WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal therapy arrays

  1. Intracavitary ultrasound phased arrays for thermal therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Erin

    Currently, the success of hyperthermia and thermal surgery treatments is limited by the technology used in the design and fabrication of clinical heating devices and the completeness of the thermometry systems used for guidance. For both hyperthermia and thermal surgery, electrically focused ultrasound generated by phased arrays provides a means of controlling localized energy deposition in body tissues. Intracavitary applicators can be used to bring the energy source close to a target volume, such as the prostate, thereby minimizing normal tissue damage. The work performed in this study was aimed at improving noninvasive prostate thermal therapies and utilized three research approaches: (1) Acoustic, thermal and optimization simulations, (2) Design and fabrication of multiple phased arrays, (3) Ex vivo and in vivo experimental testing of the heating capabilities of the phased arrays. As part of this study, a novel aperiodic phased array design was developed which resulted in a 30- 45% reduction in grating lobe levels when compared to conventional phased arrays. Measured acoustic fields generated by the constructed aperiodic arrays agreed closely with the fields predicted by the theoretical simulations and covered anatomically appropriate ranges. The power capabilities of these arrays were demonstrated to be sufficient for the purposes of hyperthermia and thermal surgery. The advantage of using phased arrays in place of fixed focus transducers was shown by demonstrating the ability of electronic scanning to increase the size of the necrosed tissue volume while providing a more uniform thermal dose, which can ultimately reduce patient treatment times. A theoretical study on the feasibility of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) thermometry for noninvasive temperature feedback control was investigated as a means to improve transient and steady state temperature distributions achieved in hyperthermia treatments. MRI guided ex vivo and in vivo experiments demonstrated

  2. Intracavitary ultrasound phased arrays for prostate thermal therapies: MRI compatibility and in vivo testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, E B; Hynynen, K

    1998-12-01

    A 62 element MRI-compatible linear phased array was designed and constructed to investigate the feasibility of using transrectal ultrasound for the thermal therapeutic treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. An aperiodic design technique developed in a previous study was used in the design of this array, which resulted in reduced grating lobe levels by using an optimized random distribution of unequally sized elements. The element sizes used in this array were selected to be favorable for both grating lobe levels as determined by array aperiodicity and array efficiency as determined by width to thickness ratios. The heating capabilities and MRI compatibility of the array were tested with in vivo rabbit thigh muscle heating experiments using MRI temperature monitoring. The array produced therapeutic temperature elevations in vivo at depths of 3-6 cm and axial locations up to 3 cm off the central axis and increased the size of the heated volume with electronic scanning of a single focus. The ability of this array to be used for ultrasound surgery was demonstrated by creating necrosed tissue lesions in vivo using short high-power sonications. The ability of the array to be used for hyperthermia was demonstrated by inducing therapeutic temperature elevations for longer exposures. Based on the acoustic and heating performance of this array, it has the potential to be clinically useful for delivering thermal therapies to the prostate and other target volumes close to body cavities.

  3. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm -2 . By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled

  4. Thermal therapy for breast tumors by using a cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning: a preliminary numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C-S; Ju, K-C; Cheng, T-Y; Chen, Y-Y; Lin, W-L

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a 1 MHz cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning to produce uniform heating for breast tumor thermal therapy. The breast was submerged in water and surrounded by the cylindrical ultrasound phased array. A multifocus pattern was generated and electrically scanned by the phased array to enlarge the treatment lesion in single heating. To prevent overheating normal tissues, a large planning target volume (PTV) would be divided into several planes with several subunits on each plane and sequentially treated with a cooling phase between two successive heatings of the subunit. Heating results for different target temperatures (T tgt ), blood perfusion rates and sizes of the PTV have been studied. Furthermore, a superficial breast tumor with different water temperatures was also studied. Results indicated that a higher target temperature would produce a slightly larger thermal lesion, and a higher blood perfusion rate would not affect the heating lesion size but increase the heating time significantly. The acoustic power deposition and temperature elevations in ribs can be minimized by orienting the acoustic beam from the ultrasound phased array approximately parallel to the ribs. In addition, a large acoustic window on the convex-shaped breast surface for the proposed ultrasound phased array and the cooling effect of water would prevent the skin overheating for the production of a lesion at any desired location. This study demonstrated that the proposed cylindrical ultrasound phased array can provide effective heating for breast tumor thermal therapy without overheating the skin and ribs within a reasonable treatment time

  5. Thermal crosstalk in heated microcantilever arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hoe Joon; Dai, Zhenting; King, William P

    2013-01-01

    We report on a detailed characterization and analysis of thermal crosstalk in a heated microcantilever array. The fabricated heated cantilever array consists of five identical independently controlled heated cantilevers. The temperature of each cantilever can be controlled over a large temperature range, up to 900 °C, by means of an integrated solid-state resistive heater. We analyze thermal crosstalk in steady and transient operating conditions when the heated cantilever array is either in contact with a substrate or freely suspended in air. The thermal conductance between neighboring cantilevers is as high as 0.61 µW °C −1 , resulting in non-negligible temperature increases in neighboring cantilevers, depending upon the operating conditions. By understanding and accounting for thermal crosstalk, it is possible to improve temperature control and temperature measurements with heated microcantilever arrays. (paper)

  6. Thermal physics of transition edge sensor arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoevers, H.F.C.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal transport in transition edge sensor (TES)-based microcalorimeter arrays is reviewed. The fundamentals of thermal conductance in Si 3 N 4 membranes are discussed and the magnitude of the electron-phonon coupling and Kapitza coupling in practical devices is summarized. Next, the thermal transport in high-stopping power and low-heat capacity absorbers, required for arrays of TES microcalorimeters, is discussed in combination with a performance analysis of detectors with mushroom-absorbers. Finally, the phenomenology of unexplained excess noise, observed in both Mo- and Ti-based TESs, is briefly summarized and related with the coupling of the TES to the heat bath

  7. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  8. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Michael R [Albuquerque, NM; Shaw, Michael J [Tijeras, NM; Nielson, Gregory N [Albuquerque, NM; Lentine, Anthony L [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-02-23

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  9. Rapid thermal cycling of new technology solar array blanket coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Kurland, Richard M.; Mesch, Hans G.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting thermal cycle testing of a new solar array blanket technologies. These technologies include test coupons for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the advanced photovoltaic solar array (APSA). The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array interconnect design and blanket technology within a low earth orbit (LEO) or geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) thermal cycling environment. Both the SSF and the APSA array survived all rapid thermal cycling with little or no degradation in peak performance. This testing includes an equivalent of 15 years in LEO for SSF test coupons and 30 years of GEO plus ten years of LEO for the APSA test coupon. It is concluded that both the parallel gap welding of the SSF interconnects and the soldering of the APSA interconnects are adequately designed to handle the thermal stresses of space environment temperature extremes.

  10. Thermal Conduction in Vertically Aligned Copper Nanowire Arrays and Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barako, Michael T; Roy-Panzer, Shilpi; English, Timothy S; Kodama, Takashi; Asheghi, Mehdi; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2015-09-02

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer heat between sources and sinks is often a bottleneck in the thermal management of modern energy conversion technologies ranging from microelectronics to thermoelectric power generation. These interfaces contribute parasitic thermal resistances that reduce device performance and are subjected to thermomechanical stresses that degrade device lifetime. Dense arrays of vertically aligned metal nanowires (NWs) offer the unique combination of thermal conductance from the constituent metal and mechanical compliance from the high aspect ratio geometry to increase interfacial heat transfer and device reliability. In the present work, we synthesize copper NW arrays directly onto substrates via templated electrodeposition and extend this technique through the use of a sacrificial overplating layer to achieve improved uniformity. Furthermore, we infiltrate the array with an organic phase change material and demonstrate the preservation of thermal properties. We use the 3ω method to measure the axial thermal conductivity of freestanding copper NW arrays to be as high as 70 W m(-1) K(-1), which is more than an order of magnitude larger than most commercial interface materials and enhanced-conductivity nanocomposites reported in the literature. These arrays are highly anisotropic, and the lateral thermal conductivity is found to be only 1-2 W m(-1) K(-1). We use these measured properties to elucidate the governing array-scale transport mechanisms, which include the effects of morphology and energy carrier scattering from size effects and grain boundaries.

  11. Thermal poling of multi-wire array optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Lin; An, Honglin; Hayashi, Juliano G.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate in this paper thermal poling of multi-wire array fibers, which extends poling of fibers with two anodes to similar to 50 and similar to 500 wire array anodes. The second harmonic microscopy observations show that second order nonlinearity (SON) layers are developed surrounding all...... the rings of wires in the similar to 50 anode array fiber with poling of 1.8kV, 250 degrees C and 30min duration, and the outer rings of the similar to 500 anode array fiber at lower poling temperature. Our simulations based on a two-dimensional charge dynamics model confirm this can be explained...

  12. Thermal crosstalk in arrays of III-N-based Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuc, Maciej; Sarzała, Robert P.; Nakwaski, Włodzimierz

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D comprehensive thermal-electrical self-consistent model of the continuous-wave (CW) operation of one-dimensional arrays of III-N-based laser diodes at room-temperature (RT). Their performance is mostly limited by thermal processes, in particular by thermal crosstalk between array emitters. Based on data collected from a range of secondary sources, the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities of III-N materials used to manufacture nitride-based devices is shown to be a function of the thickness, aluminum mole fractions and Si- and Mg-doping levels of the nitride layers. The impact of substrate width and thickness on increasing the efficiency of heat-flux transport and reducing thermal crosstalk is investigated. As expected, the application of a top-mounted diamond heat spreader was found to have considerable influence on the thermal crosstalk between array emitters, enabling the RT CW operation of laser diode arrays with additional emitters

  13. Thermally-Induced Structural Disturbances of Rigid Panel Solar Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, John D.; Thornton, Earl A.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a significant number of spacecraft has been impacted negatively by attitude disturbances resulting from thermally-induced motions of flexible structures. Recent examples of spacecraft affected by these disturbances include the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Thermally-induced structural disturbances occur as the result of rapid changes in thermal loading typically initiated as a satellite exits or enters the Earth's shadow. Temperature differences in flexible appendages give rise to structural deformations, which in turn result in disturbance torques reacting back on the spacecraft. Structures which have proven susceptible to these disturbances include deployable booms and solar arrays. This paper investigates disturbances resulting from thermally-induced deformations of rigid panel solar arrays. An analytical model for the thermal-structural response of the solar array and the corresponding disturbance torque are presented. The effect of these disturbances on the attitude dynamics of a simple spacecraft is then investigated using a coupled system of governing equations which includes the effects of thermally-induced deformations. Numerical results demonstrate the effect of varying solar array geometry on the dynamic response of the system.

  14. Thermal analysis for folded solar array of spacecraft in orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.H.; Cheng, H.E.; Cai, A.

    2004-01-01

    The combined radiation-conduction heat transfer in folded solar array was considered as a three-dimensional anisotropic conduction without inner heat source. The three-dimensional equivalent conductivity in cell plate were obtained. The especially discrete equation coefficients of the nodes on the surfaces of adjacent cell plates were deduced by utilizing the simplified radiation network among the two adjacent cell plate surfaces and the deep cold space. All the thermal influence factors on the temperature response of the folded solar array were considered carefully. SIP method was used to solve the discrete equation. By comparing the calculation results under three cases, the temperature response and the maximum average difference of the folded solar array was obtained during the period of throw-radome of the launch vehicle and spread of the folded solar array. The obtained result is a valuable reference for the selection of the launch time of the spacecraft

  15. A thermal plasmonic sensor platform: resistive heating of nanohole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Mudassar; Xiong, Kunli; Svedendahl, Mikael; Käll, Mikael; Dahlin, Andreas B

    2014-06-11

    We have created a simple and efficient thermal plasmonic sensor platform by letting a DC current heat plasmonic nanohole arrays. The sensor can be used to determine thermodynamic parameters in addition to monitoring molecular reactions in real-time. As an application example, we use the thermal sensor to determine the kinetics and activation energy for desorption of thiol monolayers on gold. Further, the temperature of the metal can be measured optically by the spectral shift of the bonding surface plasmon mode (0.015 nm/K). We show that this resonance shift is caused by thermal lattice expansion, which reduces the plasma frequency of the metal. The sensor is also used to determine the thin film thermal expansion coefficient through a theoretical model for the expected resonance shift.

  16. Beam-Forming Concentrating Solar Thermal Array Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Thomas A. (Inventor); Dimotakis, Paul E. (Inventor); Hoppe, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to concentrating solar-power systems and, more particularly, beam-forming concentrating solar thermal array power systems. A solar thermal array power system is provided, including a plurality of solar concentrators arranged in pods. Each solar concentrator includes a solar collector, one or more beam-forming elements, and one or more beam-steering elements. The solar collector is dimensioned to collect and divert incoming rays of sunlight. The beam-forming elements intercept the diverted rays of sunlight, and are shaped to concentrate the rays of sunlight into a beam. The steering elements are shaped, dimensioned, positioned, and/or oriented to deflect the beam toward a beam output path. The beams from the concentrators are converted to heat at a receiver, and the heat may be temporarily stored or directly used to generate electricity.

  17. A cryogenic thermal source for detector array characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Edward J.; Berman, Leah; Colazo, Felipe; DeGeorge, Martin; Helson, Kyle; Sagliocca, Marco

    2017-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and validation of a cryogenically compatible quasioptical thermal source for characterization of detector arrays. The source is constructed using a graphite-loaded epoxy mixture that is molded into a tiled pyramidal structure. The mold is fabricated using a hardened steel template produced via a wire electron discharge machining process. The absorptive mixture is bonded to a copper backplate enabling thermalization of the entire structure and measurement of the source temperature. Measurements indicate that the reflectance of the source is <0.001 across a spectral band extending from 75 to 330 GHz.

  18. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, N; Iasiello, M; Naso, V

    2015-01-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics ® . Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared. (paper)

  19. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, N.; Iasiello, M.; Naso, V.

    2015-11-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics®. Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared.

  20. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H.P.; Gellermann, J.; van den Berg, C.A.T.; Stauffer, P.R.; Hand, J.W.; Crezee, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality and substantial progress has been made over the last decade. Thermal modelling is a very important and challenging aspect of hyperthermia treatment planning. Various thermal models have been developed for this purpose, with varying complexity. Since blood perfusion is such an important factor in thermal redistribution of energy in in vivo tissue, thermal simulations are most accurately performed by modelling discrete vasculature. This review describes the progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature for the purpose of hyperthermia treatment planning and thermal ablation. There has been significant progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature. Recent developments have made real-time simulations possible, which can provide feedback during treatment for improved therapy. Future clinical application of thermal modelling with discrete vasculature in hyperthermia treatment planning is expected to further improve treatment quality. PMID:23738700

  1. Photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles arrayed on thermal insulation layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-04-08

    Efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles on a porous SiO(2) layer was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The Au nanoparticle arrays/porous SiO(2)/SiO(2)/Ag mirror sandwiches, namely, local plasmon resonators, were prepared by dynamic oblique deposition (DOD). Photoacoustic measurements were performed on the local plasmon resonators, whose optical absorption was varied from 0.03 (3%) to 0.95 by varying the thickness of the dielectric SiO(2) layer. The sample with high absorption (0.95) emitted a sound that was eight times stronger than that emitted by graphite (0.94) and three times stronger than that emitted by the sample without the porous SiO(2) layer (0.93). The contribution of the porous SiO(2) layer to the efficient photoacoustic emission was analyzed by means of a numerical method based on a one-dimensional heat transfer model. The result suggested that the low thermal conductivity of the underlying porous layer reduces the amount of heat escaping from the substrate and contributes to the efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticle arrays. Because both the thermal conductivity and the spatial distribution of the heat generation can be controlled by DOD, the local plasmon resonators produced by DOD are suitable for the spatio-temporal modulation of the local temperature.

  2. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Meng, Dennis Desheng

    2011-01-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA

  3. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  4. The impact of thermal wave characteristics on thermal dose distribution during thermal therapy: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-C.; Kou, H.-S.; Liauh, C.-T.; Lin, W.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the propagation speed of a thermal wave in terms of the thermal relaxation time on the temperature/thermal dose distributions in living tissue during thermal therapies. The temperature field in tissue was solved by the finite difference method, and the thermal dose was calculated from the formulation proposed by Sapareto and Dewey [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 10, 787-800 (1984)]. Under the same total deposited energy, for a rapid heating process the time lagging behavior of the peak temperature became pronounced and the level of the peak temperature was decreased with increasing the thermal relaxation time. When the heating duration was longer than the thermal relaxation time of tissues, there was no significant difference between the thermal dose distributions with/without considering the effect of the thermal relaxation time. In other words, when the heating duration is comparable to or shorter than the thermal relaxation time of tissue, the results of the wave bioheat transfer equation (WBHTE) are fully different from that of the Pennes' bioheat transfer equation (PBHTE). Besides, for a rapid heating process the dimension of thermal lesion was still significantly affected by perfusion, because this is what is predicted by the WBHTE but not by the PBHTE, i.e., the wave feature of the temperature field cannot fully be predicted by the PBHTE

  5. Development of an Infrared Lamp Array for the Smap Spacecraft Thermal Balance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer R.; Emis, Nickolas; Forgette, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    NASA launched the SMAP observatory in January 2015 aboard a Delta II into a sun-synchronous orbit around Earth. The science payload of a radar and a radiometer utilizes a shared rotating six-meter antenna to provide a global map of the Earth's soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state on a global, high-resolution scale in this three-year mission. An observatory-level thermal balance test conducted in May/June 2014 validated the thermal design and demonstrated launch readiness as part of the planned environmental test campaign. An infrared lamp array was designed and used in the thermal balance test to replicate solar heating on the solar array and sunlit side of the spacecraft that would normally be seen in orbit. The design, implementation, and operation of an infrared lamp array used for this nineteen-day system thermal test are described in this paper. Instrumental to the smooth operation of this lamp array was a characterization test performed in the same chamber two months prior to the observatory test to provide insight into its array operation and flux uniformity. This knowledge was used to identify the lamp array power settings that would provide the worst case predicted on-orbit fluxes during eclipse, cold, and hot cases. It also showed the lamp array variation when adjustments in flux were needed. Calorimeters calibrated prior to testing determined a relationship between calorimeter temperature and lamp array flux. This allowed the team to adjust the lamp output for the desired absorbed flux on the solar array. Flux levels were within 10% of the desired value at the center of the solar array with an ability to maintain these levels within 5% during steady state cases. All tests demonstrated the infrared lamp array functionality and furthered lamp array understanding for modeling purposes. This method contributed to a high-fidelity environmental simulation, which was required to replicate the extreme on-orbit thermal environments.

  6. Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geohegan, David B [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilya N [Knoxville, TN; Puretzky, Alexander A [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-27

    Methods and apparatus are described for fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites. A composition includes a vertically aligned nanotube array including a plurality of nanotubes characterized by a property across substantially all of the vertically aligned nanotube array. A method includes depositing a vertically aligned nanotube array that includes a plurality of nanotubes; and controlling a deposition rate of the vertically aligned nanotubes array as a function of an in situ monitored property of the plurality of nanotubes.

  7. Surface-restrained growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays with excellent thermal transport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Linquan; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Li, Jincheng; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ma, Chaoqun; Tai, Kaiping; Cong, Hongtao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2017-06-22

    A vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) array is a promising candidate for a high-performance thermal interface material in high-power microprocessors due to its excellent thermal transport property. However, its rough and entangled free tips always cause poor interfacial contact, which results in serious contact resistance dominating the total thermal resistance. Here, we employed a thin carbon cover to restrain the disorderly growth of the free tips of a VACNT array. As a result, all the free tips are seamlessly connected by this thin carbon cover and the top surface of the array is smoothed. This unique structure guarantees the participation of all the carbon nanotubes in the array in the heat transport. Consequently the VACNT array grown on a Cu substrate shows a record low thermal resistance of 0.8 mm 2 K W -1 including the two-sided contact resistances, which is 4 times lower than the best result previously reported. Remarkably, the VACNT array can be easily peeled away from the Cu substrate and act as a thermal pad with excellent flexibility, adhesive ability and heat transport capability. As a result the CNT array with a thin carbon cover shows great potential for use as a high-performance flexible thermal interface material.

  8. Performance of a thermal imager employing a hybrid pyroelectric detector array with MOSFET readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watton, R.; Mansi, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    A thermal imager employing a two-dimensional hybrid array of pyroelectric detectors with MOSFET readout has been built. The design and theoretical performance of the detector are discussed, and the results of performance measurements are presented. 8 references

  9. Thermally Conductive Tape Based on Carbon Nanotube Array, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future NASA missions require thermal control systems that can accommodate large changes in ambient temperature. The two essential aspects of an effective thermal...

  10. Optical spins and nano-antenna array for magnetic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammawongsa, N; Mitatha, S; Yupapin, P P

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic therapy is an alternative medicine practice involving the use of magnetic fields subjected to certain parts of the body and stimulates healing from a range of health problems. In this paper, an embedded nano-antenna system using the optical spins generated from a particular configuration of microrings (PANDA) is proposed. The orthogonal solitons pairs corresponding to the left-hand and right-hand optical solitons (photons) produced from dark-bright soliton conversion can be simultaneously detected within the system at the output ports. Two possible spin states which are assigned as angular momentum of either +ħ or -ħ will be absorbed by an object whenever this set of orthogonal solitons is imparted to the object. Magnetic moments could indeed arise from the intrinsic property of spins. By controlling some important parameters of the system such as soliton input power, coupling coefficients and sizes of rings, output signals from microring resonator system can be tuned and optimized to be used as magnetic therapy array.

  11. Output performance analyses of solar array on stratospheric airship with thermal effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun; Lv, Mingyun; Tan, Dongjie; Zhu, Weiyu; Sun, Kangwen; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A model investigating the output power of solar array is proposed. • The output power in the cruise condition with thermal effect is researched. • The effect of some factors on output performance is discussed in detail. • A suitable transmissivity of external layer is crucial in preliminary design step. - Abstract: Output performance analyses of the solar array are very critical for solving the energy problem of a long endurance stratospheric airship, and the solar cell efficiency is very sensitive to temperature of the solar cell. But the research about output performance of solar array with thermal effect is rare. This paper outlines a numerical model including the thermal model of airship and solar cells, the incident solar radiation model on the solar array, and the power output model. Based on this numerical model, a MATLAB computer program is developed. In the course of the investigation, the comparisons of the simulation results with and without considering thermal effect are reported. Furthermore, effects of the transmissivity of external encapsulation layer of solar array and wind speed on the thermal performance and output power of solar array are discussed in detail. The results indicate that this method is helpful for planning energy management.

  12. Control of thermal therapies with moving power deposition field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Dhiraj; Minor, Mark A; Skliar, Mikhail; Roemer, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    A thermal therapy feedback control approach to control thermal dose using a moving power deposition field is developed and evaluated using simulations. A normal tissue safety objective is incorporated in the controller design by imposing constraints on temperature elevations at selected normal tissue locations. The proposed control technique consists of two stages. The first stage uses a model-based sliding mode controller that dynamically generates an 'ideal' power deposition profile which is generally unrealizable with available heating modalities. Subsequently, in order to approximately realize this spatially distributed idealized power deposition, a constrained quadratic optimizer is implemented to compute intensities and dwell times for a set of pre-selected power deposition fields created by a scanned focused transducer. The dwell times for various power deposition profiles are dynamically generated online as opposed to the commonly employed a priori-decided heating strategies. Dynamic intensity and trajectory generation safeguards the treatment outcome against modelling uncertainties and unknown disturbances. The controller is designed to enforce simultaneous activation of multiple normal tissue temperature constraints by rapidly switching between various power deposition profiles. The hypothesis behind the controller design is that the simultaneous activation of multiple constraints substantially reduces treatment time without compromising normal tissue safety. The controller performance and robustness with respect to parameter uncertainties is evaluated using simulations. The results demonstrate that the proposed controller can successfully deliver the desired thermal dose to the target while maintaining the temperatures at the user-specified normal tissue locations at or below the maximum allowable values. Although demonstrated for the case of a scanned focused ultrasound transducer, the developed approach can be extended to other heating modalities with

  13. Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array for Picosat Propulsion and Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeenko, Alina; Cardiff, Eric; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept for propulsion and thermal control of picosats exploits microscale surface tension effect in conjunction with temperature- dependent vapor pressure to realize compact, tunable and low-power thermal valving system. The FEMTA is intended to be a self-contained propulsion unit requiring only a low-voltage DC power source to operate. The microfabricated thermal valving and very-high-integration level enables fast high-capacity cooling and high-resolution, low-power micropropulsion for picosats that is superior to existing smallsat micropropulsion and thermal management alternatives.

  14. Effects of thermal annealing temperature and duration on hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.Q.; Kim, C.R.; Lee, J.Y.; Shin, C.M.; Heo, J.H.; Leem, J.Y. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, H. [Department of Nano Systems Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr; Chang, J.H. [Major of Nano Semiconductor, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H.C. [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, Korea Maritime University, 1 Dongsam-dong, Yeongdo-Ku, Busan 606-791 (Korea, Republic of); Son, C.S. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Silla University, Gwaebeop-dong, Sasang-gu, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, B.C.; Lee, W.J. [Department of Nano Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, W.G. [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, 861-1, Jeongneung-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, S.T. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Zhao, J.L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, X.W. [Institute of Microelectronics, 11 Science Park Road, Science Park II, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, the effects of thermal annealing temperature and duration on ZnO nanorod arrays fabricated by hydrothermal method were investigated. The annealed ZnO/Si(1 1 1) substrate was used for ZnO nanorod array growth. The effects of annealing treatment on the structural and optical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and room-temperature photoluminescence measurements. With the annealing temperature of 750 {sup o}C and the annealing duration of 10 min, both the structural and optical properties of the ZnO nanorod arrays improved significantly, as indicated in the X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurement.

  15. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H. Petra; Gellermann, Johanna; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Hand, Jeffrey W.; Crezee, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality, and substantial

  16. Phononic thermal resistance due to a finite periodic array of nano-scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trang Nghiêm, T. T.; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier [Univ. Lyon, CNRS, INSA-Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CETHIL UMR5008, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-07-28

    The wave property of phonons is employed to explore the thermal transport across a finite periodic array of nano-scatterers such as circular and triangular holes. As thermal phonons are generated in all directions, we study their transmission through a single array for both normal and oblique incidences, using a linear dispersionless time-dependent acoustic frame in a two-dimensional system. Roughness effects can be directly considered within the computations without relying on approximate analytical formulae. Analysis by spatio-temporal Fourier transform allows us to observe the diffraction effects and the conversion of polarization. Frequency-dependent energy transmission coefficients are computed for symmetric and asymmetric objects that are both subject to reciprocity. We demonstrate that the phononic array acts as an efficient thermal barrier by applying the theory of thermal boundary (Kapitza) resistances to arrays of smooth scattering holes in silicon for an exemplifying periodicity of 10 nm in the 5–100 K temperature range. It is observed that the associated thermal conductance has the same temperature dependence as that without phononic filtering.

  17. Treatment time reduction for large thermal lesions by using a multiple 1D ultrasound phased array system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.-L.; Chen, Y.-Y.; Yen, J.-Y.; Lin, W.-L.

    2003-01-01

    To generate large thermal lesions in ultrasound thermal therapy, cooling intermissions are usually introduced during the treatment to prevent near-field heating, which leads to a long treatment time. A possible strategy to shorten the total treatment time is to eliminate the cooling intermissions. In this study, the two methods, power optimization and acoustic window enlargement, for reducing power accumulation in the near field are combined to investigate the feasibility of continuously heating a large target region (maximally 3.2 x 3.2 x 3.2 cm 3 ). A multiple 1D ultrasound phased array system generates the foci to scan the target region. Simulations show that the target region can be successfully heated without cooling and no near-field heating occurs. Moreover, due to the fact that there is no cooling time during the heating sessions, the total treatment time is significantly reduced to only several minutes, compared to the existing several hours

  18. MR-guided noninvasive thermal coagulation of in-vivo liver tissue using ultrasonic phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, Douglas R.; Smith, Nadine; McDannold, Nathan; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    1999-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to guide and monitor the thermal tissue coagulation of in vivo porcine tissue using a 256 element ultrasonic phased array. The array could coagulate tissue volumes greater than 2 cm3 in liver and 0.5 cm3 in kidney using a single 20 second sonication. This sonication used multiple focus fields which were temporally cycled to heat large tissue volumes simultaneously. Estimates of the coagulated tissue using a thermal dose threshold compare well with T2-weighted images of post sonication lesions. The overlapping large focal volumes could aid in the treatment of large tumor volumes which require multiple overlapping sonications. The ability of MR to detect the presence and undesirable thermal increases at acoustic obstacle such as cartilaginous and bony ribs is demonstrated. This could have a significant impact on the ability to monitor thermal treatments of the liver and other organs which are acoustically blocked.

  19. Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT) | Huang | Alexandria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photo-thermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally-invasive therapy in which photon energy is converted into heat to kill cancer. Gold nanoparticles absorb light strongly and convert photon energy into heat quickly and efficiently, thereby making them superior contrast agents for PTT. This gold nanoparticle-assisted PTT called ...

  20. Fabrication of three-dimensional ordered nanodot array structures by a thermal dewetting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenxing; Yoshino, Masahiko; Yamanaka, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    A new fabrication method for three-dimensional nanodot arrays with low cost and high throughput is developed in this paper. In this process, firstly a 2D nanodot array is fabricated by combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches. A nanoplastic forming technique is utilized as the top-down approach to fabricate a groove grid pattern on an Au layer deposited on a substrate, and self-organization by thermal dewetting is employed as the bottom-up approach. On the first-layer nanodot array, SiO 2 is deposited as a spacer layer. Au is then deposited on the spacer layer and thermal dewetting is conducted to fabricate a second-layer nanodot array. The effective parameters influencing dot formation on the second layer, including Au layer thickness and SiO 2 layer thickness, are studied. It is demonstrated that a 3D nanodot array of good vertical alignment is obtained by repeating the SiO 2 deposition, Au deposition and thermal dewetting. The mechanism of the dot agglomeration process is studied based on geometrical models. The effects of the spacer layer thickness and Au layer thickness on the morphology and alignment of the second-layer dots are discussed. (paper)

  1. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays Bonded to Solid Graphite Substrates: Thermal Analysis for Future Device Cooling Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty T. Quinton

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are known for high thermal conductivity and have potential use as nano-radiators or heat exchangers. This paper focuses on the thermal performance of carpet-like arrays of vertically aligned CNTs on solid graphite substrates with the idea of investigating their behavior as a function of carpet dimensions and predicting their performance as thermal interface material (TIM for electronic device cooling. Vertically aligned CNTs were grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG substrate, which creates a robust and durable all-carbon hierarchical structure. The multi-layer thermal analysis approach using Netzsch laser flash analysis system was used to evaluate their performance as a function of carpet height, from which their thermal properties can be determined. It was seen that the thermal resistance of the CNT array varies linearly with CNT carpet height, providing a unique way of decoupling the properties of the CNT carpet from its interface. This data was used to estimate the thermal conductivity of individual multi-walled nanotube strands in this carpet, which was about 35 W/m-K. The influence of CNT carpet parameters (aerial density, diameter, and length on thermal resistance of the CNT carpet and its potential advantages and limitations as an integrated TIM are discussed.

  2. Thin-film sparse boundary array design for passive acoustic mapping during ultrasound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Christian M; Kozick, Richard J; Hurrell, Andrew; Smith, Penny Probert; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-10-01

    A new 2-D hydrophone array for ultrasound therapy monitoring is presented, along with a novel algorithm for passive acoustic mapping using a sparse weighted aperture. The array is constructed using existing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrasound sensor technology, and is utilized for its broadband characteristics and its high receive sensitivity. For most 2-D arrays, high-resolution imagery is desired, which requires a large aperture at the cost of a large number of elements. The proposed array's geometry is sparse, with elements only on the boundary of the rectangular aperture. The missing information from the interior is filled in using linear imaging techniques. After receiving acoustic emissions during ultrasound therapy, this algorithm applies an apodization to the sparse aperture to limit side lobes and then reconstructs acoustic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution. Experiments show verification of the theoretical point spread function, and cavitation maps in agar phantoms correspond closely to predicted areas, showing the validity of the array and methodology.

  3. A practical dimensionless equation for the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes and CNT arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results reported in the last decade on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs have shown a fairly divergent behavior. An underlying intrinsic consistency was believed to exist in spite of the divergence in the thermal conductivity data of various CNTs. A dimenisonless equation that describes the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity was derived by introducing reduced forms relative to a chosen reference point. This equation can serve as a practical approximation to characterize the conductivity of individual CNT with different structural parameters as well as bulk CNT arrays with different bundle configurations. Comparison of predictions by the equation and historical measurements showed good agreements within their uncertainties.

  4. High-performance ferroelectric and magnetoresistive materials for next-generation thermal detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Michael A.; Donohue, Paul P.; Watton, Rex; Williams, Dennis J.; Anthony, Carl J.; Blamire, Mark G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper discusses the potential thermal imaging performance achievable from thermal detector arrays and concludes that the current generation of thin-film ferroelectric and resistance bolometer based detector arrays are limited by the detector materials used. It is proposed that the next generation of large uncooled focal plane arrays will need to look towards higher performance detector materials - particularly if they aim to approach the fundamental performance limits and compete with cooled photon detector arrays. Two examples of bolometer thin-film materials are described that achieve high performance from operating around phase transitions. The material Lead Scandium Tantalate (PST) has a paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition around room temperature and is used with an applied field in the dielectric bolometer mode for thermal imaging. PST films grown by sputtering and liquid-source CVD have shown merit figures for thermal imaging a factor of 2 to 3 times higher than PZT-based pyroelectric thin films. The material Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCMO) has a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition around -20oC. This paper describes recent measurements of TCR and 1/f noise in pulsed laser-deposited LCMO films on Neodymium Gallate substrates. These results show that LCMO not only has high TCR's - up to 30%/K - but also low 1/f excess noise, with bolometer merit figures at least an order of magnitude higher than Vanadium Oxide, making it ideal for the next generation of microbolometer arrays. These high performance properties come at the expense of processing complexities and novel device designs will need to be introduced to realize the potential of these materials in the next generation of thermal detectors.

  5. Turbulence, chaos and thermal noise in globally coupled Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the effects of thermal noise in underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive load and driven by an rf current. We study the breakdown of the law of large numbers in the turbulent phase of the Josephson arrays. This corresponds to a saturation of the broad band noise S 0 for a large number N of junctions. We find that this phenomenon is stable against thermal fluctuations below a critical temperature T cl . The behaviour of S 0 vs. T, for large N, shows three different regimes. For 0 cl , S 0 decreases when increasing T, and there is turbulence and the breakdown of the law of large numbers. For T cl c2 , S 0 is constant and the dynamics is dominated by the chaos of the individual junctions. Finally for T > T c2 , S 0 in mainly due to thermal fluctuations, since it increases linearly with T. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  6. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: Growth conditions and tube inhomogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Pham, Quang N.; Saltonstall, Christopher B.; Norris, Pamela M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4746 (United States)

    2014-10-13

    The thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VACNTAs) grown on silicon dioxide substrates via chemical vapor deposition is measured using a 3ω technique. For each sample, the VACNTA layer and substrate are pressed to a heating line at varying pressures to extract the sample's thermophysical properties. The nanotubes' structure is observed via transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of hydrogen and water vapor in the fabrication process is tuned to observe the effect on measured thermal properties. The presence of iron catalyst particles within the individual nanotubes prevents the array from achieving the overall thermal conductivity anticipated based on reported measurements of individual nanotubes and the packing density.

  7. Fiber-array based optogenetic prosthetic system for stimulation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ling; Cote, Chris; Tejeda, Hector; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2012-02-01

    Recent advent of optogenetics has enabled activation of genetically-targeted neuronal cells using low intensity blue light with high temporal precision. Since blue light is attenuated rapidly due to scattering and absorption in neural tissue, optogenetic treatment of neurological disorders may require stimulation of specific cell types in multiple regions of the brain. Further, restoration of certain neural functions (vision, and auditory etc) requires accurate spatio-temporal stimulation patterns rather than just precise temporal stimulation. In order to activate multiple regions of the central nervous system in 3D, here, we report development of an optogenetic prosthetic comprising of array of fibers coupled to independently-controllable LEDs. This design avoids direct contact of LEDs with the brain tissue and thus does not require electrical and heat isolation, which can non-specifically stimulate and damage the local brain regions. The intensity, frequency, and duty cycle of light pulses from each fiber in the array was controlled independently using an inhouse developed LabView based program interfaced with a microcontroller driving the individual LEDs. While the temporal profile of the light pulses was controlled by varying the current driving the LED, the beam profile emanating from each fiber tip could be sculpted by microfabrication of the fiber tip. The fiber array was used to stimulate neurons, expressing channelrhodopsin-2, in different locations within the brain or retina. Control of neural activity in the mice cortex, using the fiber-array based prosthetic, is evaluated from recordings made with multi-electrode array (MEA). We also report construction of a μLED array based prosthetic for spatio-temporal stimulation of cortex.

