WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal therapy arrays

  1. 1D multi-element CMUT arrays for ultrasound thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Djin, William Apoutou; Canney, Michael; Meynier, Cyril; Chavrier, Françoise; Lafon, Cyril; Nguyen-Dinh, An; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2017-03-01

    Interstitial therapeutic ultrasound devices are a promising technology for performing thermal ablation in a wide variety of organs. In this study, the use of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (CMUTs) for interstitial heating applications was investigated. CMUTs exhibit potential advantages for use in therapeutic ultrasound applications in comparison to standard piezo ultrasound transducer technologies as they have good characteristics in terms of miniaturization (cell size: few dozens of microns), bandwidth (several MHz) and high electro-acoustic efficiency. Two designs of CMUT arrays were studied: (1) a 1D 128-element planar-CMUT array originally dedicated to abdominal ultrasound imaging purposes (5 MHz, element size: 0.3 × 8.0 mm2); (2) a 12-element linear-array, 32.4-mm long and 0.8-mm wide, developed specifically for minimally-invasive interstitial therapeutic applications (6 MHz, element size: 2.7 × 0.8 mm2). Simulations were performed to evaluate the ability to generate thermal lesions in soft tissues with: (1) 1 single linear array, (2) a combination of multiple linear arrays positioned on a cylindrical catheter. Experimental investigations performed with the CMUT imaging array showed the ability to generate surface acoustic intensities (Iac) up to 20 W.cm-2 and to generate intense centimetric thermal lesions in in-vitro turkey breast tissues. At 6 MHz, a single element was able to generate in water a maximum peak pressure of >0.5 MPa. In simulations, the ability to use various power levels and frequencies on independent elements, as well as combinations of multiple linear-arrays offered sufficient flexibility to achieve a wide variety of thermal ablation patterns in 3D. Simulated ablation volumes could be controlled to cover accurately non-symmetrical volumes of brain metastases. In conclusion, CMUT arrays show interesting characteristics, which may open new perspectives of spatial control for conformal interstitial thermal therapy with

  2. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melodelima, David [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Lafon, Cyril [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Prat, Frederic [Centre Hospitalier Bicetre, 78 Avenue General Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Birer, Alain [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Cathignol, Dominique [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France)

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm{sup -2}. By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  3. Thermal physics of transition edge sensor arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoevers, H.F.C.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal transport in transition edge sensor (TES)-based microcalorimeter arrays is reviewed. The fundamentals of thermal conductance in Si 3 N 4 membranes are discussed and the magnitude of the electron-phonon coupling and Kapitza coupling in practical devices is summarized. Next, the thermal transport in high-stopping power and low-heat capacity absorbers, required for arrays of TES microcalorimeters, is discussed in combination with a performance analysis of detectors with mushroom-absorbers. Finally, the phenomenology of unexplained excess noise, observed in both Mo- and Ti-based TESs, is briefly summarized and related with the coupling of the TES to the heat bath

  4. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  5. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Michael R [Albuquerque, NM; Shaw, Michael J [Tijeras, NM; Nielson, Gregory N [Albuquerque, NM; Lentine, Anthony L [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  6. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-02

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  7. Thermal poling of multi-wire array optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lin; An, Honglin; Hayashi, Juliano G.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate in this paper thermal poling of multi-wire array fibers, which extends poling of fibers with two anodes to similar to 50 and similar to 500 wire array anodes. The second harmonic microscopy observations show that second order nonlinearity (SON) layers are developed surrounding all...... the rings of wires in the similar to 50 anode array fiber with poling of 1.8kV, 250 degrees C and 30min duration, and the outer rings of the similar to 500 anode array fiber at lower poling temperature. Our simulations based on a two-dimensional charge dynamics model confirm this can be explained...

  8. Ordered Pinning Arrays with Tunable Geometry via Thermal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy, Juan; Bernard, Rozenn; Briatico, Javier; Villegas, Javier E.; Malnou, Maxime; Bergeal, Nicolas; Lesueur, Jerome; Ulysse, Christian; Faini, Giancarlo

    2015-03-01

    We have used geometrically frustrated pinning arrays to create artificial vortex-ice. The pinning arrays are fabricated via ion irradiation of high-Tc superconducting films. These arrays present a very unique characteristic: the frustration can be reversibly switched on/off using temperature as a control knob, which allows stabilizing either a vortex-ice or a square vortex lattice. We have further investigated the thermal switching mechanism by studying the matching of the flux lattice to arrays that are incrementally deformed upon fabrication by introducing minute variations of the distance between pins. The array deformation exacerbates the thermal effects, leading to dramatic variations of the vortex distribution as a function of temperature. These results illustrate the strength of the temperature-induced reconfiguration effects, which may constitute a novel knob in fluxtronic devices based on vortex manipulation. Work supported by the French ANR MASTHER, the COST Action NanoSC, the Ville de Paris and the Galician Fundacion Barrie.

  9. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  10. Thermal Management of Quantum Cascade Lasers in an individually Addressable Array Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Thermal Management of Quantum Cascade Lasers in an Individually Addressable Monolithic Array Architecture Leo Missaggia, Christine Wang, Michael...Array Module Architecture As an initial demonstration of a monolithic QCL array, the module was designed to accommodate an array comprised of up to...management strategies were developed to facilitate the demonstration of a monolithic QCL array operating under CW conditions. Thermal models were

  11. Nanoengineered Thermal Materials Based on Carbon Nanotube Array Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Dangelo, Carols

    2012-01-01

    State-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) for microprocessors routinely dissipate power densities on the order of 50 W/cm2. This large power is due to the localized heating of ICs operating at high frequencies and must be managed for future high-frequency microelectronic applications. As the size of components and devices for ICs and other appliances becomes smaller, it becomes more difficult to provide heat dissipation and transport for such components and devices. A thermal conductor for a macro-sized thermal conductor is generally inadequate for use with a microsized component or device, in part due to scaling problems. A method has been developed for providing for thermal conduction using an array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). An array of vertically oriented CNTs is grown on a substrate having high thermal conductivity, and interstitial regions between adjacent CNTs in the array are partly or wholly filled with a filler material having a high thermal conductivity so that at least one end of each CNT is exposed. The exposed end of each CNT is pressed against a surface of an object from which heat is to be removed. The CNT-filler-composite adjacent to the substrate provides improved mechanical strength to anchor CNTs in place, and also serves as a heat spreader to improve diffusion of heat flux from the smaller volume (CNTs) to a larger heat sink.

  12. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    To increase contact conductance between two mating surfaces, a conductive tape has been developed by growing dense arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, graphite layers folded into cylinders) on both sides of a thermally conductive metallic foil. When the two mating surfaces are brought into contact with the conductive tape in between, the CNT arrays will adhere to the mating surface. The van der Waals force between the contacting tubes and the mating surface provides adhesion between the two mating surfaces. Even though the thermal contact conductance of a single tube-to-tube contact is small, the tremendous amount of CNTs on the surface leads to a very large overall contact conductance. Interface contact thermal resistance rises from the microroughness and the macroscopic non-planar quality of mating surfaces. When two surfaces come into contact with each other, the actual contact area may be much less than the total area of the surfaces. The real area of contact depends on the load, the surface roughness, and the elastic and inelastic properties of the surface. This issue is even more important at cryogenic temperatures, where materials become hard and brittle and vacuum is used, which prevents any gas conduction through the interstitial region. A typical approach to increase thermal contact conductance is to use thermally conducting epoxies or greases, which are not always compatible with vacuum conditions. In addition, the thermal conductivities of these compounds are often relatively low. The CNTs used in this approach can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the folding angle and diameter. The electrical resistivity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been reported. MWCNTs can pass a current density and remain stable at high temperatures in air. The thermal conductivity of a MWCNT at room temperature is measured to be approximately 3,000 W/m-K, which is much larger than that of diamond. At room temperature, the thermal conductance of a 0.3 sq cm

  13. A thermal plasmonic sensor platform: resistive heating of nanohole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Mudassar; Xiong, Kunli; Svedendahl, Mikael; Käll, Mikael; Dahlin, Andreas B

    2014-06-11

    We have created a simple and efficient thermal plasmonic sensor platform by letting a DC current heat plasmonic nanohole arrays. The sensor can be used to determine thermodynamic parameters in addition to monitoring molecular reactions in real-time. As an application example, we use the thermal sensor to determine the kinetics and activation energy for desorption of thiol monolayers on gold. Further, the temperature of the metal can be measured optically by the spectral shift of the bonding surface plasmon mode (0.015 nm/K). We show that this resonance shift is caused by thermal lattice expansion, which reduces the plasma frequency of the metal. The sensor is also used to determine the thin film thermal expansion coefficient through a theoretical model for the expected resonance shift.

  14. Beam-Forming Concentrating Solar Thermal Array Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Thomas A. (Inventor); Dimotakis, Paul E. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to concentrating solar-power systems and, more particularly, beam-forming concentrating solar thermal array power systems. A solar thermal array power system is provided, including a plurality of solar concentrators arranged in pods. Each solar concentrator includes a solar collector, one or more beam-forming elements, and one or more beam-steering elements. The solar collector is dimensioned to collect and divert incoming rays of sunlight. The beam-forming elements intercept the diverted rays of sunlight, and are shaped to concentrate the rays of sunlight into a beam. The steering elements are shaped, dimensioned, positioned, and/or oriented to deflect the beam toward a beam output path. The beams from the concentrators are converted to heat at a receiver, and the heat may be temporarily stored or directly used to generate electricity.

  15. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael J.; Watts, Michael R.; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2010-10-26

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  16. Seedless Growth of Bismuth Nanowire Array via Vacuum Thermal Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Chang-Yong; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-01-01

    Here a seedless and template-free technique is demonstrated to scalably grow bismuth nanowires, through thermal evaporation in high vacuum at RT. Conventionally reserved for the fabrication of metal thin films, thermal evaporation deposits bismuth into an array of vertical single crystalline nanowires over a flat thin film of vanadium held at RT, which is freshly deposited by magnetron sputtering or thermal evaporation. By controlling the temperature of the growth substrate the length and width of the nanowires can be tuned over a wide range. Responsible for this novel technique is a previously unknown nanowire growth mechanism that roots in the mild porosity of the vanadium thin film. Infiltrated into the vanadium pores, the bismuth domains (~ 1 nm) carry excessive surface energy that suppresses their melting point and continuously expels them out of the vanadium matrix to form nanowires. This discovery demonstrates the feasibility of scalable vapor phase synthesis of high purity nanomaterials without using any catalysts. PMID:26709727

  17. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Desheng Meng, Dennis

    2011-08-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA.

  18. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  19. Conformal Bulk Ablation And Therapy Monitoring Using Intracorporeal Image-Treat Ultrasound Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, I. R.; Faidi, W.; Mast, T. D.; Runk, M.; Slayton, M.; Barthe, P.

    2005-03-01

    For thermal treatment of soft tissue, an alternative to HIFU is bulk ablation using unfocused or weakly focused intense ultrasound fields. This approach offers faster ablation of large tissue volumes and can be performed in minimally invasive (e.g., laparoscopic or percutaneous) procedures. Here, methods for image-guided ablation of large tissue volumes using compact dual-modality (image and treat) ultrasound arrays are reported including tissue modification caused by the thermal therapy. The dual-modality arrays developed have 16-64 elements spanning apertures of 2-8 mm in elevation and 24-48 mm in azimuth. These devices can provide both therapeutically significant power (e.g. source intensity > 80 W/cm2 at 3.1 MHz) and broad bandwidth (e.g. 50% with a center frequency of 3.5 MHz) for imaging. Imaging challenges associated with limited probe dimensions and channel count are met using signal processing techniques that improve definition and contrast, allowing high-quality B-scan images and useful monitoring information to be obtained during therapy planning and treatment. Using linear and rotational scanning methods, large tissue volumes (20-60 cc) can be treated. The approach can be applied for ablation of other soft tissue pathologies, e.g., kidney, heart, uterus, brain, GI tract, etc.

  20. Performance of a thermal imager employing a hybrid pyroelectric detector array with MOSFET readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watton, R.; Mansi, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal imager employing a two-dimensional hybrid array of pyroelectric detectors with MOSFET readout has been built. The design and theoretical performance of the detector are discussed, and the results of performance measurements are presented. 8 references

  1. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  2. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  3. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  4. Output performance analyses of solar array on stratospheric airship with thermal effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Lv, Mingyun; Tan, Dongjie; Zhu, Weiyu; Sun, Kangwen; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model investigating the output power of solar array is proposed. • The output power in the cruise condition with thermal effect is researched. • The effect of some factors on output performance is discussed in detail. • A suitable transmissivity of external layer is crucial in preliminary design step. - Abstract: Output performance analyses of the solar array are very critical for solving the energy problem of a long endurance stratospheric airship, and the solar cell efficiency is very sensitive to temperature of the solar cell. But the research about output performance of solar array with thermal effect is rare. This paper outlines a numerical model including the thermal model of airship and solar cells, the incident solar radiation model on the solar array, and the power output model. Based on this numerical model, a MATLAB computer program is developed. In the course of the investigation, the comparisons of the simulation results with and without considering thermal effect are reported. Furthermore, effects of the transmissivity of external encapsulation layer of solar array and wind speed on the thermal performance and output power of solar array are discussed in detail. The results indicate that this method is helpful for planning energy management.

  5. By-Pass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    By-Pass diodes are a key design feature of solar arrays and system design must be robust against local heating, especially with implementation of larger solar cells. By-Pass diode testing was performed to aid thermal model development for use in future array designs that utilize larger cell sizes that result in higher string currents. Testing was performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon provided by SSL. Test conditions were vacuum with cold array backside using discrete by-pass diode current steps of 0.25 A ranging from 0 A to 2.0 A.

  6. Optical spins and nano-antenna array for magnetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammawongsa, N; Mitatha, S; Yupapin, P P

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic therapy is an alternative medicine practice involving the use of magnetic fields subjected to certain parts of the body and stimulates healing from a range of health problems. In this paper, an embedded nano-antenna system using the optical spins generated from a particular configuration of microrings (PANDA) is proposed. The orthogonal solitons pairs corresponding to the left-hand and right-hand optical solitons (photons) produced from dark-bright soliton conversion can be simultaneously detected within the system at the output ports. Two possible spin states which are assigned as angular momentum of either +ħ or -ħ will be absorbed by an object whenever this set of orthogonal solitons is imparted to the object. Magnetic moments could indeed arise from the intrinsic property of spins. By controlling some important parameters of the system such as soliton input power, coupling coefficients and sizes of rings, output signals from microring resonator system can be tuned and optimized to be used as magnetic therapy array.

  7. Thermal Microphotonic Focal Plane Array (TM-FPA).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Frederick Bossert; Lentine, Anthony L.; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Watts, Michael R.; Shaw, Michael J.; Rakich, Peter T.; Nielson, Gregory N.; Peters, David William; Zortman, William A.

    2009-10-01

    The advent of high quality factor (Q) microphotonic-resonators has led to the demonstration of high-fidelity optical sensors of many physical phenomena (e.g. mechanical, chemical, and biological sensing) often with far better sensitivity than traditional techniques. Microphotonic-resonators also offer potential advantages as uncooled thermal detectors including significantly better noise performance, smaller pixel size, and faster response times than current thermal detectors. In particular, microphotonic thermal detectors do not suffer from Johnson noise in the sensor, offer far greater responsivity, and greater thermal isolation as they do not require metallic leads to the sensing element. Such advantages make the prospect of a microphotonic thermal imager highly attractive. Here, we introduce the microphotonic thermal detection technique, present the theoretical basis for the approach, discuss our progress on the development of this technology and consider future directions for thermal microphotonic imaging. Already we have demonstrated viability of device fabrication with the successful demonstration of a 20{micro}m pixel, and a scalable readout technique. Further, to date, we have achieved internal noise performance (NEP{sub Internal} < 1pW/{radical}Hz) in a 20{micro}m pixel thereby exceeding the noise performance of the best microbolometers while simultaneously demonstrating a thermal time constant ({tau} = 2ms) that is five times faster. In all, this results in an internal detectivity of D*{sub internal} = 2 x 10{sup 9}cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W, while roughly a factor of four better than the best uncooled commercial microbolometers, future demonstrations should enable another order of magnitude in sensitivity. While much work remains to achieve the level of maturity required for a deployable technology, already, microphotonic thermal detection has demonstrated considerable potential.

  8. Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array for Picosat Propulsion and Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeenko, Alina; Cardiff, Eric; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept for propulsion and thermal control of picosats exploits microscale surface tension effect in conjunction with temperature- dependent vapor pressure to realize compact, tunable and low-power thermal valving system. The FEMTA is intended to be a self-contained propulsion unit requiring only a low-voltage DC power source to operate. The microfabricated thermal valving and very-high-integration level enables fast high-capacity cooling and high-resolution, low-power micropropulsion for picosats that is superior to existing smallsat micropropulsion and thermal management alternatives.

  9. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampleford, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Timothy McGuire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bell, Kate Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Brent M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Leroy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sherlock, Mark [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Appelbe, Brian [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Giuliani, John [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Ouart, Nicholas [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Seely, John [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  10. Nano-thermal transport array: An instrument for combinatorial measurements of heat transfer in nanoscale films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCluskey, Patrick J.; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    The nano-Thermal Transport Array is a silicon-based micromachined device for measuring the thermal properties of nanoscale materials in a high-throughput methodology. The device contains an array of thermal sensors, each one of which consists of a silicon nitride membrane and a tungsten heating element that also serves as a temperature gauge. The thermal behavior of the sensors is described with an analytical model. The assumptions underlying this model and its accuracy are checked using the finite element method. The analytical model is used in a data reduction scheme that relates experimental quantities to materials properties. Measured properties include thermal effusivity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. While the array is specifically designed for combinatorial analysis, here we demonstrate the capabilities of the device with a high-throughput study of copper multi-layer films as a function of film thickness, ranging from 15 to 470 nm. Thermal conductivity results show good agreement with earlier models predicting the conductivity based on electron scattering at interfaces.

  11. Thermal management of quantum cascade lasers in an individually addressable monolithic array architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaggia, Leo; Wang, Christine; Connors, Michael; Saar, Brian; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Creedon, Kevin; Turner, George; Herzog, William

    2016-03-01

    There are a number of military and commercial applications for high-power laser systems in the mid-to-long-infrared wavelength range. By virtue of their demonstrated watt-level performance and wavelength diversity, quantum cascade laser (QCL) and amplifier devices are an excellent choice of emitter for those applications. To realize the power levels of interest, beam combining of arrays of these emitters is required and as a result, array technology must be developed. With this in mind, packaging and thermal management strategies were developed to facilitate the demonstration of a monolithic QCL array operating under CW conditions. Thermal models were constructed and simulations performed to determine the effect of parameters such as array-element ridge width and pitch on gain region temperature rise. The results of the simulations were considered in determining an appropriate QCL array configuration. State-of-the-art micro-impingement cooling along with an electrical distribution scheme comprised of AlN multi-layer technology were integrated into the design. The design of the module allows for individual electrical addressability of the array elements, a method of phase control demonstrated previously for coherent beam combining of diode arrays, along with access to both front and rear facets. Hence, both laser and single-pass amplifier arrays can be accommodated. A module was realized containing a 5 mm cavity length monolithic QCL array comprised of 7 elements on 450 m pitch. An output power of 3.16 W was demonstrated under CW conditions at an emission wavelength of 9μm.

  12. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Technology, Physics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Thermometry, and Technical Considerations for Proper Catheter Placement During Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh V; Mian, Matthew; Stafford, R Jason; Nahed, Brian V; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Danish, Shabbar F

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced thermal therapy has become a powerful tool in the neurosurgical armamentarium. The physics of laser therapy are complex, but a sound understanding of this topic is clinically relevant, as many centers have incorporated it into their treatment algorithm, and educated patients are demanding consideration of its use for their disease. Laser ablation has been used for a wide array of intracranial lesions. Laser catheter placement is guided by stereotactic planning; however, as the procedure has popularized, the number of ways in which the catheter can be inserted has also increased. There are many technical nuances for laser placement, and, to date, there is not a clear understanding of whether any one technique is better than the other. In this review, we describe the basic physics of magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy and describe the several common techniques for accurate Visualase laser catheter placement in a stepwise fashion. MRg-LITT, magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapyPAD, precision aiming device.

  13. High frequency ultrasonic imaging using thermal mechanical noise recorded on capacitive micromachined transducer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lani, Shane; Satir, Sarp; Gurun, Gokce; Sabra, Karim G.; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2011-11-01

    The cross-correlation of diffuse thermal-mechanical noise recorded by two sensors yields an estimate of the ultrasonic waves propagating between them. We used this approach at high frequencies (1-30 MHz) on a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) ring array (d = 725 μm), monolithically integrated with low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics. The thermal-mechanical noise cross-correlations between the CMUT array elements in immersion reveal both evanescent surface waves (below 10 MHz) and waves propagating primarily in the fluid (above 10 MHz). These propagating waves may allow passive imaging of scatterers closer to the array as compared to conventional pulse-echo systems, providing potentially higher resolution.

  14. A practical dimensionless equation for the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes and CNT arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results reported in the last decade on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs have shown a fairly divergent behavior. An underlying intrinsic consistency was believed to exist in spite of the divergence in the thermal conductivity data of various CNTs. A dimenisonless equation that describes the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity was derived by introducing reduced forms relative to a chosen reference point. This equation can serve as a practical approximation to characterize the conductivity of individual CNT with different structural parameters as well as bulk CNT arrays with different bundle configurations. Comparison of predictions by the equation and historical measurements showed good agreements within their uncertainties.

  15. Turbulence, chaos and thermal noise in globally coupled Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the effects of thermal noise in underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive load and driven by an rf current. We study the breakdown of the law of large numbers in the turbulent phase of the Josephson arrays. This corresponds to a saturation of the broad band noise S 0 for a large number N of junctions. We find that this phenomenon is stable against thermal fluctuations below a critical temperature T cl . The behaviour of S 0 vs. T, for large N, shows three different regimes. For 0 cl , S 0 decreases when increasing T, and there is turbulence and the breakdown of the law of large numbers. For T cl c2 , S 0 is constant and the dynamics is dominated by the chaos of the individual junctions. Finally for T > T c2 , S 0 in mainly due to thermal fluctuations, since it increases linearly with T. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  16. Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT) | Huang | Alexandria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photo-thermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally-invasive therapy in which photon energy is converted into heat to kill cancer. Gold nanoparticles absorb light strongly and convert photon energy into heat quickly and efficiently, thereby making them superior contrast agents for PTT. This gold nanoparticle-assisted PTT called ...

  17. Reducing thermal crosstalk in ten-channel tunable slotted-laser arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, I; Abdullaev, A; Lei, S; Enright, R; Wallace, M J; Donegan, J F

    2015-09-07

    Given the tight constraints on the wavelength stability of sources in optical networks, the thermal crosstalk between operating devices in a ten-channel thermally-tunable slotted laser array for DWDM applications has been investigated. It was found experimentally the current standard thermal solution with the laser array chip mounted on an AlN carrier does not allow for wavelength stability of ± 25 GHz ( ± 2 K) with a temperature rise of 5 K measured in a device with 100 mA (CW) applied to a neighbouring laser (device spacing = 360 µm). A combined experimental/numerical approach revealed solid state submounts comprising diamond or highly ordered pyrolytic graphite are inadequate to reduce crosstalk below an allowable level. Numerical simulations of advanced cooling technologies reveal a microfluidic enabled substrate would reduce thermal crosstalk between operational devices on the chip to acceptable levels. Critically our simulations show this reduced crosstalk is not at the expense of device tunability as the thermal resistance of individual lasers remains similar for the base and microfluidic cases.

  18. Characterization of Thermal Cross-talk in a γ-ray Microcalorimeter Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jethava, N.; Ullom, J. N.; Bennett, D. A.; Irwin, K. D.; Horansky, R. D.; Beall, J. A.; Hilton, G. C.; Vale, L. R.; Hoover, A.; Bacrania, M. K.; Rabin, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    We present experimental data describing cross-talk within an array of gamma-ray microcalorimeters during gamma-ray irradiation. The microcalorimeters consist of Mo/Cu transition-edge sensors (TESs) with attached Sn absorbers. We observe both thermal and electrical cross-talk with peak cross-talk amplitudes as large as 0.4%. We have developed an analytical model for thermal cross-talk and make a preliminary comparison to data. Cross-talk must be understood and minimized for high resolution spectroscopy at high input count rates.

  19. Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles: Recent Progress in Thermal Therapy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukula, Kondareddy; Manickavasagam Lekshmi, Kamali; Uthaman, Saji; Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of many alternative anti-cancer approaches, such as thermal therapies, which cause minimal damage to healthy cells. Current challenges in cancer treatment are the identification of the diseased area and its efficient treatment without generating many side effects. Image-guided therapies can be a useful tool to diagnose and treat the diseased tissue and they offer therapy and imaging using a single nanostructure. The present review mainly focuses on recent advances in the field of thermal therapy and imaging integrated with multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles. The main heating sources for heat-induced therapies are the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the near infrared region and alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The different families of inorganic nanoparticles employed for SPR- and AMF-based thermal therapies and imaging are described. Furthermore, inorganic nanomaterials developed for multimodal therapies with different and multi-imaging modalities are presented in detail. Finally, relevant clinical perspectives and the future scope of inorganic nanoparticles in image-guided therapies are discussed. PMID:28335204

  20. A review of immune therapy in cancer and a question: can thermal therapy increase tumor response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joan M C

    2017-11-03

    Immune therapy is a successful cancer treatment coming into its own. This is because checkpoint molecules, adoptive specific lymphocyte transfer and chimeric antigen T-cell (CAR-T) therapy are able to induce more durable responses in an increasing number of malignancies compared to chemotherapy. In addition, immune therapies are able to treat bulky disease, whereas standard cytotoxic therapies cannot treat large tumour burdens. Checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies are becoming widely used in the clinic and although more complex, adoptive lymphocyte transfer and CAR-T therapies show promise. We are learning that there are nuances to predicting the successful use of the checkpoint inhibitors as well as to specific-antigen adoptive and CAR-T therapies. We are also newly aware of a here-to-fore unrealised natural force, the status of the microbiome. However, despite better understanding of mechanisms of action of the new immune therapies, the best responses to the new immune therapies remain 20-30%. Likely the best way to improve this somewhat low response rate for patients is to increase the patient's own immune response. Thermal therapy is a way to do this. All forms of thermal therapy, from fever-range systemic thermal therapy, to high-temperature HIFU and even cryotherapy improve the immune response pre-clinically. It is time to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in vivo to test for optimal timing of the combinations that will best enhance tumour response and then to begin to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in the clinic as soon as possible.

  1. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Chad Webb

    Full Text Available Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP and stratum corneum (SC determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions.

  2. Ultrasound therapy transducers with space-filling non-periodic arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Balasundar I; Hall, Christopher S; Seip, Ralf

    2011-05-01

    Ultrasound transducers designed for therapeutic purposes such as tissue ablation, histotripsy, or drug delivery require large apertures for adequate spatial localization while providing sufficient power and steerability without the presence of secondary grating lobes. In addition, it is highly preferred to minimize the total number of channels and to maintain simplicity in electrical matching network design. To this end, we propose array designs that are both space-filling and non-periodic in the placement of the elements. Such array designs can be generated using the mathematical concept of non-periodic or aperiodic tiling (tessellation) and can lead to reduced grating lobes while maintaining full surface area coverage to deliver maximum power. For illustration, we designed two 2-D space-filling therapeutic arrays with 128 elements arranged on a spherical shell. One was based on the two-shape Penrose rhombus tiling, and the other was based on a single rectangular shape arranged non-periodically. The steerability performance of these arrays was studied using acoustic field simulations. For comparison, we also studied two other arrays, one with circular elements distributed randomly, and the other a periodic array with square elements. Results showed that the two space-filling non-periodic arrays were able to steer to treat a volume of 16 x 16 x 20 mm while ensuring that the grating lobes were under -10 dB compared with the main lobe. The rectangular non-periodic array was able to generate two and half times higher power than the random circles array. The rectangular array was then fabricated by patterning the array using laser scribing methods and its steerability performance was validated using hydrophone measurements. This work demonstrates that the concept of space-filling aperiodic/non-periodic tiling can be used to generate therapy arrays that are able to provide higher power for the same total transducer area compared with random arrays while maintaining

  3. Equivalent thermal history reconstruction from a partially crystallized glass-ceramic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Bauke

    2015-11-01

    The basic concept of a thermal history sensor is that it records the accumulated exposure to some unknown, typically varying temperature profile for a certain amount of time. Such a sensor is considered to be capable of measuring the duration of several (N) temperature intervals. For this purpose, the sensor deploys multiple (M) sensing elements, each with different temperature sensitivity. At the end of some thermal exposure for a known period of time, the sensor array is read-out and an estimate is made of the set of N durations of the different temperature ranges. A potential implementation of such a sensor was pioneered by Fair et al. [Sens. Actuators, A 141, 245 (2008)], based on glass-ceramic materials with different temperature-dependent crystallization dynamics. In their work, it was demonstrated that an array of sensor elements can be made sensitive to slight differences in temperature history. Further, a forward crystallization model was used to simulate the variations in sensor array response to differences in the temperature history. The current paper focusses on the inverse aspect of temperature history reconstruction from a hypothetical sensor array output. The goal of such a reconstruction is to find an equivalent thermal history that is the closest representation of the true thermal history, i.e., the durations of a set of temperature intervals that result in a set of fractional crystallization values which is closest to the one resulting from the true thermal history. One particular useful simplification in both the sensor model as well as in its practical implementation is the omission of nucleation effects. In that case, least squares models can be used to approximate the sensor response and make reconstruction estimates. Even with this simplification, sensor noise can have a destabilizing effect on possible reconstruction solutions, which is evaluated using simulations. Both regularization and non-negativity constrained least squares

  4. Thermal Analysis and Correlation of the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft's Solar Array During Aerobraking Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; George, Benjamin E.

    2002-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft made use of multipass aerobraking to gradually reduce its orbit period from a highly elliptical insertion orbit to its final science orbit. Aerobraking operations provided an opportunity to apply advanced thermal analysis techniques to predict the temperature of the spacecraft's solar array for each drag pass. Odyssey telemetry data was used to correlate the thermal model. The thermal analysis was tightly coupled to the flight mechanics, aerodynamics, and atmospheric modeling efforts being performed during operations. Specifically, the thermal analysis predictions required a calculation of the spacecraft's velocity relative to the atmosphere, a prediction of the atmospheric density, and a prediction of the heat transfer coefficients due to aerodynamic heating. Temperature correlations were performed by comparing predicted temperatures of the thermocouples to the actual thermocouple readings from the spacecraft. Time histories of the spacecraft relative velocity, atmospheric density, and heat transfer coefficients, calculated using flight accelerometer and quaternion data, were used to calculate the aerodynamic heating. During aerobraking operations, the correlations were used to continually update the thermal model, thus increasing confidence in the predictions. This paper describes the thermal analysis that was performed and presents the correlations to the flight data.

  5. Heat transfer behavior including thermal wake effects in forced air cooling of arrays of rectangular blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, S.; Faghri, M.; Lessmann, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study thermal wake effects in arrays of rectangular blocks encountered in electronic equipment. Data were obtained for a series of channel heights and flow velocities. The temperature rise due to wake effects behind a single heated module was found to be fairly independent of the channel height and the position of the heated block, for a given approach velocity. The adiabatic temperature rise data for a module due to a heated element immediately upstream of it for different inter-module spacings were found to correlate well in terms of a new parameter called the surface packing density. This paper reports that it was reported by the authors in an earlier paper that both the adiabatic heat transfer coefficient nd pressure-drop data for regular in-line arrays correlated well in terms of a composite geometric parameter called the column packing density. These experiments have been extended to a higher Reynolds number. Empirical correlations are presented here for friction factor and Nusselt number in terms of the volume packing density, and for the thermal wake effects in terms of the surface packing density. Data from literature for arrays with widely different geometric parameters are shown to agree with these correlations

  6. A space qualified thermal imaging system using a Pt Si detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astheimer, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    EDO Corporation, Barnes Engineering Division designed and constructed a high resolution thermal imaging system on contract to Lockheed for use in the SDI Star Lab. This employs a Pt Si CCD array which is sensitive in the spectral range of 3 to 5 microns. Star Lab will be flown in the Shuttle bay and consists basically of a large, reflecting, tracking telescope with associated sensors and electronics. The thermal imaging system is designed to operate in the focal plane of this telescope. The configuration of the system is illustrated. The telescope provides a collimated beam output which is focussed onto the detector array by a silicon objective lens. The detector array subtends a field of view of 1.6 degrees x 1.22 degrees. A beam switching mirror permits bypassing the large telescope to give a field of 4 degrees x 3 degrees. Two 8 position filter wheels are provided, and background radiation is minimized by Narcissus mirrors. The detector is cooled with a Joule-Thompson cryostat fed from a high pressure supply tank. This was selected instead of a more convenient closed-cycle system because of concern with vibration. The latter may couple into the extremely critical Starlab tracking telescope. The electronics produce a digitized video signal for recording. Offset and responsivity correction factors are stored for all pixels and these corrections are made to the digitized output in real time.

  7. Intravenous Laser Therapy in Young Children with Thermal Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Bocharov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the laboratory and clinical effects of combined intravenous laser therapy in young children with thermalinjuries in the acute period of burn disease.Subjects and methods. Forty children whose mean age was 2.67±0.35 years were examined; thermal injuries accounted for 25.05±1.01% of the total body surface area; of them degrees IIIaIIIb was 19.04±0.85%. A comparison group (n=15 received conventional therapy without taking into account and correcting baseline and current hemostasiological disorders. On day 1, a study group (n=25 had programmed anticoagulant therapy and intravenous laser therapy at different radiation frequencies with a Mustang 20002+ laser therapy apparatus (patent for invention No. 2482894 in addition to the conventional therapy. The laser therapy cycle was 6 to 16 sessions. The investigators estimated and compared the following examined parameters: white blood cell count; leukocytic index of intoxication; plasma average mass molecules at a wavelength of 254 nm; toxogenic granularity of neutrophils; wound exudate discharge time; surgical plasty area; and hospitalization time.Results. The positive laboratory and clinical effects of the performed combined intravenous laser therapy in the combined therapy of burn disease in young children were comparatively shown in the study group patients. The significant decrease in the level of an inflammatory response and endogenous intoxication led to a rapider burn wound cleansing, active epithelization, and reduced surgical plasty volumes.Conclusion. Combined intravenous laser therapy signif icantly exerts antiinflammatory and detoxifying effects in young children with 40% thermal injuries in the acute period of burn disease. Abolishing a systemic inflammatory response by combined intravenous laser therapy initiated early regenerative processes in the burn wound and caused reductions in surgical plasty volumes and hospitalization time, which optimizes ther

  8. Spatio-temporal chaos and thermal noise in Josephson junction series arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We study underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive shunting load and driven by an rf bias current. We find that they can be an experimental realization of many phenomena currently studied in globally coupled logistic map. Depending on the bias current the array can show Shapiro steps but also spatio-temporal chaos or ''turbulence'' in the IV characteristics. In the turbulent phase there is a saturation of the broad band noise for a large number of junctions. This corresponds to a break down of the law of large numbers as seen in globally coupled maps. We study this phenomenon as a function of thermal noise. We find that when increasing the temperature the broad band noise decreases. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  9. DWDM laser arrays fabricated using thermal nanoimprint lithography on Indium Phosphide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, K.; Nørregaard, J.; Mironov, A.

    2013-01-01

    by including a lambda quarter shift at the center of the grating. The need for phase shifts and multiple wavelengths eliminates some lithography methods such as holography. Typically, these lasers are produced by e-beam lithography (EBL). We present a production method based on thermal nanoimprint lithography...... (T-NIL), which is potentially less costly and faster than EBL. NIL Technology and NeoPhotonics designed a stamp with the structures shown in Figure 1. The stamp was fabricated using EBL and dry etching. The line width on the stamp was 40 nm to accommodate for line broadening in subsequent processing....... The fabricated lasers were cleaved and measured. Laser arrays exhibited >40mW optical power in all 12 channels. Figure 3 shows the overlaid spectra of a 12-channel array laser chip with uniform (~3nm) wavelength spacing and good sidemode suppression....

  10. Test stand for non-uniformity correction of microbolometer focal plane arrays used in thermal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupiński, Michał; Bareła, Jaroslaw; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Kastek, Mariusz

    2013-10-01

    Uneven response of particular detectors (pixels) to the same incident power of infrared radiation is an inherent feature of microbolometer focal plane arrays. As a result an image degradation occurs, known as Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), which distorts the thermal representation of an observed scene and impairs the parameters of a thermal camera. In order to compensate such non-uniformity, several NUC correction methods are applied in digital data processing modules implemented in thermal cameras. Coefficients required to perform the non-uniformity correction procedure (NUC coefficients) are determined by calibrating the camera against uniform radiation sources (blackbodies). Non-uniformity correction is performed in a digital processing unit in order to remove FPN pattern in the registered thermal images. Relevant correction coefficients are calculated on the basis of recorded detector responses to several values of radiant flux emitted from reference IR radiation sources (blackbodies). The measurement of correction coefficients requires specialized setup, in which uniform, extended radiation sources with high temperature stability are one of key elements. Measurement stand for NUC correction developed in Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT, comprises two integrated extended blackbodies with the following specifications: area 200×200 mm, stabilized absolute temperature range +15 °C÷100 °C, and uniformity of temperature distribution across entire surface +/-0.014 °C. Test stand, method used for the measurement of NUC coefficients and the results obtained during the measurements conducted on a prototype thermal camera will be presented in the paper.

  11. Hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum of a Maxwell distribution higher than the room temperature of 300 K, has been studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in a living body for a deep-seated tumor in neutron capture therapy (NCT). Simulation calculations using MCNP-V3 were carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of the hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field. From the results of simulation calculations, the following were confirmed: (i) The irradiation field of the hyper-thermal neutrons is feasible by using some scattering materials with high temperature, such as Be, BeO, C, SiC and ZrH 1.7 . Especially, ZrH 1.7 is thought to be the best material because of good characteristics of up-scattering for thermal neutrons. (ii) The ZrH 1.7 of 1200 K yields the hyper-thermal neutrons of a Maxwell-like distribution at about 2000 K and the treatable depth is about 1.5 cm larger comparing with the irradiation of the thermal neutrons of 300 K. (iii) The contamination by the secondary gamma-rays from the scattering materials can be sufficiently eliminated to the tolerance level for NCT through the bismuth layer, without the larger change of the energy spectrum of hyper-thermal neutrons. ((orig.))

  12. Investigation Results on Solar Array Thermal & Electrical Imbalance Phenomenon on Power Systems Equipped with MPPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, F.; Samaniego, B.; Soriano, T.; Beaufils, G.; Fernandez Lisbona, E.; Dettlaff, K.; Jensen, H.

    2014-08-01

    The thermal / electrical imbalance phenomenon on the satellite solar arrays is a common issue inherent to the negative thermal voltage coefficient of the triple junction cells, which is usually already taken into account with basic precautions on the solar panel layout.In the frame of the ESA TRP study "Investigation on Solar Array thermal and electrical imbalance phenomenon on power systems equipped with Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT)" performed by Airbus Defence & Space (former Astrium Toulouse and Ottobrunn) and TERMA, in-depth analyses were conducted for the first time to better understand and characterize the secondary maximum power point phenomenon for various representative mission cases, whether in Earth vicinity or not. With the help of a newly developed detailed thermo-electrical coupled solver and a wide range of solar cell characterizations in flux and temperature, multiple sets of simulations were run to simulate realistic solar panel characteristics.The study showed that no secondary false maximum power point can be created on the solar panel characteristic IV curve for missions around Earth vicinity, at the sole exception of critical shadowing cases. Furthermore, the same conclusions apply for missions up to Mars orbit. The only potential threats come from the missions further than Mars (typically Jupiter missions) where various very high heterogeneities could lead to multiple maxima. This is deeply linked to the LILT (low illumination low temperature) conditions applied to the current solar cell triple junction characteristics and shape. Moreover, thermo-electrical imbalances that do not create secondary power point can still seriously grieve the solar array power output performances. This power loss can however be accurately assessed by the newly developed solver in support of in-development missions like Juice.

  13. Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and Non-Thermal Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2009-03-01

    The well known built-in voltage potential for some select semiconductor p-n junctions and various rectifying devices is proposed to be favorable for generating DC electricity at "zero bias" (with no DC bias voltage applied) in the presence of Johnson noise or 1/f noise which originates from the quantum vacuum (Koch et al., 1982). The 1982 Koch discovery that certain solid state devices exhibit measurable quantum noise has also recently been labeled a finding of dark energy in the lab (Beck and Mackey, 2004). Tunnel diodes are a class of rectifiers that are qualified and some have been credited with conducting only because of quantum fluctuations. Microwave diodes are also good choices since many are designed for zero bias operation. A completely passive, unamplified zero bias diode converter/detector for millimeter (GHz) waves was developed by HRL Labs in 2006 under a DARPA contract, utilizing a Sb-based "backward tunnel diode" (BTD). It is reported to be a "true zero-bias diode." It was developed for a "field radiometer" to "collect thermally radiated power" (in other words, 'night vision'). The diode array mounting allows a feed from horn antenna, which functions as a passive concentrating amplifier. An important clue is the "noise equivalent power" of 1.1 pW per root hertz and the "noise equivalent temperature difference" of 10° K, which indicate sensitivity to Johnson noise (Lynch, et al., 2006). There also have been other inventions such as "single electron transistors" that also have "the highest signal to noise ratio" near zero bias. Furthermore, "ultrasensitive" devices that convert radio frequencies have been invented that operate at outer space temperatures (3 degrees above zero point: 3° K). These devices are tiny nanotech devices which are suitable for assembly in parallel circuits (such as a 2-D array) to possibly produce zero point energy direct current electricity with significant power density (Brenning et al., 2006). Photovoltaic p-n junction

  14. Performance evaluation of a conformal thermal monitoring sheet sensor array for measurement of surface temperature distributions during superficial hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K; Maccarini, P; Juang, T; Gaeta, C; Stauffer, P R

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a novel conformal thermal monitoring sheet (TMS) sensor array with differential thermal sensitivity for measuring temperature distributions over large surface areas. Performance of the sensor array is evaluated in terms of thermal accuracy, mechanical stability and conformity to contoured surfaces, probe self-heating under irradiation from microwave and ultrasound hyperthermia sources, and electromagnetic field perturbation. A prototype with 4 x 4 array of fiber-optic sensors embedded between two flexible and thermally conducting polyimide films was developed as an alternative to the standard 1-2 mm diameter plastic catheter-based probes used in clinical hyperthermia. Computed tomography images and bending tests were performed to evaluate the conformability and mechanical stability respectively. Irradiation and thermal barrier tests were conducted and thermal response of the prototype was compared with round cross-sectional clinical probes. Bending and conformity tests demonstrated higher flexibility, dimensional stability and close conformity to human torso. Minimal perturbation of microwave fields and low probe self-heating was observed when irradiated with 915 MHz microwave and 3.4 MHz ultrasound sources. The transient and steady state thermal responses of the TMS array were superior compared to the clinical probes. A conformal TMS sensor array with improved thermal sensitivity and dimensional stability was investigated for real-time skin temperature monitoring. This fixed-geometry, body-conforming array of thermal sensors allows fast and accurate characterization of two-dimensional temperature distributions over large surface areas. The prototype TMS demonstrates significant advantages over clinical probes for characterizing skin temperature distributions during hyperthermia treatments of superficial tissue disease.

