spiral wound RO and NF membrane systems resulting in a decline in membrane performance, produced water quality, and quantity. In practice, detection of biofouling is typically done indirectly through measurements of performance decline. Existing direct biofouling detection methods are mainly destructive, such as membrane autopsies, where biofilm samples can be contaminated, damaged and resulting in biofilm structural changes. The objective of this study was to test whether transparent luminescent planar oxygen sensing optodes, in combination with a simple imaging system, can be used for in-situ, non-destructive biofouling characterization. Aspects of the study were early detection of biofouling, biofilm spatial patterning in spacer filled channels, and the effect of feed cross-flow velocity, and feed flow temperature. Oxygen sensing optode imaging was found suitable for studying biofilm processes and gave detailed spatial and quantitative biofilm development information enabling better understanding of the biofouling development process. The outcome of this study attests the importance of in-situ, non-destructive imaging in acquiring detailed knowledge on biofilm development in membrane systems contributing to the development of effective biofouling control strategies.

  6. Non-Destructive Thermography Analysis of Impact Damage on Large-Scale CFRP Automotive Parts

    Alexander Maier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated composites are increasingly used in aeronautics and the wind energy industry, as well as in the automotive industry. In these applications, the construction and processing need to fulfill the highest requirements regarding weight and mechanical properties. Environmental issues, like fuel consumption and CO2-footprint, set new challenges in producing lightweight parts that meet the highly monitored standards for these branches. In the automotive industry, one main aspect of construction is the impact behavior of structural parts. To verify the quality of parts made from composite materials with little effort, cost and time, non-destructive test methods are increasingly used. A highly recommended non-destructive testing method is thermography analysis. In this work, a prototype for a car’s base plate was produced by using vacuum infusion. For research work, testing specimens were produced with the same multi-layer build up as the prototypes. These specimens were charged with defined loads in impact tests to simulate the effect of stone chips. Afterwards, the impacted specimens were investigated with thermography analysis. The research results in that work will help to understand the possible fields of application and the usage of thermography analysis as the first quick and economic failure detection method for automotive parts.

  7. Non-destructive forensic latent fingerprint acquisition with chromatic white light sensors

    Leich, Marcus; Kiltz, Stefan; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2011-02-01

    Non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition is an emerging field of research, which, unlike traditional methods, makes latent fingerprints available for additional verification or further analysis like tests for substance abuse or age estimation. In this paper a series of tests is performed to investigate the overall suitability of a high resolution off-the-shelf chromatic white light sensor for the contact-less and non-destructive latent fingerprint acquisition. Our paper focuses on scanning previously determined regions with exemplary acquisition parameter settings. 3D height field and reflection data of five different latent fingerprints on six different types of surfaces (HDD platter, brushed metal, painted car body (metallic and non-metallic finish), blued metal, veneered plywood) are experimentally studied. Pre-processing is performed by removing low-frequency gradients. The quality of the results is assessed subjectively; no automated feature extraction is performed. Additionally, the degradation of the fingerprint during the acquisition period is observed. While the quality of the acquired data is highly dependent on surface structure, the sensor is capable of detecting the fingerprint on all sample surfaces. On blued metal the residual material is detected; however, the ridge line structure dissolves within minutes after fingerprint placement.

  8. Non-destructive investigations of Swiss museums objects with neutron and x-ray imaging methods

    Lehmann, E.H.; Deschler, E.; Pernet, L.; Vontobel, P.

    2004-01-01

    Many objects of archaeological relevance found in Switzerland are from the Celtic and Roman era. Because of their uniqueness in most cases it is demanded to perform any investigation with such samples non-destructively. Depending on the structure and size of the objects a transmission experiment performed either with X-ray or neutron can alight inner structures, composition, defects or the principles of the manufacturing procedures. Furthermore, the treatment by conservators and restaurateurs becomes visible in many cases. This report describes some examples of such investigations. In the case of neutron investigations, beside the transmission imaging as a radiograph the three-dimensional structure was observed with a tomography technique. For X-ray radiography, the images were obtained in the same digital format because the similar experimental method (imaging plates) was applied. It becomes evident in the described examples that the combination and complementary use of both methods (neutrons and X-ray) brings insights in different aspects of the samples properties and treatment. This approach to study museums objects stored and exhibit in Switzerland can be extrapolated to other countries where these techniques are also simultaneously available in order to investigate other objects of relevance. The European network COST-G8 entitled 'Non-destructive analysis and testing of museum objects' can help to support initiatives in this direction. (author)

  9. Application of digital radiography for the non-destructive characterization of radioactive waste packages

    Lierse, C.; Goebel, H.; Kaciniel, E.; Buecherl, T.; Krebs, K.

    1995-01-01

    Digital radiography (DR) using gamma-rays is a powerful tool for the non-destructive determination of various parameters which are relevant within the quality control procedure of radioactive waste packages prior to an interim storage or a final disposal. DR provides information about the waste form and the extent of filling in a typical container. It can identify internal structures and defects, gives their geometric dimensions and helps to detect non-declared inner containers, shielding materials etc. From a digital radiographic image the waste matrix homogeneity may be determined and mean attenuation coefficients as well as density values for selected regions of interest can be calculated. This data provides the basis for an appropriate attenuation correction of gamma emission measurements (gamma scanning) and makes a reliable quantification of gamma emitters in waste containers possible. Information from DR measurements are also used for the selection of interesting height positions of the object which are subsequently inspected in more detail by other non-destructive methods, e. g. by transmission computerized tomography (TCT). The present paper gives important technical specifications of an integrated tomography system (ITS) which is used to perform digital radiography as well as transmission/emission computerized tomography (TCT/ECT) on radioactive waste packages. It describes the DR mode and some of its main applications and shows typical examples of radiographs of real radioactive waste drums

  10. Non-Destructive Thermography Analysis of Impact Damage on Large-Scale CFRP Automotive Parts.

    Maier, Alexander; Schmidt, Roland; Oswald-Tranta, Beate; Schledjewski, Ralf

    2014-01-14

    Laminated composites are increasingly used in aeronautics and the wind energy industry, as well as in the automotive industry. In these applications, the construction and processing need to fulfill the highest requirements regarding weight and mechanical properties. Environmental issues, like fuel consumption and CO₂-footprint, set new challenges in producing lightweight parts that meet the highly monitored standards for these branches. In the automotive industry, one main aspect of construction is the impact behavior of structural parts. To verify the quality of parts made from composite materials with little effort, cost and time, non-destructive test methods are increasingly used. A highly recommended non-destructive testing method is thermography analysis. In this work, a prototype for a car's base plate was produced by using vacuum infusion. For research work, testing specimens were produced with the same multi-layer build up as the prototypes. These specimens were charged with defined loads in impact tests to simulate the effect of stone chips. Afterwards, the impacted specimens were investigated with thermography analysis. The research results in that work will help to understand the possible fields of application and the usage of thermography analysis as the first quick and economic failure detection method for automotive parts.

  11. Photothermal depth profiling: Comparison between genetic algorithms and thermal wave backscattering (abstract)

    Li Voti, R.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal depth profiling has been the subject of many papers in the last years. Inverse problems on different kinds of materials have been identified, classified, and solved. A first classification has been done according to the type of depth profile: the physical quantity to be reconstructed is the optical absorption in the problems of type I, the thermal effusivity for type II, and both of them for type III. Another classification may be done depending on the time scale of the pump beam heating (frequency scan, time scan), or on its geometrical symmetry (one- or three-dimensional). In this work we want to discuss two different approaches, the genetic algorithms (GA) [R. Li Voti, C. Melchiorri, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 410 (2001); R. Li Voti, Proceedings, IV Int. Workshop on Advances in Signal Processing for Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials, Quebec, August 2001] and the thermal wave backscattering (TWBS) [R. Li Voti, G. L. Liakhou, S. Paoloni, C. Sibilia, and M. Bertolotti, Anal. Sci. 17, 414 (2001); J. C. Krapez and R. Li Voti, Anal. Sci. 17, 417 (2001)], showing their performances and limits of validity for several kinds of photothermal depth profiling problems: The two approaches are based on different mechanisms and exhibit obviously different features. GA may be implemented on the exact heat diffusion equation as follows: one chromosome is associated to each profile. The genetic evolution of the chromosome allows one to find better and better profiles, eventually converging towards the solution of the inverse problem. The main advantage is that GA may be applied to any arbitrary profile, but several disadvantages exist; for example, the complexity of the algorithm, the slow convergence, and consequently the computer time consumed. On the contrary, TWBS uses a simplified theoretical model of heat diffusion in inhomogeneous materials. According to such a model, the photothermal signal depends linearly on the thermal effusivity

  12. Wave propagation in embedded inhomogeneous nanoscale plates incorporating thermal effects

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza; Dabbagh, Ali

    2018-04-01

    In this article, an analytical approach is developed to study the effects of thermal loading on the wave propagation characteristics of an embedded functionally graded (FG) nanoplate based on refined four-variable plate theory. The heat conduction equation is solved to derive the nonlinear temperature distribution across the thickness. Temperature-dependent material properties of nanoplate are graded using Mori-Tanaka model. The nonlocal elasticity theory of Eringen is introduced to consider small-scale effects. The governing equations are derived by the means of Hamilton's principle. Obtained frequencies are validated with those of previously published works. Effects of different parameters such as temperature distribution, foundation parameters, nonlocal parameter, and gradient index on the wave propagation response of size-dependent FG nanoplates have been investigated.

  13. Directional radiative cooling thermal compensation for gravitational wave interferometer mirrors

    Justin Kamp, Carl [Department of Chemical Reaction Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goteborg (Sweden)], E-mail: carl.kamp@chalmers.se; Kawamura, Hinata [Yokoyama Junior High School, Sanda, Hachioji, Tokyo 193-0832 (Japan); Passaquieti, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Enrico Fermi' and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Universita' di Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); DeSalvo, Riccardo [LIGO Observatories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2009-08-21

    The concept of utilizing directional radiative cooling to correct the problem of thermal lensing in the mirrors of the LIGO/VIRGO gravitational wave detectors has been shown and has prospects for future use. Two different designs utilizing this concept, referred to as the baffled and parabolic mirror solutions, have been proposed with different means of controlling the cooling power. The technique takes advantage of the power naturally radiated by the mirror surfaces at room temperature to prevent their heating by the powerful stored laser beams. The baffled solution has been simulated via COMSOL Multiphysics as a design tool. Finally, the parabolic mirror concept was experimentally validated with the results falling in close agreement with theoretical cooling calculations. The technique of directional radiative thermal correction can be reversed to image heat rings on the mirrors periphery to remotely and dynamically correct their radius of curvature without subjecting the mirror to relevant perturbations.

  14. Non destructive examination of primary wall small scale mock-up DS-1F

    Jeskanen, H.; Lahdenperae, K.; Kauppinen, P.; Taehtinen, S.

    1998-06-01

    Ultrasonic examination of primary wall small scale mock up DS-1F before thermal testing showed no major defects on studied interfaces. However, some small indications were found on copper to copper and copper to steel interfaces and surface roughness of the outer surface of copper layer gave clear indications on ultrasonic images. After thermal test a curved 50 mm long crack along the Y- direction in the middle of the heated surface of the mock up and a 220 mm long crack along the copper to copper interface on the side surface of the mock up were detected. Small cracks, less than 60-80 μm in depth, were observed on copper surface. After thermal test the corresponding ultrasonic examination showed a strong effect on ultrasonic attenuation properties and on leaky Rayleigh waves on outer surface of copper layer. A major indication was found on copper to copper interface. About 50% of the copper to copper interface was delaminated. However, some small indications found already before thermal test were also found after thermal test and they were not grown in size. No indications were observed on copper to stainless steel interfaces. Additionally, major indications were found on stainless steel tube to copper interfaces. Tubes No. 1 and 2 were almost completely whereas tube No. 3 only partly separated from copper. No indications were found on stainless steel tube to copper interface on tube No. 4. Eddy current measurements showed no volumetric or crack like flaws in the stainless steel tubes, however, delamination of the copper to copper interface along the tubes No. 1, 2 and 3 was observed. (orig.)

  15. Automatic non-destructive three-dimensional acoustic coring system for in situ detection of aquatic plant root under the water bottom

    Katsunori Mizuno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Digging is necessary to detect plant roots under the water bottom. However, such detection is affected by the transparency of water and the working skills of divers, usually requires considerable time for high-resolution sampling, and always damages the survey site. We developed a new automatic non-destructive acoustic measurement system that visualizes the space under the water bottom, and tested the system in the in situ detection of natural plant roots. The system mainly comprises a two-dimensional waterproof stage controlling unit and acoustic measurement unit. The stage unit was electrically controlled through a notebook personal computer, and the space under the water bottom was scanned in a two-dimensional plane with the stage unit moving in steps of 0.01 m (±0.0001 m. We confirmed a natural plant root with diameter of 0.025–0.030 m in the reconstructed three-dimensional acoustic image. The plant root was at a depth of about 0.54 m and the propagation speed of the wave between the bottom surface and plant root was estimated to be 1574 m/s. This measurement system for plant root detection will be useful for the non-destructive assessment of the status of the space under the water bottom.