  8. Fabrication of Random Microwell Arrays as Pseudo-Thermal Speckle Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axiu Cao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum correlated imaging using the intensity fluctuations of thermal light possesses advantages of high resolution and strong anti-interference ability. The common method to produce pseudo-thermal light source is using a rotary ground glass and transmission of laser beam. In the present work, we propose a method for the fabrication of microwell arrays with randomly varied diameters, which could be used as a new structural element for pseudo-thermal speckle light source. If these are etched with random sizes then they may also have random and complex varying curvatures (diffusion limited etching leading to random destructive interference of the coherent beam which could be a good thing. The microwell arrays, with diameters randomly varying from 5 μm to 40 μm, height varying from 200 nm to 20 μm, were fabricated by photolithography combined with acid etching. The experimental conditions are simple and can be scaled up to for large structures. The produced microwell arrays can transform the laser beam to a pseudo-thermal light source with a certain divergent angle by rational designing of mask and adjustable process parameters.

  9. Calculating electrical and thermal characteristics of multiple PV array configurations installed in the tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effendy Ya’acob, M.; Hizam, Hashim; Htay, Myo Than; Radzi, M. Amran M.; Khatib, Tamer; Bakri A, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrical and temperature characteristics of multiple PV array configurations. • Ten months tropical field analysis implying SNL model for array parameter. • Review on T c equations and GEV analysis for rapid fluctuating environmental data. • CPV array projects the highest ΔT of 2.72 °C with G e of 0.36 W/m 2 . • Fixed flat array produces highest parameter values of I sc , V oc , I mp , V mp and P mp . - Abstract: This study intends to define the electrical characteristics and temperature equations of PV array installed in the tropics based on Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) model. Ten units of 1 kW rated PV array namely Fixed Flat (FF), Tracking Flat (TF) and Concentrating (CPV) have been installed at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Serdang District, Malaysia at the coordinate of 2°59′20′′N:101°43′30′′E with tropical-based ground conditions. Electrical characteristics are the main elements of contributions where five operating conditions for CEEG PV Module are applied based on the SNL model to produce array parameter values. It is found that FF array projects the highest operating value of 12.06 A (I sc ), 11.55 A (I mp ), 524.78 V (V oc ), 89.5 V (V mp ), and 1033.7 W (P mp ) with good regression fit and strong correlation R 2 of more than 0.5. The versatility and accuracy of this work have been validated and applied for three different types of PV array system installed in the equatorial doldrum spot of uniform temperature–irradiance, high in humidity–rainfall and generally light wind field conditions. The parameters are calculated using filtered field data sampled at STC of 5% tolerance. Focal point of calculating array temperature (T array ) as means of thermal effect on multiple PV array configurations is highlighted based on recent study on T c equations and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) analysis using field data at site

  10. Luminescent nanoprobes for thermal bio-sensing: Towards controlled photo-thermal therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaque, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos (GFFC), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil); Jacinto, Carlos [Grupo de Fotônica e Fluidos Complexos (GFFC), Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2016-01-15

    Photo-thermal therapies, based on the light-induced local heating of cancer tumors and tissues, are nowadays attracting an increasing attention due to their effectiveness, universality, and low cost. In order to avoid undesirable collateral damage in the healthy tissues surrounding the tumors, photo-thermal therapies should be achieved while monitoring tumor’s temperature in such a way that thermal therapy could be stopped before reaching the damage limit. Measuring tumor temperature is not an easy task at all and novel strategies should be adopted. In this work it is demonstrated how luminescent nanoparticles, in particular Neodymium doped LaF{sub 3} nanoparticles, could be used as multi-functional agents capable of simultaneous heating and thermal sensing. Advantages and disadvantages of such nanoparticles are discussed and the future perspectives are briefly raised. - Highlights: • Thermal control is essential in novel photo-thermal therapies. • Thermal control and heating can be achieved by Neodymium doped nanoparticles. • Perspectives of Neodymium doped nanoparticles in potential in vivo applications are discussed.

  11. Additive model for thermal comfort generated by matrix experiment using orthogonal array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Reuy-Lung [Department of Occupational Safety and Health, China Medical University, 91 Huseh-shin Road, Taichung 404 (China); Lin, Tzu-Ping [Department of Leisure Planning, National Formosa University, 64 Wen-hua Road, Huwei, Yunlin 632 (China); Liang, Han-Hsi [Department of Architecture, National United University, No. 1, Lien Da, Kung-Ching Li, Miaoli 360 (China); Yang, Kuan-Hsiug; Yeh, Tsung-Chyn [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yet-Sen University, No. 91, Lien-hai Road, Kaohsiung (China)

    2009-08-15

    In addition to ensuring the thermal comfort of occupants, monitoring and controlling indoor thermal environments can reduce the energy consumed by air conditioning systems. This study develops an additive model for predicting thermal comfort with rapid and simple arithmetic calculations. The advantage of the additive model is its comprehensibility to administrators of air conditioning systems, who are unfamiliar with the PMV-PPD model but want to adjust an indoor environment to save energy without generating complaints of discomfort from occupants. In order to generate the additive model, a laboratory chamber experiment based on matrix experiment using orthogonal array, was performed. By applying the analysis of variance on observed thermal sensation votes and percentage of dissatisfaction, the factor effects of environmental variables that account for the additive model were determined. Additionally, the applicability of the PMV-PPD model in hot and humid climates is discussed in this study, based on experimental results. (author)

  12. Analysis of thermal dispersion in an array of parallel plates with fully-developed laminar flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jiaying; Lu Tianjian; Hodson, Howard P.; Fleck, Norman A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of thermal dispersion upon heat transfer across a periodic array of parallel plates is studied. Three basic heat transfer problems are addressed, each for steady, fully-developed, laminar fluid flow: (a) transient heat transfer due to an arbitrary initial temperature distribution within the fluid, (b) steady heat transfer with constant heat flux on all plate surfaces, and (c) steady heat transfer with constant wall temperatures. For problems (a) and (b), the effective thermal dispersivity scales with the Peclet number Pe according to 1 + CPe 2 , where the coefficient C is independent of Pe. For problem (c) the coefficient C is a function of Pe.

  13. Characterization of Thermal Cross-talk in a γ-ray Microcalorimeter Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jethava, N.; Ullom, J. N.; Bennett, D. A.; Irwin, K. D.; Horansky, R. D.; Beall, J. A.; Hilton, G. C.; Vale, L. R.; Hoover, A.; Bacrania, M. K.; Rabin, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    We present experimental data describing cross-talk within an array of gamma-ray microcalorimeters during gamma-ray irradiation. The microcalorimeters consist of Mo/Cu transition-edge sensors (TESs) with attached Sn absorbers. We observe both thermal and electrical cross-talk with peak cross-talk amplitudes as large as 0.4%. We have developed an analytical model for thermal cross-talk and make a preliminary comparison to data. Cross-talk must be understood and minimized for high resolution spectroscopy at high input count rates.

  14. Performance study of solar cell arrays based on a Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Ji, Xu; Li, Guoliang; Wei, Shengxian; Li, YingFeng; Shi, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The performances of solar cell arrays based on a Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system have been studied. → The optimum concentration ratios for the single crystalline silicon cell, the Super cells and the GaAs cells were studied by experiments. → The influences between the solar cell's performance and the series resistances, the working temperature, solar irradiation intensity were explored. - Abstract: The performances of solar cell arrays based on a Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system have been studied via both experiment and theoretical calculation. The I-V characteristics of the solar cell arrays and the output performances of the TCPV/T system demonstrated that among the investigated four types of solar cell arrays, the triple junction GaAs cells possessed good performance characteristics and the polysilicon cells exhibited poor performance characteristics under concentrating conditions. The optimum concentration ratios for the single crystalline silicon cell, the Super cells and the GaAs cells were also studied by experiments. The optimum concentration ratios for the single crystalline silicon cells and Super cells were 4.23 and 8.46 respectively, and the triple junction GaAs cells could work well at higher concentration ratio. Besides, some theoretical calculations and experiments were performed to explore the influences of the series resistances and the working temperature. When the series resistances R s changed from 0 Ω to 1 Ω, the maximum power P m of the single crystalline silicon, the polycrystalline silicon, the Super cell and the GaAs cell arrays decreased by 67.78%, 74.93%, 77.30% and 58.07% respectively. When the cell temperature increased by 1 K, the short circuit current of the four types of solar cell arrays decreased by 0.11818 A, 0.05364 A, 0.01387 A and 0.00215 A respectively. The research results demonstrated that the output performance of the solar cell arrays with lower

  15. Intravenous Laser Therapy in Young Children with Thermal Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Bocharov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the laboratory and clinical effects of combined intravenous laser therapy in young children with thermalinjuries in the acute period of burn disease.Subjects and methods. Forty children whose mean age was 2.67±0.35 years were examined; thermal injuries accounted for 25.05±1.01% of the total body surface area; of them degrees IIIaIIIb was 19.04±0.85%. A comparison group (n=15 received conventional therapy without taking into account and correcting baseline and current hemostasiological disorders. On day 1, a study group (n=25 had programmed anticoagulant therapy and intravenous laser therapy at different radiation frequencies with a Mustang 20002+ laser therapy apparatus (patent for invention No. 2482894 in addition to the conventional therapy. The laser therapy cycle was 6 to 16 sessions. The investigators estimated and compared the following examined parameters: white blood cell count; leukocytic index of intoxication; plasma average mass molecules at a wavelength of 254 nm; toxogenic granularity of neutrophils; wound exudate discharge time; surgical plasty area; and hospitalization time.Results. The positive laboratory and clinical effects of the performed combined intravenous laser therapy in the combined therapy of burn disease in young children were comparatively shown in the study group patients. The significant decrease in the level of an inflammatory response and endogenous intoxication led to a rapider burn wound cleansing, active epithelization, and reduced surgical plasty volumes.Conclusion. Combined intravenous laser therapy signif icantly exerts antiinflammatory and detoxifying effects in young children with 40% thermal injuries in the acute period of burn disease. Abolishing a systemic inflammatory response by combined intravenous laser therapy initiated early regenerative processes in the burn wound and caused reductions in surgical plasty volumes and hospitalization time, which optimizes ther

  16. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Jones, Ryan M; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system's ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non-thermal

  17. Hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum of a Maxwell distribution higher than the room temperature of 300 K, has been studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in a living body for a deep-seated tumor in neutron capture therapy (NCT). Simulation calculations using MCNP-V3 were carried out in order to investigate the characteristics of the hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field. From the results of simulation calculations, the following were confirmed: (i) The irradiation field of the hyper-thermal neutrons is feasible by using some scattering materials with high temperature, such as Be, BeO, C, SiC and ZrH 1.7 . Especially, ZrH 1.7 is thought to be the best material because of good characteristics of up-scattering for thermal neutrons. (ii) The ZrH 1.7 of 1200 K yields the hyper-thermal neutrons of a Maxwell-like distribution at about 2000 K and the treatable depth is about 1.5 cm larger comparing with the irradiation of the thermal neutrons of 300 K. (iii) The contamination by the secondary gamma-rays from the scattering materials can be sufficiently eliminated to the tolerance level for NCT through the bismuth layer, without the larger change of the energy spectrum of hyper-thermal neutrons. ((orig.))

  18. Equivalent thermal history reconstruction from a partially crystallized glass-ceramic sensor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeg, Bauke

    2015-11-01

    The basic concept of a thermal history sensor is that it records the accumulated exposure to some unknown, typically varying temperature profile for a certain amount of time. Such a sensor is considered to be capable of measuring the duration of several (N) temperature intervals. For this purpose, the sensor deploys multiple (M) sensing elements, each with different temperature sensitivity. At the end of some thermal exposure for a known period of time, the sensor array is read-out and an estimate is made of the set of N durations of the different temperature ranges. A potential implementation of such a sensor was pioneered by Fair et al. [Sens. Actuators, A 141, 245 (2008)], based on glass-ceramic materials with different temperature-dependent crystallization dynamics. In their work, it was demonstrated that an array of sensor elements can be made sensitive to slight differences in temperature history. Further, a forward crystallization model was used to simulate the variations in sensor array response to differences in the temperature history. The current paper focusses on the inverse aspect of temperature history reconstruction from a hypothetical sensor array output. The goal of such a reconstruction is to find an equivalent thermal history that is the closest representation of the true thermal history, i.e., the durations of a set of temperature intervals that result in a set of fractional crystallization values which is closest to the one resulting from the true thermal history. One particular useful simplification in both the sensor model as well as in its practical implementation is the omission of nucleation effects. In that case, least squares models can be used to approximate the sensor response and make reconstruction estimates. Even with this simplification, sensor noise can have a destabilizing effect on possible reconstruction solutions, which is evaluated using simulations. Both regularization and non-negativity constrained least squares

  19. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction is approx. 10μ, or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor

  20. Thermal wave interference with high-power VCSEL arrays for locating vertically oriented subsurface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Erik; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Studemund, Taarna; Ziegler, Mathias

    2018-04-01

    Among the photothermal methods, full-field thermal imaging is used to characterize materials, to determine thicknesses of layers, or to find inhomogeneities such as voids or cracks. The use of classical light sources such as flash lamps (impulse heating) or halogen lamps (modulated heating) led to a variety of nondestructive testing methods, in particular, lock-in and flash-thermography. In vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), laser light is emitted perpendicularly to the surface with a symmetrical beam profile. Due to the vertical structure, they can be arranged in large arrays of many thousands of individual lasers, which allows power scaling into the kilowatt range. Recently, a high-power yet very compact version of such a VCSEL-array became available that offers both the fast timing behavior of a laser as well as the large illumination area of a lamp. Moreover, it allows a spatial and temporal control of the heating because individual parts of the array can be controlled arbitrarily in frequency, amplitude, and phase. In conjunction with a fast infrared camera, such structured heating opens up a field of novel thermal imaging and testing methods. As a first demonstration of this approach, we chose a testing problem very challenging to conventional thermal infrared testing: The detection of very thin subsurface defects perpendicularly oriented to the surface of metallic samples. First, we generate destructively interfering thermal wave fields, which are then affected by the presence of defects within their reach. It turned out that this technique allows highly sensitive detection of subsurface defects down to depths in excess of the usual thermographic rule of thumb, with no need for a reference or surface preparation.

  1. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-07

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  2. Heat transfer behavior including thermal wake effects in forced air cooling of arrays of rectangular blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, S.; Faghri, M.; Lessmann, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study thermal wake effects in arrays of rectangular blocks encountered in electronic equipment. Data were obtained for a series of channel heights and flow velocities. The temperature rise due to wake effects behind a single heated module was found to be fairly independent of the channel height and the position of the heated block, for a given approach velocity. The adiabatic temperature rise data for a module due to a heated element immediately upstream of it for different inter-module spacings were found to correlate well in terms of a new parameter called the surface packing density. This paper reports that it was reported by the authors in an earlier paper that both the adiabatic heat transfer coefficient nd pressure-drop data for regular in-line arrays correlated well in terms of a composite geometric parameter called the column packing density. These experiments have been extended to a higher Reynolds number. Empirical correlations are presented here for friction factor and Nusselt number in terms of the volume packing density, and for the thermal wake effects in terms of the surface packing density. Data from literature for arrays with widely different geometric parameters are shown to agree with these correlations

  3. Spatio-temporal chaos and thermal noise in Josephson junction series arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We study underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive shunting load and driven by an rf bias current. We find that they can be an experimental realization of many phenomena currently studied in globally coupled logistic map. Depending on the bias current the array can show Shapiro steps but also spatio-temporal chaos or ''turbulence'' in the IV characteristics. In the turbulent phase there is a saturation of the broad band noise for a large number of junctions. This corresponds to a break down of the law of large numbers as seen in globally coupled maps. We study this phenomenon as a function of thermal noise. We find that when increasing the temperature the broad band noise decreases. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  4. Test stand for non-uniformity correction of microbolometer focal plane arrays used in thermal cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupiński, Michał; Bareła, Jaroslaw; Firmanty, Krzysztof; Kastek, Mariusz

    2013-10-01

    Uneven response of particular detectors (pixels) to the same incident power of infrared radiation is an inherent feature of microbolometer focal plane arrays. As a result an image degradation occurs, known as Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), which distorts the thermal representation of an observed scene and impairs the parameters of a thermal camera. In order to compensate such non-uniformity, several NUC correction methods are applied in digital data processing modules implemented in thermal cameras. Coefficients required to perform the non-uniformity correction procedure (NUC coefficients) are determined by calibrating the camera against uniform radiation sources (blackbodies). Non-uniformity correction is performed in a digital processing unit in order to remove FPN pattern in the registered thermal images. Relevant correction coefficients are calculated on the basis of recorded detector responses to several values of radiant flux emitted from reference IR radiation sources (blackbodies). The measurement of correction coefficients requires specialized setup, in which uniform, extended radiation sources with high temperature stability are one of key elements. Measurement stand for NUC correction developed in Institute of Optoelectronics, MUT, comprises two integrated extended blackbodies with the following specifications: area 200×200 mm, stabilized absolute temperature range +15 °C÷100 °C, and uniformity of temperature distribution across entire surface +/-0.014 °C. Test stand, method used for the measurement of NUC coefficients and the results obtained during the measurements conducted on a prototype thermal camera will be presented in the paper.

  5. Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and Non-Thermal Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2009-03-01

    The well known built-in voltage potential for some select semiconductor p-n junctions and various rectifying devices is proposed to be favorable for generating DC electricity at "zero bias" (with no DC bias voltage applied) in the presence of Johnson noise or 1/f noise which originates from the quantum vacuum (Koch et al., 1982). The 1982 Koch discovery that certain solid state devices exhibit measurable quantum noise has also recently been labeled a finding of dark energy in the lab (Beck and Mackey, 2004). Tunnel diodes are a class of rectifiers that are qualified and some have been credited with conducting only because of quantum fluctuations. Microwave diodes are also good choices since many are designed for zero bias operation. A completely passive, unamplified zero bias diode converter/detector for millimeter (GHz) waves was developed by HRL Labs in 2006 under a DARPA contract, utilizing a Sb-based "backward tunnel diode" (BTD). It is reported to be a "true zero-bias diode." It was developed for a "field radiometer" to "collect thermally radiated power" (in other words, 'night vision'). The diode array mounting allows a feed from horn antenna, which functions as a passive concentrating amplifier. An important clue is the "noise equivalent power" of 1.1 pW per root hertz and the "noise equivalent temperature difference" of 10° K, which indicate sensitivity to Johnson noise (Lynch, et al., 2006). There also have been other inventions such as "single electron transistors" that also have "the highest signal to noise ratio" near zero bias. Furthermore, "ultrasensitive" devices that convert radio frequencies have been invented that operate at outer space temperatures (3 degrees above zero point: 3° K). These devices are tiny nanotech devices which are suitable for assembly in parallel circuits (such as a 2-D array) to possibly produce zero point energy direct current electricity with significant power density (Brenning et al., 2006). Photovoltaic p-n junction

  6. Kalman Filtered MR Temperature Imaging for Laser Induced Thermal Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, D.; Yung, J.; Hazle, J. D.; Weinberg, J. S.; Stafford, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comp...

  7. Thermal Molding of Organic Thin-Film Transistor Arrays on Curved Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Kento; Ishimine, Hiroto; Okada, Yugo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Sadamitsu, Yuichi; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a thermal molding technique is proposed for the fabrication of plastic electronics on curved surfaces, enabling the preparation of plastic films with freely designed shapes. The induced strain distribution observed in poly(ethylene naphthalate) films when planar sheets were deformed into hemispherical surfaces clearly indicated that natural thermal contraction played an important role in the formation of the curved surface. A fingertip-shaped organic thin-film transistor array molded from a real human finger was fabricated, and slight deformation induced by touching an object was detected from the drain current response. This type of device will lead to the development of robot fingers equipped with a sensitive tactile sense for precision work such as palpation or surgery.

  8. Ordering and thermal excitations in dipolar coupled single domain magnet arrays (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östman, Erik; Arnalds, Unnar; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin

    2015-09-01

    For a small island of a magnetic material the magnetic state of the island is mainly determined by the exchange interaction and the shape anisotropy. Two or more islands placed in close proximity will interact through dipolar interactions. The state of a large system will thus be dictated by interactions at both these length scales. Enabling internal thermal fluctuations, e.g. by the choice of material, of the individual islands allows for the study of thermal ordering in extended nano-patterned magnetic arrays [1,2]. As a result nano-magnetic arrays represent an ideal playground for the study of physical model systems. Here we present three different studies all having used magneto-optical imaging techniques to observe, in real space, the order of the systems. The first study is done on a square lattice of circular islands. The remanent magnetic state of each island is a magnetic vortex structure and we can study the temperature dependence of the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields [3]. The second are long chains of dipolar coupled elongated islands where the magnetization direction in each island only can point in one of two possible directions. This creates a system which in many ways mimics the Ising model [4] and we can relate the correlation length to the temperature. The third one is a spin ice system where elongated islands are placed in a square lattice. Thermal excitations in such systems resemble magnetic monopoles [2] and we can investigate their properties as a function of temperature and lattice parameters. [1] V. Kapaklis et al., New J. Phys. 14, 035009 (2012) [2] V. Kapaklis et al., Nature Nanotech 9, 514(2014) [3] E. Östman et al.,New J. Phys. 16, 053002 (2014) [4] E. Östman et al.,Thermal ordering in mesoscopic Ising chains, In manuscript.

  9. A Probabilistic Approach to Predict Thermal Fatigue Life for Ball Grid Array Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Helin; Wang, Kuisheng

    2011-11-01

    Numerous studies of the reliability of solder joints have been performed. Most life prediction models are limited to a deterministic approach. However, manufacturing induces uncertainty in the geometry parameters of solder joints, and the environmental temperature varies widely due to end-user diversity, creating uncertainties in the reliability of solder joints. In this study, a methodology for accounting for variation in the lifetime prediction for lead-free solder joints of ball grid array packages (PBGA) is demonstrated. The key aspects of the solder joint parameters and the cyclic temperature range related to reliability are involved. Probabilistic solutions of the inelastic strain range and thermal fatigue life based on the Engelmaier model are developed to determine the probability of solder joint failure. The results indicate that the standard deviation increases significantly when more random variations are involved. Using the probabilistic method, the influence of each variable on the thermal fatigue life is quantified. This information can be used to optimize product design and process validation acceptance criteria. The probabilistic approach creates the opportunity to identify the root causes of failed samples from product fatigue tests and field returns. The method can be applied to better understand how variation affects parameters of interest in an electronic package design with area array interconnections.

  10. Fabrication of a Micro-Needle Array Electrode by Thermal Drawing for Bio-Signals Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lei; Jiang, Qing; Chen, Keyun; Chen, Zhipeng; Pan, Chengfeng; Jiang, Lelun

    2016-06-17

    A novel micro-needle array electrode (MAE) fabricated by thermal drawing and coated with Ti/Au film was proposed for bio-signals monitoring. A simple and effective setup was employed to form glassy-state poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) into a micro-needle array (MA) by the thermal drawing method. The MA was composed of 6 × 6 micro-needles with an average height of about 500 μm. Electrode-skin interface impedance (EII) was recorded as the insertion force was applied on the MAE. The insertion process of the MAE was also simulated by the finite element method. Results showed that MAE could insert into skin with a relatively low compression force and maintain stable contact impedance between the MAE and skin. Bio-signals, including electromyography (EMG), electrocardiography (ECG), and electroencephalograph (EEG) were also collected. Test results showed that the MAE could record EMG, ECG, and EEG signals with good fidelity in shape and amplitude in comparison with the commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes, which proves that MAE is an alternative electrode for bio-signals monitoring.

  11. Fabrication of a Micro-Needle Array Electrode by Thermal Drawing for Bio-Signals Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel micro-needle array electrode (MAE fabricated by thermal drawing and coated with Ti/Au film was proposed for bio-signals monitoring. A simple and effective setup was employed to form glassy-state poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA into a micro-needle array (MA by the thermal drawing method. The MA was composed of 6 × 6 micro-needles with an average height of about 500 μm. Electrode-skin interface impedance (EII was recorded as the insertion force was applied on the MAE. The insertion process of the MAE was also simulated by the finite element method. Results showed that MAE could insert into skin with a relatively low compression force and maintain stable contact impedance between the MAE and skin. Bio-signals, including electromyography (EMG, electrocardiography (ECG, and electroencephalograph (EEG were also collected. Test results showed that the MAE could record EMG, ECG, and EEG signals with good fidelity in shape and amplitude in comparison with the commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes, which proves that MAE is an alternative electrode for bio-signals monitoring.

  12. Thermal Characterisation of Micro Flat Aluminium Heat Pipe Arrays by Varying Working Fluid and Inclination Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghan Huang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A micro heat pipe array is desirable owing to its high heat transfer capacity, compact size, and high surface–volume ratio compared with conventional heat pipes. In this study, micro flat aluminium heat pipe arrays (MF-AHPA were developed and systematically characterised by varying working fluid and inclination angle. Three MF-AHPAs with different working fluids, i.e., acetone, cyclopentane, and n-hexane, were fabricated. The acetone MF-AHPA achieved the best thermal performance. The underlying mechanism is the small flow viscous friction and small shearing force of liquid vapour. Additionally, the experimental results show a strong dependence of MF-AHPAs’ thermal resistance on the orientation due to the gravitational effect on axial liquid distribution. Finally, a criterion is proposed to determine the optimal inclination angle of the MF-AHPA. In the present study, a volumetric fraction (αa,c of 74 ± 7% has been shown to well predict an optimal inclination angle of the MF-AHPAs with various working fluids and heat loads.

  13. The utility of sparse 2D fully electronically steerable focused ultrasound phased arrays for thermal surgery: a simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellens, Nicholas; Pulkkinen, Aki; Song Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Sparse arrays are widely used in diagnostic ultrasound for their strong performance and relative technical simplicity. This simulation study assessed the efficacy of phased arrays of varied sparseness for thermal surgery, especially with regard to power consumption and near-field heating. It employs a linear ultrasound propagation model and a semi-analytical solution to the Pennes' bioheat transfer equation. The basic design had 4912 cylindrical transducers (500 kHz) arranged on a flat 12 cm disk (1.5 mm spacing). This array was compared to randomly-thinned sparse arrays with 75%, 50% and 25% populations. Temperature elevations of 60 and 70 deg. C were induced in sonication times of 5-20 s, at foci spanning depths of 50-150 mm and radii of 0-60 mm. The sparse arrays produced nearly indistinguishable focal patterns but, averaged across the foci, required 132%, 200% and 393% of the power of the full array, respectively, applied through fewer transducer elements. Comparable results were found at 1 MHz from equivalent arrays. Simulated lesions were formed (thermal dose ≥ 240 equivalent minutes at 43 deg. C (T 43 )) and 'transition' and 'unsafe' regions (both defined as 5 min 43 < 240 min) were identified, the former immediately surrounding the lesion and the latter anywhere else. At a depth of 100 mm, sparse arrays were found to produce comparable lesions to the full array at the focus, but 'unsafe', over-heated near-field regions after some ablated lesion volume: about 12 mL for the 25% array, around 100 mL for the 50% array, while the 75% and full arrays produced 150 mL lesions safely.

  14. Physics of epi-thermal boron neutron capture therapy (epi-thermal BNCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Ryoichi; Wakisaka, Yushi; Morimoto, Nami; Takashina, Masaaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Toki, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The physics of epi-thermal neutrons in the human body is discussed in the effort to clarify the nature of the unique radiologic properties of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). This discussion leads to the computational method of Monte Carlo simulation in BNCT. The method is discussed through two examples based on model phantoms. The physics is kept at an introductory level in the discussion in this tutorial review.

  15. Design Methodology of a Dual-Halbach Array Linear Actuator with Thermal-Electromagnetic Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Paulo Roberto; Flores Filho, Aly Ferreira; Perondi, Eduardo; Ferri, Jeferson; Goltz, Evandro

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a design methodology for linear actuators, considering thermal and electromagnetic coupling with geometrical and temperature constraints, that maximizes force density and minimizes force ripple. The method allows defining an actuator for given specifications in a step-by-step way so that requirements are met and the temperature within the device is maintained under or equal to its maximum allowed for continuous operation. According to the proposed method, the electromagnetic and thermal models are built with quasi-static parametric finite element models. The methodology was successfully applied to the design of a linear cylindrical actuator with a dual quasi-Halbach array of permanent magnets and a moving-coil. The actuator can produce an axial force of 120 N and a stroke of 80 mm. The paper also presents a comparative analysis between results obtained considering only an electromagnetic model and the thermal-electromagnetic coupled model. This comparison shows that the final designs for both cases differ significantly, especially regarding its active volume and its electrical and magnetic loading. Although in this paper the methodology was employed to design a specific actuator, its structure can be used to design a wide range of linear devices if the parametric models are adjusted for each particular actuator.

  16. Transurethral ultrasound applicators with dynamic multi-sector control for prostate thermal therapy: In vivo evaluation under MR guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Rieke, Viola; Nau, William H.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Bouley, Donna; Sommer, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and performance of a multi-sectored tubular array transurethral ultrasound applicator for prostate thermal therapy, with potential to provide dynamic angular and length control of heating under MR guidance without mechanical movement of the applicator. Test configurations were fabricated, incorporating a linear array of two multi-sectored tubular transducers (7.8-8.4 MHz, 3 mm OD, 6 mm length), with three 120 deg. independent active sectors per tube. A flexible delivery catheter facilitated water cooling (100 ml min -1 ) within an expandable urethral balloon (35 mm longx10 mm diameter). An integrated positioning hub allows for rotating and translating the transducer assembly within the urethral balloon for final targeting prior to therapy delivery. Rotational beam plots indicate ∼90 deg. - 100 deg. acoustic output patterns from each 120 deg. transducer sector, negligible coupling between sectors, and acoustic efficiencies between 41% and 53%. Experiments were performed within in vivo canine prostate (n=3), with real-time MR temperature monitoring in either the axial or coronal planes to facilitate control of the heating profiles and provide thermal dosimetry for performance assessment. Gross inspection of serial sections of treated prostate, exposed to TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) tissue viability stain, allowed for direct assessment of the extent of thermal coagulation. These devices created large contiguous thermal lesions (defined by 52 deg. C maximum temperature, t 43 =240 min thermal dose contours, and TTC tissue sections) that extended radially from the applicator toward the border of the prostate (∼15 mm) during a short power application (∼8-16 W per active sector, 8-15 min), with ∼200 deg. or 360 deg. sector coagulation demonstrated depending upon the activation scheme. Analysis of transient temperature profiles indicated progression of lethal temperature and thermal dose contours

  17. Transient three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays: general equations and numerical scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wnek, W.J.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Trapp, J.A.; Hughes, E.D.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1975-11-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution scheme for thermal-hydraulic analysis of fuel rod arrays are given. The model alleviates the two major deficiencies associated with existing rod array analysis models, that of a correct transverse momentum equation and the capability of handling reversing and circulatory flows. Possible applications of the model include steady state and transient subchannel calculations as well as analysis of flows in heat exchangers, other engineering equipment, and porous media

  18. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error 10 sec.

  19. Realization of thermally durable close-packed 2D gold nanoparticle arrays using self-assembly and plasma etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Sankar K; Santhanam, Venugopal

    2012-01-01

    Realization of thermally and chemically durable, ordered gold nanostructures using bottom-up self-assembly techniques are essential for applications in a wide range of areas including catalysis, energy generation, and sensing. Herein, we describe a modular process for realizing uniform arrays of gold nanoparticles, with interparticle spacings of 2 nm and above, by using RF plasma etching to remove ligands from self-assembled arrays of ligand-coated gold nanoparticles. Both nanoscale imaging and macroscale spectroscopic characterization techniques were used to determine the optimal conditions for plasma etching, namely RF power, operating pressure, duration of treatment, and type of gas. We then studied the effect of nanoparticle size, interparticle spacing, and type of substrate on the thermal durability of plasma-treated and untreated nanoparticle arrays. Plasma-treated arrays showed enhanced chemical and thermal durability, on account of the removal of ligands. To illustrate the application potential of the developed process, robust SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering) substrates were formed using plasma-treated arrays of silver-coated gold nanoparticles that had a silicon wafer or photopaper as the underlying support. The measured value of the average SERS enhancement factor (2 × 10 5 ) was quantitatively reproducible on both silicon and paper substrates. The silicon substrates gave quantitatively reproducible results even after thermal annealing. The paper-based SERS substrate was also used to swab and detect probe molecules deposited on a solid surface. (paper)

  20. Optimization of single channel glazed photovoltaic thermal (PVT) array using Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) and carbon credit earned by the optimized array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sonveer; Agrawal, Sanjay; Gadh, Rajit

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimization of SCGPVT array using Evolutionary Algorithm. • The overall exergy gain is maximized with an Evolutionary Algorithm. • Annual Performance has been evaluated for New Delhi (India). • There are improvement in results than the model given in literature. • Carbon credit analysis has been done. - Abstract: In this paper, work is carried out in three steps. In the first step, optimization of single channel glazed photovoltaic thermal (SCGPVT) array has been done with an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) keeping the overall exergy gain is an objective function of the SCGPVT array. For maximization of overall exergy gain, total seven design variables have been optimized such as length of the channel (L), mass flow rate of flowing fluid (m_F), velocity of flowing fluid (V_F), convective heat transfer coefficient through the tedlar (U_T), overall heat transfer coefficient between solar cell to ambient through glass cover (U_S_C_A_G), overall back loss heat transfer coefficient from flowing fluid to ambient (U_F_A) and convective heat transfer coefficient of tedlar (h_T). It has been observed that the instant overall exergy gain obtained from optimized system is 1.42 kW h, which is 87.86% more than the overall exergy gain of a un-optimized system given in literature. In the second step, overall exergy gain and overall thermal gain of SCGPVT array has been evaluated annually and there are 69.52% and 88.05% improvement in annual overall exergy gain and annual overall thermal gain respectively than the un-optimized system for the same input irradiance and ambient temperature. In the third step, carbon credit earned by the optimized SCGPVT array has also been evaluated as per norms of Kyoto Protocol Bangalore climatic conditions.

  1. Thermal imager based on the array light sensor device of 128×128 CdHgTe-photodiodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reva V. P.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigation of developed thermal imager for middle (3—5 µm infrared region are presented and its applications features are discussed. The thermal imager consists of cooled to 80 K 128×128 diodes focal plane array on the base of cadmium–mercury–telluride compound and cryostat with temperature checking system. The photodiode array is bonded with readout device (silicon focal processor via indium microcontacts. The measured average value of noise equivalent temperature difference was NETD= 20±4 mK (background radiation temperature T = 300 K, field of view 2θ = 180°, the cooled diaphragm was not used.

  2. Far infrared thermal detectors for laser radiometry using a carbon nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, John H.; Lee, Bob; Grossman, Erich N.

    2011-07-20

    We present a description of a 1.5 mm long, vertically aligned carbon nanotube array (VANTA) on a thermopile and separately on a pyroelectric detector. Three VANTA samples, having average lengths of 40 {mu}m, 150 {mu}m, and 1.5 mm were evaluated with respect to reflectance at a laser wavelength of 394 {mu}m(760 GHz), and we found that the reflectance decreases substantially with increasing tube length, ranging from 0.38 to 0.23 to 0.01, respectively. The responsivity of the thermopile by electrical heating (98.4 mA/W) was equal to that by optical heating (98.0 mA/W) within the uncertainty of the measurement. We analyzed the frequency response and temporal response and found a thermal decay period of 500 ms, which is consistent with the specific heat of comparable VANTAs in the literature. The extremely low (0.01) reflectance of the 1.5 mm VANTAs and the fact that the array is readily transferable to the detector's surface is, to our knowledge, unprecedented.

  3. Experimental study on the thermal performance of a new type of thermal energy storage based on flat micro-heat pipe array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Feng-fei; Diao, Yan-hua; Zhao, Yao-hua; Zhu, Ting-ting; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel thermal energy storage based on flat micro-heat pipe array is proposed. • The thermal storage shows excellent thermal performance in the working process. • The novel thermal storage has the advantage of low flow resistance. - Abstract: The thermal performance of an air-based phase change storage unit is analyzed and discussed in this study. The thermal energy storage uses flat micro-heat pipe array (FMHPA) as the core heat transfer component and lauric acid as phase change material (PCM). An experimental system is devised to test the heat storage–release property of the storage unit under different inlet temperatures and flow rates of the heat transfer medium. The performance of the storage unit and the melting/solidification curves of the phase change material are obtained based on extensive experimental data. Experimental results indicate that the flat micro-heat pipe array exhibits excellent temperature uniformity in the heat storage–release process, and the performance of the storage unit is efficient and steady.

  4. A Micro-Thermal Sensor for Focal Therapy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Harishankar; Hodges, Wyatt; Choi, Jeunghwan; Lubner, Sean; Dames, Chris; Bischof, John

    2016-02-01

    There is an urgent need for sensors deployed during focal therapies to inform treatment planning and in vivo monitoring in thin tissues. Specifically, the measurement of thermal properties, cooling surface contact, tissue thickness, blood flow and phase change with mm to sub mm accuracy are needed. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that a micro-thermal sensor based on the supported “3ω” technique can achieve this in vitro under idealized conditions in 0.5 to 2 mm thick tissues relevant to cryoablation of the pulmonary vein (PV). To begin with “3ω” sensors were microfabricated onto flat glass as an idealization of a focal probe surface. The sensor was then used to make new measurements of ‘k’ (W/m.K) of porcine PV, esophagus, and phrenic nerve, all needed for PV cryoabalation treatment planning. Further, by modifying the sensor use from traditional to dynamic mode new measurements related to tissue vs. fluid (i.e. water) contact, fluid flow conditions, tissue thickness, and phase change were made. In summary, the in vitro idealized system data presented is promising and warrants future work to integrate and test supported “3ω” sensors on in vivo deployed focal therapy probe surfaces (i.e. balloons or catheters).