  15. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  16. Bypass Diode Temperature Tests of a Solar Array Coupon Under Space Thermal Environment Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Hoang, Bao; Wong, Frankie; Wu, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Tests were performed on a 56-cell Advanced Triple Junction solar array coupon whose purpose was to determine margin available for bypass diodes integrated with new, large multi-junction solar cells that are manufactured from a 4-inch wafer. The tests were performed under high vacuum with coupon back side thermal conditions of both cold and ambient. The bypass diodes were subjected to a sequence of increasing discrete current steps from 0 Amp to 2.0 Amp in steps of 0.25 Amp. At each current step, a temperature measurement was obtained via remote viewing by an infrared camera. This paper discusses the experimental methodology, experiment results, and the thermal model.

  17. Thermal Molding of Organic Thin-Film Transistor Arrays on Curved Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Kento; Ishimine, Hiroto; Okada, Yugo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Sadamitsu, Yuichi; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a thermal molding technique is proposed for the fabrication of plastic electronics on curved surfaces, enabling the preparation of plastic films with freely designed shapes. The induced strain distribution observed in poly(ethylene naphthalate) films when planar sheets were deformed into hemispherical surfaces clearly indicated that natural thermal contraction played an important role in the formation of the curved surface. A fingertip-shaped organic thin-film transistor array molded from a real human finger was fabricated, and slight deformation induced by touching an object was detected from the drain current response. This type of device will lead to the development of robot fingers equipped with a sensitive tactile sense for precision work such as palpation or surgery.

  18. Thermal Molding of Organic Thin-Film Transistor Arrays on Curved Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Kento; Ishimine, Hiroto; Okada, Yugo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Sadamitsu, Yuichi; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a thermal molding technique is proposed for the fabrication of plastic electronics on curved surfaces, enabling the preparation of plastic films with freely designed shapes. The induced strain distribution observed in poly(ethylene naphthalate) films when planar sheets were deformed into hemispherical surfaces clearly indicated that natural thermal contraction played an important role in the formation of the curved surface. A fingertip-shaped organic thin-film transistor array molded from a real human finger was fabricated, and slight deformation induced by touching an object was detected from the drain current response. This type of device will lead to the development of robot fingers equipped with a sensitive tactile sense for precision work such as palpation or surgery.

  19. Ordering and thermal excitations in dipolar coupled single domain magnet arrays (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östman, Erik; Arnalds, Unnar; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2015-09-01

    For a small island of a magnetic material the magnetic state of the island is mainly determined by the exchange interaction and the shape anisotropy. Two or more islands placed in close proximity will interact through dipolar interactions. The state of a large system will thus be dictated by interactions at both these length scales. Enabling internal thermal fluctuations, e.g. by the choice of material, of the individual islands allows for the study of thermal ordering in extended nano-patterned magnetic arrays [1,2]. As a result nano-magnetic arrays represent an ideal playground for the study of physical model systems. Here we present three different studies all having used magneto-optical imaging techniques to observe, in real space, the order of the systems. The first study is done on a square lattice of circular islands. The remanent magnetic state of each island is a magnetic vortex structure and we can study the temperature dependence of the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields [3]. The second are long chains of dipolar coupled elongated islands where the magnetization direction in each island only can point in one of two possible directions. This creates a system which in many ways mimics the Ising model [4] and we can relate the correlation length to the temperature. The third one is a spin ice system where elongated islands are placed in a square lattice. Thermal excitations in such systems resemble magnetic monopoles [2] and we can investigate their properties as a function of temperature and lattice parameters. [1] V. Kapaklis et al., New J. Phys. 14, 035009 (2012) [2] V. Kapaklis et al., Nature Nanotech 9, 514(2014) [3] E. Östman et al.,New J. Phys. 16, 053002 (2014) [4] E. Östman et al.,Thermal ordering in mesoscopic Ising chains, In manuscript.

  20. Fabrication of a Micro-Needle Array Electrode by Thermal Drawing for Bio-Signals Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel micro-needle array electrode (MAE fabricated by thermal drawing and coated with Ti/Au film was proposed for bio-signals monitoring. A simple and effective setup was employed to form glassy-state poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA into a micro-needle array (MA by the thermal drawing method. The MA was composed of 6 × 6 micro-needles with an average height of about 500 μm. Electrode-skin interface impedance (EII was recorded as the insertion force was applied on the MAE. The insertion process of the MAE was also simulated by the finite element method. Results showed that MAE could insert into skin with a relatively low compression force and maintain stable contact impedance between the MAE and skin. Bio-signals, including electromyography (EMG, electrocardiography (ECG, and electroencephalograph (EEG were also collected. Test results showed that the MAE could record EMG, ECG, and EEG signals with good fidelity in shape and amplitude in comparison with the commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes, which proves that MAE is an alternative electrode for bio-signals monitoring.

  1. Laser interstitial thermal therapy of the spine: technical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Evans, Linton T; Grasu, Roxana; Rhines, Laurence D; Tatsui, Claudio E

    2018-04-01

    Spinal laser interstitial thermal therapy has been developed as a minimally invasive modality to treat epidural spinal tumors percutaneously. The safe and effective use of this technology requires meticulous preoperative trajectory planning and an intraoperative workflow incorporating navigation and MR thermography. Instrumented stabilization can be performed during the same operation if needed. Operative considerations and technical aspects are reviewed. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/P--frsag6gU .

  2. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator. PMID:26978370

  3. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Eckert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  4. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  5. Realization of thermally durable close-packed 2D gold nanoparticle arrays using self-assembly and plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Sankar K; Santhanam, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Realization of thermally and chemically durable, ordered gold nanostructures using bottom-up self-assembly techniques are essential for applications in a wide range of areas including catalysis, energy generation, and sensing. Herein, we describe a modular process for realizing uniform arrays of gold nanoparticles, with interparticle spacings of 2 nm and above, by using RF plasma etching to remove ligands from self-assembled arrays of ligand-coated gold nanoparticles. Both nanoscale imaging and macroscale spectroscopic characterization techniques were used to determine the optimal conditions for plasma etching, namely RF power, operating pressure, duration of treatment, and type of gas. We then studied the effect of nanoparticle size, interparticle spacing, and type of substrate on the thermal durability of plasma-treated and untreated nanoparticle arrays. Plasma-treated arrays showed enhanced chemical and thermal durability, on account of the removal of ligands. To illustrate the application potential of the developed process, robust SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) substrates were formed using plasma-treated arrays of silver-coated gold nanoparticles that had a silicon wafer or photopaper as the underlying support. The measured value of the average SERS enhancement factor (2 × 10 5 ) was quantitatively reproducible on both silicon and paper substrates. The silicon substrates gave quantitatively reproducible results even after thermal annealing. The paper-based SERS substrate was also used to swab and detect probe molecules deposited on a solid surface. (paper)

  6. Thermal imager based on the array light sensor device of 128×128 CdHgTe-photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva V. P.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of developed thermal imager for middle (3—5 µm infrared region are presented and its applications features are discussed. The thermal imager consists of cooled to 80 K 128×128 diodes focal plane array on the base of cadmium–mercury–telluride compound and cryostat with temperature checking system. The photodiode array is bonded with readout device (silicon focal processor via indium microcontacts. The measured average value of noise equivalent temperature difference was NETD= 20±4 mK (background radiation temperature T = 300 K, field of view 2θ = 180°, the cooled diaphragm was not used.

  7. Thermal treatment effects in the self-assembly of FePt nanoparticle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeonidis, K.; Mourdikoudis, S.; Tsiaoussis, I.; Dendrinou-Samara, C.; Angelakeris, M.; Kalogirou, O.

    2008-01-01

    This work concentrates on the influence of synthetic mechanisms of FePt nanoparticles on their self-arrangement and some structural and magnetic properties as studied by means of different electron microscopy techniques and SQUID magnetometry. High-reflux points associated with long boiling durations seem adequate to increase the iron precursor's decomposition yield and facilitate the simultaneous cubic to tetragonal FePt transformation, in single-phase FePt nanoparticles. Nevertheless, such conditions also result in the loss of long-range arrangement and in the appearance of coalescence effects. A core-shell structure comprising of FePt and Fe 3 O 4 is favored under mild thermal conditions during synthesis, which seems to confront the undesirable atomic diffusion. Additionally, particle isolation due to the surfactant coating leads in an hcp-symmetry self-assembly. Moreover, working at lower temperatures allows a homogeneous mixture between different phases producing binary composite arrays

  8. Multi-Focus Beamforming for Thermal Strain Imaging Using a Single Ultrasound Linear Array Transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Man M; Ding, Xuan; Leers, Steven A; Kim, Kang

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (TSI) has been used successfully to identify lipid- and water-based tissues in atherosclerotic plaques in some research settings. However, TSI faces several challenges to be realized in clinics. These challenges include motion artifacts and displacement tracking accuracy, as well as limited heating capability, which contributes to low thermal strain signal-to-noise ratio, and a limited field of view. Our goal was to address the challenge in heating tissue in TSI. Current TSI systems use separate heating and imaging transducers, which require physical alignment of the heating and imaging beams and result in a bulky setup that limits in vivo operation. We evaluated a new design for heating beams that can be implemented on a linear array imaging transducer and can provide improved heating area and efficiency as compared with previous implementations. The heating beams designed were implemented with a clinical linear array imaging transducer connected to a research ultrasound platform. In vitro experiments using tissue-mimicking phantoms with no blood flow revealed that the new design resulted in an effective heating area of approximately 0.85 cm 2 and a 0.3°C temperature rise in 2 s of heating, which compared well with in silico finite-element simulations. With the new heating beams, TSI was found to be able to detect a lipid-mimicking rubber inclusion with a diameter of 1 cm from the water-based gelatin background, with a strain contrast of 2.3 (+0.14% strain in the rubber inclusion and -0.06% strain in the gelatin background). Lastly, lipid-based tissue in a 1-cm-diameter human carotid endarterectomy (CEA) sample was identified in good agreement with histology. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with dynamic multi-sector control for prostate thermal therapy: In vivo evaluation under MR guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Nau, William H.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Bouley, Donna; Sommer, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and performance of a multi-sectored tubular array transurethral ultrasound applicator for prostate thermal therapy, with potential to provide dynamic angular and length control of heating under MR guidance without mechanical movement of the applicator. Test configurations were fabricated, incorporating a linear array of two multi-sectored tubular transducers (7.8-8.4 MHz, 3 mm OD, 6 mm length), with three 120 deg. independent active sectors per tube. A flexible delivery catheter facilitated water cooling (100 ml min -1 ) within an expandable urethral balloon (35 mm longx10 mm diameter). An integrated positioning hub allows for rotating and translating the transducer assembly within the urethral balloon for final targeting prior to therapy delivery. Rotational beam plots indicate ∼90 deg. - 100 deg. acoustic output patterns from each 120 deg. transducer sector, negligible coupling between sectors, and acoustic efficiencies between 41% and 53%. Experiments were performed within in vivo canine prostate (n=3), with real-time MR temperature monitoring in either the axial or coronal planes to facilitate control of the heating profiles and provide thermal dosimetry for performance assessment. Gross inspection of serial sections of treated prostate, exposed to TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) tissue viability stain, allowed for direct assessment of the extent of thermal coagulation. These devices created large contiguous thermal lesions (defined by 52 deg. C maximum temperature, t 43 =240 min thermal dose contours, and TTC tissue sections) that extended radially from the applicator toward the border of the prostate (∼15 mm) during a short power application (∼8-16 W per active sector, 8-15 min), with ∼200 deg. or 360 deg. sector coagulation demonstrated depending upon the activation scheme. Analysis of transient temperature profiles indicated progression of lethal temperature and thermal dose contours

  10. Physics of epi-thermal boron neutron capture therapy (epi-thermal BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Ryoichi; Wakisaka, Yushi; Morimoto, Nami; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Toki, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The physics of epi-thermal neutrons in the human body is discussed in the effort to clarify the nature of the unique radiologic properties of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). This discussion leads to the computational method of Monte Carlo simulation in BNCT. The method is discussed through two examples based on model phantoms. The physics is kept at an introductory level in the discussion in this tutorial review.

  11. Theoretical thermal dosimetry produced by an annular phased array system in CT-based patient models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, K.D.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Lynch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical calculations for the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the resulting temperature distributions produced by an annular phased array (APA) type system are made. The finite element numerical method is used in the formulation of both the electromagnetic (EM) and the thermal boundary value problems. A number of detailed patient models based on CT-scan data from the pelvic, visceral, and thoracic regions are generated to stimulate a variety of tumor locations and surrounding normal tissues. The SAR values from the EM solution are input into the bioheat transfer equation, and steady-rate temperature distributions are calculated for a wide variety of blood flow rates. Based on theoretical modeling, the APA shows no preferential heating of superficial over deep-seated tumors. However, in most cases satisfactory thermal profiles (therapeutic volume near 60%) are obtained in all three regions of the human trunk only for tumors with little or no blood flow. Unsatisfactory temperature patterns (therapeutic volume <50%) are found for tumors with moderate to high perfusion rates. These theoretical calculations should aid the clinician in the evaluation of the effectiveness of APA type devices in heating tumors located in the trunk region

  12. Thermally responsive silicon nanowire arrays for native/denatured-protein separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei; Wang Yanwei; Yuan Lin; Wang Lei; Yang Weikang; Wu Zhaoqiang; Li Dan; Chen Hong

    2013-01-01

    We present our findings of the selective adsorption of native and denatured proteins onto thermally responsive, native-protein resistant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) decorated silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs). The PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface, which shows very low levels of native-protein adsorption, favors the adsorption of denatured proteins. The amount of denatured-protein adsorption is higher at temperatures above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAAm. Temperature cycling surrounding the LCST, which ensures against thermal denaturation of native proteins, further increases the amount of denatured-protein adsorption. Moreover, the PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface is able to selectively adsorb denatured protein even from mixtures of different protein species; meanwhile, the amount of native proteins in solution is kept nearly at its original level. It is believed that these results will not only enrich current understanding of protein interactions with PNIPAAm-modified SiNWAs surfaces, but may also stimulate applications of PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surfaces for native/denatured protein separation. (paper)

  13. Evaluation of a fuzzy logic controller for laser thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Vanessa; Sadeghian, Alireza; Sherar, Michael D.; Whelan, William M.

    2002-06-01

    Laser thermal therapy (LTT) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to destroy solid tumors while minimizing damage to adjacent normal tissues. Optical energy, delivered through fibers implanted into the target volume, raises tissue temperatures above 60 degree(s)C resulting in coagulative necrosis (thermal damage). Thermal damage volumes, however, can be irregular and unpredictable, resulting from dynamic changes in the tissue properties during treatment. A closed-loop feedback fuzzy logic controller for LTT was developed with the tissue treated as a black-box system. Preliminary testing was conducted for simulated LTT with a single spherically emitting source fiber at the center of 5 mm and 10 mm diameter target tissues. Dynamic changes in blood perfusion and tissue optical properties due to heating were incorporated into the LTT simulator. Input laser power was modulated to control the temperature field in an attempt to reach target temperatures at the source (90 degree(s)C to avoid tissue charring) and at the target boundary (55 degree(s)C). In all simulations, thermal damage based on Arrhenius formulation ((Omega) equals 1) was reached at the target boundary. The controller also responded efficiently to unexpected, rapid temperature changes.

  14. Effect of phonon transport on the Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Jyothi Swaroop

    Thermoelectrics enable solid-state conversion of heat to electricity by the Seebeck effect, but must provide scalable and cost-effective technology for practical waste heat harvesting. This dissertation explores the thermoelectric properties of electrochemically etched silicon nanowires through experiments, complemented by charge and thermal transport theories. Electrolessly etched silicon nanowires show anomalously low thermal conductivity that has been attributed to the increased scattering of heat conducting phonons from the surface disorder introduced by etching. The reduction is below the incoherent limit for phonon scattering at the boundary, the so-called Casimir limit. A new model of partially coherent phonon transport shows that correlated multiple scattering of phonons off resonantly matched rough surfaces can indeed lead to thermal conductivity below the Casimir limit. Using design guidelines from the theory, silicon nanowires of controllable surface roughness are fabricated using metal-assisted chemical etching. Extensive characterization of the nanowire surfaces using transmission electron microscopy provides surface roughness parameters that are important in testing transport theories. The second part of the dissertation focuses on the implications of increased phonon scattering on the Seebeck coefficient, which is a cumulative effect of non-equilibrium amongst charge carriers and phonons. A novel frequency-domain technique enables simultaneous measurements of the Seebeck coefficient and the thermal conductivity of nanowire arrays. The frequency response measurements isolate the parasitic contributions thus improving upon existing techniques for cross-plane thermoelectric measurements. While the thermal conductivity of nanowires reduces significantly with increased roughness, there is also a significant reduction in the Seebeck coefficient over a wide range of doping. Theoretical fitting of the data reveals that such reduction results from the

  15. Multi-parameter fibre Bragg grating sensor-array for thermal vacuum cycling test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Ahlers, B.; Toet, P.; Casarosa, G.; Appolloni, M.

    2017-11-01

    Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor systems based on optical fibres are gaining interest in space applications. Studies on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of the reusable launchers using FBG sensors have been carried out in the Future European Space Transportation Investigations Programme (FESTIP). Increasing investment in the development on FBG sensor applications is foreseen for the Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP). TNO has performed different SHM measurements with FBGs including on the VEGA interstage [1, 2] in 2006. Within the current project, a multi-parameter FBG sensor array demonstrator system for temperature and strain measurements is designed, fabricated and tested under ambient as well as Thermal Vacuum (TV) conditions in a TV chamber of the European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC site. The aim is the development of a multi-parameters measuring system based on FBG technology for space applications. During the TV tests of a Space Craft (S/C) or its subsystems, thermal measurements, as well as strain measurements are needed by the engineers in order to verify their prediction and to validate their models. Because of the dimensions of the test specimen and the accuracy requested to the measurement, a large number of observation/measuring points are needed. Conventional sensor systems require a complex routing of the cables connecting the sensors to their acquisition unit. This will add extra weight to the construction under test. FBG sensors are potentially light-weight and can easily be multiplexed in an array configuration. The different tasks comply of a demonstrator system design; its component selection, procurement, manufacturing and finally its assembly. The temperature FBG sensor is calibrated in a dedicated laboratory setup down to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature at TNO. A temperature-wavelength calibration curve is generated. After a test programme definition a setup in thermal vacuum is realised at ESA premises including a mechanical

  16. A Micro-Thermal Sensor for Focal Therapy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Harishankar; Hodges, Wyatt; Choi, Jeunghwan; Lubner, Sean; Dames, Chris; Bischof, John

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for sensors deployed during focal therapies to inform treatment planning and in vivo monitoring in thin tissues. Specifically, the measurement of thermal properties, cooling surface contact, tissue thickness, blood flow and phase change with mm to sub mm accuracy are needed. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a micro-thermal sensor based on the supported “3ω” technique can achieve this in vitro under idealized conditions in 0.5 to 2 mm thick tissues relevant to cryoablation of the pulmonary vein (PV). To begin with “3ω” sensors were microfabricated onto flat glass as an idealization of a focal probe surface. The sensor was then used to make new measurements of ‘k’ (W/m.K) of porcine PV, esophagus, and phrenic nerve, all needed for PV cryoabalation treatment planning. Further, by modifying the sensor use from traditional to dynamic mode new measurements related to tissue vs. fluid (i.e. water) contact, fluid flow conditions, tissue thickness, and phase change were made. In summary, the in vitro idealized system data presented is promising and warrants future work to integrate and test supported “3ω” sensors on in vivo deployed focal therapy probe surfaces (i.e. balloons or catheters).

  17. A Micro-Thermal Sensor for Focal Therapy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Harishankar; Hodges, Wyatt; Choi, Jeunghwan; Lubner, Sean; Dames, Chris; Bischof, John

    2016-02-26

    There is an urgent need for sensors deployed during focal therapies to inform treatment planning and in vivo monitoring in thin tissues. Specifically, the measurement of thermal properties, cooling surface contact, tissue thickness, blood flow and phase change with mm to sub mm accuracy are needed. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a micro-thermal sensor based on the supported "3ω" technique can achieve this in vitro under idealized conditions in 0.5 to 2 mm thick tissues relevant to cryoablation of the pulmonary vein (PV). To begin with "3ω" sensors were microfabricated onto flat glass as an idealization of a focal probe surface. The sensor was then used to make new measurements of 'k' (W/m.K) of porcine PV, esophagus, and phrenic nerve, all needed for PV cryoabalation treatment planning. Further, by modifying the sensor use from traditional to dynamic mode new measurements related to tissue vs. fluid (i.e. water) contact, fluid flow conditions, tissue thickness, and phase change were made. In summary, the in vitro idealized system data presented is promising and warrants future work to integrate and test supported "3ω" sensors on in vivo deployed focal therapy probe surfaces (i.e. balloons or catheters).

  18. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss ∆t > 10 sec.

  19. Photoacoustic temperature measurements for monitoring of thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiou-Han; Wei, Chen-Wei; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Li, Pai-Chi

    2009-02-01

    Plasmonic photothermal therapy is a new cancer thermotherapy method based on surface plasmon resonance of nanoparticles. It is important to measure the temperature during thermotherapy for safety and efficacy. In this study, we apply a photoacoustic (PA) method for real-time, non-invasive temperature measurements. In particular, this method can be effectively combined with a photothermal therapy system that we developed in parallel. The method is based on the fact that the PA pressure amplitude is linearly related to temperature. To explore its potential, a home-made, 20 MHz PA transducer was used, in which an optical fiber was inserted in its center for emitting laser pulses while the PA signal was simultaneously detected. Continuous wave (CW) laser was used to heat the subject, including both phantoms and mice. The temperature of the region of interest was also measured by a fine-needle thermal couple. Results show that the temperature was linearly proportional to the PA signal with good correlation with the CW laser irradiation. The in vivo study also demonstrated potential of this technique.

  20. A 1-MHz 2-D CMUT array for HIFU thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Park, Kwan Kyu; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Firouzi, Kamyar; Choe, Jung Woo; Watkins, Ronald D.; Oguz, Huseyin Kagan; Kupnik, Mario; Pauly, Kim Butts; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    We developed a fully-populated 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. The 2-D CMUT array, which consists of 20 × 20 square CMUT elements with an element-to-element pitch of 1 mm, was designed and fabricated using the thick-buried-oxide (BOX) fabrication process. It was then assembled on a custom interface board that can provide various array configurations depending on the desired applications. In this study, the interface board groups the CMUT array elements into eight channels, based on the phase delay from the element to the targeted focal point at a 20-mm distance from the array surface, which corresponds to an F-number of 1. An 8-channel phase generating system supplies continuous waves with eight different phases to the eight channels of the CMUT array through bias-tees and amplifiers. This array aperture, grouped into eight channels, gives a focusing gain of 6.09 according to field simulation using Field II. Assuming a peak-to-peak pressure of 1 MPa at the surface of the array, our custom temperature simulator predicts successful tissue ablation at the focus. During the measurements, each channel was tuned with a series inductor for an operational frequency of 1 MHz. With a CMUT DC bias of 100 V and a 1-MHz AC input voltage of 55 V, we achieved peak-to-peak output pressures of 173.9 kPa and 568.7 kPa at the array surface and at the focus, respectively. The focusing gain calculated from this measurement is 3.27, which is lower than the simulated gain of 6.09 because of the mutual radiation impedance among the CMUT cells. Further optimization of the operating condition of this array and design improvements for reducing the effect of mutual radiation impedance are currently on-going.

  1. Safety of Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy in Patients With Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Sanjeet S; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Favazza, Christopher P; Watson, Robert E; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2018-02-10

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) has increasingly been used as a treatment option for medically refractory epilepsy, tumors, and radiation necrosis. The use of LiTT requires intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) thermography. This can become an issue in patients with other implanted therapeutic devices such as pacemakers and vagal nerve stimulators due to concerns regarding increases in the specific absorption rate (SAR). This is a technical case report demonstrating a successfully and safely performed LiTT in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with a pacemaker for mesial temporal sclerosis. An 83-yr-old gentleman who had an implanted cardiac pacemaker presented with medically intractable epilepsy and was confirmed to have mesial temporal sclerosis on imaging. Video electroencephalography demonstrated concordant ipsilateral seizures and semiology. He underwent LiTT for ablation of the mesial temporal lobe. This was performed with the below described protocol with a cardiology nurse monitoring the patient's cardiac condition and a physicist monitoring SAR, and MR imaging quality without any adverse events. This study reports on a protocol of cardiac and MR SAR to safely perform MR-guided LiTT in the setting of traditional pacemakers in patients who are not pacemaker dependent. Copyright © 2018 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  2. Thermally Induced Vibrations of the Hubble Space Telescope's Solar Array 3 in a Test Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Derrick A.; Haile, William B.; Turczyn, Mark T.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) conducted a disturbance verification test on a flight Solar Array 3 (SA3) for the Hubble Space Telescope using the ESA Large Space Simulator (LSS) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The LSS cyclically illuminated the SA3 to simulate orbital temperature changes in a vacuum environment. Data acquisition systems measured signals from force transducers and accelerometers resulting from thermally induced vibrations of the SAI The LSS with its seismic mass boundary provided an excellent background environment for this test. This paper discusses the analysis performed on the measured transient SA3 responses and provides a summary of the results.

  3. Magnetic Reversal and Thermal Stability of CoFeB Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Arrays Patterned by Block Copolymer Lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Kun-Hua

    2018-04-10

    Dense arrays of pillars, with diameters of 64 and 25 nm, were made from a perpendicular CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction thin film stack using block copolymer lithography. While the soft layer and hard layer in the 64 nm pillars reverse at different fields, the reversal of the two layers in the 25 nm pillars could not be distinguished, attributed to the strong interlayer magnetostatic coupling. First order reversal curves were used to identify the steps that occur during switching, and the thermal stability and effective switching volume were determined from scan rate dependent hysteresis measurements.

  4. Numerical analysis of temperature and thermal dose response of biological tissues to thermal non-equilibrium during hyperthermia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping

    2008-03-01

    The temperature and thermal dose response of tumor tissue to hyperthermia therapy under conditions of thermal non-equilibrium have been investigated. The thermal model considers the tissue with its blood vessel distribution as a porous medium and employs the convection term instead of the perfusion term in the energy conservation equations for both tissue and blood. By using a numerical method, the temperatures and thermal dose responses of tissues with different vessel diameters, blood velocities, and porosities were calculated. Through an accuracy comparison, the numerical results were used to compare this model with the results for the one-equation porous model under thermal equilibrium. The primary results indicate that the one-equation porous model is suitable for a distribution of blood vessels when the diameters are less than 30 microm and the blood velocities are lower than 0.4 cm s(-1).

  5. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  6. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic compound eye array via two-step thermal reflow of simply pre-modeled hierarchic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengzhou; Li, Mujun; Shen, Lianguan; Qiu, Jinfeng; Zhou, Youquan

    2017-06-01

    A flexible fabrication method for the biomimetic compound eye (BCE) array is proposed. In this method, a triple-layer sandwich-like coating configuration was introduced, and the required hierarchic microstructures are formed with a simple single-scan exposure in maskless digital lithography. Taking advantage of the difference of glass transition point (Tg) between photoresists of each layer, the pre-formed hierarchic microstructures are in turn reflowed to the curved substrate and the BCE ommatidia in a two-step thermal reflow process. To avoid affecting the spherical substrate formed in the first thermal reflow, a non-contact strategy was proposed in the second reflow process. The measurement results were in good agreement with the designed BCE profiles. Results also showed that the fabricated BCE had good performances in optical test. The presented method is flexible, convenient, low-cost and can easily adapt to the fabrications of other optical elements with hierarchic microstructures.

  7. Efficient array design for sonotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Douglas N; Kruse, Dustin E; Ferrara, Katherine W; Ergun, Arif S; Barnes, Stephen; Lu, X Ming

    2008-01-01

    New linear multi-row, multi-frequency arrays have been designed, constructed and tested as fully operational ultrasound probes to produce confocal imaging and therapeutic acoustic intensities with a standard commercial ultrasound imaging system. The triple-array probes and imaging system produce high quality B-mode images with a center row imaging array at 5.3 MHz and sufficient acoustic power with dual therapeutic arrays to produce mild hyperthermia at 1.54 MHz. The therapeutic array pair in the first probe design (termed G3) utilizes a high bandwidth and peak pressure, suitable for mechanical therapies. The second multi-array design (termed G4) has a redesigned therapeutic array pair which is optimized for a high time-averaged power output suitable for mild hyperthermia applications. The 'thermal therapy' design produces more than 4 W of acoustic power from the low-frequency arrays with only a 10.5 deg. C internal rise in temperature after 100 s of continuous use with an unmodified conventional imaging system or substantially longer operation at lower acoustic power. The low-frequency arrays in both probe designs were examined and contrasted for real power transfer efficiency with a KLM model which includes all lossy contributions in the power delivery path from system transmitters to the tissue load. Laboratory verification was successfully performed for the KLM-derived estimates of transducer parallel model acoustic resistance and dissipation resistance, which are the critical design factors for acoustic power output and undesired internal heating, respectively

  8. A silicon strip detector array for energy verification and quality assurance in heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrot, Emily; Newall, Matthew; Guatelli, Susanna; Petasecca, Marco; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2018-02-01

    The measurement of depth dose profiles for range and energy verification of heavy ion beams is an important aspect of quality assurance procedures for heavy ion therapy facilities. The steep dose gradients in the Bragg peak region of these profiles require the use of detectors with high spatial resolution. The aim of this work is to characterize a one dimensional monolithic silicon detector array called the "serial Dose Magnifying Glass" (sDMG) as an independent ion beam energy and range verification system used for quality assurance conducted for ion beams used in heavy ion therapy. The sDMG detector consists of two linear arrays of 128 silicon sensitive volumes each with an effective size of 2mm × 50μm × 100μm fabricated on a p-type substrate at a pitch of 200 μm along a single axis of detection. The detector was characterized for beam energy and range verification by measuring the response of the detector when irradiated with a 290 MeV/u 12 C ion broad beam incident along the single axis of the detector embedded in a PMMA phantom. The energy of the 12 C ion beam incident on the detector and the residual energy of an ion beam incident on the phantom was determined from the measured Bragg peak position in the sDMG. Ad hoc Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup were also performed to give further insight into the detector response. The relative response profiles along the single axis measured with the sDMG detector were found to have good agreement between experiment and simulation with the position of the Bragg peak determined to fall within 0.2 mm or 1.1% of the range in the detector for the two cases. The energy of the beam incident on the detector was found to vary less than 1% between experiment and simulation. The beam energy incident on the phantom was determined to be (280.9 ± 0.8) MeV/u from the experimental and (280.9 ± 0.2) MeV/u from the simulated profiles. These values coincide with the expected energy of 281 MeV/u. The sDMG detector

  9. Comparative study on radon effects and thermal effects on humans in radon hot spring therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Mitsunobu, F.; Hanamoto, K.; Tanizaki, Y.; Sugita, K.; Kohima, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The radon therapy is used radon ( 222 Rn) gas, which mainly emits alpha-rays, and induces a small amount of active oxygen in the body. Because most of the diseases to which the radon therapy as well as the thermal therapy is applied are related to activated oxygen, in this study the effects of the radioactivity of radon and thermal effects were compared under the room or the hot spring condition with the similar chemical component, using as the parameters which are closely involved in the clinical for radon therapy. In the results, the radon and thermal therapy enhanced the antioxidation function, such as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which inhibit lipid peroxidation and total cholesterol produce in the body. Moreover the therapy enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mitogen response, and increased the level of CD4, which is the marker of helper T cell, and decreased the level of CD8, which is the common marker of killer T cell and supresser T cell, in the white cell differentiation antigen (CD4/CD8) assay. Furthermore, the therapy increased the levels of alpha atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha ANP), beta endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), insulin and glucose-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), and decreased the vasopression level. The results were on the whole larger in the radon group than in the thermal group. The findings suggest that the radon therapy more contributes to the prevention of life style-related diseases related to peroxidation reactions and immune depression than thermal therapy. Moreover these indicate what may be a part of the mechanism for the alleviation of hypertension, osteoarthritis (pain) and diabetes mellitus brought about more radon therapy than thermal therapy

  10. Implications and considerations of thermal effects when applying irreversible electroporation tissue ablation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Rafael V; Bhonsle, Suyashree; Neal, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) describes a cellular response to electric field exposure, resulting in the formation of nanoscale defects that can lead to cell death. While this behavior occurs independently of thermally-induced processes, therapeutic ablation of targeted tissues with IRE uses a series of brief electric pulses, whose parameters result in secondary Joule heating of the tissue. Where contemporary clinical pulse protocols use aggressive energy regimes, additional evidence is supplementing original studies that assert care must be taken in clinical ablation protocols to ensure the cumulative thermal effects do not induce damage that will alter outcomes for therapies using the IRE non-thermal cell death process for tissue ablation. In this letter, we seek to clarify the nomenclature regarding IRE as a non-thermal ablation technique, as well as identify existing literature that uses experimental, clinical, and numerical results to discretely address and evaluate the thermal considerations relevant when applying IRE in clinical scenarios, including several approaches for reducing these effects. Existing evidence in the literature describes cell response to electric fields, suggesting cell death from IRE is a unique process, independent from traditional thermal damage. Numerical simulations, as well as preclinical and clinical findings demonstrate the ability to deliver therapeutic IRE ablation without occurrence of morbidity associated with thermal therapies. Clinical IRE therapy generates thermal effects, which may moderate the non-thermal aspects of IRE ablation. Appropriate protocol development, utilization, and pulse delivery devices may be implemented to restrain these effects and maintain IRE as the vastly predominant tissue death modality, reducing therapy-mitigating thermal damage. Clinical applications of IRE should consider thermal effects and employ protocols to ensure safe and effective therapy delivery. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate

  11. Nanofabrication and characterization of ZnO nanorod arrays and branched microrods by aqueous solution route and rapid thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupan, Oleg; Chow, Lee; Chai, Guangyu; Roldan, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Schulte, Alfons; Heinrich, Helge

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an inexpensive and fast fabrication method for one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and branched two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) - nanoarchitectures. Our synthesis technique includes the use of an aqueous solution route and post-growth rapid thermal annealing. It permits rapid and controlled growth of ZnO nanorod arrays of 1D - rods, 2D - crosses, and 3D - tetrapods without the use of templates or seeds. The obtained ZnO nanorods are uniformly distributed on the surface of Si substrates and individual or branched nano/microrods can be easily transferred to other substrates. Process parameters such as concentration, temperature and time, type of substrate and the reactor design are critical for the formation of nanorod arrays with thin diameter and transferable nanoarchitectures. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the samples

  12. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  13. Passive Films for CubeSat Solar Array and Radiator Thermal Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trending towards reduced power and mass budget on satellites with a longer mission life, there is a need for a reliable thermal control system that is more efficient...

  14. One-dimensional arrays of oscillators: Energy localization in thermal equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigada, R.; Romero, A.H.; Sarmiento, A.; Lindenberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    All systems in thermal equilibrium exhibit a spatially variable energy landscape due to thermal fluctuations. Thus at any instant there is naturally a thermodynamically driven localization of energy in parts of the system relative to other parts of the system. The specific characteristics of the spatial landscape such as, for example, the energy variance, depend on the thermodynamic properties of the system and vary from one system to another. The temporal persistence of a given energy landscape, that is, the way in which energy fluctuations (high or low) decay toward the thermal mean, depends on the dynamical features of the system. We discuss the spatial and temporal characteristics of spontaneous energy localization in 1D anharmonic chains in thermal equilibrium. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  15. Thermal IR imaging system using a self-scanned HgCdTe/CCD detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain-Abidi, A. S.; Ostrow, H.; Rubin, B.

    1980-01-01

    It is likely that future high resolution earth observation imaging systems will utilize self-scanned IR detectors. In an initial step toward this goal, an IR imaging system operating in the 10 to 12 micron spectral region has been developed. This system uses a 9-element HgCdTe/CCD linear array operating in the photoconductive mode, nine pre-amplifiers and a silicon CCD multiplexer integrated into a focal plane assembly. Opto-mechanical techniques are used to scan the scene and images are produced in real time. The imaging performance of this system is described and measurements of noise, responsivity, specific detectivity, and detector sensitivity profiles are presented. The requirements for more advanced detector arrays for use in future NASA remote sensing missions are also discussed.

  16. A wafer-scale backplane-assisted resonating nanoantenna array SERS device created by tunable thermal dewetting nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Te-Wei; Ranjan Gartia, Manas; Seo, Sujin; Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, Gang

    2014-04-01

    A tunable lithography-less nanofabrication process using a metal thin-film thermal dewetting technique has been developed to fabricate wafer-scale and uniform plasmonic substrates at low cost for optimal performance in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) applications. The relationship between the tunable parameters of this process and the corresponding optical and plasmonic characteristic is investigated both experimentally and theoretically to understand the deterministic design of an optimal SERS device with a three-dimensional plasmonic nanoantenna structure. The enhancement of SERS using various nanoplasmonic particle sizes, structure lengths, lateral hot spot spacings and resonating effects are examined and demonstrated. We achieve a uniform optimal enhancement factor of 1.38 × 108 on a 4 in wafer-scale SERS substrate with a backplane-assisted resonating nanoantenna array design. Sensitive environmental nitrate sensing, vitamin detection and oligonucleotide identification are demonstrated on the high-performance SERS device.

  17. Polarization effects associated with thermal processing of HY-80 structural steel using high-power laser diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Baker, Bradford W.; Rotter, Mark D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Wiechec, Maxwell E.; Brown, Zachary M.; Beach, Raymond J.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

    2017-12-01

    Localized heating of roughened steel surfaces using highly divergent laser light emitted from high-power laser diode arrays was experimentally demonstrated and compared with theoretical predictions. Polarization dependence was analyzed using Fresnel coefficients to understand the laser-induced temperature rise of HY-80 steel plates under 383- to 612-W laser irradiation. Laser-induced, transient temperature distributions were directly measured using bulk thermocouple probes and thermal imaging. Finite-element analysis yielded quantitative assessment of energy deposition and heat transport in HY-80 steel using absorptivity as a tuning parameter. The extracted absorptivity values ranged from 0.62 to 0.75 for S-polarized and 0.63 to 0.85 for P-polarized light, in agreement with partially oxidized iron surfaces. Microstructural analysis using electron backscatter diffraction revealed a heat affected zone for the highest temperature conditions (612 W, P-polarized) as evidence of rapid quenching and an austenite to martensite transformation. The efficient use of diode arrays for laser-assisted advanced manufacturing technologies, such as hybrid friction stir welding, is discussed.

  18. Effect of Different Photovoltaic Materials on Energetic and Exergetic Performance of Photovoltaic Thermal Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajoria C.S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the effect of packing factor of Photovoltaic (PV module on the room temperature, cell temperature and efficiency of a proposed Building Integrated Semi-transparent Photovoltaic Thermal (BiSPVT and Building Integrated Opaque Photovoltaic Thermal (BiOPVT systems with duct mounted on the roof of the building. Different PV materials like mono-crystalline silicon (m-Si, amorphous silicon (a-Si, poly-crystalline silicon (p-Si, cadmium telluride (CdTe, copper indium selenide (CIS and hetero-junction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT have been considered in the analysis under the cold climatic condition of India. Since Srinagar (India has the cold climatic condition, therefore, its climatic data has been considered in the present analysis.

  19. Fluorescence sensor array for identification of commercial milk samples according to their thermal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungkarndee, Radeemada; Techakriengkrai, Ittipon; Tumcharern, Gamolwan; Sukwattanasinitt, Mongkol

    2016-04-15

    Identification of processed milk is of importance for commercial and legal concerns. The fluorescence response patterns induced by fluorophore/protein interactions allow a possible discrimination of processed milk samples corresponding to their thermal treatment. The fluorescence responses of 4 fluorophores upon addition of commercial milk samples in 96-well plate are measured in the range of 400-600 nm using the excitation wavelength at 375 nm. The pattern recognition of the 53,126 fluorescence responses (4 fluorophores×41 wavelengths×4 thermally processed milks×3 brands×3 lots×3 bottles×3 repeats) are analyzed by multivariate statistical methods. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) successfully recognizes the milk samples according to their thermal processing, i.e. pasteurized milk, sterilized milk, UHT fresh milk and recombined milk (UHT milk having milk powder), with 100% classification accuracy in a cross validation using a leave-one-out technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutron capture therapy with thermal neutrons at IRT MIFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, K.N.; Portnov, A.A.; Savkin, V.A.; Kulakov, V.N.; Khokhlov, V.F.; Shejno, I.N.; Vajnson, A.A.; Kozlovskaya, N.G.; Meshcherikova, V.V.; Mitin, V.N.; Yarmonenko, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Combined preclinical investigations into neutron capture therapy are conducted. Malignant melanoma was adopted as the line of investigation; boron-containing and gadolinium-containing preparations were used during the neutron capture therapy working off. Preparations produce secondary varying radiations when used in tumor. Dogs with spontaneous melanoma were used for the experiments. Procedures for the irradiation of dogs by neutron beam as the stage before use for the treatment of oncology patients were finished off; efficiency of neutron beam influence on normal tissues during the irradiation of dogs with melanoma (and without it) in antitumor and side effect sense was estimated [ru

  1. MgB2-Based Bolometer Array for Far Infra-Red Thermal Imaging and Fourier Transform Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, B.; Aslam, S.; Brasunas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The mid-superconducting critical temperature (T(sub c) approximately 39 K) of the simple binary, intermetallic MgB, [1] makes it a very good candidate for the development of the next generation of electrooptical devices (e.g. [2]). In particular, recent advances in thin film deposition teclmiques to attain higb quality polycrystalline thin film MgB, deposited on SiN-Si substrates, with T(sub c) approximately 38K [3] coupled with the low voltage noise performance of the film [4] makes it higbly desirable for the development of moderately cooled bolometer arrays for integration into future space-bourne far infra-red (FIR) spectrometers and thermal mappers for studying the outer planets, their icy moons and other moons of interest in the 17-250 micrometer spectral wavelength range. Presently, commercially available pyroelectric detectors operating at 300 K have specific detectivity, D(*), around 7 x 10(exp 8) to 2 x 10(exp 9) centimeters square root of Hz/W. However, a MgB2 thin film based bolometer using a low-stress (less than 140 MPa) SiN membrane isolated from the substrate by a small thermal conductive link, operating at 38 K, promises to have two orders of magnitude higher specific detectivity [5][6].