  16. Art, historical and cultural heritage objects studied with different non-destructive analysis

    Rizzutto, Marcia A.; Tabacniks, Manfredo H.; Added, Nemitala; Campos, Pedro H.O.V.; Curado, Jessica F.; Kajiya, Elizabeth A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Since 2003, the analysis of art, historical and cultural heritage objects has being performed at the Laboratorio de Analise de Materiais of the Instituto de Fisica of the Universidade de Sao Paulo (LAMFI-USP). Initially the studies were restricted to non-destructive methods using ion beams to characterize the chemical elements present in the objects. Recently, new analytical techniques and procedures have been incorporated to the better characterization of the objects and the examinations were expanded to other non-destructive analytical techniques such as portable X-Ray fluorescence (XRF), digitalized radiography, high resolution photography with visible, UV (ultraviolet) light and reflectography in the infrared region. These non-destructive analytical techniques systematically applied to the objects are helping the better understanding of these objects and allow studying them by examining their main components; their conservation status and also the creative process of the artist, particularly in easel paintings allow making new discoveries. The setup of the external beam in the LAMFI laboratory is configured to allow different simultaneous analysis by PIXE / PIGE (Particle Induced X-ray emission / Particle Induced gamma rays emission), RBS (Rutherford Backscattering) and IBL (Ion Beam Luminescence) and to expand the archaeometric results using ion beams. PIXE and XRF analysis are important to characterize the elements presents in the objects, pigments and others materials. The digitized radiography has provided important information about the internal structure of the objects, the manufacturing process, the internal particles existing and in case of easel paintings it can reveal features of the artist's creative process showing hidden images and the first paintings done by the artist in the background. Some Brazilian paintings studied by IR imaging revealed underlying drawings, which allowed us to discover the process of creation and also some

  17. Art, historical and cultural heritage objects studied with different non-destructive analysis

    Rizzutto, Marcia A.; Tabacniks, Manfredo H.; Added, Nemitala; Campos, Pedro H.O.V.; Curado, Jessica F.; Kajiya, Elizabeth A.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Since 2003, the analysis of art, historical and cultural heritage objects has being performed at the Laboratorio de Analise de Materiais of the Instituto de Fisica of the Universidade de Sao Paulo (LAMFI-USP). Initially the studies were restricted to non-destructive methods using ion beams to characterize the chemical elements present in the objects. Recently, new analytical techniques and procedures have been incorporated to the better characterization of the objects and the examinations were expanded to other non-destructive analytical techniques such as portable X-Ray fluorescence (XRF), digitalized radiography, high resolution photography with visible, UV (ultraviolet) light and reflectography in the infrared region. These non-destructive analytical techniques systematically applied to the objects are helping the better understanding of these objects and allow studying them by examining their main components; their conservation status and also the creative process of the artist, particularly in easel paintings allow making new discoveries. The setup of the external beam in the LAMFI laboratory is configured to allow different simultaneous analysis by PIXE / PIGE (Particle Induced X-ray emission / Particle Induced gamma rays emission), RBS (Rutherford Backscattering) and IBL (Ion Beam Luminescence) and to expand the archaeometric results using ion beams. PIXE and XRF analysis are important to characterize the elements presents in the objects, pigments and others materials. The digitized radiography has provided important information about the internal structure of the objects, the manufacturing process, the internal particles existing and in case of easel paintings it can reveal features of the artist's creative process showing hidden images and the first paintings done by the artist in the background. Some Brazilian paintings studied by IR imaging revealed underlying drawings, which allowed us to discover the process of creation and also some

  18. Laser ultrasonic receivers based on photorefractive materials in non-destructive testing

    Zamiri Hosseinzadeh, S.

    2014-01-01

    The field of laser ultrasonics is one of the most interesting topics in which laser light is used for the generation and the detection of ultrasound waves in materials. This contactless method is extremely useful for materials inspection being nondestructive and contactless, especially for hazardous environments. In this method a pulsed laser with a short pulse length of e.g. nano- or even picoseconds is focused on the surface of a specimen and then ultrasonic waves, nanometer vibrations, such as surface and bulk waves are generated and propagate in all directions on to the material. For contactless detection of ultrasonic waves several interferometers such as confocal Fabry-Perot, Michelson, and long path difference interferometers have been applied. Each of them has its individual advantages and disadvantages concerning, e.g., frequency responses and sensitivity. However, most of these interferometers work best on mirror-like surfaces and exhibit reduced sensitivity on rough surfaces. Also these kinds of interferometer are sensible to external noise as air fluctuations, sample vibrations or thermal deformations, thus requiring relatively complex stabilization techniques. This hinders their applicability in industrial applications with harsh environmental conditions. As an alternative to the before mentioned techniques interferometers based on photorefractive materials (PR) have been established. A typical two wave mixing interferometer (TWMI) configuration enables broadband ultrasonic measurements on rough surfaces. These types of interferometers have a good sensitivity up to 3e-7 nm(W/Hz) 1/2 spatially for samples with a high rough surface unlike the Michelson interferometer. By using ferroelectric photorefractive crystals such as LiNbO:Fe+2, sensitivity even is enhanced to 4e-8 nm(W/Hz) 1/2 but response time in these crystals is slower. In this work, contactless interferometer set ups based on photorefractive materials such as BSO (Bismuth Silicon Oxide: Bi 12

  19. Research on Debonding Defects in Thermal Barrier Coatings Structure by Thermal-Wave Radar Imaging (TWRI)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Junyan; Mohummad, Oliullah; Wang, Yang

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, thermal-wave radar imaging (TWRI) is introduced to detect debonding defects in SiC-coated Ni-based superalloy plates. Linear frequency modulation signal (chirp) is used as the excitation signal which has a large time-bandwidth product. Artificial debonding defects in SiC coating are excited by the laser beam with the light intensity modulated by a chirp signal. Cross-correlation algorithm and chirp lock-in algorithm are introduced to extract the thermal-wave signal characteristic. The comparative experiment between TWRI reflection mode and transmission mode was carried out. Experiments are conducted to investigate the influence of laser power density, chirp period, and excitation frequency. Experimental results illustrate that chirp lock-in phase has a better detection capability than other characteristic parameters. TWRI can effectively detect simulated debonding defects of SiC-coated Ni-based superalloy plates.

  20. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Ryan, C.G.; Van Achterbergy, E. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C.A. [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Application of acoustic emission, as non destructive testing technique, to nuclear components inspection

    Sanchez Miro, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A panorama of actual state of acoustic emission as non destructive testing technique, from stand point of its safety applications to nuclear reactor is offered. In first place the physic grounds of acoustic emission phenomenon is briefly exposed. After we speak about the experimental methods for detection, and overall is made an explanation of the problems which are found during the application of this technology to on-line inspection of nuclear oower plants. It is hoped that this repport makes a contribution in the sense of to create a favourable atmosphere toward the introduction in our country of this important technique, and concretely within the nuclear power industry. In this last field the employ of acoustic emission is overcoming the experimental stage. (author)

  2. The non-destructive analysis of fluid inclusions in minerals using the proton microprobe

    Ryan, C G; Van Achterbergy, E [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience; Heinrich, C A [ETH Zentrum, Zurich, (Switzerland). Department Erdwissenschaften; Mernagh, T P [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Zaw, K [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The study of ore forming fluids trapped as fluid inclusions in minerals is the key to understanding fluid flow paths at the time of ore formation and to predicting the location of ore bodies within large-scale magmatic hydrothermal systems. The large penetration depths and the predictable nature of MeV proton trajectories and X-ray absorption enables reliable modelling of PIXE yields and the development of standardless quantitative analytical methods. This permits quantitative microanalysis of minerals at ppm levels, and more recently has enabled the development of methods for quantitative trace-element imaging and the quantitative, non-destructive analysis of individual fluid inclusions. This paper reports on recent developments in Proton Microprobe techniques with special emphasis on ore systems and fluid inclusion analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Non-destructive thermo-mechanical behavior assessment of glass-ceramics for dental applications

    Kordatos, E. Z.; Abdulkadhim, Z.; Feteira, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Every year millions of people seek dental treatment to either repair damaged, unaesthetic and dysfunctional teeth or replace missing natural teeth. Several dental materials have been developed to meet the stringent requirements in terms of mechanical properties, aesthetics and chemical durability in the oral environment. Glass-ceramics exhibit a suitable combination of these properties for dental restorations. This research is focused on the assessment of the thermomechanical behavior of bio-ceramics and particularly lithium aluminosilicate glass-ceramics (LAS glass-ceramics). Specifically, methodologies based on Infrared Thermography (IRT) have been applied in order the structure - property relationship to be evaluated. Non-crystallized, partially crystallized and fully crystallized glass-ceramic samples have been non-destructively assessed in order their thermo-mechanical behavior to be associated with their micro-structural features.

  4. Non-destructive spatial characterization of buried interfaces in multilayer stacks via two color picosecond acoustics

    Faria, Jorge C. D.; Garnier, Philippe; Devos, Arnaud

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the ability to construct wide-area spatial mappings of buried interfaces in thin film stacks in a non-destructive manner using two color picosecond acoustics. Along with the extraction of layer thicknesses and sound velocities from acoustic signals, the morphological information presented is a powerful demonstration of phonon imaging as a metrological tool. For a series of heterogeneous (polymer, metal, and semiconductor) thin film stacks that have been treated with a chemical procedure known to alter layer properties, the spatial mappings reveal changes to interior thicknesses and chemically modified surface features without the need to remove uppermost layers. These results compare well to atomic force microscopy scans showing that the technique provides a significant advantage to current characterization methods for industrially important device stacks.

  5. A robust approach to optimal matched filter design in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE)

    Li, Minghui; Hayward, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    The matched filter was demonstrated to be a powerful yet efficient technique to enhance defect detection and imaging in ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of coarse grain materials, provided that the filter was properly designed and optimized. In the literature, in order to accurately approximate the defect echoes, the design utilized the real excitation signals, which made it time consuming and less straightforward to implement in practice. In this paper, we present a more robust and flexible approach to optimal matched filter design using the simulated excitation signals, and the control parameters are chosen and optimized based on the real scenario of array transducer, transmitter-receiver system response, and the test sample, as a result, the filter response is optimized and depends on the material characteristics. Experiments on industrial samples are conducted and the results confirm the great benefits of the method.

  6. Determination of nuclear fuel burnup by non-destructive gamma spectroscopy

    Soares, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of nuclear fuel burnup by the non-destructive gamma spectroscopy method is studied. A MTR (Materials Testing Reactor) -type fuel element is used in the measurement. The fuel element was removed from the reactor core in 1958 and, because of the long decay time, show only one peak in is gamma spectrum at 661.6 Kev. Corresponding to 137 Cs. Measurements are made at 330 points of the element using a Nal detector and the final result revealed that the quantity of 235 U consumed was 3.3 +- 0,8 milligram in the entire element. The effect of the migration of 137 Cs in the element is neglected in view of the fact that it occurs only when the temperature is above 1000 0 C, which is not the case in IEAR-1. (Author)

  7. Selection of non-destructive assay methods: Neutron counting or calorimetric assay?

    Cremers, T.L.; Wachter, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The transition of DOE facilities from production to D ampersand D has lead to more measurements of product, waste, scrap, and other less attractive materials. Some of these materials are difficult to analyze by either neutron counting or calorimetric assay. To determine the most efficacious analysis method, variety of materials, impure salts and hydrofluorination residues have been assayed by both calorimetric assay and neutron counting. New data will be presented together with a review of published data. The precision and accuracy of these measurements are compared to chemistry values and are reported. The contribution of the gamma ray isotopic determination measurement to the overall error of the calorimetric assay or neutron assay is examined and discussed. Other factors affecting selection of the most appropriate non-destructive assay method are listed and considered

  8. Assuring the reliability of structural components - experimental data and non-destructive examination requirements

    Lucia, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The probability of failure of a structural component can be estimated by either statistical methods or a probabilistic structural reliability approach (where the failure is seen as a level crossing of a damage stochastic process which develops in space and in time). The probabilistic approach has the advantage that it makes available not only an absolute value of the failure probability but also a lot of additional information. The disadvantage of the probabilistic approach is its complexity. It is discussed for the following situations: reliability of a structural component, material properties, data for fatigue crack growth evaluation, a bench mark exercise on reactor pressure vessel failure probability computation, and non-destructive examination for assuring a given level of structural reliability. (U.K.)

  9. Commissioning of calorimeter in radiochemical laboratory for non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials

    Patra, S.; Mhatre, A.M.; Agarwal, C.; Chaudhury, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Accounting of special nuclear materials (SNM) in every stages of nuclear fuel cycle is a necessity where one needs the quantitative estimation of SNM in variety of samples like sealed containers or finished products without altering its physical and chemical form. Non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques are capable of assaying such samples by the way of measuring passive/active neutrons/gamma rays or by the measurement of decay heat. Radiochemistry Division has been actively involved in the development and deployment of various NDA methodologies for meeting the demand of nuclear material accounting as and when required. Recently a radiometric calorimeter, developed by Reactor Control Division, E and I Group, BARC, has been installed in Lab C-33, Radiochemistry Division

  10. Magnetic non-destructive evaluation of ruptures of tensile armor in oil risers

    Pérez-Benitez, J A; Padovese, L R

    2012-01-01

    Risers are flexible multilayered pipes formed by an inner flexible metal structure surrounded by polymer layers and spiral wound steel ligaments, also known as armor wires. Since these risers are used to link subsea pipelines to floating oil and gas production installations, and their failure could produce catastrophic consequences, some methods have been proposed to monitor the armor integrity. However, until now there is no practical method that allows the automatic non-destructive detection of individual armor wire rupture. In this work we show a method using magnetic Barkhausen noise that has shown high efficiency in the detection of armor wire rupture. The results are examined under the cyclic and static load conditions of the riser. This work also analyzes the theory behind the singular dependence of the magnetic Barkhausen noise on the applied tension in riser armor wires. (paper)

  11. Usage of FTIR-ATR as Non-Destructive Analysis of Selected Toxic Dyes

    Bartošová Alica

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of the environment which is due to the discharge of polluting wastewater from industrial sources poses a real problem in several countries. Textile industries use large volumes of water in their operations, discharging thus large volume of wastewater into the environment, most of which is untreated. The wastewater contains a variety of chemicals from various stages of process operations, including desizing, scouring, bleaching and dyeing. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce Infrared Spectrometry with Fourier transformation as a non-destructive method for study, identifation and rapid determination of selected representatives of cationic (Methylene Blue, azo (Congo Red, Eriochrome Black T and nitroso (Naphthol Green B dyes. In conjunction with the ATR technique, FTIR offers a reliable detection method of dyes without extraction by other dangerous substances.

  12. Portable generator-based X RF instrument for non-destructive analysis at crime scenes

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S.; Trombka, Jacob I.; Floyd, Samuel; Selavka, Carl; Zeosky, Gerald; Gahn, Norman; McClanahan, Timothy; Burbine, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Unattended and remote detection systems find applications in space exploration, telemedicine, teleforensics, homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation programs. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals investigate crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ, together with state and local forensic laboratories. A general-purpose X-ray fluorescence system has been built for non-destructive analyses of trace and invisible material at crime scenes. This portable instrument is based on a generator that can operate to 60 kV and a Schottky CdTe detector. The instrument has been shown to be successful for the analysis of gunshot residue and a number of bodily fluids at crime scenes

  13. Mapping of mechanical properties of cast iron melts using non-destructive structuroscopy

    J. Dočekal

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is focused on mapping of mechanical properties using methods of non-destructive structuroscopy of cast irons, which are a result of research at TU of Liberec and Institute of Physics of ASCR. Investigated samples become from melts of FOCAM s.r.o Olomouc Foundry shop. It compares data of mechanical properties obtained using ultrasound method with data from magnetic spot method and MAT. These are interpreted by mathematic models applicable in practice. In the following it concerns to derivation of loading tensile curve method, which can be used to obtain yield and fatigue strength limits even for cast irons with flake graphite. In spite of promising results reported by literature the experiments are bothered with error. This method can be applied to structure checking both before casting and at vendor inspection of castings.