  5. Thermally responsive silicon nanowire arrays for native/denatured-protein separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongwei; Wang Yanwei; Yuan Lin; Wang Lei; Yang Weikang; Wu Zhaoqiang; Li Dan; Chen Hong

    2013-01-01

    We present our findings of the selective adsorption of native and denatured proteins onto thermally responsive, native-protein resistant poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) decorated silicon nanowire arrays (SiNWAs). The PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface, which shows very low levels of native-protein adsorption, favors the adsorption of denatured proteins. The amount of denatured-protein adsorption is higher at temperatures above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PNIPAAm. Temperature cycling surrounding the LCST, which ensures against thermal denaturation of native proteins, further increases the amount of denatured-protein adsorption. Moreover, the PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surface is able to selectively adsorb denatured protein even from mixtures of different protein species; meanwhile, the amount of native proteins in solution is kept nearly at its original level. It is believed that these results will not only enrich current understanding of protein interactions with PNIPAAm-modified SiNWAs surfaces, but may also stimulate applications of PNIPAAm–SiNWAs surfaces for native/denatured protein separation. (paper)

  6. Theoretical thermal dosimetry produced by an annular phased array system in CT-based patient models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, K.D.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Lynch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical calculations for the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the resulting temperature distributions produced by an annular phased array (APA) type system are made. The finite element numerical method is used in the formulation of both the electromagnetic (EM) and the thermal boundary value problems. A number of detailed patient models based on CT-scan data from the pelvic, visceral, and thoracic regions are generated to stimulate a variety of tumor locations and surrounding normal tissues. The SAR values from the EM solution are input into the bioheat transfer equation, and steady-rate temperature distributions are calculated for a wide variety of blood flow rates. Based on theoretical modeling, the APA shows no preferential heating of superficial over deep-seated tumors. However, in most cases satisfactory thermal profiles (therapeutic volume near 60%) are obtained in all three regions of the human trunk only for tumors with little or no blood flow. Unsatisfactory temperature patterns (therapeutic volume <50%) are found for tumors with moderate to high perfusion rates. These theoretical calculations should aid the clinician in the evaluation of the effectiveness of APA type devices in heating tumors located in the trunk region

  7. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm 3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  8. Thermal efficiency of Duovent array glassing; Eficiencia termica de arreglos de vidrios Duovent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Garcia G; Cortina Leyva, C; Flores Prieto, Jose J [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Tecnologico, DGIT SEP, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the thermal performance of duovent glazing with different solar control coatings. The thermal efficiency, {eta}, was determined. The duovent array consists of 6 mm glass+solar coating+air layer+6 mm glass. The width of the air layer between the two glasses is 12 mm. The experimental work was carried out using a calorimeter setup calling DEMETEV. The DEMETEV was specially designed to measure the heat gains through sample glassings. The heat flux, the shading coefficients and the thermal efficiency curve as a function of the temperature difference and incident radiative flux are presented. Comparing the results for duovent with clear glasses with the ones reported by Dubrous show a difference of 2.2%. Also this study verifies the theoretical model reported. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presenta un estudio experimental del comportamiento termico de vidrios Duovent con diferentes filtros solares mediante el calculo de la eficiencia termica, {eta}. El arreglo lo comprende vidrio+filtro+aire+vidrio de 6 mm de espesor con un espacio con aire entre vidrios de 12 mm. El trabajo experimental se llevo a cabo haciendo uso del dispositivo calorimetrico experimental, denominado DEMETEV, que fue disenado especialmente para medir las ganancias de calor a traves de vidrios. Se presentan los flujos de calor, los coeficientes de sombreado y la curva de eficiencia termica como funcion de la diferencia de temperaturas y del flujo radioactivo incidente. Los resultados obtenidos para vidrios claros fueron comparados con los que se obtuvieron en el trabajo reportado por Dubrous obteniendo una diferencia del 2.2%. Tambien se presenta la validacion de los datos experimentales con un modelo teorico reportado.

  9. Modelling of the thermal parameters of high-power linear laser-diode arrays. Two-dimensional transient model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezotosnyi, V V; Kumykov, Kh Kh

    1998-01-01

    A two-dimensional transient thermal model of an injection laser is developed. This model makes it possible to analyse the temperature profiles in pulsed and cw stripe lasers with an arbitrary width of the stripe contact, and also in linear laser-diode arrays. This can be done for any durations and repetition rates of the pump pulses. The model can also be applied to two-dimensional laser-diode arrays operating quasicontinuously. An analysis is reported of the influence of various structural parameters of a diode array on the thermal regime of a single laser. The temperature distributions along the cavity axis are investigated for different variants of mounting a crystal on a heat sink. It is found that the temperature drop along the cavity length in cw and quasi-cw laser diodes may exceed 20%. (lasers)

  10. Multi-parameter fibre Bragg grating sensor-array for thermal vacuum cycling test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Ahlers, B.; Toet, P.; Casarosa, G.; Appolloni, M.

    2017-11-01

    Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor systems based on optical fibres are gaining interest in space applications. Studies on Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of the reusable launchers using FBG sensors have been carried out in the Future European Space Transportation Investigations Programme (FESTIP). Increasing investment in the development on FBG sensor applications is foreseen for the Future Launchers Preparatory Programme (FLPP). TNO has performed different SHM measurements with FBGs including on the VEGA interstage [1, 2] in 2006. Within the current project, a multi-parameter FBG sensor array demonstrator system for temperature and strain measurements is designed, fabricated and tested under ambient as well as Thermal Vacuum (TV) conditions in a TV chamber of the European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC site. The aim is the development of a multi-parameters measuring system based on FBG technology for space applications. During the TV tests of a Space Craft (S/C) or its subsystems, thermal measurements, as well as strain measurements are needed by the engineers in order to verify their prediction and to validate their models. Because of the dimensions of the test specimen and the accuracy requested to the measurement, a large number of observation/measuring points are needed. Conventional sensor systems require a complex routing of the cables connecting the sensors to their acquisition unit. This will add extra weight to the construction under test. FBG sensors are potentially light-weight and can easily be multiplexed in an array configuration. The different tasks comply of a demonstrator system design; its component selection, procurement, manufacturing and finally its assembly. The temperature FBG sensor is calibrated in a dedicated laboratory setup down to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature at TNO. A temperature-wavelength calibration curve is generated. After a test programme definition a setup in thermal vacuum is realised at ESA premises including a mechanical

  11. Use of a two-dimensional ionization chamber array for proton therapy beam quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ding Xiaoning; Gillin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional ion chamber arrays are primarily used for conventional and intensity modulated radiotherapy quality assurance. There is no commercial device of such type available on the market that is offered for proton therapy quality assurance. We have investigated suitability of the MatriXX, a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array detector for proton therapy QA. This device is designed to be used for photon and electron therapy QA. The device is equipped with 32x32 parallel plate ion chambers, each with 4.5 mm diam and 7.62 mm center-to-center separation. A 250 MeV proton beam was used to calibrate the dose measured by this device. The water equivalent thickness of the buildup material was determined to be 3.9 mm using a 160 MeV proton beam. Proton beams of different energies were used to measure the reproducibility of dose output and to evaluate the consistency in the beam flatness and symmetry measured by MatriXX. The output measurement results were compared with the clinical commissioning beam data that were obtained using a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber. The agreement was consistently found to be within 1%. The profiles were compared with film dosimetry and also with ion chamber data in water with an excellent agreement. The device is found to be well suited for quality assurance of proton therapy beams. It provides fast two-dimensional dose distribution information in real time with the accuracy comparable to that of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry

  12. Safety of Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy in Patients With Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Sanjeet S; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Favazza, Christopher P; Watson, Robert E; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2018-02-10

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) has increasingly been used as a treatment option for medically refractory epilepsy, tumors, and radiation necrosis. The use of LiTT requires intraoperative magnetic resonance (MR) thermography. This can become an issue in patients with other implanted therapeutic devices such as pacemakers and vagal nerve stimulators due to concerns regarding increases in the specific absorption rate (SAR). This is a technical case report demonstrating a successfully and safely performed LiTT in a 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a patient with a pacemaker for mesial temporal sclerosis. An 83-yr-old gentleman who had an implanted cardiac pacemaker presented with medically intractable epilepsy and was confirmed to have mesial temporal sclerosis on imaging. Video electroencephalography demonstrated concordant ipsilateral seizures and semiology. He underwent LiTT for ablation of the mesial temporal lobe. This was performed with the below described protocol with a cardiology nurse monitoring the patient's cardiac condition and a physicist monitoring SAR, and MR imaging quality without any adverse events. This study reports on a protocol of cardiac and MR SAR to safely perform MR-guided LiTT in the setting of traditional pacemakers in patients who are not pacemaker dependent. Copyright © 2018 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  13. Thermal Management of Quantum Cascade Lasers in an individually Addressable Array Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    diode arrays, along with access to both front and rear facets. Hence, both laser and single-pass amplifier arrays can be accommodated. A module was... CW conditions at an emission wavelength of 9 m. OCIS codes: Semiconductor lasers , quantum cascade (140.5965), Laser arrays (140.3290) 1...Rubio, "Active coherent beam combining of diode lasers ," Opt. Lett. 36, 999-1001 (2011). 2. B. G. Saar, K. Creedon, L. Missaggia, C. A. Wang, M. K

  14. Study on the dose distribution of the mixed field with thermal and epi-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kanda, Keiji

    1994-01-01

    Simulation calculations using DOT 3.5 were carried out in order to confirm the characteristics of depth-dependent dose distribution in water phantom dependent on incident neutron energy. The epithermal neutrons mixed to thermal neutron field is effective improving the thermal neutron depth-dose distribution for neutron capture therapy. A feasibility study on the neutron energy spectrum shifter was performed using ANISN-JR for the KUR Heavy Water Facility. The design of the neutron spectrum shifter is feasible, without reducing the performance as a thermal neutron irradiation field. (author)

  15. Comparative study on radon effects and thermal effects on humans in radon hot spring therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaoka, K.; Mitsunobu, F.; Hanamoto, K.; Tanizaki, Y.; Sugita, K.; Kohima, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The radon therapy is used radon ( 222 Rn) gas, which mainly emits alpha-rays, and induces a small amount of active oxygen in the body. Because most of the diseases to which the radon therapy as well as the thermal therapy is applied are related to activated oxygen, in this study the effects of the radioactivity of radon and thermal effects were compared under the room or the hot spring condition with the similar chemical component, using as the parameters which are closely involved in the clinical for radon therapy. In the results, the radon and thermal therapy enhanced the antioxidation function, such as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which inhibit lipid peroxidation and total cholesterol produce in the body. Moreover the therapy enhanced concanavalin A (ConA)-induced mitogen response, and increased the level of CD4, which is the marker of helper T cell, and decreased the level of CD8, which is the common marker of killer T cell and supresser T cell, in the white cell differentiation antigen (CD4/CD8) assay. Furthermore, the therapy increased the levels of alpha atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha ANP), beta endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), insulin and glucose-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH), and decreased the vasopression level. The results were on the whole larger in the radon group than in the thermal group. The findings suggest that the radon therapy more contributes to the prevention of life style-related diseases related to peroxidation reactions and immune depression than thermal therapy. Moreover these indicate what may be a part of the mechanism for the alleviation of hypertension, osteoarthritis (pain) and diabetes mellitus brought about more radon therapy than thermal therapy

  16. A silicon strip detector array for energy verification and quality assurance in heavy ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrot, Emily; Newall, Matthew; Guatelli, Susanna; Petasecca, Marco; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2018-02-01

    The measurement of depth dose profiles for range and energy verification of heavy ion beams is an important aspect of quality assurance procedures for heavy ion therapy facilities. The steep dose gradients in the Bragg peak region of these profiles require the use of detectors with high spatial resolution. The aim of this work is to characterize a one dimensional monolithic silicon detector array called the "serial Dose Magnifying Glass" (sDMG) as an independent ion beam energy and range verification system used for quality assurance conducted for ion beams used in heavy ion therapy. The sDMG detector consists of two linear arrays of 128 silicon sensitive volumes each with an effective size of 2mm × 50μm × 100μm fabricated on a p-type substrate at a pitch of 200 μm along a single axis of detection. The detector was characterized for beam energy and range verification by measuring the response of the detector when irradiated with a 290 MeV/u 12 C ion broad beam incident along the single axis of the detector embedded in a PMMA phantom. The energy of the 12 C ion beam incident on the detector and the residual energy of an ion beam incident on the phantom was determined from the measured Bragg peak position in the sDMG. Ad hoc Monte Carlo simulations of the experimental setup were also performed to give further insight into the detector response. The relative response profiles along the single axis measured with the sDMG detector were found to have good agreement between experiment and simulation with the position of the Bragg peak determined to fall within 0.2 mm or 1.1% of the range in the detector for the two cases. The energy of the beam incident on the detector was found to vary less than 1% between experiment and simulation. The beam energy incident on the phantom was determined to be (280.9 ± 0.8) MeV/u from the experimental and (280.9 ± 0.2) MeV/u from the simulated profiles. These values coincide with the expected energy of 281 MeV/u. The sDMG detector

  17. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  18. Thermally Induced Vibrations of the Hubble Space Telescope's Solar Array 3 in a Test Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Derrick A.; Haile, William B.; Turczyn, Mark T.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) conducted a disturbance verification test on a flight Solar Array 3 (SA3) for the Hubble Space Telescope using the ESA Large Space Simulator (LSS) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The LSS cyclically illuminated the SA3 to simulate orbital temperature changes in a vacuum environment. Data acquisition systems measured signals from force transducers and accelerometers resulting from thermally induced vibrations of the SAI The LSS with its seismic mass boundary provided an excellent background environment for this test. This paper discusses the analysis performed on the measured transient SA3 responses and provides a summary of the results.

  19. Magnetic Reversal and Thermal Stability of CoFeB Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Arrays Patterned by Block Copolymer Lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Kun-Hua

    2018-04-10

    Dense arrays of pillars, with diameters of 64 and 25 nm, were made from a perpendicular CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction thin film stack using block copolymer lithography. While the soft layer and hard layer in the 64 nm pillars reverse at different fields, the reversal of the two layers in the 25 nm pillars could not be distinguished, attributed to the strong interlayer magnetostatic coupling. First order reversal curves were used to identify the steps that occur during switching, and the thermal stability and effective switching volume were determined from scan rate dependent hysteresis measurements.

  20. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  1. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic compound eye array via two-step thermal reflow of simply pre-modeled hierarchic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengzhou; Li, Mujun; Shen, Lianguan; Qiu, Jinfeng; Zhou, Youquan

    2017-06-01

    A flexible fabrication method for the biomimetic compound eye (BCE) array is proposed. In this method, a triple-layer sandwich-like coating configuration was introduced, and the required hierarchic microstructures are formed with a simple single-scan exposure in maskless digital lithography. Taking advantage of the difference of glass transition point (Tg) between photoresists of each layer, the pre-formed hierarchic microstructures are in turn reflowed to the curved substrate and the BCE ommatidia in a two-step thermal reflow process. To avoid affecting the spherical substrate formed in the first thermal reflow, a non-contact strategy was proposed in the second reflow process. The measurement results were in good agreement with the designed BCE profiles. Results also showed that the fabricated BCE had good performances in optical test. The presented method is flexible, convenient, low-cost and can easily adapt to the fabrications of other optical elements with hierarchic microstructures.

  2. Fabrication of gold-nanoparticle arrays using photolithography and thermal dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreede, Lennart; Göeken, Kristian; Göeken, Kristian; Gill, Ron; Gill, Ron; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Zengerle, R.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a new manufacturing method using only basic cleanroom techniques to produce an array of 106 100 nm diameter gold-nanoparticles (GNPs) of equal shape and 5 μm spacing on a fused silica surface. Photolithography and sputtering are used to produce gold islets, followed by a simple

  3. Nanofabrication and characterization of ZnO nanorod arrays and branched microrods by aqueous solution route and rapid thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupan, Oleg; Chow, Lee; Chai, Guangyu; Roldan, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed; Schulte, Alfons; Heinrich, Helge

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an inexpensive and fast fabrication method for one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and branched two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) - nanoarchitectures. Our synthesis technique includes the use of an aqueous solution route and post-growth rapid thermal annealing. It permits rapid and controlled growth of ZnO nanorod arrays of 1D - rods, 2D - crosses, and 3D - tetrapods without the use of templates or seeds. The obtained ZnO nanorods are uniformly distributed on the surface of Si substrates and individual or branched nano/microrods can be easily transferred to other substrates. Process parameters such as concentration, temperature and time, type of substrate and the reactor design are critical for the formation of nanorod arrays with thin diameter and transferable nanoarchitectures. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the samples

  4. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Güdel, Manuel [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rupen, Michael, E-mail: jrv@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  5. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  6. One-dimensional arrays of oscillators: Energy localization in thermal equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigada, R.; Romero, A.H.; Sarmiento, A.; Lindenberg, K.

    1999-01-01

    All systems in thermal equilibrium exhibit a spatially variable energy landscape due to thermal fluctuations. Thus at any instant there is naturally a thermodynamically driven localization of energy in parts of the system relative to other parts of the system. The specific characteristics of the spatial landscape such as, for example, the energy variance, depend on the thermodynamic properties of the system and vary from one system to another. The temporal persistence of a given energy landscape, that is, the way in which energy fluctuations (high or low) decay toward the thermal mean, depends on the dynamical features of the system. We discuss the spatial and temporal characteristics of spontaneous energy localization in 1D anharmonic chains in thermal equilibrium. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  7. Passive Films for CubeSat Solar Array and Radiator Thermal Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trending towards reduced power and mass budget on satellites with a longer mission life, there is a need for a reliable thermal control system that is more efficient...

  8. The Surface Interface Characteristics of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube and Graphitic Carbon Fiber Arrays Grown by Thermal and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2002-01-01

    The development of nano-arrays for sensors and devices requires the growth of arrays with the proper characteristics. One such application is the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphitic carbon fibers (GCFs) for the chemical attachment of probe molecules. The effectiveness of such an array is dependent not only upon the effectiveness of the probe and the interface between that probe and the array, but also the array and the underlaying substrate. If that array is a growth of vertically aligned CNTs or GCFs then the attachment of that array to the surface is of the utmost importance. This attachment provides the mechanical stability and durability of the array, as well as, the electrical properties of that array. If the detection is to be acquired through an electrical measurement, then the appropriate resistance between the array and the surface need to be fabricated into the device. I will present data on CNTs and GCFs grown from both thermal and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The focus will be on the characteristics of the metal film from which the CNTs and GCFs are grown and the changes that occur due to changes within the growth process.

  9. Thermalism in Argentina. Alternative or complementary dermatologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubogui, J; Stengel, F M; Kien, M C; Sevinsky, L; Rodríguez Lupo, L

    1998-11-01

    Our study took place in the region of the Copahue Volcano in the Andes Mountain range, 1900 m above sea level. Fifty-five patients who came to the Copahue Thermal Basin Complex (Neuquén, Argentina) for treatment of psoriasis vulgaris were clinically evaluated for participation in this study. Thermal products--waters, mud, and/or algae--were the only therapeutic agents used, except for bland emollients for xerosis. Treatment for brief periods (10 +/- 3 days) resulted in notable improvement.

  10. Highly selective gas sensor arrays based on thermally reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, Alexey; Varezhnikov, Alexey; Wilson, Peter; Sysoev, Victor; Kolmakov, Andrei; Sinitskii, Alexander

    2013-06-21

    The electrical properties of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been previously shown to be very sensitive to surface adsorbates, thus making rGO a very promising platform for highly sensitive gas sensors. However, poor selectivity of rGO-based gas sensors remains a major problem for their practical use. In this paper, we address the selectivity problem by employing an array of rGO-based integrated sensors instead of focusing on the performance of a single sensing element. Each rGO-based device in such an array has a unique sensor response due to the irregular structure of rGO films at different levels of organization, ranging from nanoscale to macroscale. The resulting rGO-based gas sensing system could reliably recognize analytes of nearly the same chemical nature. In our experiments rGO-based sensor arrays demonstrated a high selectivity that was sufficient to discriminate between different alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol and isopropanol, at a 100% success rate. We also discuss a possible sensing mechanism that provides the basis for analyte differentiation.

  11. Neutron capture therapy with thermal neutrons at IRT MIFI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, K.N.; Portnov, A.A.; Savkin, V.A.; Kulakov, V.N.; Khokhlov, V.F.; Shejno, I.N.; Vajnson, A.A.; Kozlovskaya, N.G.; Meshcherikova, V.V.; Mitin, V.N.; Yarmonenko, S.P.

    2001-01-01

    Combined preclinical investigations into neutron capture therapy are conducted. Malignant melanoma was adopted as the line of investigation; boron-containing and gadolinium-containing preparations were used during the neutron capture therapy working off. Preparations produce secondary varying radiations when used in tumor. Dogs with spontaneous melanoma were used for the experiments. Procedures for the irradiation of dogs by neutron beam as the stage before use for the treatment of oncology patients were finished off; efficiency of neutron beam influence on normal tissues during the irradiation of dogs with melanoma (and without it) in antitumor and side effect sense was estimated [ru

  12. Numerical simulation of ambient flow and thermal distributions in a spent fuel storage cask array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michener, T.; Trent, D.S.; Guttmann, J.; Bajwa, C.

    2001-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) analyzed the thermal performance of the Utah Private Fuel Storage (PFS) using the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics software. A three-dimensional section of the PFS with a total of 20 casks was modeled to estimate the ambient flow and temperature distributions surrounding the casks. The purpose of this analysis was to compute the cask inlet vent air temperature to be used for boundary conditions in a detailed analysis of an individual Holtec Hi-Storm 100 cask using the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) thermal hydraulic computer software. (author)

  13. DWDM laser arrays fabricated using thermal nanoimprint lithography on Indium Phosphide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smistrup, K.; Nørregaard, J.; Mironov, A.

    2013-01-01

    by including a lambda quarter shift at the center of the grating. The need for phase shifts and multiple wavelengths eliminates some lithography methods such as holography. Typically, these lasers are produced by e-beam lithography (EBL). We present a production method based on thermal nanoimprint lithography...... during the imprint process and the narrow temperature window for imprint and separation (80°C and 55°C) ensures minimal issues with thermal mismatch between the InP substrate and the Si stamp. The imprinted InP wafers were processed in NeoPhotonics standard process line to create working lasers...

  14. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established

  15. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  16. Elevation of antioxidant enzymes in the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy for bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Hosaki, Yasuhiro; Ashida, Kozo; Tanizaki, Yoshiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Sugita, Katsuhiro; Kojima, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    An increased systemic production of oxygen-free radicals by activated inflammatory cells is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy on asthma in relation to antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide. Radon and thermal therapy were performed once a week. All subjects went to a hot bathroom with a high concentration of radon, and nasal inhalation of vapor from a hot spring was performed for 40 min once a day under conditions of high humidity. The room temperature was 48 deg C; the room radon concentration was 2,080 Bq/m 3 . Blood samples were collected at 2 h, 14, and 28 days after the first therapy. A blood sample also was collected before the first therapy (at body temperature and background radon level) to be used as the control. The forced expiratory volume in one second (%FEV 1 ) was significantly increased 28 days after the first therapy. On day 28, the catalase (CAT) activity was significantly increased in comparison with the control. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly increased compared to the control after first inhalation. On days 14 and 28, the lipid peroxide level was significantly decreased in comparison with the control. In conclusion, the present pilot study has shown that radon and thermal therapy improved the pulmonary function of asthmatics by increasing the reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. (author)

  17. A study on the utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum of a Maxwellian distribution of a higher temperature than the room temperature of 300 K, was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at the deeper part in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using MCNP-V3 in order to confirm the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e., (1) depth dependence of neutron energy spectrum, and (2) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper and wider area in a living body compared with the thermal neutron irradiation. Practically, by the incidence of the hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution, the thermal neutron flux at 5 cm depth can be given about four times larger than by the incidence of the thermal neutrons of 300 K. (author)

  18. MgB2-Based Bolometer Array for Far Infra-Red Thermal Imaging and Fourier Transform Spectroscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, B.; Aslam, S.; Brasunas, J.

    2012-01-01

    The mid-superconducting critical temperature (T(sub c) approximately 39 K) of the simple binary, intermetallic MgB, [1] makes it a very good candidate for the development of the next generation of electrooptical devices (e.g. [2]). In particular, recent advances in thin film deposition teclmiques to attain higb quality polycrystalline thin film MgB, deposited on SiN-Si substrates, with T(sub c) approximately 38K [3] coupled with the low voltage noise performance of the film [4] makes it higbly desirable for the development of moderately cooled bolometer arrays for integration into future space-bourne far infra-red (FIR) spectrometers and thermal mappers for studying the outer planets, their icy moons and other moons of interest in the 17-250 micrometer spectral wavelength range. Presently, commercially available pyroelectric detectors operating at 300 K have specific detectivity, D(*), around 7 x 10(exp 8) to 2 x 10(exp 9) centimeters square root of Hz/W. However, a MgB2 thin film based bolometer using a low-stress (less than 140 MPa) SiN membrane isolated from the substrate by a small thermal conductive link, operating at 38 K, promises to have two orders of magnitude higher specific detectivity [5][6].

  19. Further development of thermal neutron capture therapy for metastatic and deeply-invasive human malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Yutaka

    1995-03-01

    This issue is the collection of the papers presented thermal neutron capture therapy for metastatic and deeply-invasive human malignant melanoma. Separate abstracts were prepared for 2 of the papers in this report. The remaining 32 papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  20. In vitro assessment of the efficacy of thermal therapy in human benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmick, P.; Coad, J. E.; Bhowmick, S.; Pryor, J. L.; Larson, T.; de la Rosette, J.; Bischof, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    The successful management of BPH with minimally invasive thermal therapies requires a firm understanding of the temperature-time relationship for tissue destruction. In order to accomplish this objective, the present in vitro study assesses the cellular viability of human BPH tissue subjected to an

  1. 3D perfused brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy and imaging: design, construction and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, José M; Jarosz, Boguslaw J

    2015-01-01

    Thermal therapy has emerged as an independent modality of treating some tumors. In many clinics the hyperthermia, one of the thermal therapy modalities, has been used adjuvant to radio- or chemotherapy to substantially improve the clinical treatment outcomes. In this work, a methodology for building a realistic brain phantom for interstitial ultrasound low dose-rate thermal therapy of the brain is proposed. A 3D brain phantom made of the tissue mimicking material (TMM) had the acoustic and thermal properties in the 20–32 °C range, which is similar to that of a brain at 37 °C. The phantom had 10–11% by mass of bovine gelatin powder dissolved in ethylene glycol. The TMM sonicated at 1 MHz, 1.6 MHz and 2.5 MHz yielded the amplitude attenuation coefficients of 62  ±  1 dB m −1 , 115  ±  4 dB m −1 and 175  ±  9 dB m −1 , respectively. The density and acoustic speed determination at room temperature (∼24 °C) gave 1040  ±  40 kg m −3 and 1545  ±  44 m s −1 , respectively. The average thermal conductivity was 0.532 W m −1  K −1 . The T1 and T2 values of the TMM were 207  ±  4 and 36.2  ±  0.4 ms, respectively. We envisage the use of our phantom for treatment planning and for quality assurance in MRI based temperature determination. Our phantom preparation methodology may be readily extended to other thermal therapy technologies. (paper)

  2. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Lin, Chia-Hung; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-02-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500-700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility.

  3. Blood leakage detection during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with array photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Xing; Huang, Ping-Tzan; Li, Chien-Ming

    2018-01-01

    Blood leakage and blood loss are serious life-threatening complications occurring during dialysis therapy. These events have been of concerns to both healthcare givers and patients. More than 40% of adult blood volume can be lost in just a few minutes, resulting in morbidities and mortality. The authors intend to propose the design of a warning tool for the detection of blood leakage/blood loss during dialysis therapy based on fog computing with an array of photocell sensors and heteroassociative memory (HAM) model. Photocell sensors are arranged in an array on a flexible substrate to detect blood leakage via the resistance changes with illumination in the visible spectrum of 500–700 nm. The HAM model is implemented to design a virtual alarm unit using electricity changes in an embedded system. The proposed warning tool can indicate the risk level in both end-sensing units and remote monitor devices via a wireless network and fog/cloud computing. The animal experimental results (pig blood) will demonstrate the feasibility. PMID:29515815

  4. Heat transfer due to electroconvulsive therapy: Influence of anisotropic thermal and electrical skull conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes de Oliveira, Marilia; Wen, Peng; Ahfock, Tony

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and head models to investigate temperature profiles arising when anisotropic thermal and electrical conductivities are considered in the skull layer. The aim was to numerically investigate the threshold for which this therapy operates safely to the brain, from the thermal point of view. A six-layer spherical head model consisting of scalp, fat, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid, grey matter and white matter was developed. Later on, a realistic human head model was also implemented. These models were built up using the packages from COMSOL Inc. and Simpleware Ltd. In these models, three of the most common electrode montages used in ECT were applied. Anisotropic conductivities were derived using volume constraint and included in both spherical and realistic head models. The bio-heat transferring problem governed by Laplace equation was solved numerically. The results show that both the tensor eigenvalues of electrical conductivity and the electrode montage affect the maximum temperature, but thermal anisotropy does not have a significant influence. Temperature increases occur mainly in the scalp and fat, and no harm is caused to the brain by the current applied during ECT. The work assures the thermal safety of ECT and also provides a numerical method to investigate other non-invasive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of vascular targeting agents with thermal or radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, Michael R.; Murata, Rumi

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The most likely clinical application of vascular targeting agents (VTAs) is in combination with more conventional therapies. In this study, we report on preclinical studies in which VTAs were combined with hyperthermia and/or radiation. Methods and Materials: A C3H mammary carcinoma grown in the right rear foot of female CDF1 mice was treated when at 200 mm 3 in size. The VTAs were combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP, 25 mg/kg), flavone acetic acid (FAA, 150 mg/kg), and 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA, 20 mg/kg), and were all injected i.p. Hyperthermia and radiation were locally administered to tumors of restrained, nonanesthetized mice, and response was assessed using either a tumor growth or tumor control assay. Results: Heating tumors at 41.5 degree sign C gave rise to a linear relationship between the heating time and tumor growth with a slope of 0.02. This slope was increased to 0.06, 0.09, and 0.08, respectively, by injecting the VTAs either 30 min (CA4DP), 3 h (FAA), or 6 h (DMXAA) before heating. The radiation dose (±95% confidence interval) that controls 50% of treated tumors (the TCD 50 value) was estimated to be 53 Gy (51-55 Gy) for radiation alone. This was decreased to 48 Gy (46-51 Gy), 45 Gy (41-49 Gy), and 42 Gy (39-45 Gy), respectively, by injecting CA4DP, DMXAA, or FAA 30-60 min after irradiating. These values were further decreased to around 28-33 Gy if the tumors of VTA-treated mice were also heated to 41.5 degree sign C for 1 h, starting 4 h after irradiation, and this effect was much larger than the enhancement seen with either 41.5 degree sign C or even 43 degree sign C alone. Conclusions: Our preclinical studies and those of others clearly demonstrate that VTAs can enhance tumor response to hyperthermia and/or radiation and support the concept that such combination studies should be undertaken clinically for the full potential of VTAs to be realized

  6. Subsurface thermal behaviour of tissue mimics embedded with large blood vessels during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Narasimhan, Arunn; Das, Sarit K; Sengupta, Soujit; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the subsurface thermal behaviour of a tissue phantom embedded with large blood vessels (LBVs) when exposed to near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The effect of the addition of nanoparticles to irradiated tissue on the thermal sink behaviour of LBVs was also studied. Experiments were performed on a tissue phantom embedded with a simulated blood vessel of 2.2 mm outer diameter (OD)/1.6 mm inner diameter (ID) with a blood flow rate of 10 mL/min. Type I collagen from bovine tendon and agar gel were used as tissue. Two different nanoparticles, gold mesoflowers (AuMS) and graphene nanostructures, were synthesised and characterised. Energy equations incorporating a laser source term based on multiple scattering theories were solved using finite element-based commercial software. The rise in temperature upon NIR irradiation was seen to vary according to the position of the blood vessel and presence of nanoparticles. While the maximum rise in temperature was about 10 °C for bare tissue, it was 19 °C for tissue embedded with gold nanostructures and 38 °C for graphene-embedded tissues. The axial temperature distribution predicted by computational simulation matched the experimental observations. A different subsurface temperature distribution has been obtained for different tissue vascular network models. The position of LBVs must be known in order to achieve optimal tissue necrosis. The simulation described here helps in predicting subsurface temperature distributions within tissues during plasmonic photo-thermal therapy so that the risks of damage and complications associated with in vivo experiments and therapy may be avoided.

  7. Investigation of illumination efficiency on the LED therapy with different array types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Liou, Cheng-Jyun

    2009-08-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are a major discovery in twenty-one century for its advantages including small size, long lifetime, low voltage, high response and good mechanical properties. It is an environment-friendly product and maybe becomes a lighting source in future. In the other way LED lighting also is used for the lighting source of cosmetology. LED phototherapy provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths that are biologically optimal for pain treatment and holistic healing. The illumination efficiency is one of the key indexes for the LED phototherapy. LEDs were arranged on a disk of diameter of 100mm with different array types: a radial, a rhombus, an octagon, and a square. Then the LEDs with view angle of 120 degree were used for the lighting sources. Trace-Pro software was used for the optical simulation. The array types of radial and square were better than those of rhombus and octagon for illumination efficiency. In the mixture efficiency of a radial array was observed by different distances from 1mm to 100mm. However lighting could reach the well mixture after the treatment distance of 30mm by optical simulation. The view angle could reach +/-60 degree at the treatment distance of 50 mm for the LED phototherapy mockup.

  8. VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF DG TAU'S RADIO JET: A HIGHLY COLLIMATED THERMAL OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, C.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52240 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Ray, T. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Section, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Skinner, S. L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. C. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    The active young protostar DG Tau has an extended jet that has been well studied at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. We report sensitive new Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations of the core and jet between 5 GHz and 8 GHz. Our high angular resolution observation at 8 GHz clearly shows an unpolarized inner jet with a size of 42 AU (0.''35) extending along a position angle similar to the optical-X ray outer jet. Using our nearly coeval 2012 VLA observations, we find a spectral index {alpha} = +0.46 {+-} 0.05, which combined with the lack of polarization is consistent with bremsstrahlung (free-free) emission, with no evidence for a non-thermal coronal component. By identifying the end of the radio jet as the optical depth unity surface, and calculating the resulting emission measure, we find that our radio results are in agreement with previous optical line studies of electron density and consequent mass-loss rate. We also detect a weak radio knot at 5 GHz located 7'' from the base of the jet, coincident with the inner radio knot detected by Rodriguez et al. in 2009 but at lower surface brightness. We interpret this as due to expansion of post-shock ionized gas in the three years between observations.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, V M; Borgen, A E; Jansen, E C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2 ) treatment has in animal experiments demonstrated antinociceptive effects. It was hypothesized that these effects would attenuate secondary hyperalgesia areas (SHAs), an expression of central sensitization, after a first-degree thermal injury in humans. METHODS...... was demonstrated. However, in the nine volunteers starting with the control session, a statistical significant attenuation of SHAs was demonstrated in the HBO2 session (P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that HBO2 therapy in humans attenuates central sensitization induced by a thermal skin injury......, compared with control. These new and original findings in humans corroborate animal experimental data. The thermal injury model may give impetus to future human neurophysiological studies exploring the central effects of hyperbaric oxygen treatment....

  10. Thermal expansion behavior study of Co nanowire array with in situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Guang; Cai, Quan; Jiang, Longsheng; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Kunhao; Cheng, Weidong; Xing, Xueqing; Chen, Zhongjun; Wu, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption fine structure techniques were used to study the structural change of ordered Co nanowire array with temperature. The results show that the Co nanowires are polycrystalline with hexagonal close packed structure without phase change up until 700 °C. A nonlinear thermal expansion behavior has been found and can be well described by a quadratic equation with the first-order thermal expansion coefficient of 4.3×10-6/°C and the second-order thermal expansion coefficient of 5.9×10-9/°C. The mechanism of this nonlinear thermal expansion behavior is discussed.

  11. Thermal performance of solar air collection-storage system with phase change material based on flat micro-heat pipe arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Teng-yue; Diao, Yan-hua; Zhu, Ting-ting; Zhao, Yao-hua; Liu, Jing; Wei, Xiang-qian

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new type of solar air collection-storage thermal system with PCM is proposed. • Flat micro-heat pipe array is used as the core heat transfer element. • Air volume flow rate influence charging and discharging time obviously. • Air-side thermal resistance dominates during charging and discharging. - Abstract: In this study, a new type of solar air collection-storage thermal system (ACSTS) with phase change material (PCM) is designed using flat micro-heat pipe arrays (FMHPA) as the heat transfer core element. The solar air collector comprises FMHPA and vacuum tubes. The latent thermal storage device (LTSD) utilizes lauric acid, which is a type of fatty acid, as PCM. The experiments test the performance of collector efficiency and charging and discharging time of thermal storage device through different air volume flow rates. After a range of tests, high air volume flow rate is concluded to contribute to high collector efficiency and short charging and discharging time and enhance instantaneous heat transfer, whereas an air volume flow rate of 60 m"3/h during discharging provides a steady outlet temperature. The cumulative heat transfer during discharging is between 4210 and 4300 kJ.