  2. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  3. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  4. Spectral Analysis of the Primary Flight Focal Plane Arrays for the Thermal Infrared Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a (1) New longwave infrared (10 - 12 micron) sensor for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, (2) 185 km ground swath; 100 meter pixel size on ground, (3) Pushbroom sensor configuration. Issue of Calibration are: (1) Single detector -- only one calibration, (2) Multiple detectors - unique calibration for each detector -- leads to pixel-to-pixel artifacts. Objectives are: (1) Predict extent of residual striping when viewing a uniform blackbody target through various atmospheres, (2) Determine how different spectral shapes affect the derived surface temperature in a realistic synthetic scene.

  5. Identification of controlled-complexity thermal therapy models derived from magnetic resonance thermometry images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Niu

    Full Text Available Medical imaging provides information valuable in diagnosis, planning, and control of therapies. In this paper, we develop a method that uses a specific type of imaging--the magnetic resonance thermometry--to identify accurate and computationally efficient site and patient-specific computer models for thermal therapies, such as focused ultrasound surgery, hyperthermia, and thermally triggered targeted drug delivery. The developed method uses a sequence of acquired MR thermometry images to identify a treatment model describing the deposition and dissipation of thermal energy in tissues. The proper orthogonal decomposition of thermal images is first used to identify a set of empirical eigenfunctions, which captures spatial correlations in the thermal response of tissues. Using the reduced subset of eigenfunction as a functional basis, low-dimensional thermal response and the ultrasound specific absorption rate models are then identified. Once identified, the treatment models can be used to plan, optimize, and control the treatment. The developed approach is validated experimentally using the results of MR thermal imaging of a tissue phantom during focused ultrasound sonication. The validation demonstrates that our approach produces accurate low-dimensional treatment models and provides a convenient tool for balancing the accuracy of model predictions and the computational complexity of the treatment models.

  6. A study on the utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum of a Maxwellian distribution of a higher temperature than the room temperature of 300 K, was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at the deeper part in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using MCNP-V3 in order to confirm the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e., (1) depth dependence of neutron energy spectrum, and (2) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper and wider area in a living body compared with the thermal neutron irradiation. Practically, by the incidence of the hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution, the thermal neutron flux at 5 cm depth can be given about four times larger than by the incidence of the thermal neutrons of 300 K. (author)

  7. The Clinical Study on the Thermal Changes and Side Effects after Bee Venom Acupuncture Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yook Tae-han

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was done to observe the effects on the thermal changes and side effects of Bee Venom acupuncture. The objectives are as follows; If there are remarkable local thermal changes between pre and post Bee Venom acupuncture therapy on D.I.T.I. or not. If there are those, we examine how long it's changes are maintained, what is the adequate interval on Bee Venom acupuncture therapy, and what the reactions in a local or whole body are on that therapy. Methods To study the local thermal changes in Bee Venom acupuncture therapy, D.I.T.I. was used. Determination of this analysis periods are pre and post-therapy(5 minutes, 1 hour, 1day, 2days, 3days, 5days and 7days later. The study group was divided into two groups. One was BV group(N=19, another was NS(Normal Saline group. The Bee Venom acupuncture was injected by 0.2ml divided into 0.05ml at the Fengmen(風門: B12, Feishu(肺兪: B13, Fufen(附分: B41, Pohu(魄戶: B42 4 points. Then, in order to analyze the clinical form, we have observed responses of 23 students whenever we checked the thermal changes of their after performing. Results The following results were obtained. 1. In BV group, there was a significant dermatothermal difference between pre and post therapy. That difference was most remarkable in post-therapy 1 hour to 1day, and was not remarkable in post-therapy 5-7days later. 2. There was no significant dermatothermal changes at NS group, but BV group had remarkable changes between operated and non-operated area in post-therapy 1hour, 1day, 2days. But there was none 7 days later. 3. Among the physical reactions after Bee Venom acupuncture therapy, operated-area pain, itching, pain on moving and fatigue sign most appeared until post-therapy 3days. Itching and fatigue sign appeared until post-therapy 7days. 4. In comparison the dermatothermal changes with the physical reactions, the decrease of { CT = (Rt. Temperature - Lt. Temperature / Rt. Temperature X 100} and the

  8. Further development of thermal neutron capture therapy for metastatic and deeply-invasive human malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Yutaka

    1995-03-01

    This issue is the collection of the papers presented thermal neutron capture therapy for metastatic and deeply-invasive human malignant melanoma. Separate abstracts were prepared for 2 of the papers in this report. The remaining 32 papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  9. The Effects of Thermal and Cold Therapies on the Flexibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relative effects of the application of heating and cooling modalities on the muscles prior to the performance of flexibility exercises have not been extensively studied. This study was therefore designed to determine and compare the effects of thermal (heat) and cold (ice) therapies on the flexibility of the hamstring muscle ...

  10. Insights into a microwave susceptible agent for minimally invasive microwave tumor thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitang; Liu, Tianlong; Fu, Changhui; Li, Linlin; Tan, Longfei; Wang, Jingzhuo; Ren, Xiangling; Ren, Jun; Wang, Jianxin; Meng, Xianwei

    2015-03-01

    This work develops a kind of sodium alginate (SA) microcapsules as microwave susceptible agents for in vivo tumor microwave thermal therapy for the first time. Due to the excellent microwave susceptible properties and low bio-toxicity, excellent therapy efficiency can be achieved with the tumor inhibiting ratio of 97.85% after one-time microwave thermal therapy with ultralow power (1.8 W, 450 MHz). Meanwhile, the mechanism of high microwave heating efficiency was confirmed via computer-simulated model in theory, demonstrating that the spatial confinement efficiency of microcapsule walls endows the inside ions with high microwave susceptible properties. This strategy offers tremendous potential applications in clinical tumor treatment with the benefits of safety, reliability, effectiveness and minimally invasiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF DG TAU'S RADIO JET: A HIGHLY COLLIMATED THERMAL OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, C.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52240 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Ray, T. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Section, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Skinner, S. L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. C. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    The active young protostar DG Tau has an extended jet that has been well studied at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. We report sensitive new Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations of the core and jet between 5 GHz and 8 GHz. Our high angular resolution observation at 8 GHz clearly shows an unpolarized inner jet with a size of 42 AU (0.''35) extending along a position angle similar to the optical-X ray outer jet. Using our nearly coeval 2012 VLA observations, we find a spectral index {alpha} = +0.46 {+-} 0.05, which combined with the lack of polarization is consistent with bremsstrahlung (free-free) emission, with no evidence for a non-thermal coronal component. By identifying the end of the radio jet as the optical depth unity surface, and calculating the resulting emission measure, we find that our radio results are in agreement with previous optical line studies of electron density and consequent mass-loss rate. We also detect a weak radio knot at 5 GHz located 7'' from the base of the jet, coincident with the inner radio knot detected by Rodriguez et al. in 2009 but at lower surface brightness. We interpret this as due to expansion of post-shock ionized gas in the three years between observations.

  12. Exploration of preprocessing architectures for field-programmable gate array-based thermal-visual smart camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Rinner, Bernhard; Zand, Sajjad Zandi; O'Nils, Mattias

    2016-07-01

    Embedded smart cameras are gaining in popularity for a number of real-time outdoor surveillance applications. However, there are still challenges, i.e., computational latency, variation in illumination, and occlusion. To solve these challenges, multimodal systems, integrating multiple imagers can be utilized. However, trade-off is more stringent requirements on processing and communication for embedded platforms. To meet these challenges, we investigated two low-complexity and high-performance preprocessing architectures for a multiple imagers' node on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). In the proposed architectures, majority of the tasks are performed on the thermal images because of the lower spatial resolution. Analysis with different sets of images show that the system with proposed architectures offers better detection performance and can reduce output data from 1.7 to 99 times as compared with full-size images. The proposed architectures can achieve a frame rate of 53 fps, logics utilization from 2.1% to 4.1%, memory consumption 987 to 148 KB and power consumption in the range of 141 to 163 mW on Artix-7 FPGA. This concludes that the proposed architectures offer reduced design complexity and lower processing and communication requirements while retaining the configurability of the system.

  13. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-01-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500–700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility. PMID:29515815

  14. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Lin, Chia-Hung; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500-700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility.

  15. Novel microwave applicators for thermal therapy, ablation, and hemostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Clegg, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Microwave applicators are becoming more prevalent in cancer ablation therapy due to factors of penetration, high power, and shortened treatment time. These applicators create the largest zones of necrosis of available energy sources. Progress has been made both with interstitial applicators for surgical, laparoscopic, or radiological approaches, as well as surface applicators that provide hemostasis or precoagulation prior to resection. Most commonly, the applicators operate at 915 MHz or 2450 MHz, and are well matched to tissue. Surgical applicators are as large as 5.6 mm and have the capability to operate at 100-200 W. With smaller applicators, internal cooling may be required to avoid heating sensitive skin surfaces if used percutaneously or laparoscopically. With the interstitial applicators, animal studies have shown a strong relationship between power and ablation volume, including reaching a steady-state plateau in performance based more on power level and less on time. As shown in-vivo, MW surface applicators are very efficient in surface coagulation for hemostasis or precoagulation and in the treatment of surface breaking lesions. These applicators are also capable of deep penetration as applied from the surface. Characteristic treatment times for interstitial applicators are four minutes and for surface applicators, one minute or less is sufficient. Examples will be shown of multi-organ results with surface coagulation using high-power microwaves. Finally, future trends will be discussed that include treatment planning, multiple applicators, and navigation.

  16. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimized noninvasive monitoring of thermal changes on digital B-mode renal sonography during revascularization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, Mohammad D; Tavakoli, Vahid; Sahba, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Noninvasive real-time thermal change monitoring of human internal organs can play a critical role in diagnosis and treatment of many disorders, including reperfusion of renal arteries during anticoagulation therapy. This article focuses on tissue temperature detection using ultrasound velocity changes in different structures and their related speckle shift from their primary locations on high-quality B-mode digital sonography. We evaluated different speckle-tracking techniques and optimized them using appropriate motion estimation methods to determine the best algorithm and parameters. Performing thermal detection methods on simulated phantoms showed a good correlation between speckle shifts and the ground truth temperature. For the simulated images, average thermal error was 0.5 degrees C with an SD of 0.5 degrees C, where lower errors can be obtained in noiseless (motionless) data. The proposed technique was evaluated on real in vivo cases during surgical occlusion and reopening of the renal segmental artery and showed the potential of the algorithm for observation of internal organ changes using only digital ultrasound systems for diagnosis and therapy. The adaptive Rood pattern search proved to be the best block-matching technique, whereas the multiresolution Horn-Schunck technique was the best gradient optical flow method. The extracted thermal change during in vivo revascularization therapy is promising. In addition, we present an evaluation of several block-matching and optical flow motion estimation techniques.

  18. Investigation of illumination efficiency on the LED therapy with different array types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Liou, Cheng-Jyun

    2009-08-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a major discovery in twenty-one century for its advantages including small size, long lifetime, low voltage, high response and good mechanical properties. It is an environment-friendly product and maybe becomes a lighting source in future. In the other way LED lighting also is used for the lighting source of cosmetology. LED phototherapy provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths that are biologically optimal for pain treatment and holistic healing. The illumination efficiency is one of the key indexes for the LED phototherapy. LEDs were arranged on a disk of diameter of 100mm with different array types: a radial, a rhombus, an octagon, and a square. Then the LEDs with view angle of 120 degree were used for the lighting sources. Trace-Pro software was used for the optical simulation. The array types of radial and square were better than those of rhombus and octagon for illumination efficiency. In the mixture efficiency of a radial array was observed by different distances from 1mm to 100mm. However lighting could reach the well mixture after the treatment distance of 30mm by optical simulation. The view angle could reach +/-60 degree at the treatment distance of 50 mm for the LED phototherapy mockup.

  19. Subsurface thermal behaviour of tissue mimics embedded with large blood vessels during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Narasimhan, Arunn; Das, Sarit K; Sengupta, Soujit; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the subsurface thermal behaviour of a tissue phantom embedded with large blood vessels (LBVs) when exposed to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The effect of the addition of nanoparticles to irradiated tissue on the thermal sink behaviour of LBVs was also studied. Experiments were performed on a tissue phantom embedded with a simulated blood vessel of 2.2 mm outer diameter (OD)/1.6 mm inner diameter (ID) with a blood flow rate of 10 mL/min. Type I collagen from bovine tendon and agar gel were used as tissue. Two different nanoparticles, gold mesoflowers (AuMS) and graphene nanostructures, were synthesised and characterised. Energy equations incorporating a laser source term based on multiple scattering theories were solved using finite element-based commercial software. The rise in temperature upon NIR irradiation was seen to vary according to the position of the blood vessel and presence of nanoparticles. While the maximum rise in temperature was about 10 °C for bare tissue, it was 19 °C for tissue embedded with gold nanostructures and 38 °C for graphene-embedded tissues. The axial temperature distribution predicted by computational simulation matched the experimental observations. A different subsurface temperature distribution has been obtained for different tissue vascular network models. The position of LBVs must be known in order to achieve optimal tissue necrosis. The simulation described here helps in predicting subsurface temperature distributions within tissues during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy so that the risks of damage and complications associated with in vivo experiments and therapy may be avoided.

  20. Thermal performance of solar air collection-storage system with phase change material based on flat micro-heat pipe arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Teng-yue; Diao, Yan-hua; Zhu, Ting-ting; Zhao, Yao-hua; Liu, Jing; Wei, Xiang-qian

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new type of solar air collection-storage thermal system with PCM is proposed. • Flat micro-heat pipe array is used as the core heat transfer element. • Air volume flow rate influence charging and discharging time obviously. • Air-side thermal resistance dominates during charging and discharging. - Abstract: In this study, a new type of solar air collection-storage thermal system (ACSTS) with phase change material (PCM) is designed using flat micro-heat pipe arrays (FMHPA) as the heat transfer core element. The solar air collector comprises FMHPA and vacuum tubes. The latent thermal storage device (LTSD) utilizes lauric acid, which is a type of fatty acid, as PCM. The experiments test the performance of collector efficiency and charging and discharging time of thermal storage device through different air volume flow rates. After a range of tests, high air volume flow rate is concluded to contribute to high collector efficiency and short charging and discharging time and enhance instantaneous heat transfer, whereas an air volume flow rate of 60 m 3 /h during discharging provides a steady outlet temperature. The cumulative heat transfer during discharging is between 4210 and 4300 kJ.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry and Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo; Sharma, Mayur; Juthani, Rupa; Meola, Antonio; Barnett, Gene H

    2017-10-01

    Recent technological advancements in intraoperative imaging are shaping the way for a new era in brain tumor surgery. Magnetic resonance thermometry has provided intraoperative real-time imaging feedback for safe and effective application of laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) in neuro-oncology. Thermal ablation has also established itself as a surgical option in epilepsy surgery and is currently used in spine oncology with promising results. This article reviews the principles and rationale as well as the clinical application of LITT for brain tumors. It also discusses the technical nuances of the current commercially available systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The potential of vacuum therapy in the treatment of a newborn infant with severe thermal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Budkevich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of successful combination therapy in a newborn infant with severe thermal injury. When admitted to the hospital, the infant was diagnosed with third-degree flame burn covering 75% of the body surface and shock. Specialized emergency care involved antishock measures and replacement of vital functions, stepwise surgical interventions aimed to excise necrotic tissues and to restore lost skin tissue, and antimicrobial and symptomatic therapies. Topical treatment included the use of current wound coatings. Skin autocells were used for significant skin defect. Aacuum therapy was performed to stimulate repair processes and to prepare wounds for further skin plasty. The techniques of vacuum therapy included RENAS\\S-GO and PICO apparatuses. Its efficiency was evaluated by microbiological, immunohistochemical, and planimetric examinations. Analysis of the decontaminating impact of a vacuum coating could establish its substantial effect in reducing wound bacterial contamination by 65% in the study group and by an average of 21% in the comparison group. That of immunohistochemical findings during vacuum therapy could reveal the high expression of two markers characterizing wound an-giogenesis. Comparative analysis of planimetric readings showed no significant differences in the use of vacuum therapy and current wound coatings. Thus, negative-pressure therapy creates favorable conditions for a wound healing process, providing effective wound decontamination and stimulating granulation tissue maturation as a factor to prepare for skin plasty.

  3. Perturbative diffusion theory formalism for interpreting temporal light intensity changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lee C L; Whelan, William M; Vitkin, I Alex

    2007-03-21

    In an effort to understand dynamic optical changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT), we utilize the perturbative solution of the diffusion equation in heterogeneous media to formulate scattering weight functions for cylindrical line sources. The analysis explicitly shows how changes in detected interstitial light intensity are associated with the extent and location of the volume of thermal coagulation during treatment. Explanations for previously reported increases in optical intensity observed early during laser heating are clarified using the model and demonstrated with experimental measurements in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. This work provides an improved understanding of interstitial optical signal changes during LITT and indicates the sensitivity and potential of interstitial optical monitoring of thermal damage.

  4. Dosimetric characteristics of the thermal neutron beam facility for neutron capture therapy at Hanaro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Han; Suh, Soheigh; Ji, Young Hoon

    2006-01-01

    The thermal neutron beam facility utilizing a typical tangential beam port for Neutron Capture Therapy was installed at the Hanaro, 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor. In order to determine the different dose components in phantoms irradiated with a mixed thermal neutron beam and gamma-ray for clinical applications, various techniques were applied including the use of activation foils, TLDs and ionization chambers. The water phantom was utilized in the measurement. The results of the measurement were compared with MCNP4B calculations. The thermal neutron fluxes were 1.02E9 and 6.07E8/cm 2 ·s at 10 and 20 mm depth in water, respectively. The gamma-ray dose rate was 5.10 Gy/hr at 20 mm depth in water. The result of this study can be used as basic data for subsequent BNCT clinical application. (author)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of PEG-iron oxide core-shell composite nanoparticles for thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydra, Robert J.; Kruse, Anastasia M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Bae, Younsoo [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Anderson, Kimberly W. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: hilt@engr.uky.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In this study, core-shell nanoparticles were developed to achieve thermal therapy that can ablate cancer cells in a remotely controlled manner. The core-shell nanoparticles were prepared using atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to coat iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polymer shell. The iron oxide core allows for the remote heating of the particles in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The coating of iron oxide with PEG was verified through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. A thermoablation (55 °C) study was performed on A549 lung carcinoma cells exposed to nanoparticles and over a 10 min AMF exposure. The successful thermoablation of A549 demonstrates the potential use of polymer coated particles for thermal therapy. - Highlights: • Utilized atomic transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to coat iron oxide nanoparticles with PEG • Investigated the surface coating by surface characterization methods • Demonstrated the potential use of nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications.

  6. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Epilepsy Radiosurgery Research Program, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Department of Computer Science, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Epilepsy Radiosurgery Research Program, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California 92354 and Department of Surgery-Neurosurgery, Duke University and Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm{sup 3} resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  7. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm 3 resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  8. Development of a quantum dot mediated thermometry for minimally invasive thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Willard L.

    Thermally-related, minimally invasive therapies are designed to treat tumors while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissues. Adjacent tissues become susceptible to thermal injury to ensure the cancer is completely destroyed. Destroying tumor cells, while minimizing collateral damage to the surrounding tissue, requires the capacity to control and monitor tissue temperatures both spatially and temporally. Current devices measure the tumor's tissue temperature at a specific location leaving the majority unmonitored. A point-wise application can not substantiate complete tumor destruction. This type of surgery would be more effective if volumetric tissue temperature measurement were available. On this premise, the feasibility of a quantum dot (QD) assembly to measure the tissue temperature volumetrically was tested in the experiments described in this dissertation. QDs are fluorescence semiconductor nanoparticles having various superior optical properties. This new QD-mediated thermometry is capable of monitoring the thermal features of tissues non-invasively by measuring the aggregate fluorescence intensity of the QDs accumulated at the target tissues prior to and during the surgical procedure. Thus, such a modality would allow evaluation of tissue destruction by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the QD as a function of temperature. The present study also quantified the photoluminescence intensity and attenuation of the QD as a function of depth and wavelength using a tissue phantom. A prototype system was developed to measure the illumination through a tissue phantom as a proof of concept of the feasibility of a noninvasive thermal therapy. This prototype includes experimental hardware, software and working methods to perform image acquisition, and data reduction strategic to quantify the intensity and transport characteristics of the QD. The significance of this work is that real-time volumetric temperature information will prove a more robust tool for use

  9. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for an eloquent region supratentorial brain lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Krivosheya, Daria; Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Barnett, Gene H; Mohammadi, Alireza M

    2018-04-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive stereotactic technique that causes tumor ablation using thermal energy. LITT has shown to be efficacious for the treatment of deep-seated brain lesions, including those near eloquent areas. In this video, the authors present the case of a 62-year-old man with a history of metastatic melanoma who presented with worsening right-sided hemiparesis. MRI revealed a contrast-enhancing lesion in left centrum semiovale in close proximity to corticospinal tracts, consistent with radiation necrosis. The authors review their stepwise technique of LITT with special attention to details for a lesion located near eloquent area. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/ndrTgi6MXqE .

  10. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambarini, G.; Valente, M.; Moss, R.L.; Daquino, G.G.; Nievaart, V.A.; Mariani, M.; Vanossi, E.; Carrara, M.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  11. Flexible integration of high-imaging-resolution and high-power arrays for ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Douglas N; Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T H; Chen, Xucai; Kim, Kang

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (USTSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (TSI in carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm(2) in the tissue target region.

  12. Flexible Integration of Both High Imaging Resolution and High Power Arrays for Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Strain Imaging (US-TSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T.H.; Chen, Xucai

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (TSI on carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm2 in tissue target region. PMID:24297029

  13. Contemporaneous biopsy and laser interstitial thermal therapy for two treatment-refractory brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashish H; Richardson, Angela M; Burks, Joshua D; Komotar, Ricardo J

    2018-04-01

    Recurrent treatment-refractory brain metastases can be treated with modern adjuvant therapies such as laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT). Since previously radiated lesions may be indolent (treatment effect) or recurrent tumor, histological confirmation may be helpful. The authors present the utility of contemporaneous biopsy and LITT using intraoperative O-arm navigation in a patient who presented with multiple refractory metastases. The authors demonstrate the utility of O-arm navigation to confirm intraoperative biopsy and LITT placement. Concurrent stereotactic biopsy and LITT may be a safe and efficacious method for both the diagnosis and treatment of deep lesions that are unamenable to standard adjuvant treatment modalities. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/SUY-qiahMyo .

  14. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P.; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed. PMID:26861341

  15. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  16. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  17. Circulating proteins in response to combined-modality therapy in rectal cancer identified by antibody array screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Meltzer, Sebastian; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2016-07-26

    The increasingly complex programs of contemporary cancer therapy emphasize the need for biological indicators of both therapeutic response and adverse effects. One example is combined-modality treatment aimed at improving long-term outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, which commonly comes at the price of extended limits of patient tolerance. In a prospective study with intensified neoadjuvant treatment of rectal cancer patients, using an antibody array, the profiling of approximately 500 proteins was performed in serial serum samples collected at different stages of the treatment course. The small number of proteins whose levels significantly changed after induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) expanded substantially following the sequential chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and persisted four weeks later at treatment evaluation before pelvic surgery. Serum levels of proteins selected for validation of the experimental design, lipocalin-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9, declined after NACT and gradually reverted to baseline values during the remaining neoadjuvant course. Of note, the greater the decline in post-NACT and post-CRT matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels, the more favorable progression-free survival. No correlation was found, however, with diarrhea scores, the clinical correlate of adverse therapeutic effects. Even though the findings were indicative of only tumor and not normal tissue effects, multiplex immunoassay analysis of circulating proteins in patients undergoing combined-modality therapy may in principle dissect the contribution of the individual modalities to overall systemic responses in patient outcome and tolerance. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00278694 ; registration date: January 16, 2006, retrospective to enrollment of the first 10 patients of the current report.

  18. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  19. Thermally switchable adhesions of polystyrene-block-poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer pillar array mimicking climb attitude of geckos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Wang, Jing-Hong; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the gecko foot pad, we fabricated polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-b-PNIPAAm) copolymer pillar array to mimic climbing attitude of a gecko, alternately attach to and detach from a surface. The pillar array structure of the PS segment significantly enhances both of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic property of PNIPAAm segment tips at 25 and 50 °C, respectively, which could generate alternating adhesive forces of approximately 120 and 11 nN. The dramatic change in adhesive and friction force difference at 25 and 50 °C may guide the design of bio-inspired artificial analogues, which could approach gecko's climbing behavior.

  20. Development of array-type prompt gamma measurement system for in vivo range verification in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Chul Hee; Lee, Han Rim; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Se Byeong

    2012-04-01

    In vivo range verification is one of the most important parts of proton therapy to fully utilize its benefits delivering high radiation dose to tumor, while sparing the normal tissue with the so-called Bragg peak. Currently, however, range verification method is not used in clinics. The purpose of the present study is to optimize and evaluate the configuration of an array-type prompt gamma measurement system on determining distal dose edge for in vivo range verification of proton therapy. To effectively measure the prompt gammas against the background gammas, the Monte Carlo simulations with the MCNPX code were employed in optimizing the configuration of the measurement system, and the Monte Carlo method was also used to understand the effect of the background gammas, mainly neutron capture gammas, in the measured gamma distribution. To reduce the effect of the background gammas, the optimized energy window of 4-10 MeV in measuring the prompt gammas was employed. A parameterized source was used to maximize computation speed in the optimization study. A simplified test measurement system, using only one detector moving from one measurement location to the next, was constructed and applied to therapeutic proton beams of 80-220 MeV. For accurate determination of the distal dose edge, the sigmoidal curve-fitting method was applied to the measured distributions of the prompt gammas, and then, the location of the half-value between the maximum and minimum value in the curve-fitting was determined as the distal dose edge and compared with the beam range assessed by the proton dose distribution. The parameterized source term employed in optimization process improved the calculation speed by up to ∼300 times. The optimization study indicates that an array-type measurement system with 3, 2, 2, and 150 mm for scintillator thickness, slit width, septal thickness, and slit length, respectively, can effectively measure the prompt gamma distributions minimizing the contribution

  1. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for focal cerebral radiation necrosis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Valerio, Jose E; Chao, Sam; Barnett, Gene H

    2012-01-01

    Whole-brain radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) play a central role in the treatment of metastatic brain tumors. Radiation necrosis occurs in 5% of patients and can be very difficult to treat. The available treatment options for radiation necrosis include prolonged high-dose corticosteroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulation, bevacizumab, and surgical resection. We present the first report and results using laser-interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for medically refractory radionecrosis. A 74-year-old diabetic patient who had a history of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases and subsequent treatment with SRS, presented with a focal lesion in the left centrum semiovale with progressively worsening edema. Image findings were consistent with radiation necrosis that was refractory despite prolonged, high-dose steroid therapy. His associated comorbidities obviated alternative interventions and the lesion was not in a location amenable to surgical resection. We used laser thermal ablation to treat the biopsy-proven radionecrosis. The procedure was tolerated well and the patient was discharged 48 hours postoperatively. Imaging at 7-week follow-up showed near complete resolution of the edema and associated mass effect. Additionally, the patient was completely weaned off steroids. To our knowledge this is the first report using LITT for the treatment of focal radiation necrosis. LITT may be an effective treatment modality for patients with medically refractory radiation necrosis with lesions not amenable to surgical decompression. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Cryo-thermal therapy elicits potent anti-tumor immunity by inducing extracellular Hsp70-dependent MDSC differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Aili; He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving control of metastatic disease is a long-sought goal in cancer therapy. Treatments that encourage a patient’s own immune system are bringing new hopes in reaching such a goal. In clinic, local hyperthermia and cryoablation have been explored to induce anti-tumor immune responses against tumors. We have also developed a novel therapeutic modality of cryo-thermal treatment by alternating liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling and radio frequency (RF) heating, and better therapeutic effect was achieved in treating metastatic cancer in animal model. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of systemic immune response elicited by cryo-thermal therapy. In the 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model, we found that local cryo-thermal therapy resulted in a considerable reduction of distant lung metastases, and improved long-term survival. Moreover, results of tumor re-challenge experiments indicated generation of a strong tumor-specific immune memory after the local treatment of primary tumors. Our further study indicated that cryo-thermal therapy caused an elevated extracellular release of Hsp70. Subsequently, Hsp70 induced differentiation of MDSCs into mature DCs, contributing to the relief of MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression and ultimately the activation of strong anti-tumor immune response. Our findings reveal new insight into the mechanism of robust therapeutic effects of cryo-thermal therapy against metastatic cancers. PMID:27256519

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, V M; Borgen, A E; Jansen, E C; Rotbøll Nielsen, P H; Werner, M U

    2015-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 ) treatment has in animal experiments demonstrated antinociceptive effects. It was hypothesized that these effects would attenuate secondary hyperalgesia areas (SHAs), an expression of central sensitization, after a first-degree thermal injury in humans. Seventeen healthy volunteers were examined during two sessions using a randomized crossover design. Volunteers were studied during control conditions (ambient pressure, FI O2  = 0.21) and during HBO2 (2.4 standard atmosphere, FI O2  = 1.0, 90 min) conditions in a pressure chamber. Quantitative sensory testing, including assessment of SHAs was performed. A statistically significant overall attenuation of SHAs was seen during the HBO2 sessions compared with the control-sessions (P = 0.011). In the eight volunteers starting with the HBO2 session, no difference in SHAs compared with control was demonstrated. However, in the nine volunteers starting with the control session, a statistical significant attenuation of SHAs was demonstrated in the HBO2 session (P = 0.004). The results indicate that HBO2 therapy in humans attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal skin injury, compared with control. These new and original findings in humans corroborate animal experimental data. The thermal injury model may give impetus to future human neurophysiological studies exploring the central effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bevacizumab (Avastin and Thermal Laser Combination Therapy for Peripapillary Choroidal Neovascular Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. Adrean

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This is a retrospective interventional case series describing the results of 5 eyes from 5 patients with symptomatic peripapillary choroidal neovascularization (CNVM receiving initial bevacizumab treatment followed by thermal laser and bevacizumab combination therapy. Methods. Patients received intravitreal bevacizumab injections until the lesions were well-defined. Thermal laser ablation was then administered and followed by an additional bevacizumab injection after one week. Visual outcomes, OCT changes, and rates of recurrence were recorded and analyzed. Results. Median visual outcomes improved from 20/50 to 20/30 (p=0.0232. Median central macular thickness decreased from 347 μm to 152 μm (p=0.0253. The mean visual improvement was 3 lines. An average of 3.8 bevacizumab injections per patient were given overall. Patients were followed for an average of 24 months, during which all eyes were absent for recurrence. Conclusion. Symptomatic peripapillary CNVM may be successfully managed with bevacizumab followed by a combination of thermal laser and bevacizumab without the need for frequent retreatment. The area requiring treatment may be better defined using bevacizumab, limiting the ablation of the healthy retina and improving treatment margins. With this treatment regimen, the patients experience improved visual outcomes and have a low rate of recurrence.

  5. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, M.; Zondag, H.A.; Elswijk, M.J.; Strootman, K.J.; Jong, M.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept, consisting of 25 m 2 of PVT panels and a ground coupled heat pump, has been simulated in TRNSYS. It has been found that this system is able to cover 100% of the total heat demand for a typical newly-built Dutch one-family dwelling, while covering nearly all of its own electricity use and keeping the long-term average ground temperature constant. The cost of such a system has been compared to the cost of a reference system, where the PVT panels have been replaced with separate PV panels (26 m 2 ) and solar thermal collectors (7 m 2 ), but which is otherwise identical. The electrical and thermal yield of this reference system is equal to that of the PVT system. It has been found that both systems require a nearly identical initial investment. Finally, a view on future PVT markets is given. In general, the residential market is by far the most promising market. The system discussed in this paper is expected to be most successful in newly-built low-energy housing concepts. (Author)

  6. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, M.; Zondag, H.A.; Elswijk, M.J.; Strootman, K.J.; Jong, M.J.M.

    2005-03-01

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept, consisting of 25 m 2 of PVT panels and a ground coupled heat pump, has been simulated in TRNSYS. It has been found that this system is able to cover 100% of the total heat demand for a typical newly-built Dutch one-family dwelling, while covering nearly all of its own electricity use and keeping the long-term average ground temperature constant. The cost of such a system has been compared to the cost of a reference system, where the PVT panels have been replaced with separate PV panels (26 m 2 ) and solar thermal collectors (7 m 2 ), but which is otherwise identical. The electrical and thermal yield of this reference system is equal to that of the PVT system. It has been found that both systems require a nearly identical initial investment. Finally, a view on future PVT markets is given. In general, the residential market is by far the most promising market. The system discussed in this paper is expected to be most successful in newly-built low-energy housing concepts

  7. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  8. Effect of thermal implying during ageing process of nanorods growth on the properties of zinc oxide nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A. S., E-mail: kyrin-samaxi@yahoo.com; Mamat, M. H., E-mail: mhmamat@salam.uitm.edu.my; Rusop, M., E-mail: rusop@salam.uitm.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Universiti Teknologi MARA - UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Malek, M. F., E-mail: firz-solarzelle@yahoo.com; Abdullah, M. A. R., E-mail: ameerridhwan89@gmail.com; Sin, M. D., E-mail: diyana0366@johor.uitm.edu.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Undoped and Sn-doped Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have been fabricated using a simple sol-gel immersion method at 95°C of growth temperature. Thermal sourced by hot plate stirrer was supplied to the solution during ageing process of nanorods growth. The results showed significant decrement in the quality of layer produced after the immersion process where the conductivity and porosity of the samples reduced significantly due to the thermal appliance. The structural properties of the samples have been characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) electrical properties has been characterized using current voltage (I-V) measurement.

  9. Effect of thermal implying during ageing process of nanorods growth on the properties of zinc oxide nanorod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, A. S.; Mamat, M. H.; Rusop, M.; Malek, M. F.; Abdullah, M. A. R.; Sin, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Undoped and Sn-doped Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have been fabricated using a simple sol-gel immersion method at 95°C of growth temperature. Thermal sourced by hot plate stirrer was supplied to the solution during ageing process of nanorods growth. The results showed significant decrement in the quality of layer produced after the immersion process where the conductivity and porosity of the samples reduced significantly due to the thermal appliance. The structural properties of the samples have been characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) electrical properties has been characterized using current voltage (I-V) measurement.

  10. Dynamic model of thermal reaction of biological tissues to laser-induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seteikin, Alexey Yu; Krasnikov, Ilya V; Drakaki, Eleni; Makropoulou, Mersini

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the temperature fields and the dynamics of heat conduction into the skin tissue under several laser irradiation conditions with both a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser (λ=337  nm) and a continuous-wave (cw) visible laser beam (λ=632.8  nm) using Monte Carlo modeling. Finite-element methodology was used for heat transfer simulation. The analysis of the results showed that heat is not localized on the surface, but is collected inside the tissue in lower skin layers. The simulation was made with the pulsed UV laser beam (used as excitation source in laser-induced fluorescence) and the cw visible laser (used in photodynamic therapy treatments), in order to study the possible thermal effects.

  11. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) for thermal therapy dosimetry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of tissues have been utilized for disease detection, diagnosis, and progression, however they have not been extensively utilized for therapy dosimetry. Magnetic hyperthermia aims to kill cells and ablate tumors using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) either injected in or targeted to tumors. Upon application of an appropriate AC magnetic field, MNPs can heat target tissue while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of magnetic hyperthermia is needed to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. During hyperthermia treatments, the viscoelastic properties of tissues are altered due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration, making these properties candidates for dosimetry. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the biomechanical properties of tissues. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the hyperthermia dose based on the elastic changes revealed by MM-OCE. In this study, MNPs embedded in tissues were utilized for both hyperthermia and MM-OCE measurements. Tissue temperature and elastic modulus were obtained, where the elastic modulus was extracted from the resonance frequency detected by MM-OCE. Results showed a correlation between stiffness and temperature change following treatment. To investigate the thermal-dose-dependent changes, intervals of hyperthermia treatment were repeatedly performed on the same tissue sequentially, interspersed with MM-OCE. With increasing times of treatment, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results suggest that MM-OCE may potentially identify reversible and irreversible tissue changes during thermal therapy, supporting the use of MM-OCE for dosimetric control of hyperthermia in future applications.

  12. Magnetic field activated drug release system based on magnetic PLGA microspheres for chemo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kun; Song, Lina; Gu, Zhuxiao; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been extensively investigated for cancer therapy in order to obtain better specific targeting and therapeutic efficiency. Herein, we developed doxorubicin-loaded magnetic PLGA microspheres (DOX-MMS), in which DOX was encapsulated in the core and high contents (28.3 wt%) of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (IOs) were electrostatically assembled on the surface of microsphere to ensure the high sensitivity to response of an external alternating current magnetic field (ACMF). The IOs in PLGA shell can both induce the heat effect and trigger shell permeability enhancement to release drugs when DOX-MMs was activated by ACMF. Results show that the cumulative drug release from DOX-MMs exposed to ACMF for 30 min (21.6%) was significantly higher (approximately 7 times higher) than that not exposed to ACMF (2.8%). The combination of hyperthermia and enhanced DOX release from DOX-MMS is beneficial for in vitro 4T1 breast cancer cell apoptosis as well as effective inhibition of tumor growth in 4T1 tumor xenografts. Therefore, the DOX-MMS can be optimized as powerful delivery system for efficient magnetic responsive drug release and chemo-thermal therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypoxia-driven immunosuppression: a new reason to use thermal therapy in the treatment of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Mace, Thomas; Repasky, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia within the tumour microenvironment is correlated with poor treatment outcome after radiation and chemotherapy, and with decreased overall survival in cancer patients. Several molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia supports tumour growth and interferes with effective radiation and chemotherapies are now well established. However, several new lines of investigation are pointing to yet another ominous outcome of hypoxia in the tumour microenvironment: suppression of anti-tumour immune effector cells and enhancement of tumour escape from immune surveillance. This review summarises this important information, and highlights mechanistic data by which hypoxia incapacitates several different types of immune effector cells, enhances the activity of immunosuppressive cells and provides new avenues which help 'blind' immune cells to detect the presence of tumour cells. Finally, we discuss data which indicates that mild thermal therapy, through its physiologically regulated ability to alter vascular perfusion and oxygen tensions within the tumour microenvironment, as well as its ability to enhance the function of some of the same immune effector activities that are inhibited by hypoxia, could be used to rapidly and safely release the tight grip of hypoxia in the tumour microenvironment thereby reducing barriers to more effective immune-based therapies.

  14. Thermal Characteristics of Multilayer Insulation Materials for Flexible Thin-Film Solar Cell Array of Stratospheric Airship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangwen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible thin-film solar cell is an efficient energy system on the surface of stratospheric airship for utilizing the solar energy. In order to ensure the normal operation of airship platform, the thermal control problem between the flexible thin-film solar cell and the airship envelope should be properly resolved. In this paper, a multilayer insulation material (MLI is developed first, and low temperature environment test is carried out to verify the insulation effect of MLI. Then, a thermal heat transfer model of flexible thin-film solar cell and MLI is proposed, and the equivalent thermal conductivity coefficients of flexible thin-film solar cell and Nomex honeycomb are calculated based on the environment test and the temperature profile of flexible thin-film solar cell versus each layer of MLI. Finally, FLUENT is used for modeling and simulation analysis on the flexible thin-film solar cell and MLI, and the simulation results agree well with the experimental data, which validate the correctness of the proposed heat transfer model of MLI. In some way, our study can provide helpful support for further engineering applications of flexible thin-film solar cell.

  15. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, R.L.; Lords, L.V.; Kiser, D.M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage

  16. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic performance of hydrocarbon refrigerants during flow boiling in a microchannels array heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez, Cristian A.; Leão, Hugo L.S.L.; Ribatski, Gherhardt

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluation of refrigerants R600a, R290 and R1270 during flow boiling in a microchannels array. • Comparison of data for hydrocarbons with previous data for R134a. • Parametric analysis of heat transfer coefficient, pressure drop, ONB and exergy behaviors. • Comparison of the experimental data and prediction methods from literature. • In general, refrigerant R290 presents the best performance. - Abstract: The present study concerns an experimental evaluation of the performance of hydrocarbon refrigerants during flow boiling in a microchannels array heat sink. The heat sink is composed of fifty channels with cross sectional areas of 123 × 494 μm 2 and length of 15 mm manufactured in a copper block. Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop data were obtained for refrigerants R600a, R290 and R1270, mass velocities from 165 to 823 kg/m 2 s, heat fluxes up to 400 kW/m 2 , liquid subcooling at the inlet of the test section of 5, 10 and 15 °C and saturation temperature of 25 °C. The data were compared with experimental results obtained in a previous study for R134a and predictions by methods from literature. In general, R290 presented the best performance, providing the highest average heat transfer coefficient and a pressure drop only slightly higher than R1270 that was the fluid presenting the lowest pressure drop. An exergy analysis also revealed the refrigerant R290 as the one presenting the best performance. However, R290 needed the highest excess of superheating to trigger the boiling process (ONB). The methods from literature evaluated in the present study poorly predicted the experimental data for two-phase pressure drop. On the other hand, the method of Kanizawa et al. (2016) was quite accurate in predicting the heat transfer results.

  17. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  18. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy in neuro-oncology: a review of its current clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Barnett, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive treatment modality with recent increasing use to ablate brain tumors. When originally introduced in the late 1980s, the inability to precisely monitor and control the thermal ablation limited the adoption of LITT in neuro-oncology. Popularized as a means of destroying malignant hepatic and renal metastatic lesions percutaneously, its selective thermal tumor destruction and preservation of adjacent normal tissues have since been optimized for use in neuro-oncology. The progress made in real-time thermal imaging with MRI, laser probe design, and computer algorithms predictive of tissue kill has led to the resurgence of interest in LITT as a means to ablate brain tumors. Current LITT systems offer a surgical option for some inoperable brain tumors. We discuss the origins, principles, current indications, and future directions of MRI-guided LITT in neuro-oncology. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A heterogeneous tissue model for treatment planning for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Drew; Fahrenholtz, Samuel; MacLellan, Christopher; Bastos, Dhiego; Rao, Ganesh; Prabhu, Sujit; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Hazle, John; Stafford, Jason; Fuentes, David

    2018-02-05

    We evaluated a physics-based model for planning for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy for focal brain lesions. Linear superposition of analytical point source solutions to the steady-state Pennes bioheat transfer equation simulates laser-induced heating in brain tissue. The line integral of the photon attenuation from the laser source enables computation of the laser interaction with heterogeneous tissue. Magnetic resonance thermometry data sets (n = 31) were used to calibrate and retrospectively validate the model's thermal ablation prediction accuracy, which was quantified by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between model-predicted and measured ablation regions (T > 57 °C). A Gaussian mixture model was used to identify independent tissue labels on pre-treatment anatomical magnetic resonance images. The tissue-dependent optical attenuation coefficients within these labels were calibrated using an interior point method that maximises DSC agreement with thermometry. The distribution of calibrated tissue properties formed a population model for our patient cohort. Model prediction accuracy was cross-validated using the population mean of the calibrated tissue properties. A homogeneous tissue model was used as a reference control. The median DSC values in cross-validation were 0.829 for the homogeneous model and 0.840 for the heterogeneous model. In cross-validation, the heterogeneous model produced a DSC higher than that produced by the homogeneous model in 23 of the 31 brain lesion ablations. Results of a paired, two-tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated that the performance improvement of the heterogeneous model over that of the homogeneous model was statistically significant (p < 0.01).