  14. Synchrotron radiation microtomography of musical instruments: a non-destructive monitoring technique for insect infestations

    Beatrice Bentivoglio-Ravasio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography is becoming a common technique for the structural analysis of samples of cultural relevance, providing luthiers, art historians, conservators and restorators with a unique tool for the characterization of musical instruments. Synchrotron-radiation phase-contrast microtomography is an ideal technique for the non-destructive 3D analysis of samples where small lowabsorbing details such as larvae and eggs can be detected. We report results from the first feasibility studies performed at the Elettra synchrotron laboratory, where the 1494 organ by Lorenzo Gusnasco da Pavia has been studied. Together with important information about the structural conditions, the presence of xylophages could be detected and characterized.

  15. Non-destructive linear model for leaf area estimation in Vernonia ferruginea Less

    MC. Souza

    Full Text Available Leaf area estimation is an important biometrical trait for evaluating leaf development and plant growth in field and pot experiments. We developed a non-destructive model to estimate the leaf area (LA of Vernonia ferruginea using the length (L and width (W leaf dimensions. Different combinations of linear equations were obtained from L, L2, W, W2, LW and L2W2. The linear regressions using the product of LW dimensions were more efficient to estimate the LA of V. ferruginea than models based on a single dimension (L, W, L2 or W2. Therefore, the linear regression “LA=0.463+0.676WL” provided the most accurate estimate of V. ferruginea leaf area. Validation of the selected model showed that the correlation between real measured leaf area and estimated leaf area was very high.

  16. Usage of FTIR-ATR as Non-Destructive Analysis of Selected Toxic Dyes

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka; Sirotiak, Maroš; Michalíková, Anna

    2017-06-01

    The degradation of the environment which is due to the discharge of polluting wastewater from industrial sources poses a real problem in several countries. Textile industries use large volumes of water in their operations, discharging thus large volume of wastewater into the environment, most of which is untreated. The wastewater contains a variety of chemicals from various stages of process operations, including desizing, scouring, bleaching and dyeing. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce Infrared Spectrometry with Fourier transformation as a non-destructive method for study, identifation and rapid determination of selected representatives of cationic (Methylene Blue), azo (Congo Red, Eriochrome Black T) and nitroso (Naphthol Green B) dyes. In conjunction with the ATR technique, FTIR offers a reliable detection method of dyes without extraction by other dangerous substances. Spectral interpretation of dye spectra revealed valuable information about the identification and characterization of each group of dyes.

  17. Post-harvest Quality Evaluation of Grapes using Non-destructive Electronic Nose

    RAJIN S. M. Ataul Karim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, electronic nose has opened a variety of possibilities and is becoming one of the most important non-destructive odour inspection technologies in the food industry. The objective of this study is to determine the quality degradation of the fruit by monitoring the change in the volatile compound while kept in storage using a lab manufactured electronic nose. Here, grapes are chosen as the fruit sample for experiment. Principal component analysis (PCA is used to determine the ability of the electronic nose to distinguish the different quality of the fruit stored over an interval of time. The result shows that using PCA analysis, the electronic nose is able to identify a clear distinction between the aromas of grapes stored for different time intervals.

  18. Qualification and authorization of staff carrying out non-destructive testing in Electricite de France

    Sermadiras, P.; Lhermitte, R.; Boulet, J.

    1985-01-01

    The surveillance carried out by the Group des laboratoires of the Service de la Production thermique on components submitted to Quality Assurance in nuclear power plants of all types requires the use for non-destructive testing of staff who have been given authorization for their particular services. These authorizations are for activities specific to Electricite de France. In the first part, the authors describe the staff of the Groupe des Laboratoires and show how the different levels of authorization (4 levels) are given, taking into account staff qualifications. In the second part, the procedures for qualification and authorization of the staff of outside companies working with and on behalf of the Groupe des Laboratoires are described

  19. NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: PRINCIPLE AND RESULTS

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.; MITRA, S.; HENDREY, G.; ROGERS, H.; TORBERT, A.; PRIOR, S.

    2003-01-01

    Global warming is promoted by anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere, while at the same time it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems. However, improvement in the understanding and monitoring of below ground carbon processes is essential for evaluating strategies for carbon sequestration including quantification of carbon stores for credits. A system for non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring in soil, based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS), is described. The system can be operated in stationary or scanning mode and measures soil to depth of approximately 30 cm. There is a good agreement between results obtained from INS and standard chemical analysis of soil cores collected from the same study site

  20. Non destructive method to follow the phase sigma in a duplex stainless steel

    Silva, E.M.; Andrade, A.L.S. Souza; Fialho, W.M.L.; Araujo, B.R.; Silva, J.H.R.; Leite, Josinaldo P.; Silva, Eloy M.; Leite, Joao P.

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are subject to embrittlement due to the formation of sigma phase, which is one with the greatest effect of weakening because they are rich in chromium and deplete the matrix of this element. In this paper, a non-destructive methodology based on measurements of Hall voltage, is presented for monitoring the formation of sigma phase at temperatures of 800 deg C and 900 deg C. Different field intensities are generated by an electromagnet and the flow of field lines is detected by a Hall effect sensor. Hall voltage measurements are proportional to the formation of sigma phase generated by different times of aging methods. The results are correlated with results of microscopic, hardness and X-ray diffraction. It was showed that exist a correlation between the Hall voltage and the amount of sigma phase. The formation of this phase influences the signal voltage by reducing the voltage. (author)

  1. Yucca mountain container fabrication, closure and non-destructive evaluation development activities

    Russell, E.W.; Nelson, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Container fabrication, closure, and non-destructive evaluation process development activities are described. The design parameters for a tuff environment are: no significant hydrostatic or lithostatic loading of the container; very small water flux; benign water, an oxidizing, dilute sodium bicarbonate solution of neutral pH; temperatures reaching 250 C over the first 50 to 100 years, then falling to about 97 C over the remainder of the 300-year container period. The materials under consideration are three austenitic alloys: AISI 304L, AISI 316L, and alloy 825; as well as three copper alloys: CDA 102, CDA 613, and CDA 715. Targets are controlled, uniform microstructures for the base metal, the weld and the heat affected zones of the weld; controlled microchemistry; low residual stresses; small welds and heat-affected zones; and reliable methods of flaw detection by surface and volumetric activities. The recommended procedures and processes for fabricating, closing and evaluating each of the candidate materials are reviewed

  2. Integrated automatic non-destructive testing in industrial production and in the operation of technical plant

    Hoeller, P.

    1989-01-01

    The article deals with non-destructive testing (NDT) in automated manufacture and in the automated operation of industrial plant. In both areas of application, the tests are coupled to the process (real time operation) and the results are used for the control of manufacture or of the course of the process. The control process can be coupled to the process in open loop or closed loop. The subject is explained by the following examples: 1) Automated testing of sheets in a steelworks. 2) Automatic NDT on machine parts in tempering and machining by the 3MA system (3MA: micro-magnetic, multi-parameter, micro-structure and stress analysis). 3) Automated ultrasonic testing in manufacture and in the operation of plants with the ALOK data collection and processing system (ALOK: amplitude, running time, location curves). 4) Automated wheel running surface test on Intercity experimental train, and 5) automated level measurement on BWR pressure vessels. (orig./MM) [de

  3. 3D Modeling and Simulation for Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing- Problems and Limitations

    Ilham Mukriz Zainal Abidin; Nurul Ain Ahmad Latif

    2011-01-01

    Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) plays a critical role in nuclear power plants (NPPs) for life cycle management; such testing requires specialists with various NDT related expertise with specific equipment. This paper will discuss the importance of 3D modeling and simulation for electromagnetic NDT for critical and complex components in terms of engineering reasoning and physical trials. Results from simulation are presented which show the link established between the measurements and information relating to defects, such as 3D shape, size and location, which facilitates not only forward problem but also inverse modeling involving experimental system specification and configuration; and pattern recognition for 3D defect information. Subsequently, the problems and limitations pertinent to 3D modeling and simulation are then highlighted and areas of improvement are discussed. (author)

  4. Non-destructive fraud detection in rosehip oil by MIR spectroscopy and chemometrics.

    Santana, Felipe Bachion de; Gontijo, Lucas Caixeta; Mitsutake, Hery; Mazivila, Sarmento Júnior; Souza, Leticia Maria de; Borges Neto, Waldomiro

    2016-10-15

    Rosehip oil (Rosa eglanteria L.) is an important oil in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. However, due to its high added value, it is liable to adulteration with other cheaper or lower quality oils. With this perspective, this work provides a new simple, fast and accurate methodology using mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) as a means to discriminate authentic rosehip oil from adulterated rosehip oil containing soybean, corn and sunflower oils in different proportions. The model showed excellent sensitivity and specificity with 100% correct classification. Therefore, the developed methodology is a viable alternative for use in the laboratory and industry for standard quality analysis of rosehip oil since it is fast, accurate and non-destructive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-destructive determination of trace-element concentrations. Annual progress report, September 1977

    Gordon, G.E.; Zoller, W.H.; Walters, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Equipment has been assembled at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) reactor by the University of Maryland group in cooperation with the NBS staff in order to initiate studies of a new analytical technique, neutron-capture prompt γ-ray activation analysis. According to this technique one observes prompt γ-rays while the sample is under neutron bombardment, rather than observing γ rays from decay of radioactive species produced. It is expected that this technique will make possible the non-destructive determination of a number of elements in several classes of samples that cannot be measured by present analytical methods. A beam thimble has been built for insertion into the reactor. A beam stop and target holder have been designed and are under construction. The detection system has been designed and is on order. The pulse-height analyzer system has been obtained and debugged and most of the software needed has been written

  6. High-speed image processing systems in non-destructive testing

    Shashev, D. V.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.

    2017-08-01

    Digital imaging systems are using in most of both industrial and scientific industries. Such systems effectively solve a wide range of tasks in the field of non-destructive testing. There are problems in digital image processing for decades associated with the speed of the operation of such systems, sufficient to efficiently process and analyze video streams in real time, ideally in mobile small-sized devices. In this paper, we consider the use of parallel-pipeline computing architectures in image processing problems using the example of an algorithm for calculating the area of an object on a binary image. The approach used allows us to achieve high-speed performance in the tasks of digital image processing.

  7. Non-destructive testing method for determining the solvent diffusion coefficient in the porous materials products

    Belyaev, V. P.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, P. S.

    2018-01-01

    Ensuring non-destructive testing of products in industry is an urgent task. Most of the modern methods for determining the diffusion coefficient in porous materials have been developed for bodies of a given configuration and size. This leads to the need for finished products destruction to make experimental samples from them. The purpose of this study is the development of a dynamic method that allows operatively determine the diffusion coefficient in finished products from porous materials without destroying them. The method is designed to investigate the solvents diffusion coefficient in building constructions from materials having a porous structure: brick, concrete and aerated concrete, gypsum, cement, gypsum or silicate solutions, gas silicate blocks, heat insulators, etc. A mathematical model of the method is constructed. The influence of the design and measuring device operating parameters on the method accuracy is studied. The application results of the developed method for structural porous products are presented.

  8. Non-destructive measurements of nuclear wastes. Validation and industrial operating experience

    Saas, A.; Tchemitciieff, E.

    1993-01-01

    After a short survey of the means employed for the non-destructive measurement of specific activities (γ and X-ray) in waste packages and raw waste, the performances of the device and the ANDRA requirements are presented. The validation of the γ and X-ray measurements on packages is obtained through determining, by destructive means, the same activity on coring samples. The same procedure is used for validating the homogeneity measurements on packages (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Different operating experiences are then exposed for several kinds of packages and waste. Up to now, about twenty different types of packages have been examined and more than 200 packages have allowed the calibration, validation, and control

  9. Neutron CSI: Integrated platform for non-destructive composition and stress imaging with neutrons

    Materna, T.; Pirling, T.

    2011-01-01

    We propose to build an interdisciplinary platform for non-destructive analysis and imaging with neutrons. The project regroups an instrument already available at ILL (Laue-Langevin Institute), SALSA, with a new one for Neutron Tomography coupled to Prompt-Gamma Neutron Activation (PGNA) as well as partial usage of another proposed instrument, FIPPS. The focus of the proposition is the versatility of high spatial resolution and energy-selective neutron tomography to provide a rapid and precise 3D morphological map of an object as well as indirect information on its 3D elemental and structural composition through the scan of Bragg-edges in transmission. Coupled to PGNA imaging and the strain analysis power of SALSA, the aim of the platform is to answer key questions occurring in geological, metallurgical, engineering and medical fields, material research and cultural heritage. (authors)

  10. Contribution to the improvement of heritage mural painting non-destructive testing by stimulated infrared thermography

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Di Pallo, Luigi; Detalle, Vincent; Vallet, Jean-Marc; Duvaut, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of heritage mural paintings by means of stimulated infrared thermography has now become rather efficient [1-14]. However, pigments, which form a pictorial layer, have contrasting radiative properties possibly leading to artifact detection. In this paper, attempts to alleviate this difficulty are presented. Based on the spectroscopic study of different paint layers, one can argue that, in the medium infrared field, this radiative disparity decreases significantly. Then, with similar settings, it can be shown that ceramic radiative sources allow reaching this wavelength band. Finally, on the basis of a study carried out on an academic sample and a partial copy of a fresco from the cathedral of Angers, combining ceramic heat sources with a laboratory SAMMTHIR experimental setup enables to make real headway in terms of defects' detection.