  12. Formulation Development and Evaluation of Hybrid Nanocarrier for Cancer Therapy: Taguchi Orthogonal Array Based Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K. Tekade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Taguchi orthogonal array design is a statistical approach that helps to overcome limitations associated with time consuming full factorial experimental design. In this study, the Taguchi orthogonal array design was applied to establish the optimum conditions for bovine serum albumin (BSA nanocarrier (ANC preparation. Taguchi method with L9 type of robust orthogonal array design was adopted to optimize the experimental conditions. Three key dependent factors namely, BSA concentration (% w/v, volume of BSA solution to total ethanol ratio (v : v, and concentration of diluted ethanolic aqueous solution (% v/v, were studied at three levels 3%, 4%, and 5% w/v; 1 : 0.75, 1 : 0.90, and 1 : 1.05 v/v; 40%, 70%, and 100% v/v, respectively. The ethanolic aqueous solution was used to impart less harsh condition for desolvation and attain controlled nanoparticle formation. The interaction plot studies inferred the ethanolic aqueous solution concentration to be the most influential parameter that affects the particle size of nanoformulation. This method (BSA, 4% w/v; volume of BSA solution to total ethanol ratio, 1 : 0.90 v/v; concentration of diluted ethanolic solution, 70% v/v was able to successfully develop Gemcitabine (G loaded modified albumin nanocarrier (M-ANC-G of size 25.07±2.81 nm (ζ=-23.03±1.015 mV as against to 78.01±4.99 nm (ζ=-24.88±1.37 mV using conventional method albumin nanocarrier (C-ANC-G. Hybrid nanocarriers were generated by chitosan layering (solvent gelation technique of respective ANC to form C-HNC-G and M-HNC-G of sizes 125.29±5.62 nm (ζ=12.01±0.51 mV and 46.28±2.21 nm (ζ=15.05±0.39 mV, respectively. Zeta potential, entrapment, in vitro release, and pH-based stability studies were investigated and influence of formulation parameters are discussed. Cell-line-based cytotoxicity assay (A549 and H460 cells and cell internalization assay (H460 cell line were performed to assess the

  13. Technical Note: Rapid prototyping of 3D grid arrays for image guided therapy quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittle, David; Holshouser, Barbara; Slater, James M.; Guenther, Bob D.; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional grid phantoms offer a number of advantages for measuring imaging related spatial inaccuracies for image guided surgery and radiotherapy. The authors examined the use of rapid prototyping technology for directly fabricating 3D grid phantoms from CAD drawings. We tested three different fabrication process materials, photopolymer jet with acrylic resin (PJ/AR), selective laser sintering with polyamide (SLS/P), and fused deposition modeling with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (FDM/ABS). The test objects consisted of rectangular arrays of control points formed by the intersections of posts and struts (2 mm rectangular cross section) and spaced 8 mm apart in the x, y, and z directions. The PJ/AR phantom expanded after immersion in water which resulted in permanent warping of the structure. The surface of the FDM/ABS grid exhibited a regular pattern of depressions and ridges from the extrusion process. SLS/P showed the best combination of build accuracy, surface finish, and stability. Based on these findings, a grid phantom for assessing machine-dependent and frame-induced MR spatial distortions was fabricated to be used for quality assurance in stereotactic neurosurgical and radiotherapy procedures. The spatial uniformity of the SLS/P grid control point array was determined by CT imaging (0.6x0.6x0.625 mm 3 resolution) and found suitable for the application, with over 97.5% of the control points located within 0.3 mm of the position specified in CAD drawing and none of the points off by more than 0.4 mm. Rapid prototyping is a flexible and cost effective alternative for development of customized grid phantoms for medical physics quality assurance.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles as a Photothermal Agent in Cancer Therapy: The Thermal Ablation Characteristic Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Grosges

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer therapy, the thermal ablation of diseased cells by embedded nanoparticles is one of the known therapies. It is based on the absorption of the energy of the illuminating laser by nanoparticles. The resulting heating of nanoparticles kills the cell where these photothermal agents are embedded. One of the main constraints of this therapy is preserving the surrounding healthy cells. Therefore, two parameters are of interest. The first one is the thermal ablation characteristic length, which corresponds to an action distance around the nanoparticles for which the temperature exceeds the ablation threshold. This critical geometric parameter is related to the expected conservation of the body temperature in the surroundings of the diseased cell. The second parameter is the temperature that should be reached to achieve active thermal agents. The temperature depends on the power of the illuminating laser, on the size of nanoparticles and on their physical properties. The purpose of this paper is to propose behavior laws under the constraints of both the body temperature at the boundary of the cell to preserve surrounding cells and an acceptable range of temperature in the target cell. The behavior laws are deduced from the finite element method, which is able to model aggregates of nanoparticles. We deduce sensitivities to the laser power and to the particle size. We show that the tuning of the temperature elevation and of the distance of action of a single nanoparticle is not significantly affected by variations of the particle size and of the laser power. Aggregates of nanoparticles are much more efficient, but represent a potential risk to the surrounding cells. Fortunately, by tuning the laser power, the thermal ablation characteristic length can be controlled.

  15. Effect of van der Waals forces on thermal conductance at the interface of a single-wall carbon nanotube array and silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya Feng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the effect of van der Waals forces among single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on the interfacial thermal conductance between a SWNT array and silicon substrate. First, samples of SWNTs vertically aligned on silicon substrate are simulated, where both the number and arrangement of SWNTs are varied. Results reveal that the interfacial thermal conductance of a SWNT array/Si with van der Waals forces present is higher than when they are absent. To better understand how van der Waals forces affect heat transfer through the interface between SWNTs and silicon, further constructs of one SWNT surrounded by different numbers of other ones are studied, and the results show that the interfacial thermal conductance of the central SWNT increases with increasing van der Waals forces. Through analysis of the covalent bonds and vibrational density of states at the interface, we find that heat transfer across the interface is enhanced with a greater number of chemical bonds and that improved vibrational coupling of the two sides of the interface results in higher interfacial thermal conductance. Van der Waals forces stimulate heat transfer at the interface.

  16. Development of a quantum dot mediated thermometry for minimally invasive thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Willard L.

    Thermally-related, minimally invasive therapies are designed to treat tumors while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissues. Adjacent tissues become susceptible to thermal injury to ensure the cancer is completely destroyed. Destroying tumor cells, while minimizing collateral damage to the surrounding tissue, requires the capacity to control and monitor tissue temperatures both spatially and temporally. Current devices measure the tumor's tissue temperature at a specific location leaving the majority unmonitored. A point-wise application can not substantiate complete tumor destruction. This type of surgery would be more effective if volumetric tissue temperature measurement were available. On this premise, the feasibility of a quantum dot (QD) assembly to measure the tissue temperature volumetrically was tested in the experiments described in this dissertation. QDs are fluorescence semiconductor nanoparticles having various superior optical properties. This new QD-mediated thermometry is capable of monitoring the thermal features of tissues non-invasively by measuring the aggregate fluorescence intensity of the QDs accumulated at the target tissues prior to and during the surgical procedure. Thus, such a modality would allow evaluation of tissue destruction by measuring the fluorescence intensity of the QD as a function of temperature. The present study also quantified the photoluminescence intensity and attenuation of the QD as a function of depth and wavelength using a tissue phantom. A prototype system was developed to measure the illumination through a tissue phantom as a proof of concept of the feasibility of a noninvasive thermal therapy. This prototype includes experimental hardware, software and working methods to perform image acquisition, and data reduction strategic to quantify the intensity and transport characteristics of the QD. The significance of this work is that real-time volumetric temperature information will prove a more robust tool for use

  17. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in guiding thermal therapies. A brief technical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2007-01-01

    For a number of reasons, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a unique tool for interventional use. It has a spatial resolution which is independent of the wavelength of the electromagnetic field used for imaging, has various imaging parameters which are related to the physical properties of the subject; provides a superior soft-tissue contrast; provides freedom in determining the slicing or viewing angle; and it utilizes non-ionizing radiation. This technology offers assistance in therapeutic applications such as lesion identification, treatment planning, device tracking, temperature imaging and treatment evaluation. In this article, the role of MRI in assisting thermal therapy is briefly reviewed from a technical point of view. (author)

  18. Formation of precise 2D Au particle arrays via thermally induced dewetting on pre-patterned substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of precise 2D Au nanoparticle arrays over a large area is presented. The technique was based on pre-patterning of the substrate before the deposition of a thin Au film, and the creation of periodic particle arrays by subsequent dewetting induced by annealing. Two types of pre-patterned substrates were used: The first comprised an array of pyramidal pits and the second an array of circular holes. For the dewetting of Au films on the pyramidal pit substrate, the structural curvature-driven diffusion cooperates with capillarity-driven diffusion, resulting in the formation of precise 2D particle arrays for films within a structure dependent thickness-window. For the dewetting of Au films on the circular hole substrate, the periodic discontinuities in the films, induced by the deposition, can limit the diffusion paths and lead to the formation of one particle per individual separated region (holes or mesas between holes, and thus, result in the evolution of precise 2D particle arrays. The influence of the pre-patterned structures and the film thickness is analyzed and discussed. For both types of pre-patterned substrate, the Au film thickness had to be adjusted in a certain thickness-window in order to achieve the precise 2D particle arrays.

  19. Formation of precise 2D Au particle arrays via thermally induced dewetting on pre-patterned substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ran

    2011-01-01

    Summary The fabrication of precise 2D Au nanoparticle arrays over a large area is presented. The technique was based on pre-patterning of the substrate before the deposition of a thin Au film, and the creation of periodic particle arrays by subsequent dewetting induced by annealing. Two types of pre-patterned substrates were used: The first comprised an array of pyramidal pits and the second an array of circular holes. For the dewetting of Au films on the pyramidal pit substrate, the structural curvature-driven diffusion cooperates with capillarity-driven diffusion, resulting in the formation of precise 2D particle arrays for films within a structure dependent thickness-window. For the dewetting of Au films on the circular hole substrate, the periodic discontinuities in the films, induced by the deposition, can limit the diffusion paths and lead to the formation of one particle per individual separated region (holes or mesas between holes), and thus, result in the evolution of precise 2D particle arrays. The influence of the pre-patterned structures and the film thickness is analyzed and discussed. For both types of pre-patterned substrate, the Au film thickness had to be adjusted in a certain thickness-window in order to achieve the precise 2D particle arrays. PMID:21977445

  20. Thermal dewetting with a chemically heterogeneous nano-template for self-assembled L1(0) FePt nanoparticle arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Fu; Liao, Jung-Wei; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Wang, Ding-Shuo; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Tzu-Ying; Ho, Rong-Ming; Chen, Lih-Juann; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2016-02-21

    A design for the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles is presented by thermal dewetting with a chemically heterogeneous nano-template. For the template, we fabricate a nanostructured polystyrene-b-polydimethylsiloxane (PS-b-PDMS) film on a Si|SiO2 substrate, followed by a thermal annealing and reactive ion etching (RIE) process. This gives a template composed of an ordered hexagonal array of SiOC hemispheres emerging in the polystyrene matrix. After the deposition of a FePt film on this template, we utilize the rapid thermal annealing (RTA) process, which provides in-plane stress, to achieve thermal dewetting and structural ordering of FePt simultaneously. Since the template is composed of different composition surfaces with periodically varied morphologies, it offers more tuning knobs to manipulate the nanostructures. We show that both the decrease in the area of the PS matrix and the increase in the strain energy relaxation transfer the dewetted pattern from the randomly distributed nanoparticles into a hexagonal periodic array of L10 FePt nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy with the in situ heating stage reveals the evolution of the dewetting process, and confirms that the positions of nanoparticles are aligned with those of the SiOC hemispheres. The nanoparticles formed by this template-dewetting show an average diameter and center-to-center distance of 19.30 ± 2.09 nm and 39.85 ± 4.80 nm, respectively. The hexagonal array of FePt nanoparticles reveals a large coercivity of 1.5 T, much larger than the nanoparticles fabricated by top-down approaches. This approach offers an efficient pathway toward self-assembled nanostructures in a wide range of material systems.

  1. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Zondag, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept,

  2. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M.; Vega C, H. R.

    2015-10-01

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  3. Mechanism for wettability alteration of ZnO nanorod arrays via thermal annealing in vacuum and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Liu Yanru; Wei Zhiyang; Zhang Junyan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Oxygen vacancy is the key factor in accounting for the change in morphology of the ZnO nanorod arrays. ► We firstly investigated the wettability alteration of ZnO nanorod arrays annealed in vacuum at different temperature. ► The hydrophilicity of the ZnO nanorod arrays annealed in air is not related to the oxygen vacancy but ascribed to the O adatom on the nanorod surface. - Abstract: The ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a simple hydrothermal process followed by annealing in vacuum and air respectively at different temperature. The wettability of samples was controlled by adjusting the annealing atmosphere and temperature. To investigate the mechanism of wettability alteration, the chemical composition and surface morphology of nanorod arrays were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), respectively. Increasing oxygen vacancy concentration by increasing annealing temperature in vacuum resulted in a great change of surface morphology, which played the major role in wettability change. Under annealing in air, oxygen vacancy concentration reduced and the surface morphology of nanorod arrays showed little change with increasing annealing temperature. The wettability alteration is ascribed to the O adatom on the nanorods surface.

  4. Bevacizumab (Avastin and Thermal Laser Combination Therapy for Peripapillary Choroidal Neovascular Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. Adrean

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This is a retrospective interventional case series describing the results of 5 eyes from 5 patients with symptomatic peripapillary choroidal neovascularization (CNVM receiving initial bevacizumab treatment followed by thermal laser and bevacizumab combination therapy. Methods. Patients received intravitreal bevacizumab injections until the lesions were well-defined. Thermal laser ablation was then administered and followed by an additional bevacizumab injection after one week. Visual outcomes, OCT changes, and rates of recurrence were recorded and analyzed. Results. Median visual outcomes improved from 20/50 to 20/30 (p=0.0232. Median central macular thickness decreased from 347 μm to 152 μm (p=0.0253. The mean visual improvement was 3 lines. An average of 3.8 bevacizumab injections per patient were given overall. Patients were followed for an average of 24 months, during which all eyes were absent for recurrence. Conclusion. Symptomatic peripapillary CNVM may be successfully managed with bevacizumab followed by a combination of thermal laser and bevacizumab without the need for frequent retreatment. The area requiring treatment may be better defined using bevacizumab, limiting the ablation of the healthy retina and improving treatment margins. With this treatment regimen, the patients experience improved visual outcomes and have a low rate of recurrence.

  5. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Hack

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In terahertz (THz materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i vanadium oxide; (ii amorphous silicon; (iii a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  6. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  7. Thermally switchable adhesions of polystyrene-block-poly(n-isopropylacrylamide) copolymer pillar array mimicking climb attitude of geckos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jem-Kun; Wang, Jing-Hong; Chang, Jia-Yaw; Fan, Shih-Kang

    2012-09-01

    Inspired by the gecko foot pad, we fabricated polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PS-b-PNIPAAm) copolymer pillar array to mimic climbing attitude of a gecko, alternately attach to and detach from a surface. The pillar array structure of the PS segment significantly enhances both of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic property of PNIPAAm segment tips at 25 and 50 °C, respectively, which could generate alternating adhesive forces of approximately 120 and 11 nN. The dramatic change in adhesive and friction force difference at 25 and 50 °C may guide the design of bio-inspired artificial analogues, which could approach gecko's climbing behavior.

  8. Magnetic Reversal and Thermal Stability of CoFeB Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Arrays Patterned by Block Copolymer Lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Kun-Hua; Fernandez Martin, Eduardo; almasi, hamid; Wang, Weigang; Navas Otero, David; Ntetsikas, Konstantinos; Moschovas, Dimitrios; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Ross, Caroline A

    2018-01-01

    Dense arrays of pillars, with diameters of 64 and 25 nm, were made from a perpendicular CoFeB magnetic tunnel junction thin film stack using block copolymer lithography. While the soft layer and hard layer in the 64 nm pillars reverse at different

  9. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  10. ZnO nanorod arrays prepared by chemical bath deposition combined with rapid thermal annealing: structural, photoluminescence and field emission characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; He, Hsin-Min; Lee, Yi-Mu; Yang, Hsi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    ZnO nanorod arrays were prepared by low temperature chemical bath deposition (CBD) combined with rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under different ambient conditions. The structure and morphology of the synthesized ZnO have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained ZnO samples are highly crystalline with a hexagonal wurtzite phase and also display well-aligned array structure. A pronounced effect on increased nanorod length was found for the RTA-treated ZnO as compared to the as-grown ZnO. Analysis of XRD indicates that the (0 0 2) feature peak of the as-grown ZnO was shifted towards a lower angle as compared to the peaks of RTA-treated ZnO samples due to the reduction of tensile strain along the c-axis by RTA. Photoluminescence (PL) studies reveal that the ZnO nanorod arrays receiving RTA in an O 2 environment have the sharpest UV emission band and greatest intensity ratio of near band-edge emission (NBE) to deep level emission (DLE). Additionally, the effects of RTA on the field emission properties were evaluated. The results demonstrate that RTA an O 2 environment can lower the turn-on field and improve the field enhancement factor. The stability of the field emission current was also tested for 4 h. (paper)

  11. Applying the sequential neural-network approximation and orthogonal array algorithm to optimize the axial-flow cooling system for rapid thermal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Shih-Yu; Shen, Ming-Ho; Chang, Ying-Pin

    2009-01-01

    The sequential neural-network approximation and orthogonal array (SNAOA) were used to shorten the cooling time for the rapid cooling process such that the normalized maximum resolved stress in silicon wafer was always below one in this study. An orthogonal array was first conducted to obtain the initial solution set. The initial solution set was treated as the initial training sample. Next, a back-propagation sequential neural network was trained to simulate the feasible domain to obtain the optimal parameter setting. The size of the training sample was greatly reduced due to the use of the orthogonal array. In addition, a restart strategy was also incorporated into the SNAOA so that the searching process may have a better opportunity to reach a near global optimum. In this work, we considered three different cooling control schemes during the rapid thermal process: (1) downward axial gas flow cooling scheme; (2) upward axial gas flow cooling scheme; (3) dual axial gas flow cooling scheme. Based on the maximum shear stress failure criterion, the other control factors such as flow rate, inlet diameter, outlet width, chamber height and chamber diameter were also examined with respect to cooling time. The results showed that the cooling time could be significantly reduced using the SNAOA approach

  12. Thermal-hydraulic performance of a multiple jet cooling module with a concave dimple array in a helium-cooled divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyo-Yeon; Kim, Kwang-Yong, E-mail: kykim@inha.ac.kr

    2017-01-15

    A numerical study was performed to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of a finger type cooling module, where multiple jets impinge on the surface with concave dimples, in the divertor of a nuclear fusion reactor. Conjugate heat transfer was analyzed in both the solid and fluid domains using three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the shear stress transport turbulence model. The computational domain consisted of a single fluid domain and three solid domains: tile, thimble, and cartridge. The numerical results for the temperature variation on the tile were validated in comparison with the experimental data. A parametric study was performed with two design variables, the ratios of dimple diameter and dimple height to the nozzle diameter, and two dimple arrays (inline and staggered arrays). The parametric study showed that the heat transfer rate was increased by up to 2.62% by introducing concave dimples, and that the heat transfer and pressure drop performances increased with increasing diameter and height of the dimples for a specified dimple array.

  13. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) for thermal therapy dosimetry (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Marjanovic, Marina; Spillman, Darold R.; Odintsov, Boris M.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of tissues have been utilized for disease detection, diagnosis, and progression, however they have not been extensively utilized for therapy dosimetry. Magnetic hyperthermia aims to kill cells and ablate tumors using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) either injected in or targeted to tumors. Upon application of an appropriate AC magnetic field, MNPs can heat target tissue while sparing non-targeted healthy tissue. However, a sensitive monitoring technique for the dose of magnetic hyperthermia is needed to prevent over-treatment and collateral injury. During hyperthermia treatments, the viscoelastic properties of tissues are altered due to protein denaturation, coagulation, and tissue dehydration, making these properties candidates for dosimetry. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MM-OCE) utilizes MNPs as internal force transducers to probe the biomechanical properties of tissues. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the hyperthermia dose based on the elastic changes revealed by MM-OCE. In this study, MNPs embedded in tissues were utilized for both hyperthermia and MM-OCE measurements. Tissue temperature and elastic modulus were obtained, where the elastic modulus was extracted from the resonance frequency detected by MM-OCE. Results showed a correlation between stiffness and temperature change following treatment. To investigate the thermal-dose-dependent changes, intervals of hyperthermia treatment were repeatedly performed on the same tissue sequentially, interspersed with MM-OCE. With increasing times of treatment, tissue stiffness increased, while temperature rise remained relatively constant. These results suggest that MM-OCE may potentially identify reversible and irreversible tissue changes during thermal therapy, supporting the use of MM-OCE for dosimetric control of hyperthermia in future applications.

  14. Deep Space Thermal Cycle Testing of Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-I) Solar Array Panels Test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sisco, Jimmy

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-I) satellite will be exposed to thermal conditions beyond normal experience flight temperatures due to the satellite's high elliptical orbital flight...

  15. Multi-Channel RF System for MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Thermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yak, Nicolas; Asselin, Matthew; Chopra, Rajiv; Bronskill, Michael

    2009-04-01

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound thermal therapy is an approach to treating localized prostate cancer which targets precise deposition of thermal energy within a confined region of the gland. This treatment requires a system incorporating a heating applicator with multiple planar ultrasound transducers and associated RF electronics to control individual elements independently in order to achieve accurate 3D treatment. We report the design, construction, and characterization of a prototype multi-channel system capable of controlling 16 independent RF signals for a 16-element heating applicator. The main components are a control computer, microcontroller, and a 16-channel signal generator with 16 amplifiers, each incorporating a low-pass filter and transmitted/reflected power detection circuit. Each channel can deliver from 0.5 to 10 W of electrical power and good linearity from 3 to 12 MHz. Harmonic RF signals near the Larmor frequency of a 1.5 T MRI were measured to be below -30 dBm and heating experiments within the 1.5 T MR system showed no significant decrease in SNR of the temperature images. The frequency and power for all 16 channels could be changed in less than 250 ms, which was sufficiently rapid for proper performance of the control algorithms. A common backplane design was chosen which enabled an inexpensive, modular approach for each channel resulting in an overall system with minimal footprint.

  16. Three nights leg thermal therapy could improve sleep quality in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Nishizaka, Mari K; Miyazono, Mami; Ando, Shin-Ichi; Inoue, Shujiro; Takemoto, Masao; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Goto, Daisuke; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hashiguchi, Nobuko; Rahmawati, Anita; Chishaki, Hiroaki; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Magota, Chie; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Chishaki, Akiko

    2018-02-01

    Sleep quality is often impaired in patients with chronic heart failure (HF), which may worsen their quality of life and even prognosis. Leg thermal therapy (LTT), topical leg warming, has been shown to improve endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cardiac function in patients with HF. However, its short-term influence to sleep quality has not been evaluated in HF patients. Eighteen of 23 patients with stable HF received LTT (15 min of warming at 45 °C and 30 min of insulation) at bedtime for 3 consecutive nights and 5 patients served as control. Subjective sleep quality was evaluated by St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire, Oguri-Shirakawa-Azumi Sleep Inventory, and Epworth sleepiness scale, and also objectively evaluated by polysomnography. LTT significantly improved subjective sleep quality indicated by depth of sleep (p quality (p improve subjective and objective sleep quality in patients with HF. LTT can be a complimentary therapy to improve sleep quality in these patients.

  17. Experimental investigations of an endoluminal ultrasound applicator for MR-guided thermal therapy of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Jones, Peter; Plata, Juan; Chen, Henry; Pauly, Kim Butts; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris

    2017-03-01

    An MR-guided endoluminal ultrasound applicator has been proposed for palliative and potential curative thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. Minimally invasive ablation or hyperthermia treatment of pancreatic tumor tissue would be performed with the applicator positioned in the gastrointestinal (GI) lumen, and sparing of the luminal tissue would be achieved with a water-cooled balloon surrounding the ultrasound transducers. This approach offers the capability of conformal volumetric therapy for fast treatment times, with control over the 3D spatial deposition of energy. Prototype endoluminal ultrasound applicators have been fabricated using 3D printed fixtures that seat two 3.2 or 5.6 MHz planar or curvilinear transducers and contain channels for wiring and water flow. Spiral surface coils have been integrated onto the applicator body to allow for device localization and tracking for therapies performed under MR guidance. Heating experiments with a tissue-mimicking phantom in a 3T MR scanner were performed and demonstrated capability of the prototype to perform volumetric heating through duodenal luminal tissue under real-time PRF-based MR temperature imaging (MRTI). Additional experiments were performed in ex vivo pig carcasses with the applicator inserted into the esophagus and aimed towards liver or soft tissue surrounding the spine under MR guidance. These experiments verified the capacity of heating targets up to 20-25 mm from the GI tract. Active device tracking and automated prescription of imaging and temperature monitoring planes through the applicator were made possible by using Hadamard encoded tracking sequences to obtain the coordinates of the applicator tracking coils. The prototype applicators have been integrated with an MR software suite that performs real-time device tracking and temperature monitoring.

  18. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, M.; Zondag, H.A.; Elswijk, M.J.; Strootman, K.J.; Jong, M.J.M.

    2005-03-01

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept, consisting of 25 m 2 of PVT panels and a ground coupled heat pump, has been simulated in TRNSYS. It has been found that this system is able to cover 100% of the total heat demand for a typical newly-built Dutch one-family dwelling, while covering nearly all of its own electricity use and keeping the long-term average ground temperature constant. The cost of such a system has been compared to the cost of a reference system, where the PVT panels have been replaced with separate PV panels (26 m 2 ) and solar thermal collectors (7 m 2 ), but which is otherwise identical. The electrical and thermal yield of this reference system is equal to that of the PVT system. It has been found that both systems require a nearly identical initial investment. Finally, a view on future PVT markets is given. In general, the residential market is by far the most promising market. The system discussed in this paper is expected to be most successful in newly-built low-energy housing concepts

  19. Performance and costs of a roof-sized PV/thermal array combined with a ground coupled heat pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, M.; Zondag, H.A.; Elswijk, M.J.; Strootman, K.J.; Jong, M.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A photovoltaic/thermal (PVT) panel is a combination of photovoltaic cells with a solar thermal collector, generating solar electricity and solar heat simultaneously. Hence, PVT panels are an alternative for a combination of separate PV panels and solar thermal collectors. A promising system concept, consisting of 25 m 2 of PVT panels and a ground coupled heat pump, has been simulated in TRNSYS. It has been found that this system is able to cover 100% of the total heat demand for a typical newly-built Dutch one-family dwelling, while covering nearly all of its own electricity use and keeping the long-term average ground temperature constant. The cost of such a system has been compared to the cost of a reference system, where the PVT panels have been replaced with separate PV panels (26 m 2 ) and solar thermal collectors (7 m 2 ), but which is otherwise identical. The electrical and thermal yield of this reference system is equal to that of the PVT system. It has been found that both systems require a nearly identical initial investment. Finally, a view on future PVT markets is given. In general, the residential market is by far the most promising market. The system discussed in this paper is expected to be most successful in newly-built low-energy housing concepts. (Author)

  20. Design and fabrication of 4π Clover Detector Array Assembly for gamma-spectroscopy studies using thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, S.R.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Sabharwal, T.P.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Kinage, L.A.; Biswas, D.C.; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy has been studied earlier from the measurement of prompt gamma rays produced in reactions with thermal neutrons from CIRUS reactor. For studying the prompt γ-spectroscopy using thermal neutrons from Dhruva Reactor, BARC, the development of a dedicated beam line (R-3001) is in progress. In this beam line a detector assembly consisting of Clover Ge detectors will be used. This experimental setup will be utilized to investigate nuclear structure using prompt (n,γ) reactions and also to study the spectroscopy of neutron-rich fission-fragment nuclei

  1. Effect of thermal implying during ageing process of nanorods growth on the properties of zinc oxide nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, A. S., E-mail: kyrin-samaxi@yahoo.com; Mamat, M. H., E-mail: mhmamat@salam.uitm.edu.my; Rusop, M., E-mail: rusop@salam.uitm.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); NANO-SciTech Centre (NST), Institute of Science (IOS), Universiti Teknologi MARA - UiTM, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Malek, M. F., E-mail: firz-solarzelle@yahoo.com; Abdullah, M. A. R., E-mail: ameerridhwan89@gmail.com; Sin, M. D., E-mail: diyana0366@johor.uitm.edu.my [NANO-ElecTronic Centre (NET), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Undoped and Sn-doped Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures have been fabricated using a simple sol-gel immersion method at 95°C of growth temperature. Thermal sourced by hot plate stirrer was supplied to the solution during ageing process of nanorods growth. The results showed significant decrement in the quality of layer produced after the immersion process where the conductivity and porosity of the samples reduced significantly due to the thermal appliance. The structural properties of the samples have been characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) electrical properties has been characterized using current voltage (I-V) measurement.

  2. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, R.L.; Lords, L.V.; Kiser, D.M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage

  3. Evaluation of thermal-hydraulic performance of hydrocarbon refrigerants during flow boiling in a microchannels array heat sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez, Cristian A.; Leão, Hugo L.S.L.; Ribatski, Gherhardt

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Evaluation of refrigerants R600a, R290 and R1270 during flow boiling in a microchannels array. • Comparison of data for hydrocarbons with previous data for R134a. • Parametric analysis of heat transfer coefficient, pressure drop, ONB and exergy behaviors. • Comparison of the experimental data and prediction methods from literature. • In general, refrigerant R290 presents the best performance. - Abstract: The present study concerns an experimental evaluation of the performance of hydrocarbon refrigerants during flow boiling in a microchannels array heat sink. The heat sink is composed of fifty channels with cross sectional areas of 123 × 494 μm"2 and length of 15 mm manufactured in a copper block. Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop data were obtained for refrigerants R600a, R290 and R1270, mass velocities from 165 to 823 kg/m"2 s, heat fluxes up to 400 kW/m"2, liquid subcooling at the inlet of the test section of 5, 10 and 15 °C and saturation temperature of 25 °C. The data were compared with experimental results obtained in a previous study for R134a and predictions by methods from literature. In general, R290 presented the best performance, providing the highest average heat transfer coefficient and a pressure drop only slightly higher than R1270 that was the fluid presenting the lowest pressure drop. An exergy analysis also revealed the refrigerant R290 as the one presenting the best performance. However, R290 needed the highest excess of superheating to trigger the boiling process (ONB). The methods from literature evaluated in the present study poorly predicted the experimental data for two-phase pressure drop. On the other hand, the method of Kanizawa et al. (2016) was quite accurate in predicting the heat transfer results.

  4. Analysis of metastasis of melanoma-bearing hamsters in thermal neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masataka; Mishima, Yutaka; Ichihashi, Masamitsu

    1985-01-01

    Melanoma-bearing hamsters were divided into three groups: the MG I was treated with both 10 B 1 -para-boronophenylalanine.HCl ( 10 B 1 -BPA) and neutron capture therapy (NCT); the MG II was treated with NCT alone; and the control group (MG III). The most satisfactory effect on regression was seen in the MG I. When the opposite site to the transplanted tumor site was exposed to thermal neutrons, no enhanced effect on metastasis was seen. Tumor cells of MG I and MG II were transplanted subcutaneously 24 hr after NCT into normal hamsters (MG It and MG IIt), and their growth and metastasis abilities were examined. MG It cells possessed neither growth nor metastasis ability; while MG IIt cells showed normal growth and metastasis abilities. Lethal effects on tumor cells seemed to occur in the MG I at 24 hr after NCT, suggesting no effects of NCT on the metastasis ability of tumor cells. Metastasis was seen in 2 of 8 animals in the MG III; however, inhibitory effects on tumor cells were the same as those in the other groups MG I and MG II. When the cells were exposed to 100 rad and 300 rad of gamma rays to assess effects of gamma rays during NCT, neither tumor growth nor lung metastasis was affected. When the tumor was excised with 5 mm margin, relapse occurred in a high incidence. There was no difference in lung metastasis between NCT and gamma irradiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  5. Thermal distribution in biological tissue at laser induced fluorescence and photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnikov, I. V.; Seteikin, A. Yu.; Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are techniques currently introduced in clinical applications for visualization and local destruction of malignant tumours as well as premalignant lesions. During the laser irradiation of tissues for the diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, the absorbed optical energy generates heat, although the power density of the treatment light for surface illumination is normally low enough not to cause any significantly increased tissue temperature. In this work we tried to evaluate the utility of Monte Carlo modeling for simulating the temperature fields and the dynamics of heat conduction into the skin tissue under several laser irradiation conditions with both a pulsed UV laser and a continuous wave visible laser beam. The analysis of the results showed that heat is not localized on the surface, but it is collected inside the tissue. By varying the boundary conditions on the surface and the type of the laser radiation (continuous or pulsed) we can reach higher than normal temperature inside the tissue without simultaneous formation of thermally damaged tissue (e.g. coagulation or necrosis zone).

  6. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shibata, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  7. SU-E-J-161: Inverse Problems for Optical Parameters in Laser Induced Thermal Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahrenholtz, SJ; Stafford, RJ; Fuentes, DT

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is investigated as a neurosurgical intervention for oncological applications throughout the body by active post market studies. Real-time MR temperature imaging is used to monitor ablative thermal delivery in the clinic. Additionally, brain MRgLITT could improve through effective planning for laser fiber's placement. Mathematical bioheat models have been extensively investigated but require reliable patient specific physical parameter data, e.g. optical parameters. This abstract applies an inverse problem algorithm to characterize optical parameter data obtained from previous MRgLITT interventions. Methods: The implemented inverse problem has three primary components: a parameter-space search algorithm, a physics model, and training data. First, the parameter-space search algorithm uses a gradient-based quasi-Newton method to optimize the effective optical attenuation coefficient, μ-eff. A parameter reduction reduces the amount of optical parameter-space the algorithm must search. Second, the physics model is a simplified bioheat model for homogeneous tissue where closed-form Green's functions represent the exact solution. Third, the training data was temperature imaging data from 23 MRgLITT oncological brain ablations (980 nm wavelength) from seven different patients. Results: To three significant figures, the descriptive statistics for μ-eff were 1470 m −1 mean, 1360 m −1 median, 369 m −1 standard deviation, 933 m −1 minimum and 2260 m −1 maximum. The standard deviation normalized by the mean was 25.0%. The inverse problem took <30 minutes to optimize all 23 datasets. Conclusion: As expected, the inferred average is biased by underlying physics model. However, the standard deviation normalized by the mean is smaller than literature values and indicates an increased precision in the characterization of the optical parameters needed to plan MRgLITT procedures. This investigation

  8. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam

  9. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M [University of Florence, Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D; Friedl, F [IBA Dosimetry, Schwarzenbruck, Bavaria (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  10. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 deg C to 90 deg C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy

  11. Numerical simulation of time fractional dual-phase-lag model of heat transfer within skin tissue during thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Rai, K N

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigated the thermal behavior in living biological tissues using time fractional dual-phase-lag bioheat transfer (DPLBHT) model subjected to Dirichelt boundary condition in presence of metabolic and electromagnetic heat sources during thermal therapy. We solved this bioheat transfer model using finite element Legendre wavelet Galerkin method (FELWGM) with help of block pulse function in sense of Caputo fractional order derivative. We compared the obtained results from FELWGM and exact method in a specific case, and found a high accuracy. Results are interpreted in the form of standard and anomalous cases for taking different order of time fractional DPLBHT model. The time to achieve hyperthermia position is discussed in both cases as standard and time fractional order derivative. The success of thermal therapy in the treatment of metastatic cancerous cell depends on time fractional order derivative to precise prediction and control of temperature. The effect of variability of parameters such as time fractional derivative, lagging times, blood perfusion coefficient, metabolic heat source and transmitted power on dimensionless temperature distribution in skin tissue is discussed in detail. The physiological parameters has been estimated, corresponding to the value of fractional order derivative for hyperthermia treatment therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment planning figures of merit in thermal and epithermal boron capture therapy of brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, S.A.; Mathur, J.N. (Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia)); Allen, B.J. (Ansto PMB 1 Menai, NSW (Australia). Biomedicine and Health)

    1994-05-01

    The boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) figures of merit of advantage depth, therapeutic depth, modified advantage depth and maximum therapeutic depth have been studied as functions of [sup 10]B tumour to blood ratios and absolute levels. These relationships were examined using the Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code, MCNP, with an ideal 18.4 cm diameter neutron beam incident laterally upon an ellipsoidal neutron photon brain-equivalent model. Mono-energetic beams of 0.025 eV (thermal) and 35 eV (epithermal) were simulated. Increasing the tumour to blood [sup 10]B ratio predictably increases all figures of merit. [sup 10]B concentration was also shown to have a strong bearing on the figures of merit when low levels were present in the system. This is the result of a non-[sup 10]B dependent background dose. At higher levels however, the concentration of [sup 10]B has a diminishing influence. For boron sulphydryl (BSH), little advantage is gained by extending the blood [sup 10]B level beyond 30 ppm, whilst for D, L,-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) this limit is 10 ppm. Applying the epithermal beam under identical conditions, the therapeutic depth reaches the brain mid-line with a tumour to blood [sup 10]B ratio of only 5.7 for BPA. For BSH, the maximum therapeutic depth reaches the brain mid-line with a tumour to blood ratio of only 1.9 with 30 ppm in the blood. Human data for these compounds are very close to these requirements. (author).