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy for Glioblastoma of the Corpus Callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Thomas L; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Kim, Albert H; Barnett, Gene H; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2018-02-08

    Glioblastoma of the corpus callosum is particularly difficult to treat, as the morbidity of surgical resection generally outweighs the potential survival benefit. Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a safe and effective treatment option for difficult to access malignant gliomas of the thalamus and insula. To assess the safety and efficacy of LITT for the treatment of glioblastoma of the corpus callosum. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The primary endpoint was the safety and efficacy of LITT as a treatment for glioblastoma of the corpus callosum. Secondary endpoints included tumor coverage at thermal damage thresholds, median survival, and change in Karnofsky Performance Scale score 1 mo after treatment. The study included patients with de novo or recurrent glioblastoma of the corpus callosum (n = 15). Mean patient age was 54.7 yr. Mean pretreatment Karnofsky Performance Scale score was 80.7 and there was no significant difference between subgroups. Mean tumor volume was 18.7 cm3. Hemiparesis occurred in 26.6% of patients. Complications were more frequent in patients with tumors >15 cm3 (RR 6.1, P = .009) and were associated with a 32% decrease in survival postLITT. Median progression-free survival, survival postLITT, and overall survival were 3.4, 7.2, and 18.2 mo, respectively. LITT is a safe and effective treatment for glioblastoma of the corpus callosum and provides survival benefit comparable to subtotal surgical resection with adjuvant chemoradiation. LITT-associated complications are related to tumor volume and can be nearly eliminated by limiting the procedure to tumors of 15 cm3 or less. Copyright © 2018 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  1. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam

  2. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D; Friedl, F [IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Bavaria (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  3. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  4. Numerical simulation of time fractional dual-phase-lag model of heat transfer within skin tissue during thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Rai, K N

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal behavior in living biological tissues using time fractional dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer (DPLBHT) model subjected to Dirichelt boundary condition in presence of metabolic and electromagnetic heat sources during thermal therapy. We solved this bioheat transfer model using finite element Legendre wavelet Galerkin method (FELWGM) with help of block pulse function in sense of Caputo fractional order derivative. We compared the obtained results from FELWGM and exact method in a specific case, and found a high accuracy. Results are interpreted in the form of standard and anomalous cases for taking different order of time fractional DPLBHT model. The time to achieve hyperthermia position is discussed in both cases as standard and time fractional order derivative. The success of thermal therapy in the treatment of metastatic cancerous cell depends on time fractional order derivative to precise prediction and control of temperature. The effect of variability of parameters such as time fractional derivative, lagging times, blood perfusion coefficient, metabolic heat source and transmitted power on dimensionless temperature distribution in skin tissue is discussed in detail. The physiological parameters has been estimated, corresponding to the value of fractional order derivative for hyperthermia treatment therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. ESR-dosimetry in thermal and epithermal neutron fields for application in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Tobias

    2016-01-22

    Dosimetry is essential for every form of radiotherapy. In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mixed neutron and gamma fields have to be considered. Dose is deposited in different neutron interactions with elements in the penetrated tissue and by gamma particles, which are always part of a neutron field. The therapeutic dose in BNCT is deposited by densely ionising particles, originating from the fragmentation of the isotope boron-10 after capture of a thermal neutron. Despite being investigated for decades, dosimetry in neutron beams or fields for BNCT remains complex, due to the variety in type and energy of the secondary particles. Today usually ionisation chambers combined with metal foils are used. The applied techniques require extensive effort and are time consuming, while the resulting uncertainties remain high. Consequently, the investigation of more effective techniques or alternative dosimeters is an important field of research. In this work the possibilities of ESR-dosimeters in those fields have been investigated. Certain materials, such as alanine, generate stable radicals upon irradiation. Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry the amount of radicals, which is proportional to absorbed dose, can be quantified. Different ESR detector materials have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany, with five setups, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been conducted in two epithermal neutron beams. The detector response, however, strongly depends on the dose depositing particle type and energy. It is hence necessary to accompany measurements by computational modelling and simulation. In this work the Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to calculate absorbed doses and dose components. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using amorphous track models. For the simulation, detailed models of

  6. Magnetic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  7. Magnetic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumper, David L. (Plaistow, NH); Kim, Won-jong (Cambridge, MA); Williams, Mark E. (Pelham, NH)

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  8. Rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide/Pt–TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Lan Ching [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Green Technology, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Universiti, Bandar Barat, 31900 Kampar, Perak (Malaysia); Leong, Kah Hon [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saravanan, Pichiah, E-mail: saravananpichiah@um.edu.my [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nanotechnology & Catalysis Research Center (NANOCAT), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Shaliza [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enhanced visible light character of TNTs was imparted by RGO/Pt via facile route. • Pt NPs contribute exemplary visible light harvesting nature through plasmon effect. • Engulfed RGO promoted enhanced charge-carriers separation. • Synergistic effect of RGO, Pt photoreduced CO{sub 2} to CH{sub 4} with max. of 10.96 μmol m{sup −2}. - Abstract: In this study, a complicate natural photosynthesis process was prototyped through a photocatalysis process by reducing CO{sub 2} to light hydrocarbon, CH{sub 4}. The composite photocatalyst employed for this study utilized Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) and rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) deposited over the surface of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TNTs). The existence and contribution of both Pt NPs and RGO in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, FESEM, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-DRS and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The TNTs in the composite exhibited pure anatase phase. The absorption bands at around 450 nm obtained from UV-DRS spectrum supported the existence of LSPR phenomenon of Pt NPs. The promising lower work function of RGO promoted the electrons transfer from TNTs to RGO efficiently. The successful depositions of Pt and RGO onto the surface of TNTs contributed for the improved photocatalytic activity (total CH{sub 4} yield of 10.96 μmol m{sup −2}) in the reduction of CO{sub 2} over TNTs and Pt–TNTs. Both of RGO and Pt NPs are equally important to exert a significant impact on the improvement of CH{sub 4} production rates.

  9. Processes and Materials for Flexible PV Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gierow, Paul

    2002-01-01

    .... A parallel incentive for development of flexible PV arrays are the possibilities of synergistic advantages for certain types of spacecraft, in particular the Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP) Vehicle...

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, V M; Borgen, A E; Jansen, E C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 ) treatment has in animal experiments demonstrated antinociceptive effects. It was hypothesized that these effects would attenuate secondary hyperalgesia areas (SHAs), an expression of central sensitization, after a first-degree thermal injury in humans. METHOD......, compared with control. These new and original findings in humans corroborate animal experimental data. The thermal injury model may give impetus to future human neurophysiological studies exploring the central effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment....

  11. Thermal tomography imaging in photonic traditional Chinese medicine information therapy with holistic effect for health whole nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Binggang; Guo, Zhouyi; Huang, Hanchuan; Yang, Xicheng

    2015-01-01

    A photonic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) information therapy was developed that has applications in whole health nursing including the prevention and treatment of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases as well as the conditioning of the subhealth state. This therapy utilizes the beam of a 630 nm LED light to irradiate the oropharynx, while simultaneously employing two beams of 650 nm LED light to irradiate corresponding acupuncture points resulting in a synergistic outcome. This method was named "1 + 2 phototherapy." The principle mechanism of the therapy is a series of photon induced biological effects that are triggered by stimulating the photosensitive tissues of the oropharynx. This tissue includes the oral mucosa, capillaries, lymph nodes, saliva glands, nerves, and Jingluo and is stimulated by light beams of certain photon energy and imitative acupuncture information. Thermal tomography imaging shows that the average temperature of the upper-body was improved significantly after oropharyngeal irradiation under irradiation of "Futu point": the heat radiation of the spine, as well as chest, shoulders, arms, and clavicle, increased under irradiation of "Hoku," whereas the overall average temperature was below the temperature before irradiation. The experiment indicates that this therapy can promote blood circulation, regulate varied physiological parameters, and have holistic effects in whole health nursing.

  12. Thermal Tomography Imaging in Photonic Traditional Chinese Medicine Information Therapy with Holistic Effect for Health Whole Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binggang Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A photonic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM information therapy was developed that has applications in whole health nursing including the prevention and treatment of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases as well as the conditioning of the subhealth state. This therapy utilizes the beam of a 630 nm LED light to irradiate the oropharynx, while simultaneously employing two beams of 650 nm LED light to irradiate corresponding acupuncture points resulting in a synergistic outcome. This method was named “1 + 2 phototherapy.” The principle mechanism of the therapy is a series of photon induced biological effects that are triggered by stimulating the photosensitive tissues of the oropharynx. This tissue includes the oral mucosa, capillaries, lymph nodes, saliva glands, nerves, and Jingluo and is stimulated by light beams of certain photon energy and imitative acupuncture information. Thermal tomography imaging shows that the average temperature of the upper-body was improved significantly after oropharyngeal irradiation under irradiation of “Futu point”: the heat radiation of the spine, as well as chest, shoulders, arms, and clavicle, increased under irradiation of “Hoku,” whereas the overall average temperature was below the temperature before irradiation. The experiment indicates that this therapy can promote blood circulation, regulate varied physiological parameters, and have holistic effects in whole health nursing.

  13. [Low back pain of cold-damp pattern treated with electric-thermal Bian-stone therapy and traditional moxibustion: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Han, Bin; Tian, Yu-Ying; Wang, Guang-Jun; Jia, Shu-Yong; Zhang, Wei-Bo

    2014-06-01

    To compare the difference in the efficacy on low back pain of cold-damp pattern between electric-thermal Bian-stone therapy and moxibustion box therapy. Forty-one cases of low back pain of cold-damp pattern were randomized into an electric-thermal Bian-stone therapy group (group A, 26 cases) and a box moxibustion therapy group (group B, 15 cases). In the group A, the electric-thermal Bian-stone was placed over Shenshu (BL 23) and Weizhong (BL 40). The temperature of stone was adjusted in accordance with patient's comfort. In the group B, moxibustion box was used over Shenshu (BL 23) and Weizhong (BL 40). The treatment was given once every day or every two days. Ten treatments made one session. The symptom and physical signs score of low back pain and the score of cold-damp syndrome were observed before and after treatment in the patients. The symptom and physical signs score of low back pain and the score of cold-damp syndrome were all improved in the two groups (all P 0.05). The efficacy on low back pain of cold-damp pattern treated with the electric-thermal Bian-stone therapy is similar to that of moxibustion box therapy. This therapy is characterized as more convenient, safer operation and less pollution.

  14. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Zhang, Weili

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate thermally tunable superconductor hole array with active control over their resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons . The array was lithographically fabricated on high temperature YBCO superconductor and characterized by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from the virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to the real surface plasmon mode. The highly tunable superconducting plasmonic hole arrays may have promising applicatio...

  15. Model development and experimental validation for analyzing initial transients of irradiation of tissues during thermal therapy using short pulse lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Mohit; Miller, Stephanie; Mitra, Kunal

    2015-11-01

    Short pulse lasers with pulse durations in the range of nanoseconds and shorter are effective in the targeted delivery of heat energy for precise tissue heating and ablation. This photothermal therapy is useful where the removal of cancerous tissue sections is required. The objective of this paper is to use finite element modeling to demonstrate the differences in the thermal response of skin tissue to short-pulse and continuous wave laser irradiation in the initial stages of the irradiation. Models have been developed to validate the temperature distribution and heat affected zone during laser irradiation of excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mouse tissue. Excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mice were subjected to Nd:YAG pulsed laser (1,064 nm, 500 ns) irradiation of varying powers. A thermal camera was used to measure the rise in surface temperature as a result of the laser irradiation. Histological analyses of the heat affected zone created in the tissue samples due to the temperature rise were performed. The thermal interaction of the laser with the tissue was quantified by measuring the thermal dose delivered by the laser. Finite element geometries of three-dimensional tissue sections for continuum and vascular models were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics. Blood flow was incorporated into the vascular model to mimic the presence of discrete blood vessels and contrasted with the continuum model without blood perfusion. The temperature rises predicted by the continuum and the vascular models agreed with the temperature rises observed at the surface of the excised rat tissue samples and live anesthetized mice due to laser irradiation respectively. The vascular model developed was able to predict the cooling produced by the blood vessels in the region where the vessels were present. The temperature rise in the continuum model due to pulsed laser irradiation was higher than that due to continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation in the

  16. Design of hyper-thermal neutron irradiation fields for neutron capture therapy in KUR-heavy water neutron irradiation facility. Mounting of hyper-thermal neutron converter in therapeutic collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCP) using thermal neutron needs to improve of depth dose distribution in a living body. Epi-thermal neutron following moderation of fast neutron is usually used for improving of the depth dose distribution. The moderation method of fast neutron, however, gets mixed some of high energy neutron which give some of serious effects to a living body, and involves the difficulty for collimation of thermal neutron to the diseased part. Hyper-thermal neutrons, which are in an energy range of 0.1-3 eV at high temperature side of thermal neutron, are under consideration for application to the NCP. The hyper-thermal neutrons can be produced by up-scattering of thermal neutron in a high temperature material. Fast neutron components in collimator for the NCP reduce on application of the up-scattering method. Graphite at high temperature (>1000k) is used as a hyper-thermal neutron converter. The hyper-thermal neutron converter is planted to mount on therapeutic collimator which is located at the nearest side of patient for the NCP. Total neutron flux, ratio of hyper-thermal neutron to total neutron, and ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron flux are calculated as a function of thickness of the graphite converter using monte carlo code MCNP-V4B. (M. Suetake)

  17. Quantifying the Influence of Near-Surface Water-Energy Budgets on Soil Thermal Properties Using a Network of Coupled Meteorological and Vadose Zone Instrument Arrays in Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, S.; Gustin, A. R.; Ellett, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Weather stations that collect reliable, sustained meteorological data sets are becoming more widely distributed because of advances in both instrumentation and data server technology. However, sites collecting soil moisture and soil temperature data remain sparse with even fewer locations where complete meteorological data are collected in conjunction with soil data. Thanks to the advent of sensors that collect continuous in-situ thermal properties data for soils, we have gone a step further and incorporated thermal properties measurements as part of hydrologic instrument arrays in central and northern Indiana. The coupled approach provides insights into the variability of soil thermal conductivity and diffusivity attributable to geologic and climatological controls for various hydrogeologic settings. These data are collected to facilitate the optimization of ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) in the glaciated Midwest by establishing publicly available data that can be used to parameterize system design models. A network of six monitoring sites was developed in Indiana. Sensors that determine thermal conductivity and diffusivity using radial differential temperature measurements around a heating wire were installed at 1.2 meters below ground surface— a typical depth for horizontal GSHP systems. Each site also includes standard meteorological sensors for calculating reference evapotranspiration following the methods by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. Vadose zone instrumentation includes time domain reflectometry soil-moisture and temperature sensors installed at 0.3-meter depth intervals down to a 1.8-meter depth, in addition to matric potential sensors at 0.15, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 meters. Cores collected at 0.3-meter intervals were analyzed in a laboratory for grain size distribution, bulk density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity. Our work includes developing methods for calibrating thermal properties sensors based on

  18. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m -2 deg C -1 for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m -2 deg C -1 for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min -1 . The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra

  19. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  20. Endoscopic laser ablation of clival chordoma with magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barrese

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The endoscopic endonasal approach to MRI-guided laser ablation is both technically feasible and safe. As a result, this therapy may be a useful alternative in hard-to-reach chordomas, or in recurrent cases that have failed other conventional treatment modalities.

  1. SU-F-BRCD-08: Uncertainty Quantification by Generalized Polynomial Chaos for MR-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenholtz, S; Fuentes, D; Stafford, R; Hazle, J

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive thermal treatment for metastatic brain lesions, offering an alternative to conventional surgery. The purpose of this investigation is to incorporate uncertainty quantification (UQ) into the biothermal parameters used in the Pennes bioheat transfer equation (BHT), in order to account for imprecise values available in the literature. The BHT is a partial differential equation commonly used in thermal therapy models. MRgLITT was performed on an in vivo canine brain in a previous investigation. The canine MRgLITT was modeled using the BHT. The BHT has four parameters'" microperfusion, conductivity, optical absorption, and optical scattering'"which lack precise measurements in living brain and tumor. The uncertainties in the parameters were expressed as probability distribution functions derived from literature values. A univariate generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion was applied to the stochastic BHT. The gPC approach to UQ provides a novel methodology to calculate spatio-temporal voxel-wise means and variances of the predicted temperature distributions. The performance of the gPC predictions were evaluated retrospectively by comparison with MR thermal imaging (MRTI) acquired during the MRgLITT procedure in the canine model. The comparison was evaluated with root mean square difference (RMSD), isotherm contours, spatial profiles, and z-tests. The peak RMSD was ∼1.5 standard deviations for microperfusion, conductivity, and optical absorption, while optical scattering was ∼2.2 standard deviations. Isotherm contours and spatial profiles of the simulation's predicted mean plus or minus two standard deviations demonstrate the MRTI temperature was enclosed by the model's isotherm confidence interval predictions. An a = 0.01 z-test demonstrates agreement. The application of gPC for UQ is a potentially powerful means for providing predictive simulations despite poorly known

  2. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  3. MR-guided interstitial thermal therapy for the treatment of brain tumors with a multi-element ultrasound probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canney, Michael; Carpentier, Alexandre; Beccaria, Kevin; Souchon, Rémi; Chavrier, Françoise; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a new therapeutic ultrasound device is presented that is designed for performing minimally invasive thermal ablation of brain tumors under guidance with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The device consists of an array of ultrasound transducers, oriented on multiple faces of a flexible sheath with an integrated cooling system that can be directly inserted into the brain through a small burr hole in the skull. Heating can be monitored using real-time MRI and conformed to the tumor volume by varying the power to the individual elements on the probe. In this work, preliminary testing of the device was performed and included acoustic characterization, numerical simulations, and experiments in a clinical MRI system. Numerical simulations of the acoustic field and temperature rise during heating were compared with results of in vitro testing using bovine brain samples. The results demonstrate that the device has good MRI compatibility and is capable of generating output surface intensities of greater than 20 W/cm2, which is sufficient to ablate tissue at depths of more than 10 mm from the probe in less than four minutes of heating.

  4. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  5. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yon-Lae [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Sik [SAM Anyang Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ{sub %}≤1, γ{sub avg} < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  6. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ % ≤1, γ avg < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  7. Gd³⁺ Tethered Gold Nanorods for Combined Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Photo-Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchaimani, Arunkumar; Duong, Tuyen; Nguyen, Thanh; Maurmann, Leila; Key, Jaehong; Bossmann, Stefan H; Aryal, Santosh

    2017-04-01

    Near infrared (NIR) mediated photothermal therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are promising treatment and imaging modalities in the field of cancer theranostics. Gold nanorods are the first choice of materials for NIR-mediated photothermal therapy due to their strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at NIR region. Similarly, gadolinium based MRI contrast agents have an ability to increase the ionic and molecular relaxivity, thereby enhancing the solvent proton relaxation rate resulting in contrast enhancement. Herein, the effort has been made to engineer a dual front theranostic agent with combined photothermal and magnetic resonance imaging capacity using gadolinium tethered gold nanorods (Gd3+-AuNR). NIR-responsive gold nanorods were surface fabricated by means of Au-thiol interaction using a thiolated macrocyclic chelator that chelates Gd3+ ions, and further stabilized by thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG-SH). The magnetic properties of the Gd3+-AuNR displayed an enhanced r 1 relaxivity of 12.1 mM–1s–1, with higher biological stability, and contrast enhancement in both solution state and in cell pellets. In-vitro (cell-free) and ex-vivo (on pig skin) analysis of the Gd3+-AuNR shows enhanced photothermal properties as equivalent to that of the raw AuNR. Furthermore, Gd3+-AuNR showed competent cellular entry and intracellular distribution as revealed by hyperspectral microscopy. In addition, Gd3+-AuNR also exhibits significant thermal ablation of B16–F10 cells in the presence of NIR. Thus, Gd3+-AuNR features a significant theranostic potential with combined photothermal and imaging modality, suggesting a great potential in anticancer therapy.

  8. Optimisation of a novel micro-calorimeter through Monte Carlo simulations and thermal analysis for use in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Kamran

    The high uncertainty in the Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) values of particle therapy beams, which are used in combination with the quantity absorbed dose in radiotherapy, together with the increase in the number of particle therapy centres worldwide necessitate a better understating of the biological effect of such modalities. The present novel study is part of performance testing and development of a microcalorimeter based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). Unlike other microdosimetric detectors that are used for investigating the energy distribution, this detector provides a direct measurement of energy deposition at the micrometer scale, that can be used to improve our understanding of biological effects in particle therapy application, radiation protection and environmental dosimetry. Temperature rises of less than 1 muK are detectable and when combined with the low specific heat capacity of the absorber at cryogenic temperature, extremely high energy deposition sensitivity of approximately 0.4 eV can be achieved. The detector consists of three layers: a Tissue Equivalent (TE) absorber, a SuperConducting (SC) absorber and a silicon substrate. Ideally all energy would be deposited in the TE absorber and the heat rise in the SC layer would arise due to heat conduction from the TE layer. However, in practice direct particle absorption occurs in all three layers and must be corrected for. To investigate the thermal behavior within the detector, and quantify any possible correction, particle tracks were simulated employing Geant4 (v9.6) Monte Carlo simulations. The track information was then passed to the COMSOL Multiphysics (Finite Element Method) software. The 3D heat transfer within each layer was then evaluated in a time-dependent model. For a statistically reliable outcome, the simulations had to be repeated for a large number of particles. An automated system has been developed that couples Geant4 Monte Carlo output to COMSOL

  9. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  10. Non-thermal plasmas: novel preventive and curative therapy against melanomas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesbert, Franck; Larue, Lionel

    2014-10-01

    Malignant melanoma is a very aggressive cancer with a very poor short-term prognosis once metastatic. For years, there was no efficient adjuvant therapy after surgery. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy provided hope, but not victory. Further efforts are therefore required, to find new ways to cure this disease. Physics has, once again, opened up new possibilities for treatment, through the use of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The curative potential of this technique was initially assessed on cancer cells, among which melanoma. In a recent issue, Yajima et al. use NEAPP on benign nevi, as a preventive treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Establishment of optimal thermal neutron capture therapy for 5 types of human malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Yutaka

    1993-03-01

    A series of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) studies has already germinated in 1972, with a view to establishing the BNCT particularly suited for the treatment of various types of malignant melanoma, and has been succeeded by research teams comprised of multi-disciplinary members. Twelve patients (7 men and 5 women, aged from 50 to 85 years) with malignant melanoma have been treated with BNCT; among them, six patients were completely cured, four had extremely reduced tumors, and two were still in the clinical process. The present Progress Report is a compilation of 39 research presentations for the recent two years. In this report, three patients are described. Of these, one patient had deep-seated lesions in right and left lymph nodes. These lesions were cured by the use of D 2 O that allowed neutron beams to reach them. Application of positron emission tomography to the diagnosis of melanoma is a highlight in this Report. (N.K.)

  12. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for the treatment of epilepsy: evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla ND

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Navika D Shukla, Allen L Ho, Arjun V Pendharkar, Eric S Sussman, Casey H Halpern Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Medically intractable epilepsy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. For those with focal epilepsy and correlated electrophysiological or radiographic features, open surgical resection can achieve high rates of seizure control, but can be associated with neurologic deficits and cognitive effects. Recent innovations have allowed for more minimally invasive methods of surgical seizure control such as magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial therapy (MRgLITT. MRgLITT achieves the goal of ablating seizure foci while preserving neuropsychological function and offering real-time feedback and monitoring of tissue ablation. This review summarizes the utilization of MRgLITT for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and other seizure disorders. Overall, the efficacy of MRgLITT is comparable to that of open surgery and offers a less invasive approach in patients with significantly less morbidity. Keywords: laser ablation, MRgLITT, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, epilepsy surgery, corpus callostomy

  13. Core–shell reconfiguration through thermal annealing in FexO/CoFe2O4 ordered 2D nanocrystal arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yalcin, A. O.; de Nijs, B.; Fan, Z.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; van Huis, M.A.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    A great variety of single- and multi-component nanocrystals (NCs) can now be synthesized and integrated into nanocrystal superlattices. However, the thermal and temporal stability of these superstructures and their components can be a limiting factor for their application as functional devices. On

  14. Effects of variable power on tissue ablation dynamics during magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy with the Visualase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Sean M; Hargreaves, Eric L; Patel, Nitesh V; Danish, Shabbar F

    2017-09-18

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive procedure used to treat various intracranial pathologies. This study investigated the effects of variable power on maximal estimated thermal damage during ablation and duration required to reach maximal ablation. All ablations were performed using the Visualase Thermal Therapy System (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota), which uses a 980 nm diffusing tip diode laser. Cases were stratified into low, medium and high power. Maximal thermal damage estimate (TDE max ) achieved in a single plane and time to reach maximal damage (t tdemax ) were measured and compared between groups using a 2×3 Fixed Factor Analysis of Covariance. Ablation area change for cases in which an initial thermal dose was followed by a subsequent dose, with increased power, was also assessed. We used real-time ablation data from 93 patients across various intracranial pathologies. t tdemax (mean ± SEM) decreased linearly as power increased (low: 139.2 ± 10.4 s, medium: 127.5 ± 4.3 s, high: 103.7 ± 5.8 s). In cases where a second thermal dose was delivered at higher power, the TDE expanded an average of 51.4 mm 2 beyond the initial TDE generated by the first ablation, with the second ablation approaching TDE max at a higher rate than the initial ablation. Increased power results in a larger TDE max and an increased ablation rate. In cases where an initial thermal dose does not fully ablate the target lesion, a second ablation at higher power can increase the area of ablation with an increased ablation rate.

  15. Filter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  16. OPTIONS FOR USE OF APPROPRIATE ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH THERMAL INJURY WITH A HIGH RISK OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATED WITH RECURRENT INTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Patients with major thermal injury require anticoagulant therapy during almost the whole period of the burn disease, forcing the physician to balance constantly between the risk of possible bleeding associated with surgical treatment and the risk of thrombosis development in patients demonstrating a number of factors predisposing to the development of VTС. We report a clinical case of appropriate anticoagulant therapy using the new oral anticoagulants in a patient with a high risk of VTС development and recurrent bleeding from the tumor of the ascending colon. 

  17. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer: Assessing an array of women's treatment experiences and perceptions, their perceived self-efficacy and nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Maatman, Gemma A.; Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W.; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Background Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with

  18. Interleukin-6 Induced "Acute" Phenotypic Microenvironment Promotes Th1 Anti-Tumor Immunity in Cryo-Thermal Therapy Revealed By Shotgun and Parallel Reaction Monitoring Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ting; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Kun; Yang, Li; Moritz, Robert L; Yan, Wei; Xu, Lisa X

    2016-01-01

    Cryo-thermal therapy has been emerged as a promising novel therapeutic strategy for advanced breast cancer, triggering higher incidence of tumor regression and enhanced remission of metastasis than routine treatments. To better understand its anti-tumor mechanism, we utilized a spontaneous metastatic mouse model and quantitative proteomics to compare N-glycoproteome changes in 94 serum samples with and without treatment. We quantified 231 highly confident N-glycosylated proteins using iTRAQ shotgun proteomics. Among them, 53 showed significantly discriminated regulatory patterns over the time course, in which the acute phase response emerged as the most enhanced pathway. The anti-tumor feature of the acute response was further investigated using parallel reaction monitoring target proteomics and flow cytometry on 23 of the 53 significant proteins. We found that cryo-thermal therapy reset the tumor chronic inflammation to an "acute" phenotype, with up-regulation of acute phase proteins including IL-6 as a key regulator. The IL-6 mediated "acute" phenotype transformed IL-4 and Treg-promoting ICOSL expression to Th1-promoting IFN-γ and IL-12 production, augmented complement system activation and CD86(+)MHCII(+) dendritic cells maturation and enhanced the proliferation of Th1 memory cells. In addition, we found an increased production of tumor progression and metastatic inhibitory proteins under such "acute" environment, favoring the anti-metastatic effect. Moreover, cryo-thermal on tumors induced the strongest "acute" response compared to cryo/hyperthermia alone or cryo-thermal on healthy tissues, accompanying by the most pronounced anti-tumor immunological effect. In summary, we demonstrated that cryo-thermal therapy induced, IL-6 mediated "acute" microenvironment shifted the tumor chronic microenvironment from Th2 immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic to Th1 immunostimulatory and tumoricidal state. Moreover, the magnitude of "acute" and "danger" signals play a key

  19. MO-FG-BRA-09: Quantification of Nanoparticle Heating and Concentration for MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLellan, CJ; Melancon, M; Fuentes, D; Stafford, RJ [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston (United States); Salatan, F; Yang, Q [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Hwang, KP [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (npLITT) is a technique that utilizes tumor localized optically activated nanoparticles to increase the conformality of laser ablation procedures. Temperatures in these procedures are dependent on the particle concentration which generally cannot be measured noninvasively prior to therapy. In this work we attempt to quantify particle concentration in vivo by estimating the increase in R2* relaxation induced by bifunctional magnetic resonance (MR)-visible gold-based nanoparticles (SPIO@Au) and relate it to the temperature increase observed during real time MR temperature imaging (MRTI) of laser ablation. Methods: SPIO@Au nanoparticles (90nm) were synthesized containing a silica-iron core (for MR visibility via R2*) and gold shell (for near-infrared absorption). High resolution R2* maps were acquired before and after injecting four different particle concentrations (saline,1e10, 5e10, and 10e10 particles/mL) into HN5 flank xenografts. Tumors were monitored using MRTI during treatment with an interstitial fiber. (1 watt, 808 nm, 3 minutes) Results: The maximum temperature within the tumors increased linearly with concentration of injected particles, reaching 34.0, 37.6, 45.8, and 55.4 {sup 0}C for saline, 1e10, 5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively (R2=.994). The highest temperatures occur at the injection site rather than the fiber, confirming that SPIO@Au nanoparticles are the primary absorber. The differences between the median R2* measured at the injection site and the rest of the tumor were −6, 134, 111, 156 s-1 for the saline,1e10,5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively. This R2* change is consistent with the measured relaxivity for the 1e10 particles/mL injection but does not maintain linearity at higher concentrations. Conclusion: Bifunctional SPIO@Au nanoparticles are a promising technology for providing noninvasive estimates of particle concentration via MRI and

  20. In vivo evaluation of a MR-guided 980nm laser interstitial thermal therapy system for ablations in porcine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Medina, Oscar; Gorny, Krzysztof; McNichols, Roger; Friese, Jeremy; Misra, Sanjay; Amrami, Kimberly; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Callstrom, Matthew; Woodrum, David

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the use of a 980-nm diode laser for magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (MR-guided LITT) ablations in liver tissue in an in vivo porcine model. MR-guided guided LITT was performed on nine juvenile pigs placed under general anesthesia. Target ablation sites were selected in the left and right lobes of the liver. Laser applicators were placed in the liver using intermittent MR guidance. Up to four separate ablations were performed in each animal using a 15 or 30 W laser generator using one or two applicators. During the ablations, continuous MR-based temperature mapping (MR-thermal mapping), using a proton resonance frequency technique, was performed to monitor the size of the ablation in real-time. Extent of thermal tissue damage was continuously estimated based on Arrhenius model. Two-minute ablations were performed at each site. MR-thermal mapping of ablations within the posteroinferior liver were accomplished with continuous breathing at low tidal volume. In the mid right lobe of the liver, due to motion artefacts, MR-thermometry was performed intermittently during breath hold periods. In the left lobe of the liver, ablations were performed with ventilation using positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 10 cm of water. Upon completion, MR imaging with gadolinium contrast was performed to assess the extent of treatment. Thermal lesions were subsequently measured using both, MR-thermal dose and MR gadolinium images, for comparison. Following the animal euthanasia, the liver was harvested and subjected to formalin fixation and paraffin embedding for histological examination. Between one and four focal liver ablations (total 24 ablations) were successfully performed in nine animals with either a 15 or 30 W laser generator. For the 15-W laser generator, the average single applicator ablation size was (2.0 ± 0.5) × (2.6 ± 0.4) cm(2) , as measured by magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry, or (1.7 ± 0.4)

  1. Radiation Hardened Bolometer Linear Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has developed space-based thermal instrument spectrometers based on thermopile detectors linear arrays that are intrinsically radiation hard. Micro-bolometers...

  2. In vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of gold nanoparticles-mediated photo-thermal therapy versus 5-fluorouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, Iman E., E-mail: iman.gomaa@guc.edu.eg; Abdel Gaber, Sara A. [German University in Cairo (GUC), Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Egypt); Bhatt, Samarth; Liehr, Thomas [Friedrich Schiller University, Jena University Hospital, Institute of Human Genetics (Germany); Glei, Michael [Friedrich Schiller University, Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy, Institute of Nutrition (Germany); El-Tayeb, Tarek A. [Cairo University, The National Institute for Laser Enhanced Sciences (NILES) (Egypt); Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud H. [German University in Cairo (GUC), Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Egypt)

    2015-02-15

    This study evaluates tumour cell-killing efficacy of metallic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-mediated photo-thermal therapy (PTT) in comparison to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a standard chemotherapeutic drug. It also focuses on the possible genetic abnormalities of both drugs in normal blood lymphocytes. Both 5-FU and light-activated spherical AuNPs of 15± nm diameter were used to target MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Alkaline comet assay, standard karyotyping and multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization were applied in order to investigate the respective possible genotoxic and mutagenic side effects that might result from the application of each therapeutic modality. Results showed that the LC25 of AuNPs-mediated PTT was achieved at a concentration of 100 µM for 12-h incubation and exposure to light energy of 50 J/cm{sup 2}, while the same cytotoxic effect was obtained by incubating the MCF-7 cells with the same concentration of the chemotherapeutic drug 5-FU for 24 h. On the other hand, AuNPs showed insignificant genotoxic effect of DNA damage represented by 4.6 % in comparison to 18.58 % exerted by 5-FU. The chromosomal studies resulted in normal karyotypes for cells treated with AuNPs-mediated PTT, while those treated with 5-FU showed several types of numerical as well as structural chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, compared to 5-FU, light-activated AuNPs-mediated PTT provides considerable efficacy in breast cancer cells killing with no genetic side effects under the proposed experimental conditions.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused laser interstitial thermal therapy for subinsular metastatic adenocarcinoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Murphy, Rory K J; Dacey, Ralph G; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2012-06-01

    To describe the novel use of the AutoLITT System (Monteris Medical, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) for focused laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stereotactic image guidance for the treatment of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the left insula. The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed man with a history of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon. He had previously undergone resection of multiple lesions, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and whole-brain radiation. Despite treatment of a left insular tumor, serial imaging revealed that the lesion continued to enlarge. Given the refractory nature of this tumor to radiation and the deep-seated location, the patient elected to undergo LITT treatment. The center of the lesion and entry point on the scalp were identified with STEALTH (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee) image-guided navigation. The AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe (Monteris Medical) for the LITT system was secured onto the skull, and a trajectory was defined to achieve access to the centroid of the tumor. After a burr hole was made, a gadolinium template probe was inserted into the AXiiiS base. The trajectory was confirmed via an intraoperative MRI, and the LITT probe driver was attached to the base and CO2-cooled, side-firing laser LITT probe. The laser was activated and thermometry images were obtained. Two trajectories, posteromedial and anterolateral, produced satisfactory tumor ablation. LITT with intraoperative MRI and stereotactic image guidance is a newly available, minimally invasive, and therapeutically viable technique for the treatment of deep seated brain tumors.

  4. Thin, Flexible IMM Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    NASA needs solar arrays that are thin, flexible, and highly efficient; package compactly for launch; and deploy into large, structurally stable high-power generators. Inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) solar cells can enable these arrays, but integration of this thin crystalline cell technology presents certain challenges. The Thin Hybrid Interconnected Solar Array (THINS) technology allows robust and reliable integration of IMM cells into a flexible blanket comprising standardized modules engineered for easy production. The modules support the IMM cell by using multifunctional materials for structural stability, shielding, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) stress relief, and integrated thermal and electrical functions. The design approach includes total encapsulation, which benefits high voltage as well as electrostatic performance.

  5. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  6. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  7. A test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator for neutron capture therapy - estimation of neutron energy spectrum by simulation calculations and TOF experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kobayashi, Katsuhei

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the irradiation characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons and the feasibility of a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy, a 'test-type' hyper-thermal neutron generator was designed and made. Graphite of 6 cm thickness and 21 cm diameter was selected as the high temperature scatterer. The scatterer is heated up to 1200 deg. C maximum using molybdenum heaters. The radiation heat is shielded by reflectors of molybdenum and stainless steel. The temperature is measured using three R-type thermo-couples and controlled by a program controller. The total thickness of the generator is designed to be as thin as possible, 20 cm in maximum, in the standing point of the neutron beam intensity. The thermal stability, controllability and safety of the generator at high temperature employment were confirmed by the heating tests. As one of the experiments for the characteristics estimation, the neutron energy spectrum dependent on the scatterer temperature was measured by the TOF (time of flight) method using the LINAC neutron generator. The estimations by simulation calculations were also performed. From the experiment and calculation results, it was confirmed that the neutron temperature shifted higher as the scatterer temperature was higher. The prospect of the feasibility of the 'hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for NCT' was opened from the estimation results of the generator characteristics by the simulation calculations and experiments

  8. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy as treatment for intractable insular epilepsy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M Scott; Donahue, David J; Malik, Saleem I; Keator, Cynthia G; Hernandez, Angel; Reddy, Rohit K; Perkins, Freedom F; Lee, Mark R; Clarke, Dave F

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Seizure onset within the insula is increasingly recognized as a cause of intractable epilepsy. Surgery within the insula is difficult, with considerable risks, given the rich vascular supply and location near critical cortex. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) provides an attractive treatment option for insular epilepsy, allowing direct ablation of abnormal tissue while sparing nearby normal cortex. Herein, the authors describe their experience using this technique in a large cohort of children undergoing treatment of intractable localization-related epilepsy of insular onset. METHODS The combined epilepsy surgery database of Cook Children's Medical Center and Dell Children's Hospital was queried for all cases of insular onset epilepsy treated with LiTT. Patients without at least 6 months of follow-up data and cases preoperatively designated as palliative were excluded. Patient demographics, presurgical evaluation, surgical plan, and outcome were collected from patient charts and described. RESULTS Twenty patients (mean age 12.8 years, range 6.1-18.6 years) underwent a total of 24 LiTT procedures; 70% of these patients had normal findings on MRI. Patients underwent a mean follow-up of 20.4 months after their last surgery (range 7-39 months), with 10 (50%) in Engel Class I, 1 (5%) in Engel Class II, 5 (25%) in Engel Class III, and 4 (20%) in Engel Class IV at last follow-up. Patients were discharged within 24 hours of the procedure in 15 (63%) cases, in 48 hours in 6 (24%) cases, and in more than 48 hours in the remaining cases. Adverse functional effects were experienced following 7 (29%) of the procedures: mild hemiparesis after 6 procedures (all patients experienced complete resolution or had minimal residual dysfunction by 6 months), and expressive language dysfunction after 1 procedure (resolved by 3 months). CONCLUSIONS To their knowledge, the authors present the largest cohort of pediatric patients undergoing insular surgery for

  10. Design of patient-specific focused ultrasound arrays for non-invasive brain therapy with increased trans-skull transmission and steering range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alec; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    The use of a phased array of ultrasound transducer elements to sonicate through the skull has opened the way for new treatments and the delivery of therapeutics beyond the blood-brain barrier. The limited steering range of current clinical devices, particularly at higher frequencies, limits the regions of the brain that are considered treatable by ultrasound. A new array design is introduced that allows for high levels of beam steering and increased transmission throughout the brain. These improvements are achieved using concave transducers normal to the outer-skull surface in a patient-specific configuration to target within the skull, so that the far-field of each beam is within the brain. It is shown that by using pulsed ultrasound waves timed to arrive in-phase at the desired target, sufficient levels of acoustic energy are delivered for blood-brain barrier opening throughout the brain.

  11. Trial production of hyper-thermal neutron generator for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and its radiation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Toru

    1999-01-01

    In NCT, it was at first important to give a cancer portion to radiation dose required for its recovery. By finding out that whole cross-section of water comprising of a living body decreased monotonously with increase of neutron energy from about 100 barn against thermal neutron, became about 40 barn at about 0.5 eV and kept constant to 40 barn till at about 100 eV, application of thermal neutron shifted to higher temperature side, called Hyper thermal neutron, to NCT is proposed. The Hyper thermal neutron radiation can be expected to have similar controllability to that of the thermal neutron radiation. In 1977 fiscal year, a trial Hyper thermal neutron generator was produced on a base of up-to-date investigation results. As a part of property evaluation of the generator, evaluation of energy spectra in the Hyper thermal neutron generated at LINAC by TOF was conducted to confirm shift of the spectra to high temperature side. And, a Fantom experiment at KUR heavy water neutron radiation facility was also conducted to confirm effect of improvement in deep portion dose distribution. (G.K.)

  12. Noninvasive, in vivo determination of uterine fibroid thermal conductivity in MRI-guided high intensity focused ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiming; Fischer, John; Warner, Lizette; Oto, Aytekin; Hor, Pei-Herng; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-06-01

    To estimate the local thermal conductivity of uterine fibroid in vivo at a high temperature range (60-80°C) typically encountered in magnetic resonance imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) surgery. The thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo is unknown and knowledge about tissue thermal conductivity may aid in effective delivery of thermal energy for ablation. All subjects (nine women) provided written informed consent to participate in this Institutional Review Board-approved study. A total of 10 fibroids were treated using MRgHIFU surgery with real-time temperature monitoring during both heating and cooling periods. The local thermal conductivity was determined by analyzing the spatiotemporal spread of temperature during the cooling period. The thermal conductivity of MRgHIFU-treated uterine fibroids was 0.47 ± 0.07 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) (range: 0.25∼0.67 W·m(-1) ·K(-1) ) which is slightly lower than the reported value for skeletal muscle at temperatures of thermal conductivity of uterine fibroids in vivo from the spatiotemporal spread of temperature around the HIFU focus during the cooling period. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Measuring Millimeter Wave of Cold Atmospheric Plasma Array by a Novel Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon Eckert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An unexplained repulsive force occasionally observed during non-thermal plasma treatment of large infections may point the way to an efficient mechanism for characterizing biofield energy. Ambient pressure air plasma in non-thermal equilibrium creates areas of localized population inversion, causing spontaneous emission at magnetic dipole rotational resonance lines. For O2, many of these lines occur in the 60 GHz frequency range. This experiment examines a possible link between the fine resonance frequencies of oxygen in the 60 GHz region, and the therapeutic frequencies used in Russian non-thermal EHF therapy. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a plasma array for biological torsion field characterization. An array of several hundred non-thermal plasma plumes are placed directly in front of a circular horn. A switchable circular polarizer is used to select left hand circular, linear or right hand circular polarization. A low noise frequency converter allows a noise temperature of less than 1150 K. A frequency scan and averaging algorithm is developed to characterize noise temperature versus frequency, comparing signal and noise levels between plasma on and plasma off, and switching polarization sense. An experimental setup is proposed as a proof of concept for detecting signals from the plasma array, while a practical laboratory tool is also proposed.