  11. In situ non-destructive measurement of biofilm thickness and topology in an interferometric optical microscope.

    Larimer, Curtis; Suter, Jonathan D; Bonheyo, George; Addleman, Raymond Shane

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are ubiquitous and impact the environment, human health, dental hygiene, and a wide range of industrial processes. Biofilms are difficult to characterize when fully hydrated, especially in a non-destructive manner, because of their soft structure and water-like bulk properties. Herein a method of measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms of using white light interferometry is described. Using this technique, surface morphology, surface roughness, and biofilm thickness were measured over time without while the biofilm continued to grow. The thickness and surface topology of a P. putida biofilm were monitored growing from initial colonization to a mature biofilm. Measured thickness followed expected trends for bacterial growth. Surface roughness also increased over time and was a leading indicator of biofilm growth. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Non-destructive local determination of doping additions and main components in single crystals

    Ehksperiandova, L.P.; Blank, A.B.; Kukhtina, N.N.; Afanasiadi, L.I.

    1994-01-01

    Procedures for local non-destructive determination of elements in optical and scintillation single crystals are developed. They are applied for determination of the main components (in cadmium tungstate) and doping additions (tellurium in zinc selenide, europium in gadolinium silicate). The metrological characteristics of the developed micro-analysis methods are estimated. Segregation of the main components and doping additions in the objects under consideration are investigated. Tellurium is found to be distributed uniformly on the cross-sections of bulk zinc selenide single crystals. The segregation of europium along gadolinium silicate ingots is almost absent. On the cross-section surface of cadmium tungstate single crystals the microregions are found characterized by the prevailing contents of cadmium or tungsten

  13. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  14. Incoherent scattering of gamma photons for non-destructive tomographic inspection of pipeline

    Sharma, Amandeep; Sandhu, B.S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2010-01-01

    A scanner system, operating in a non-destructive and non-invasive way, is presented for pipeline to determine its location in land soil, wall thickness, type of liquid flowing and crack/blockage position. The present experiment simulates a real case where pipe corrosion (wall thinning) under insulation can be known from the study of incoherent scattering of 662 keV gamma photons. The incoherent scattered intensity, obtained by unfolding (deconvolution) the experimental pulse-height distribution of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector with the help of inverse response matrix, provides the desired information. The method is quite sensitive for small change (∼1 mm) in the thickness of pipe wall, locating a defect of 1 mm width under insulation and a small change (∼0.1 gm cm -3 ) in the density of liquid flowing through pipe.

  15. Non-destructive testing of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser

    Sun, S. C.; Qi, Hong; An, X. Y.; Ren, Y. T.; Qiao, Y. B.; Ruan, Liming M.

    2018-04-01

    The non-destructive testing (NDT) of ceramic materials using mid-infrared ultrashort-pulse laser is investigated in this study. The discrete ordinate method is applied to solve the transient radiative transfer equation in 2D semitransparent medium and the emerging radiative intensity on boundary serves as input for the inverse analysis. The sequential quadratic programming algorithm is employed as the inverse technique to optimize objective function, in which the gradient of objective function with respect to reconstruction parameters is calculated using the adjoint model. Two reticulated porous ceramics including partially stabilized zirconia and oxide-bonded silicon carbide are tested. The retrieval results show that the main characteristics of defects such as optical properties, geometric shapes and positions can be accurately reconstructed by the present model. The proposed technique is effective and robust in NDT of ceramics even with measurement errors.

  16. Confirm calculation of 12 MeV non-destructive testing electron linear accelerator target

    Ma Shudong; Zhang Rutong; Guo Yanbin; Zhou Yuan; Li Xuexian; Chen Yan

    2012-01-01

    The confirm calculation of 12 MeV non-destructive testing (NDT) electron linear accelerator (LINAC) target was studied. Firstly, the most optimal target thickness and related photon dose yield, distributions of dose rate, and related photon conversion efficiencies were got by calculation with specific analysis of the physical mechanism of the interactions between the beam and target; Secondly, the photon dose rate distribution, converter efficiencies, and thickness of various kinds of targets, such as W, Au, Ta, etc. were verified by MCNP simulation and the most optimal target was got using the MCNP code; Lastly, the calculation results of theory and MCNP were compared to confirm the validity of target calculation. (authors)

  17. Characterization of the Teotihuacan mural painting: application of the external particle beam as non destructive technique

    Martinez, C.; Manzanilla, L.; Ruvalcaba, J.L.; Ontalba, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of technical indicators contained in the painting mural should follow a minim methodology from their discovery in the archaeological excavations until their analysis in the laboratory, with the purpose of rescuing diagnostic elements that mark the stages of socio cultural development in the towns. With this spirit it was carried out the present study analyzing some fragments of the Teotihuacan mural painting. The analysis consisted on applying some of the analytical techniques with particle beams used for archaeometry like the Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and the particle elastic backscattering (RBS), due to it is treated of complementary techniques, very sensitive, of multielemental character, but mainly because its are non destructive analytical techniques. (Author)

  18. Qualification of non-destructive examination for belgian nuclear reactor pressure vessel inspection

    Couplet, D.; Francoise, T.

    2001-01-01

    In Service Inspection (ISI) participates to the assessment of Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Integrity. The performance of Non Destructive Examination (NDE) techniques must be demonstrated according to predefined objectives. The qualification process is essential to trust the reliability of the information provided by NDE. In Belgian Nuclear Power Plants, the qualification was conducted through a collaboration between the vendor and a technical group from the Electricity Utility. The important facts of this qualification will be presented: - the detailed definition of the inspection and qualifications objectives, based on a combination of the ASME code and the European Methodology for Qualification; - the systematic verification of the NDE performance and limitations, for each ISI objective, through an adequate combination of tests on blocks and technical justification; - the continuous improvement of the NDE procedure; - the feedback and the lessons learnt from site experience; - the necessary multi-disciplinary approach (NDE, degradation mechanisms, structural integrity)

  19. A versatile passive and active non-destructive device for spent fuel assemblies monitoring

    Berne, R.; Bignan, G.; Andrieu, G.; Dethan, B.

    1993-01-01

    The monitoring of spent fuel assemblies in reactor pools or in reprocessing plants with NDA methods is interesting (non-destructivity, non-intrusivity) for process control, safety-criticality and/or nuclear material management. In this context, the authors present the results of the development and design of a prototype device (physical methods used, qualification...) called PYTHON. The aim of PYTHON is to check the declared characteristic values of an irradiated assembly before taking it into a transport cask for safety criticality control. The PYTHON device consists of a detector head in two sections and a 252 Cf source if active neutron counting is to be used. Each section of the detection head consists of two detectors: one fission chamber and one ionization chamber

  20. Characterization of spent fuel assemblies for storage facilities using non destructive assay

    Lebrun, A.; Bignan, G.; Recroix, H.; Huver, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many non destructive assay (NDA) techniques have been developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for spent fuel characterization and management. Passive and active neutron methods as well as gamma spectrometric methods have been carried out and applied to industrial devices like PYTHON TM and NAJA. Many existing NDA methods can be successfully applied to storage, but the most promising are the neutron methods combined with on line evolution codes. For dry storage applications, active neutron measurements require further R and D to achieve accurate results. Characterization data given by NDA instruments can now be linked to automatic fuel recognition. Both information can feed the storage management software in order to meet the storage operation requirements like: fissile mass inventory, operators declaration consistency or automatic selection of proper storage conditions. (author)

  1. Template synthesis of test tube nanoparticles using non-destructive replication.

    Wagner, Jonathan; Yao, Jingyuan; Rodgers, David; Hinds, Bruce

    2013-03-01

    Nano test tubes are a promising delivery vehicle for a range of therapeutics, including small molecule drugs and biologics. However, current template synthesis methods of producing nano test tubes are prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Here, non-destructive template replication was used to increase nano test tube yield from porous alumina by more than a hundredfold. We demonstrate how to produce nano test tubes of several sizes and compositions, including hybrid tubes with different inner and outer surfaces for targeted surface chemistry. Nano test tubes were readily suspended and stored in aqueous solutions without the need for chemical treatment. These nano test tubes should find application as delivery vehicles for therapeutics, particularly for processive 'bionanoreactors' loaded with enzymes.

  2. Template synthesis of test tube nanoparticles using non-destructive replication

    Wagner, Jonathan; Rodgers, David; Yao Jingyuan; Hinds, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Nano test tubes are a promising delivery vehicle for a range of therapeutics, including small molecule drugs and biologics. However, current template synthesis methods of producing nano test tubes are prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Here, non-destructive template replication was used to increase nano test tube yield from porous alumina by more than a hundredfold. We demonstrate how to produce nano test tubes of several sizes and compositions, including hybrid tubes with different inner and outer surfaces for targeted surface chemistry. Nano test tubes were readily suspended and stored in aqueous solutions without the need for chemical treatment. These nano test tubes should find application as delivery vehicles for therapeutics, particularly for processive ‘bionanoreactors’ loaded with enzymes. (paper)

  3. Non-destructive analysis of rape plant pod by neutron radiography

    Makino-Nakanishi, Tomoko; Inanaga, Shinobu; Kobayashi, Hisao.

    1991-01-01

    Since the ripening process of the rape plant pod has not been studied well, non-destructive analysis of the pod has been carried out by neutron radiography. From the water distribution in the pod, the formation of pod parenchyma as well as vascular system were clearly observed. During the ripening process of the pod water content and weight of the seed were measured. It was found that at the early stage of the ripening process the water content of the seed became maximum and began to decrease, whereas the weight of each seed was gradually increased throughout the ripening process. Neutron radiography, which shows the water content of the pod, will give the clue to the decrease of the water content of the seed from the middle of the ripening process. (author)

  4. A new facility for non-destructive assay using a 252Cf source

    Stevanato, L.; Caldogno, M.; Dima, R.; Fabris, D.; Hao, Xin; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Viesti, G.

    2013-01-01

    A new laboratory facility for non-destructive analysis (NDA) using a time-tagged 252 Cf source is presented. The system is designed to analyze samples having maximum size of about 20×25 cm 2 , the material recognition being obtained by measuring simultaneously total and energy dependent transmission of neutrons and gamma rays. The equipment technical characteristics and performances of the NDA system are presented, exploring also limits due to the sample thickness. Some recent applications in the field of cultural heritage are presented. - Highlights: ► Tagged 252 Cf source setup. ► Material recognition and sample imaging with measurements of gamma ray and neutron transmission. ► Material identification via energy dependent neutron and gamma ray transmission measurements. ► Identification of layered material. ► Effects due to the sample thickness on the above identification techniques

  5. Non-destructive ripeness sensing by using proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G.W.; Stroshine, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz). 7 refs., 4 figs

  6. Non-destructive Ripeness Sensing by Using Proton NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Cho, Seong In; Krutz, G. W.; Stroshine, R. L.; Bellon, V.

    1990-01-01

    More than 80 kinds of fruits and vegetables are available in the United States. But only about 6 of them have their quality standards (Dull, 1986). In the 1990 Fresh Trends survey (Zind, 1990), consumers were asked to rate 16 characteristics important to their decision to purchase fresh produce. The four top ranking factors were ripeness/freshness, taste/flavor, appearance/condition and nutritional value. Of these surveyed, 96% rated ripeness/freshness as extremely important or very important. Therefore, the development of reliable grading or sorting techniques for fresh commodities is essential. Determination of fruit quality often involves cutting and tasting. Non-destructive quality control in fruit and vegetables is a goal of growers and distributors, as well as the food processing industry. Many nondestructive techniques have been evaluated including soft x-ray, optical transmission, near infrared radiation, and machine vision. However, there are few reports of successful non-destructive measurement of sugar content directly in fruit. Higher quality fruit could be harvested and available to consumers if a nondestructive sensor that detects ripeness level directly by measuring sugar content were available. Using proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) principle is the possibility. A nondestructive ripeness (or sweetness) sensor for fruit quality control can be developed with the proton NMR principle (Cho, 1989). Several feasibility studies were necessary for the ripeness sensor development. Main objectives in this paper was to investigate the feasibilities (1) to detect ripeness (or sweetness level) of raw fruit tissue with an high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (200 MHz) and (2) to measure sugar content of intact fruit with a low resolution proton NMR spectroscopy (10 MHz).

  7. Resolution enhancement for ultrasonic echographic technique in non destructive testing with an adaptive deconvolution method

    Vivet, L.

    1989-01-01

    The ultrasonic echographic technique has specific advantages which makes it essential in a lot of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) investigations. However, the high acoustic power necessary to propagate through highly attenuating media can only be transmitted by resonant transducers, which induces severe limitations of the resolution on the received echograms. This resolution may be improved with deconvolution methods. But one-dimensional deconvolution methods come up against problems in non destructive testing when the investigated medium is highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous (i.e. austenitic steel). Numerous deconvolution techniques are well documented in the NDT literature. But they often come from other application fields (biomedical engineering, geophysics) and we show they do not apply well to specific NDT problems: frequency-dependent attenuation and non-minimum phase of the emitted wavelet. We therefore introduce a new time-domain approach which takes into account the wavelet features. Our method solves the deconvolution problem as an estimation one and is performed in two steps: (i) A phase correction step which takes into account the phase of the wavelet and estimates a phase-corrected echogram. The phase of the wavelet is only due to the transducer and is assumed time-invariant during the propagation. (ii) A band equalization step which restores the spectral content of the ideal reflectivity. The two steps of the method are performed using fast Kalman filters which allow a significant reduction of the computational effort. Synthetic and actual results are given to prove that this is a good approach for resolution improvement in attenuating media [fr

  8. Non-destructive and destructive examination of the retired North Anna 2 Reactor Pressure Vessel Head

    Ahluwalia, Kawaljit; Barnes, Robert; Rao, Gutti; Cattant, Francois; Peat, Noel

    2006-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and nickel-based weld materials has been the single biggest challenge facing the PWR industry. A fundamental and thorough knowledge was needed to properly explain this phenomenon and develop appropriate mitigation strategies. Non Destructive Examination (NDE) of the North Anna Unit 2 Reactor Vessel Head (RVH) during the 2002 fall outage identified widespread crack indications in the Alloy 600 CRDM penetrations and associated Alloy 182 and 82 J-groove attachment welds. When the Utility decided to replace the RVH, a rare opportunity was provided to the industry to undertake in-depth studies of representative defective CRDM penetrations from a retired RVH. Accordingly, the Materials Reliability Program, undertook a two-phase program on the retired North Anna 2 Alloy 600 RVH. The first phase involved selection and removal of six penetrations from the RVH and penetration decontamination, replication and laboratory NDE. The second phase consisted of a detailed destructive examination of penetration number 54. This paper provides a summary of work undertaken during this program. Criteria for selection of penetrations for removal and procedures used in removal of the penetrations are described. Extreme care was undertaken in decontamination of the penetrations to facilitate laboratory NDE. Penetration number 54 was then subjected to destructive examination to establish a correlation between NDE findings (from both field and laboratory inspections) and actual flaws. Additional objectives of the destructive examination included mechanistic assessment of defect formation and investigation of the annulus environment and wastage characterization. Data obtained from these studies is invaluable in validating safety assessment statements by developing the correlation between field NDE and actual defects. In addition, information gathered from non-destructive and destructive examinations is used to assess accuracy of the NDE techniques

  9. Control of abusive water addition to Octopus vulgaris with non-destructive methods.

    Mendes, Rogério; Schimmer, Ove; Vieira, Helena; Pereira, João; Teixeira, Bárbara

    2018-01-01

    Abusive water addition to octopus has evidenced the need for quick non-destructive methods for product qualification in the industry and control of fresh commercial products in markets. Electric conductivity (EC)/pH and dielectric property measurements were selected to detect water uptake in octopus. A significant EC decrease was determined after soaking octopus in freshwater for 4 h. EC reflected the water uptake of octopus and the correspondent concentration decrease of available ions in the interstitial fluid. Significant correlations were determined between octopus water uptake, EC (R = -0.940) and moisture/protein (M/P) ratio (R = 0.923) changes. Seasonal and spatial variation in proximate composition did not introduce any uncertainty in EC discrimination of freshwater tampering. Immersion in 5 g L -1 sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) increased EC to a value similar to control octopus. EC false negatives resulting from the use of additives (STPP and citric acid) were eliminated with the additional determination of pH. Octopus soaked in freshwater, STPP and citric acid can also be clearly discriminated from untreated samples (control) and also from frozen (thawed) ones using the dielectric properties. No significant differences in the dielectric property scores were found between octopus sizes or geographical locations. Simultaneous EC/pH or dielectric property measurements can be used in a handheld device for non-destructive water addition detection in octopus. M/P ratio can be used as a reference destructive method. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Non destructive examinations and degradations: the use of feedback experience to improve maintenance policy

    Champigny, F.