  13. Temperature mapping and thermal dose calculation in combined radiation therapy and 13.56 MHz radiofrequency hyperthermia for tumor treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Kyung; Prasad, Bibin; Kim, Suzy

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the synergistic effect of radiotherapy and radiofrequency hyperthermia therapy in the treatment of lung and liver cancers, we studied the mechanism of heat absorption and transfer in the tumor using electro-thermal simulation and high-resolution temperature mapping techniques. A realistic tumor-induced mouse anatomy, which was reconstructed and segmented from computed tomography images, was used to determine the thermal distribution in tumors during radiofrequency (RF) heating at 13.56 MHz. An RF electrode was used as a heat source, and computations were performed with the aid of the multiphysics simulation platform Sim4Life. Experiments were carried out on a tumor-mimicking agar phantom and a mouse tumor model to obtain a spatiotemporal temperature map and thermal dose distribution. A high temperature increase was achieved in the tumor from both the computation and measurement, which elucidated that there was selective high-energy absorption in tumor tissue compared to the normal surrounding tissues. The study allows for effective treatment planning for combined radiation and hyperthermia therapy based on the high-resolution temperature mapping and high-precision thermal dose calculation.

  14. ESR-dosimetry in thermal and epithermal neutron fields for application in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Tobias

    2016-01-22

    Dosimetry is essential for every form of radiotherapy. In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) mixed neutron and gamma fields have to be considered. Dose is deposited in different neutron interactions with elements in the penetrated tissue and by gamma particles, which are always part of a neutron field. The therapeutic dose in BNCT is deposited by densely ionising particles, originating from the fragmentation of the isotope boron-10 after capture of a thermal neutron. Despite being investigated for decades, dosimetry in neutron beams or fields for BNCT remains complex, due to the variety in type and energy of the secondary particles. Today usually ionisation chambers combined with metal foils are used. The applied techniques require extensive effort and are time consuming, while the resulting uncertainties remain high. Consequently, the investigation of more effective techniques or alternative dosimeters is an important field of research. In this work the possibilities of ESR-dosimeters in those fields have been investigated. Certain materials, such as alanine, generate stable radicals upon irradiation. Using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry the amount of radicals, which is proportional to absorbed dose, can be quantified. Different ESR detector materials have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA research reactor in Mainz, Germany, with five setups, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been conducted in two epithermal neutron beams. The detector response, however, strongly depends on the dose depositing particle type and energy. It is hence necessary to accompany measurements by computational modelling and simulation. In this work the Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to calculate absorbed doses and dose components. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using amorphous track models. For the simulation, detailed models of

  15. Characteristics of heat transfer and fluid flow in a channel with single-row plates array oblique to flow direction for photovoltaic/thermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed Hamza H. [Department of Energy Resources and Environmental Engineering, Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology (E-JUST), P.O. Box 179, New Borg El-Arab City, Alexandria 21934 (Egypt); Ahmed, Mahmoud; Youssef, M.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Assiut University, Assiut 71516 (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    This study has been carried out to investigate the characteristics of convective heat transfer and fluid flow for a single row of oblique plates array to the flow direction inside a channel. The flow inside the channel is laminar and the plates array have spanwise distance between the plates and heated by radiation. This configuration has been designed to be used for Photovoltaic/Thermal system (PV/T) applications. The theoretical results are validated with measured values, and a good agreement prevailed. The results show that an increase in the plate oblique angle ({gamma}) in the range from 0 to 15 degrees, leads to an increase in the Nusselt number (Nu) up to a maximum value and then decreases. The oblique angle at the maximum value of Nu depends on the flow Reynolds Number (Re), and (l{sub w}/l{sub pl}), where (l{sub w}/l{sub pl}) is defined as the ratio of the plates' spacing at zero oblique angle to the plate length. Furthermore, increasing (l{sub w}/l{sub pl}) results in a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient depending on the values of Re, and plate oblique angle ({gamma}). In addition, increasing ({gamma}) from 0 to 15 degrees results in a decrease in the friction factor up to a certain value, after which the friction value approaches a constant value depending on Re value and (l{sub w}/l{sub pl}). It was found that for any value of the plate oblique angle ({gamma}), the friction factor decreases with the increase of the values of (l{sub w}/l{sub pl}) and Re, respectively. (author)

  16. Characteristics of heat transfer and fluid flow in a channel with single-row plates array oblique to flow direction for photovoltaic/thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed Hamza H.; Ahmed, Mahmoud; Youssef, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This study has been carried out to investigate the characteristics of convective heat transfer and fluid flow for a single row of oblique plates array to the flow direction inside a channel. The flow inside the channel is laminar and the plates array have spanwise distance between the plates and heated by radiation. This configuration has been designed to be used for Photovoltaic/Thermal system (PV/T) applications. The theoretical results are validated with measured values, and a good agreement prevailed. The results show that an increase in the plate oblique angle (γ) in the range from 0 to 15 degrees, leads to an increase in the Nusselt number (Nu) up to a maximum value and then decreases. The oblique angle at the maximum value of Nu depends on the flow Reynolds Number (Re), and (l w /l pl ), where (l w /l pl ) is defined as the ratio of the plates' spacing at zero oblique angle to the plate length. Furthermore, increasing (l w /l pl ) results in a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient depending on the values of Re, and plate oblique angle (γ). In addition, increasing (γ) from 0 to 15 degrees results in a decrease in the friction factor up to a certain value, after which the friction value approaches a constant value depending on Re value and (l w /l pl ). It was found that for any value of the plate oblique angle (γ), the friction factor decreases with the increase of the values of (l w /l pl ) and Re, respectively.

  17. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joon Y; Wu, Chengyuan; Tracy, Joseph; Lorenzo, Matthew; Evans, James; Nei, Maromi; Skidmore, Christopher; Mintzer, Scott; Sharan, Ashwini D; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    To describe mesial temporal lobe ablated volumes, verbal memory, and surgical outcomes in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) treated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT). We prospectively tracked seizure outcome in 20 patients at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with drug-resistant mTLE who underwent MRI-guided LiTT from December 2011 to December 2014. Surgical outcome was assessed at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and at the most recent visit. Volume-based analysis of ablated mesial temporal structures was conducted in 17 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) and results were compared between the seizure-free and not seizure-free groups. Following LiTT, proportions of patients who were free of seizures impairing consciousness (including those with auras only) are as follows: 8 of 15 patients (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 30.1-75.2%) after 6 months, 4 of 11 patients (36.4%, 95% CI 14.9-64.8%) after 1 year, 3 of 5 patients (60%, 95% CI 22.9-88.4%) at 2-year follow-up. Median follow-up was 13.4 months after LiTT (range 1.3 months to 3.2 years). Seizure outcome after LiTT suggests an all or none response. Four patients had anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) after LiTT; three are seizure-free. There were no differences in total ablated volume of the amygdalohippocampus complex or individual volumes of hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus between seizure-free and non-seizure-free patients. Contextual verbal memory performance was preserved after LiTT, although decline in noncontextual memory task scores were noted. We conclude that MRI-guided stereotactic LiTT is a safe alternative to ATL in patients with medically intractable mTLE. Individualized assessment is warranted to determine whether the reduced odds of seizure freedom are worth the reduction in risk, discomfort, and recovery time. Larger prospective

  18. Characterization and evaluation of a flexible MRI receive coil array for radiation therapy MR treatment planning using highly decoupled RF circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Kiaran P.; Stormont, Robert S.; Lindsay, Scott A.; Taracila, Victor; Savitskij, Dennis; Robb, Fraser; Witte, Robert J.; Kaufmann, Timothy J.; Huston, John, III; Riederer, Stephen J.; Borisch, Eric A.; Rossman, Phillip J.

    2018-04-01

    The growth in the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data for radiation therapy (RT) treatment planning has been facilitated by scanner hardware and software advances that have enabled RT patients to be imaged in treatment position while providing morphologic and functional assessment of tumor volumes and surrounding normal tissues. Despite these advances, manufacturers have been slow to develop radiofrequency (RF) coils that closely follow the contour of a RT patient undergoing MR imaging. Instead, relatively large form surface coil arrays have been adapted from diagnostic imaging. These arrays can be challenging to place on, and in general do not conform to the patient’s body habitus, resulting in sub optimal image quality. The purpose of this study is to report on the characterization of a new flexible and highly decoupled RF coil for use in MR imaging of RT patients. Coil performance was evaluated by performing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise correlation measurements using two coil (SNR) and four coil (noise correlation) element combinations as a function of coil overlap distance and comparing these values to those obtained using conventional coil elements. In vivo testing was performed in both normal volunteers and patients using a four and 16 element RF coil. Phantom experiments demonstrate the highly decoupled nature of the new coil elements when compared to conventional RF coils, while in vivo testing demonstrate that these coils can be integrated into extremely flexible and form fitting substrates that follow the exact contour of the patient. The new coil design addresses limitations imposed by traditional surface coil arrays and have the potential to significantly impact MR imaging for both diagnostic and RT applications.

  19. Poster - Thurs Eve-09: Evaluation of a commercial 2D ion-chamber array for intensity modulated radiation therapy dose measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, X; Bracken, G; Kerr, A

    2008-07-01

    Experimental verification of calculated dose from a treatment planning system is often essential for quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Film dosimetry and single ion chamber measurements are commonly used for IMRT QA. Film dosimetry has very good spatial resolution, but is labor intensive and absolute dose is not reliable. Ion chamber measurements are still required for absolute dose after measurements using films. Dosimeters based on 2D detector arrays that can measure 2D dose in real-time are gaining wider use. These devices provide a much easier and reliable tool for IMRT QA. We report the evaluation of a commercial 2D ion chamber array, including its basic performance characteristics, such as linearity, reproducibility and uniformity of relative ion chamber sensitivities, and comparisons between measured 2D dose and calculated dose with a commercial treatment planning system. Our analysis shows this matrix has excellent linearity and reproducibility, but relative sensitivities are tilted such that the +Y region is over sensitive, while the -Y region is under sensitive. Despite this behavior, our results show good agreement between measured 2D dose profiles and Eclipse planned data for IMRT test plans and a few verification plans for clinical breast field-in-field plans. The gamma values (3% or 3 mm distance-to-agreement) are all less than 1 except for one or two pixels at the field edge This device provides a fast and reliable stand-alone dosimeter for IMRT QA. © 2008 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Analysis of thermal effects in endoscopic nanocarriers-based photodynamic therapy applied to esophageal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-García, I.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Wilfert, O.; Hudcova, L.; Poliak, J.; Barcik, P.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we propose a predictive model that allows the study of thermal effects produced when the optical radiation interacts with an esophageal or stomach disease with gold nanoparticles embedded. The model takes into account light distribution in the tumor tissue by means of a Monte Carlo method. Mie theory is used to obtain the gold nanoparticles optical properties and the thermal model employed is based on the bio-heat equation. The complete model was applied to two types of tumoral tissue (squamous cell carcinoma located in the esophagus and adenocarcinoma in the stomach) in order to study the thermal effects induced by the inclusion of gold nanoparticles.

  1. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Recent aspect, a change from thermal neutron to epithermal neutron beam and a new protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinobu

    1999-01-01

    Since 1968, One-hundred seventy three patients with glioblastoma (n=81), anaplastic astrocytoma (n=44), low grade astrocytoma (n=16) or other types of tumor (n=32) were treated by boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a combination of thermal neutron and BSH in 5 reactors (HTR n=13, JRR-3 n=1, MuITR n=98, KUR n=28, JRR-2 n=33). Out of 101 patients with glioma treated by BNCT under the recent protocol, 33 (10 glioblastoma, 14 anaplastic astrocytoma, 9 low grade astrocytoma) patients lived or have lived longer than 3 years. Nine of these 33 lived or have lived longer than 10 years. According to the retrospective analysis, the important factors related to the clinical results were tumor dose radiation dose and maximum radiation dose in thermal brain cortex. The result was not satisfied as it was expected. Then, we decided to introduce mixed beams which contain thermal neutron and epithermal neutron beams. KUR was reconstructed in 1996 and developed to be available to use mixed beams. Following the shutdown of the JRR-2, JRR-4 was renewed for medical use in 1998. Both reactors have capacity to yield thermal neutron beam, epithermal neutron beam and mixed beams. The development of the neutron source lead us to make a new protocol. (author)

  2. SU-E-T-644: Evaluation of Angular Dependence Correction for 2D Array Detector Using for Quality Assurance of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karthikeyan, N; Ganesh, K M; Vikraman, S; Shariff, MH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector in quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT). Methods: Total ten patients comprising of different sites were planned for VMAT and taken for the study. Each plan was exposed on Matrix Evolution 2D array detector with Omnipro IMRT software based on the following three different methods using 6MV photon beams from Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. First method, VMAT plan was delivered on Matrix Evolution detector as it gantry mounted with dedicated holder with build-up of 2.3cm. Second, the VMAT plan was delivered with the static gantry angle on to the table mounted setup. Third, the VMAT plan was delivered with actual gantry angle on Matrix Evolution detector fixed in Multicube phantom with gantry angle sensor and angular dependence correction were applied to quantify the plan quality. For all these methods, the corresponding QA plans were generated in TPS and the dose verification was done for both point and 2D fluence analysis with pass criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement. Results: The measured point dose variation for the first method was observed as 1.58±0.6% of mean and SD with TPS calculated. For second and third method, the mean and standard deviation(SD) was observed as 1.67±0.7% and 1.85±0.8% respectively. The 2D fluence analysis of measured and TPS calculated has the mean and SD of 97.9±1.1%, 97.88±1.2% and 97.55±1.3% for first, second and third methods respectively. The calculated two-tailed Pvalue for point dose and 2D fluence analysis shows the insignificance with values of 0.9316 and 0.9015 respectively, among the different methods of QA. Conclusion: The qualitative evaluation of angular dependence correction for Matrix Evolution 2D array detector shows its competency in accuracy of quality assurance measurement of composite dose distribution of volumetric modulated arc therapy

  3. Thermal tomography imaging in photonic traditional Chinese medicine information therapy with holistic effect for health whole nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Binggang; Guo, Zhouyi; Huang, Hanchuan; Yang, Xicheng

    2015-01-01

    A photonic traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) information therapy was developed that has applications in whole health nursing including the prevention and treatment of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases as well as the conditioning of the subhealth state. This therapy utilizes the beam of a 630 nm LED light to irradiate the oropharynx, while simultaneously employing two beams of 650 nm LED light to irradiate corresponding acupuncture points resulting in a synergistic outcome. This method was named "1 + 2 phototherapy." The principle mechanism of the therapy is a series of photon induced biological effects that are triggered by stimulating the photosensitive tissues of the oropharynx. This tissue includes the oral mucosa, capillaries, lymph nodes, saliva glands, nerves, and Jingluo and is stimulated by light beams of certain photon energy and imitative acupuncture information. Thermal tomography imaging shows that the average temperature of the upper-body was improved significantly after oropharyngeal irradiation under irradiation of "Futu point": the heat radiation of the spine, as well as chest, shoulders, arms, and clavicle, increased under irradiation of "Hoku," whereas the overall average temperature was below the temperature before irradiation. The experiment indicates that this therapy can promote blood circulation, regulate varied physiological parameters, and have holistic effects in whole health nursing.

  4. High speed imaging, lightning mapping arrays and thermal imaging: a synergy for the monitoring of electrical discharges at the onset of volcanic explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Damien; Cimarelli, Corrado; Behnke, Sonja; Cigala, Valeria; Edens, Harald; McNutt, Stefen; Smith, Cassandra; Thomas, Ronald; Van Eaton, Alexa

    2017-04-01

    Volcanic lightning is being increasingly studied, due to its great potential for the detection and monitoring of ash plumes. Indeed, it is observed in a large number of ash-rich volcanic eruptions and it produces electromagnetic waves that can be detected remotely in all weather conditions. Electrical discharges in volcanic plume can also significantly change the structural, chemical and reactivity properties of the erupted material. Although electrical discharges are detected in various regions of the plume, those happening at the onset of an explosion are of particular relevance for the early warning and the study of volcanic jet dynamics. In order to better constrain the electrical activity of young volcanic plumes, we deployed at Sakurajima (Japan) in 2015 a multiparametric set-up including: i) a lightning mapping array (LMA) of 10 VHF antennas recording the electromagnetic waves produced by lightning at a sample rate of 25 Msps; ii) a visible-light high speed camera (5000 frames per second, 0.5 m pixel size, 300 m field of view) shooting short movies (approx. duration 1 s) at different stages of the plume evolution, showing the location of discharges in relation to the plume; and iii) a thermal camera (25 fps, 1.5 m pixel size, 800 m field of view) continuously recording the plume and allowing the estimation of its main source parameters (volume, rise velocity, mass eruption rate). The complementarity of these three setups is demonstrated by comparing and aggregating the data at various stages of the plume development. In the earliest stages, the high speed camera spots discrete small discharges, that appear on the LMA data as peaks superimposed to the continuous radio frequency (CRF) signal. At later stages, flashes happen less frequently and increase in length. The correspondence between high speed camera and LMA data allows to define a direct correlation between the length of the flash and the intensity of the electromagnetic signal. Such correlation is

  5. Rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide/Pt–TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Lan Ching [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering and Green Technology, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Universiti, Bandar Barat, 31900 Kampar, Perak (Malaysia); Leong, Kah Hon [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saravanan, Pichiah, E-mail: saravananpichiah@um.edu.my [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Nanotechnology & Catalysis Research Center (NANOCAT), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ibrahim, Shaliza [Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enhanced visible light character of TNTs was imparted by RGO/Pt via facile route. • Pt NPs contribute exemplary visible light harvesting nature through plasmon effect. • Engulfed RGO promoted enhanced charge-carriers separation. • Synergistic effect of RGO, Pt photoreduced CO{sub 2} to CH{sub 4} with max. of 10.96 μmol m{sup −2}. - Abstract: In this study, a complicate natural photosynthesis process was prototyped through a photocatalysis process by reducing CO{sub 2} to light hydrocarbon, CH{sub 4}. The composite photocatalyst employed for this study utilized Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) and rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) deposited over the surface of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TNTs). The existence and contribution of both Pt NPs and RGO in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, FESEM, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-DRS and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The TNTs in the composite exhibited pure anatase phase. The absorption bands at around 450 nm obtained from UV-DRS spectrum supported the existence of LSPR phenomenon of Pt NPs. The promising lower work function of RGO promoted the electrons transfer from TNTs to RGO efficiently. The successful depositions of Pt and RGO onto the surface of TNTs contributed for the improved photocatalytic activity (total CH{sub 4} yield of 10.96 μmol m{sup −2}) in the reduction of CO{sub 2} over TNTs and Pt–TNTs. Both of RGO and Pt NPs are equally important to exert a significant impact on the improvement of CH{sub 4} production rates.

  6. Rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide/Pt–TiO2 nanotube arrays for enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic reduction of CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Lan Ching; Leong, Kah Hon; Saravanan, Pichiah; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Enhanced visible light character of TNTs was imparted by RGO/Pt via facile route. • Pt NPs contribute exemplary visible light harvesting nature through plasmon effect. • Engulfed RGO promoted enhanced charge-carriers separation. • Synergistic effect of RGO, Pt photoreduced CO 2 to CH 4 with max. of 10.96 μmol m −2 . - Abstract: In this study, a complicate natural photosynthesis process was prototyped through a photocatalysis process by reducing CO 2 to light hydrocarbon, CH 4 . The composite photocatalyst employed for this study utilized Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) and rapid thermal reduced graphene oxide (RGO) deposited over the surface of the TiO 2 nanotube arrays (TNTs). The existence and contribution of both Pt NPs and RGO in the composite was confirmed through various analytical techniques including XRD, HRTEM, FESEM, Raman, FTIR, XPS, UV-DRS and photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The TNTs in the composite exhibited pure anatase phase. The absorption bands at around 450 nm obtained from UV-DRS spectrum supported the existence of LSPR phenomenon of Pt NPs. The promising lower work function of RGO promoted the electrons transfer from TNTs to RGO efficiently. The successful depositions of Pt and RGO onto the surface of TNTs contributed for the improved photocatalytic activity (total CH 4 yield of 10.96 μmol m −2 ) in the reduction of CO 2 over TNTs and Pt–TNTs. Both of RGO and Pt NPs are equally important to exert a significant impact on the improvement of CH 4 production rates.

  7. High power phased array prototype for clinical high intensity focused ultrasound : applications to transcostal and transcranial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, M; Aubry, J -F; Tanter, M; Marquet, F; Montaldo, G; Boch, A -L; Kujas, M; Seilhean, D; Fink, M

    2007-01-01

    Bursts of focused ultrasound energy three orders of magnitude more intense than diagnostic ultrasound became during the last decade a noninvasive option for treating cancer from breast to prostate or uterine fibroid. However, many challenges remain to be addressed. First, the corrections of distortions induced on the ultrasonic therapy beam during its propagation through defocusing obstacles like skull bone or ribs remain today a technological performance that still need to be validated clinically. Secondly, the problem of motion artifacts particularly important for the treatment of abdominal parts becomes today an important research topic. Finally, the problem of the treatment monitoring is a wide subject of interest in the growing HIFU community. For all these issues, the potential of new ultrasonic therapy devices able to work both in Transmit and Receive modes will be emphasized. A review of the work under achievement at L.O.A. using this new generation of HIFU prototypes on the monitoring, motion correction and aberrations corrections will be presented.

  8. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m -2 deg C -1 for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m -2 deg C -1 for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min -1 . The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra

  9. Design of hyper-thermal neutron irradiation fields for neutron capture therapy in KUR-heavy water neutron irradiation facility. Mounting of hyper-thermal neutron converter in therapeutic collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCP) using thermal neutron needs to improve of depth dose distribution in a living body. Epi-thermal neutron following moderation of fast neutron is usually used for improving of the depth dose distribution. The moderation method of fast neutron, however, gets mixed some of high energy neutron which give some of serious effects to a living body, and involves the difficulty for collimation of thermal neutron to the diseased part. Hyper-thermal neutrons, which are in an energy range of 0.1-3 eV at high temperature side of thermal neutron, are under consideration for application to the NCP. The hyper-thermal neutrons can be produced by up-scattering of thermal neutron in a high temperature material. Fast neutron components in collimator for the NCP reduce on application of the up-scattering method. Graphite at high temperature (>1000k) is used as a hyper-thermal neutron converter. The hyper-thermal neutron converter is planted to mount on therapeutic collimator which is located at the nearest side of patient for the NCP. Total neutron flux, ratio of hyper-thermal neutron to total neutron, and ratio of gamma-ray dose to neutron flux are calculated as a function of thickness of the graphite converter using monte carlo code MCNP-V4B. (M. Suetake)

  10. Processes and Materials for Flexible PV Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gierow, Paul

    2002-01-01

    .... A parallel incentive for development of flexible PV arrays are the possibilities of synergistic advantages for certain types of spacecraft, in particular the Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP) Vehicle...

  11. Non-Thermal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Comet assay reveals DNA strand breaks induced by ultrasonic cavitation in vitro, Ultrasound in medicine & biology 1995; 21: 841-8. 3. Dalecki D...doxorubicin, focused ultrasound , HIFU, prostate cancer I. INTRODUCTION Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pFUS) is able to create acoustic cavitation ... ultrasound for breast cancer therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chang Ming (Charlie) Ma, Ph.D

  12. A Novel Combination of Thermal Ablation and Heat-Inducible Gene therapy for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    11. Khokhlova, V.A., et al., Effects of nonlinear propagation, cavitation , and boiling in lesion formation by high intensity focused ultrasound in...intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed as an emerging non-invasive strategy for cancer treatment by thermal ablation of tumor tissue. The...Concepts, Seattle, WA) operating at its fundamental frequency (1.1 MHz) or its third harmonics (3.3 MHz). The ultrasound imaging system was a 5/7

  13. SU-F-BRCD-08: Uncertainty Quantification by Generalized Polynomial Chaos for MR-Guided Laser Induced Thermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenholtz, S; Fuentes, D; Stafford, R; Hazle, J

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided laser induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) is a minimally invasive thermal treatment for metastatic brain lesions, offering an alternative to conventional surgery. The purpose of this investigation is to incorporate uncertainty quantification (UQ) into the biothermal parameters used in the Pennes bioheat transfer equation (BHT), in order to account for imprecise values available in the literature. The BHT is a partial differential equation commonly used in thermal therapy models. MRgLITT was performed on an in vivo canine brain in a previous investigation. The canine MRgLITT was modeled using the BHT. The BHT has four parameters'" microperfusion, conductivity, optical absorption, and optical scattering'"which lack precise measurements in living brain and tumor. The uncertainties in the parameters were expressed as probability distribution functions derived from literature values. A univariate generalized polynomial chaos (gPC) expansion was applied to the stochastic BHT. The gPC approach to UQ provides a novel methodology to calculate spatio-temporal voxel-wise means and variances of the predicted temperature distributions. The performance of the gPC predictions were evaluated retrospectively by comparison with MR thermal imaging (MRTI) acquired during the MRgLITT procedure in the canine model. The comparison was evaluated with root mean square difference (RMSD), isotherm contours, spatial profiles, and z-tests. The peak RMSD was ∼1.5 standard deviations for microperfusion, conductivity, and optical absorption, while optical scattering was ∼2.2 standard deviations. Isotherm contours and spatial profiles of the simulation's predicted mean plus or minus two standard deviations demonstrate the MRTI temperature was enclosed by the model's isotherm confidence interval predictions. An a = 0.01 z-test demonstrates agreement. The application of gPC for UQ is a potentially powerful means for providing predictive simulations despite poorly known

  14. Feasibility of using interstitial ultrasound for intradiscal thermal therapy: a study in human cadaver lumbar discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nau, William H; Diederich, Chris J; Shu, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Application of heat in the spine using resistive wire heating devices is currently being used clinically for minimally invasive treatment of discogenic low back pain. In this study, interstitial ultrasound was evaluated for the potential to heat intradiscal tissue more precisely by directing energy towards the posterior annular wall while avoiding vertebral bodies. Two single-element directional applicator design configurations were tested: a 1.5 mm OD direct-coupled (DC) applicator which can be implanted directly within the disc, and a catheter-cooled (CC) applicator which is inserted in a 2.4 mm OD catheter with integrated water cooling and implanted within the disc. The transducers were sectored to produce 90 deg. spatial heating patterns for directional control. Both applicator configurations were evaluated in four human cadaver lumbar disc motion segments. Two heating protocols were employed in this study in which the temperature measured 5 mm away from the applicator was controlled to either T = 52 deg. C, or T > 70 deg. C for the treatment period. These temperatures (thermal doses) are representative of those required for thermal necrosis of in-growing nociceptor nerve fibres and disc cellularity alone, or with coagulation and restructuring of annular collagen in the high-temperature case. Steady-state temperature maps, and thermal doses (t 43 ) were used to assess the thermal treatments. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability of controlling temperature distributions within selected regions of the disc and annular wall using interstitial ultrasound, with minimal vertebral end-plate heating. While directional heating was demonstrated with both applicator designs, the CC configuration had greater directional heating capabilities and offered better temperature control than the DC configuration, particularly during the high-temperature protocol. Further, ultrasound energy was capable of penetrating within the highly attenuating disc tissue to

  15. Quantifying the Influence of Near-Surface Water-Energy Budgets on Soil Thermal Properties Using a Network of Coupled Meteorological and Vadose Zone Instrument Arrays in Indiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, S.; Gustin, A. R.; Ellett, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    Weather stations that collect reliable, sustained meteorological data sets are becoming more widely distributed because of advances in both instrumentation and data server technology. However, sites collecting soil moisture and soil temperature data remain sparse with even fewer locations where complete meteorological data are collected in conjunction with soil data. Thanks to the advent of sensors that collect continuous in-situ thermal properties data for soils, we have gone a step further and incorporated thermal properties measurements as part of hydrologic instrument arrays in central and northern Indiana. The coupled approach provides insights into the variability of soil thermal conductivity and diffusivity attributable to geologic and climatological controls for various hydrogeologic settings. These data are collected to facilitate the optimization of ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) in the glaciated Midwest by establishing publicly available data that can be used to parameterize system design models. A network of six monitoring sites was developed in Indiana. Sensors that determine thermal conductivity and diffusivity using radial differential temperature measurements around a heating wire were installed at 1.2 meters below ground surface— a typical depth for horizontal GSHP systems. Each site also includes standard meteorological sensors for calculating reference evapotranspiration following the methods by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. Vadose zone instrumentation includes time domain reflectometry soil-moisture and temperature sensors installed at 0.3-meter depth intervals down to a 1.8-meter depth, in addition to matric potential sensors at 0.15, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 meters. Cores collected at 0.3-meter intervals were analyzed in a laboratory for grain size distribution, bulk density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity. Our work includes developing methods for calibrating thermal properties sensors based on

  16. Radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy: results of a European multicentre study of resistive ablation of incompetent truncal varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, B; Hnatek, L; Zierau, U; Camci, M; Akkersdijk, Gjm; Nio, D; Sarlija, M; Ajduk, M; Santoro, P; Roche, E

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of bipolar radiofrequency-induced thermal therapy (RFITT) in a multicentre non-randomized study. Some 672 incompetent saphenous veins (85% great saphenous varicose vein, 15% short saphenous vein) in 462 patients (56.5% CEAP [clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological elements] class 3 or worse) were treated in eight European centres. Patients were assessed between 180 and 360 days postoperatively. Occlusion rates were determined by duplex ultrasound and compared with the power used for treatment, pull back rate and experience of the operating surgeon. Complete occlusion rates of 98.4% were achieved when treatments were performed by an experienced operator (more than 20 cases), when the maximum power setting on the RFITT generator was between 18 and 20 W and the applicator was withdrawn at a rate slower than 1.5 second/cm RFITT is efficacious, well tolerated by patients and has a low incidence of procedure-related post-operative complications.

  17. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  18. Dosimetric verification of brain and head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment using EDR2 films and 2D ion chamber array matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varatharaj C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The evaluation of the agreement between measured and calculated dose plays an essential role in the quality assurance (QA procedures of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT. Aim: The purpose of this study is to compare performances of the two dosimetric systems (EDR2 and I′matriXX in the verification of the dose distributions calculated by the TPS for brain and head and neck dynamic IMRT cases. Materials and Methods: The comparison of cumulative fluence by using Kodak extended dose rate (EDR2 and I′matriXX detectors has been done for the evaluation of 10 brain, 10 head and neck IMRT cases treated with 6 MV beams. The parameter used to assess the quality of dose calculation is the gamma-index (g -index method. The acceptance limits for g calculation we have used are 3% and 3 mm respectively for dose agreement and distance to agreement parameters. Statistical analyses were performed by using the paired, two-tailed Student t-test, and P< 0.01 is kept as a threshold for the significance level. Results: The qualitative dose distribution comparison was performed using composite dose distribution in the measurement plane and profiles along various axes for TPS vs. EDR2 film and TPS Vs I′matriXX. The quantitative analysis between the calculated and measured dose distribution was evaluated using DTA and g-index. The percentage of pixels matching with the set DTA and g values are comparable for both with EDR2 film and I′matriXX array detectors. Statistically there was no significant variation observed between EDR2 film and I′matriXX in terms of the mean percentage of pixel passing g for brain cases (98.77 ± 1.03 vs 97.62 ± 1.66, P = 0.0218 and for head and neck cases (97.39 ± 2.13 vs 97.17 ± 1.52%, P = 0.7404. Conclusion: Due to simplicity and fast evaluation process of array detectors, it can be routinely used in busy departments without compromising the measurement accuracy.

  19. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yon-Lae; Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ % ≤1, γ avg < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  20. Comparison of the performance between portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional array system on pretreatment quality assurance for volumetric-modulated arc and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yon-Lae [Choonhae College of Health Sciences, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Woo [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyoung-Sik [SAM Anyang Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric performance and to evaluate the pretreatment quality assurance (QA) of a portal dosimetry and a commercial two-dimensional (2-D) array system. In the characteristics comparison study, the measured values for the dose linearity, dose rate response, reproducibility, and field size dependence for 6-MV photon beams were analyzed for both detector systems. To perform the qualitative evaluations of the 10 IMRT and the 10 VMAT plans, we used the Gamma index for quantifying the agreement between calculations and measurements. The performance estimates for both systems show that overall, minimal differences in the dosimetric characteristics exist between the Electron portal imaging device (EPID) and 2-D array system. In the qualitative analysis for pretreatment quality assurance, the EPID and 2-D array system yield similar passing rate results for the majority of clinical Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) cases. These results were satisfactory for IMRT and VMAT fields and were within the acceptable criteria of γ{sub %}≤1, γ{sub avg} < 0.5. The EPDI and the 2-D array systems showed comparable dosimetric results. In this study, the results revealed both systems to be suitable for patient-specific QA measurements for IMRT and VMAT. We conclude that, depending on the status of clinic, both systems can be used interchangeably for routine pretreatment QA.

  1. Establishment of optimal thermal neutron capture therapy for 5 types of human malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Yutaka

    1993-03-01

    A series of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) studies has already germinated in 1972, with a view to establishing the BNCT particularly suited for the treatment of various types of malignant melanoma, and has been succeeded by research teams comprised of multi-disciplinary members. Twelve patients (7 men and 5 women, aged from 50 to 85 years) with malignant melanoma have been treated with BNCT; among them, six patients were completely cured, four had extremely reduced tumors, and two were still in the clinical process. The present Progress Report is a compilation of 39 research presentations for the recent two years. In this report, three patients are described. Of these, one patient had deep-seated lesions in right and left lymph nodes. These lesions were cured by the use of D 2 O that allowed neutron beams to reach them. Application of positron emission tomography to the diagnosis of melanoma is a highlight in this Report. (N.K.)

  2. Facile integration of multiple magnetite nanoparticles for theranostics combining efficient MRI and thermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoming; Zhu, Xianglong; Li, Hui; Wang, Lirong; Chi, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jiahe; Wang, Xiaomin; Chen, Zhong; Gao, Jinhao

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanostructures with both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities have attracted considerable attention in biomedical research because they can offer great advantages in disease management and prognosis. In this work, a facile way to transfer the hydrophobic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles into aqueous media by employing carboxylic graphene oxide (GO-COOH) as the transferring agent has been reported. In this one-step process, IO nanoparticles adhere to GO-COOH and form water-dispersible clusters via hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic ligands of IO nanoparticles and the basal plane of GO-COOH. The multiple IO nanoparticles on GO-COOH sheets (IO/GO-COOH) present a significant increase in T2 contrast enhancement. Moreover, the IO/GO-COOH nanoclusters also display a high photothermal conversion efficiency and can effectively inhibit tumor growth through the photothermal effects. It is envisioned that such IO/GO-COOH nanocomposites combining efficient MRI and photothermal therapy hold great promise in theranostic applications.Multifunctional nanostructures with both diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities have attracted considerable attention in biomedical research because they can offer great advantages in disease management and prognosis. In this work, a facile way to transfer the hydrophobic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles into aqueous media by employing carboxylic graphene oxide (GO-COOH) as the transferring agent has been reported. In this one-step process, IO nanoparticles adhere to GO-COOH and form water-dispersible clusters via hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic ligands of IO nanoparticles and the basal plane of GO-COOH. The multiple IO nanoparticles on GO-COOH sheets (IO/GO-COOH) present a significant increase in T2 contrast enhancement. Moreover, the IO/GO-COOH nanoclusters also display a high photothermal conversion efficiency and can effectively inhibit tumor growth through the photothermal effects. It is envisioned

  3. Laser interstitial thermal therapy for the treatment of epilepsy: evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla ND

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Navika D Shukla, Allen L Ho, Arjun V Pendharkar, Eric S Sussman, Casey H Halpern Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Medically intractable epilepsy is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. For those with focal epilepsy and correlated electrophysiological or radiographic features, open surgical resection can achieve high rates of seizure control, but can be associated with neurologic deficits and cognitive effects. Recent innovations have allowed for more minimally invasive methods of surgical seizure control such as magnetic resonance-guided laser interstitial therapy (MRgLITT. MRgLITT achieves the goal of ablating seizure foci while preserving neuropsychological function and offering real-time feedback and monitoring of tissue ablation. This review summarizes the utilization of MRgLITT for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and other seizure disorders. Overall, the efficacy of MRgLITT is comparable to that of open surgery and offers a less invasive approach in patients with significantly less morbidity. Keywords: laser ablation, MRgLITT, mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, epilepsy surgery, corpus callostomy

  4. Array capabilities and future arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, D.

    1993-01-01

    Early results from the new third-generation instruments GAMMASPHERE and EUROGAM are confirming the expectation that such arrays will have a revolutionary effect on the field of high-spin nuclear structure. When completed, GAMMASHPERE will have a resolving power am order of magnitude greater that of the best second-generation arrays. When combined with other instruments such as particle-detector arrays and fragment mass analysers, the capabilites of the arrays for the study of more exotic nuclei will be further enhanced. In order to better understand the limitations of these instruments, and to design improved future detector systems, it is important to have some intelligible and reliable calculation for the relative resolving power of different instrument designs. The derivation of such a figure of merit will be briefly presented, and the relative sensitivities of arrays currently proposed or under construction presented. The design of TRIGAM, a new third-generation array proposed for Chalk River, will also be discussed. It is instructive to consider how far arrays of Compton-suppressed Ge detectors could be taken. For example, it will be shown that an idealised open-quote perfectclose quotes third-generation array of 1000 detectors has a sensitivity an order of magnitude higher again than that of GAMMASPHERE. Less conventional options for new arrays will also be explored

  5. Thermal conductivity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3+x and the role of dense dislocation arrays at grain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Rigui; Su, Xianli; Zheng, Zheng; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Zhang, Qingjie; Dravid, Vinayak P; Uher, Ctirad; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Tang, Xinfeng

    2018-06-01

    Several prominent mechanisms for reduction in thermal conductivity have been shown in recent years to improve the figure of merit for thermoelectric materials. Such a mechanism is a hierarchical all-length-scale architecturing that recognizes the role of all microstructure elements, from atomic to nano to microscales, in reducing (lattice) thermal conductivity. In this context, there have been recent claims of remarkably low (lattice) thermal conductivity in Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 that are attributed to seemingly ordinary grain boundary dislocation networks. These high densities of dislocation networks in Bi 0.5 Sb 1.5 Te 3 were generated via unconventional materials processing with excess Te (which formed liquid phase, thereby facilitating sintering), followed by spark plasma sintering under pressure to squeeze out the liquid. We reproduced a practically identical microstructure, following practically identical processing strategies, but with noticeably different (higher) thermal conductivity than that claimed before. We show that the resultant microstructure is anisotropic, with notable difference of thermal and charge transport properties across and along two orthonormal directions, analogous to anisotropic crystals. Thus, we believe that grain boundary dislocation networks are not the primary cause of enhanced ZT through reduction in thermal conductivity. Instead, we can reproduce the purported high ZT through a favorable but impractical and incorrect combination of thermal conductivity measured along the pressing direction of anisotropy while charge transport measured in the direction perpendicular to the anisotropic direction. We believe that our work underscores the need for consistency in charge and thermal transport measurements for unified and verifiable measurements of thermoelectric (and related) properties and phenomena.