  14. A Proposed Method for Thermal Specific Bioimaging and Therapy Technique for Diagnosis and Treatment of Malignant Tumors by Using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iddo M. Gescheit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research program is to develop a novel, noninvasive, low-cost infrared (8–12 μm spectral range imaging technique that would improve upon current methods using nanostructured core/shell magnetic/noble metal-based imaging and therapies. The biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles are able to produce heat under AC magnetic field. This thermal radiation propagates along the tissue by thermal conduction reaching the medium's (tissue's surface. The surface temperature distribution is acquired by a thermal camera and can be analyzed to retrieve and reconstruct nanoparticles' temperature and location within the tissue. The technique may function as a diagnostic tool thanks to the ability of specific bioconjugation of these nanoparticles to tumor's outer surface markers. Hence, by applying a magnetic field, we could cause a selective elevation of temperature of the targeted nanoparticles up to 5∘C, which detects the tumor. Furthermore, elevating the temperature over 65∘C and up to 100∘C stimulates a thermo ablating interaction which causes a localized irreversible damage to the cancerous site with no harm to the surrounding tissue. While functioning as a diagnostic tool, this procedure may serve as a targeted therapeutic tool under thermal feedback control as well.

  15. Terahertz superconducting plasmonic hole array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Gu, Jianqiang; Xing, Qirong; Wu, Judy; Zhang, Weili

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate a superconductor array of subwavelength holes with active thermal control over the resonant transmission induced by surface plasmon polaritons. The array was lithographically fabricated on a high-temperature yttrium barium copper oxide superconductor and characterized by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. We observe a clear transition from a virtual excitation of the surface plasmon mode to a real surface plasmon mode. The highly controllable superconducting plasmonic crystals may find promising applications in the design of low-loss, large- dynamic-range amplitude modulation and surface-plasmon-based terahertz devices.

  16. Dosimetry boron neutron capture therapy in liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) by means of MCNP-code with neutron source from thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irhas; Andang Widi Harto; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using physics principle when B 10 (Boron-10) irradiated by low energy neutron (thermal neutron). Boron and thermal neutron reaction produced B 11m (Boron-11m) (t 1/2 =10 -2 s). B 11m decay emitted alpha, Li 7 (Lithium-7) particle and gamma ray. Irradiated time needed to ensure cancer dose enough. Liver cancer was primary malignant who located in liver (Hepatocellular carcinoma). Malignant in liver were different to metastatic from Breast, Colon Cancer, and the other. This condition was Metastatic Liver Cancer. Monte Carlo method used by Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Software. Probabilistic approach used for probability of interaction occurred and record refers to characteristic of particle and material. In this case, thermal neutron produced by model of Collimated Thermal Column Kartini Research Nuclear Reactor, Yogyakarta. Modelling organ and source used liver organ that contain of cancer tissue and research reactor. Variation of boron concentration was 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 47 µg/g cancers. Output of MCNP calculation were neutron scattering dose, gamma ray dose and neutron flux from reactor. Neutron flux used to calculate alpha, proton and gamma ray dose from interaction of tissue material and thermal neutron. Variation of boron concentration result dose rate to every variation were 0,059; 0,072; 0,084; 0,098; 0.108; 0,12; 0,125 Gy/sec. Irradiation time who need to every concentration were 841,5 see (14 min 1 sec); 696,07 sec(11 min 36 sec); 593.11 sec (9 min 53 sec); 461,35 sec (8 min 30 sec); 461,238 sec (7 min 41 sec); 414,23 sec (6 min 54 sec); 398,38 sec (6 min 38 sec). Irradiating time could shortly when boron concentration more high. (author)

  17. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  18. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  19. Plasmonic fluorescent CdSe/Cu2S hybrid nanocrystals for multichannel imaging and cancer directed photo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh Mohamed, M; Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Romero Aburto, Rebecca; Mitcham, Trevor; Suzuki, Yuko; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Bouchard, Richard R; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-21

    A simple, crude Jatropha curcas (JC) oil-based synthesis approach, devoid of any toxic phosphine and pyrophoric ligands, to produce size and shape tuned CdSe QDs and a further copper sulfide (Cu2S) encasing is presented. The QDs exhibited excellent photoluminescent properties with narrow band gap emission. Furthermore, the Cu2S shell rendered additional cytocompatibility and stability to the hybrid nanomaterial, which are major factors for translational and clinical applications of QDs. The nanocomposites were PEGylated and folate conjugated to augment their cytoamiability and enhance their specificity towards cancer cells. The nanohybrids possess potentials for visible, near infrared (NIR), photoacoustic (PA) and computed tomography (μCT) imaging. The diverse functionality of the composite was derived from the multi-channel imaging abilities and thermal competence on NIR laser irradiation to specifically actuate the photo-thermal ablation of brain cancer cells.

  20. A simple method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent tissue-mimicking thermal therapy gel phantoms: Validated by magnetic resonance imaging thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N Patrik; Partanen, Ari; Asp, Patrik; Branch, Craig A; Guha, Chandan; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2016-03-01

    Tissue-mimicking thermal therapy phantoms that coagulate at specific temperatures are valuable tools for developing and evaluating treatment strategies related to thermal therapy. Here, the authors propose a simple and efficient method for determining the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent thermal therapy gel phantoms. The authors used a previously published gel phantom recipe with 2% (w/v) of bovine serum albumin as the temperature-sensitive protein. Using the programmable heating settings of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) machine, the authors heated 50 μl gel samples to various temperatures for 3 min and then imaged them using the BioRad Gel Doc system to determine the coagulation temperature using an opacity quantification method. The estimated coagulation temperatures were then validated for gel phantoms prepared with different pH levels using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) heating and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) thermometry methods on a clinical MR-HIFU system. The PCR heating method produced consistent and reproducible coagulation of gel samples in precise correlation with the set incubation temperatures. The resulting coagulation threshold temperatures for gel phantoms of varying pH levels were found to be 44.1 ± 0.1, 53.4 ± 0.9, and 60.3 ± 0.9 °C for pH levels of 4.25, 4.50, and 4.75, respectively. This corresponded well with the coagulation threshold temperatures determined by MR-thermometry, with coagulation defined as a 95% decrease in T2 relaxation time, which were estimated at 53.6 ± 1.9 and 62.9 ± 2.4 °C for a pH of 4.50 and 4.75, respectively. The opacity quantification method provides a fast and reproducible estimate of the coagulation threshold temperature of transparent temperature-sensitive gel phantoms. The temperatures determined using this method were well within the range of temperatures estimated using MR-thermometry. Due to the specific heating capabilities of the PCR machine, and the robust

  1. Flat-plate photovoltaic array design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented which integrates the results of specific studies in the areas of photovoltaic structural design optimization, optimization of array series/parallel circuit design, thermal design optimization, and optimization of environmental protection features. The analysis is based on minimizing the total photovoltaic system life-cycle energy cost including repair and replacement of failed cells and modules. This approach is shown to be a useful technique for array optimization, particularly when time-dependent parameters such as array degradation and maintenance are involved.

  2. A dosimetric study of a heterogeneous phantom for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy comparing Monte Carlo and pencil beam calculations to dose distributions measured with a 2-D diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Casey Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) and Pencil Beam (PB) calculations are compared to their measured planar dose distributions using a 2-D diode array for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). The planar dose distributions were studied for two different phantom types: an in-house heterogeneous phantom and a homogeneous phantom. The motivation is to mimic the human anatomy during a lung SBRT treatment and incorporate heterogeneities into the pre-treatment Quality Assurance process, where measured and calculated planar dose distributions are compared before the radiation treatment. Individual and combined field dosimetry has been performed for both fixed gantry angle (anterior to posterior) and planned gantry angle delivery. A gamma analysis has been performed for all beam arrangements. The measurements were obtained using the 2-D diode array MapCHECK 2(TM). MC and PB calculations were performed using the BrainLAB iPlan RTRTM Dose software. The results suggest that with the heterogeneous phantom as a quality assurance device, the MC calculations result in closer agreements to the measured values, when using the planned gantry angle delivery method for composite beams. For the homogeneous phantom, the results suggest that the preferred delivery method is at the fixed anterior to posterior gantry angle. Furthermore, the MC and PB calculations do not show significant differences for dose difference and distance to agreement criteria 3%/3mm. However, PB calculations are in better agreement with the measured values for more stringent gamma criteria when considering individual beam whereas MC agreements are closer for composite beam measurements.

  3. Broadband acoustic phased array with subwavelength active tube array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Zhang-Zhao; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Acoustic metasurfaces provide a way to manipulate wavefronts at anomalous reflection or refraction angles through subwavelength structures. Here, based on the generalized Snell's refraction law for acoustic metasurfaces and the classical acoustic phased array (PA) theory, a broadband acoustic PA with a subwavelength active tube array has been proposed to form a special acoustic beam and to determine the directivity characteristics of the acoustic source. Theoretical analysis shows that the dispersionless wavefront manipulation can be realized by the gradient model of the active tube array, and a wide working frequency band can be obtained in practical applications from the simulated and experimental results. The numerical results of forming a special acoustic beam and establishing an acoustic focus model with an arbitrary focal position are consistent with the theoretical predictions. The experimental results agree well with the simulated results in the model of forming the acoustic beam of 45 ° . By combining acoustic metamaterials and conventional acoustic PA, the model of the active tube array paves a way to design a composite acoustic PA with high radiation efficiency and system robustness without the need for any complex circuit control system. This design concept is expected to be used in the design of ultrasonic therapy devices and high-efficiency transducers.

  4. Micromachined two dimensional resistor arrays for determination of gas parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Verwey, Willem B.; Dijkstra, Mindert; Dijkstra, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A resistive sensor array is presented for two dimensional temperature distribution measurements in a micromachined flow channel. This allows simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and fluid parameters, like thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient and viscosity. More general advantages of

  5. Multifunctional gold coated thermo-sensitive liposomes for multimodal imaging and photo-thermal therapy of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengan, Aravind Kumar; Jagtap, Madhura; de, Abhijit; Banerjee, Rinti; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-12-01

    Plasmon resonant gold nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes have been extensively researched for their applications in imaging, drug delivery and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, their ability to degrade after performing the required function is essential for their application in healthcare. When combined with biodegradable liposomes, they appear to have better degradation capabilities. They degrade into smaller particles of around 5 nm that are eligible candidates for renal clearance. Distearoyl phosphatidyl choline : cholesterol (DSPC : CHOL, 8 : 2 wt%) liposomes have been synthesized and coated with gold by in situ reduction of chloro-auric acid. These particles of size 150-200 nm are analyzed for their stability, degradation capacity, model drug-release profile, biocompatibility and photothermal effects on cancer cells. It is observed that when these particles are subjected to low power continuous wave near infra-red (NIR) laser for more than 10 min, they degrade into small gold nanoparticles of size 5 nm. Also, the gold coated liposomes appear to have excellent biocompatibility and high efficiency to kill cancer cells through photothermal transduction. These novel materials are also useful in imaging using specific NIR dyes, thus exhibiting multifunctional properties for theranostics of cancer.Plasmon resonant gold nanoparticles of various sizes and shapes have been extensively researched for their applications in imaging, drug delivery and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, their ability to degrade after performing the required function is essential for their application in healthcare. When combined with biodegradable liposomes, they appear to have better degradation capabilities. They degrade into smaller particles of around 5 nm that are eligible candidates for renal clearance. Distearoyl phosphatidyl choline : cholesterol (DSPC : CHOL, 8 : 2 wt%) liposomes have been synthesized and coated with gold by in situ reduction of chloro-auric acid. These

  6. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  7. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  8. Next generation thermal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marche, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    The best design of high performance thermal imagers for the 1990s will use horizontal quasi-linear arrays with focal plane processing associated with a simple vertical mechanical scanner. These imagers will have performance that is greatly improved compared to that of present-day devices (50 to 100 percent range and resolution improvement). 5 references

  9. Transition edge sensor series array bolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, J

    2010-01-01

    A transition edge sensor series array (TES-SA) is an array of identical TESs that are connected in series by low-inductance superconducting wiring. The array elements are equally and well thermally coupled to the absorber and respond to changes in the absorber temperature in synchronization. The TES-SA total resistance increases compared to a single TES while the shape of the superconducting transition is preserved. We are developing a TES-SA with a large number, hundreds to thousands, of array elements with the goal of enabling the readout of a TES-based bolometer operated at 4.2 K with a semiconductor-based amplifier located at room temperature. The noise and dynamic performance of a TES-SA bolometer based on a niobium/aluminum bilayer is analyzed. It is shown that stable readout of the bolometer with a low-noise transimpedance amplifier is feasible.

  10. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  11. Thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional graphene antidot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yonghong; Liang, Qi-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Chang-Qin; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional (1D) graphene antidot arrays by nonequilibrium Green's function method. We show that by introducing antidots to the pristine graphene nanoribbon the thermal conductance can be reduced greatly while keeping the power factor still high, thus leading to an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). Our numerical results indicate that ZT values of 1D antidot graphene arrays can be up to unity, which means the 1D graphene antidot arrays may be promising for thermoelectric applications. -- Highlights: ► We study thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional (1D) graphene antidot arrays. ► Thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1D antidot arrays can exceed unity. ► ZT of 1D antidot arrays is larger than that of two-dimensional arrays.

  12. Image-guided resection of glioblastoma in eloquent brain areas facilitated by laser surface thermal therapy: clinical outcomes and long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozumenko, Artem; Kliuchka, Valentyn; Rozumenko, Volodymir; Semenova, Vera; Kolesnyk, Sergii; Fedorenko, Zoja

    2018-01-22

    The increased interest in the application of lasers in neuro-oncology prompted us to present our experience of using the laser technologies in the treatment of cerebral gliomas. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of image-guided laser surface thermal therapy (LSTT) and its influence on survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM).Data of 91 patients (49 males, 42 females, mean age 51.4 years, range 23-70 years) with supratentorial GBMs located in close vicinity to or within the eloquent brain areas were retrospectively analyzed.All patients were divided into two groups: LSTT group (n = 28) and control group (n = 63). There were no significant differences by gender, age, Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score, and tumor location between groups. Total removal in the LSTT group was performed in 67.9%, in the control group-31.7% (p rates (p rate of complete resection and improved overall survival without the negative effect on the functional status after surgery.

  13. A CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF NEUTRON COLLIMATOR IN THE THERMAL COLUMN OF KARTINI RESEARCH REACTOR FOR IN VITRO AND IN VIVO TEST OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fauziah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to design a collimator which results in epithermal neutron beam for IN VITRO and IN VIVO of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT at the Kartini research reactor by means of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP codes. Reactor within 100 kW of thermal power was used as the neutron source. The design criteria were based on recommendation from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. All materials used were varied in size, according to the value of mean free path for each material. MCNP simulations indicated that by using 5 cm thick of Ni as collimator wall, 60 cm thick of Al as moderator, 15 cm thick of 60Ni as filter, 2 cm thick of Bi as γ-ray shielding, 3 cm thick of 6Li2CO3-polyethylene as beam delimiter, with 1 to 5 cm varied aperture size, epithermal neutron beam with maximum flux of 7.65 x 108 n.cm-2.s-1 could be produced. The beam has minimum fast neutron and γ-ray components of, respectively, 1.76 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1 and 1.32 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, minimum thermal neutron per epithermal neutron ratio of 0.008, and maximum directionality of 0.73. It did not fully pass the IAEA’s criteria, since the epithermal neutron flux was below the recommended value, 1.0 x 109 n.cm-2.s-1. Nonetheless, it was still usable with epithermal neutron flux exceeding 5.0 x 108 n.cm-2.s-1. When it was assumed that the graphite inside the thermal column was not discharged but only the part which was going to be replaced by the collimator, the performance of the collimator became better within the positive effect from the surrounding graphite that the beam resulted passed all criteria with epithermal neutron flux up to 1.68 x 109 n.cm-2.s-1. Keywords: design, collimator, epithermal neutron beam, BNCT, MCNP, criteria   Telah dilakukan penelitian tentang desain kolimator yang menghasilkan radiasi netron epitermal untuk uji in vitro dan in vivo pada Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT di Reaktor Riset Kartini dengan menggunakan program Monte

  14. Thermal (Infrared) Imaging Sensors (Review Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhir Khare; S. S. Negi

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in improved type of infrared detector technologies focal plane arrays,signal processing techniques, and innovative optical designs have enabled thermal imagingtechnology to undergo revolutionary advancement, leading to realisation of high performanceand compact thermal cameras for surveillance, target acquisition, tracking, and guidance.Instruments Research and Development Establishment (IRDE), Dehradun, has designed anddeveloped a variety of thermal imaging sights for dif...

  15. Microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Freitas, Barry L.; Beach, Raymond J.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Sperry, Verry; Comaskey, Brian J.; Emanuel, Mark A.; Solarz, Richard W.; Mundinger, David C.

    1992-06-01

    Detailed performance results and fabrication techniques for an efficient and low thermal impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor or even CW operation of fully filled laser diode arrays is enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using a photolithographic pattern definition procedure followed by anisotropic chemical etching. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for the heatsink design allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel cooled heatsinks is ideally suited to pump array requirements for high average power crystalline lasers because of the stringent temperature demands that result from coupling the diode light to several nanometers wide absorption features characteristic of lasing ions in crystals.

  16. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  17. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  18. In vitro and in vivo mapping of drug release after laser ablation thermal therapy with doxorubicin-loaded hollow gold nanoshells using fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hannah J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Jun; Zhou, Min; Bouchard, Richard R.; Mitcham, Trevor; Wallace, Michael; Stafford, R. Jason; Li, Chun; Gupta, Sanjay; Melancon, Marites P.

    2013-01-01

    approaches to assessing Dox release and monitoring temperature, respectively, after Dox@PEG-HAuNS–mediated thermal ablation therapy. PMID:23920038

  19. Integrated avalanche photodiode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Eric S.

    2015-07-07

    The present disclosure includes devices for detecting photons, including avalanche photon detectors, arrays of such detectors, and circuits including such arrays. In some aspects, the detectors and arrays include a virtual beveled edge mesa structure surrounded by resistive material damaged by ion implantation and having side wall profiles that taper inwardly towards the top of the mesa structures, or towards the direction from which the ion implantation occurred. Other aspects are directed to masking and multiple implantation and/or annealing steps. Furthermore, methods for fabricating and using such devices, circuits and arrays are disclosed.

  20. Cover array string reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Crochemore, Maxime; S. Iliopoulos, Costas; P. Pissis, Solon; Tischler, German

    2010-01-01

    International audience; A proper factor u of a string y is a cover of y if every letter of y is within some occurrence of u in y. The concept generalises the notion of periods of a string. An integer array C is the minimal-cover (resp. maximal-cover) array of y if C[i] is the minimal (resp. maximal) length of covers of y[0.. i], or zero if no cover exists. In this paper, we present a constructive algorithm checking the validity of an array as a minimal-cover or maximal-cover array of some str...

  1. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  2. Solar array stepping to minimize array excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mahabaleshwar K. P. (Inventor); Liu, Tung Y. (Inventor); Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations of a mechanism containing a stepper motor, such as a solar-array powered spacecraft, are reduced and minimized by the execution of step movements in pairs of steps, the period between steps being equal to one-half of the period of torsional oscillation of the mechanism. Each pair of steps is repeated at needed intervals to maintain desired continuous movement of the portion of elements to be moved, such as the solar array of a spacecraft. In order to account for uncertainty as well as slow change in the period of torsional oscillation, a command unit may be provided for varying the interval between steps in a pair.

  3. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  4. Procedural techniques and multicenter postmarket experience using minimally invasive convective radiofrequency thermal therapy with Rezūm system for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darson MF

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Micheal F Darson,1 Erik E Alexander,1 Zvi J Schiffman,2 Michael Lewitton,2 Robert A Light,2 Mark A Sutton,2 Carlos Delgado-Rodriguez,2 Ricardo R Gonzalez2 1Arizona Urology Specialists, Scottsdale, AZ, 2Houston Metro Urology, Houston, TX, USA Objective: This report evaluates clinical experience with the Rezūm system after US Food and Drug Administration clearance in consecutive cases accrued by multiple community urologists for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Treatment techniques for transurethral convective radiofrequency water-vapor thermal therapy and outcomes with up to 12 months’ follow-up are presented. Materials and methods: A total of 131 patients with moderate–severe LUTS were included in a retrospective analysis of BPH procedures with the Rezūm system. Pre- and postprocedure assessments included International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, quality of life, peak urinary flow rate, voided volume, and postvoid residual urine volume. Urologists used their own discretion for patient selection, with variable prostate sizes, LUTS severity, urinary retention, or presence of an obstructing median lobe. Safety signals and surgical retreatment rates were monitored prospectively. Results: Men aged 47–96 years with prostates 13–183 cm3 showed significant improvement in IPSS, quality of life, and postvoid residual volume durable through 12 months after thermal therapy. Patients with either moderate (IPSS 8–19 or severe (IPSS 20–35 symptoms achieved significantly improved scores. Postprocedure adverse events normally anticipated and related to endoscopic instrumentation were transient and mild–moderate in nature. No de novo erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction was reported. Conclusion: This study corroborates prior published pilot and randomized controlled trial results indicating significant relief of urinary symptoms and reproducibility of responses to thermal

  5. Micromirror array for protein micro array fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kook-Nyung; Shin, Dong-Sik; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2003-05-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized a micromirror array for protein microarray fabrication that has a simple structure, and the straightforward fabrication process for the mirror will allow the use of low-cost mirrors in protein pattern applications. The characteristics of an exposure system utilizing the micromirror array have been demonstrated by means of an experiment employing a photoresist that is in general use in the semiconductor industry. The micromirror dimensions were 54 × 54 mum2, with a 30 mum separation between mirrors, and a 5.5 mum gap from the bottom electrode so that the mirror had an approximately 10° deflection angle. The size and separation of the mirror were designed in consideration of the protein pattern size and pitch, in contrast with the commercial Texas Instruments Digital Light Processor, which is utilized in the components of projection display systems. The exposure system combined with the micromirror has been used in the photochemical synthesis of chemical ligands via protein immobilization on a chip. Several photosynthesis experiments for peptide array synthesis have been carried out using the micromirror array. Parallel experiments on photochemical ligand synthesis on a chip can easily be performed in the laboratory using this exposure system.

  6. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  7. Micromachined electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2007-12-11

    An electrode array is disclosed which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array, in certain embodiments, can include a plurality of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. In other embodiments of the electrode array, the electrodes can be fixed to the substrate. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, and can include electrode tips having an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis.

  8. LaF3:Ln mesoporous spheres: controllable synthesis, tunable luminescence and application for dual-modal chemo-/photo-thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ruichan; Yang, Guixin; He, Fei; Dai, Yunlu; Gai, Shili; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-11-01

    In this report, uniform LaF3:Ln mesoporous spheres have been synthesized by a facile and mild in situ ion-exchange method using yolk-like La(OH)3:Ln mesoporous spheres as templates, which were prepared through a self-produced bubble-template route. It was found that the structures of the final LaF3:Ln can simply be tuned by adding a polyetherimide (PEI) reagent. LaF3:Ln hollow mesoporous spheres (HMSs) and LaF3:Ln flower-like mesoporous spheres (FMSs) were obtained when assisted by PEI and in the absence of PEI. The up-conversion (UC) luminescence results reveal that the doping of Nd3+ ions in LaF3:Ln can markedly influence the UC emissions of the products. It is interesting that an obvious thermal effect is achieved due to the energy back-transfer from Tm3+ to Nd3+ ions under 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. The LaF3:Yb/Er/Tm/Nd HMSs show good biocompatibility and sustained doxorubicin (DOX) release properties. In particular, upon 980 nm NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect arising from the Nd3+ doping induces a faster DOX release from the drug release system. Moreover, UC luminescence images of LaF3:Yb/Er/Tm/Nd HMSs uptaken by MCF-7 cells exhibit apparent green emission under 980 nm NIR irradiation. Such a multifunctional carrier combining UC luminescence and hyperthermia with the chemotherapeutic drugs should be of high potential for the simultaneous anti-cancer therapy and cell imaging.In this report, uniform LaF3:Ln mesoporous spheres have been synthesized by a facile and mild in situ ion-exchange method using yolk-like La(OH)3:Ln mesoporous spheres as templates, which were prepared through a self-produced bubble-template route. It was found that the structures of the final LaF3:Ln can simply be tuned by adding a polyetherimide (PEI) reagent. LaF3:Ln hollow mesoporous spheres (HMSs) and LaF3:Ln flower-like mesoporous spheres (FMSs) were obtained when assisted by PEI and in the absence of PEI. The up-conversion (UC) luminescence results reveal that

  9. Solar panels offer array of hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The installation of what is believed to be the largest array of solar thermal panels currently in use at a UK NHS hospital has taken place at an ideal time for the facility in question, Harlow's Princess Alexandra Hospital, with the hospital's gas bill alone having risen by 153% over the past nine months thanks to soaring energy prices, and the estates department keen to mitigate the effects in any way possible. Jonathan Baillie reports.

  10. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  11. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  12. Micromirror arrays for object selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldis, Severin; Zamkotsian, Frederic; Clerc, Pierre-Andre; Zickar, Michael; Noell, Wilfried; de Rooij, Nico

    2007-10-01

    We report on micromirror arrays being developed for object selection in Multi Object Spectrographs for astronomical applications. The micromirrors are etched in bulk single crystal silicon whereas the cantilever type suspension is realized by surface micromachining. One micromirror element is 100μm × 200μm in size. The micromirrors are actuated electrostatically by electrodes located on a second chip. The use of silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers for both mirror and electrode chip ensures thermal compatibility for cryogenic operation. A system of multiple landing beams has been developed, which passively locks the mirror at a well defined tilt angle when actuated. The mechanical tilt angle obtained is 20° at a pull-in voltage of 90V. Measurements with an optical profiler showed that the tilt angle of the actuated and locked mirror is stable with a precision of one arc minute over a range of 15V. This locking system makes the tilt angle merely independent from process variations across the wafer and thus provides uniform tilt angle over the whole array. The precision on tilt angle from mirror to mirror measured is one arc minute. The surface quality of the mirrors in actuated state is better than 10nm peak-to-valley and the local roughness is around 1nm RMS. Preliminary cryogenic tests showed that the micromirror device sustains 120K without any structural damage.

  13. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  14. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  15. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  16. SMEX-Lite Modular Solar Array Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, John

    2002-01-01

    similarity to multiple missions. It then becomes possible to procure solar array modules in advance of mission definition and respond quickly and inexpensively to a selected mission's unique requirements. The solar array modular architecture allows the procurement of solar array modules before the array geometry has been frozen. This reduces the effect of procurement lead-time on the mission integration and test flow by as much as 50%. Second, by spreading the non-recurring costs over multiple missions, the cost per unit area is also reduced. In the case of the SMEX-Lite procurement, this reduction was by about one third of the cost per unit area compared to previous SMEX mission-unique procurements. Third, the modular architecture greatly facilitates the infusion of new solar cell technologies into flight programs as these technologies become available. New solar cell technologies need only be fabricated onto a standard-sized module to be incorporated into the next available mission. The modular solar array can be flown in a mixed configuration with some new and some standard cell technologies. Since each module has its own wiring terminals, the array can be arranged as desired electrically with little impact to cost and schedule. The solar array modular architecture does impose some additional constraints on systems and subsystem engineers. First, they must work with discrete solar array modules rather than size the array to fit exactly within an available envelope. The array area is constrained to an integer multiple of the module area. Second, the modular design is optimized for space radiation and thermal environments not greatly different from a typical SMEX LEO environment. For example, a mission with a highly elliptical orbit (e.g., Polar, SMEX/FAST) would require thicker coverglasses to protect the solar cells from the more intense radiation environment.

  17. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  18. Flexible retinal electrode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat [Albuquerque, NM; Wessendorf, Kurt O [Albuquerque, NM; Christenson, Todd R [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-10-24

    An electrode array which has applications for neural stimulation and sensing. The electrode array can include a large number of electrodes each of which is flexibly attached to a common substrate using a plurality of springs to allow the electrodes to move independently. The electrode array can be formed from a combination of bulk and surface micromachining, with electrode tips that can include an electroplated metal (e.g. platinum, iridium, gold or titanium) or a metal oxide (e.g. iridium oxide) for biocompatibility. The electrode array can be used to form a part of a neural prosthesis, and is particularly well adapted for use in an implantable retinal prosthesis where the electrodes can be tailored to provide a uniform gentle contact pressure with optional sensing of this contact pressure at one or more of the electrodes.

  19. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  20. Expandable LED array interconnect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  1. MR thermometry characterization of a hyperthermia ultrasound array designed using the k-space computational method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hotaik

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound induced hyperthermia is a useful adjuvant to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. A uniform thermal dose (43°C for 30 minutes is required within the targeted cancerous volume for effective therapy. This requires specific ultrasound phased array design and appropriate thermometry method. Inhomogeneous, acoustical, three-dimensional (3D prostate models and economical computational methods provide necessary tools to predict the appropriate shape of hyperthermia phased arrays for better focusing. This research utilizes the k-space computational method and a 3D human prostate model to design an intracavitary ultrasound probe for hyperthermia treatment of prostate cancer. Evaluation of the probe includes ex vivo and in vivo controlled hyperthermia experiments using the noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI thermometry. Methods A 3D acoustical prostate model was created using photographic data from the Visible Human Project®. The k-space computational method was used on this coarse grid and inhomogeneous tissue model to simulate the steady state pressure wavefield of the designed phased array using the linear acoustic wave equation. To ensure the uniformity and spread of the pressure in the length of the array, and the focusing capability in the width of the array, the equally-sized elements of the 4 × 20 elements phased array were 1 × 14 mm. A probe was constructed according to the design in simulation using lead zerconate titanate (PZT-8 ceramic and a Delrin® plastic housing. Noninvasive MRI thermometry and a switching feedback controller were used to accomplish ex vivo and in vivo hyperthermia evaluations of the probe. Results Both exposimetry and k-space simulation results demonstrated acceptable agreement within 9%. With a desired temperature plateau of 43.0°C, ex vivo and in vivo controlled hyperthermia experiments showed that the MRI temperature at the steady state was 42.9 ± 0.38

  2. Performance analysis of solar cell arrays in concentrating light intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongfeng; Li Ming; Lin Wenxian; Wang Liuling; Xiang Ming; Zhang Xinghua; Wang Yunfeng; Wei Shengxian

    2009-01-01

    Performance of concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system is researched by experiment and simulation calculation. The results show that the I-V curve of the GaAs cell array is better than that of crystal silicon solar cell arrays and the exergy produced by 9.51% electrical efficiency of the GaAs solar cell array can reach 68.93% of the photovoltaic/thermal system. So improving the efficiency of solar cell arrays can introduce more exergy and the system value can be upgraded. At the same time, affecting factors of solar cell arrays such as series resistance, temperature and solar irradiance also have been analyzed. The output performance of a solar cell array with lower series resistance is better and the working temperature has a negative impact on the voltage in concentrating light intensity. The output power has a -20 W/V coefficient and so cooling fluid must be used. Both heat energy and electrical power are then obtained with a solar trough concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system. (semiconductor devices)

  3. Environmental thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Samuel M; Guisto, John A; Sullivan, John B

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stress from cold and heat can affect health and productivity in a wide range of environmental and workload conditions. Health risks typically occur in the outer zones of heat and cold stress, but are also related to workload. Environmental factors related to thermal stress are reviewed. Individuals undergo thermoregulatory physiologic changes to adapt and these changes are reviewed. Heat and cold related illnesses are reviewed as well as their appropriate therapy. Published standards, thresholds and recommendations regarding work practices, personal protection and types of thermal loads are reviewed.

  4. Influence of Y2O3 Addition on Crystallization, Thermal, Mechanical, and Electrical Properties of BaO-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 Glass-Ceramic for Ceramic Ball Grid Array Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Wei; Zheng, Jingguo

    2018-01-01

    Y2O3 addition has a significant influence on the crystallization, thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of BaO -Al2O3 -B2O3 -SiO2 (BABS) glass-ceramics. Semi-quantitative calculation based on x-ray diffraction demonstrated that with increasing Y2O3 content, both the crystallinity and the phase content of cristobalite gradually decreased. It is effective for the additive Y2O3 to inhibit the formation of cristobalite phase with a large coefficient of thermal expansion value. The flexural strength and the Young's modulus, thus, are remarkably increased from 140 MPa to 200 MPa and 56.5 GPa to 63.7 GPa, respectively. Also, the sintering kinetics of BABS glass-ceramics with various Y2O3 were investigated using the isothermal sintering shrinkage curve at different sintering temperatures. The sintering activation energy Q sharply decreased from 99.8 kJ/mol to 81.5 kJ/mol when 0.2% Y2O3 was added, which indicated that a small amount of Y2O3 could effectively promote the sintering procedure of BABS glass-ceramics.

  5. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  6. Photoluminescence, thermally stimulated luminescence and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    an important role in the development of thermolumine- scent dosimeters (Vohra et al 1980; Shinde et al 1996) and offer a very fertile area for further studies to eluci- date the thermally stimulated reactions resulting in lumine- scence. Actinide doped alkaline-earth sulphates are of spe- cial interest due to an array of defect ...

  7. Photovoltaic array reliability optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the photovoltaic array reliability problem is presented, and a high reliability/minimum cost approach to this problem is presented. Design areas covered are cell failure, interconnect fatigue, and electrical insulation breakdown, and three solution strategies are discussed. The first involves controlling component failures in the solar cell (cell cracking, cell interconnects) and at the module level (must be statistically treated). Second, a fault tolerant circuit is designed which reduces array degradation, improves module yield losses, and controls hot-spot heating. Third, cost optimum module replacement strategies are also effective in reducing array degradation. This can be achieved by minimizing the life-cycle energy cost of the photovoltaic system. The integration of these solutions is aimed at reducing the 0.01% failure rate.

  8. Coaxial phased array antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    A coaxial antenna array for communicating circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation is disclosed. A pair of open ended antenna cavities is coaxially constructed and operates by excitation of linear radiation elements arranged within each of the cavities. A pair of crossed dipole radiation devices is centered within the inner cavity and operated by means of a phase shifting network circuit to transmit as well as receive circularly polarized radiation. Four monopole radiation devices are symmetrically arranged to operate in the outer cavity in phase quadrature by means of the phase shifting network circuit to both transmit and receive circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation. Combined operation of the two antenna cavities with a 180 deg phase differential between the fields related to the two antenna cavities provides a broad beam, relatively wide frequency bandwidth communication capability. Particular embodiments disclosed feature a generally square cavity array as well as a circular cavity array.

  9. Micromachined droplet ejector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perçin, Gökhan; Yaralioglu, Göksenin G.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2002-12-01

    In this article we present a micromachined flextensional droplet ejector array used to eject liquids. By placing a fluid behind one face of a vibrating circular plate that has an orifice at its center, we achieve continuous ejection of the fluid. We present results of ejection of water and isopropanol. The ejector is harmless to sensitive fluids and can be used to eject fuels, organic polymers, photoresists, low-k dielectrics, adhesives, and chemical and biological samples. Micromachined two-dimensional array flextensional droplet ejectors were realized using planar silicon micromachining techniques. Typical resonant frequency of the micromachined device ranges from 400 kHz to 4.5 MHz. The ejections of water through a 4 μm diameter orifice at 3.45 MHz and a 10 μm diameter orifice at 2.15 MHz were demonstrated by using the developed micromachined two-dimensional array ejectors.

  10. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  11. SEP solar array Shuttle flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Hill, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to verify the operational performance of a full-scale Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) solar array is described. Scheduled to fly on the Shuttle in 1983, the array will be deployed from the bay for ten orbits, with dynamic excitation to test the structural integrity being furnished by the Orbiter verniers; thermal, electrical, and sun orientation characteristics will be monitored, in addition to safety, reliability, and cost effective performance. The blanket, with aluminum and glass as solar cell mass simulators, is 4 by 32 m, with panels (each 0.38 by 4 m) hinged together; two live Si cell panels will be included. The panels are bonded to stiffened graphite-epoxy ribs and are storable in a box in the bay. The wing support structure is detailed, noting the option of releasing the wing into space by use of the Remote Manipulator System if the wing cannot be refolded. Procedures and equipment for monitoring the array behavior are outlined, and comprise both analog data and TV recording for later playback and analysis. The array wing experiment will also aid in developing measurement techniques for large structure dynamics in space.

  12. A review of array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  13. WE-H-209-01: Advances in Ultrasound Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynynen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments

  14. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  15. Measurement of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Compression Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changhong

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the form of vertically aligned arrays or films has been of interest due to the super-compressible response and the ability to be used as electrical and thermal contacts. CNT arrays have shown the remarkable ability to react as foam-like structures and exhibit localized, coordinated buckling within specific regions. An understanding of the buckling region evolution and the resulting effects on the bulk CNT array response are important, unanswered fundamental questions necessary for the future application of CNT arrays. Here, we report on the low-cycle compression of bulk vertically aligned CNT arrays to observe initiation and growth of the buckling as a function of compressive strain and the contacting substrate material. A critical strain of ˜5.5% is found above which the buckling region length increased and below which remained at or below the applied strain. The results are corroborated with nanoindentation on the surfaces, which indicate a stiffening of the near surface by 9.4%-16.5% with increasing applied strain. Also, contact counterfaces with different stiffness, lithium niobate and a polymer gel, were compared, which resulted in changes of ˜32% in total array height after cyclic compression. Raman spectroscopy on CNT arrays before and after compressive deformation was performed observing repeatable vibrational shifts in the strained regions. Also, to observe the applicability of CNT arrays as contact sensors, electrical resistance change during compression was measured and found to increase by 4 times in the parallel versus vertical direction. Observation and results of the buckling region nature and relationship with applied strain and contacting substrates are important for applying the nanotube arrays to energy absorbing cushions, tunable dampers, thermal contacts, contact sensing, chemical sensing, or in sliding contact.

  16. Hyperspectral Longwave Infrared Focal Plane Array and Camera Based on Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a hyperspectral focal plane array and camera imaging in a large number of sharp hyperspectral bands in the thermal infrared. The camera is...

  17. Optothermal profile of an ablation catheter with integrated microcoil for MR-thermometry during Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies of the liver—an in-vitro experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardoulaki, Evdokia M; Syms, Richard R A; Young, Ian R; Choonee, Kaushal; Rea, Marc; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M W

    2015-03-01

    Flexible microcoils integrated with ablation catheters can improve the temperature accuracy during local MR-thermometry in Nd:YAG laser interstitial thermal therapies. Here, the authors are concerned with obtaining a preliminary confirmation of the clinical utility of the modified catheter. They investigate whether the thin-film substrate and copper tracks of the printed coil inductor affect the symmetry of the thermal profile, and hence of the lesion produced. Transmission spectroscopy in the near infrared was performed to test for the attenuation at 1064 nm through the 25 μm thick Kapton substrate of the microcoil. The radial transmission profile of an infrared high-power, light emitting diode with >80% normalized power at 1064 nm was measured through a cross section of the modified applicator to assess the impact of the copper inductor on the optical profile. The measurements were performed in air, as well as with the applicator surrounded by two types of scattering media; crystals of NaCl and a layer of liver-mimicking gel phantom. A numerical model based on Huygens-Fresnel principle and finite element simulations, using a commercially available package (COMSOL Multiphysics), were employed to compare with the optical measurements. The impact of the modified optical profile on the thermal symmetry was assessed by examining the high resolution microcoil derived thermal maps from a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a liver-mimicking gel phantom. Less than 30% attenuation through the Kapton film was verified. Shadowing behind the copper tracks was observed in air and the measured radial irradiation correlated well with the diffraction pattern calculated numerically using the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Both optical experiments and simulations, demonstrate that shadowing is mitigated by the scattering properties of a turbid medium. The microcoil derived thermal maps at the end of a Nd:YAG laser ablation performed on a gel phantom in a 3 T scanner confirm that the

  18. Developing the ultimate biomimetic flow-sensor array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinink, C.M.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Kolster, M.L.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution reports on the major developments and achievements in our group on fabricating highly sensitive biomimetic flow-sensor arrays. The mechanoreceptive sensory hairs of crickets are taken as a model system for their ability to perceive flow signals at thermal noise levels and,

  19. Thruster array design approaches for a solar electric propulsion Encke Flyby mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Design approaches are described and evaluated for a mercury electron-bombardment ion thruster array. Such an array might be used on a solar electric interplanetary spacecraft that obtains electrical energy from large solar panels. Thruster array designs are described and evaluated as they would apply to an Encke Flyby mission. Besides several well known approaches, a new concept utilizing individual two-axis gimbal actuators on each thruster is described and shown to have many structural and thermal advantages.

  20. Fuzzy Array Approach to Unit Commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jan; Eliasson, Bo

    1996-01-01

    The paper investigates the unit commitment problem of Swedish power company Sydkraft as a constraint satisfaction problem. The power system is a simplified system with nuclear, thermal, and hydro generators as well as power interchange. In this paper we focus on soft constraints, for instance `ap...... `approximately equal`, `much larger than`, and `a little`. Several authors have recognized the significance of soft or fuzzy constraints. Our specific objective is to compute a power balance by means of fuzzy array logic in order to accommodate uncertainty....

  1. Thermal surveillance of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A systematic aircraft program to monitor changes in the thermal emission from volcanoes of the Cascade Range has been initiated and is being carried out in conjunction with ERTS-1 thermal surveillance experiments. Night overflights by aircraft equipped with thermal infrared scanners sensitive to terrestrial emission in the 4-5.5 and 8-14 micron bands are currently being carried out at intervals of a few months. Preliminary results confirm that Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Mount Saint Helens, Mount Shasta, and the Lassen area continue to be thermally active, although with the exception of Lassen which erupted between 1914 and 1917, and Mount Saint Helens which had a series of eruptions between 1831 and 1834, there has been no recent eruptive activity. Excellent quality infrared images recorded over Mount Rainier, as recently as April, 1972, show similar thermal patterns to those reported in 1964-1966. Infrared images of Mount Baker recorded in November 1970 and again in April 1972 revealed a distinct array of anomalies 1000 feet below the crater rim and associated with fumaroles or structures permitting convective heat transfer to the surface.