    2007-01-01

    In France, since 1995, 58 pressurized water reactors have been operating to produce electricity. These reactors were built from 1975 to the beginning of nineties and are ranked in 4 standardized series, 900 MWe CP0 types, 900 MWe CPY types, 1300 MWe types and 1400 MWe types. The plants have undergone evolutions taking into account the feedback experience for manufacturing and construction, net power growth but also maintenance operations. In 1977 the first maintenance programs were based upon the American experience using ASME section XI code. As and when required, they have been modified with the events appeared during the operation. First of them concerned the steam generator tubes with the discover of the first primary water stress corrosion cracking at the end of the seventies then the under-clad cracking phenomenon in the 900 MWe pressure vessel nozzles. At the beginning of years 2000, the new departmental order dedicated to operation required to check and modify, if necessary, the maintenance policy to better take into account the possible damages, fast fracture studies for primary and secondary systems and, last but not least, qualification processes for non destructive examinations. These new requirements have induced a rewriting of the maintenance policies and inspection programs in the way to be more consistent with the need of an improved availability of the plants while keeping a high safety level. Through few examples, we show how the approaches and the practices have been modified in terms of non-destructive examination (NDE) and particularly the impact of the NDE qualification results. In addition, examples of the important choices between in-service inspection and repair policy are also described. (author)

  11. A comparison between destructive and non-destructive techniques in determining coating thickness

    Haider, F. I.; Suryanto; Ani, M. H.; Mahmood, M. H.

    2018-01-01

    Measuring coating thickness is an important part in research works related to coating applications. In general, techniques for measuring coating thickness may be divided into destructive and non-destructive methods which are commonly used depending on the applications. The objective of this study is to compare two methods measuring the coating thickness of electroplating copper coating on the austenitic stainless-steel substrate. The electroplating was carried out in a solution containing 200 g/L CuSO4, 100 g/L H2SO4 at room temperature and current of 40mA/cm2 during 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mins as coating periods. And the coating thickness was measured by two methods, cross sectional analysis as a destructive technique and weight gain as a non-destructive technique. The results show that at 20 mins coating time interval, the thickness measured by cross sectional method was 16.67 μm and by weight gain method was 17.37 μm, with difference of 0.7 μm and percentage error of 4.11%. This error increased to 5.27% at 100mins time interval, where the values of the thickness measured by cross sectional and weight gain were 86.33 μm and 81.9 μm respectively, and the difference was 4.43 μm. Moreover, though the weight gain method is fast and gives the indication for the termination of a coating process, information regarding the uniformity, porosity and the presence of cracks cannot be obtained. On the other hand, determining the coating thickness using destructive method will damage the sample.

  12. Development and assembly of equipment for non destructive assay system control using nuclear radiation

    Melo, Jose Altino Tupinamba

    2006-01-01

    Nondestructive Assay (NDA) is applied to machines and components quality tests. These elements would not have a good performance if they were conceived without concern about the mechanical project quality, used materials, manufacture processes and inspection and maintenance methodology. There are constant developments in high level of technology with the objective of guaranteeing the components quality and the good functioning of these machines, in the mechanics, naval, aeronautical, petrochemical and steel industry, energy and nuclear generation as well. The globalization in the industry lines is a fact, leading to an increase in the multinational projects and products. The following questions arise: how to assure the high quality of components and processes? How to optimize the test methods to assure that the materials do not have defects affecting the performance of the components? The answers to the questions above are found in the application of NDA. The complex materials analysis (inhomogeneous) using NDA requires a detailed study of the sensors response signal. In this work, a measure and control system of non destructive processes was developed, using a radioactive source with a defined energy in function of the material to be analyzed. This system involves: (a) Interface of input/output (I/O) (the Hardware) and (b) graphical Interface (Software). In the non destructive analysis, it is made the comparison of the signal proceeding from the sensor with a signal preset (Set Point) or analogical signal of reference (Base Line), which is adjusted in the I/O Interface. Analyzed the signal, the system will make the decision: (a) to reject or (b) to accept the analyzed material. The I/O Interface is implemented by electronic equipment with a MCS51. The purpose of this interface is to supply conditions to exchange information, using serial RS232, between the sensor and the microcomputer. The graphical Interface (software) is written in visual C++ language (author)

  13. Development of non-destructive testing system of shoes for infrared rays

    Kim, Jae Yeol; Park, Chang Sun; Oh, Ki Jang; Ma, Sang Dong; Kim, Bong Jae [Chosun Univesity, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Jo [Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-15

    Diagnosis or measurements using Infrared thermo-image hasn't been available. A quick diagnosis and thermal analysis can be possible when that kind of system is introduced to the investigation of each part. In this study, Infrared Camera, Thermo-vision 900 of AGEMA Company was used in order to investigate. Infrared Camera usually detects only Infrared wave from the light in order to illustrate the temperature distribution. Infrared diagnosis system can be applied to various field. But the defect discrimination can be automatic or mechanization on the special shoes total inspection system. Also, it is more effective to development and composition on the shoes total inspection system. In this study, it is introduction method of special shoes nondestructive total inspection. Performance of the proposed method are shown by through thermo-Image.

  14. Field testing of prototype systems for the non-destructive measurement of the neutral temperature of railroad tracks

    Phillips, Robert; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Nucera, Claudio; Fateh, Mahmood; Choros, John

    2014-03-01

    In both high speed and freight rail systems, the modern construction method is Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). The purpose of the CWR method is to eliminate joints in order to reduce the maintenance costs for both the rails and the rolling stock. However the elimination of the joints increases the risk of rail breakage in cold weather and buckling in hot weather. In order to predict the temperature at which the rail will break or buckle, it is critical to have knowledge of the temperature at which the rail is stress free, namely, the Rail Neutral Temperature (Rail-NT).The University of California at San Diego has developed an innovative technique based on non-linear ultrasonic guided waves, under FRA research and development grants for the non-destructive measurement of the neutral temperature of railroad tracks. Through the licensing of this technology from the UCSD and under the sponsorship of the FRA Office of Research and Development, a field deployable prototype system has been developed and recently field tested at cooperating railroad properties. Three prototype systems have been deployed to the Union Pacific (UP), Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF), and AMTRAK railroads for field testing and related data acquisition for a comprehensive evaluation of the system, with respect to both performance and economy of operation. The results from these tests have been very encouraging. Based on the lessons learned from these field tests and the feedback from the railroads, it is planned develop a compact 2nd generation Rail-NT system to foster deployment and furtherance of FRA R&D grant purpose of potential contribution to the agency mission of US railroad safety. In this paper, the results of the field tests with the railroads in summer of 2013 are reported.

  15. Assessment of the variation of the moisture content in the Pinus pinaster Ait. using the non destructive GPR technique

    Díez Barra, R.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The moisture content variations in wood have a significant influence in wood’s physicochemical properties, as well as in its electromagnetic properties and to specific effects upon waves’ characteristics. In particular, this paper focuses on the analysis of the Ground-penetrating Radar’s (GPR using an antenna of 1.6GHz central frequency capacity to register the velocity and the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves’ variation during the drying process of Pinus pinaster Ait timber joists. The results showed that when timber MC descends, the propagation velocity and amplitude of both the direct and the reflected wave increased. The high correlation found between the variables studied demonstrates GPR efficiency and the innovative application of this technique as a non-destructive evaluation tool for timber structures, particularly when studying its moisture content.La variación en el contenido de humedad (CH tiene una influencia significativa tanto en las propiedades físico- químicas de la madera, como en sus propiedades electromagnéticas y por tanto afecta a las características de la propagación de las ondas. En concreto, en este trabajo se estudia la capacidad del georradar (GR empleando una antena de 1.6GHz de frecuencia central para registrar las variaciones que se producen en la velocidad y en la amplitud de las ondas electromagnéticas cuando se propagan en unas viguetas de madera de Pinus pinaster Ait de uso estructural cuyo CH va disminuyendo. Se ha comprobado como cuando el CH descendía la velocidad de propagación y las amplitudes, tanto de la onda directa como de la reflejada aumentaba. Los altos factores de correlación encontrados demuestran que el GR es una técnica capaz de evaluar, de forma no destructiva, el CH de la madera de uso estructural.

  16. A quantitative, non-destructive methodology for habitat characterisation and benthic monitoring at offshore renewable energy developments.

    Emma V Sheehan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Following governments' policies to tackle global climate change, the development of offshore renewable energy sites is likely to increase substantially over coming years. All such developments interact with the seabed to some degree and so a key need exists for suitable methodology to monitor the impacts of large-scale Marine Renewable Energy Installations (MREIs. Many of these will be situated on mixed or rocky substrata, where conventional methods to characterise the habitat are unsuitable. Traditional destructive sampling is also inappropriate in conservation terms, particularly as safety zones around (MREIs could function as Marine Protected Areas, with positive benefits for biodiversity. Here we describe a technique developed to effectively monitor the impact of MREIs and report the results of its field testing, enabling large areas to be surveyed accurately and cost-effectively. The methodology is based on a high-definition video camera, plus LED lights and laser scale markers, mounted on a "flying array" that maintains itself above the seabed grounded by a length of chain, thus causing minimal damage. Samples are taken by slow-speed tows of the gear behind a boat (200 m transects. The HD video and randomly selected frame grabs are analysed to quantify species distribution. The equipment was tested over two years in Lyme Bay, UK (25 m depth, then subsequently successfully deployed in demanding conditions at the deep (>50 m high-energy Wave Hub site off Cornwall, UK, and a potential tidal stream energy site in Guernsey, Channel Islands (1.5 ms⁻¹ current, the first time remote samples from such a habitat have been achieved. The next stage in the monitoring development process is described, involving the use of Remote Operated Vehicles to survey the seabed post-deployment of MREI devices. The complete methodology provides the first quantitative, relatively non-destructive method for monitoring mixed-substrate benthic communities beneath

  17. A Quantitative, Non-Destructive Methodology for Habitat Characterisation and Benthic Monitoring at Offshore Renewable Energy Developments

    Sheehan, Emma V.; Stevens, Timothy F.; Attrill, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Following governments' policies to tackle global climate change, the development of offshore renewable energy sites is likely to increase substantially over coming years. All such developments interact with the seabed to some degree and so a key need exists for suitable methodology to monitor the impacts of large-scale Marine Renewable Energy Installations (MREIs). Many of these will be situated on mixed or rocky substrata, where conventional methods to characterise the habitat are unsuitable. Traditional destructive sampling is also inappropriate in conservation terms, particularly as safety zones around (MREIs) could function as Marine Protected Areas, with positive benefits for biodiversity. Here we describe a technique developed to effectively monitor the impact of MREIs and report the results of its field testing, enabling large areas to be surveyed accurately and cost-effectively. The methodology is based on a high-definition video camera, plus LED lights and laser scale markers, mounted on a “flying array” that maintains itself above the seabed grounded by a length of chain, thus causing minimal damage. Samples are taken by slow-speed tows of the gear behind a boat (200 m transects). The HD video and randomly selected frame grabs are analysed to quantify species distribution. The equipment was tested over two years in Lyme Bay, UK (25 m depth), then subsequently successfully deployed in demanding conditions at the deep (>50 m) high-energy Wave Hub site off Cornwall, UK, and a potential tidal stream energy site in Guernsey, Channel Islands (1.5 ms−1 current), the first time remote samples from such a habitat have been achieved. The next stage in the monitoring development process is described, involving the use of Remote Operated Vehicles to survey the seabed post-deployment of MREI devices. The complete methodology provides the first quantitative, relatively non-destructive method for monitoring mixed-substrate benthic communities beneath MPAs and

  18. In situ non-destructive measurement of biofilm thickness and topology in an interferometric optical microscope

    Larimer, Curtis [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle for the USDOE, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-50 Richland WA 99354 USA; Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle for the USDOE, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-50 Richland WA 99354 USA; Bonheyo, George [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle for the USDOE, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-50 Richland WA 99354 USA; Addleman, Raymond Shane [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Battelle for the USDOE, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-50 Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-03-15

    Biofilms are ubiquitous and deleteriously impact a wide range of industrial processes, medical and dental health issues, and environmental problems such as transport of invasive species and the fuel efficiency of ocean going vessels. Biofilms are difficult to characterize when fully hydrated, especially in a non-destructive manner, because of their soft structure and water-like bulk properties. Herein we describe a non-destructive high resolution method of measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms of using white light interferometric optical microscopy. Using this technique, surface morphology, surface roughness, and biofilm thickness can be measured non-destructively and with high resolution as a function of time without disruption of the biofilm activity and processes. The thickness and surface topology of a P. putida biofilm were monitored growing from initial colonization to a mature biofilm. Typical bacterial growth curves were observed. Increase in surface roughness was a leading indicator of biofilm growth.