  6. SNP Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Louhelainen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The papers published in this Special Issue “SNP arrays” (Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Arrays focus on several perspectives associated with arrays of this type. The range of papers vary from a case report to reviews, thereby targeting wider audiences working in this field. The research focus of SNP arrays is often human cancers but this Issue expands that focus to include areas such as rare conditions, animal breeding and bioinformatics tools. Given the limited scope, the spectrum of papers is nothing short of remarkable and even from a technical point of view these papers will contribute to the field at a general level. Three of the papers published in this Special Issue focus on the use of various SNP array approaches in the analysis of three different cancer types. Two of the papers concentrate on two very different rare conditions, applying the SNP arrays slightly differently. Finally, two other papers evaluate the use of the SNP arrays in the context of genetic analysis of livestock. The findings reported in these papers help to close gaps in the current literature and also to give guidelines for future applications of SNP arrays.

  7. Multiparametric fat-water separation method for fast chemical-shift imaging guidance of thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jonathan S; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Jackson, Edward F; Hazle, John D; Stafford, R Jason; Taylor, Brian A

    2013-10-01

    .980 ± 0.004, and 0.941 ± 0.002 for DSC, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively). Temperature uncertainties, based on PRF uncertainties from a 5 × 5-voxel ROI, were 0.342 and 0.351°C for pure and mixed fat/water regions, respectively. Algorithm speed was tested using 25 × 25-voxel and whole image ROIs containing both fat and water, resulting in average processing times per acquisition of 2.00 ± 0.07 s and 146 ± 1 s, respectively, using uncompiled MATLAB scripts running on a shared CPU server with eight Intel Xeon(TM) E5640 quad-core processors (2.66 GHz, 12 MB cache) and 12 GB RAM. Results from both the mathematical and physical phantom suggest the k-means-based classification algorithm could be useful for rapid, dynamic imaging in an ROI for thermal interventions. Successful separation of fat/water information would aid in reducing errors from the nontemperature sensitive fat PRF, as well as potentially facilitate using fat as an internal reference for PRF shift thermometry when appropriate. Additionally, the T1-W or R2* signals may be used for monitoring temperature in surrounding adipose tissue.

  8. The cryo-thermal therapy eradicated melanoma in mice by eliciting CD4+ T-cell-mediated antitumor memory immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kun; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X

    2017-03-23

    Tumor metastasis is a major concern in tumor therapy. In our previous studies, a novel tumor therapeutic modality of the cryo-thermal therapy has been presented, highlighting its effect on the suppression of distal metastasis and leading to long-term survival in 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. To demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy in other aggressive tumor models and further investigate the mechanism of long-term survival induced, in this study, spontaneous metastatic murine B16F10 melanoma model was used. The cryo-thermal therapy induced regression of implanted melanoma and prolonged long-term survival while inhibiting lung metastasis. It also promoted the activation of CD4 + CD25 - conventional T cells, while reduced the percentage of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the spleen, lung and blood. Furthermore, the cryo-thermal therapy enhanced the cytolytic function of CD8 + T cells and induced differentiation of CD8 + T cells into memory stem T cell (T SCM ), and differentiation of CD4 + T cells into dominant CD4-CTL, Th1 and Tfh subsets in the spleen for 90 days after the treatment. It was found that good therapeutic effect was mainly dependent on CD4 + T cells providing a durable memory antitumor immune response. At the same time, significant increase of serum IFN-γ was also observed to provide an ideal microenvironment of antitumor immunity. Further study showed that the rejection of re-challenge of B16F10 but not GL261 tumor in the treated mice in 45 or 60 days after the treatment, implied a strong systemic and melanoma-specific memory antitumor immunity induced by the treatment. Thus the cryo-thermal therapy would be considered as a new therapeutic strategy to prevent tumor recurrence and metastasis with potential clinical applications in the near future.

  9. Enhanced graphitization of c-CVD grown multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays assisted by removal of encapsulated iron-based phases under thermal treatment in argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boncel, Slawomir; Koziol, Krzysztof K.K.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Annealing of the c-CVD MWCNT arrays toward complete removal of iron nanoparticles. • The ICP-AES protocol established for quantitative analysis of Fe-content in MWCNTs. • The vertical alignment from the as-grown MWCNT arrays found intact after annealing. • A route to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the MWCNT graphene walls. • A foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs. - Abstract: The effect of annealing on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays grown via catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (c-CVD) was studied. The treatment enabled to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the graphene walls of MWCNTs’, which was reflected in Raman spectroscopy by reduction of the I D /I G ratio by 27%. Moreover, the vertical alignment from the as-synthesized nanotube arrays was found intact after annealing. Not only graphitization of the nanotube walls occurred under annealing, but the amount of metal iron-based catalyst residues (interfering with numerous physicochemical properties, and hence applications of MWCNTs) was reduced from 9.00 wt.% (for pristine MWCNTs) to 0.02 wt.% as detected by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This value, established by a new analytical protocol, is the lowest recorded by now for purified c-CVD MWCNTs and, due to operating under atmospheric pressure, medium temperature regime (as for annealing processes), reasonable time-scale and metal residue non-specificity, it could lay the foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs

  10. Enhanced graphitization of c-CVD grown multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays assisted by removal of encapsulated iron-based phases under thermal treatment in argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncel, Slawomir, E-mail: slawomir.boncel@polsl.pl [Department of Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Silesian University of Technology, Krzywoustego 4, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Koziol, Krzysztof K.K., E-mail: kk292@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, CB3 0FS Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Annealing of the c-CVD MWCNT arrays toward complete removal of iron nanoparticles. • The ICP-AES protocol established for quantitative analysis of Fe-content in MWCNTs. • The vertical alignment from the as-grown MWCNT arrays found intact after annealing. • A route to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the MWCNT graphene walls. • A foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs. - Abstract: The effect of annealing on multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays grown via catalytic Chemical Vapour Deposition (c-CVD) was studied. The treatment enabled to decrease number of defects/imperfections in the graphene walls of MWCNTs’, which was reflected in Raman spectroscopy by reduction of the I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio by 27%. Moreover, the vertical alignment from the as-synthesized nanotube arrays was found intact after annealing. Not only graphitization of the nanotube walls occurred under annealing, but the amount of metal iron-based catalyst residues (interfering with numerous physicochemical properties, and hence applications of MWCNTs) was reduced from 9.00 wt.% (for pristine MWCNTs) to 0.02 wt.% as detected by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This value, established by a new analytical protocol, is the lowest recorded by now for purified c-CVD MWCNTs and, due to operating under atmospheric pressure, medium temperature regime (as for annealing processes), reasonable time-scale and metal residue non-specificity, it could lay the foundation for commercial purification of c-CVD derived MWCNTs.

  11. Use of two-dimensional chamber arrays in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment verification; Empleo de matrices bidimensionales de camaras de ionizacion en la verificacion de tratamientos de arcoterapia volumetrica modulada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente Gutierrez, F.; Perez Vara, C.; Prieto Villacorta, M.; Fernandez Ruiz, M. L.; Ruiz Prados, M.

    2013-09-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) requires, as another kind of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), patient-specific QA procedures. This work analyzes the method carried out in our institution for VMAT treatment verification. Our hypothesis is that traditional IMRT QA is valid for VMAT technique. Results obtained for absolute point-dose measurements with ion chamber are presented, as well as comparison with treatment planning system calculations (mean difference of (-0.50 {+-} 0.43)%). In addition, different setups with 2D ion chamber array for dose distributions comparison are analyzed. These detectors are the basis of our QA procedure. Advantages and disadvantages of those setups are shown. The present study includes results for 111 patients treated with VMAT technique from different disease sites. We conclude that 2D ion chamber arrays traditionally used in IMRT QA are valid detectors for rotational techniques if these arrays are used together with additional devices (phantoms, accessories) that allow us to obtain as much information as possible. (Author)

  12. electrode array

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    A geoelectric investigation employing vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the Ajayi - Makinde Two-Electrode array and the ... arrangements used in electrical D.C. resistivity survey. These include ..... Refraction Tomography to Study the.

  13. OPTIONS FOR USE OF APPROPRIATE ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH THERMAL INJURY WITH A HIGH RISK OF THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATED WITH RECURRENT INTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Borisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Patients with major thermal injury require anticoagulant therapy during almost the whole period of the burn disease, forcing the physician to balance constantly between the risk of possible bleeding associated with surgical treatment and the risk of thrombosis development in patients demonstrating a number of factors predisposing to the development of VTС. We report a clinical case of appropriate anticoagulant therapy using the new oral anticoagulants in a patient with a high risk of VTС development and recurrent bleeding from the tumor of the ascending colon. 

  14. Endocrine therapy for breast cancer: Assessing an array of women's treatment experiences and perceptions, their perceived self-efficacy and nonadherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Hans; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Maatman, Gemma A.; Van Geffen, Erica C.G.; Vree, Robbert; Nortier, Johan W.; Van Dijk, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Background Although adjuvant endocrine therapy effectively prevents breast cancer recurrence, nonadherence rates are substantial. We therefore examined associations of women's experiences and perceptions regarding the efficacy, side effects, and practical problems of endocrine therapy with

  15. MO-FG-BRA-09: Quantification of Nanoparticle Heating and Concentration for MR-Guided Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLellan, CJ; Melancon, M; Fuentes, D; Stafford, RJ; Salatan, F; Yang, Q; Hwang, KP

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (npLITT) is a technique that utilizes tumor localized optically activated nanoparticles to increase the conformality of laser ablation procedures. Temperatures in these procedures are dependent on the particle concentration which generally cannot be measured noninvasively prior to therapy. In this work we attempt to quantify particle concentration in vivo by estimating the increase in R2* relaxation induced by bifunctional magnetic resonance (MR)-visible gold-based nanoparticles (SPIO@Au) and relate it to the temperature increase observed during real time MR temperature imaging (MRTI) of laser ablation. Methods: SPIO@Au nanoparticles (90nm) were synthesized containing a silica-iron core (for MR visibility via R2*) and gold shell (for near-infrared absorption). High resolution R2* maps were acquired before and after injecting four different particle concentrations (saline,1e10, 5e10, and 10e10 particles/mL) into HN5 flank xenografts. Tumors were monitored using MRTI during treatment with an interstitial fiber. (1 watt, 808 nm, 3 minutes) Results: The maximum temperature within the tumors increased linearly with concentration of injected particles, reaching 34.0, 37.6, 45.8, and 55.4 "0C for saline, 1e10, 5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively (R2=.994). The highest temperatures occur at the injection site rather than the fiber, confirming that SPIO@Au nanoparticles are the primary absorber. The differences between the median R2* measured at the injection site and the rest of the tumor were −6, 134, 111, 156 s-1 for the saline,1e10,5e10 and 10e10 particles/mL injections, respectively. This R2* change is consistent with the measured relaxivity for the 1e10 particles/mL injection but does not maintain linearity at higher concentrations. Conclusion: Bifunctional SPIO@Au nanoparticles are a promising technology for providing noninvasive estimates of particle concentration via MRI and

  16. SU-F-J-215: Non-Thermal Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Combined with 5-Aminolevulinic Acid: An in Vivo Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: It has recently been shown that non-thermal pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has a cell-killing effect. The purpose of the study is to investigate the sonosensitizing effect of 5-Aminolevulinic Acid (5-ALA) in non-thermal pHIFU cancer therapy. Methods: FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the flanks of nude mice. After one to two weeks, the tumors reached the volume of 112 ± 8 mm3 and were assigned randomly into a non-thermal pHIFU group (n=9) and a non-thermal sonodynamic therapy (pHIFU after 5-ALA administration) group (n=7). The pHIFU treatments (parameters: 1 MHz frequency; 25 W acoustic power; 0.1 duty cycle; 60 seconds duration) were delivered using an InSightec ExAblate 2000 system with a GE Signa 1.5T MR scanner. The mice in the non-thermal sonodynamic group received 5-ALA tail-vein injection 4 hours prior to the pHIFU treatment. The tumor growth was monitored using the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT system. Results: The tumors in this study grew very aggressively and about 60% of the tumors in this study developed ulcerations at various stages. Tumor growth delay after treatments was observed by comparing the treated (n=9 in pHIFU group; n=7 in sonodynamic group) and untreated tumors (n=17). However, no statistically significant differences were found between the non-thermal pHIFU and non-thermal sonodynamic group. The mean normalized tumor volume of the untreated tumors on Day 7 after their first CT scans was 7.05 ± 0.54, while the normalized volume of the treated tumors on Day 7 after treatment was 5.89 ± 0.79 and 6.27 ± 0.47 for the sonodynamic group and pHIFU group, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, no significant sonosensitizing effects of 5-ALA were obtained on aggressive FaDu tumors despite apparent tumor growth delay in some mice treated with non-thermal sonodynamic therapy.

  17. In vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of gold nanoparticles-mediated photo-thermal therapy versus 5-fluorouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, Iman E.; Abdel Gaber, Sara A.; Bhatt, Samarth; Liehr, Thomas; Glei, Michael; El-Tayeb, Tarek A.; Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud H.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates tumour cell-killing efficacy of metallic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-mediated photo-thermal therapy (PTT) in comparison to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a standard chemotherapeutic drug. It also focuses on the possible genetic abnormalities of both drugs in normal blood lymphocytes. Both 5-FU and light-activated spherical AuNPs of 15± nm diameter were used to target MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Alkaline comet assay, standard karyotyping and multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization were applied in order to investigate the respective possible genotoxic and mutagenic side effects that might result from the application of each therapeutic modality. Results showed that the LC25 of AuNPs-mediated PTT was achieved at a concentration of 100 µM for 12-h incubation and exposure to light energy of 50 J/cm 2 , while the same cytotoxic effect was obtained by incubating the MCF-7 cells with the same concentration of the chemotherapeutic drug 5-FU for 24 h. On the other hand, AuNPs showed insignificant genotoxic effect of DNA damage represented by 4.6 % in comparison to 18.58 % exerted by 5-FU. The chromosomal studies resulted in normal karyotypes for cells treated with AuNPs-mediated PTT, while those treated with 5-FU showed several types of numerical as well as structural chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, compared to 5-FU, light-activated AuNPs-mediated PTT provides considerable efficacy in breast cancer cells killing with no genetic side effects under the proposed experimental conditions

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of gold nanoparticles-mediated photo-thermal therapy versus 5-fluorouracil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, Iman E., E-mail: iman.gomaa@guc.edu.eg; Abdel Gaber, Sara A. [German University in Cairo (GUC), Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Egypt); Bhatt, Samarth; Liehr, Thomas [Friedrich Schiller University, Jena University Hospital, Institute of Human Genetics (Germany); Glei, Michael [Friedrich Schiller University, Faculty of Biology and Pharmacy, Institute of Nutrition (Germany); El-Tayeb, Tarek A. [Cairo University, The National Institute for Laser Enhanced Sciences (NILES) (Egypt); Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud H. [German University in Cairo (GUC), Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology (Egypt)

    2015-02-15

    This study evaluates tumour cell-killing efficacy of metallic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-mediated photo-thermal therapy (PTT) in comparison to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a standard chemotherapeutic drug. It also focuses on the possible genetic abnormalities of both drugs in normal blood lymphocytes. Both 5-FU and light-activated spherical AuNPs of 15± nm diameter were used to target MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Alkaline comet assay, standard karyotyping and multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization were applied in order to investigate the respective possible genotoxic and mutagenic side effects that might result from the application of each therapeutic modality. Results showed that the LC25 of AuNPs-mediated PTT was achieved at a concentration of 100 µM for 12-h incubation and exposure to light energy of 50 J/cm{sup 2}, while the same cytotoxic effect was obtained by incubating the MCF-7 cells with the same concentration of the chemotherapeutic drug 5-FU for 24 h. On the other hand, AuNPs showed insignificant genotoxic effect of DNA damage represented by 4.6 % in comparison to 18.58 % exerted by 5-FU. The chromosomal studies resulted in normal karyotypes for cells treated with AuNPs-mediated PTT, while those treated with 5-FU showed several types of numerical as well as structural chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, compared to 5-FU, light-activated AuNPs-mediated PTT provides considerable efficacy in breast cancer cells killing with no genetic side effects under the proposed experimental conditions.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused laser interstitial thermal therapy for subinsular metastatic adenocarcinoma: technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Murphy, Rory K J; Dacey, Ralph G; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2012-06-01

    To describe the novel use of the AutoLITT System (Monteris Medical, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) for focused laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and stereotactic image guidance for the treatment of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the left insula. The patient was a 61-year-old right-handed man with a history of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the colon. He had previously undergone resection of multiple lesions, Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and whole-brain radiation. Despite treatment of a left insular tumor, serial imaging revealed that the lesion continued to enlarge. Given the refractory nature of this tumor to radiation and the deep-seated location, the patient elected to undergo LITT treatment. The center of the lesion and entry point on the scalp were identified with STEALTH (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee) image-guided navigation. The AXiiiS Stereotactic Miniframe (Monteris Medical) for the LITT system was secured onto the skull, and a trajectory was defined to achieve access to the centroid of the tumor. After a burr hole was made, a gadolinium template probe was inserted into the AXiiiS base. The trajectory was confirmed via an intraoperative MRI, and the LITT probe driver was attached to the base and CO2-cooled, side-firing laser LITT probe. The laser was activated and thermometry images were obtained. Two trajectories, posteromedial and anterolateral, produced satisfactory tumor ablation. LITT with intraoperative MRI and stereotactic image guidance is a newly available, minimally invasive, and therapeutically viable technique for the treatment of deep seated brain tumors.

  20. Filter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  1. SCORE-EVET: a computer code for the multidimensional transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear fuel rod arrays. [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, R. L.; Lords, L. V.; Kiser, D. M.

    1978-02-01

    The SCORE-EVET code was developed to study multidimensional transient fluid flow in nuclear reactor fuel rod arrays. The conservation equations used were derived by volume averaging the transient compressible three-dimensional local continuum equations in Cartesian coordinates. No assumptions associated with subchannel flow have been incorporated into the derivation of the conservation equations. In addition to the three-dimensional fluid flow equations, the SCORE-EVET code ocntains: (a) a one-dimensional steady state solution scheme to initialize the flow field, (b) steady state and transient fuel rod conduction models, and (c) comprehensive correlation packages to describe fluid-to-fuel rod interfacial energy and momentum exchange. Velocity and pressure boundary conditions can be specified as a function of time and space to model reactor transient conditions such as a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) or flow blockage.

  2. In vitro radiobiological evaluation of selective killing effects of 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine.HCl in the thermal neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihashi, M.; Ueda, M.; Hayashibe, K.; Hatta, S.; Tsuji, M.; Mishima, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kanda, K.

    1985-01-01

    In order to clarify the specific affinity of 10 B 1 -p-boronophenylalanine.HCl ( 10 B 1 -BPA) to melanoma cells, the killing effects of 10 B 1 -BPA in the thermal neutron capture treatment on both cultured melanotic and amelanotic melanoma cells were compared with those on non-melanoma cells, such as Alexander cells, HeLa cells and normal human fibroblasts. Cells in the plateau phase cultured in the usual medium for 4-7 days were incubated with the medium containing 50 μg/ml 10 B 1 -BPA for 20 hours until 2 hours before thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation, the number of colonies consisting of more than 50 cells was counted to obtain the dose-survival curves. The melanotic cells pre-incubated with 10 B 1 -BPA had more enhanced killing sensitivity to thermal neutron irradiation than amelanotic melanoma cells pre-incubated similarly with 10 B 1 -BPA. 10 B 1 -BPA pre-incubation had no enhanced killing effects on Alexander cells, but had slightly enhanced killing effects on HeLa cells. These results indicate that 10 B 1 -BPA could be incorporated by a specific uptake mechanism of melanoma cells and accumulated within melanotic melanoma cells and that 10 B 1 -BPA at present could be the best chemical for the thermal neutron capture therapy of human malignant melanoma. (Namekawa, K.)

  3. A test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator for neutron capture therapy - estimation of neutron energy spectrum by simulation calculations and TOF experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Kobayashi, Katsuhei

    1999-01-01

    In order to clarify the irradiation characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons and the feasibility of a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy, a 'test-type' hyper-thermal neutron generator was designed and made. Graphite of 6 cm thickness and 21 cm diameter was selected as the high temperature scatterer. The scatterer is heated up to 1200 deg. C maximum using molybdenum heaters. The radiation heat is shielded by reflectors of molybdenum and stainless steel. The temperature is measured using three R-type thermo-couples and controlled by a program controller. The total thickness of the generator is designed to be as thin as possible, 20 cm in maximum, in the standing point of the neutron beam intensity. The thermal stability, controllability and safety of the generator at high temperature employment were confirmed by the heating tests. As one of the experiments for the characteristics estimation, the neutron energy spectrum dependent on the scatterer temperature was measured by the TOF (time of flight) method using the LINAC neutron generator. The estimations by simulation calculations were also performed. From the experiment and calculation results, it was confirmed that the neutron temperature shifted higher as the scatterer temperature was higher. The prospect of the feasibility of the 'hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for NCT' was opened from the estimation results of the generator characteristics by the simulation calculations and experiments

  4. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  5. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The configuration of a tomographic array in which the object can rotate about its axis is described. The X-ray detector is a cylindrical screen perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The X-ray source has a line-shaped focus coinciding with the axis of rotation. The beam is fan-shaped with one side of this fan lying along the axis of rotation. The detector screen is placed inside an X-ray image multiplier tube

  6. Tomographic array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A tomographic array with the following characteristics is described. An X-ray screen serving as detector is placed before a photomultiplier tube which itself is placed in front of a television camera connected to a set of image processors. The detector is concave towards the source and is replacable. Different images of the object are obtained simultaneously. Optical fibers and lenses are used for transmission within the system

  7. Design of patient-specific focused ultrasound arrays for non-invasive brain therapy with increased trans-skull transmission and steering range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alec; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-09-01

    The use of a phased array of ultrasound transducer elements to sonicate through the skull has opened the way for new treatments and the delivery of therapeutics beyond the blood-brain barrier. The limited steering range of current clinical devices, particularly at higher frequencies, limits the regions of the brain that are considered treatable by ultrasound. A new array design is introduced that allows for high levels of beam steering and increased transmission throughout the brain. These improvements are achieved using concave transducers normal to the outer-skull surface in a patient-specific configuration to target within the skull, so that the far-field of each beam is within the brain. It is shown that by using pulsed ultrasound waves timed to arrive in-phase at the desired target, sufficient levels of acoustic energy are delivered for blood-brain barrier opening throughout the brain.

  8. Trial production of hyper-thermal neutron generator for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) and its radiation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Toru

    1999-01-01

    In NCT, it was at first important to give a cancer portion to radiation dose required for its recovery. By finding out that whole cross-section of water comprising of a living body decreased monotonously with increase of neutron energy from about 100 barn against thermal neutron, became about 40 barn at about 0.5 eV and kept constant to 40 barn till at about 100 eV, application of thermal neutron shifted to higher temperature side, called Hyper thermal neutron, to NCT is proposed. The Hyper thermal neutron radiation can be expected to have similar controllability to that of the thermal neutron radiation. In 1977 fiscal year, a trial Hyper thermal neutron generator was produced on a base of up-to-date investigation results. As a part of property evaluation of the generator, evaluation of energy spectra in the Hyper thermal neutron generated at LINAC by TOF was conducted to confirm shift of the spectra to high temperature side. And, a Fantom experiment at KUR heavy water neutron radiation facility was also conducted to confirm effect of improvement in deep portion dose distribution. (G.K.)

  9. Dosimetry boron neutron capture therapy in liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) by means of MCNP-code with neutron source from thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irhas; Andang Widi Harto; Yohannes Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using physics principle when B 10 (Boron-10) irradiated by low energy neutron (thermal neutron). Boron and thermal neutron reaction produced B 11m (Boron-11m) (t 1/2 =10 -2 s). B 11m decay emitted alpha, Li 7 (Lithium-7) particle and gamma ray. Irradiated time needed to ensure cancer dose enough. Liver cancer was primary malignant who located in liver (Hepatocellular carcinoma). Malignant in liver were different to metastatic from Breast, Colon Cancer, and the other. This condition was Metastatic Liver Cancer. Monte Carlo method used by Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Software. Probabilistic approach used for probability of interaction occurred and record refers to characteristic of particle and material. In this case, thermal neutron produced by model of Collimated Thermal Column Kartini Research Nuclear Reactor, Yogyakarta. Modelling organ and source used liver organ that contain of cancer tissue and research reactor. Variation of boron concentration was 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 47 µg/g cancers. Output of MCNP calculation were neutron scattering dose, gamma ray dose and neutron flux from reactor. Neutron flux used to calculate alpha, proton and gamma ray dose from interaction of tissue material and thermal neutron. Variation of boron concentration result dose rate to every variation were 0,059; 0,072; 0,084; 0,098; 0.108; 0,12; 0,125 Gy/sec. Irradiation time who need to every concentration were 841,5 see (14 min 1 sec); 696,07 sec(11 min 36 sec); 593.11 sec (9 min 53 sec); 461,35 sec (8 min 30 sec); 461,238 sec (7 min 41 sec); 414,23 sec (6 min 54 sec); 398,38 sec (6 min 38 sec). Irradiating time could shortly when boron concentration more high. (author)

  10. Measuring Millimeter Wave of Cold Atmospheric Plasma Array by a Novel Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryon Eckert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An unexplained repulsive force occasionally observed during non-thermal plasma treatment of large infections may point the way to an efficient mechanism for characterizing biofield energy. Ambient pressure air plasma in non-thermal equilibrium creates areas of localized population inversion, causing spontaneous emission at magnetic dipole rotational resonance lines. For O2, many of these lines occur in the 60 GHz frequency range. This experiment examines a possible link between the fine resonance frequencies of oxygen in the 60 GHz region, and the therapeutic frequencies used in Russian non-thermal EHF therapy. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a plasma array for biological torsion field characterization. An array of several hundred non-thermal plasma plumes are placed directly in front of a circular horn. A switchable circular polarizer is used to select left hand circular, linear or right hand circular polarization. A low noise frequency converter allows a noise temperature of less than 1150 K. A frequency scan and averaging algorithm is developed to characterize noise temperature versus frequency, comparing signal and noise levels between plasma on and plasma off, and switching polarization sense. An experimental setup is proposed as a proof of concept for detecting signals from the plasma array, while a practical laboratory tool is also proposed.

  11. Coupling in reflector arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1968-01-01

    In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present communic......In order to reduce the space occupied by a reflector array, it is desirable to arrange the array antennas as close to each other as possible; however, in this case coupling between the array antennas will reduce the reflecting properties of the reflector array. The purpose of the present...

  12. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  13. Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) and adjuvant fractionated radiotherapeutic multimodal therapy for intracranial malignant glioma in a canine patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, P A; Pancotto, T; Rossmeisl, J H; Henao-Guerrero, N; Gustafson, N R; Daniel, G B; Robertson, J L; Ellis, T L; Davalos, R V

    2011-02-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (N-TIRE) has shown promise as an ablative therapy for a variety of soft-tissue neoplasms. Here we describe the therapeutic planning aspects and first clinical application of N-TIRE for the treatment of an inoperable, spontaneous malignant intracranial glioma in a canine patient. The N-TIRE ablation was performed safely, effectively reduced the tumor volume and associated intracranial hypertension, and provided sufficient improvement in neurological function of the patient to safely undergo adjunctive fractionated radiotherapy (RT) according to current standards of care. Complete remission was achieved based on serial magnetic resonance imaging examinations of the brain, although progressive radiation encephalopathy resulted in the death of the dog 149 days after N-TIRE therapy. The length of survival of this patient was comparable to dogs with intracranial tumors treated via standard excisional surgery and adjunctive fractionated external beam RT. Our results illustrate the potential benefits of N-TIRE for in vivo ablation of undesirable brain tissue, especially when traditional methods of cytoreductive surgery are not possible or ideal, and highlight the potential radiosensitizing effects of N-TIRE on the brain.

  14. Estrogen therapy offsets thermal impairment of vitellogenesis, but not zonagenesis, in maiden spawning female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelli Anderson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In female Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar, exposure to warm summer temperatures causes a reduction in plasma 17β-estradiol (E2, which impairs downstream vitellogenesis and zonagenesis, and reduces egg fertility and embryo survival. The aim of the present study was to determine whether E2-treatment could offset thermal impairment of endocrine function and maintain egg quality in maiden (first-time-spawning S. salar reared at 22 °C. Treatment with E2 at 22 °C stimulated vitellogenin (vtg gene expression and subsequent protein synthesis which promoted oocyte growth and increased egg size relative to untreated fish at 14 and 22 °C. However, E2-treatment at 22 °C was not associated with an increase in egg fertility and embryo survival relative to untreated fish at 22 °C, despite the positive effects of E2-treatment on vitellogenesis and oocyte growth. As there was no evidence to suggest that the estrogen receptor alpha expression was suppressed by high temperature, this could be due to the lack of stimulation on zonagenesis by E2-treatment observed at high temperature during oocyte development. Our results demonstrate that treatment with E2 is not able to maintain zonagenesis or egg quality in maiden S. salar at high temperature, even when vtg gene expression, protein synthesis and subsequent oocyte growth is promoted. This implies that the mechanisms regulating zonagenesis, but not vitellogenesis are impaired at elevated temperature in female S. salar broodstock, and highlights the remarkable complexity of thermally induced endocrine disruption in fish.

  15. Flat-plate photovoltaic array design optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented which integrates the results of specific studies in the areas of photovoltaic structural design optimization, optimization of array series/parallel circuit design, thermal design optimization, and optimization of environmental protection features. The analysis is based on minimizing the total photovoltaic system life-cycle energy cost including repair and replacement of failed cells and modules. This approach is shown to be a useful technique for array optimization, particularly when time-dependent parameters such as array degradation and maintenance are involved.

  16. Platinum nanoparticles: a non-toxic, effective and thermally stable alternative plasmonic material for cancer therapy and bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Akbar; Klingberg, Henrik; Jauffred, Liselotte; Kjær, Andreas; Bendix, Poul Martin; Oddershede, Lene B

    2018-05-17

    Absorption of near infrared (NIR) light by metallic nanoparticles can cause extreme heating and is of interest for instance in cancer treatment since NIR light has a relatively large penetration depth into biological tissue. Here, we quantify the extraordinary thermoplasmonic properties of platinum nanoparticles and demonstrate their efficiency in photothermal cancer therapy. Although platinum nanoparticles are extensively used for catalysis, they are much overlooked in a biological context. Via direct measurements based on a biological matrix we show that individual irradiated platinum nanoparticles with diameters of 50-70 nm can easily reach surface temperatures up to 900 K. In contrast to gold nanoshells, which are often used for photothermal purposes, we demonstrate that the platinum particles remain stable at these extreme temperatures. The experiments are paralleled by finite element modeling confirming the experimental results and establishing a theoretical understanding of the particles' thermoplasmonic properties. At extreme temperatures it is likely that a vapor layer will form around the plasmonic particle, and we show this scenario to be consistent with direct measurements and simulations. Viability studies demonstrate that platinum nanoparticles themselves are non-toxic at therapeutically relevant concentrations, however, upon laser irradiation we show that they efficiently kill human cancer cells. Therefore, platinum nanoparticles are highly promising candidates for thermoplasmonic applications in the life sciences, in nano-medicine, and for bio-medical engineering.

  17. Combined Therapies for the Treatment of Technically Unresectable Liver Malignancies: Bland Embolization and Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation within the Same Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Orgera, Gianluigi; Chiappa, Antonio; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Zampino, Maria Giulia; Orsi, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study evaluated the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of combining transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA) in a single session for the treatment of technically unresectable liver-only malignancies. Methods: From May 2006 to January 2011, a total of 30 patients affected by liver metastases with single or multiple unresectable liver-only lesions underwent a combined treatment with TAE followed by RFA in the same session, for a total of 36 treated lesions. Patients were extrapolated from a cohort of patients discussed within the weekly institutional tumor board. TAE was performed by using 100 μm microspheres; RFA was performed immediately after TAE by positioning the electrode needle via ultrasound and/or computed tomographic guidance. Local tumor responses and procedure-related complications were evaluated. Results: Completion of both procedures was obtained in all patients for all 36 lesions. Liver lesions had a maximum axial diameter ranging 16–59 mm. Postintervention unenhanced ablated areas ranged 28–104 mm in maximum axial diameter. Safety margins ranged 1–30.5 mm. Complete response, defined as complete devascularization at computed tomography, was obtained in all treated lesions for a maximum period of 12 months. Tumor relapse was observed in one patient at 12 months. Sixteen patients developed new liver lesions or progressive systemic disease during follow-up. Nine patients were still disease-free. Seven patients died as a result of systemic progressive disease. One major treatment-related complication was observed. Conclusions: In patients with technically unresectable liver-only malignancies, single-session combined TAE-RFA is an effective and safe treatment.

  18. Polarization measurements made on LFRA and OASIS emitter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geske, Jon; Sparkman, Kevin; Oleson, Jim; Laveigne, Joe; Sieglinger, Breck; Marlow, Steve; Lowry, Heard; Burns, James

    2008-04-01

    Polarization is increasingly being considered as a method of discrimination in passive sensing applications. In this paper the degree of polarization of the thermal emission from the emitter arrays of two new Santa Barbara Infrared (SBIR) micro-bolometer resistor array scene projectors was characterized at ambient temperature and at 77 K. The emitter arrays characterized were from the Large Format Resistive Array (LFRA) and the Optimized Arrays for Space-Background Infrared Simulation (OASIS) scene projectors. This paper reports the results of this testing.

  19. A CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF NEUTRON COLLIMATOR IN THE THERMAL COLUMN OF KARTINI RESEARCH REACTOR FOR IN VITRO AND IN VIVO TEST OF BORON NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fauziah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to design a collimator which results in epithermal neutron beam for IN VITRO and IN VIVO of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT at the Kartini research reactor by means of Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP codes. Reactor within 100 kW of thermal power was used as the neutron source. The design criteria were based on recommendation from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. All materials used were varied in size, according to the value of mean free path for each material. MCNP simulations indicated that by using 5 cm thick of Ni as collimator wall, 60 cm thick of Al as moderator, 15 cm thick of 60Ni as filter, 2 cm thick of Bi as γ-ray shielding, 3 cm thick of 6Li2CO3-polyethylene as beam delimiter, with 1 to 5 cm varied aperture size, epithermal neutron beam with maximum flux of 7.65 x 108 n.cm-2.s-1 could be produced. The beam has minimum fast neutron and γ-ray components of, respectively, 1.76 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1 and 1.32 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, minimum thermal neutron per epithermal neutron ratio of 0.008, and maximum directionality of 0.73. It did not fully pass the IAEA’s criteria, since the epithermal neutron flux was below the recommended value, 1.0 x 109 n.cm-2.s-1. Nonetheless, it was still usable with epithermal neutron flux exceeding 5.0 x 108 n.cm-2.s-1. When it was assumed that the graphite inside the thermal column was not discharged but only the part which was going to be replaced by the collimator, the performance of the collimator became better within the positive effect from the surrounding graphite that the beam resulted passed all criteria with epithermal neutron flux up to 1.68 x 109 n.cm-2.s-1. Keywords: design, collimator, epithermal neutron beam, BNCT, MCNP, criteria   Telah dilakukan penelitian tentang desain kolimator yang menghasilkan radiasi netron epitermal untuk uji in vitro dan in vivo pada Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT di Reaktor Riset Kartini dengan menggunakan program Monte

  20. Micromachined two dimensional resistor arrays for determination of gas parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, J.J.J.; Verwey, Willem B.; Dijkstra, Mindert; Dijkstra, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    A resistive sensor array is presented for two dimensional temperature distribution measurements in a micromachined flow channel. This allows simultaneous measurement of flow velocity and fluid parameters, like thermal conductivity, diffusion coefficient and viscosity. More general advantages of

  1. Fiber Laser Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simpson, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    ...., field-dependent, loss within the coupled laser array. During this program, Jaycor focused on the construction and use of an experimental apparatus that can be used to investigate the coherent combination of an array of fiber lasers...