  2. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  3. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  4. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  5. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  6. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  7. Spaceborne Processor Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edward T.; Schatzel, Donald V.; Whitaker, William D.; Sterling, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A Spaceborne Processor Array in Multifunctional Structure (SPAMS) can lower the total mass of the electronic and structural overhead of spacecraft, resulting in reduced launch costs, while increasing the science return through dynamic onboard computing. SPAMS integrates the multifunctional structure (MFS) and the Gilgamesh Memory, Intelligence, and Network Device (MIND) multi-core in-memory computer architecture into a single-system super-architecture. This transforms every inch of a spacecraft into a sharable, interconnected, smart computing element to increase computing performance while simultaneously reducing mass. The MIND in-memory architecture provides a foundation for high-performance, low-power, and fault-tolerant computing. The MIND chip has an internal structure that includes memory, processing, and communication functionality. The Gilgamesh is a scalable system comprising multiple MIND chips interconnected to operate as a single, tightly coupled, parallel computer. The array of MIND components shares a global, virtual name space for program variables and tasks that are allocated at run time to the distributed physical memory and processing resources. Individual processor- memory nodes can be activated or powered down at run time to provide active power management and to configure around faults. A SPAMS system is comprised of a distributed Gilgamesh array built into MFS, interfaces into instrument and communication subsystems, a mass storage interface, and a radiation-hardened flight computer.

  8. Lectin-Array Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Raquel; Echevarria, Juan; Hernandez, Alvaro; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune or neurodegenerative disorders. Unlocking the potential of glycans as disease markers will require rapid and unbiased glycoproteomics methods for glycan biomarker discovery. The present method is a facile and rapid protocol for qualitative analysis of protein glycosylation in complex biological mixtures. While traditional lectin arrays only provide an average signal for the glycans in the mixture, which is usually dominated by the most abundant proteins, our method provides individual lectin binding profiles for all proteins separated in the gel electrophoresis step. Proteins do not have to be excised from the gel for subsequent analysis via the lectin array but are transferred by contact diffusion from the gel to a glass slide presenting multiple copies of printed lectin arrays. Fluorescently marked glycoproteins are trapped by the printed lectins via specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions and after a washing step their binding profile with up to 20 lectin probes is analyzed with a fluorescent scanner. The method produces the equivalent of 20 lectin blots in a single experiment, giving detailed insight into the binding epitopes present in the fractionated proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh, E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazd.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasi, Amir [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza [Laser and Optics Research School, 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-28

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4–60.0 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.21 μg L{sup −1}, an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05–300 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.016 μg L{sup −1} and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples. - Graphical abstract: A novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient mixed hemimicelles

  10. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Abbasi, Amir; Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza; Behjat, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4–60.0 μg L −1 , a detection limit of 0.21 μg L −1 , an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L −1 level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05–300 μg L −1 , a detection limit of 0.016 μg L −1 and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L −1 level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples. - Graphical abstract: A novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid

  11. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available wider range of temperature limits, saving energy while still satisfying the majority of building occupants. It is also noted that thermal comfort varies significantly between individuals and it is generally not possible to provide a thermal environment...

  12. Simulating the Sky as Seen by the Square Kilometer Array using the MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Oberoi, D.; Wayth, R. B.

    2009-05-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is a proposed next-generation radio telescope that will operate at frequencies of 0.1-30 GHz and be 50-100 times more sensitive than existing radio arrays. Meeting the performance goals of this instrument will require innovative new hardware and software developments, a variety of which are now under consideration. Key to evaluating the performance characteristics of proposed SKA designs and testing the feasibility of new data calibration and processing algorithms is the ability to carry out realistic simulations of radio wavelength arrays under a variety of observing conditions. The MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS) (http://www.haystack.mit.edu/ast/arrays/maps/index.html) is an observations simulation package designed to achieve this goal. MAPS accepts an input source list or sky model and generates a model visibility set for a user-defined "virtual observatory'', incorporating such factors as array geometry, primary beam shape, field-of-view, and time and frequency resolution. Optionally, effects such as thermal noise, out-of-beam sources, variable station beams, and time/location-dependent ionospheric effects can be included. We will showcase current capabilities of MAPS for SKA applications by presenting results from an analysis of the effects of realistic sky backgrounds on the achievable image fidelity and dynamic range of SKA-like arrays comprising large numbers of small-diameter antennas.

  13. Thermal and biological properties of the Schiff base N,N‧-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, a potential adjuvant to antibiotic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, T. A.; da Costa, R. C.; da Silva, L. E.; Teixeira, A. M. R.; Lima, V. N.; Sena, D. M.; Coutinho, H. D. Melo; Freire, P. T. C.; Pizani, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    Schiff base N,N‧-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, salophen, is a substance that presents synergism when combined with amikacin against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Measurements of temperature dependence of the Raman spectra of salophen combined with thermal analysis investigations are presented. The room temperature crystalline structure seems to be stable up to the temperature where the phase transition from solid to liquid (433-443 K) is observed. The Raman spectra in the temperature range 433-443 K were observed to be characterized by the loss of external vibrational modes, in accordance with thermal analysis curves. According to thermogravimetric analysis, salophen shows a weight loss variation in the temperature range 300-453 K corresponding to 5% loss in weight, which is attributed to dehydration and materials melting temperature. The enthalpy (ΔH) obtained from the integration of the differential scanning calorimetry peak at melting (Tm = 438 K) and decomposition temperature (Td = 484 K) is founded to be - 91 J/g and 239 J/g, respectively. Finally, it was carried out biological assays to evaluate the antibacterial potential of the salophen.

  14. Fast Neutron Spectroscopy using a CLYC array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Emery; Brown, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Lister, C. J.; Wilson, G. L.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    A new inorganic scintillator, Cs2LiYCl6, or CLYC, has recently shown great promise as a dual gamma-neutron detector, where neutron-gamma discrimination is achieved through digital pulse shape processing. The 35Cl(n,p) reaction allows fast neutrons to be measured with an energy resolution of ~10 %. Following initial tests with natural Li, 6Li-depleted crystals were chosen to reduce the strong thermal capture response of 6Li. A 16-element array of 1'' x 1'' 6Li-depleted CLYC crystals is being tested in a variety of applications. A VME-based digital DAQ is used for pulse shape discrimination and extracting energies. The array was deployed at the LANSCE WNR facility, to measure elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections of neutrons on 56Fe and 238U. The data acquisition and analysis software were originally based on Python. The sorting codes were re-written in C, which sped up the analysis by two orders of magnitude. Most of the sorting code is within the framework of the CERN-ROOT software. Details of the detector array and the analysis will be presented. Supported by NNSA-SSAA program through DOE Grant DE-NA00013008.

  15. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  16. Radiation from waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, M.

    1977-07-01

    The theory of phased waveguide arrays (the 'Grill'), developed in view of Lower Hybrid Heating of toroidal plasmas, is applied to two simple cases, in order to gain insight on field distributions and power flow. First, the far-field radiation pattern of the Grill towards an empty half-space is evaluated. Next, the excitation of a passive waveguide by a Grill mounted in a T configuration is considered. These results constitue two examples of exact solutions of Maxwell's equations in relatively complex geometry

  17. Molecular logic gate arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, A Prasanna

    2011-03-01

    Chemists are now able to emulate the ideas and instruments of mathematics and computer science with molecules. The integration of molecular logic gates into small arrays has been a growth area during the last few years. The design principles underlying a collection of these cases are examined. Some of these computing molecules are applicable in medical- and biotechnologies. Cases of blood diagnostics, 'lab-on-a-molecule' systems, and molecular computational identification of small objects are included. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Synthesis and photophysical study of unsymmetrical porphyrin arrays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Porphyrin-based dimers, trimers and oligomers have received considerable attention as models for the study of electron transfer and energy transfer processes in photosynthesis. Multiporphyrin arrays are also attractive because of their potential use in nonlinear optics, molecular devices and photodynamic therapy of ...

  19. The regeneration of thermal wound on mice skin (Mus Musculus) after Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation for cancer therapy candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsari, R.; Nahdliyatun, E.; Winarni, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the regeneration of mice skin tissue (Mus Musculus) irradiated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser and morphological change due to Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation compared to conventional heating (hairdryer). The 2-3 month of twenty-seven mice were used for experimental animals. Mice were incised in the dorsum by the damage effect of laser energy dose (therapeutic dose) of 29.5 J/cm2 with 10 seconds of exposure time, 10 Hz of repetition rate, and 100 pulses of the given single pulse energy. The mice skin tissue was injuried by hairdryer to get burned effect. Mice were divided into three groups, Group I (control) were not treated by anything, Group II were treated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation and sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days, and Group III were treated by hairdryer then sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days. Pathology examination showed that the energy of 29,5 J/cm2 dose produced the hole effect (ablation) through the hypodermic layer caused by optical breakdown and collagen coagulation. Thus, the 60 °C temperature of burn showed coagulation necrosis because piknosis discovered in the injured area. The regeneration process showed that the mice skin tissue's ability to regenerate was irradiated by fast laser because of the focus of Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser. It was showed by the scab releases on third day and completely reepithelialization formation on the fifth day. The collagen fibers distribution was same as normal skin tissue on day 5 and so did angiogenesis. Therefore, Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser can be applied for problems of dermatology medical therapies, especially melasma, nevus of ota and tatto therapy. For skin cancer therapy application, energy dose of unregenerated skin tissue is chosen because the death expected effect is permanent.

  20. The Long Wavelength Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlström, Ylva

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open-skies, user-oriented aperture synthesis instrument dedicated to explore frequencies between 20 and 80 MHz. The LWA will provide high temporal (millisecond or better) and high spatial resolution (arcsecond) and mJy-level sensitivity. The LWA key science areas include acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM; the high-redshift Universe; planetary, solar and space science; and the transient universe at radio wavelengths. In addition, key goals of the LWA are as a training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers and to re-invigorate radio astronomy in the US at the university level. The LWA will be operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC), thereby providing opportunities for students within the fields of astronomy, computer science and electrical engineering. Currently, in its first year of construction funding, the LWA team is now bringing up the first station near the Very Large Array site in the southwest US.

  1. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  2. Array controller system with cryogenic pre-amplifiers for MIMIZUKU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, K.; Sako, S.; Miyata, T.; Kamizuka, T.; Ohsawa, R.; Uchiyama, M. S.; Mori, K.; Yamaguchi, J.; Asano, K.; Uchiyama, M.

    2016-07-01

    MIMIZUKU is a mid-infrared imager and spectrograph being developed for the University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) 6.5-m telescope (PI: Y. Yoshii). To fully utilize a high atmospheric transmission of the Chajnantor site, MIMIZUKU covers a wide wavelength range from 2 to 38 μm with three array detectors: a HAWAII-1RG HgCdTe 1024 × 1024 array with a 5 μm cutoff manufactured by Teledyne, an Aquarius Si:As IBC 1024 × 1024 array by Raytheon, and a MF-128 Si:Sb BIB 128 × 128 array by DRS. We have newly developed an array controller system to operate these multiple arrays. A sampling rate higher than 0.5 MHz is required to prevent from saturation of their wells in broad-band imaging observations with MIMIZUKU due to high thermal background flux. Such high speed signals are dulled when passing through lines from the arrays to readout circuits. To overcome this problem, we have developed high-speed cryogenic buffer pre-amplifier circuits with commercial GaAs MESFETs, instead of Si JFETs, which are generally used in buffer amplifiers at cryogenic temperatures. The cryogenic buffer circuits are installed on an outer wall of the optical bench of MIMIZUKU at 20 K. We have measured readout noises of the array controller system including the cryogenic buffers in a test cryostat and room temperature circuits and confirmed that input referred noises of the system are lower than the specification value of the readout noise of the Aquarius array.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, Teruyoshi; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively

  4. Electromagnetically Clean Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem, Theodore G.; Kenniston, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    The term 'electromagnetically clean solar array' ('EMCSA') refers to a panel that contains a planar array of solar photovoltaic cells and that, in comparison with a functionally equivalent solar-array panel of a type heretofore used on spacecraft, (1) exhibits less electromagnetic interferences to and from other nearby electrical and electronic equipment and (2) can be manufactured at lower cost. The reduction of electromagnetic interferences is effected through a combination of (1) electrically conductive, electrically grounded shielding and (2) reduction of areas of current loops (in order to reduce magnetic moments). The reduction of cost is effected by designing the array to be fabricated as a more nearly unitary structure, using fewer components and fewer process steps. Although EMCSAs were conceived primarily for use on spacecraft they are also potentially advantageous for terrestrial applications in which there are requirements to limit electromagnetic interference. In a conventional solar panel of the type meant to be supplanted by an EMCSA panel, the wiring is normally located on the back side, separated from the cells, thereby giving rise to current loops having significant areas and, consequently, significant magnetic moments. Current-loop geometries are chosen in an effort to balance opposing magnetic moments to limit far-0field magnetic interactions, but the relatively large distances separating current loops makes full cancellation of magnetic fields problematic. The panel is assembled from bare photovoltaic cells by means of multiple sensitive process steps that contribute significantly to cost, especially if electomagnetic cleanliness is desired. The steps include applying a cover glass and electrical-interconnect-cell (CIC) sub-assemble, connecting the CIC subassemblies into strings of series-connected cells, laying down and adhesively bonding the strings onto a panel structure that has been made in a separate multi-step process, and mounting the

  5. Modular microchannel cooled heatsinks for high average power laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Ray; Benett, William J.; Freitas, Barry L.; Mundinger, D.; Comaskey, Brian J.; Solarz, Richard W.; Emanuel, Mark A.

    1992-04-01

    Detailed performance results for an efficient and low thermal impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor or CW operation of fully filled laser diode arrays is made possible at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using an anisotropic chemical etching process. A modular rack-and-stack architecture is adopted for the heatsink design, allowing arbitrarily large two-dimensional arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel cooled heatsinks is ideally suited to pump array requirements for high average power crystalline lasers because of the stringent temperature demands that result from coupling the diode light to several nanometers wide absorption features characteristics of lasing ions in crystals.

  6. Microchannel-cooled heatsinks for high-average-power laser diode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Freitas, Barry L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Beach, Raymond J.; Sutton, Steven B.; Emanuel, Mark A.; Solarz, Richard W.

    1993-11-01

    Detailed performance results for an efficient and low thermal impedance laser diode array heatsink are presented. High duty factor and even cw operation of fully filled laser diode arrays at high stacking densities are enabled at high average power. Low thermal impedance is achieved using a liquid coolant and laminar flow through microchannels. The microchannels are fabricated in silicon using an anisotropic chemical etching process. A modular rack-and- stack architecture is adopted for heatsink design, allowing arbitrarily large 2-D arrays to be fabricated and easily maintained. The excellent thermal control of the microchannel heatsinks is ideally suited to pump array requirements for high average power crystalline lasers because of the stringent temperature demands that are required to efficiently couple diode light to several-nanometer-wide absorption features characteristic of lasing ions in crystals.

  7. Synthesis of ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, G.Q.; Shen, W.Z.; Zheng, M.J.; Fan, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    An effective approach is demonstrated for growing ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering deposition on porous alumina membranes (PAMs). The realization of highly ordered hexagonal ZnO nanopore arrays benefits from the unique properties of ZnO (hexagonal structure, polar surfaces, and preferable growth directions) and PAMs (controllable hexagonal nanopores and localized negative charges). Further evidence has been shown through the effects of nanorod size and thermal treatment of PAMs on the yielded morphology of ZnO nanopore arrays. This approach opens the possibility of creating regular semiconducting nanopore arrays for the application of filters, sensors, and templates

  8. Development of nanowire arrays for neural probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Xie, Jining; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    It is already established that functional electrical stimulation is an effective way to restore many functions of the brain in disabled individuals. The electrical stimulation can be done by using an array of electrodes. Neural probes stimulate or sense the biopotentials mainly through the exposed metal sites. These sites should be smaller relative to the spatial potential distribution so that any potential averaging in the sensing area can be avoided. At the same time, the decrease in size of these sensing sites is limited due to the increase in impedance levels and the thermal noise while decreasing its size. It is known that current density in a planar electrode is not uniform and a higher current density can be observer around the perimeter of the electrodes. Electrical measurements conducted on many nanotubes and nanowires have already proved that it could be possible to use for current density applications and the drawbacks of the present design in neural probes can be overcome by incorporating many nanotechnology solutions. In this paper we present the design and development of nanowire arrays for the neural probe for the multisite contact which has the ability to collect and analyze isolated single unit activity. An array of vertically grown nanowires is used as contact site and many of such arrays can be used for stimulating as well as recording sites. The nanolevel interaction and wireless communication solution can extend to applications involving the treatment of many neurological disorders including Parkinson"s disease, Alzheimer"s disease, spinal injuries and the treatment of blindness and paralyzed patients with minimal or no invasive surgical procedures.

  9. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  10. Effect of fibre shape on transverse thermal conductivity of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ent. The work of this paper focuses entirely on this transverse thermal conductivity of the fibre reinforced composite lamina. Rayleigh (1892) was the first to analyse the effective property of periodic arrays. He considered the effective electric conductivity of dilute dispersions with spheres arranged in a simple cubic array.

  11. Compact dynamic microfluidic iris array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmle, Christina; Doering, Christoph; Steuer, Anna; Fouckhardt, Henning

    2011-09-01

    A dynamic microfluidic iris is realized. Light attenuation is achieved by absorption of an opaque liquid (e.g. black ink). The adjustment of the iris diameter is achieved by fluid displacement via a transparent elastomer (silicone) half-sphere. This silicone calotte is hydraulically pressed against a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrate as the bottom window, such that the opaque liquid is squeezed away, this way opening the iris. With this approach a dynamic range of more than 60 dB can be achieved with response times in the ms to s regime. The design allows the realization of a single iris as well as an iris array. So far the master for the molded silicone structure was fabricated by precision mechanics. The aperture diameter was changed continuously from 0 to 8 mm for a single iris and 0 to 4 mm in case of a 3 x 3 iris array. Moreover, an iris array was combined with a PMMA lens array into a compact module, the distance of both arrays equaling the focal length of the lenses. This way e.g. spatial frequency filter arrays can be realized. The possibility to extend the iris array concept to an array with many elements is demonstrated. Such arrays could be applied e.g. in light-field cameras.

  12. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  13. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  14. Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    and Science in Sports and Exercise 37: 1328--1334. Coris EE, Ramirez AM, and Van Durme DJ (2004) Heat illness in athletes : The dangerous combination...of heat, humidity and exercise. Sports Medicine 34: 9--16. Gordon CJ and Leon LR (2005) Thermal stress and the physiological response to environmental...code) 2011 Book Chapter-Enc. of Environmental Health Thermal Stress L.R. Leon, C.J. Gordon Thermal and Mountain Medicine Division U.S. Research

  15. Modular package for cooling a laser diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.; Beach, Raymond J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar packages and active cooling. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar package having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar packages are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink that is attached proximate to the laser bar so that it absorbs heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar package comprises a thin inlet manifold and a thin outlet manifold connected to an inlet corridor and an outlet corridor. The inlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array, and the outlet corridor comprises a hole extending through each of the packages in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has application as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers. Further, it can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors, and in military and space applications, and it can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations.

  16. Printed glycan array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shilova, Nadezhda; Navakouski, Maxim; Khasbiullina, Nailya

    2012-01-01

    Using printed glycan array (PGA) we compared the results of antibody profiling in undiluted, moderately (1:15) and highly (1:100) diluted human blood serum. Undiluted serum is suitable for studying blood as a tissue in its native state, whereas to study the serum of newborns or small animals one...... usually has to dilute the starting material in order to have sufficient volume for PGA experimentation. The PGA used in this study allows for the use of whole serum without modifications to the protocol, and the background is surprisingly low. Antibodies profiles observed in undiluted serum versus 1......:15 dilution were similar, with only a limited number of new signals identified in the undiluted serum. However, unexpected irregularities were found when IgG and IgM are measured separately, namely, at a 1:15 dilution more intensive IgG signals for many glycans are observed. We believe that in conditions...

  17. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  18. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  19. Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hust, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines the heat transfer properties of solids, with emphasis on the behavior of pure metals and alloys. Topics considered include electronic conduction, magnetic field effects, lattice conduction, measuring methods, specimen size, uncertainty, thermal anchoring, radial heat loss, thermal conductivity apparatus, thermal diffusivity apparatus, empirical correlations, the Wiedemann-Franz-Lorenz law, Matthiessen's rule, low-temperature correlation, predictive techniques, crystalline dielectrics, and disordered dielectrics. The materials examined include copper, aluminium, binary alloys, structural alloys, and structural composites

  20. Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse in a Patient with a Thermal Burn Wound Caused by Hot Stone Therapy, a Traditional Thai Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasivimol Srisukho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of an incarcerated uterine prolapse along with an infected wound at the anterior uterine wall. She had previously undergone the traditional Thai practice Yue Fai, or “lying by the fire,” as performed by postpartum women. However, her uterus was burned by the extremely high temperature involved in the practice; it subsequently became infected and incarcerated. Pelvic examination revealed stage IV genitourinary prolapse according to the POP-Q classification. An ill-defined ulcer measuring 6.5 × 4.5 cm was present in the anterior wall of the uterus, and a 2.0 cm diameter ulcer was present in the right posterior wall of the uterus. The patient was treated symptomatically with broad-spectrum antibiotics, local estrogen therapy, analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents, and antiseptic dressing of the ulcerated area. After alleviation of all symptoms, the ulcer almost completely healed. She was advised to undergo definitive surgical treatment for the prolapsed uterus.

  1. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  2. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common cancers develop through a multistep process often including inherited susceptibility. Collaboration among multiple institutions, and funding from multiple sources, has allowed the development of an inexpensive genotyping microarray, the OncoArray. The array includes a genome-wi...

  3. Submillimeter heterodyne arrays for APEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güsten, R.; Baryshev, A.; Bell, A.; Belloche, A.; Graf, U.; Hafok, H.; Heyminck, S.; Hochgürtel, S.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.; Kasemann, C.; Klein, B.; Klein, T.; Korn, A.; Krämer, I.; Leinz, C.; Lundgren, A.; Menten, K. M.; Meyer, K.; Muders, D.; Pacek, F.; Rabanus, D.; Schäfer, F.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, G.; Stutzki, J.; Wieching, G.; Wunsch, A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report on developments of submillimeter heterodyne arrays for high resolution spectroscopy with APEX. Shortly, we will operate state-of-the-art instruments in all major atmospheric windows accessible from Llano de Chajnantor. CHAMP+, a dual-color 2×7 element heterodyne array for operation in the

  4. Therapy: a new nonsurgical therapy option for benign thyroid nodules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing implementation of iodization programs, benign nodular thyroid disease will remain a prevalent therapeutic concern for decades. recent research suggests that nonsurgical therapy, including radioactive iodine, radiofrequency thermal ablation and percutaneous laser ablation...

  5. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  6. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  7. Uncooled infrared focal plane array imaging in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shuyu

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the development of uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIFPA) imaging in China in the past decade. Sensors based on optical or electrical read-out mechanism were developed but the latter dominates the market. In resistive bolometers, VOx and amorphous silicon are still the two major thermal-sensing materials. The specifications of the IRFPA made by different manufactures were collected and compared. Currently more than five Chinese companies and institutions design and fabricate uncooled infrared focal plane array. Some devices have sensitivity as high as 30 mK; the largest array for commercial products is 640×512 and the smallest pixel size is 17 μm. Emphasis is given on the pixel MEMS design, ROIC design, fabrication, and packaging of the IRFPA manufactured by GWIC, especially on design for high sensitivities, low noise, better uniformity and linearity, better stabilization for whole working temperature range, full-digital design, etc.

  8. Water Cooled TJ Dense Array Modules for Parabolic Dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeckenhoff, Ruediger; Kubera, Tim; Rasch, Klaus Dieter

    2010-01-01

    AZUR SPACE Solar Power GmbH has developed a novel type of dense array module for use in parabolic dishes. Such dishes never produce a perfectly homogeneous, rectangular light spot but an inhomogeneous light distribution. A regular module would use this light distribution very inefficiently. Therefore AZUR SPACE developed a dense array module concept which can be adapted to inhomogeneous light spots. It is populated with state of the art triple junction solar cells.The modules are designed for light intensities in the range of 50-100 W/cm 2 and are actively water cooled. Prototypes are installed in 11 m 2 parabolic dishes produced by Zenith Solar. A peak output of 2.3 kW electrical and 5.5 kW thermal power could be demonstrated. The thermal power may be used for solar heating, solar cooling or warm water.

  9. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darkazalli, G.

    1980-07-01

    Month by month energy transfer data between an occupied residence and its energy supply systems are presented. Energy transfer data are divided into different categories depending on how the energy is consumed. Energy transfers between some system components are also categorized. These components include a flat-plate thermal collector array, a flat-plate photovoltaic array, a dc to ac inverter, thermal storage tanks, and a series heat pump. System operations included directing surplus electrical energy (generated by the photovoltaic array) into the local utility grid. The heat pump used off-peak utility power to chill water during the cooling season.

  10. Planning a Global Array of Broadband Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Keith D.; Ammon, Charles J.

    2013-08-01

    A diverse group of more than 70 seismologists met for 2 days in Raleigh, N.C., to report on recent innovations in seismic array methods and to discuss the future of seismic arrays in global seismology. The workshop was sponsored by the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), with U.S. National Science Foundation funding. Participants included representatives of existing array research groups in Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Norway, and the United States, with individuals from academia, government, and industry. The workshop was organized by the authors of this meeting report, Pablo Ampeuro (California Institute of Technology), and Colleen Dalton (Boston University), along with IRIS staff support.

  11. Self-assembled ordered carbon-nanotube arrays and membranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Imagine free-standing flexible membranes with highly-aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) running through their thickness. Perhaps with both ends of the CNTs open for highly controlled nanofiltration? Or CNTs at heights uniformly above a polymer membrane for a flexible array of nanoelectrodes or field-emitters? How about CNT films with incredible amounts of accessible surface area for analyte adsorption? These self-assembled crystalline nanotubes consist of multiple layers of graphene sheets rolled into concentric cylinders. Tube diameters (3-300 nm), inner-bore diameters (2-15 nm), and lengths (nanometers - microns) are controlled to tailor physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. We proposed to explore growth and characterize nanotube arrays to help determine their exciting functionality for Sandia applications. Thermal chemical vapor deposition growth in a furnace nucleates from a metal catalyst. Ordered arrays grow using templates from self-assembled hexagonal arrays of nanopores in anodized-aluminum oxide. Polymeric-binders can mechanically hold the CNTs in place for polishing, lift-off, and membrane formation. The stiffness, electrical and thermal conductivities of CNTs make them ideally suited for a wide-variety of possible applications. Large-area, highly-accessible gas-adsorbing carbon surfaces, superb cold-cathode field-emission, and unique nanoscale geometries can lead to advanced microsensors using analyte adsorption, arrays of functionalized nanoelectrodes for enhanced electrochemical detection of biological/explosive compounds, or mass-ionizers for gas-phase detection. Materials studies involving membrane formation may lead to exciting breakthroughs in nanofiltration/nanochromatography for the separation of chemical and biological agents. With controlled nanofilter sizes, ultrafiltration will be viable to separate and preconcentrate viruses and many strains of bacteria for 'down-stream' analysis.

  12. The performance analysis of the Trough Concentrating Solar Photovoltaic/Thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Li, G.L.; Ji, X.; Yin, F.; Xu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A 2 m 2 Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system is built, a single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. → Another 10 m 2 TCPV/T system using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. → The economic performance analysis show the electricity generating cost of the TCPV/T system with the concentrating silicon cell array can catch up with flat-plate PV system. -- Abstract: The electrical and thermal performance of a 2 m 2 Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system with an energy flux ratio 10.27 are characterized by experiments. A single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. The experimental results show that the electrical performance of the system with the GaAs cell array is better than that of crystal silicon solar cell arrays. The superior output performance of the GaAs cell array mainly benefits from its lower series resistance. But the thermal performances of the system using the single crystal silicon solar cell array and the polycrystalline silicon solar cell array are better. It results from the widths of the two types of cells in the system close to that of the focal line. Another 10 m 2 TCPV/T system with an energy flux ratio of 20 using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. The experimental results indicate that the photoelectric efficiency of the GaAs cell array is 23.83%, and the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system are 9.88% and 49.84% respectively. While the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system using the low-cost concentrating silicon cell array are 7.51% and 42

  13. The Next-Generation Very Large Array: Technical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    As part of its mandate as a national observatory, the NRAO is looking toward the long range future of radio astronomy and fostering the long term growth of the US astronomical community. NRAO has sponsored a series of science and technical community meetings to consider the science mission and design of a next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA), building on the legacies of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Very Large Array (VLA).The basic ngVLA design emerging from these discussions is an interferometric array with approximately ten times the sensitivity and ten times higher spatial resolution than the VLA and ALMA radio telescopes, optimized for operation in the wavelength range 0.3cm to 3cm. The ngVLA would open a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milli-arcsecond resolution, as well as unprecedented broadband continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The specifications and concepts for major ngVLA system elements are rapidly converging.We will provide an overview of the current system design of the ngVLA. The concepts for major system elements such as the antenna, receiving electronics, and central signal processing will be presented. We will also describe the major development activities that are presently underway to advance the design.

  14. Dependently typed array programs don't go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2008-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  15. Dependently typed array programs don’t go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2009-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  16. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  17. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  18. ESPRIT And Uniform Linear Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. H.; Goldburg, M.; Ottersten, B. E.; Swindlehurst, A. L.; Viberg, M.; Kailath, T.

    1989-11-01

    Abstract ¬â€?ESPRIT is a recently developed and patented technique for high-resolution estimation of signal parameters. It exploits an invariance structure designed into the sensor array to achieve a reduction in computational requirements of many orders of magnitude over previous techniques such as MUSIC, Burg's MEM, and Capon's ML, and in addition achieves performance improvement as measured by parameter estimate error variance. It is also manifestly more robust with respect to sensor errors (e.g. gain, phase, and location errors) than other methods as well. Whereas ESPRIT only requires that the sensor array possess a single invariance best visualized by considering two identical but other-wise arbitrary arrays of sensors displaced (but not rotated) with respect to each other, many arrays currently in use in various applications are uniform linear arrays of identical sensor elements. Phased array radars are commonplace in high-resolution direction finding systems, and uniform tapped delay lines (i.e., constant rate A/D converters) are the rule rather than the exception in digital signal processing systems. Such arrays possess many invariances, and are amenable to other types of analysis, which is one of the main reasons such structures are so prevalent. Recent developments in high-resolution algorithms of the signal/noise subspace genre including total least squares (TLS) ESPRIT applied to uniform linear arrays are summarized. ESPRIT is also shown to be a generalization of the root-MUSIC algorithm (applicable only to the case of uniform linear arrays of omni-directional sensors and unimodular cisoids). Comparisons with various estimator bounds, including CramerRao bounds, are presented.

  19. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment; Caracterizacion dosimetrica de un arreglo 2D de 223 detectores de estado solido para verificaciones matutinas diarias en un equipo de Tomo Terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Lomas del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: uvaldoreyes@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  20. Replica amplification of nucleic acid arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mitra, Robi D.

    2010-08-31

    Disclosed are improved methods of making and using immobilized arrays of nucleic acids, particularly methods for producing replicas of such arrays. Included are methods for producing high density arrays of nucleic acids and replicas of such arrays, as well as methods for preserving the resolution of arrays through rounds of replication. Also included are methods which take advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays for increased sensitivity in detection of sequences on arrays. Improved methods of sequencing nucleic acids immobilized on arrays utilizing single copies of arrays and methods taking further advantage of the availability of replicas of arrays are disclosed. The improvements lead to higher fidelity and longer read lengths of sequences immobilized on arrays. Methods are also disclosed which improve the efficiency of multiplex PCR using arrays of immobilized nucleic acids.

  1. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  2. Antenna arrays a computational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of antenna array topics that are becoming increasingly important in wireless applications, particularly in design and computer modeling. Signal processing and numerical modeling algorithms are explored, and MATLAB computer codes are provided for many of the design examples. Pictures of antenna arrays and components provided by industry and government sources are presented with explanations of how they work. Antenna Arrays is a valuable reference for practicing engineers and scientists in wireless communications, radar, and remote sensing, and an excellent textbook for advanced antenna courses.

  3. Interferometric optical vortex array generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sunil; Senthilkumaran, P

    2007-05-20

    Two new interferometric configurations for optical vortex array generation are presented. These interferometers are different from the conventional interferometers in that they are capable of producing a large number of isolated zeros of intensity, and all of them contain optical vortices. Simulation and theory for optical vortex array generation using three-plane-wave interference is presented. The vortex dipole array produced this way is noninteracting, as there are no attraction or repulsion forces between them, leading to annihilation or creation of vortex pairs.

  4. On the Mesh Array for Matrix Multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    This article presents new properties of the mesh array for matrix multiplication. In contrast to the standard array that requires 3n-2 steps to complete its computation, the mesh array requires only 2n-1 steps. Symmetries of the mesh array computed values are presented which enhance the efficiency of the array for specific applications. In multiplying symmetric matrices, the results are obtained in 3n/2+1 steps. The mesh array is examined for its application as a scrambling system.

  5. Characterization of Kilopixel TES detector arrays for PIPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rahul; Ade, Peter; Benford, Dominic; Bennett, Charles; Chuss, David; Costen, Nicholas; Coughlin, Kevin; Dotson, Jessie; Eimer, Joseph; Fixsen, Dale; Gandilo, Natalie; Halpern, Mark; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Hilton, Gene; Hinshaw, Gary; Irwin, Kent; Jhabvala, Christine; Kimball, Mark; Kogut, Al; Lazear, Justin; Lowe, Luke; Manos, George; McMahon, Jeff; Miller, Timothy; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, Samuel Harvey; Pawlyk, Samuel; Rodriguez, Samelys; Sharp, Elmer; Shirron, Peter; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Sullivan, Dan; Switzer, Eric; Taraschi, Peter; Tucker, Carole; Walts, Alexander; Wollack, Edward

    2018-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Polarization ExploreR (PIPER) is a balloon-borne instrument optimized to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at large angular scales. It will map 85% of the sky in four frequency bands centered at 200, 270, 350, and 600 GHz to characterize dust foregrounds and constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. The sky is imaged on to 32x40 pixel arrays of time-domain multiplexed Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers operating at a bath temperature of 100 mK to achieve background-limited sensitivity. Each kilopixel array is indium-bump-bonded to a 2D superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) time-domain multiplexer (MUX) chip and read out by warm electronics. Each pixel measures total incident power over a frequency band defined by bandpass filters in front of the array, while polarization sensitivity is provided by the upstream Variable-delay Polarization Modulators (VPMs) and analyzer grids. We present measurements of the detector parameters from the laboratory characterization of the first kilopixel science array for PIPER including transition temperature, saturation power, thermal conductivity, time constant, and noise performance. We also describe the testing of the 2D MUX chips, optimization of the integrated readout parameters, and the overall pixel yield of the array. The first PIPER science flight is planned for June 2018 from Palestine, Texas.

  6. In situ x-ray diffraction study on AgI nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yinhai; Ye Changhui; Wang Guozhong; Zhang Lide; Liu Yanmei; Zhao Zhongyan

    2003-01-01

    The AgI nanowire arrays were prepared in the ordered porous alumina membrane by an electrochemical method. Transmission electron microscopy observation shows that the AgI nanowires are located in the channels of the alumina membrane. In situ x-ray diffractions show that the nanowire arrays possess hexagonal close-packed structure (β-AgI) at 293 K, orienting along the (002) plane, whereas at 473 K, the nanowire arrays possess a body-centered cubic structure (α-AgI), orienting along the (110) plane. The AgI nanowire arrays exhibit a negative thermal expansion property from 293 to 433 K, and a higher transition temperature from the β to α phase. We ascribe the negative thermal expansion behavior to the phase transition from the β to α phase, and the elevated transition temperature to the radial restriction by the channels of alumina membrane

  7. Gallium arsenide quantum well-based far infrared array radiometric imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Kathrine A.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.

    1991-01-01

    We have built an array-based camera (FIRARI) for thermal imaging (lambda = 8 to 12 microns). FIRARI uses a square format 128 by 128 element array of aluminum gallium arsenide quantum well detectors that are indium bump bonded to a high capacity silicon multiplexer. The quantum well detectors offer good responsivity along with high response and noise uniformity, resulting in excellent thermal images without compensation for variation in pixel response. A noise equivalent temperature difference of 0.02 K at a scene temperature of 290 K was achieved with the array operating at 60 K. FIRARI demonstrated that AlGaAS quantum well detector technology can provide large format arrays with performance superior to mercury cadmium telluride at far less cost.

  8. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  9. Fundamentals of spherical array processing

    CERN Document Server

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of spherical microphone arrays. It is written for graduate students, researchers and engineers who work with spherical microphone arrays in a wide range of applications.   The first two chapters provide the reader with the necessary mathematical and physical background, including an introduction to the spherical Fourier transform and the formulation of plane-wave sound fields in the spherical harmonic domain. The third chapter covers the theory of spatial sampling, employed when selecting the positions of microphones to sample sound pressure functions in space. Subsequent chapters present various spherical array configurations, including the popular rigid-sphere-based configuration. Beamforming (spatial filtering) in the spherical harmonics domain, including axis-symmetric beamforming, and the performance measures of directivity index and white noise gain are introduced, and a range of optimal beamformers for spherical arrays, includi...

  10. Thermopile Area Array Readout Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/JPL thermopile detector linear arrays, wire bonded to Black Forest Engineering (BFE) CMOS readout integrated circuits (ROICs), have been utilized in NASA...

  11. The Applicability of Incoherent Array Processing to IMS Seismic Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Steven J.

    2014-03-01

    The seismic arrays of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) are highly diverse in size and configuration, with apertures ranging from under 1 km to over 60 km. Large and medium aperture arrays with large inter-site spacings complicate the detection and estimation of high-frequency phases lacking coherence between sensors. Pipeline detection algorithms often miss such phases, since they only consider frequencies low enough to allow coherent array processing, and phases that are detected are often attributed qualitatively incorrect backazimuth and slowness estimates. This can result in missed events, due to either a lack of contributing phases or by corruption of event hypotheses by spurious detections. It has been demonstrated previously that continuous spectral estimation can both detect and estimate phases on the largest aperture arrays, with arrivals identified as local maxima on beams of transformed spectrograms. The estimation procedure in effect measures group velocity rather than phase velocity, as is the case for classical f-k analysis, and the ability to estimate slowness vectors requires sufficiently large inter-sensor distances to resolve time-delays between pulses with a period of the order 4-5 s. Spectrogram beampacking works well on five IMS arrays with apertures over 20 km (NOA, AKASG, YKA, WRA, and KURK) without additional post-processing. Seven arrays with 10-20 km aperture (MJAR, ESDC, ILAR, KSRS, CMAR, ASAR, and EKA) can provide robust parameter estimates subject to a smoothing of the resulting slowness grids, most effectively achieved by convolving the measured slowness grids with the array response function for a 4 or 5 s period signal. Even for medium aperture arrays which can provide high-quality coherent slowness estimates, a complementary spectrogram beampacking procedure could act as a quality control by providing non-aliased estimates when the coherent slowness grids display

  12. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  13. Thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT) for thermal-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Allen; Swartz, Stephen; Huff, Michael; Gross, Steven

    2008-04-01

    We have been developing a novel thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT), an uncooled thermal-IR imager that is based on a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI). The FPI-based IR imager can convert a thermal-IR image to a video electronic image. IR radiation that is emitted by an object in the scene is imaged onto an IR-absorbing material that is located within an FPI. Temperature variations generated by the spatial variations in the IR image intensity cause variations in optical thickness, modulating the reflectivity seen by a probe laser beam. The reflected probe is imaged onto a visible array, producing a visible image of the IR scene. This technology can provide low-cost IR cameras with excellent sensitivity, low power consumption, and the potential for self-registered fusion of thermal-IR and visible images. We will describe characteristics of requisite pixelated arrays that we have fabricated.

  14. Flexible eddy current coil arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Johnson, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel approach was devised to overcome certain limitations of conventional eddy current testing. The typical single-element hand-wound probe was replaced with a two dimensional array of spirally wound probe elements deposited on a thin, flexible polyimide substrate. This provides full and reliable coverage of the test area and eliminates the need for scanning. The flexible substrate construction of the array allows the probes to conform to irregular part geometries, such as turbine blades and tubing, thereby eliminating the need for specialized probes for each geometry. Additionally, the batch manufacturing process of the array can yield highly uniform and reproducible coil geometries. The array is driven by a portable computer-based eddy current instrument, smartEDDY/sup TM/, capable of two-frequency operation, and offers a great deal of versatility and flexibility due to its software-based architecture. The array is coupled to the instrument via an 80-switch multiplexer that can be configured to address up to 1600 probes. The individual array elements may be addressed in any desired sequence, as defined by the software

  15. Calibration of a microprobe array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, Christian; Tutsch, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Conventional coordinate measurement machines are not well adapted to the specific needs for the measurement of mechanical microstructures that are made in a highly parallel production process. In particular, the increase of the measurement speed is addressed by using an array of microprobes to measure a number of objects in parallel. It consists of multiple microprobes that are etched into the same silicon substrate. The styli are glued onto a boss structure in the middle of a silicon membrane. To facilitate the alignment of an array and the underlying wafer, the array is mounted on three stacked rotational stages. Due to the production tolerances, the positions of the touching balls of the probes relative to their pivot have to be calibrated. The probe sensitivity is another field of calibration. This paper describes an efficient calibration procedure of the probe array which is usable for arrays with a large number of probes and different array layouts. The validation method of this procedure is explained and calibration results are discussed (paper)

  16. Integrated residential photovoltaic array development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, G. C., III

    1981-04-01

    Sixteen conceptual designs of residential photovoltaic arrays are described. Each design concept was evaluated by an industry advisory panel using a comprehensive set of technical, economic and institutional criteria. Key electrical and mechanical concerns that effect further array subsystem development are also discussed. Three integrated array design concepts were selected by the advisory panel for further optimization and development. From these concepts a single one will be selected for detailed analysis and prototype fabrication. The three concepts selected are: (1) An array of frameless panels/modules sealed in a T shaped zipper locking neoprene gasket grid pressure fitted into an extruded aluminum channel grid fastened across the rafters. (2) An array of frameless modules pressure fitted in a series of zipper locking EPDM rubber extrusions adhesively bonded to the roof. Series string voltage is developed using a set of integral tongue connectors and positioning blocks. (3) An array of frameless modules sealed by a silicone adhesive in a prefabricated grid of rigid tape and sheet metal attached to the roof.