  19. Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides

    Pu, Minhao; Chen, Yaohui; Yvind, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects.......Influence of thermal effects induced by nonlinear absorption on four-wave mixing in silicon waveguides is investigated. A conversion bandwidth reduction up to 63% is observed in simulation due to the thermal effects....

  20. Photothermal coherence tomography for 3-D visualization and structural non-destructive imaging of a wood inlay

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Sfarra, Stefano; Gargiulo, Gianfranco; Sivagurunathan, Koneshwaran; Mandelis, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the suitability of truncated correlation photothermal coherence tomography (TC-PCT) for the non-destructive imaging of a replica of a real inlay to identify subsurface features that often are invisible areas of vulnerability and damage. Defects of inlays involve glue-rich areas, glue-starved areas, termite attack, insect damage, and laminar splitting. These defects have the potential to result in extensive damage to the art design layers of inlays. Therefore, there is a need for an imaging technique to visualize and determine the location of defects within the sample. The recently introduced TC-PCT modality proved capable of providing 3-D images of specimens with high axial resolution, deep subsurface depth profiling capability, and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Therefore, in this study the authors used TC-PCT to image a fabricated inlay sample with various natural and artificial defects in the middle and top layers. The inlay in question reproduces to scale a piece of art preserved in the "Mirror room" of the Castle Laffitte in France. It was built by a professional restorer following the ancient procedure named element by element. Planar TC-PCT images of the inlay were stacked coherently to provide 3-D visualization of areas with known defects in the sample. The experimental results demonstrated the identification of defects such as empty holes, a hole filled with stucco, subsurface delaminations and natural features such as a wood knot and wood grain in different layers of the sample. For this wooden sample that has a very low thermal diffusivity, a depth range of 2 mm was achieved.

  1. Quantitative Method to Measure Thermal Conductivity of One-Dimensional Nanostructures Based on Scanning Thermal Wave Microscopy

    Park, Kyung Bae; Chung, Jae Hun; Hwang, Gwang Seok; Jung, Eui Han; Kwon, Oh Myoung [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We present a method to quantitatively measure the thermal conductivity of one-dimensional nanostructures by utilizing scanning thermal wave microscopy (STWM) at a nanoscale spatial resolution. In this paper, we explain the principle for measuring the thermal diffusivity of one-dimensional nanostructures using STWM and the theoretical analysis procedure for quantifying the thermal diffusivity. The SWTM measurement method obtains the thermal conductivity by measuring the thermal diffusivity, which has only a phase lag relative to the distance corresponding to the transferred thermal wave. It is not affected by the thermal contact resistances between the heat source and nanostructure and between the nanostructure and probe. Thus, the heat flux applied to the nanostructure is accurately obtained. The proposed method provides a very simple and quantitative measurement relative to conventional measurement techniques.

  2. Thermal analysis of gyrotron traveling-wave tube collector

    Zheng Zhiqing; Luo Yong; Jiang Wei; Tang Yong

    2013-01-01

    In order to solve cooling problem of the gyrotron traveling-wave tube(TWT) collector and guarantee the gyrotron TWT's reliability and stability, the electron trajectories in the gyrotron TWT are simulated using CST electron simulation software. Thermal analysis of the collector with finite element software ANSYS is performed. The ways of applying boundary that affects the distribution of collector temperature are compared. The influence of the water temperature and flow rate on collector temperature distribution under actual heat fluxes (boundary condition) is researched. The size and number of collector fins are optimized, and a relatively perfect structure is obtained finally. The result estimated by simulation is consistent with the experiment and proves that the model and method employed in this work are suitable. (authors)

  3. Edward’s sword? – A non-destructive study of a medieval king’s sword

    Segebade, Chr.

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  4. Edward's sword? - A non-destructive study of a medieval king's sword

    Segebade, Chr. [Idaho Accelerator Centre, Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Non-destructive and instrumental methods including photon activation analysis were applied in an examination of an ancient sword. It was tried to find indication of forgery or, if authentic, any later processing and alteration. Metal components of the hilt and the blade were analysed by instrumental photon activation. Non-destructive metallurgical studies (hardness measurements, microscopic microstructure analysis) are briefly described, too. The results of these investigations did not yield indication of non-authenticity. This stood in agreement with the results of stylistic and scientific studies by weapon experts.

  5. Non-destructive evaluation of the hidden voids in integrated circuit packages using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Park, Sung-Hyeon; Kim, Hak-Sung; Jang, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) imaging technique was used as a non-destructive inspection method for detecting voids in integrated circuit (IC) packages. Transmission and reflection modes, with an angle of incidence of 30°, were used to detect voids in IC packages. The locations of the detected voids in the IC packages could be calculated by analyzing THz waveforms. Finally, voids that are positioned at the different interfaces in the IC package samples could be successfully detected and imaged. Therefore, this THz-TDS imaging technique is expected to be a promising technique for non-destructive evaluation of IC packages. (paper)

  6. Magnetic fluctuations due to thermally excited Alfven waves

    Agim, Y.Z.; Prager, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic fluctuations due to the thermally excited MHD waves are investigated using fluid and kinetic models to describe a stable, uniform, compressible plasma in the range above the drift wave frequency and below the ion cyclotron frequency. It is shown that the fluid model with resistivity yields spectral densities which are roughly Lorentzian, exhibit equipartition with no apparent cutoff in wavenumber space and a Bohm-type diffusion coefficient. Under certain conditions, the ensuing transport may be comparable to classical values. For a phenomenological cutoff imposed on the spectrum, the typical fluctuating-to-equilibrium magnetic field ratio is found to be of the order of 10 -10 . Physical mechanisms to obtain decay profiles of the spectra with increasing wavenumber due to dispersion and/or different forms of damping are investigated analytically in a cold fluid approximation and numerically, with a kinetic model. The mode dispersion due to the finite ion-gyrofrequency is identified as the leading effect determining the spectral profile shapes. It is found that the amplitude of fluctuations may be within a factor of the value suggested by the cold plasma model. The results from both models are presented and compared in low- and high-β regimes. 21 refs., 6 figs

  7. Thermal effects on parallel-propagating electron cyclotron waves

    Robinson, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal effects on the dispersion of right-handed electron cyclotron waves propagating parallel to a uniform, ambient magnetic field are investigated in the strictly non-relativistic ('classical') and weakly relativistic approximations for real frequency and complex wave vector. In each approximation, the two branches of the RH mode reconnect near the cyclotron frequency as the plasma temperature is increased or the density is lowered. This reconnection occurs in a manner different from that previously assumed at parallel propagation and from that at perpendicular propagation, giving rise to a new mode near the cold plasma cut-off frequency ωsub(xC). For both parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is noted that reconnection occurs approximately when the cyclotron linewidth equals the width of the stop-band in the cold plasma dispersion relation. Inclusion of weakly relativistic effects is found to be necessary for quantitative calculations and for an accurate treatment of the new mode near ωsub(xC). Weakly relativistic effects also modify the analytic properties of the dispersion relation so as to introduce a new family of weakly damped and undamped solutions. (author)

  8. Application of advanced non-destructive testing for testing the integrity of concrete foundations

    Nguyen Le Son; Nguyen Phuoc Lan; Pham The Hung; Vu Huy Thuc

    2004-01-01

    Solid foundations are integral important part of any structures. Obtaining accurate and timely information on the integrity of structural foundations is essential for project progress and success. Cross-hole sonic method has been widely accepted for quality assurance and quality control on projects with deep foundations, and to assess the integrity of other civil engineering structures. Under the framework of the basic VAEC project (2003) and project VIE/8/013, the Cross-hole sonic method (CHM) was evaluated at Center for Nuclear Techniques, Hochiminh City (CNT). Background information on principle and general description of the method as is typically applied in the evaluation of deep foundations are also summarized. A suitable experimental model of the shaft foundations was prepared, where the artificial defects can be controlled for the Cross-hole sonic logging was conducted by measuring the propagation time of ultrasonic signals between two probes in vertical holes in a shaft. The purpose of the test program is to evaluate the ability of the cross-hole sonic method to identify the defects present in the experimental model, to evaluate the capabilities of the method and the equipped system Cs-97, to improve the presentation of test results to meet requirements for interpreting the quality of drilled shafts by processing the data of Cs-97. The cross-hole sonic testing program is describe. Summarizes the results and analysis of the cross-hole sonic logging are presented to highlight both the applicability and limitations of the method. The cross-hole sonic logging evaluation is a valuable non-destructive method in assessing the integrity of deep foundations. The cross-hole sonic logging tests successfully determined the location and extent of the built-in defects on experimental model shaft. Minimum sizes of defects can be detected were about ≥ 10 cm Cs-97. Effects of the directions, detectable sizes and natures of defects were studied. The apparent velocities

  9. Impact to non-destructive testing (NDT) companies of PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel

    De Jesus, Teresita G.

    2002-12-01

    This research discusses the impact to non-destructive testing (NDT) companies of PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel to the individual and to the organization that the individual belongs in the midst of competitive, demanding and fast-paced workplace in the NDT industry. Related literature and studies were carefully chosen and reviewed to validate the consistencies of the research design and data gathering relationship to the present undertaking to previous studies were also discussed and analyzed. The research design used were the descriptive-normative survey method together with a questionnaire consisting of six (6) parts. The first part includes queries on personal/demographic profiles of respondents. The second part contains queries on the level of expectation of the respondents of the job-related variables. The third part contains queries on the levels of adequacy of the organization-related variables. The fourth part consists of questions on the impact of the PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel before and after the training. It is divided into two sections, first was for the organization and second was for the individual development. The fifth part was on the analysis of the personal-related factors that influence the impact of the PNRI/PSNT trained NDT personnel. The last part was to find out the significant differences on the impact of the training as to methods. A five-point scale was used to quantify the degree of respondents' responses to queries in the questionnaires. In addition, the following statistical formula were used for treatment of gathered data were frequency percentage, ranking, wilcoxon signed ranks test and spearman rho. The null hypotheses that were presented for acceptance or rejection were also tested. Presentation of findings, analysis and interpretations were presented based on the data gathered and the computations. Recommendations were discussed based on the findings. It is recommended that training of NDT personnel in the different NDT

  10. Non-Destructive Testing: Sample Questions for Conduct of Examinations at Levels 1 and 2

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports industrial applications of radiation technology which include non-destructive testing (NDT) under its various programmes such as individual country Technical Co-operation (TC) projects, Regional Projects and Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs). NDT technology is essentially needed for the improvement of the quality of industrial products, equipment and plants all over the world, especially in developing Member States. Trained and certified personnel is one of the essential requirements for applying this technology in industry. With this in view, the IAEA first played an important role in cooperation with the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) for the development of a standard for training and certification of NDT personnel, namely ISO 9712, 'Non-Destructive Testing: Qualification and Certification of Personnel'. Subsequently the syllabi and needed training materials were identified and developed for the creation of, in each of the Member States, a core group of personnel who are trained and qualified to establish the training and certification process in their respective countries. One of the important requirements for such a process is to have the examination questions for conducting the certification examinations. A need had been felt to compile the appropriate questions firstly for conducting these examinations at the national and regional levels and secondly to provide these to the certification bodies of the Member States so that they could initiate their own level 1 and 2 certification examinations. For this purpose, Experts' Task Force Meetings were convened first in Accra, Ghana and then in Vienna, Austria under the AFRA regional projects on NDT. The experts examined and discussed in detail the ISO 9712 (1999 and 2005 versions) requirements for general, specific and practical examinations for level 1 and 2 personnel. After that a set of questions has been established which are

  11. Accuracy of Non-Destructive Testing of PBRs to Estimate Fragilities

    Brune, J. N.; Brune, R.; Biasi, G. P.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Purvance, M.

    2011-12-01

    Prior studies of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) have involved various methods of documenting rock shapes and fragilities. These have included non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as photomodeling, and potentially destructive testing (PDT) such as forced tilt tests. PDT methods usually have the potential of damaging or disturbing the rock or its pedestal so that the PBR usefulness for future generations is compromised. To date we have force-tilt tested approximately 28 PBRs, and of these we believe 7 have been compromised. We suggest here that given other inherent uncertainties in the current methodologies, NDT methods are now sufficiently advanced as to be adequate for the current state of the art use for comparison with Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) and seismic hazard maps (SHMs). Here we compare tilt-test static toppling estimates to three non-destructive methods: (1) 3-D photographic modeling (2) profile analysis assuming the rock is 2-D, and (3) expert judgments from photographs. 3-D modeling uses the commercial Photomodeler program and photographs in the field taken from numerous directions around the rock. The output polyhedral shape is analyzed in Matlab determine the center of mass and in Autocad to estimate the static overturning angle alpha. For the 2-D method we chose the photograph in profile looking perpendicular to the estimated direction of toppling. The rock is outlined as a 2-D object in Matlab. Rock dimensions, rocking points, and a vertical reference are supplied by the photo analyst to estimate the center of gravity and static force overturning angles. For the expert opinion method we used additional photographs taken from different directions to improve the estimates of the center of mass and the rocking points. We used 7 rocks for comparisons. The error in estimating tan alpha from 3-D modeling is about 0.05. For 2-D estimates an average error is about 0.1 (?). For expert opinion estimates the error is about 0.06. For