  2. Next generation thermal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marche, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    The best design of high performance thermal imagers for the 1990s will use horizontal quasi-linear arrays with focal plane processing associated with a simple vertical mechanical scanner. These imagers will have performance that is greatly improved compared to that of present-day devices (50 to 100 percent range and resolution improvement). 5 references

  3. Transition edge sensor series array bolometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, J, E-mail: joern.beyer@ptb.d [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestrasse 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A transition edge sensor series array (TES-SA) is an array of identical TESs that are connected in series by low-inductance superconducting wiring. The array elements are equally and well thermally coupled to the absorber and respond to changes in the absorber temperature in synchronization. The TES-SA total resistance increases compared to a single TES while the shape of the superconducting transition is preserved. We are developing a TES-SA with a large number, hundreds to thousands, of array elements with the goal of enabling the readout of a TES-based bolometer operated at 4.2 K with a semiconductor-based amplifier located at room temperature. The noise and dynamic performance of a TES-SA bolometer based on a niobium/aluminum bilayer is analyzed. It is shown that stable readout of the bolometer with a low-noise transimpedance amplifier is feasible.

  4. Transition edge sensor series array bolometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, J

    2010-01-01

    A transition edge sensor series array (TES-SA) is an array of identical TESs that are connected in series by low-inductance superconducting wiring. The array elements are equally and well thermally coupled to the absorber and respond to changes in the absorber temperature in synchronization. The TES-SA total resistance increases compared to a single TES while the shape of the superconducting transition is preserved. We are developing a TES-SA with a large number, hundreds to thousands, of array elements with the goal of enabling the readout of a TES-based bolometer operated at 4.2 K with a semiconductor-based amplifier located at room temperature. The noise and dynamic performance of a TES-SA bolometer based on a niobium/aluminum bilayer is analyzed. It is shown that stable readout of the bolometer with a low-noise transimpedance amplifier is feasible.

  5. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  6. Thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional graphene antidot arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yonghong; Liang, Qi-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Wu, Chang-Qin; Li, Baowen

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional (1D) graphene antidot arrays by nonequilibrium Green's function method. We show that by introducing antidots to the pristine graphene nanoribbon the thermal conductance can be reduced greatly while keeping the power factor still high, thus leading to an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). Our numerical results indicate that ZT values of 1D antidot graphene arrays can be up to unity, which means the 1D graphene antidot arrays may be promising for thermoelectric applications. -- Highlights: ► We study thermoelectric properties of one-dimensional (1D) graphene antidot arrays. ► Thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1D antidot arrays can exceed unity. ► ZT of 1D antidot arrays is larger than that of two-dimensional arrays.

  7. Development of FIR arrays with integrating amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Erick T.

    1988-08-01

    The development of optimized photoconductor arrays suitable for far infrared space astronomical applications are described. Although the primary impetus is the production of a 16 by 16 element Ge:Ga demonstration array for SIRTF, the extension of this technology to Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is considered. The optimization of Ge:Ga and Ge:Be photoconductor materials is discussed. In collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, measurements of FIR photoconductors with quantum efficiencies greater than 20 percent at 100 micrometers, and dark currents below 300 electrons/s are presented. Integrating J-FET amplifier technology is discussed. The current generation of integrating amplifiers has a demonstrated read noise of less than 20 electrons for an integration time of 100 s. The design is shown for a stackable 16 x n Ge:Ga array that utilizes a 16-channel monolithic version of the J-FET integrator. A part of the design is the use of a thin, thermally insulating substrate that allows the electronics to operate at the optimum temperature of 50 K while maintaining thermal and optical isolation from the detectors at 2 K. The power dissipation for the array is less than 16 mW. The array design may particularly be applicable to high resolution imaging spectrometers for LDR.

  8. Silicon monolithic microchannel-cooled laser diode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skidmore, J. A.; Freitas, B. L.; Crawford, J.; Satariano, J.; Utterback, E.; DiMercurio, L.; Cutter, K.; Sutton, S.

    2000-01-01

    A monolithic microchannel-cooled laser diode array is demonstrated that allows multiple diode-bar mounting with negligible thermal cross talk. The heat sink comprises two main components: a wet-etched Si layer that is anodically bonded to a machined glass block. The continuous wave (cw) thermal resistance of the 10 bar diode array is 0.032 degree sign C/W, which matches the performance of discrete microchannel-cooled arrays. Up to 1.5 kW/cm 2 is achieved cw at an emission wavelength of ∼808 nm. Collimation of a diode array using a monolithic lens frame produced a 7.5 mrad divergence angle by a single active alignment. This diode array offers high average power/brightness in a simple, rugged, scalable architecture that is suitable for large two-dimensional areas. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  9. A Method of Estimating Pressure and Intensity Distributions of Multielement Phased Array High Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Field at Full Power Using a Needle Hydrophone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Ying; Shen Guofeng; Bai Jingfeng; Chen Yazhu

    2011-01-01

    The pressure and intensity distribution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields at full power are critical for predicting heating patterns and ensuring safety of the therapy. With the limitations of maximum pressure at the hydrophone and damage from cavitation or thermal effects, it is hard to measure pressure and intensity directly when HIFU is at full power. HIFU-phased arrays are usually composed of large numbers of small elements and the sound power radiated from some of them at full power is measureable using a hydrophone, we grouped them based on the limitation of maximum permissible pressure at the hydrophone and the characteristics of the element arrangement in the array. Then sound field measurement of the group was carried out at full power level. Using the acoustic coherence principle, the pressure and intensity distribution of the array at full power level can be calculated from corresponding values from the groups. With this method, computer simulations and sound field measurement of a 65-element concentric distributed phased array was carried out. The simulation results demonstrate theoretically the feasibility of this method. Measurements on the 65-element phased array also verify the effectiveness of this method for estimating the pressure and intensity distribution of phased array at full power level using a needle hydrophone.

  10. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  11. Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev Hansen, J.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    In this review we intend to cover recent work involving arrays of Josephson junctions. The work on such arrays falls naturally into three main areas of interest: 1. Technical applications of Josephson junction arrays for high-frequency devices. 2. Experimental studies of 2-D model systems (Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition, commensurate-incommensurate transition in frustrated (flux) lattices). 3. Investigations of phenomena associated with non-equilibrium superconductivity in and around Josephson junctions (with high current density). (orig./BUD)

  12. Phased-array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1985-02-01

    The operating principles, technology, and applications of phased-array radars are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams and photographs. Consideration is given to the antenna elements, circuitry for time delays, phase shifters, pulse coding and compression, and hybrid radars combining phased arrays with lenses to alter the beam characteristics. The capabilities and typical hardware of phased arrays are shown using the US military systems COBRA DANE and PAVE PAWS as examples.

  13. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water reflected (i.e., surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established. When evaluating arrays, it has become more common for analysts to use calculations to demonstrate the safety of the array configuration. In performing these calculations, the analyst has considerable freedom concerning the assumptions made for modeling the reflection of the array. Considerations are given for the physical layout of the array with little or no discussion (or demonstration) of what conditions are bounded by the assumed reflection conditions. For example, an array may be generically evaluated by placing it in a corner of a room in which the opposing walls are far away. Typically, it is believed that complete flooding of the room is incredible, so the array is evaluated for various levels of water mist interspersed among array containers. This paper discusses some assumptions that are made regarding storage array reflection

  14. The EUROBALL array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi Alvarez, C.

    1998-01-01

    The quality of the multidetector array EUROBALL is described, with emphasis on the history and formal organization of the related European collaboration. The detector layout is presented together with the electronics and Data Acquisition capabilities. The status of the instrument, its performances and the main features of some recently developed ancillary detectors will also be described. The EUROBALL array is operational in Legnaro National Laboratory (Italy) since April 1997 and is expected to run up to November 1998. The array represents a significant improvement in detector efficiency and sensitivity with respect to the previous generation of multidetector arrays

  15. Rectenna array measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The measured performance characteristics of a rectenna array are reviewed and compared to the performance of a single element. It is shown that the performance may be extrapolated from the individual element to that of the collection of elements. Techniques for current and voltage combining were demonstrated. The array performance as a function of various operating parameters is characterized and techniques for overvoltage protection and automatic fault clearing in the array demonstrated. A method for detecting failed elements also exists. Instrumentation for deriving performance effectiveness is described. Measured harmonic radiation patterns and fundamental frequency scattered patterns for a low level illumination rectenna array are presented.

  16. Arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual; Sales, Salvador; Pastor, Daniel; Ortega, Beatriz; Martinez, Alfonso

    2003-02-01

    We present a novel device, an arrayed waveguide Sagnac interferometer, that combines the flexibility of arrayed waveguides and the wide application range of fiber or integrated optics Sagnac loops. We form the device by closing an array of wavelength-selective light paths provided by two arrayed waveguides with a single 2 x 2 coupler in a Sagnac configuration. The equations that describe the device's operation in general conditions are derived. A preliminary experimental demonstration is provided of a fiber prototype in passive operation that shows good agreement with the expected theoretical performance. Potential applications of the device in nonlinear operation are outlined and discussed.

  17. Focal plane array with modular pixel array components for scalability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Randolph R; Campbell, David V; Shinde, Subhash L; Rienstra, Jeffrey L; Serkland, Darwin K; Holmes, Michael L

    2014-12-09

    A modular, scalable focal plane array is provided as an array of integrated circuit dice, wherein each die includes a given amount of modular pixel array circuitry. The array of dice effectively multiplies the amount of modular pixel array circuitry to produce a larger pixel array without increasing die size. Desired pixel pitch across the enlarged pixel array is preserved by forming die stacks with each pixel array circuitry die stacked on a separate die that contains the corresponding signal processing circuitry. Techniques for die stack interconnections and die stack placement are implemented to ensure that the desired pixel pitch is preserved across the enlarged pixel array.

  18. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  19. ISS Solar Array Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, James P.; Martin, Keith D.; Thomas, Justin R.; Caro, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Solar Array Management (SAM) software toolset provides the capabilities necessary to operate a spacecraft with complex solar array constraints. It monitors spacecraft telemetry and provides interpretations of solar array constraint data in an intuitive manner. The toolset provides extensive situational awareness to ensure mission success by analyzing power generation needs, array motion constraints, and structural loading situations. The software suite consists of several components including samCS (constraint set selector), samShadyTimers (array shadowing timers), samWin (visualization GUI), samLock (array motion constraint computation), and samJet (attitude control system configuration selector). It provides high availability and uptime for extended and continuous mission support. It is able to support two-degrees-of-freedom (DOF) array positioning and supports up to ten simultaneous constraints with intuitive 1D and 2D decision support visualizations of constraint data. Display synchronization is enabled across a networked control center and multiple methods for constraint data interpolation are supported. Use of this software toolset increases flight safety, reduces mission support effort, optimizes solar array operation for achieving mission goals, and has run for weeks at a time without issues. The SAM toolset is currently used in ISS real-time mission operations.

  20. Solar panels offer array of hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The installation of what is believed to be the largest array of solar thermal panels currently in use at a UK NHS hospital has taken place at an ideal time for the facility in question, Harlow's Princess Alexandra Hospital, with the hospital's gas bill alone having risen by 153% over the past nine months thanks to soaring energy prices, and the estates department keen to mitigate the effects in any way possible. Jonathan Baillie reports.

  1. Sensor array signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Naidu, Prabhakar S

    2009-01-01

    Chapter One: An Overview of Wavefields 1.1 Types of Wavefields and the Governing Equations 1.2 Wavefield in open space 1.3 Wavefield in bounded space 1.4 Stochastic wavefield 1.5 Multipath propagation 1.6 Propagation through random medium 1.7 ExercisesChapter Two: Sensor Array Systems 2.1 Uniform linear array (ULA) 2.2 Planar array 2.3 Distributed sensor array 2.4 Broadband sensor array 2.5 Source and sensor arrays 2.6 Multi-component sensor array2.7 ExercisesChapter Three: Frequency Wavenumber Processing 3.1 Digital filters in the w-k domain 3.2 Mapping of 1D into 2D filters 3.3 Multichannel Wiener filters 3.4 Wiener filters for ULA and UCA 3.5 Predictive noise cancellation 3.6 Exercises Chapter Four: Source Localization: Frequency Wavenumber Spectrum4.1 Frequency wavenumber spectrum 4.2 Beamformation 4.3 Capon's w-k spectrum 4.4 Maximum entropy w-k spectrum 4.5 Doppler-Azimuth Processing4.6 ExercisesChapter Five: Source Localization: Subspace Methods 5.1 Subspace methods (Narrowband) 5.2 Subspace methods (B...

  2. Thermal resonance in signal transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigada, Ramon; Sarmiento, Antonio; Lindenberg, Katja

    2001-01-01

    We use temperature tuning to control signal propagation in simple one-dimensional arrays of masses connected by hard anharmonic springs and with no local potentials. In our numerical model a sustained signal is applied at one site of a chain immersed in a thermal environment and the signal-to-noise ratio is measured at each oscillator. We show that raising the temperature can lead to enhanced signal propagation along the chain, resulting in thermal resonance effects akin to the resonance observed in arrays of bistable systems

  3. Thermal resonance in signal transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigada, Ramon; Sarmiento, Antonio; Lindenberg, Katja

    2001-06-01

    We use temperature tuning to control signal propagation in simple one-dimensional arrays of masses connected by hard anharmonic springs and with no local potentials. In our numerical model a sustained signal is applied at one site of a chain immersed in a thermal environment and the signal-to-noise ratio is measured at each oscillator. We show that raising the temperature can lead to enhanced signal propagation along the chain, resulting in thermal resonance effects akin to the resonance observed in arrays of bistable systems.

  4. Daytime Solar Heating of Photovoltaic Arrays in Low Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current work is to determine the out-gassing rate of H2O molecules for a solar array placed under daytime solar heating (full sunlight) conditions typically encountered in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Arc rates are established for individual arrays held at 14 C and are used as a baseline for future comparisons. Radiated thermal solar flux incident to the array is simulated by mounting a stainless steel panel equipped with resistive heating elements several centimeters behind the array. A thermal plot of the heater plate temperature and the array temperature as a function of heating time is then obtained. A mass spectrometer is used to record the levels of partial pressure of water vapor in the test chamber after each of the 5 heating/cooling cycles. Each of the heating cycles was set to time duration of 40 minutes to simulate the daytime solar heat flux to the array over a single orbit. Finally the array is cooled back to ambient temperature after 5 complete cycles and the arc rates of the solar arrays is retested. A comparison of the various data is presented with rather some unexpected results.

  5. Introduction to adaptive arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Monzingo, Bob; Haupt, Randy

    2011-01-01

    This second edition is an extensive modernization of the bestselling introduction to the subject of adaptive array sensor systems. With the number of applications of adaptive array sensor systems growing each year, this look at the principles and fundamental techniques that are critical to these systems is more important than ever before. Introduction to Adaptive Arrays, 2nd Edition is organized as a tutorial, taking the reader by the hand and leading them through the maze of jargon that often surrounds this highly technical subject. It is easy to read and easy to follow as fundamental concept

  6. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  7. Development of a spherically focused phased array transducer for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingfei; Foiret, Josquin; Stephens, Douglas N.; Le Baron, Olivier; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2016-01-01

    A 1.5 MHz prolate spheroidal therapeutic array with 128 circular elements was designed to accommodate standard imaging arrays for ultrasonic image-guided hyperthermia. The implementation of this dual-array system integrates real-time therapeutic and imaging functions with a single ultrasound system (Vantage 256, Verasonics). To facilitate applications involving small animal imaging and therapy the array was designed to have a beam depth of field smaller than 3.5 mm and to electronically steer...

  8. Solar cell array design handbook - The principles and technology of photovoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar cell array design and technology for ground-based and space applications are discussed from the user's point of view. Solar array systems are described, with attention given to array concepts, historical development, applications and performance, and the analysis of array characteristics, circuits, components, performance and reliability is examined. Aspects of solar cell array design considered include the design process, photovoltaic system and detailed array design, and the design of array thermal, radiation shielding and electromagnetic components. Attention is then given to the characteristics and design of the separate components of solar arrays, including the solar cells, optical elements and mechanical elements, and the fabrication, testing, environmental conditions and effects and material properties of arrays and their components are discussed.

  9. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  10. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Altug, Hatice; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    We recently proposed two-dimensional coupled photonic crystal nanocavity arrays as a route to achieve a slow-group velocity of light in all crystal directions, thereby enabling numerous applications...

  11. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, S; Mahrholz, T; Wierach, P; Sinapius, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750–2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs. (paper)

  12. Performance analysis of solar cell arrays in concentrating light intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongfeng; Li Ming; Lin Wenxian; Wang Liuling; Xiang Ming; Zhang Xinghua; Wang Yunfeng; Wei Shengxian

    2009-01-01

    Performance of concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system is researched by experiment and simulation calculation. The results show that the I-V curve of the GaAs cell array is better than that of crystal silicon solar cell arrays and the exergy produced by 9.51% electrical efficiency of the GaAs solar cell array can reach 68.93% of the photovoltaic/thermal system. So improving the efficiency of solar cell arrays can introduce more exergy and the system value can be upgraded. At the same time, affecting factors of solar cell arrays such as series resistance, temperature and solar irradiance also have been analyzed. The output performance of a solar cell array with lower series resistance is better and the working temperature has a negative impact on the voltage in concentrating light intensity. The output power has a -20 W/V coefficient and so cooling fluid must be used. Both heat energy and electrical power are then obtained with a solar trough concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system. (semiconductor devices)

  13. WE-H-209-01: Advances in Ultrasound Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynynen, K. [University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments.

  14. WE-H-209-01: Advances in Ultrasound Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynynen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments

  15. Micropatterned arrays of porous silicon: toward sensory biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavel, Benjamin S; Sweetman, Martin J; Shearer, Cameron J; Shapter, Joseph G; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2011-07-01

    We describe the fabrication of arrays of porous silicon spots by means of photolithography where a positive photoresist serves as a mask during the anodization process. In particular, photoluminescent arrays and porous silicon spots suitable for further chemical modification and the attachment of human cells were created. The produced arrays of porous silicon were chemically modified by means of a thermal hydrosilylation reaction that facilitated immobilization of the fluorescent dye lissamine, and alternatively, the cell adhesion peptide arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine. The latter modification enabled the selective attachment of human lens epithelial cells on the peptide functionalized regions of the patterns. This type of surface patterning, using etched porous silicon arrays functionalized with biological recognition elements, presents a new format of interfacing porous silicon with mammalian cells. Porous silicon arrays with photoluminescent properties produced by this patterning strategy also have potential applications as platforms for in situ monitoring of cell behavior.

  16. Influence of Y2O3 Addition on Crystallization, Thermal, Mechanical, and Electrical Properties of BaO-Al2O3-B2O3-SiO2 Glass-Ceramic for Ceramic Ball Grid Array Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Wei; Zheng, Jingguo

    2018-01-01

    Y2O3 addition has a significant influence on the crystallization, thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of BaO -Al2O3 -B2O3 -SiO2 (BABS) glass-ceramics. Semi-quantitative calculation based on x-ray diffraction demonstrated that with increasing Y2O3 content, both the crystallinity and the phase content of cristobalite gradually decreased. It is effective for the additive Y2O3 to inhibit the formation of cristobalite phase with a large coefficient of thermal expansion value. The flexural strength and the Young's modulus, thus, are remarkably increased from 140 MPa to 200 MPa and 56.5 GPa to 63.7 GPa, respectively. Also, the sintering kinetics of BABS glass-ceramics with various Y2O3 were investigated using the isothermal sintering shrinkage curve at different sintering temperatures. The sintering activation energy Q sharply decreased from 99.8 kJ/mol to 81.5 kJ/mol when 0.2% Y2O3 was added, which indicated that a small amount of Y2O3 could effectively promote the sintering procedure of BABS glass-ceramics.

  17. Testing of focal plane arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriam, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Problems associated with the testing of focal plane arrays are briefly examined with reference to the instrumentation and measurement procedures. In particular, the approach and instrumentation used as the Naval Ocean Systems Center is presented. Most of the measurements are made with flooded illumination on the focal plane array. The array is treated as an ensemble of individual pixels, data being taken on each pixel and array averages and standard deviations computed for the entire array. Data maps are generated, showing the pixel data in the proper spatial position on the array and the array statistics

  18. The effect of the thermal diode laser (wavelength 808-980 nm) in non-surgical periodontal therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, D.E.; Jorritsma, K.H.; Cobb, C.M.; van der Weijden, F.A.

    2014-01-01

    Focused question What is the adjunctive effect of a diode laser (DL) following non-surgical periodontal debridement (SRP) during the initial phase of periodontal therapy on the clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation. Material and Methods The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-Central Register of

  19. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  20. SEP solar array Shuttle flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Hill, H. C.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to verify the operational performance of a full-scale Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) solar array is described. Scheduled to fly on the Shuttle in 1983, the array will be deployed from the bay for ten orbits, with dynamic excitation to test the structural integrity being furnished by the Orbiter verniers; thermal, electrical, and sun orientation characteristics will be monitored, in addition to safety, reliability, and cost effective performance. The blanket, with aluminum and glass as solar cell mass simulators, is 4 by 32 m, with panels (each 0.38 by 4 m) hinged together; two live Si cell panels will be included. The panels are bonded to stiffened graphite-epoxy ribs and are storable in a box in the bay. The wing support structure is detailed, noting the option of releasing the wing into space by use of the Remote Manipulator System if the wing cannot be refolded. Procedures and equipment for monitoring the array behavior are outlined, and comprise both analog data and TV recording for later playback and analysis. The array wing experiment will also aid in developing measurement techniques for large structure dynamics in space.

  1. A review of array radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookner, E.

    1981-10-01

    Achievements in the area of array radars are illustrated by such activities as the operational deployment of the large high-power, high-range-resolution Cobra Dane; the operational deployment of two all-solid-state high-power, large UHF Pave Paws radars; and the development of the SAM multifunction Patriot radar. This paper reviews the following topics: array radars steered in azimuth and elevation by phase shifting (phase-phase steered arrays); arrays steered + or - 60 deg, limited scan arrays, hemispherical coverage, and omnidirectional coverage arrays; array radars steering electronically in only one dimension, either by frequency or by phase steering; and array radar antennas which use no electronic scanning but instead use array antennas for achieving low antenna sidelobes.

  2. Detector array and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy, J.G.; Bybee, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A detector array and method are described in which sets of electrode elements are provided. Each set consists of a number of linear extending parallel electrodes. The sets of electrode elements are disposed at an angle (preferably orthogonal) with respect to one another so that the individual elements intersect and overlap individual elements of the other sets. Electrical insulation is provided between the overlapping elements. The detector array is exposed to a source of charged particles which in accordance with one embodiment comprise electrons derived from a microchannel array plate exposed to photons. Amplifier and discriminator means are provided for each individual electrode element. Detection means are provided to sense pulses on individual electrode elements in the sets, with coincidence of pulses on individual intersecting electrode elements being indicative of charged particle impact at the intersection of the elements. Electronic readout means provide an indication of coincident events and the location where the charged particle or particles impacted. Display means are provided for generating appropriate displays representative of the intensity and locaton of charged particles impacting on the detector array

  3. Diode lasers and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streifer, W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles of operation of III-V semiconductor diode lasers, the use of distributed feedback, and high power laser arrays. The semiconductor laser is a robust, miniature, versatile device, which directly converts electricity to light with very high efficiency. Applications to pumping solid-state lasers and to fiber optic and point-to-point communications are reviewed

  4. Array Theory and Nial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Peter; Jenkins, Michael

    1999-01-01

    This report is the result of collaboration between the authors during the first 8 months of 1999 when M. Jenkins was visiting professor at DTU. The report documents the development of a tool for the investigation of array theory concepts and in particular presents various approaches to choose...

  5. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Castro, David; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT

  6. Rectenna thermal model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiramangalam, Murall; Alden, Adrian; Speyer, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Deploying rectennas in space requires adapting existing designs developed for terrestrial applications to the space environment. One of the major issues in doing so is to understand the thermal performance of existing designs in the space environment. Toward that end, a 3D rectenna thermal model has been developed, which involves analyzing shorted rectenna elements and finite size rectenna element arrays. A shorted rectenna element is a single element whose ends are connected together by a material of negligible thermal resistance. A shorted element is a good approximation to a central element of a large array. This model has been applied to Brown's 2.45 GHz rectenna design. Results indicate that Brown's rectenna requires redesign or some means of enhancing the heat dissipation in order for the diode temperature to be maintained below 200 C above an output power density of 620 W/sq.m. The model developed in this paper is very general and can be used for the analysis and design of any type of rectenna design of any frequency.

  7. Point absorbed dose verification for volumetric modulated arc therapy plans. A comparative study between ionization microchamber and chamber array; Verificacion de dosis absorbida en un punto para planes de arcoterapia volumetrica modulada. Estudio comparativo entre microcamara de ionizacion y matriz de camaras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudepon Moreno, F.; Pizarro Trigo, F.; Sanchez Jimenez, J.; Nunez Martinez, L.; Morillas Ruiz, J.; Palomo Llinares, R.

    2016-10-01

    According to the international recommendations a quality control must be made for IMRT treatments before these can be delivered. These recommendations are applied to volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments in our Department. As a part of the verifications chain, measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom point and in the phantom volume are made for a specific patient with ionization chamber and ionization chambers array, respectively. The aim of this issue is to compare measurements of absorbed dose between these two kinds of detectors. The predictions of absorbed dose from Treatment Planning System are taken as the reference one. The differences among these measurements and the reference are calculated for 105 specific patients. A statistical analysis shows that the measurements of absorbed dose with chamber and array are strongly correlated. This result allows us to eliminate from our verifications chain the measurements of absorbed dose in a phantom point with ionization chamber because these ones are included in measurements of absorbed dose in the volume with a very small statistic risk. As a result, much time can be saved in the verifications process without any lack of quality. (Author)

  8. Hyperspectral Longwave Infrared Focal Plane Array and Camera Based on Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a hyperspectral focal plane array and camera imaging in a large number of sharp hyperspectral bands in the thermal infrared. The camera is...

  9. Column Grid Array Rework for High Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Atul C.; Bodie, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to requirements for reduced size and weight, use of grid array packages in space applications has become common place. To meet the requirement of high reliability and high number of I/Os, ceramic column grid array packages (CCGA) were selected for major electronic components used in next MARS Rover mission (specifically high density Field Programmable Gate Arrays). ABSTRACT The probability of removal and replacement of these devices on the actual flight printed wiring board assemblies is deemed to be very high because of last minute discoveries in final test which will dictate changes in the firmware. The questions and challenges presented to the manufacturing organizations engaged in the production of high reliability electronic assemblies are, Is the reliability of the PWBA adversely affected by rework (removal and replacement) of the CGA package? and How many times can we rework the same board without destroying a pad or degrading the lifetime of the assembly? To answer these questions, the most complex printed wiring board assembly used by the project was chosen to be used as the test vehicle, the PWB was modified to provide a daisy chain pattern, and a number of bare PWB s were acquired to this modified design. Non-functional 624 pin CGA packages with internal daisy chained matching the pattern on the PWB were procured. The combination of the modified PWB and the daisy chained packages enables continuity measurements of every soldered contact during subsequent testing and thermal cycling. Several test vehicles boards were assembled, reworked and then thermal cycled to assess the reliability of the solder joints and board material including pads and traces near the CGA. The details of rework process and results of thermal cycling are presented in this paper.

  10. Developing the ultimate biomimetic flow-sensor array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinink, C.M.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; de Boer, Meint J.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Kolster, M.L.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This contribution reports on the major developments and achievements in our group on fabricating highly sensitive biomimetic flow-sensor arrays. The mechanoreceptive sensory hairs of crickets are taken as a model system for their ability to perceive flow signals at thermal noise levels and,

  11. Concurrent array-based queue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  12. Study of solar array switching power management technology for space power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    This report documents work performed on the Solar Array Switching Power Management Study. Mission characteristics for three missions were defined to the depth necessary to determine their power management requirements. Solar array switching concepts which could satisfy the mission requirements were identified. The switching concepts were compared with a conventional buck regulator system for cost, weight and volume, reliability, efficiency and thermal control. Solar array switching provided significant advantages in all areas of comparison for the reviewed missions.

  13. The regeneration of thermal wound on mice skin (Mus Musculus) after Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation for cancer therapy candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsari, R.; Nahdliyatun, E.; Winarni, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the regeneration of mice skin tissue (Mus Musculus) irradiated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser and morphological change due to Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation compared to conventional heating (hairdryer). The 2-3 month of twenty-seven mice were used for experimental animals. Mice were incised in the dorsum by the damage effect of laser energy dose (therapeutic dose) of 29.5 J/cm2 with 10 seconds of exposure time, 10 Hz of repetition rate, and 100 pulses of the given single pulse energy. The mice skin tissue was injuried by hairdryer to get burned effect. Mice were divided into three groups, Group I (control) were not treated by anything, Group II were treated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation and sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days, and Group III were treated by hairdryer then sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days. Pathology examination showed that the energy of 29,5 J/cm2 dose produced the hole effect (ablation) through the hypodermic layer caused by optical breakdown and collagen coagulation. Thus, the 60 °C temperature of burn showed coagulation necrosis because piknosis discovered in the injured area. The regeneration process showed that the mice skin tissue's ability to regenerate was irradiated by fast laser because of the focus of Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser. It was showed by the scab releases on third day and completely reepithelialization formation on the fifth day. The collagen fibers distribution was same as normal skin tissue on day 5 and so did angiogenesis. Therefore, Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser can be applied for problems of dermatology medical therapies, especially melasma, nevus of ota and tatto therapy. For skin cancer therapy application, energy dose of unregenerated skin tissue is chosen because the death expected effect is permanent.

  14. Radar techniques using array antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Wirth, Wulf-Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Radar Techniques Using Array Antennas is a thorough introduction to the possibilities of radar technology based on electronic steerable and active array antennas. Topics covered include array signal processing, array calibration, adaptive digital beamforming, adaptive monopulse, superresolution, pulse compression, sequential detection, target detection with long pulse series, space-time adaptive processing (STAP), moving target detection using synthetic aperture radar (SAR), target imaging, energy management and system parameter relations. The discussed methods are confirmed by simulation stud

  15. The Big Optical Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozurkewich, D.; Johnston, K.J.; Simon, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the design and the capabilities of the Naval Research Laboratory Big Optical Array (BOA), an interferometric optical array for high-resolution imaging of stars, stellar systems, and other celestial objects. There are four important differences between the BOA design and the design of Mark III Optical Interferometer on Mount Wilson (California). These include a long passive delay line which will be used in BOA to do most of the delay compensation, so that the fast delay line will have a very short travel; the beam combination in BOA will be done in triplets, to allow measurement of closure phase; the same light will be used for both star and fringe tracking; and the fringe tracker will use several wavelength channels

  16. A 4 probe array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, C E [CEGB, Marchwood Engineering Laboratories, Marchwood, Southampton, Hampshire (United Kingdom)

    1980-11-01

    A NDT system is described which moves away from the present manual method using a single send/receive transducer combination and uses instead an array of four transducers. Four transducers are shown sufficient to define a point reflector with a resolution of m{lambda}z/R where m{lambda} is the minimum detectable path difference in the system (corresponding to a m cycle time resolution), z the range and R the radius of the array. Signal averaging with an input ADC rate of 100 MHz is used with voice output for the range data. Typical resolution measurements in a water tank are presented. We expect a resolution of the order of mm in steel at a range of 80 mm. The system is expected to have applications in automated, high resolution, sizing of defects and in the inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds. (author)

  17. Timed arrays wideband and time varying antenna arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Haupt, Randy L

    2015-01-01

    Introduces timed arrays and design approaches to meet the new high performance standards The author concentrates on any aspect of an antenna array that must be viewed from a time perspective. The first chapters briefly introduce antenna arrays and explain the difference between phased and timed arrays. Since timed arrays are designed for realistic time-varying signals and scenarios, the book also reviews wideband signals, baseband and passband RF signals, polarization and signal bandwidth. Other topics covered include time domain, mutual coupling, wideband elements, and dispersion. The auth

  18. Solar collector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John Champlin; Martins, Guy Lawrence

    2015-09-06

    A method and apparatus for efficient manufacture, assembly and production of solar energy. In one aspect, the apparatus may include a number of modular solar receiver assemblies that may be separately manufactured, assembled and individually inserted into a solar collector array housing shaped to receive a plurality of solar receivers. The housing may include optical elements for focusing light onto the individual receivers, and a circuit for electrically connecting the solar receivers.

  19. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  20. Phased array antenna control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  1. Seismometer array station processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, F.A.; Lea, T.G.; Douglas, A.

    1977-01-01

    A description is given of the design, construction and initial testing of two types of Seismometer Array Station Processor (SASP), one to work with data stored on magnetic tape in analogue form, the other with data in digital form. The purpose of a SASP is to detect the short period P waves recorded by a UK-type array of 20 seismometers and to edit these on to a a digital library tape or disc. The edited data are then processed to obtain a rough location for the source and to produce seismograms (after optimum processing) for analysis by a seismologist. SASPs are an important component in the scheme for monitoring underground explosions advocated by the UK in the Conference of the Committee on Disarmament. With digital input a SASP can operate at 30 times real time using a linear detection process and at 20 times real time using the log detector of Weichert. Although the log detector is slower, it has the advantage over the linear detector that signals with lower signal-to-noise ratio can be detected and spurious large amplitudes are less likely to produce a detection. It is recommended, therefore, that where possible array data should be recorded in digital form for input to a SASP and that the log detector of Weichert be used. Trial runs show that a SASP is capable of detecting signals down to signal-to-noise ratios of about two with very few false detections, and at mid-continental array sites it should be capable of detecting most, if not all, the signals with magnitude above msub(b) 4.5; the UK argues that, given a suitable network, it is realistic to hope that sources of this magnitude and above can be detected and identified by seismological means alone. (author)

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, Teruyoshi; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively

  3. Lectin-Array Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Raquel; Echevarria, Juan; Hernandez, Alvaro; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2017-09-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer, infectious diseases, and autoimmune or neurodegenerative disorders. Unlocking the potential of glycans as disease markers will require rapid and unbiased glycoproteomics methods for glycan biomarker discovery. The present method is a facile and rapid protocol for qualitative analysis of protein glycosylation in complex biological mixtures. While traditional lectin arrays only provide an average signal for the glycans in the mixture, which is usually dominated by the most abundant proteins, our method provides individual lectin binding profiles for all proteins separated in the gel electrophoresis step. Proteins do not have to be excised from the gel for subsequent analysis via the lectin array but are transferred by contact diffusion from the gel to a glass slide presenting multiple copies of printed lectin arrays. Fluorescently marked glycoproteins are trapped by the printed lectins via specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions and after a washing step their binding profile with up to 20 lectin probes is analyzed with a fluorescent scanner. The method produces the equivalent of 20 lectin blots in a single experiment, giving detailed insight into the binding epitopes present in the fractionated proteins. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Array processor architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, George H. (Inventor); Lundstrom, Stephen F. (Inventor); Shafer, Philip E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high speed parallel array data processing architecture fashioned under a computational envelope approach includes a data base memory for secondary storage of programs and data, and a plurality of memory modules interconnected to a plurality of processing modules by a connection network of the Omega gender. Programs and data are fed from the data base memory to the plurality of memory modules and from hence the programs are fed through the connection network to the array of processors (one copy of each program for each processor). Execution of the programs occur with the processors operating normally quite independently of each other in a multiprocessing fashion. For data dependent operations and other suitable operations, all processors are instructed to finish one given task or program branch before all are instructed to proceed in parallel processing fashion on the next instruction. Even when functioning in the parallel processing mode however, the processors are not locked-step but execute their own copy of the program individually unless or until another overall processor array synchronization instruction is issued.

  5. EPOXI Uplink Array Experiment of June 27, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Tsao, P. C.; Lee, D. K.; Cornish, T. P.; Paal, L.; Jamnejad, V.

    2008-08-01

    Uplink array technology is currently being developed for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) to provide greater range and data throughput for future NASA missions, including manned missions to Mars and exploratory missions to the outer planets, the Kuiper Belt, and beyond. The DSN uplink arrays employ N microwave antennas transmitting at 7.2 GHz (X-band) to produce signals that add coherently at the spacecraft, hence providing a power gain of N^2 over a single antenna. This gain can be traded off directly for an N^2 higher data rate at a given distance such as Mars, providing, for example, high-definition video broadcast from Earth to a future human mission, or it can provide a given data rate for commands and software uploads at a distance N times greater than would be possible with a single antenna. The uplink arraying concept has been recently demonstrated using the three operational 34-m antennas of the Apollo Complex at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in California, which transmitted arrayed signals to the EPOXI spacecraft (an acronym formed from EPOCh and DIXI: Extrasolar Planetary Observation and Characterization and Deep Impact Extended Investigation). Both two-element and three-element uplink arrays were configured, and the theoretical array gains of 6 dB and 9.5 dB, respectively, were demonstrated experimentally. This required initial phasing of the array elements, the generation of accurate frequency predicts to maintain phase from each antenna despite relative velocity components due to Earth rotation and spacecraft trajectory, and monitoring of the ground-system phase for possible drifts caused by thermal effects over the 16-km fiber-optic signal distribution network. This article provides a description of the equipment and techniques used to demonstrate the uplink arraying concept in a relevant operational environment. Data collected from the EPOXI spacecraft are also analyzed to verify array calibration, array gain, and system stability

  6. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  7. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Abbasi, Amir; Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza; Behjat, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4–60.0 μg L"−"1, a detection limit of 0.21 μg L"−"1, an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L"−"1 level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05–300 μg L"−"1, a detection limit of 0.016 μg L"−"1 and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L"−"1 level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples. - Graphical abstract: A novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid

  8. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadfarnia, Shayessteh, E-mail: sdadfarnia@yazd.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbasi, Amir [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza [Laser and Optics Research School, 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjat, Abbas [Department of Physics, Yazd University, Safaieh, 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-28

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4–60.0 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.21 μg L{sup −1}, an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05–300 μg L{sup −1}, a detection limit of 0.016 μg L{sup −1} and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L{sup −1} level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples. - Graphical abstract: A novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient mixed hemimicelles

  9. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  10. Simulating the Sky as Seen by the Square Kilometer Array using the MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Doeleman, S. S.; Fish, V. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Oberoi, D.; Wayth, R. B.