  17. CCD and IR array controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Robert W.; Low, Frank J.

    2000-08-01

    A family of controllers has bene developed that is powerful and flexible enough to operate a wide range of CCD and IR focal plane arrays in a variety of ground-based applications. These include fast readout of small CCD and IR arrays for adaptive optics applications, slow readout of large CCD and IR mosaics, and single CCD and IR array operation at low background/low noise regimes as well as high background/high speed regimes. The CCD and IR controllers have a common digital core based on user- programmable digital signal processors that are used to generate the array clocking and signal processing signals customized for each application. A fiber optic link passes image data and commands to VME or PCI interface boards resident in a host computer to the controller. CCD signal processing is done with a dual slope integrator operating at speeds of up to one Megapixel per second per channel. Signal processing of IR arrays is done either with a dual channel video processor or a four channel video processor that has built-in image memory and a coadder to 32-bit precision for operating high background arrays. Recent developments underway include the implementation of a fast fiber optic data link operating at a speed of 12.5 Megapixels per second for fast image transfer from the controller to the host computer, and supporting image acquisition software and device drivers for the PCI interface board for the Sun Solaris, Linux and Windows 2000 operating systems.

  18. Preparation of barium titanate nanoparticle sphere arrays and their dielectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Satoshi; Yazawa, Aki; Hoshina, Takuya; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Tsurumi, Takaaki; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2008-09-01

    Barium titanate (BaTiO(3)) nanoparticles from 27 to 192 nm were prepared by the 2-step thermal decomposition method from barium titanyl oxalate nanoparticles. These particles were dispersed well into 1-propanol, and dense BaTiO(3); nanoparticle sphere arrays without stress-field were prepared by the meniscus method. Temperature dependence of dielectric properties was successfully measured using these dense nanoparticle sphere arrays, and size effect on dielectric properties was discussed.

  19. Thermal Characterization of the Air Force Institute of Technology Solar Simulation Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    VACUUM CHAMBER I. Introduction Motivation The CubeSat class of nanosatellites continues to become a preferred choice for Department of Defense...DoD) and university research satellites. A CubeSat is specifically defined as a nanosatellite made of a combination of one to six approximately...School (NPS), Smith generated a thermal model of the NPS Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) nanosatellite [4]. Smith developed the thermal model in

  20. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  1. Fabrication of microlens arrays using a CO2-assisted embossing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tzu-Chien; Chan, Bin-Da; Ciou, Jyun-Kai; Yang, Sen-Yeu

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a method to fabricate microlens arrays with a low processing temperature and a low pressure. The method is based on embossing a softened polymeric substrate over a mold with micro-hole arrays. Due to the effect of capillary and surface tension, microlens arrays can be formed. The embossing medium is CO 2 gas, which supplies a uniform pressing pressure so that large-area microlens arrays can be fabricated. CO 2 gas also acts as a solvent to plasticize the polymer substrates. With the special dissolving ability and isotropic pressing capacity of CO 2 gas, microlens arrays can be fabricated at a low temperature (lower than T g ) and free of thermal-induced residual stress. Such a combined mechanism of dissolving and embossing with CO 2 gas makes the fabrication of microlens arrays direct with complex processes, and is more compatible for optical usage. In the study, it is also found that the sag height of microlens changes when different CO 2 dissolving pressure and time are used. This makes it easy to fabricate microlens arrays of different geometries without using different molds. The quality, uniformity and optical property of the fabricated microlens arrays have been verified with measurements of the dimensions, surface smoothness, focal length, transmittance and light intensity through the fabricated microlens arrays

  2. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... and operators to navigate the complex and varied world of standards in the field of thermal environment for improving indoor environmental quality and energy saving. The examples discussed in the paper will also be useful for the standardization, leading to harmonized documents more readable for all users....... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...

  3. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendulić-Slivar Senka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of clients in health spa resorts entails various forms of hydrotherapy. Due to specific properties of water, especially thermal mineral waters, hydrokinesitherapy has a positive effect on the locomotor system, aerobic capabilities of organism and overall quality of human life. The effects of use of water in movement therapy are related to the physical and chemical properties of water. The application of hydrotherapy entails precautionary measures, with an individual approach in assessment and prescription. The benefits of treatment in thermal mineral water should be emphasized and protected, as all thermal mineral waters differ in composition. All physical properties of water are more pronounced in thermal mineral waters due to its mineralisation, hence its therapeutical efficiency is greater, as well.

  4. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  5. Mechanical Development of a Very Non-Standard Patch Array Antenna for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard; Chamberlain, Neil; Jakoboski, Julie; Petkov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical development of patch antenna arrays for the Juno mission. The patch arrays are part of a six-frequency microwave radiometer instrument that will be used to measure thermal emissions from Jupiter. The very harsh environmental conditions in Jupiter orbit, as well as a demanding launch environment, resulted in a design that departs radically from conventional printed circuit patch antennas. The paper discusses the development and qualification of the Juno patch array antennas, with emphasis on the materials approach that was devised to mitigate the effects of electron charging in Jupiter orbit.

  6. Design and testing of a combustion-heated nineteen-converter SAVTEC array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyren, T.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Korringa, M.; McVey, J.; Sahines, T.

    1984-01-01

    The SAVTEC (Self-Adjusting Versatile Thermionic Energy Converter) is a new design approach for achieving very close (<12μ) interelectrode spacing in a thermionic converter. Techniques were developed for fabricating an array of nineteen SAVTEC converters. The array was incorporated in an SiC protective ''hot shell'' which also served as a radiant heat source for the emitter of each converter. The completed assembly was tested with a specially constructed combustion heat source. Electric output was generated by sixteen of the nineteen converters, despite poor thermal contact in a cooling block, which resulted in high collector temperatures. Details of the array design and test results are described

  7. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.; Cannon, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described which uses uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts so that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. The array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors. 15 claims

  8. Design and characterisation of a phased antenna array for intact breast hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Sergio; Garcia-Miquel, Aleix; Suh, Minyoung; Vidal, Neus; Lopez-Villegas, Jose M; Prakash, Punit

    2017-06-28

    Currently available hyperthermia technology is not well suited to treating cancer malignancies in the intact breast. This study investigates a microwave applicator incorporating multiple patch antennas, with the goal of facilitating controllable power deposition profiles for treating lesions at diverse locations within the intact breast. A 3D-computational model was implemented to assess power deposition profiles with 915 MHz applicators incorporating a hemispheric groundplane and configurations of 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 antennas. Hemispheric breast models of 90 mm and 150 mm diameter were considered, where cuboid target volumes of 10 mm edge length (1 cm 3 ) and 30 mm edge length (27 cm 3 ) were positioned at the centre of the breast, and also located 15 mm from the chest wall. The average power absorption (αPA) ratio expressed as the ratio of the PA in the target volume and in the full breast was evaluated. A 4-antenna proof-of-concept array was fabricated and experimentally evaluated. Computational models identified an optimal inter-antenna spacing of 22.5° along the applicator circumference. Applicators with 8 and 12 antennas excited with constant phase presented the highest αPA at centrally located and deep-seated targets, respectively. Experimental measurements with a 4-antenna proof-of-concept array illustrated the potential for electrically steering power deposition profiles by adjusting the relative phase of the signal at antenna inputs. Computational models and experimental results suggest that the proposed applicator may have potential for delivering conformal thermal therapy in the intact breast.

  9. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  10. Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xiaohua Huang

    One other method for making monodisperse Au NRs is the earlier reported hard template method,27 in which nanorods are grown in a nanoporous solid template and then dispersed in an aqueous or organic solvent to form nanorods solution. Photochemical reduction,28 X-ray irradiation,29 proton beam irradiation,30 ...

  11. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  12. Innovations in IR projector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Barry E.; Higashi, B.; Ridley, Jeff A.; Holmen, J.; Newstrom, K.; Zins, C.; Nguyen, K.; Weeres, Steven R.; Johnson, Burgess R.; Stockbridge, Robert G.; Murrer, Robert Lee; Olson, Eric M.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Kircher, James R.; Flynn, David S.

    2000-07-01

    In the past year, Honeywell has developed a 512 X 512 snapshot scene projector containing pixels with very high radiance efficiency. The array can operate in both snapshot and raster mode. The array pixels have near black body characteristics, high radiance outputs, broad band performance, and high speed. IR measurements and performance of these pixels will be described. In addition, a vacuum probe station that makes it possible to select the best die for packaging and delivery based on wafer level radiance screening, has been developed and is in operation. This system, as well as other improvements, will be described. Finally, a review of the status of the present projectors and plans for future arrays is included.

  13. Design Considerations for Array CGH to OligonucleotideArrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldocchi, R.A.; Glynne, R.J.; Chin, K.; Kowbel, D.; Collins, C.; Mack, D.H.; Gray, J.W.

    2005-03-04

    Background: Representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis has been developed for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms and/or for genome copy number changes. In this process, the intensity of hybridization to oligonucleotides arrays is increased by hybridizing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified representation of reduced genomic complexity. However, hybridization to some oligonucleotides is not sufficiently high to allow precise analysis of that portion of the genome. Methods: In an effort to identify aspects of oligonucleotide hybridization affecting signal intensity, we explored the importance of the PCR product strand to which each oligonucleotide is homologous and the sequence of the array oligonucleotides. We accomplished this by hybridizing multiple PCR-amplified products to oligonucleotide arrays carrying two sense and two antisense 50-mer oligonucleotides for each PCR amplicon. Results: In some cases, hybridization intensity depended more strongly on the PCR amplicon strand (i.e., sense vs. antisense) than on the detection oligonucleotide sequence. In other cases, the oligonucleotide sequence seemed to dominate. Conclusion: Oligonucleotide arrays for analysis of DNA copy number or for single nucleotide polymorphism content should be designed to carry probes to sense and antisense strands of each PCR amplicon to ensure sufficient hybridization and signal intensity.

  14. Phased arrays: inline flow line hub inspection using phased arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, J.G.P.; Chougrani, K.; Rundberg, H.; Oldenziel, G.; Deleye, X.; Martina, Q.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of the inspection of flow line hubs using the phased array technique was investigated to determine the surface area of the seal area degraded by corrosion. A clean model of the hub was simulated to gain insight into the geometrical echoes and to determine the area covered by the

  15. Hybrid Arrays for Chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kirsten E.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Johnson, Kevin J.; Minor, Christian P.

    In recent years, multisensory approaches to environment monitoring for chemical detection as well as other forms of situational awareness have become increasingly popular. A hybrid sensor is a multimodal system that incorporates several sensing elements and thus produces data that are multivariate in nature and may be significantly increased in complexity compared to data provided by single-sensor systems. Though a hybrid sensor is itself an array, hybrid sensors are often organized into more complex sensing systems through an assortment of network topologies. Part of the reason for the shift to hybrid sensors is due to advancements in sensor technology and computational power available for processing larger amounts of data. There is also ample evidence to support the claim that a multivariate analytical approach is generally superior to univariate measurements because it provides additional redundant and complementary information (Hall, D. L.; Linas, J., Eds., Handbook of Multisensor Data Fusion, CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 2001). However, the benefits of a multisensory approach are not automatically achieved. Interpretation of data from hybrid arrays of sensors requires the analyst to develop an application-specific methodology to optimally fuse the disparate sources of data generated by the hybrid array into useful information characterizing the sample or environment being observed. Consequently, multivariate data analysis techniques such as those employed in the field of chemometrics have become more important in analyzing sensor array data. Depending on the nature of the acquired data, a number of chemometric algorithms may prove useful in the analysis and interpretation of data from hybrid sensor arrays. It is important to note, however, that the challenges posed by the analysis of hybrid sensor array data are not unique to the field of chemical sensing. Applications in electrical and process engineering, remote sensing, medicine, and of course, artificial

  16. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  17. Gallium arsenide processing for gate array logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Eric D.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a reliable and reproducible GaAs process was initiated for applications in gate array logic. Gallium Arsenide is an extremely important material for high speed electronic applications in both digital and analog circuits since its electron mobility is 3 to 5 times that of silicon, this allows for faster switching times for devices fabricated with it. Unfortunately GaAs is an extremely difficult material to process with respect to silicon and since it includes the arsenic component GaAs can be quite dangerous (toxic) especially during some heating steps. The first stage of the research was directed at developing a simple process to produce GaAs MESFETs. The MESFET (MEtal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is the most useful, practical and simple active device which can be fabricated in GaAs. It utilizes an ohmic source and drain contact separated by a Schottky gate. The gate width is typically a few microns. Several process steps were required to produce a good working device including ion implantation, photolithography, thermal annealing, and metal deposition. A process was designed to reduce the total number of steps to a minimum so as to reduce possible errors. The first run produced no good devices. The problem occurred during an aluminum etch step while defining the gate contacts. It was found that the chemical etchant attacked the GaAs causing trenching and subsequent severing of the active gate region from the rest of the device. Thus all devices appeared as open circuits. This problem is being corrected and since it was the last step in the process correction should be successful. The second planned stage involves the circuit assembly of the discrete MESFETs into logic gates for test and analysis. Finally the third stage is to incorporate the designed process with the tested circuit in a layout that would produce the gate array as a GaAs integrated circuit.

  18. Thermal Imaging with Novel Infrared Focal Plane Arrays and Quantitative Analysis of Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Soibel, A.; Ting, D. Z.; Tidrow, Meimei

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a single long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) camera for thermography. This camera has been used to measure the temperature profile of patients. A pixel coregistered simultaneously reading mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR)/LWIR dual-band QWIP camera was developed to improve the accuracy of temperature measurements especially with objects with unknown emissivity. Even the dualband measurement can provide inaccurate results due to the fact that emissivity is a function of wavelength. Thus we have been developing a four-band QWIP camera for accurate temperature measurement of remote object.

  19. Thermal Clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Gateway Technologies, Inc. is marketing and developing textile insulation technology originally developed by Triangle Research and Development Corporation. The enhanced thermal insulation stems from Small Business Innovation Research contracts from NASA's Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Air Force. The effectiveness of the insulation comes from the microencapsulated phase-change materials originally made to keep astronauts gloved hands warm. The applications for the product range from outer wear, housing insulation, and blankets to protective firefighting gear and scuba diving suits. Gateway has developed and begun marketing thermal regulating products under the trademark, OUTLAST. Products made from OUTLAST are already on the market, including boot and shoe liners, winter headgear, hats and caps for hunting and other outdoor sports, and a variety of men's and women's ski gloves.

  20. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  1. Microcoil Spring Interconnects for Ceramic Grid Array Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, S. M.; Hester, J. D.; Gowan, A. K.; Montgomery, R. K.; Geist, D. L.; Blanche, J. F.; McGuire, G. D.; Nash, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    As integrated circuit miniaturization trends continue, they drive the need for smaller higher input/output (I/O) packages. Hermetically sealed ceramic area array parts are the package of choice by the space community for high reliability space flight electronic hardware. Unfortunately, the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the ceramic area array package and the epoxy glass printed wiring board limits the life of the interconnecting solder joint. This work presents the results of an investigation by Marshall Space Flight Center into a method to increase the life of this second level interconnection by the use of compliant microcoil springs. The design of the spring and its attachment process are presented along with thermal cycling results of microcoil springs (MCS) compared with state-of-the-art ball and column interconnections. Vibration testing has been conducted on MCS and high lead column parts. Radio frequency simulation and measurements have been made and the MCS has been modeled and a stress analysis performed. Thermal cycling and vibration testing have shown MCS interconnects to be significantly more reliable than solder columns. Also, MCS interconnects are less prone to handling damage than solder columns. Future work that includes shock testing, incorporation into a digital signal processor board, and process evaluation of expansion from a 400 I/O device to a device with over 1,100 I/O is identified.

  2. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rifat, Ahmmed A. [Integrated Lightwave Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  3. Gamma-ray array physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution I am going to discuss the development of large arrays of Compton Suppressed, High Purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors and the physics that has been, that is being, and that will be done with them. These arrays and their science have dominated low-energy nuclear structure research for the last twenty years and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. John Sharpey Schafer played a visionary role in convincing a skeptical world that the development of these arrays would lead to a path of enlightenment. The extent to which he succeeded can be seen both through the world-wide propagation of ever more sophisticated devices, and through the world-wide propagation of his students. I, personally, would not be working in research if it were not for Johns inspirational leadership. I am eternally grateful to him. Many excellent reviews of array physics have been made in the past which can provide detailed background reading. The review by Paul Nolan, another ex-Sharpey Schafer student, is particularly comprehensive and clear

  4. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  5. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  6. LOFAR- The Low Frequency Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcke, H.D.E.

    2006-01-01

    LOFAR is an innovative radio telescope in the frequency range of 10-240 MHz, realized as a phased array. It will become the largest radio telescope in the world in the time frame 2006-2010, located in Northern Europe. LOFAR is being implemented as a Wide Area Sensor Network which connects thousands

  7. Array Technology for Terahertz Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Theodore; Siles, Jose; Jung, Cecile; Gill, John; Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, Imran; Cooper, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Heterodyne terahertz (0.3 - 3THz) imaging systems are currently limited to single or a low number of pixels. Drastic improvements in imaging sensitivity and speed can be achieved by replacing single pixel systems with an array of detectors. This paper presents an array topology that is being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory based on the micromachining of silicon. This technique fabricates the array's package and waveguide components by plasma etching of silicon, resulting in devices with precision surpassing that of current metal machining techniques. Using silicon increases the versatility of the packaging, enabling a variety of orientations of circuitry within the device which increases circuit density and design options. The design of a two-pixel transceiver utilizing a stacked architecture is presented that achieves a pixel spacing of 10mm. By only allowing coupling from the top and bottom of the package the design can readily be arrayed in two dimensions with a spacing of 10mm x 18mm.

  8. Light weight digital array SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, M.; Maas, N.; Bolt, R.; Anitori, L.

    2010-01-01

    A light weight SAR has been designed, suitable for short range tactical UAVs, consisting of a fully digital receive array, and a very compact active transmit antenna. The weight of the complete RF front is expected to be below 3 kg, with a power consumption below 30 W. This X-band system can provide

  9. Solar array manufacturing industry simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Firnett, P. J.; Kleine, B.

    1980-01-01

    Solar Array Manufacturing Industry Simulation (SAMIS) program is a standardized model of industry to manufacture silicon solar modules for use in electricity generation. Model is used to develop financial reports that detail requirements, including amounts and prices for materials, labor, facilities, and equipment required by companies.

  10. Directivity of basic linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Henning

    1970-01-01

    For a linear uniform array ofnelements, an expression is derived for the directivity as a function of the spacing and the phase constants. The cases of isotropic elements, collinear short dipoles, and parallel short dipoles are included. The formula obtained is discussed in some detail and contour...

  11. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  12. PHARUS : PHased ARray Universal SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paquay, M.H.A.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.; Koomen, P.J.; Hoogeboom, P.; Snoeij, P.; Pouwels, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) has been developed. The project is called PHARUS, an acronm for PHased ARray Universal SAR. This instrument serves remote sensing applications. The antenna system contains 48 active modules (expandable to 96). A module

  13. Development of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; Krumweide, Duane; Gaddy, Edward; Katz, Ira

    2000-01-01

    The results of design, analysis, and qualification of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panel are described. The objective of the ECSA design is to provide an electrostatic environment that does not interfere with sensitive instruments on scientific spacecraft. The ECSA design uses large, ITO-coated coverglasses that cover multiple solar cells, an aperture grid that covers the intercell areas, stress-relieved interconnects for connecting the aperture grid to the coverglasses, and edge clips to provides an electromagnetically shielded enclosure for the solar array active circuitry. Qualification coupons were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic response, conductivity, and survivability to launch acoustic and thermal cycling environments simulating LEO and GEO missions. The benefits of reducing solar panel interaction with the space environment are also discussed.

  14. Matching of the Flux Lattice to Geometrically Frustrated Pinning Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trastoy, J.; Bernard, R.; Briatico, J.; Villegas, J. E.; Lesueur, J.; Ulysse, C.; Faini, G.

    2013-03-01

    We use vortex dynamics on artificial nanoscale energy landscapes as a model to experimentally investigate a problem inspired by ``spin ice'' systems. In particular, we study the matching of the flux lattice to pinning arrays in which the geometrical frustration is expected to impede a unique stable vortex configuration and to promote metastability. This is done with YBCO films in which the nanoscale vortex energy landscape is fabricated via masked ion irradiation. Surprisingly, we found that minimal changes in the distance between pinning sites lead to the suppression of some of the magneto-resistance matching effects, that is, for certain well-defined vortex densities. This effect strongly depends on the temperature. We argue that this behavior can be explained considering the arrays' geometrical frustration and the thermally activated reconfiguration of the vortex lattice between isoenergetic states. Work supported by the French ANR via SUPERHYRBIDS-II and ``MASTHER,'' and the Galician Fundacion Barrie

  15. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  16. Impact of Improved Heat Sinking of an X-Ray Calorimeter Array on Crosstalk, Noise, and Background Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Adams, J. S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Porter, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    The x-ray calorimeter array of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) of the Astro-H satellite will incorporate a silicon thermistor array produced during the development of the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) of the Suzaku satellite. On XRS, inadequate heat sinking of the array led to several non-ideal effects. The thermal crosstalk, while too small to be confused with x-ray signals, nonetheless contributed a noise term that could be seen as a degradation in energy resolution at high flux. When energy was deposited in the silicon frame around the active elements of the array, such as by a cosmic ray, the resulting pulse in the temperature of the frame resulted in coincident signal pulses on most of the pixels. In orbit, the resolution was found to depend on the particle background rate. In order to minimize these effects on SXS, heat-sinking gold was applied to areas on the front and back of the array die, which was thermally anchored to the gold of its fanout board via gold wire bonds. The thermal conductance from the silicon chip to the fanout board was improved over that of XRS by an order of magnitude. This change was sufficient for essentially eliminating frame events and allowing high-resolution to be attained at much higher counting rates. We will present the improved performance, the measured crosstalk, and the results of the thermal characterization of such arrays.

  17. Phased Array of Phased Arrays (PAPA) Laser Systems Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManamon, P. A. U. L. F.; Thompson, William

    This paper introduces and analyzes revolutionary laser system architecture capable of dramatically reducing the complexity of laser systems while simultaneously increasing capability. The architecture includes three major subsystems. The first is a phased array of laser sources. In this article, we discuss diode-pumped fiber lasers as the elements of the phased array, although other waveguide lasers can also be considered. The second provides wavefront control and electronics beam steering, as described in an IEEE Proceedings article on "Optical Phased Array Technology" [1]. The third is subaperture receiver technology. Combining these three technologies into a new laser systems architecture results in a system that has graceful degradation, can steer to as wide an angle as individual optical phased array subapertures, and can be scaled to high power and large apertures through phasing of a number of subapertures. Diode-pumped fiber lasers are appealing as laser sources because they are electrically pumped, efficient, relatively simple, and scalable to significant power levels (over 100 Watts has been demonstrated from a single diode-pumped fiber laser) [2]. The fiber laser design also lends itself to integration into a phased array. Fiber lasers have been phased. Initial phasing demonstrations have been at low power and were conducted by taking a single source, dividing it into multiple fibers, then phasing them together. To develop this technology further we need to use independent fiber lasers or fiber amplifiers, seeded by a common source, and to increase laser power. As we increase laser power, we will have to learn to cope with nonlinearities in the laser amplifiers. Optical Phased Array technology has demonstrated steering over a 90-degree field of regard [4], although this approach used additional optical components. If we use straightforward optical phased array beam steering without additional optics we can steer with high efficiency to about one-third

  18. The coil array method for creating a dynamic imaging volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elliot; Freschi, Fabio; Repetto, Maurizio; Crozier, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    Gradient strength and speed are limited by peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) thresholds. The coil array method allows the gradient field to be moved across the imaging area. This can help reduce PNS and provide faster imaging for image-guided therapy systems such as the magnetic resonance imaging-guided linear accelerator (MRI-linac). The coil array is designed such that many coils produce magnetic fields, which combine to give the desired gradient profile. The design of the coil array uses two methods: either the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a set of field profiles or the electromagnetic modes of the coil surface. Two whole-body coils and one experimental coil were designed to investigate the method. The field produced by the experimental coil was compared to simulated results. The experimental coil region of uniformity (ROU) was moved along the z axis as shown in simulation. The highest observed field deviation was 16.9% at the edge of the ROU with a shift of 35 mm. The whole-body coils showed a median field deviation across all offsets below 5% with an eight-coil basis when using the SVD design method. Experimental results show the feasibility of a moving imaging region within an MRI with a low number of coils in the array. Magn Reson Med 78:784-793, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Extremely Black Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhe; Wang, Huimin; Jian, Muqiang; Li, Yanshen; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Mingchao; Wang, Chunya; Wang, Qi; Ma, Ming; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Zhang, Yingying

    2017-08-30

    The unique structure of a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) array makes it behave most similarly to a blackbody. It is reported that the optical absorptivity of an extremely black VACNT array is about 0.98-0.99 over a large spectral range of 200 nm-200 μm, inspiring us to explore the performance of VACNT arrays in solar energy harvesting. In this work, we report the highly efficient steam generation simply by laminating a layer of VACNT array on the surface of water to harvest solar energy. It is found that under solar illumination the temperature of upper water can significantly increase with obvious water steam generated, indicating the efficient solar energy harvesting and local temperature rise by the thin layer of VACNTs. We found that the evaporation rate of water assisted by VACNT arrays is 10 times that of bare water, which is the highest ratio for solar-thermal-steam generation ever reported. Remarkably, the solar thermal conversion efficiency reached 90%. The excellent performance could be ascribed to the strong optical absorption and local temperature rise induced by the VACNT layer, as well as the ultrafast water transport through the VACNT layer due to the frictionless wall of CNTs. Based on the above, we further demonstrated the application of VACNT arrays in solar-driven desalination.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    CVD) and thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD), are developed. The physical properties of the resulting CNTs are analyzed using Raman...MWCNTs) [1]. In the ensuing years the characterization of unique and phenomenal mechanical, electrical, thermal , and chemical properties of CNTs has...rediscovered or introduced carbon nanotubes to the scientific community as a by-product of an electric arc discharge method of synthesizing C60 fullerenes [1

  1. DNA electrophoresis through microlithographic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevick, E.M.; Williams, D.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophoresis is one of the most widely used techniques in biochemistry and genetics for size-separating charged molecular chains such as DNA or synthetic polyelectrolytes. The separation is achieved by driving the chains through a gel with an external electric field. As a result of the field and the obstacles that the medium provides, the chains have different mobilities and are physically separated after a given process time. The macroscopically observed mobility scales inversely with chain size: small molecules move through the medium quickly while larger molecules move more slowly. However, electrophoresis remains a tool that has yet to be optimised for most efficient size separation of polyelectrolytes, particularly large polyelectrolytes, e.g. DNA in excess of 30-50 kbp. Microlithographic arrays etched with an ordered pattern of obstacles provide an attractive alternative to gel media and provide wider avenues for size separation of polyelectrolytes and promote a better understanding of the separation process. Its advantages over gels are (1) the ordered array is durable and can be re-used, (2) the array morphology is ordered and can be standardized for specific separation, and (3) calibration with a marker polyelectrolyte is not required as the array is reproduced to high precision. Most importantly, the array geometry can be graduated along the chip so as to expand the size-dependent regime over larger chain lengths and postpone saturation. In order to predict the effect of obstacles upon the chain-length dependence in mobility and hence, size separation, we study the dynamics of single chains using theory and simulation. We present recent work describing: 1) the release kinetics of a single DNA molecule hooked around a point, frictionless obstacle and in both weak and strong field limits, 2) the mobility of a chain impinging upon point obstacles in an ordered array of obstacles, demonstrating the wide range of interactions possible between the chain and

  2. Thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    The traditional question at the start of a class on thermal properties of wood is, “Does wood burn?” The students have all been warmed in front of a wood-burning fire before, so they are sure the answer is yes—but since the professor asked the question, there must be some hidden trick to the obvious answer. Going with their experience, their answer is “yes, wood burns...

  3. Thermal insulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, R.; Asada, Y.; Matsuo, Y.; Mikoda, M.

    1985-07-16

    A thermal insulator comprises an expanded resin body having embedded therein an evacuated powder insulation portion which consists of fine powder and a container of film-like plastics or a film-like composite of plastics and metal for enclosing the powder. The resin body has been expanded by a Freon gas as a blowing agent. Since a Freon gas has a larger molecular diameter than the constituent gases of air, it is less likely to permeate through the container than air. Thus present invention provides a novel composite insulator which fully utilizes the benefits of vacuum insulation without necessitating a strong and costly material for a vacuum container.

  4. High-Conductance Thermal Interfaces Based on Carbon Nanotubes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel thermal interface material (TIM) that is based on an array of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for high heat flux applications. For...

  5. Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF) for Sparse Aperture Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daniel W.; Miller, David W.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining relative orientation. Additional problems posed by propellant include optical contamination, plume impingement, thermal emission, and vibration excitation. For these missions where control of relative degrees of freedom is important, we consider using a system of electromagnets, in concert with reaction wheels, to replace the consumables. Electromagnetic Formation Flight sparse apertures, powered by solar energy, are designed differently from traditional propulsion systems, which are based on V. This paper investigates the design of sparse apertures both inside and outside the Earth's gravity field.

  6. Iron-copper metallization for flexible solar/cell arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavendel, H. W.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of a copper-base metallization for shallow-junction cells applied in flexible solar arrays in space is discussed. This type of metallization will reduce usage of precious metals (such as silver), increase case of bonding (by welding or by soldering) and eliminate heavy high Z interconnects (such as molybdenum). The main points of concern are stability against thermally induced diffusion of copper into silicon which causes degradation of shallow cell junctions, and low series resistance of the contact with semiconductor which promotes cell efficiency.

  7. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  8. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Uncooled focal plane arrays have improved dramatically and array sizes of 320x240 elements in a 50-?m pitch are commercially available at affordable cost. Black...

  9. Radiometric Testing of Magnesium Diboride Array (MDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective is to develop a 2-Dimensional Far Infra-Red Magnesium Diboride Array (2D FIR MDA) to use in NASA's future planetary exploration instruments. The array...

  10. Microfabricated Multianalyte Sensor Arrays for Metabolic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pishko, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    ...(ethylene glycol) diacrylate or PEG-DA on the array electrodes. The fabricated microarray sensors were individually addressable and with no cross-talk between adjacent array elements as assessed using cyclic voltammetry...

  11. Microfabricated Multianalyte Sensor Arrays for Metabolic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pishko, Michael V

    2007-01-01

    ...(ethylene glycol) diacrylate or PEG-DA on the array electrodes. The fabricated microarray sensors were individually addressable and with no cross-talk between adjacent array elements as assessed using cyclic voltammetry...

  12. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  13. Human location estimation using thermopile array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnin, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Utilization of Thermopile sensor at an early stage of human detection is challenging as there are many things that produce thermal heat other than human such as electrical appliances and animals. Therefrom, an algorithm for early presence detection has been developed through the study of human body temperature behaviour with respect to the room temperature. The change in non-contact detected temperature of human varied according to body parts. In an indoor room, upper parts of human body change up to 3°C whereas lower part ranging from 0.58°C to 1.71°C. The average changes in temperature of human is used as a conditional set-point value in the program algorithm to detect human presence. The current position of human and its respective angle is gained when human is presence at certain pixels of Thermopile’s sensor array. Human position is estimated successfully as the developed sensory system is tested to the actuator of a stand fan.

  14. 3D Printing of Ball Grid Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Hines, Daniel; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Das, Siddhartha

    Ball grid arrays (BGA) are interconnects between an integrated circuit (IC) and a printed circuit board (PCB), that are used for surface mounting electronic components. Typically, lead free alloys are used to make solder balls which, after a reflow process, establish a mechanical and electrical connection between the IC and the PCB. High temperature processing is required for most of these alloys leading to thermal shock causing damage to ICs. For producing flexible circuits on a polymer substrate, there is a requirement for low temperature processing capabilities (around 150 C) and for reducing strain from mechanical stresses. Additive manufacturing techniques can provide an alternative methodology for fabricating BGAs as a direct replacement for standard solder bumped BGAs. We have developed aerosol jet (AJ) printing methods to fabricate a polymer bumped BGA. As a demonstration of the process developed, a daisy chain test chip was polymer bumped using an AJ printed ultra violet (UV) curable polymer ink that was then coated with an AJ printed silver nanoparticle laden ink as a conducting layer printed over the polymer bump. The structure for the balls were achieved by printing the polymer ink using a specific toolpath coupled with in-situ UV curing of the polymer which provided good control over the shape, resulting in well-formed spherical bumps on the order of 200 um wide by 200 um tall for this initial demonstration. A detailed discussion of the AJ printing method and results from accelerated life-time testing will be presented

  15. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  16. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  17. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Ingersoll, David [Albuquerque, NM; Schmidt, Carrie [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  18. Exergetic Optimization of a Solar Photovoltaic Array

    OpenAIRE

    Sarhaddi, Faramarz; Farahat, Said; Ajam, Hossein; Behzadmehr, Amin

    2009-01-01

    An exergetic optimization is developed to determine the optimal performance and design parameters of a solar photovoltaic (PV) array. A detailed energy and exergy analysis is carried out to evaluate the electrical performance, exergy destruction components, and exergy efficiency of a typical PV array. The exergy efficiency of a PV array obtained in this paper is a function of climatic, operating, and design parameters such as ambient temperature, solar radiation intensity, PV array temperatur...

  19. Safety System for a Towed Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-25

    300196 1 of 13 SAFETY SYSTEM FOR A TOWED SOURCE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured...invention is a towed array safety system and method of use that prevents the loss of a towed array cable and towed array handling system in the event of a...tension surge while retaining required safety features of the towed array handling system . (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] There have

  20. High voltage load resistor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Monty Ray [Smithfield, VA

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  1. Antenna Arrays and Automotive Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This book throws a lifeline to designers wading through mounds of antenna array patents looking for the most suitable systems for their projects. Drastically reducing the research time required to locate solutions to the latest challenges in automotive communications, it sorts and systematizes material on cutting-edge antenna arrays that feature multi-element communication systems with enormous potential for the automotive industry. These new systems promise to make driving safer and more efficient, opening up myriad applications, including vehicle-to-vehicle traffic that prevents collisions, automatic toll collection, vehicle location and fine-tuning for cruise control systems. This book’s exhaustive coverage begins with currently deployed systems, frequency ranges and key parameters. It proceeds to examine system geometry, analog and digital beam steering technology (including "smart" beams formed in noisy environments), maximizing signal-to-noise ratios, miniaturization, and base station technology that ...

  2. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  3. Subwavelength micropillar array terahertz lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Deutsch, Christoph; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2014-01-13

    We report on micropillar-based terahertz lasers with active pillars that are much smaller than the emission wavelength. These micropillar array lasers correspond to scaled-down band-edge photonic crystal lasers forming an active photonic metamaterial. In contrast to photonic crystal lasers which use significantly larger pillar structures, lasing emission is not observed close to high-symmetry points in the photonic band diagram, but in the effective medium regime. We measure stimulated emission at 4 THz for micropillar array lasers with pillar diameters of 5 µm. Our results not only demonstrate the integration of active subwavelength optics in a terahertz laser, but are also an important step towards the realization of nanowire-based terahertz lasers.

  4. Microneedle array electrode for human EEG recording.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Microneedle array electrodes for EEG significantly reduce the mounting time, particularly by circumvention of the need for skin preparation by scrubbing. We designed a new replication process for numerous types of microneedle arrays. Here, polymer microneedle array electrodes with 64 microneedles,

  5. Ferroelectric transistor memory arrays on flexible foils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, A. van; Kam, B.; Cobb, B.; Rodriguez, F.G.; Heck, G. van; Myny, K.; Marrani, A.; Vinciguerra, V.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we successfully fabricated and operated passive matrix P(VDF-TrFE) transistor arrays, i.e. memory arrays in which no pass-transistors or other additional electronic components are used. Because of the smaller cell, a higher integration density is possible. We demonstrate arrays up to

  6. Towards Hybrid Array Types in SAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grelck, C.; Tang, F.

    2014-01-01

    Array programming is characterised by a formal calculus of (regular, dense) multidimensional arrays that defines the relationships between structural properties like rank and shape as well as data set sizes. Operations in the array calculus often impose certain constraints on the relationships of

  7. Arrays of magnetic nanoparticles capped with alkylamines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While there has been reasonable success in preparing arrays of metal and semiconducting chalcoginide nanoparticles, arrays of metal oxides are relatively unknown. [12,13]. We considered it important to prepare arrays of metal oxide particles with use- ful magnetic properties, particularly in view of their stability under ...

  8. Calibration strategies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaug, M.; Berge, D.; Daniel, M.; Doro, M.; Förster, A.; Hofmann, W.; Maccarone, M.C.; Parsons, D.; de los Reyes Lopez, R.; van Eldik, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Calibration Facilities workpackage of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy defines the overall calibration strategy of the array, develops dedicated hardware and software for the overall array calibration and coordinates the calibration

  9. Si Microwire Array Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putnam, Morgan C.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Turner-Evans, Daniel B.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.; Warren, Emily L.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2010-01-01

    Si microwire-array solar cells with Air Mass 1.5 Global conversion efficiencies of up to 7.9% have been fabricated using an active volume of Si equivalent to a 4 μm thick Si wafer. These solar cells exhibited open-circuit voltages of 500 mV, short-circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) of up to 24 mA cm{sup -2}, and fill factors >65% and employed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric particles that scattered light incident in the space between the wires, a Ag back reflector that prevented the escape of incident illumination from the back surface of the solar cell, and an a-SiN{sub x}:H passivation/anti-reflection layer. Wire-array solar cells without some or all of these design features were also fabricated to demonstrate the importance of the light-trapping elements in achieving a high J{sub sc}. Scanning photocurrent microscopy images of the microwire-array solar cells revealed that the higher J{sub sc} of the most advanced cell design resulted from an increased absorption of light incident in the space between the wires. Spectral response measurements further revealed that solar cells with light-trapping elements exhibited improved red and infrared response, as compared to solar cells without light-trapping elements.

  10. LOFAR, the low frequency array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope designed by ASTRON, with antenna stations concentrated in the north of the Netherlands and currently spread into Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom; plans for more LOFAR stations exist in several other countries. Utilizing a novel, phased-array design, LOFAR is optimized for the largely unexplored low frequency range between 30 and 240 MHz. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid re-pointing of the telescopes as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. Processing (e.g. cross-correlation) takes place in the LOFAR BlueGene/P supercomputer, and associated post-processing facilities. With its dense core (inner few km) array and long (more than 1000 km) interferometric baselines, LOFAR reaches unparalleled sensitivity and resolution in the low frequency radio regime. The International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) is now issuing its first call for observing projects that will be peer reviewed and selected for observing starting in December. Part of the allocations will be made on the basis of a fully Open Skies policy; there are also reserved fractions assigned by national consortia in return for contributions from their country to the ILT. In this invited talk, the gradually expanding complement of operationally verified observing modes and capabilities are reviewed, and some of the exciting first astronomical results are presented.

  11. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these ...

  12. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  13. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  14. BASIMO - Borehole Heat Exchanger Array Simulation and Optimization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Daniel O.; Bastian, Welsch; Wolfram, Rühaak; Kristian, Bär; Ingo, Sass

    2017-04-01

    Arrays of borehole heat exchangers are an increasingly popular source for renewable energy. Furthermore, they can serve as borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems for seasonally fluctuating heat sources like solar thermal energy or district heating grids. The high temperature level of these heat sources prohibits the use of the shallow subsurface for environmental reasons. Therefore, deeper reservoirs have to be accessed instead. The increased depth of the systems results in high investment costs and has hindered the implementation of this technology until now. Therefore, research of medium deep BTES systems relies on numerical simulation models. Current simulation tools cannot - or only to some extent - describe key features like partly insulated boreholes unless they run fully discretized models of the borehole heat exchangers. However, fully discretized models often come at a high computational cost, especially for large arrays of borehole heat exchangers. We give an update on the development of BASIMO: a tool, which uses one dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for the borehole heat exchangers coupled with a numerical finite element model for the subsurface heat transport in a dual-continuum approach. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh bypasses the limitations of structured grids for borehole path geometries, while the thermal resistance and capacity model is improved to account for borehole heat exchanger properties changing with depth. Thereby, partly insulated boreholes can be considered in the model. Furthermore, BASIMO can be used to improve the design of BTES systems: the tool allows for automated parameter variations and is readily coupled to other code like mathematical optimization algorithms. Optimization can be used to determine the required minimum system size or to increase the system performance.

  15. The Colorado Lightning Mapping Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, W.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Thomas, R. J.; Rodeheffer, D.; Fuchs, B.

    2012-12-01

    A fifteen station Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) was installed in northern Colorado in the spring of 2012. While the driving force for the array was to produce 3-dimensional lightning data to support the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment (Barth, this conference), data from the array are being used for several other projects. These include: electrification studies in conjunction with the CSU CHILL radar (Lang et al, this conference); observations of the parent lightning discharges of sprites (Lyons et al, this conference); trying to detect upward discharges triggered by wind turbines, characterizing conditions in which aircraft flying through clouds produce discharges which can be detected by the LMA, and other opportunities, such as observations of lightning in pyrocumulus clouds produced by the High Park Fire west of Fort Collins, CO. All the COLMA stations are solar-powered, and use broadband cellular modems for data communications. This makes the stations completely self-contained and autonomous, allowing a station to be installed anywhere a cellular signal is available. Because most of the stations were installed well away from anthropogenic noise sources, the COLMA is very sensitive. This is evidenced by the numerous plane tracks detected in its the vicinity. The diameter, D, of the COLMA is about 100 km, significantly larger than other LMAs. Because the error in the radial distance r is proportional to (r/D)2, and the error in the altitude z is proportional to (z/D)2, the larger array diameter greatly expands the usable range of the COLMA. The COLMA is able to detect and characterize lighting flashes to a distance of about 350 km from the array center. In addition to a web-based display (lightning.nmt.edu/colma), geo-referenced images are produced and updated at one-minute intervals. These geo-referenced images can be used to overlay the real-time lightning data on Google Earth and other mapping software. These displays were used by the DC3

  16. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang, E-mail: sgyang@nju.edu.cn

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  17. Thermal Impact of Medium Deep Borehole Thermal Energy Storage on the Shallow Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Schulte, Daniel O.; Rühaak, Wolfram; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Borehole heat exchanger arrays are a well-suited and already widely applied method for exploiting the shallow subsurface as seasonal heat storage. However, in most of the populated regions the shallow subsurface also comprises an important aquifer system used for drinking water production. Thus, the operation of shallow geothermal heat storage systems leads to a significant increase in groundwater temperatures in the proximity of the borehole heat exchanger array. The magnitude of the impact on groundwater quality and microbiology associated with this temperature rise is controversially discussed. Nevertheless, the protection of shallow groundwater resources has priority. Accordingly, water authorities often follow restrictive permission policies for building such storage systems. An alternative approach to avoid this issue is the application of medium deep borehole heat exchanger arrays instead of shallow ones. The thermal impact on shallow aquifers can be significantly reduced as heat is stored at larger depth. Moreover, it can be further diminished by the installation of a thermally insulating materials in the upper section of the borehole heat exchangers. Based on a numerical simulation study, the advantageous effects of medium deep borehole thermal energy storage are demonstrated and quantified. A finite element software is used to model the heat transport in the subsurface in 3D, while the heat transport in the borehole heat exchangers is solved analytically in 1D. For this purpose, an extended analytical solution is implemented, which also allows for the consideration of a thermally insulating borehole section.