  12. Image-based phenotyping for non-destructive screening of different salinity tolerance traits in rice

    Hairmansis, Aris

    2014-08-14

    Background Soil salinity is an abiotic stress wide spread in rice producing areas, limiting both plant growth and yield. The development of salt-tolerant rice requires efficient and high-throughput screening techniques to identify promising lines for salt affected areas. Advances made in image-based phenotyping techniques provide an opportunity to use non-destructive imaging to screen for salinity tolerance traits in a wide range of germplasm in a reliable, quantitative and efficient way. However, the application of image-based phenotyping in the development of salt-tolerant rice remains limited. Results A non-destructive image-based phenotyping protocol to assess salinity tolerance traits of two rice cultivars (IR64 and Fatmawati) has been established in this study. The response of rice to different levels of salt stress was quantified over time based on total shoot area and senescent shoot area, calculated from visible red-green-blue (RGB) and fluorescence images. The response of rice to salt stress (50, 75 and 100 mM NaCl) could be clearly distinguished from the control as indicated by the reduced increase of shoot area. The salt concentrations used had only a small effect on the growth of rice during the initial phase of stress, the shoot Na+ accumulation independent phase termed the ‘osmotic stress’ phase. However, after 20 d of treatment, the shoot area of salt stressed plants was reduced compared with non-stressed plants. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the concentration of Na+ in the shoot. Variation in the senescent area of the cultivars IR64 and Fatmawati in response to a high concentration of Na+ in the shoot indicates variation in tissue tolerance mechanisms between the cultivars. Conclusions Image analysis has the potential to be used for high-throughput screening procedures in the development of salt-tolerant rice. The ability of image analysis to discriminate between the different aspects of salt stress (shoot ion

  13. Training Guidelines in Non-Destructive Testing Techniques: Manual for Visual Testing at Level 2

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been active in the promotion of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology for many decades. The prime reason for this interest has been the need for stringent quality control standards for safe operation of nuclear as well as other industrial installations. The IAEA has successfully executed a number of projects, including technical cooperation projects (national and regional) and coordinated research projects, in which NDT was an important part. Through these projects, a large number of persons have been trained in numerous Member States, leading to the establishment of national certifying bodies responsible for training and certification of NDT personnel. Consequently a state of self-sufficiency in this area of technology has been achieved in many of these States. All along there has been a realization of the need to have well established training guidelines and related books, in order, first, to guide IAEA experts involved in this training programme and, second, to achieve some level of international uniformity and harmonization of training materials and consequent competence of NDT personnel. The syllabuses for training courses have been published in the form of TECDOC publications. The first was IAEA-TECDOC-407 (1987), which contained syllabuses for the five basic NDT methods: liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, eddy current testing, radiographic testing and ultrasonic testing. To accommodate advancements in NDT technology, later versions of this publication were issued in 1991, 2002 and 2008, with the current version being IAEA-TECDOC- 628/Rev.2 (2008), which includes additional and more advanced NDT methods. The next logical step was to compile textbooks and training manuals in accordance with these syllabuses. Manuals on liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, radiographic, ultrasonic and eddy current testing have already been published in the Training Course Series. These play a vital role in

  14. X-rays for industry: Non-destructive testing helps Malaysia’s competitiveness

    Plonsky, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Industrial testing using nuclear technology has contributed to the competitiveness of Malaysia’s manufacturing sector, industry players have said. The country has also built itself an export niche in South-East Asia, offering non-destructive testing (NDT) with nuclear devices to manufacturers in neighbouring countries. “The fact that we can get NDT services of a good quality level at a very reasonable price allows us to spend more money on inspection, and thus improve our competitiveness as well as the level of safety of our plant,” said Zamaludin Ali, senior engineer at oil company PETRONAS. Before the development of a local NDT industry and accreditation system for testing services, PETRONAS and other companies in Malaysia had to rely on foreign NDT providers, or local companies hiring operators certified abroad, he explained. NDT using nuclear techniques involves the use of ionizing radiation to test the quality of finished products. It is based on the same principle as X-rays used in hospitals. Oil pipes, boilers, pressure vessels, aircraft equipment and ships are among the products whose quality is tested with the technique. The IAEA has played an important role in helping Malaysia to establish accredited training agencies and a certification system, and to promote NDT technologies such as radiographic testing. As a result of this longstanding partnership, over 50 companies in Malaysia, employing more than 2000 technicians, are certified to carry out NDT testing.

  15. Determination of burnup for IEAR-1 fuel elements by non destructive method of gamma spectrometry

    Madi Filho, T.; Holland, L.

    1982-01-01

    Burnup determination, by non-destructive gamma spectrometry of spent fuel with high and low activity of IEAR-1 reactor, using Cs-137 as burnup monitor, were done. To measure the Cs-137 distribution in these elements a Ge(Li) detector, with volume equal to 73,7 cm 3 , in two measurement systems with defined geometry and good colimation, was used. The IEA-14 taken from the core about 20 years ago, presents a gamma spectra due to Cs-137. The IEA-80, with cooling time approximately to 5 years, shows a more complex gamma spectrum due to other fission products still found in significant quantities. The IEA-14 measures were done in a measurement system used outside the reactor pool (S.I.), being the global efficiency of this system obtained by using a plane, calibrated and extense Ag-110 m source. Detailed measures of gamma transmission, using Cs-137 as a calibrated and punctiforme source, showed the high homogenity of the fuel plates. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Static characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitor for non destructive evaluation applications

    Saleem, Hussam; Laflamme, Simon; Zhang, Huanhuan; Geiger, Randall; Kessler, Michael; Rajan, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    A large and flexible strain transducer consisting of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) has been proposed by the authors. Arranged in a network setup, the sensing strategy offers tremendous potential at conducting non-destructive evaluation of large-scale surfaces. In prior work, the authors have demonstrated the performance of the sensor at tracking strain history, localizing cracks, and detecting vibration signatures. In this paper, we characterize the static performance of the proposed SEC. The characterization includes sensitivity of the signal, and temperature and humidity dependences. Tests are conducted on a simply supported aluminum beam subjected to bending as well as on a free standing sensor. The performance of the SEC is compared against off-the-shelf resistance-based strain gauges with resolution of 1 με. A sensitivity of 1190 pF/ε is obtained experimentally, in agreement with theory. Results also show the sensor linearity over the given level of strain, showing the promise of the SEC at monitoring of surface strain

  17. Spectral algorithm for non-destructive damage localisation: Application to an ancient masonry arch model

    Masciotta, Maria-Giovanna; Ramos, Luís F.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Vasta, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Structural monitoring and vibration-based damage identification methods are fundamental tools for condition assessment and early-stage damage identification, especially when dealing with the conservation of historical constructions and the maintenance of strategic civil structures. However, although the substantial advances in the field, several issues must still be addressed to broaden the application range of such tools and to assert their reliability. This study deals with the experimental validation of a novel method for non-destructive damage identification purposes. This method is based on the use of spectral output signals and has been recently validated by the authors through a numerical simulation. After a brief insight into the basic principles of the proposed approach, the spectral-based technique is applied to identify the experimental damage induced on a masonry arch through statically increasing loading. Once the direct and cross spectral density functions of the nodal response processes are estimated, the system's output power spectrum matrix is built and decomposed in eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The present study points out how the extracted spectral eigenparameters contribute to the damage analysis allowing to detect the occurrence of damage and to locate the target points where the cracks appear during the experimental tests. The sensitivity of the spectral formulation to the level of noise in the modal data is investigated and discussed. As a final evaluation criterion, the results from the spectrum-driven method are compared with the ones obtained from existing non-model based damage identification methods.

  18. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  19. New possibilities for non-destructive testing of pipelines with intelligent pigs

    Willems, H.; Jaskolla, B.; Barbian, O.A. [NDT Systems and Services, Stutensee (Germany); Niese, F. [Institut fuer zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Pipelines are considered to be the safest way for transportation of large amounts of liquid and gas over large distances. In the course of the lifetime of a pipeline, however, many effects can lead to damages affecting the integrity of the line, e.g. manufacturing-related anomalies, operationally induced anomalies or third-party damage. In order to avoid pipeline failures with potentially catastrophic consequences so-called intelligent pigs (or smart pigs) were developed during the last decades: These tools allow for the internal inspection (In-Line Inspection, ILI) of pipelines using non-destructive testing technologies for the early detection and sizing of defects. Most common are magnetic flux leakage (MFL) and ultrasonic techniques for corrosion inspection and the latter also for crack inspection. While the ultrasonic techniques offer superior sizing capabilities they are limited to the inspection of liquid pipelines where the medium itself provides the necessary coupling between the (piezoelectric) ultrasonic transducers and the pipe wall. However, this limitation can be overcome by recent developments using EMAT (Electro-Magnetic Acoustic Transducer) technology. By a special sensor design, the EMAT inspection is combined with eddy current (EC) inspection and MFL inspection at the same time. As a result, this new multi-technology approach offers improved sizing as well as enhanced feature identification for wall thickness inspection of gas pipelines. (orig.)

  20. Completely non-destructive elemental analysis of bulky samples by PGA

    Oura, Y.; Nakahara, H.; Sueki, K.; Sato, W.; Tomizawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A new non-destructive method is proposed for the elemental analysis of bulk samples. It is essentially a combination of PGA and NAA by a single neutron irradiation, and allows determinations of elemental contents of both major and minor constituents relative to that of some reference element. Major elements and some trace elements such as B, Sm, and Gd are mostly determined by the measurement of prompt gamma rays emitted when a bulky sample in its original form, namely, without any reduction of the sample size, is placed in the beam of neutrons guided from a nuclear reactor. Minor elements are then determined by the off-line measurements of gamma rays emitted from the radioactive nuclides produced within the sample by neutron capture reactions. As the radioactivity remaining in the sample becomes negligibly small after a few weeks cooling, the proposed method will be most usefully applied for the elemental analysis of bulky precious samples such as archaeological samples, and arts and crafts. In this presentation, applicability of the method will be demonstrated for porcelain and bronze samples. (author)

  1. Non-destructive measurements for characterisation of materials and datation of Corona Ferrea of Monza

    Milazzo, M.; Cicardi, C.; Mannoni, T.; Tuniz, C.

    1997-01-01

    Non-destructive analyses of Corona Ferrea of Monza, a late Roman or Longobard origin, were performed using energy dispersive-XRF portable instrumentation. To irradiate the internal surfaces of the six gold plates which make up the Crown we employed the radioactive isotope americium-241 as the x-radiation source, while to probe the other parts (approximately 200 separate points were studied) we used various types of x-ray tubes equipped with glass capillary to focus the x-rays on single small spots were used. It was not possible to use monochromatic exciting radiation when analysing the Monza Crown; furthermore, none of its surfaces proved to be flat. This meant that the secondary, concentration-dependent x-ray emission from copper could not be calculated, neither was it possible to calculate the influence of surface irregularities on x- ray intensity. We overcame these difficulties by a method that involved calculating the ratios: copper line intensity to gold line intensity (I Cu /I Au ) and silver line intensity to gold line intensity (I Ag / Au ). We then compared these ratios to the same ratios determined in standard samples of gold alloy whose compositions were accurately known and similar to that of the Crown. In this way the secondary excitation effect of copper was allowed for. The method depends upon the ratio of the intensities of two x-ray emission lines from a metal alloy being relatively insensitive to the geometry of irradiation

  2. High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated circuits

    Holler, Mirko; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Tsai, Esther H. R.; Dinapoli, Roberto; Müller, Elisabeth; Bunk, Oliver; Raabe, Jörg; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography—a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique—can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.

  3. Non-destructive prediction of pigment content in lettuce based on visible-NIR spectroscopy.

    Steidle Neto, Antonio José; Moura, Lorena de Oliveira; Lopes, Daniela de Carvalho; Carlos, Lanamar de Almeida; Martins, Luma Moreira; Ferraz, Leila de Castro Louback

    2017-05-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is one of the most important salad vegetables in the world, with a number of head shapes, leaf types and colors. The lettuce pigments play important physiological functions, such as photosynthetic processes and light stress defense, but they also benefit human health because of their antioxidant action and anticarcinogenic properties. In this study three lettuce cultivars were grown under different farming systems, and partial least squares models were built to predict the leaf chlorophyll, carotenoid and anthocyanin content. The three proposed models resulted in high coefficients of determination and variable importance for the projection values, as well as low estimative errors for calibration and external validation datasets. These results confirmed that it is possible to accurately predict chlorophyll, carotenoid and anthocyanin content of green and red lettuces, grown in different farming systems, based on the spectral reflectance from 500 to 1000 nm. The proposed models were adequate for estimating lettuce pigments in a quick and non-destructive way, representing an alternative to conventional measurement methods. Prediction accuracies were improved by using the detrending, smoothing and first derivative pretreatments to the original spectral signatures prior to estimating lettuce chlorophyll, carotenoid and anthocyanin content, respectively. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Static characterization of a soft elastomeric capacitor for non destructive evaluation applications

    Saleem, Hussam; Laflamme, Simon; Zhang, Huanhuan; Geiger, Randall; Kessler, Michael; Rajan, Krishna

    2014-02-01

    A large and flexible strain transducer consisting of a soft elastomeric capacitor (SEC) has been proposed by the authors. Arranged in a network setup, the sensing strategy offers tremendous potential at conducting non-destructive evaluation of large-scale surfaces. In prior work, the authors have demonstrated the performance of the sensor at tracking strain history, localizing cracks, and detecting vibration signatures. In this paper, we characterize the static performance of the proposed SEC. The characterization includes sensitivity of the signal, and temperature and humidity dependences. Tests are conducted on a simply supported aluminum beam subjected to bending as well as on a free standing sensor. The performance of the SEC is compared against off-the-shelf resistance-based strain gauges with resolution of 1 μɛ. A sensitivity of 1190 pF/ɛ is obtained experimentally, in agreement with theory. Results also show the sensor linearity over the given level of strain, showing the promise of the SEC at monitoring of surface strain.

  5. Non-destructive examination and estimation of radioactivity levels for decorative building materials

    Mao Yahong; Liu Yigang; Lin Libin

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of gamma ray intensity from building materials can be substituted by measuring alpha rays following outline of a radionuclide decay. Exposure levels of alpha ray from the surface of decorative materials can be measured non-destructively by placing a detector on the surface of the materials. Authors have studied the relationship between gamma specific activities of natural radionuclides and alpha and beta ray level in building materials used in interior decoration, and the saturated thickness of beta ray from the surface of different materials. The results showed that the range of beta ray with the maximum energy in natural radioactive series is longer than thickness of a piece of decorative materials. So the exposure level of beta ray cannot be used to estimate the limit of external and internal indexes. The polynomial between exposure level of alpha ray from surface (α) and external index (I γ ) for granite is: I γ =0.38 + 49.84α + 288.24α 2 . The measured values were in accordance with the values from the polynomial within 95%. The polynomial between exposure level of alpha ray from surface (α) and external index (Iγ) for polishing tiles is: I γ =0.42 + 343.55α-32999.66α 2 . The measured values were in accordance with the values from the polynomial within 90%

  6. Operator performance in non-destructive testing: A study of operator performance in a performance test

    Enkvist, J.; Edland, A.; Svenson, Ola [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Psychology

    2000-05-15

    In the process industries there is a need of inspecting the integrity of critical components without disrupting the process. Such in-service inspections are typically performed with non-destructive testing (NDT). In NDT the task of the operator is to (based on diagnostic information) decide if the component can remain in service or not. The present study looks at the performance in NDT. The aim is to improve performance, in the long run, by exploring the operators' decision strategies and other underlying factors and to this way find out what makes some operators more successful than others. Sixteen operators performed manual ultrasonic inspections of four test pieces with the aim to detect (implanted) cracks. In addition to these performance demonstration tests (PDT), the operators performed independent ability tests and filled out questionnaires. The results show that operators who trust their gut feeling more than the procedure (when the two come to different results) and that at the same time have a positive attitude towards the procedure have a higher PDT performance. These results indicate the need for operators to be motivated and confident when performing NDT. It was also found that the operators who performed better rated more decision criteria higher in the detection phase than the operators who performed worse. For characterizing it was the other way around. Also, the operators who performed better used more time, both detecting and characterizing, than the operators who performed worse.

  7. Non-destructive provenance differentiation of prehistoric pigments by external PIXE

    Beck, L.; Salomon, H.; Lahlil, S.; Lebon, M.; Odin, G.P.; Coquinot, Y.; Pichon, L.

    2012-01-01

    The elemental analysis of minerals/rocks has been often used for the determination of their geological origin. When these natural rocks were exploited by prehistoric civilizations as objects, weapons, or pigments, the composition of the minerals can provide information on the mobility, the exchanges and the interaction between groups of population. In this paper, we will present results obtained from archaeological samples of prehistoric pigments, mainly iron and manganese oxides. PIXE analysis has been applied to samples of the prehistoric cave “La grotte du Renne” in Arcy-sur-Cure, France (Chatelperronian, 38,000–34,000 BP). Because most of the archaeological objects are decorated or display some use marks, it is not possible to take samples. Consequently, we have used a non-destructive technique thanks to the external beam of AGLAE (C2RMF, Paris). In order to improve the limits of detection (LOD less than 10 ppm from Cu to Sb), a metal absorber has been placed on the X-ray detector to preferentially filter the Fe–K or Mn–K lines. Based on the quantitative analysis of major and trace elements, we have obtained groups of compositions corresponding to different geological sources. We demonstrate in this study that it is possible to extend PIXE analysis to the characterization of prehistoric pigments such as iron and manganese oxides for differentiating potential sources of pigments in archaeological contexts.

  8. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Shujie Fan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  9. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  10. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    Kiefel, Denis, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com; Stoessel, Rainer, E-mail: Denis.Kiefel@airbus.com, E-mail: Rainer.Stoessel@airbus.com [Airbus Group Innovations, Munich (Germany); Grosse, Christian, E-mail: Grosse@tum.de [Technical University Munich (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented.

  11. Quantitative impact characterization of aeronautical CFRP materials with non-destructive testing methods

    Kiefel, Denis; Stoessel, Rainer; Grosse, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of safety-relevant structures are designed and manufactured from carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRP) in order to reduce weight of airplanes by taking the advantage of their specific strength into account. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods for quantitative defect analysis of damages are liquid- or air-coupled ultrasonic testing (UT), phased array ultrasonic techniques, and active thermography (IR). The advantage of these testing methods is the applicability on large areas. However, their quantitative information is often limited on impact localization and size. In addition to these techniques, Airbus Group Innovations operates a micro x-ray computed tomography (μ-XCT) system, which was developed for CFRP characterization. It is an open system which allows different kinds of acquisition, reconstruction, and data evaluation. One main advantage of this μ-XCT system is its high resolution with 3-dimensional analysis and visualization opportunities, which enables to gain important quantitative information for composite part design and stress analysis. Within this study, different NDT methods will be compared at CFRP samples with specified artificial impact damages. The results can be used to select the most suitable NDT-method for specific application cases. Furthermore, novel evaluation and visualization methods for impact analyzes are developed and will be presented

  12. Non-destructive XRF analyses of fine-grained basalts from Eiao, Marquesas Islands

    Charleux, M.; McAlister, A.; Mills, P.R.; Lundblad, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    The Marquesan island of Eiao was an important source of fine-grained basalt in Central East Polynesia, with examples being identified in archaeological assemblages throughout the region. However, compared to many other large-scale Polynesian basalt sources, little has been published about the physical extent and geochemical variability of tool-quality basalt on Eiao; prior to our study, only a single site with evidence of stone extraction had been identified and geochemical information was limited to less than two dozen samples. In this paper we report geochemical data for 225 additional basalt specimens collected on Eiao. Our analyses were conducted non-destructively using three EDXRF instruments: one lab-based unit and two portable analysers. The majority of our sample, identified here as Group 1, possesses geochemical and physical characteristics similar to those reported in previous studies. Group 1 samples were collected from various locations on Eiao suggesting that, rather than being limited to a single quarry site, fine-grained basalt was extracted from multiple sources throughout the island. In addition, we identified a second group (Group 2), which possesses a distinct geochemistry, a coarser grain and often an unusual reddish colour. Evidence from Eiao indicates that Group 2 stone was regularly utilised and our analysis of an adze collected on Hiva Oa Island suggests that this material was distributed at least as far as the southern Marquesas. (author)

  13. Spatial distribution pattern analysis of subtidal macroalgae assemblages by a non-destructive rapid assessment method

    Guinda, Xabier; Juanes, José Antonio; Puente, Araceli; Echavarri-Erasun, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    The extensive field work carried out over the last century has allowed the worldwide description of general distribution patterns and specific composition of rocky intertidal communities. However, the information concerning subtidal communities on hard substrates is more recent and scarce due to the difficulties associated with working in such environments. In this work, a non-destructive method is applied to the study and mapping of subtidal rocky bottom macroalgae assemblages on the coast of Cantabria (N Spain) which is quick, easy and economical. Gelidium corneum and Cystoseira baccata were the dominant species, however, the composition and coverage of macroalgae assemblages varied significantly at different locations and depth ranges. The high presence of Laminaria ochroleuca and Saccorhiza polyschides, characteristic of colder waters, shows the transitional character of this coastal area. The results obtained throughout this study have been very useful to the application of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD 2000/60/EC) and could be of great interest for the future conservation and management of these ecosystems (e.g. Habitats Directive 92/43/EEC).

  14. Portable generator-based X RF instrument for non-destructive analysis at crime scenes

    Schweitzer, Jeffrey S. [University of Connecticut, Department of Physics, Unit 3046 Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States)]. E-mail: schweitz@phys.uconn.edu; Trombka, Jacob I. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Floyd, Samuel [Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Selavka, Carl [Massachusetts State Police Crime Laboratory, 59 Horse Pond Road, Sudbury, MA 01776 (United States); Zeosky, Gerald [Forensic Investigation Center, Crime Laboratory Building, 22 State Campus, Albany, NY 12226 (United States); Gahn, Norman [Assistant District Attorney, Milwaukee County, District Attorney' s Office, 821 West State Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233-1427 (United States); McClanahan, Timothy [Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Burbine, Thomas [Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    Unattended and remote detection systems find applications in space exploration, telemedicine, teleforensics, homeland security and nuclear non-proliferation programs. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) have teamed up to explore the use of NASA developed technologies to help criminal justice agencies and professionals investigate crimes. The objective of the program is to produce instruments and communication networks that have application within both NASA's space program and NIJ, together with state and local forensic laboratories. A general-purpose X-ray fluorescence system has been built for non-destructive analyses of trace and invisible material at crime scenes. This portable instrument is based on a generator that can operate to 60 kV and a Schottky CdTe detector. The instrument has been shown to be successful for the analysis of gunshot residue and a number of bodily fluids at crime scenes.

  15. Non-destructive testing of rocket propellant quality using -X-ray radiography

    Arayaprecha, W.

    1979-01-01

    Currently, X-rays radiography has been used extensively in various industries. In this thesis, X-rays has been used in the study of compaction of rocket propellant. For a rocket, to gain an accurate guidance result, the propellant used must be mixed and compacted thoroughly. The quality control of the production of propellant sticks must be carefully done. In this study of non-destructive quality testing of rocket propellant, at first the ultrasonic rays was used to test its homogeneity. However, because the density of the propellant was too low, the test equipment could not detect any reflected signals from the propellant being tested. Then the new procedure using X-rays radiography was tried. The variables in the test procedure were voltage, amperage and the focal-film distance. Also different types of films were used. The results of this experiment were then used to construct an exposure chart for testing the homogeneity of the rocket propellant. The advantage of this chart is that a tester can use this table with propellant sticks of different sizes if they have similar density to the density specified in the chart. Also, it is not necessary that the mixture of the testing propellant be the same as the ones used to construct this chart

  16. Recent advances in rapid and non-destructive assessment of meat quality using hyperspectral imaging

    Tao, Feifei; Ngadi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Meat is an important food item in human diet. Its production and consumption has greatly increased in the last decades with the development of economies and improvement of peoples' living standards. However, most of the traditional methods for evaluation of meat quality are time-consuming, laborious, inconsistent and destructive to samples, which make them not appropriate for a fast-paced production and processing environment. Development of innovative and non-destructive optical sensing techniques to facilitate simple, fast, and accurate evaluation of quality are attracting increasing attention in the food industry. Hyperspectral imaging is one of the promising techniques. It integrates the combined merits of imaging and spectroscopic techniques. This paper provides a comprehensive review on recent advances in evaluation of the important quality attributes of meat including color, marbling, tenderness, pH, water holding capacity, and also chemical composition attributes such as moisture content, protein content and fat content in pork, beef and lamb. In addition, the future potential applications and trends of hyperspectral imaging are also discussed in this paper.

  17. Non-destructive X-ray examination of weft knitted wire structures

    Obermann, M.; Ellouz, M.; Aumann, S.; Martens, Y.; Bartelt, P.; Klöcker, M.; Kordisch, T.; Ehrmann, A.; Weber, M. O.

    2016-07-01

    Conductive yarns or wires are often integrated in smart textiles to enable data or energy transmission. In woven fabrics, these conductive parts are fixed at defined positions and thus protected from external loads. Knitted fabrics, however, have relatively loose structures, resulting in higher impacts of possible mechanical forces on the individual yarns. Hence, metallic wires with smaller diameters in particular are prone to break when integrated in knitted fabrics. In a recent project, wires of various materials including copper, silver and nickel with diameters varying between 0.05 mm and 0.23 mm were knitted in combination with textile yarns. Hand flat knitting machines of appropriate gauges were used to produce different structures. On these samples, non-destructive examinations, using an industrial X-ray system Seifert x|cube (225 kV) equipped with a minifocus X-ray tube, were carried out, directly after knitting as well as after different mechanical treatments (tensile, burst, and washing tests). In this way, structural changes of the stitch geometry could be visualized before failure. In this paper, the loop geometries in the knitted fabrics are depicted depending on knitted structures, wire properties and the applied mechanical load. Consequently, it is shown which metallic wires and yarns are most suitable to be integrated into knitted smart textiles.

  18. Non-destructive testing of high pressure fibre reinforced composites tubes by computed tomography

    Klimek, L. [Qualitaetszentrum Dortmund (Germany); Monstadt, H.; Boedecker, T. [EFMT, Bochum (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    For new applications of fibre reinforced composites, new non-destructive testing methods are required which on the one hand can be used as a quality testing method and on the other hand as an in-service inspection method during the life of a product. Special attention should be paid to the defect sensitivity and to a detailed classification of visible defects. Defining a detectable standard, comparable investigations were carried out using the Ultra Fast Scanner which is located at the Entwicklungs- und Forschungszentrum fuer Mikrotherapie gGmbH (EFMT) and the industrial scanner of the Qualitaetszentrum Dortmund GmbH u. Co. KG (QZ-DO). The investigation object is a high pressure tube which is made up of three different diameter structures. There can be distinguished between three types of tube layers. Digital image processing has been used to get more information form measured data. We developed two different types of digital image filters: A SIGMA and a Contrast Sensitive Weights (CSW) image filter and made a comparative study. (orig./RHM)

  19. International cooperation program on non-destructive inspection. Overview of PINC and PARENT

    Komura, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    PINC (The Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components) and its successor program PARENT (The Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques) are the programs on the verification of nondestructive inspection technology for detecting / dimension-evaluating the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) generated in the weld zone of nickel-based alloy. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission plays a leading role, and the institutions of the United States, Japan, Korea, Sweden, Finland, and Switzerland participate in them. PINC was run from 2003 to 2009, and PARENT is currently underway with a schedule from 2010 to July 2017, including the extension period after July 2015. This paper outlined the implementation items and test results / achievements of PINC and PARENT programs. The target parts of PINC were a safe-end reducer and a reactor bottom instrument tube rest, and the flaw detection test and its analytical evaluation were carried out with a focus on the detectability and the sizing accuracy of defects. As a feature of the verification test of the non-destructive inspection technology in PARENT, two kinds of flaw detection tests, namely blind test and open test, are distinctively carried out. (A.O.)

  20. Non-destructive Inspection of Multi-layered Composite Using Ultrasonic Signal Processing

    Ng, S C; Ismail, N; Ali, Aidy; Sahari, Barkawi; Yusof, J M; Chu, B W

    2011-01-01

    Composites exhibit higher strength and stiffness, better design practice and greater corrosion resistance compare to metal material. However, composites are susceptible to impact damage and the typical damage behaviour in the laminated composites is fibre-breakage and delamination. Detection of failure in laminated composites is complicated compared with ordinary non-destructive testing for metal materials as they are sensitive to echoes drown in noise due to the properties of the constituent materials and the multi-layered structure of the composites. In the current study, the detection of failure in multi-layered composite materials is investigated. To obtain a high probability of defect detection in composite materials, signal processing algorithms were used to resolve echoes associated with defects in glass fibre-reinforced plastics (GRP) detected by using ultrasonic testing. Pulse-echo method with single transducer was used to transmit and receive ultrasound. The obtained signals were processed to reduce noise and to extract suitable features. Results were validated on GRP with and without defects in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the method on defect detection in composites.