  18. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  19. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan's investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra) n , where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan's aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays

  20. Investigation of plasmon properties of silver microsphere array demonstrated experimentally by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqi; Zhao, Lijiang; Li, Xinjuan; Zeng, Zhuo; Wang, Peijie; Zhang, Lisheng; Fang, Yan

    2018-01-01

    Due to high spatial resolution and extraordinarily high detection sensitivity of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), it has attracted more and more attention. However, the tip size and shape, and tip substrate distance have a large impact on the TERS enhancement properties. In this study, a silver microsphere array was prepared on a Polystyrene (PS) microsphere array by vacuum thermal evaporation. And the correlation between the properties of two-dimensional surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mapping of rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) absorbed on the silver microsphere array and the polarization direction of the incident light was investigated. The effect of the location of the tip on the surface plasmon distribution of the silver microsphere array was also revealed in TERS. In addition, the surface electromagnetic field distribution of the silver microsphere array was simulated by three-dimensional finite-difference time domain (3D-FDTD) method. These results show that the distribution of 'hot spots' on the surface of the silver microsphere array has a dependency on the polarization direction of the incident laser. Moreover, with the introduction of the tip, the 'hot spot' on the surface of the silver microsphere array becomes much more localized and largely enhanced. These results obtained in this paper may have some significance for further studies on the surface plasmon resonance bio-sensing.

  1. Thin planar package for cooling an array of edge-emitting laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, David C.; Benett, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A laser diode array is disclosed that includes a plurality of planar assemblies and active cooling of each assembly. The laser diode array may be operated in a long duty cycle, or in continuous operation. A laser diode bar and a microchannel heat sink are thermally coupled in a compact, thin planar assembly having the laser diode bar located proximate to one edge. In an array, a number of such thin planar assemblies are secured together in a stacked configuration, in close proximity so that the laser diodes are spaced closely. The cooling means includes a microchannel heat sink proximate to the laser diode bar to absorb heat generated by laser operation. To provide the coolant to the microchannels, each thin planar assembly comprises passageways that connect the microchannels to inlet and outlet corridors. Each inlet passageway may comprise a narrow slot that directs coolant into the microchannels and increases the velocity of flow therethrough. The corridors comprises holes extending through each of the assemblies in the array. The inlet and outlet corridors are connected to a conventional coolant circulation system. The laser diode array with active cooling has applications as an optical pump for high power solid state lasers, or by mating the diodes with fiber optic lenses. Further, the arrays can be useful in applications having space constraints and energy limitations, and in military and space applications. The arrays can be incorporated in equipment such as communications devices and active sensors.

  2. Cooling an array of multiple heat sources by a row of slot air jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huzayyin, A.S.; Nada, S.A.; Rady, M.A.; Faris, A. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Benha High Institute of Technology, Benha 13512 (Egypt)

    2006-07-15

    An experimental study of cooling an array of multiple heat sources simulating electronic equipment by a single row of slot air jets positioned above a critical row (row having maximum heat dissipation rate) of the array was conducted. The other low power rows of the array were cooled by the spent air flow from the air jets. The experimental work was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, each block of the array was heated at a time and the other blocks of the array were kept unheated. The Nusselt number of each heated block and the thermal wake effect on downstream blocks were investigated and correlated for different values of jet Reynolds number, position of the block with respect to the jet impingement point and the separation distance between the orifice plate and the impingement surface. A superposition technique was implemented to demonstrate the practical importance of the present correlations in predicting the operating temperature of any block in an array with multiple heated blocks. In the second phase, the experiments were carried out with heating all the blocks at the same time. This phase was carried out to verify the superposition technique used to predict the operating temperature of the blocks of the array in the case of the multiple heating. (author)

  3. Acoustic array systems theory, implementation, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mingsian R; Benesty, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Presents a unified framework of far-field and near-field array techniques for noise source identification and sound field visualization, from theory to application. Acoustic Array Systems: Theory, Implementation, and Application provides an overview of microphone array technology with applications in noise source identification and sound field visualization. In the comprehensive treatment of microphone arrays, the topics covered include an introduction to the theory, far-field and near-field array signal processing algorithms, practical implementations, and common applic

  4. Magnetomicrofluidics Circuits for Organizing Bioparticle Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh

    Single-cell analysis (SCA) tools have important applications in the analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity, which is difficult or impossible to analyze in bulk cell culture or patient samples. SCA tools thus have a myriad of applications ranging from better credentialing of drug therapies to the analysis of rare latent cells harboring HIV infection or in Cancer. However, existing SCA systems usually lack the required combination of programmability, flexibility, and scalability necessary to enable the study of cell behaviors and cell-cell interactions at the scales sufficient to analyze extremely rare events. To advance the field, I have developed a novel, programmable, and massively-parallel SCA tool which is based on the principles of computer circuits. By integrating these magnetic circuits with microfluidics channels, I developed a platform that can organize a large number of single particles into an array in a controlled manner. My magnetophoretic circuits use passive elements constructed in patterned magnetic thin films to move cells along programmed tracks with an external rotating magnetic field. Cell motion along these tracks is analogous to the motion of charges in an electrical conductor, following a rule similar to Ohm's law. I have also developed asymmetric conductors, similar to electrical diodes, and storage sites for cells that behave similarly to electrical capacitors. I have also developed magnetophoretic circuits which use an overlaid pattern of microwires to switch single cells between different tracks. This switching mechanism, analogous to the operation of electronic transistors, is achieved by establishing a semiconducting gap in the magnetic pattern which can be changed from an insulating state to a conducting state by application of electrical current to an overlaid electrode. I performed an extensive study on the operation of transistors to optimize their geometry and minimize the required gate currents. By combining these elements into

  5. Status of wake and array loss research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Coupling Between Waveguide-Fed Slot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengarajan, Sembiam

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between two waveguide-fed planar slot arrays has been investigated using full-wave analysis. The analysis employs the method-of-moments solution to the pertinent coupled integral equations for the aperture electric field of all slots. In order to compute coupling between two arrays, the input port of the first array is excited with a TE(sub 10) mode wave while the second one is match-terminated. After solving the moment method matrix equations, the aperture fields of all slots are obtained and thereby the TE(sub 10) mode wave received at the input port of the second array is determined. Coupling between two arrays is the ratio of the wave amplitude arriving in the second array port to the incident wave amplitude at the first array port. The coupling mechanism has been studied as a function of spacing between arrays in different directions, e.g. the electric field plane, the magnetic field plane, and the diagonal plane. Computed coupling values are presented for different array geometries. This work is novel since it provides a good understanding of coupling between waveguide-fed slot arrays as a function of spacing and orientation for different aperture distributions and array architectures. This serves as a useful tool for antenna design engineers and system engineers.

  7. Design of circular differential microphone arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Cohen, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a completely novel and efficient way to design differential beamforming algorithms for linear microphone arrays. Thanks to this very flexible approach, any order of differential arrays can be designed. Moreover, they can be made robust against white noise amplification, which is the main inconvenience in these types of arrays. The other well-known problem with linear arrays is that electronic steering is not really feasible.  In this book, we extend all these fundamental ideas to circular microphone arrays and show that we can design small and compact differential arrays of any order that can be electronically steered in many different directions and offer a good degree of control of the white noise amplification problem, high directional gain, and frequency-independent response. We also present a number of practical examples, demonstrating that differential beamforming with circular microphone arrays is likely one of the best candidates for applications involving speech enhancement (i....

  8. Biological therapy of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivamani Raja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of psoriasis has undergone a revolution with the advent of biologic therapies, including infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, efalizumab, and alefacept. These medications are designed to target specific components of the immune system and are a major technological advancement over traditional immunosuppressive medications. These usually being well tolerated are being found useful in a growing number of immune-mediated diseases, psoriasis being just one example. The newest biologic, ustekinumab, is directed against the p40 subunit of the IL-12 and IL-23 cytokines. It has provided a new avenue of therapy for an array of T-cell-mediated diseases. Biologics are generally safe; however, there has been concern over the risk of lymphoma with use of these agents. All anti-TNF-α agents have been associated with a variety of serious and "routine" opportunistic infections.

  9. Advanced materials for thermal management of electronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2011-01-01

    The need for advanced thermal management materials in electronic packaging has been widely recognized as thermal challenges become barriers to the electronic industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. With increased performance requirements for smaller, more capable, and more efficient electronic power devices, systems ranging from active electronically scanned radar arrays to web servers all require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires that the materials have high capability of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility

  10. Reducing fiber cross-talk in mineral fiber arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Lee Stark

    2017-01-01

    Monocentric optics replace current systems with diffraction limited performance. The fiber arrays have been the issue. Commercial expensive fiber arrays are available, but enhanced mineral fiber arrays offer very inexpensive fiber arrays.

  11. HIFU Monitoring and Control with Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Andrew Jacob

    The biological effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been known and studied for decades. HIFU has been shown capable of treating a wide variety of diseases and disorders. However, despite its demonstrated potential, HIFU has been slow to gain clinical acceptance. This is due, in part, to the difficulty associated with robustly monitoring and controlling the delivery of the HIFU energy. The non-invasive nature of the surgery makes the assessment of treatment progression difficult, leading to long treatment times and a significant risk of under treatment. This thesis research develops new techniques and systems for robustly monitoring HIFU therapies for the safe and efficacious delivery of the intended treatment. Systems and algorithms were developed for the two most common modes of HIFU delivery systems: single-element and phased array applicators. Delivering HIFU with a single element transducer is a widely used technique in HIFU therapies. The simplicity of a single element offers many benefits in terms of cost and overall system complexity. Typical monitoring schemes rely on an external device (e.g. diagnostic ultrasound or MRI) to assess the progression of therapy. The research presented in this thesis explores using the same element to both deliver and monitor the HIFU therapy. The use of a dual-mode ultrasound transducer (DMUT) required the development of an FPGA based single-channel arbitrary waveform generator and high-speed data acquisition unit. Data collected from initial uncontrolled ablations led to the development of monitoring and control algorithms which were implemented directly on the FPGA. Close integration between the data acquisition and arbitrary waveform units allowed for fast, low latency control over the ablation process. Results are presented that demonstrate control of HIFU therapies over a broad range of intensities and in multiple in vitro tissues. The second area of investigation expands the DMUT research to an

  12. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  13. Innovative Solar Tracking Concept by Rotating Prism Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become one of the most promising renewable energies and is the most widely used nowadays. In order to achieve an optimum performance, both photovoltaic and solar thermal applications are required to track the position of the sun throughout the day and year in the most effective way possible to avoid a high negative impact on the system efficiency. The present paper attempts to describe a novel semipassive solar tracking concentrator (SPSTC in which, in order to track the sun, two independent arrays of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA prisms are implemented to refract sunlight by rotating said prisms, thus being able to redirect solar radiation as desired. The first set is responsible for eliminating one of the directional components of the solar radiation; the task is achieved by rotating the prisms within the array at a specific angle. The second set deals with another of the sunlight’s directional components, transforming its direction into a completely perpendicular pattern to the array. Having downward vertical radiation makes it possible to implement a stationary Fresnel lens to concentrate the solar radiation for any application desired. The system is designed and validated using simulation software to prove the feasibility of the concept.

  14. The FPGA Pixel Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromalik, Marianne S.; Green, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-01-01

    A proposed design for a reconfigurable x-ray Pixel Array Detector (PAD) is described. It operates by integrating a high-end commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) into a 3-layer device along with a high-resistivity diode detection layer and a custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) layer. The ASIC layer contains an energy-discriminating photon-counting front end with photon hits streamed directly to the FPGA via a massively parallel, high-speed data connection. FPGA resources can be allocated to perform user defined tasks on the pixel data streams, including the implementation of a direct time autocorrelation function (ACF) with time resolution down to 100 ns. Using the FPGA at the front end to calculate the ACF reduces the required data transfer rate by several orders of magnitude when compared to a fast framing detector. The FPGA-ASIC high-speed interface, as well as the in-FPGA implementation of a real-time ACF for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments has been designed and simulated. A 16×16 pixel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated and is being tested. -- Highlights: ► We describe the novelty and need for the FPGA Pixel Array Detector. ► We describe the specifications and design of the Diode, ASIC and FPGA layers. ► We highlight the Autocorrelation Function (ACF) for speckle as an example application. ► Simulated FPGA output calculates the ACF for different input bitstreams to 100 ns. ► Reduced data transfer rate by 640× and sped up real-time ACF by 100× other methods.

  15. Space-Based Radar Array System Simulation and Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    external field RBCA (NBFA,3), Array of position vectors R pointing to the center of RBC(NBF,3) ’ array a or array b element current segments from array...to center of array a RBCA (NBFA,3) element current segments from array a element feedpoint TSXB, TSYB Array b phase factors YDEL Skew parameter for...Number of feedback modes used in mutual coupling calcu- lation (POLX, POLY, POLZ) Polarization vector of external field RBCA (NBFA,3), Array of position

  16. Thermal neutron flux distribution in ET-RR-2 reactor thermal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mahmoud M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal column in the ET-RR-2 reactor is intended to promote a thermal neutron field of high intensity and purity to be used for following tasks: (a to provide a thermal neutron flux in the neutron transmutation silicon doping, (b to provide a thermal flux in the neutron activation analysis position, and (c to provide a thermal neutron flux of high intensity to the head of one of the beam tubes leading to the room specified for boron thermal neutron capture therapy. It was, therefore, necessary to determine the thermal neutron flux at above mentioned positions. In the present work, the neutron flux in the ET-RR-2 reactor system was calculated by applying the three dimensional diffusion depletion code TRITON. According to these calculations, the reactor system is composed of the core, surrounding external irradiation grid, beryllium block, thermal column and the water reflector in the reactor tank next to the tank wall. As a result of these calculations, the thermal neutron fluxes within the thermal column and at irradiation positions within the thermal column were obtained. Apart from this, the burn up results for the start up core calculated according to the TRITION code were compared with those given by the reactor designer.

  17. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  18. Conformal Antenna Array Design Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    PLOTI-e2#Yo2) AsYSCL*(J-1 )-YSL CALL N~IE(7.*L ,-LH2tH~oto4HF4.0) GO TO 10 11 CALL PLOT(-oltY92) 10 YuY ..Y DX. XM/NX NNX=NX+1 DO 20 K-19NNX CALL PLUT...polynomial. Then the coefficients are determined from the Chebyshev polynomial (Taylor, 1952; Tseng and Cheng , 1968). As in the case of linear arrays, a...used ( Cheng and Tseng, 1967). Difference pattern parameters such as slope (Powers, 1967) or directivity (Bayliss, 1968) can also be maximized at the

  19. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  20. Use of VCSEL arrays for parallel optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebby, Michael S.; Gaw, Craig A.; Jiang, Wenbin; Kiely, Philip A.; Shieh, Chan L.; Claisse, Paul R.; Ramdani, Jamal; Hartman, Davis H.; Schwartz, Daniel B.; Grula, Jerry

    1996-04-01

    The use of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) in a parallel optical interconnect for Motorola's OPTOBUSTM interconnect was made public over 1 year ago. This was the first time VCSELs were introduced into a product which took advantage of the excellent qualities of VCSELs over edge-emitting lasers. Motorola's OPTOBUSTM interconnect is a ten channel parallel bi-directional data link based on two 10 channel multimode fiber ribbons. One of the key differences in this type of interconnect compared with previous data link designs is the use of the VCSELs as the optical source for the link's fiber optic transmitter. A single 1 X 10 VCSEL array from a GaAs wafer is die attached to a 10 channel GUIDECASTTM optical interface unit which couples the emission from each laser device to its corresponding fiber ribbon channel and thus negates the use of expensive manufacturing techniques such as active alignment and pig-tailing. The OPTOBUSTM interconnect achieves its performance goals (which include low cost) via the unique characteristics of the GaAs VCSELs arrays. For example, the 850 nm devices produce a circular symmetric beam with a half angle of about 10 degrees allowing the coupling loss into the waveguide to be less than 3 dB. In addition, to maintain low manufacturing costs, each VCSEL array is individually and automatically probe tested (just as in the silicon industry) to verify that each VCSEL achieves the OPTOBUSTM interconnect's stringent electrical, optical, thermal and mechanical specifications. Typical computer generated wafer maps from automated production tooling and statistical parametric results are discussed. The combination of low threshold currents with superior thermal and optical performance allow the devices to be modulated under fixed bias conditions. Typical drive currents of 3X threshold are used to obtain nominal FDA Class 1 safety optical power levels from the GUIDECASTTM optical interface unit.

  1. Layout Of Antennas And Cables In A Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Layout devised to minimize total land area occupied by large phased array of antennas and to minimize total length of cables in array. In original intended application, array expanded version of array of paraboloidal-dish microwave communication antennas of Deep Space Network. Layout also advantageous for other phased arrays of antennas and antenna elements, including notably printed-circuit microwave antenna arrays.

  2. Effects of fin pitch and array of the frost layer growth on extended surface of a heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Keun; Lee, Kwan Soo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents the effects of the fin array and pitch on the frost layer growth of a heat exchanger. The numerical results are compared with experimental data of a cold plate to validate the present model, and agree well with experimental data within a maximum error of 8%. The characteristics of the frost formation on staggered fin array are somewhat different from those of in-line array. For fin pitch below 10 mm, the frost layer growth of second fin in the staggered array is affected by that of first fin. The heat transfer of single fin deteriorate with decreasing fin pitch regardless of fin array, however, the thermal performance of a heat exchanger, considering increase of heat surface area, becomes better.

  3. Large-area gold nanohole arrays fabricated by one-step method for surface plasmon resonance biochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huijie; Niu, Lihong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, Shujie; Yang, Jingjing; Guo, Siyi; Lawson, Tom; Shi, Bingyang; Song, Chunpeng

    2018-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensors based on metallic nanohole arrays have been widely reported to detect binding interactions in biological specimens. A simple and effective method for constructing nanoscale arrays is essential for the development of SPR nanosensors. In this work, we report a one-step method to fabricate nanohole arrays by thermal nanoimprinting in the matrix of IPS (Intermediate Polymer Stamp). No additional etching process or supporting substrate is required. The preparation process is simple, time-saving and compatible for roll-to-roll process, potentially allowing mass production. Moreover, the nanohole arrays were integrated into detection platform as SPR sensors to investigate different types of biological binding interactions. The results demonstrate that our one-step method can be used to efficiently fabricate large-area and uniform nanohole arrays for biochemical sensing.

  4. Custom ceramic microchannel-cooled array for high-power fiber-coupled application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Jeremy; Feeler, Ryan; Stephens, Ed

    2018-03-01

    A low-SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) diode array has been developed for a high-power fiber-coupled application. High efficiency ( 65%) diodes enable high optical powers while minimizing thermal losses. A large amount of waste heat is still generated and must be extracted. Custom ceramic microchannel-coolers (MCCs) are used to dissipate the waste heat. The custom ceramic MCC was designed to accommodate long cavity length diodes and micro-lenses. The coolers provide similar thermal performance as copper MCCs however they are not susceptible to erosion and can be cooled with standard filtered water. The custom ceramic micro-channel cooled array was designed to be a form/fit replacement for an existing copperbased solution. Each array consisted of three-vertically stacked MCCs with 4 mm CL, 976 nm diodes and beamshaping micro-optics. The erosion and corrosion resistance of ceramic array is intended to mitigate the risk of copperbased MCC corrosion failures. Elimination of the water delivery requirements (pH, resistivity and dissolved oxygen control) further reduces the system SWaP while maintaining reliability. The arrays were fabricated and fully characterized. This work discusses the advantages of the ceramic MCC technology and describes the design parameters that were tailored for the fiber-coupled application. Additional configuration options (form/fit, micro-lensing, alternate coolants, etc.) and on-going design improvements are also discussed.

  5. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    The present conference discusses Schottky-barrier IR image sensors, SWIR and MWIR Schottky-barrier imagers, a 640 x 640 PtSi, models of nonlinearities in focal plane arrays, retinal function relative to IRT focal plane arrays, a solid-state pyroelectric imager, and electrolyte electroreflectance spectroscopies for the ion-implanted HgCdTe with thermal annealing. Also discussed are HgCdTe hybrid focal plane arrays for thermoelectrically cooled applications, a novel IR detector plasma-edge detector, and IR detector circuits using monolithic CMOS amps with InSb detectors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  6. ArrayBridge: Interweaving declarative array processing with high-performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Haoyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Floratos, Sofoklis [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blanas, Spyros [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Byna, Suren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prabhat, Prabhat [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Paul [Paradigm4, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Scientists are increasingly turning to datacenter-scale computers to produce and analyze massive arrays. Despite decades of database research that extols the virtues of declarative query processing, scientists still write, debug and parallelize imperative HPC kernels even for the most mundane queries. This impedance mismatch has been partly attributed to the cumbersome data loading process; in response, the database community has proposed in situ mechanisms to access data in scientific file formats. Scientists, however, desire more than a passive access method that reads arrays from files. This paper describes ArrayBridge, a bi-directional array view mechanism for scientific file formats, that aims to make declarative array manipulations interoperable with imperative file-centric analyses. Our prototype implementation of ArrayBridge uses HDF5 as the underlying array storage library and seamlessly integrates into the SciDB open-source array database system. In addition to fast querying over external array objects, ArrayBridge produces arrays in the HDF5 file format just as easily as it can read from it. ArrayBridge also supports time travel queries from imperative kernels through the unmodified HDF5 API, and automatically deduplicates between array versions for space efficiency. Our extensive performance evaluation in NERSC, a large-scale scientific computing facility, shows that ArrayBridge exhibits statistically indistinguishable performance and I/O scalability to the native SciDB storage engine.

  7. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  8. Thermal-mechanical-noise-based CMUT characterization and sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F Levent

    2012-06-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Because the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics when a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. Because these measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, the approach is suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-μm-diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10 to 20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element methods and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT-based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure.

  9. Thermal-Mechanical Noise Based CMUT Characterization and Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurun, Gokce; Hochman, Michael; Hasler, Paul; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2012-01-01

    When capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) are monolithically integrated with custom-designed low-noise electronics, the output noise of the system can be dominated by the CMUT thermal-mechanical noise both in air and in immersion even for devices with low capacitance. Since the thermal-mechanical noise can be related to the electrical admittance of the CMUTs, this provides an effective means of device characterization. This approach yields a novel method to test the functionality and uniformity of CMUT arrays and the integrated electronics where a direct connection to CMUT array element terminals is not available. These measurements can be performed in air at the wafer level, suitable for batch manufacturing and testing. We demonstrate this method on the elements of an 800-μm diameter CMUT-on-CMOS array designed for intravascular imaging in the 10-20 MHz range. Noise measurements in air show the expected resonance behavior and spring softening effects. Noise measurements in immersion for the same array provide useful information on both the acoustic cross talk and radiation properties of the CMUT array elements. The good agreement between a CMUT model based on finite difference and boundary element method and the noise measurements validates the model and indicates that the output noise is indeed dominated by thermal-mechanical noise. The measurement method can be exploited to implement CMUT based passive sensors to measure immersion medium properties, or other parameters affecting the electro-mechanics of the CMUT structure. PMID:22718877

  10. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  11. A novel, flat, electronically-steered phased array transducer for tissue ablation: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, Nicholas P K; Lucht, Benjamin B C; Gunaseelan, Samuel T; Hudson, John M; Hynynen, Kullervo H

    2015-01-01

    Flat, λ/2-spaced phased arrays for therapeutic ultrasound were examined in silico and in vitro. All arrays were made by combining modules made of 64 square elements with 1.5 mm inter-element spacing along both major axes. The arrays were designed to accommodate integrated, co-aligned diagnostic transducers for targeting and monitoring. Six arrays of 1024 elements (16 modules) and four arrays of 6144 elements (96 modules) were modelled and compared according to metrics such as peak pressure amplitude, focal size, ability to be electronically-steered far off-axis and grating lobe amplitude. Two 1024 element prototypes were built and measured in vitro, producing over 100 W of acoustic power. In both cases, the simulation model of the pressure amplitude field was in good agreement with values measured by hydrophone. Using one of the arrays, it was shown that the peak pressure amplitude dropped by only 24% and 25% of the on-axis peak pressure amplitude when steered to the edge of the array (40 mm) at depths of 30 mm and 50 mm. For the 6144 element arrays studied in in silico only, similarly high steerability was found: even when steered 100 mm off-axis, the pressure amplitude decrease at the focus was less than 20%, while the maximum pressure grating lobe was only 20%. Thermal simulations indicate that the modules produce more than enough acoustic power to perform rapid ablations at physiologically relevant depths and steering angles. Arrays such as proposed and tested in this study have enormous potential: their high electronic steerability suggests that they will be able to perform ablations of large volumes without the need for any mechanical translation. (paper)

  12. Simulation and experimental study of thermal performance of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Building concrete roof with vertical cylindrical hole of 0.5 × 0.5 m and array of 3 × 3 filled with phase change material (PCM) was considered for analysis. A detailed thermal analysis was carried by both simulation and experimental study. Results showed that this type of PCM room can decrease the indoor air temperature ...

  13. Transdermal Delivery of siRNA through Microneedle Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Chen, Jiao; Zhao, Yi; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li; Choy, Kwongwai; Hu, Jun; Sant, Himanshu J.; Gale, Bruce K.; Tang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Successful development of siRNA therapies has significant potential for the treatment of skin conditions (alopecia, allergic skin diseases, hyperpigmentation, psoriasis, skin cancer, pachyonychia congenital) caused by aberrant gene expression. Although hypodermic needles can be used to effectively deliver siRNA through the stratum corneum, the major challenge is that this approach is painful and the effects are restricted to the injection site. Microneedle arrays may represent a better way to deliver siRNAs across the stratum corneum. In this study, we evaluated for the first time the ability of the solid silicon microneedle array for punching holes to deliver cholesterol-modified housekeeping gene (Gapdh) siRNA to the mouse ear skin. Treating the ear with microneedles showed permeation of siRNA in the skin and could reduce Gapdh gene expression up to 66% in the skin without accumulation in the major organs. The results showed that microneedle arrays could effectively deliver siRNA to relevant regions of the skin noninvasively.

  14. Nanomanipulation of 2 inch wafer fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays by nanoimprint lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Ian Y. Y.; Eichhorn, Volkmar; Carlson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are typically defined by electron beam lithography (EBL), and hence limited to small areas due to the low throughput. To obtain wafer‐scale fabrication we propose large area thermal nanoimprint lithography (NIL). A 2‐inch stamp master is defined using EBL for subsequent......, efficient production of wafer‐scale/larger arrays of CNTs has been achieved. The CNTs have been deposited by wafer‐scale plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) of C2H2/NH3. Substrates containing such nanotubes have been used to automate nanorobotic manipulation sequences of individual CNTs...

  15. Zero-crossing detection algorithm for arrays of optical spatial filtering velocimetry sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Michael Linde; Pedersen, Finn; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    2008-01-01

    factor is directly related to the thermal expansion and refractive-index coefficients of the optics (> 10(-5) K-1 for glass). By cascade-coupling an array of sensors, the ensemble-averaged angular velocity is measured in "real-time". This will reduce the influence of pseudo-vibrations arising from......This paper presents a zero-crossing detection algorithm for arrays of compact low-cost optical sensors based on spatial filtering for measuring fluctuations in angular velocity of rotating solid structures. The algorithm is applicable for signals with moderate signal-to-noise ratios, and delivers...

  16. Light Trapping with Silicon Light Funnel Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Ashish; Nissan, Yuval; Gabay, Tamir; Shalev, Gil

    2018-03-19

    Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF) arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of high-density complex Mie modes. Specifically, light funnel arrays exhibit broadband absorption enhancement of the solar spectrum. In the current study, we numerically explore the optical coupling between surface light funnel arrays and the underlying substrates. We show that the absorption in the LF array-substrate complex is higher than the absorption in LF arrays of the same height (~10% increase). This, we suggest, implies that a LF array serves as an efficient surface element that imparts additional momentum components to the impinging illumination, and hence optically excites the substrate by near-field light concentration, excitation of traveling guided modes in the substrate, and mode hybridization.

  17. Light Trapping with Silicon Light Funnel Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Prajapati

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Silicon light funnels are three-dimensional subwavelength structures in the shape of inverted cones with respect to the incoming illumination. Light funnel (LF arrays can serve as efficient absorbing layers on account of their light trapping capabilities, which are associated with the presence of high-density complex Mie modes. Specifically, light funnel arrays exhibit broadband absorption enhancement of the solar spectrum. In the current study, we numerically explore the optical coupling between surface light funnel arrays and the underlying substrates. We show that the absorption in the LF array-substrate complex is higher than the absorption in LF arrays of the same height (~10% increase. This, we suggest, implies that a LF array serves as an efficient surface element that imparts additional momentum components to the impinging illumination, and hence optically excites the substrate by near-field light concentration, excitation of traveling guided modes in the substrate, and mode hybridization.

  18. Photovoltaic array space power plus diagnostics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidice, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Photovoltaic Array Space Power Plus Diagnostics (PASP Plus) experiment is to measure the effects of the interaction of the low- to mid-altitude space environment on the performance of a diverse set of small solar-cell arrays (planar and concentrator, representative of present and future military technologies) under differing conditions of velocity-vector orientation and simulated (by biasing) high-voltage operation. Solar arrays to be tested include Si and GaAs planar arrays and several types of GaAs concentrator arrays. Diagnostics (a Langmuir probe and a pressure gauge) and a transient pulse monitor (to measure radiated and conducted EMI during arcing) will be used to determine the impact of the environment on array operation to help verify various interactions models. Results from a successful PASP Plus flight will furnish answers to important interactions questions and provide inputs for design and test standards for photovoltaic space-power subsystems.

  19. Space and power efficient hybrid counters array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Salapura, Valentina [Chappaqua, NY

    2009-05-12

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events. The hybrid counter array includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each counter device for receiving signals representing occurrences of events from an event source and providing a first count value corresponding to a lower order bits of the hybrid counter array. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits of the hybrid counter array. A control device monitors each of the N counter devices of the first counter portion and initiates updating a value of a corresponding second count value stored at the corresponding addressable memory location in the second counter portion. Thus, a combination of the first and second count values provide an instantaneous measure of number of events received.

  20. Generating Milton Babbitt's all-partition arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bemman, Brian; Meredith, David

    2016-01-01

    In most of Milton Babbitt's (1916–2011) works written since the early 1960s, both the pitch and rhythmic content is organized according to a highly constrained structure known as the all-partition array. The all-partition array provides a framework that ensures that as many different forms...... backtracking algorithm for generating a particular type of all-partition array found in Babbitt’s works, known as a Smalley array. Constructing such an array is a difficult task, and we present two heuristics for helping to generate this type of structure. We provide the parameter values required...... by this algorithm to generate the specific all-partition arrays used in three of Babbitt’s works. Finally, we evaluate the algorithm and the heuristics in terms of how well they predict the sequences of integer partitions used in two of Babbitt’s works. We also explore the effect of the heuristics...

  1. Thermal conductivity of zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinwiddie, R. B.; Beecher, S. C.; Nagaraj, B. A.; Moore, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBC's is of primary importance. Physical vapor deposition (PVD) and plasma spraying (PS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The PS coatings were applied with either standard powder or hollow sphere particles. The hollow sphere particles yielded a lower density and lower thermal conductivity coating. The thermal conductivity of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia, before and after thermal aging, will be compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposed to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. Sintering of the as-fabricated plasma sprayed lamellar structure is observed by scanning electron microscopy of coatings isothermally heat treated at temperatures greater than 1100 C. During this sintering process the planar porosity between lamella is converted to a series of small spherical pores. The change in pore morphology is the primary reason for the observed increase in thermal conductivity. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, preliminary results suggest that they have a higher thermal conductivity than PS coatings, both before and after thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for partially stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia have been found to be less than for fully stabilized plasma sprayed zirconia coatings. The high temperature thermal diffusivity data indicate that if these coatings reach a temperature above 1100 C

  2. Kinetic analysis of the thermal isomerisation pathways in an asymmetric double azobenzene switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robertus, Jort; Reker, Siebren F.; Pijper, Thomas C.; Deuzeman, Albert; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a photochemical and kinetic study of the thermal relaxation reaction of a double azobenzene system, in which two azobenzene photochromic units are connected via a phenyl ring. Upon UV irradiation, three thermally unstable isomers are formed. Kinetic studies using arrayed H-1-NMR

  3. Tissue Damage, Temperature, and pH Induced by Different Electrode Arrays on Potato Pieces (Solanum tuberosum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraelys Morales González

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging problems of electrochemical therapy is the design and selection of suitable electrode array for cancer. The aim is to determine how two-dimensional spatial patterns of tissue damage, temperature, and pH induced in pieces of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., var. Mondial depend on electrode array with circular, elliptical, parabolic, and hyperbolic shape. The results show the similarity between the shapes of spatial patterns of tissue damage and electric field intensity, which, like temperature and pH take the same shape of electrode array. The adequate selection of suitable electrodes array requires an integrated analysis that involves, in a unified way, relevant information about the electrochemical process, which is essential to perform more efficiently way the therapeutic planning and the personalized therapy for patients with a cancerous tumor.

  4. Mapping Electrical Crosstalk in Pixelated Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Suresh (Inventor); Cole, David (Inventor); Smith, Roger M. (Inventor); Hancock, Bruce R. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The effects of inter pixel capacitance in a pixilated array may be measured by first resetting all pixels in the array to a first voltage, where a first image is read out, followed by resetting only a subset of pixels in the array to a second voltage, where a second image is read out, where the difference in the first and second images provide information about the inter pixel capacitance. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  5. Halbach arrays in precision motion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumper, D.L.; Williams, M.E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The Halbach array was developed for use as an optical element in particle accelerators. Following up on a suggestion from Klaus Halbach, the authors have investigated the utility of such arrays as the permanent magnet structure for synchronous machines in cartesian, polar, and cylindrical geometries. Their work has focused on the design of a novel Halbach array linear motor for use in a magnetic suspension stage for photolithography. This paper presents the details of the motor design and its force and power characteristics.

  6. Big Data Challenges for Large Radio Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dayton L.; Wagstaff, Kiri; Thompson, David; D'Addario, Larry; Navarro, Robert; Mattmann, Chris; Majid, Walid; Lazio, Joseph; Preston, Robert; Rebbapragada, Umaa

    2012-01-01

    Future large radio astronomy arrays, particularly the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to generate data at rates far higher than can be analyzed or stored affordably with current practices. This is, by definition, a "big data" problem, and requires an end-to-end solution if future radio arrays are to reach their full scientific potential. Similar data processing, transport, storage, and management challenges face next-generation facilities in many other fields.

  7. Multi-Channel Capacitive Sensor Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bingnan; Long, Jiang; Teo, Koon Hoo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, multi-channel capacitive sensor arrays based on microstrip band-stop filters are studied. The sensor arrays can be used to detect the proximity of objects at different positions and directions. Each capacitive sensing structure in the array is connected to an inductive element to form resonance at different frequencies. The resonances are designed to be isolated in the frequency spectrum, such that the change in one channel does not affect resonances at other channels. The indu...

  8. Magnetic remanence of Josephson junction arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Passos, W. A. C.; Araujo-Moreira, F. M.; Ortiz, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work we study the magnetic remanence exhibited by Josephson junction arrays in response to an excitation with an AC magnetic field. The effect, predicted by numerical simulations to occur in a range of temperatures, is clearly seen in our tridimensional disordered arrays. We also discuss the influence of the critical current distribution on the temperature interval within which the array develops a magnetic remanence. This effect can be used to determine the critical current distribut...

  9. Identification of Tequila with an Array of ZnO Thin Films: A Simple and Cost-Effective Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Estanislao Acuña-Avila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An array of ZnO thin film sensors was obtained by thermal oxidation of physical vapor deposited thin Zn films. Different conditions of the thermal treatment (duration and temperature were applied in view of obtaining ZnO sensors with different gas sensing properties. Films having undergone a long thermal treatment exhibited high responses to low ethanol concentrations, while short thermal treatments generally led to sensors with high ethanol sensitivity. The sensor array was used to distinguish among Tequilas and Agave liquor. Linear discriminant analysis and the multilayer perceptron neural network reached 100% and 86.3% success rates in the discrimination between real Tequila and Agave liquor and in the identification of Tequila brands, respectively. These results are promising for the development of an inexpensive tool offering low complexity and cost of analysis for detecting fraud in spirits.

  10. Large Format Uncooled Focal Plane Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Black Forest Engineering has identified innovative modifications in uncooled focal plane array (UFPA) architecture and processing that allows development of large...

  11. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  12. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION Hand Therapy is a type of rehabilitation performed by an occupational or physical therapist with patients that suffer from conditions affecting the hands and upper extremities. Therapy enables patients to hasten ...

  13. Electroconvulsive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007474.htm Electroconvulsive therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression ...

  14. Thermal Contraction of Electrodeposited Bi/BiSb Superlattice Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou XC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lattice parameter of Bi/BiSb superlattice nanowire (SLNW has been measured using in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction method. The single crystalline Bi/BiSb SLNW arrays with different bilayer thicknesses have been fabricated within the porous anodic alumina membranes (AAMs by a charge-controlled pulse electrodeposition. Different temperature dependences of the lattice parameter and thermal expansion coefficient were found for the SLNWs. It was found that the thermal expansion coefficient of the SLNWs with a large bilayer thickness has weak temperature dependence, and the interface stress and defect are the main factors responsible for the thermal contraction of the SLNWs.

  15. Gigapixel imaging with microlens arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Antony; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2016-03-01

    A crucial part of the drug discovery process involves imaging the response of thousands of cell cultures to candidate drugs. Quantitative parameters from these "high content screens", such as protein expression and cell morphology, are extracted from fluorescence and brightfield micrographs. Due to the sheer number of cells that need to imaged for adequate statistics, the imaging time itself is a major bottleneck. Automated microscopes image small fields-of-view (FOVs) serially, which are then stitched together to form gigapixel-scale mosaics. We have developed a microscopy architecture that reduces mechanical overhead of traditional large field-of-view by parallelizing the image capture process. Instead of a single objective lens imaging FOVs one by one, we employ a microlens array for continuous photon capture, resulting in a 3-fold throughput increase. In this contribution, we present the design and imaging results of this microscopy architecture in three different contrast modes: multichannel fluorescence, hyperspectral fluorescence and brightfield.

  16. A Portable Diode Array Spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, David

    2016-05-01

    A cheap portable visible light spectrometer is presented. The spectrometer uses readily sourced items and could be constructed by anyone with a knowledge of electronics. The spectrometer covers the wavelength range 450-725 nm with a resolution better than 5 nm. The spectrometer uses a diffraction grating to separate wavelengths, which are detected using a 128-element diode array, the output of which is analyzed using a microprocessor. The spectrum is displayed on a small liquid crystal display screen and can be saved to a micro SD card for later analysis. Battery life (2 × AAA) is estimated to be 200 hours. The overall dimensions of the unit are 120 × 65 × 60 mm, and it weighs about 200 g. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Array abstractions for GPU programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, Martin

    The shift towards massively parallel hardware platforms for highperformance computing tasks has introduced a need for improved programming models that facilitate ease of reasoning for both users and compiler optimization. A promising direction is the field of functional data-parallel programming......, for which functional invariants can be utilized by optimizing compilers to perform large program transformations automatically. However, the previous work in this area allow users only limited ability to reason about the performance of algorithms. For this reason, such languages have yet to see wide...... industrial adoption. We present two programming languages that attempt at both supporting industrial applications and providing reasoning tools for hierarchical data-parallel architectures, such as GPUs. First, we present TAIL, an array based intermediate language and compiler framework for compiling a large...

  18. Conformable eddy current array delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summan, Rahul; Pierce, Gareth; Macleod, Charles; Mineo, Carmelo; Riise, Jonathan; Morozov, Maxim; Dobie, Gordon; Bolton, Gary; Raude, Angélique; Dalpé, Colombe; Braumann, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    The external surface of stainless steel containers used for the interim storage of nuclear material may be subject to Atmospherically Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (AISCC). The inspection of such containers poses a significant challenge due to the large quantities involved; therefore, automating the inspection process is of considerable interest. This paper reports upon a proof-of-concept project concerning the automated NDT of a set of test containers containing artificially generated AISCCs. An Eddy current array probe with a conformable padded surface from Eddyfi was used as the NDT sensor and end effector on a KUKA KR5 arc HW robot. A kinematically valid cylindrical raster scan path was designed using the KUKA|PRC path planning software. Custom software was then written to interface measurement acquisition from the Eddyfi hardware with the motion control of the robot. Preliminary results and analysis are presented from scanning two canisters.

  19. Scanning strategies for imaging arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Attila

    2008-07-01

    Large-format (sub)millimeter wavelength imaging arrays are best operated in scanning observing modes rather than traditional position-switched (chopped) modes. The choice of observing mode is critical for isolating source signals from various types of noise interference, especially for ground-based instrumentation operating under a bright atmosphere. Ideal observing strategies can combat 1/f noise, resist instrumental defects, sensitively recover emission on large scales, and provide an even field coverage - all under feasible requirements of telescope movement. This work aims to guide the design of observing patterns that maximize scientific returns. It also compares some of the popular choices of observing modes for (sub)millimeter imaging, such as random, Lissajous, billiard, spiral, On-The-Fly (OTF), DREAM, chopped and stare patterns. Many of the conclusions are also applicable other imaging applications and imaging in one dimension (e.g. spectroscopic observations).

  20. Thermal Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Philipp Andreas

    Accidental ignition of flammable gases is a critical safety concern in many industrial applications. Particularly in the aviation industry, the main areas of concern on an aircraft are the fuel tank and adjoining regions, where spilled fuel has a high likelihood of creating a flammable mixture. To this end, a fundamental understanding of the ignition phenomenon is necessary in order to develop more accurate test methods and standards as a means of designing safer air vehicles. The focus of this work is thermal ignition, particularly auto-ignition with emphasis on the effect of heating rate, hot surface ignition and flame propagation, and puffing flames. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels is traditionally separated into slow reaction, cool flame, and ignition regimes based on pressure and temperature. Standard tests, such as the ASTM E659, are used to determine the lowest temperature required to ignite a specific fuel mixed with air at atmospheric pressure. It is expected that the initial pressure and the rate at which the mixture is heated also influences the limiting temperature and the type of combustion. This study investigates the effect of heating rate, between 4 and 15 K/min, and initial pressure, in the range of 25 to 100 kPa, on ignition of n-hexane air mixtures. Mixtures with equivalence ratio ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 were investigated. The problem is also modeled computationally using an extension of Semenov's classical auto-ignition theory with a detailed chemical mechanism. Experiments and simulations both show that in the same reactor either a slow reaction or an ignition event can take place depending on the heating rate. Analysis of the detailed chemistry demonstrates that a mixture which approaches the ignition region slowly undergoes a significant modification of its composition. This change in composition induces a progressive shift of the explosion limit until the mixture is no longer flammable. A mixture that approaches the ignition region