    2009-05-01

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) is a proposed next-generation radio telescope that will operate at frequencies of 0.1-30 GHz and be 50-100 times more sensitive than existing radio arrays. Meeting the performance goals of this instrument will require innovative new hardware and software developments, a variety of which are now under consideration. Key to evaluating the performance characteristics of proposed SKA designs and testing the feasibility of new data calibration and processing algorithms is the ability to carry out realistic simulations of radio wavelength arrays under a variety of observing conditions. The MIT Array Performance Simulator (MAPS) (http://www.haystack.mit.edu/ast/arrays/maps/index.html) is an observations simulation package designed to achieve this goal. MAPS accepts an input source list or sky model and generates a model visibility set for a user-defined "virtual observatory'', incorporating such factors as array geometry, primary beam shape, field-of-view, and time and frequency resolution. Optionally, effects such as thermal noise, out-of-beam sources, variable station beams, and time/location-dependent ionospheric effects can be included. We will showcase current capabilities of MAPS for SKA applications by presenting results from an analysis of the effects of realistic sky backgrounds on the achievable image fidelity and dynamic range of SKA-like arrays comprising large numbers of small-diameter antennas.

  11. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2013-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of th...

  12. Thermal Mud Molecular Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Odabasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal mud (peloids, which are frequently used for thermal therapy purposes consist of organic and inorganic (minerals compounds in general. Organic structure is formed after a variety of chemical processes occurring in decades and comprise of a very complex structure. Stagnant water environment, herbal diversity, microorganism multiplicity and time are crucial players to form the structure. Data regarding description of organic compounds are very limited. Nowadays, it was clearly understood that a variety of compounds those are neglected in daily practice are found in thermal mud after GC-MS and similar methods are being frequently used. Those compounds which are biologically active are humic compounds, carboxylic acids, terpenoids, steroids and fatty acids. By comprising the thermal mud, these different compound groups which are related to divers areas from cosmetology to inflammation, make the thermal mud very meaningful in the treatment of human disease. In this review, it was tried to put forward the effects of several molecule groups those consisting of the thermal mud structure. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 257-264

  13. Educational Cosmic Ray Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soluk, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    In the last decade a great deal of interest has arisen in using sparse arrays of cosmic ray detectors located at schools as a means of doing both outreach and physics research. This approach has the unique advantage of involving grade school students in an actual ongoing experiment, rather then a simple teaching exercise, while at the same time providing researchers with the basic infrastructure for installation of cosmic ray detectors. A survey is made of projects in North America and Europe and in particular the ALTA experiment at the University of Alberta which was the first experiment operating under this paradigm

  14. Storage array reflection considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Jordan, W.C.; Taylor, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    The assumptions used for reflection conditions of single containers are fairly well established and consistently applied throughout the industry in nuclear criticality safety evaluations. Containers are usually considered to be either fully water-reflected (i.e. surrounded by 6 to 12 in. of water) for safety calculations or reflected by 1 in. of water for nominal (structural material and air) conditions. Tables and figures are usually available for performing comparative evaluations of containers under various loading conditions. Reflection considerations used for evaluating the safety of storage arrays of fissile material are not as well established

  15. Therapy: a new nonsurgical therapy option for benign thyroid nodules?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing implementation of iodization programs, benign nodular thyroid disease will remain a prevalent therapeutic concern for decades. recent research suggests that nonsurgical therapy, including radioactive iodine, radiofrequency thermal ablation and percutaneous laser ablation, m...

  16. Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapse in a Patient with a Thermal Burn Wound Caused by Hot Stone Therapy, a Traditional Thai Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasivimol Srisukho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 72-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of an incarcerated uterine prolapse along with an infected wound at the anterior uterine wall. She had previously undergone the traditional Thai practice Yue Fai, or “lying by the fire,” as performed by postpartum women. However, her uterus was burned by the extremely high temperature involved in the practice; it subsequently became infected and incarcerated. Pelvic examination revealed stage IV genitourinary prolapse according to the POP-Q classification. An ill-defined ulcer measuring 6.5 × 4.5 cm was present in the anterior wall of the uterus, and a 2.0 cm diameter ulcer was present in the right posterior wall of the uterus. The patient was treated symptomatically with broad-spectrum antibiotics, local estrogen therapy, analgesic and anti-inflammatory agents, and antiseptic dressing of the ulcerated area. After alleviation of all symptoms, the ulcer almost completely healed. She was advised to undergo definitive surgical treatment for the prolapsed uterus.

  17. Enhancing transformer dynamic rating through grid application of photovoltaic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Gasseir, M.M.; Sayer, M.A.; Alteneder, K.P.; McCulla, G.A.; Bigger, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that exact matching between the substation's peak-day load profile and the profile of coincident net output generation of the PV array is unjustifiable and will unduly lead to overlooking many investment deferment opportunities that would otherwise be major components of high value applications of PV arrays. Further, the paper shows how and to what extent the load matchability requirement could be relaxed. Because of the thermal inertia of transformers, the output of an adequately sized and located photovoltaic array can both delay and reduce transformer temperature rise even in cases where load peak occurs after sunset. The time lag due to thermal inertia and ambient temperature decline allow overloading of the transformer beyond its normal rating without significant loss of life. Simulations depicting the interplay between PV array capacity, ambient temperature, transformer size, oil and winding temperature rise, peak load magnitude, load profile and loss of life, have been conducted. Tradeoffs between PV array capacity and transformer over-rating gains have been assessed. The impacts of PV generation on the over-rating potential of an actual 22.4-MVA bank transformer of a Salt River Project (SRP) distribution substation in Phoenix, Arizona were evaluated

  18. Selecting Sums in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jørgensen, Allan Grønlund

    2008-01-01

    In an array of n numbers each of the \\binomn2+nUnknown control sequence '\\binom' contiguous subarrays define a sum. In this paper we focus on algorithms for selecting and reporting maximal sums from an array of numbers. First, we consider the problem of reporting k subarrays inducing the k largest...... sums among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u. For this problem we design an optimal O(n + k) time algorithm. Secondly, we consider the problem of selecting a subarray storing the k’th largest sum. For this problem we prove a time bound of Θ(n · max {1,log(k/n)}) by describing...... an algorithm with this running time and by proving a matching lower bound. Finally, we combine the ideas and obtain an O(n· max {1,log(k/n)}) time algorithm that selects a subarray storing the k’th largest sum among all subarrays of length at least l and at most u....

  19. Programmable cellular arrays. Faults testing and correcting in cellular arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cercel, L.

    1978-03-01

    A review of some recent researches about programmable cellular arrays in computing and digital processing of information systems is presented, and includes both combinational and sequential arrays, with full arbitrary behaviour, or which can realize better implementations of specialized blocks as: arithmetic units, counters, comparators, control systems, memory blocks, etc. Also, the paper presents applications of cellular arrays in microprogramming, in implementing of a specialized computer for matrix operations, in modeling of universal computing systems. The last section deals with problems of fault testing and correcting in cellular arrays. (author)

  20. Synthesis of ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, G.Q.; Shen, W.Z.; Zheng, M.J.; Fan, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    An effective approach is demonstrated for growing ordered large-scale ZnO nanopore arrays through radio-frequency magnetron sputtering deposition on porous alumina membranes (PAMs). The realization of highly ordered hexagonal ZnO nanopore arrays benefits from the unique properties of ZnO (hexagonal structure, polar surfaces, and preferable growth directions) and PAMs (controllable hexagonal nanopores and localized negative charges). Further evidence has been shown through the effects of nanorod size and thermal treatment of PAMs on the yielded morphology of ZnO nanopore arrays. This approach opens the possibility of creating regular semiconducting nanopore arrays for the application of filters, sensors, and templates

  1. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  2. Silicon Micromachined Microlens Array for THz Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsup; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Mehdi, IImran; Gill, John J.; Jung-Kubiak, Cecile D.; Llombart, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    5 5 silicon microlens array was developed using a silicon micromachining technique for a silicon-based THz antenna array. The feature of the silicon micromachining technique enables one to microfabricate an unlimited number of microlens arrays at one time with good uniformity on a silicon wafer. This technique will resolve one of the key issues in building a THz camera, which is to integrate antennas in a detector array. The conventional approach of building single-pixel receivers and stacking them to form a multi-pixel receiver is not suited at THz because a single-pixel receiver already has difficulty fitting into mass, volume, and power budgets, especially in space applications. In this proposed technique, one has controllability on both diameter and curvature of a silicon microlens. First of all, the diameter of microlens depends on how thick photoresist one could coat and pattern. So far, the diameter of a 6- mm photoresist microlens with 400 m in height has been successfully microfabricated. Based on current researchers experiences, a diameter larger than 1-cm photoresist microlens array would be feasible. In order to control the curvature of the microlens, the following process variables could be used: 1. Amount of photoresist: It determines the curvature of the photoresist microlens. Since the photoresist lens is transferred onto the silicon substrate, it will directly control the curvature of the silicon microlens. 2. Etching selectivity between photoresist and silicon: The photoresist microlens is formed by thermal reflow. In order to transfer the exact photoresist curvature onto silicon, there needs to be etching selectivity of 1:1 between silicon and photoresist. However, by varying the etching selectivity, one could control the curvature of the silicon microlens. The figure shows the microfabricated silicon microlens 5 x5 array. The diameter of the microlens located in the center is about 2.5 mm. The measured 3-D profile of the microlens surface has a

  3. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  4. Combinatorial aspects of covering arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J. Colbourn

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Covering arrays generalize orthogonal arrays by requiring that t -tuples be covered, but not requiring that the appearance of t -tuples be balanced.Their uses in screening experiments has found application in software testing, hardware testing, and a variety of fields in which interactions among factors are to be identified. Here a combinatorial view of covering arrays is adopted, encompassing basic bounds, direct constructions, recursive constructions, algorithmic methods, and applications.

  5. Nanoelectrode array for electrochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelton, William G [Sandia Park, NM; Siegal, Michael P [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-12-01

    A nanoelectrode array comprises a plurality of nanoelectrodes wherein the geometric dimensions of the electrode controls the electrochemical response, and the current density is independent of time. By combining a massive array of nanoelectrodes in parallel, the current signal can be amplified while still retaining the beneficial geometric advantages of nanoelectrodes. Such nanoelectrode arrays can be used in a sensor system for rapid, non-contaminating field analysis. For example, an array of suitably functionalized nanoelectrodes can be incorporated into a small, integrated sensor system that can identify many species rapidly and simultaneously under field conditions in high-resistivity water, without the need for chemical addition to increase conductivity.

  6. Array architectures for iterative algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Hosagrahar V.; Rao, Sailesh K.; Kailath, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Regular mesh-connected arrays are shown to be isomorphic to a class of so-called regular iterative algorithms. For a wide variety of problems it is shown how to obtain appropriate iterative algorithms and then how to translate these algorithms into arrays in a systematic fashion. Several 'systolic' arrays presented in the literature are shown to be specific cases of the variety of architectures that can be derived by the techniques presented here. These include arrays for Fourier Transform, Matrix Multiplication, and Sorting.

  7. Josephson junctions array resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargiulo, Oscar; Muppalla, Phani; Mirzaei, Iman; Kirchmair, Gerhard [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    We present an experimental analysis of the self- and cross-Kerr effect of extended plasma resonances in Josephson junction chains. The chain consists of 1600 individual junctions and we can measure quality factors in excess of 10000. The Kerr effect manifests itself as a frequency shift that depends linearly on the number of photons in a resonant mode. By changing the input power we are able to measure this frequency shift on a single mode (self-kerr). By changing the input power on another mode while measuring the same one, we are able to evaluate the cross-kerr effect. We can measure the cross-Kerr effect by probing the resonance frequency of one mode while exciting another mode of the array with a microwave drive.

  8. Diagnosable structured logic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  9. Low Frequency Space Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, B.; Weiler, K.W.; Johnston, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Low Frequency Space Array (LFSA) is a conceptual mission to survey the entire sky and to image individual sources at frequencies between 1.5 and 26 MHz, a frequency range over which the earth's ionosphere transmits poorly or not at all. With high resolution, high sensitivity observations, a new window will be opened in the electromagnetic spectrum for astronomical investigation. Also, extending observations down to such low frequencies will bring astronomy to the fundamental limit below which the galaxy becomes optically thick due to free-free absorption. A number of major scientific goals can be pursued with such a mission, including mapping galactic emission and absorption, studies of individual source spectra in a frequency range where a number of important processes may play a role, high resolution imaging of extended sources, localization of the impulsive emission from Jupiter, and a search for coherent emission processes. 19 references

  10. Scintillator detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusano, D.A.; Dibianca, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This patent application relates to a scintillator detector array for use in computerized tomography and comprises a housing including a plurality of chambers, the said housing having a front wall transmissive to x-rays and side walls opaque to x-rays, such as of tungsten and tantalum, a liquid scintillation medium including a soluble fluor, the solvent for the fluor being disposed in the chambers. The solvent comprises either an intrinsically high Z solvent or a solvent which has dissolved therein a high Z compound e.g. iodo or bromonaphthalene; or toluene, xylene or trimethylbenzene with a lead or tin alkyl dissolved therein. Also disposed about the chambers are a plurality of photoelectric devices. (author)

  11. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, R; De Brún, C; Kempers, R; Lupoi, R; Robinson, A J

    2016-01-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7 o C. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux. (paper)

  12. Cascading Constrained 2-D Arrays using Periodic Merging Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Laursen, Torben Vaarby

    2003-01-01

    We consider a method for designing 2-D constrained codes by cascading finite width arrays using predefined finite width periodic merging arrays. This provides a constructive lower bound on the capacity of the 2-D constrained code. Examples include symmetric RLL and density constrained codes...

  13. Networked Sensor Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tighe, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    A set of independent radiation sensors, coupled with real-time data telemetry, offers the opportunity to run correlation algorithms for the sensor array as well as to incorporate non-radiological data into the system. This may enhance the overall sensitivity of the sensors and provide an opportunity to project the location of a source within the array. In collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), we have conducted field experiments to test a prototype system. Combining the outputs of a set of distributed sensors permits the correlation that the independent sensor outputs. Combined with additional information such as traffic patterns and velocities, this can reduce random/false detections and enhance detection capability. The principle components of such a system include: (1) A set of radiation sensors. These may be of varying type and complexity, including gamma and/or neutron detectors, gross count and spectral-capable sensors, and low to high energy-resolution sensors. (2) A set of non-radiation sensors. These may include sensors such as vehicle presence and imaging sensors. (3) A communications architecture for near real-time telemetry. Depending upon existing infrastructure and bandwidth requirements, this may be a radio or hard-wire based system. (4) A central command console to pole the sensors, correlate their output, and display the data in a meaningful form to the system operator. Both sensitivity and selectivity are important considerations when evaluating the performance of a detection system. Depending on the application, the optimization of sensitivity as well as the rejection of ''nuisance'' radioactive sources may or may not be critical

  14. WE-H-209-00: Carson/Zagzebski Distinguished Lectureship: Image Guided Ultrasound Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments.

  15. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  16. Dosimetric characterization of a 2-D array of 223 solid state detectors for daily morning checks in Tomo Therapy equipment; Caracterizacion dosimetrica de un arreglo 2D de 223 detectores de estado solido para verificaciones matutinas diarias en un equipo de Tomo Terapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes S, U.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenieria, Lomas del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: uvaldoreyes@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Tomo Therapy is a new technique for the cancer treatment; however, the equipment must meet nearly all mechanical and dosimetric characteristics of a conventional linear accelerator for medical use. Daily quality controls are vital to the good operation of the equipment and thus guarantee excellent quality in the daily delivery of treatments. This paper presents the procedure of the dosimetric characterization of a two-dimensional array of 223 solid state detectors, called TomoDose of the Sun Nuclear Company. Dosimetric important criteria are established to perform these checks quickly and accurately. Dosimetric tests proposed are: repeatability, linearity, dependence of Sad and SSD. Some results are compared with readings of the ionization chamber Exradim A1SL. Finally the results of 30 consecutive days are presented to establish criteria for evidence of dose, field size, symmetry and flattening of the radiation beam on Tomo Therapy equipment. Expected values for daily verification are: Dose constancy of 194.89 c Gy, σ= 1.31 c Gy, symmetry in the X axis of -0.19 %, σ=0.08 %, symmetry in the Y axis of 1.66 %, σ= 0.05 %, flattened in the X axis of 25.71 %, σ= 0.05 % and flattened in the Y axis of 6.41 %, σ= 10.23 %. Field sizes obtained were 40.45 cm in the X axis and 5.10 on the Y axis, with standard deviations of 0.02 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. TomoDose dosimetric values, compared to the values obtained with ionization chamber, presented differences smaller than 2%. (Author)

  17. Cyclotron-Resonance-Maser Arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesar, A.; Lei, L.; Dikhtyar, V.; Korol, M.; Jerby, E.

    1999-01-01

    The cyclotron-resonance-maser (CRM) array [1] is a radiation source which consists of CRM elements coupled together under a common magnetic field. Each CRM-element employs a low-energy electron-beam which performs a cyclotron interaction with the local electromagnetic wave. These waves can be coupled together among the CRM elements, hence the interaction is coherently synchronized in the entire array. The implementation of the CRM-array approach may alleviate several technological difficulties which impede the development of single-beam gyro-devices. Furthermore, it proposes new features, such as the phased-array antenna incorporated in the CRM-array itself. The CRM-array studies may lead to the development of compact, high-power radiation sources operating at low-voltages. This paper introduces new conceptual schemes of CRM-arrays, and presents the progress in related theoretical and experimental studies in our laboratory. These include a multi-mode analysis of a CRM-array, and a first operation of this device with five carbon-fiber cathodes

  18. Submillimeter heterodyne arrays for APEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güsten, R.; Baryshev, A.; Bell, A.; Belloche, A.; Graf, U.; Hafok, H.; Heyminck, S.; Hochgürtel, S.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.; Kasemann, C.; Klein, B.; Klein, T.; Korn, A.; Krämer, I.; Leinz, C.; Lundgren, A.; Menten, K. M.; Meyer, K.; Muders, D.; Pacek, F.; Rabanus, D.; Schäfer, F.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, G.; Stutzki, J.; Wieching, G.; Wunsch, A.; Wyrowski, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report on developments of submillimeter heterodyne arrays for high resolution spectroscopy with APEX. Shortly, we will operate state-of-the-art instruments in all major atmospheric windows accessible from Llano de Chajnantor. CHAMP+, a dual-color 2×7 element heterodyne array for operation in the

  19. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  20. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo; Castro, David; Conchouso Gonzalez, David; Kosel, Jü rgen; Foulds, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  1. Chunking of Large Multidimensional Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotem, Doron; Otoo, Ekow J.; Seshadri, Sridhar

    2007-02-28

    Data intensive scientific computations as well on-lineanalytical processing applications as are done on very large datasetsthat are modeled as k-dimensional arrays. The storage organization ofsuch arrays on disks is done by partitioning the large global array intofixed size hyper-rectangular sub-arrays called chunks or tiles that formthe units of data transfer between disk and memory. Typical queriesinvolve the retrieval of sub-arrays in a manner that accesses all chunksthat overlap the query results. An important metric of the storageefficiency is the expected number of chunks retrieved over all suchqueries. The question that immediately arises is "what shapes of arraychunks give the minimum expected number of chunks over a query workload?"In this paper we develop two probabilistic mathematical models of theproblem and provide exact solutions using steepest descent and geometricprogramming methods. Experimental results, using synthetic workloads onreal life data sets, show that our chunking is much more efficient thanthe existing approximate solutions.

  2. Passive microfluidic array card and reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Lawrence Christopher [Modesto, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA

    2011-08-09

    A microfluidic array card and reader system for analyzing a sample. The microfluidic array card includes a sample loading section for loading the sample onto the microfluidic array card, a multiplicity of array windows, and a transport section or sections for transporting the sample from the sample loading section to the array windows. The microfluidic array card reader includes a housing, a receiving section for receiving the microfluidic array card, a viewing section, and a light source that directs light to the array window of the microfluidic array card and to the viewing section.

  3. SAQC: SNP Array Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling-Hui

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays containing hundreds of thousands of SNPs from the human genome have proven useful for studying important human genome questions. Data quality of SNP arrays plays a key role in the accuracy and precision of downstream data analyses. However, good indices for assessing data quality of SNP arrays have not yet been developed. Results We developed new quality indices to measure the quality of SNP arrays and/or DNA samples and investigated their statistical properties. The indices quantify a departure of estimated individual-level allele frequencies (AFs from expected frequencies via standardized distances. The proposed quality indices followed lognormal distributions in several large genomic studies that we empirically evaluated. AF reference data and quality index reference data for different SNP array platforms were established based on samples from various reference populations. Furthermore, a confidence interval method based on the underlying empirical distributions of quality indices was developed to identify poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Analyses of authentic biological data and simulated data show that this new method is sensitive and specific for the detection of poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. Conclusions This study introduces new quality indices, establishes references for AFs and quality indices, and develops a detection method for poor-quality SNP arrays and/or DNA samples. We have developed a new computer program that utilizes these methods called SNP Array Quality Control (SAQC. SAQC software is written in R and R-GUI and was developed as a user-friendly tool for the visualization and evaluation of data quality of genome-wide SNP arrays. The program is available online (http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/quality/SAQC.htm.

  4. Uncooled infrared focal plane array imaging in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shuyu

    2015-06-01

    This article reviews the development of uncooled infrared focal plane array (UIFPA) imaging in China in the past decade. Sensors based on optical or electrical read-out mechanism were developed but the latter dominates the market. In resistive bolometers, VOx and amorphous silicon are still the two major thermal-sensing materials. The specifications of the IRFPA made by different manufactures were collected and compared. Currently more than five Chinese companies and institutions design and fabricate uncooled infrared focal plane array. Some devices have sensitivity as high as 30 mK; the largest array for commercial products is 640×512 and the smallest pixel size is 17 μm. Emphasis is given on the pixel MEMS design, ROIC design, fabrication, and packaging of the IRFPA manufactured by GWIC, especially on design for high sensitivities, low noise, better uniformity and linearity, better stabilization for whole working temperature range, full-digital design, etc.

  5. Generic nano-imprint process for fabrication of nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurelie; Hocevar, Moira; Algra, Rienk E; Timmering, Eugene C; Verschuuren, Marc A; Immink, George W G; Verheijen, Marcel A; Bakkers, Erik P A M [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven, High Tech Campus 11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Diedenhofen, Silke L [FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics c/o Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Vlieg, E, E-mail: e.p.a.m.bakkers@tue.nl [IMM, Solid State Chemistry, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-10

    A generic process has been developed to grow nearly defect-free arrays of (heterostructured) InP and GaP nanowires. Soft nano-imprint lithography has been used to pattern gold particle arrays on full 2 inch substrates. After lift-off organic residues remain on the surface, which induce the growth of additional undesired nanowires. We show that cleaning of the samples before growth with piranha solution in combination with a thermal anneal at 550 deg. C for InP and 700 deg. C for GaP results in uniform nanowire arrays with 1% variation in nanowire length, and without undesired extra nanowires. Our chemical cleaning procedure is applicable to other lithographic techniques such as e-beam lithography, and therefore represents a generic process.

  6. Micro-array collimators for X-rays and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimmino, A.; Allman, B.E.; Klein, A.G.; Bastie, P.

    1998-08-01

    The authors describe the fabrication techniques of novel, compact optical elements for collimating and/or focusing beams of X-rays or thermal neutrons. These optical elements are solid composite arrays consisting of regular stacks of alternating micro-foils, analogous in action to Soller slit collimators, but up to three orders of magnitude smaller. The arrays are made of alternating metals with suitable refractive indices for reflection and/or absorption of the specific radiation. In one implementation, the arrays are made of stacked micro-foils of transmissive elements (Al, Cu) coated and/or electroplated with absorbing elements (Gd, Cd), which are repeatedly rolled or drawn and restacked to achieve the required collimation parameters. The authors present results of these collimators using both X-rays and neutrons. The performance of the collimating element is limited only by the choice of micro-foil materials and the uniformity of their interfaces

  7. The performance analysis of the Trough Concentrating Solar Photovoltaic/Thermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M., E-mail: liming@ynnu.edu.c [Solar Energy Research Institute, Yunnan Normal University, 650092 Kunming (China); Li, G.L. [School of Physics and Electronic Information, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Ji, X.; Yin, F.; Xu, L. [Solar Energy Research Institute, Yunnan Normal University, 650092 Kunming (China)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: {yields} A 2 m{sup 2} Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system is built, a single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. {yields} Another 10 m{sup 2} TCPV/T system using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. {yields} The economic performance analysis show the electricity generating cost of the TCPV/T system with the concentrating silicon cell array can catch up with flat-plate PV system. -- Abstract: The electrical and thermal performance of a 2 m{sup 2} Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system with an energy flux ratio 10.27 are characterized by experiments. A single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. The experimental results show that the electrical performance of the system with the GaAs cell array is better than that of crystal silicon solar cell arrays. The superior output performance of the GaAs cell array mainly benefits from its lower series resistance. But the thermal performances of the system using the single crystal silicon solar cell array and the polycrystalline silicon solar cell array are better. It results from the widths of the two types of cells in the system close to that of the focal line. Another 10 m{sup 2} TCPV/T system with an energy flux ratio of 20 using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. The experimental results indicate that the photoelectric efficiency of the GaAs cell array is 23.83%, and the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system are 9.88% and 49.84% respectively. While the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system using the low-cost concentrating

  8. The performance analysis of the Trough Concentrating Solar Photovoltaic/Thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Li, G.L.; Ji, X.; Yin, F.; Xu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → A 2 m 2 Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system is built, a single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. → Another 10 m 2 TCPV/T system using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. → The economic performance analysis show the electricity generating cost of the TCPV/T system with the concentrating silicon cell array can catch up with flat-plate PV system. -- Abstract: The electrical and thermal performance of a 2 m 2 Trough Concentrating Photovoltaic/Thermal (TCPV/T) system with an energy flux ratio 10.27 are characterized by experiments. A single crystalline silicon solar cell array, a polycrystalline silicon cell array, a Super cell array and a GaAs cell array are respectively used in the experiments. The experimental results show that the electrical performance of the system with the GaAs cell array is better than that of crystal silicon solar cell arrays. The superior output performance of the GaAs cell array mainly benefits from its lower series resistance. But the thermal performances of the system using the single crystal silicon solar cell array and the polycrystalline silicon solar cell array are better. It results from the widths of the two types of cells in the system close to that of the focal line. Another 10 m 2 TCPV/T system with an energy flux ratio of 20 using the GaAs cell array and a concentrating silicon cell array are also constructed and characterized. The experimental results indicate that the photoelectric efficiency of the GaAs cell array is 23.83%, and the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system are 9.88% and 49.84% respectively. While the instantaneous electrical efficiency and thermal efficiency of the system using the low-cost concentrating silicon cell array are 7.51% and 42

  9. Dependently typed array programs don’t go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2009-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  10. Dependently typed array programs don't go wrong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trojahner, K.; Grelck, C.

    2008-01-01

    The array programming paradigm adopts multidimensional arrays as the fundamental data structures of computation. Array operations process entire arrays instead of just single elements. This makes array programs highly expressive and introduces data parallelism in a natural way. Array programming

  11. Self-assembled ordered carbon-nanotube arrays and membranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Imagine free-standing flexible membranes with highly-aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) running through their thickness. Perhaps with both ends of the CNTs open for highly controlled nanofiltration? Or CNTs at heights uniformly above a polymer membrane for a flexible array of nanoelectrodes or field-emitters? How about CNT films with incredible amounts of accessible surface area for analyte adsorption? These self-assembled crystalline nanotubes consist of multiple layers of graphene sheets rolled into concentric cylinders. Tube diameters (3-300 nm), inner-bore diameters (2-15 nm), and lengths (nanometers - microns) are controlled to tailor physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. We proposed to explore growth and characterize nanotube arrays to help determine their exciting functionality for Sandia applications. Thermal chemical vapor deposition growth in a furnace nucleates from a metal catalyst. Ordered arrays grow using templates from self-assembled hexagonal arrays of nanopores in anodized-aluminum oxide. Polymeric-binders can mechanically hold the CNTs in place for polishing, lift-off, and membrane formation. The stiffness, electrical and thermal conductivities of CNTs make them ideally suited for a wide-variety of possible applications. Large-area, highly-accessible gas-adsorbing carbon surfaces, superb cold-cathode field-emission, and unique nanoscale geometries can lead to advanced microsensors using analyte adsorption, arrays of functionalized nanoelectrodes for enhanced electrochemical detection of biological/explosive compounds, or mass-ionizers for gas-phase detection. Materials studies involving membrane formation may lead to exciting breakthroughs in nanofiltration/nanochromatography for the separation of chemical and biological agents. With controlled nanofilter sizes, ultrafiltration will be viable to separate and preconcentrate viruses and many strains of bacteria for 'down-stream' analysis.

  12. Copper-encapsulated vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Chapla, Rachel; Carroll, Murphy; Nowak, Joshua; McCord, Marian; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-11-13

    A new procedure is described for the fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) that are decorated, and even completely encapsulated, by a dense network of copper nanoparticles. The process involves the conformal deposition of pyrolytic carbon (Py-C) to stabilize the aligned carbon-nanotube structure during processing. The stabilized arrays are mildly functionalized using oxygen plasma treatment to improve wettability, and they are then infiltrated with an aqueous, supersaturated Cu salt solution. Once dried, the salt forms a stabilizing crystal network throughout the array. After calcination and H2 reduction, Cu nanoparticles are left decorating the CNT surfaces. Studies were carried out to determine the optimal processing parameters to maximize Cu content in the composite. These included the duration of Py-C deposition and system process pressure as well as the implementation of subsequent and multiple Cu salt solution infiltrations. The optimized procedure yielded a nanoscale hybrid material where the anisotropic alignment from the VACNT array was preserved, and the mass of the stabilized arrays was increased by over 24-fold because of the addition of Cu. The procedure has been adapted for other Cu salts and can also be used for other metal salts altogether, including Ni, Co, Fe, and Ag. The resulting composite is ideally suited for application in thermal management devices because of its low density, mechanical integrity, and potentially high thermal conductivity. Additionally, further processing of the material via pressing and sintering can yield consolidated, dense bulk composites.

  13. The Next-Generation Very Large Array: Technical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Mark; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    As part of its mandate as a national observatory, the NRAO is looking toward the long range future of radio astronomy and fostering the long term growth of the US astronomical community. NRAO has sponsored a series of science and technical community meetings to consider the science mission and design of a next-generation Very Large Array (ngVLA), building on the legacies of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Very Large Array (VLA).The basic ngVLA design emerging from these discussions is an interferometric array with approximately ten times the sensitivity and ten times higher spatial resolution than the VLA and ALMA radio telescopes, optimized for operation in the wavelength range 0.3cm to 3cm. The ngVLA would open a new window on the Universe through ultra-sensitive imaging of thermal line and continuum emission down to milli-arcsecond resolution, as well as unprecedented broadband continuum polarimetric imaging of non-thermal processes. The specifications and concepts for major ngVLA system elements are rapidly converging.We will provide an overview of the current system design of the ngVLA. The concepts for major system elements such as the antenna, receiving electronics, and central signal processing will be presented. We will also describe the major development activities that are presently underway to advance the design.

  14. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  15. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Dan Michael

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  16. ESPRIT And Uniform Linear Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. H.; Goldburg, M.; Ottersten, B. E.; Swindlehurst, A. L.; Viberg, M.; Kailath, T.

    1989-11-01

    Abstract ¬â€?ESPRIT is a recently developed and patented technique for high-resolution estimation of signal parameters. It exploits an invariance structure designed into the sensor array to achieve a reduction in computational requirements of many orders of magnitude over previous techniques such as MUSIC, Burg's MEM, and Capon's ML, and in addition achieves performance improvement as measured by parameter estimate error variance. It is also manifestly more robust with respect to sensor errors (e.g. gain, phase, and location errors) than other methods as well. Whereas ESPRIT only requires that the sensor array possess a single invariance best visualized by considering two identical but other-wise arbitrary arrays of sensors displaced (but not rotated) with respect to each other, many arrays currently in use in various applications are uniform linear arrays of identical sensor elements. Phased array radars are commonplace in high-resolution direction finding systems, and uniform tapped delay lines (i.e., constant rate A/D converters) are the rule rather than the exception in digital signal processing systems. Such arrays possess many invariances, and are amenable to other types of analysis, which is one of the main reasons such structures are so prevalent. Recent developments in high-resolution algorithms of the signal/noise subspace genre including total least squares (TLS) ESPRIT applied to uniform linear arrays are summarized. ESPRIT is also shown to be a generalization of the root-MUSIC algorithm (applicable only to the case of uniform linear arrays of omni-directional sensors and unimodular cisoids). Comparisons with various estimator bounds, including CramerRao bounds, are presented.

  17. The Owens Valley Millimeter Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padin, S.; Scott, S.L.; Woody, D.P.; Scoville, N.Z.; Seling, T.V.

    1991-01-01

    The telescopes and signal processing systems of the Owens Valley Millimeter Array are considered, and improvements in the sensitivity and stability of the instrument are characterized. The instrument can be applied to map sources in the 85 to 115 GHz and 218 to 265 GHz bands with a resolution of about 1 arcsec in the higher frequency band. The operation of the array is fully automated. The current scientific programs for the array encompass high-resolution imaging of protoplanetary/protostellar disk structures, observations of molecular cloud complexes associated with spiral structure in nearby galaxies, and observations of molecular structures in the nuclei of spiral and luminous IRAS galaxies. 9 refs

  18. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  19. SQIF Arrays as RF Sensors (Briefing Charts)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yukon, Stanford P

    2007-01-01

    ... (Superconducting Quantum Interference Filter) arrays may be employed as sensitive RF sensors. RF SQIF arrays fabricated with high Tc Josephson junctions can be cooled with small Sterling microcoolers...

  20. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  1. Progress on conformal microwave array applicators for heating chestwall disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, P. R.; Maccarini, P. F.; Juang, T.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Gaeta, C. J.; Schlorff, J. L.; Milligan, A. J.

    2007-02-01

    Previous studies have reported the computer modeling, CAD design, and theoretical performance of single and multiple antenna arrays of Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) square slot radiators driven at 915 and 433 MHz. Subsequently, practical CAD designs of microstrip antenna arrays constructed on thin and flexible printed circuit board (PCB) material were reported which evolved into large Conformal Microwave Array (CMA) sheets that could wrap around the surface of the human torso for delivering microwave energy to large areas of superficial tissue. Although uniform and adjustable radiation patterns have been demonstrated from multiple element applicators radiating into simple homogeneous phantom loads, the contoured and heterogeneous tissue loads typical of chestwall recurrent breast cancer have required additional design efforts to achieve good coupling and efficient heating from the increasingly larger conformal array applicators used to treat large area contoured patient anatomy. Thus recent work has extended the theoretical optimization of DCC antennas to improve radiation efficiency of each individual aperture and reduce mismatch reflections, radiation losses, noise, and cross coupling of the feedline distribution network of large array configurations. Design improvements have also been incorporated into the supporting bolus structure to maintain effective coupling of DCC antennas into contoured anatomy and to monitor and control surface temperatures under the entire array. New approaches for non-invasive monitoring of surface and sub-surface tissue temperatures under each independent heat source are described that make use of microwave radiometry and flexible sheet grid arrays of thermal sensors. Efforts to optimize the clinical patient interface and move from planar rectangular shapes to contoured vest applicators that accommodate entire disease in a larger number of patients are summarized. By applying heat more uniformly to large areas of contoured anatomy

  2. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro......-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 mu m. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  3. Next Generation Microshutter Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop the next generation MicroShutter Array (MSA) as a multi-object field selector for missions anticipated in the next two decades. For many...

  4. Fundamentals of spherical array processing

    CERN Document Server

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the theory and practice of spherical microphone arrays. It is written for graduate students, researchers and engineers who work with spherical microphone arrays in a wide range of applications.   The first two chapters provide the reader with the necessary mathematical and physical background, including an introduction to the spherical Fourier transform and the formulation of plane-wave sound fields in the spherical harmonic domain. The third chapter covers the theory of spatial sampling, employed when selecting the positions of microphones to sample sound pressure functions in space. Subsequent chapters present various spherical array configurations, including the popular rigid-sphere-based configuration. Beamforming (spatial filtering) in the spherical harmonics domain, including axis-symmetric beamforming, and the performance measures of directivity index and white noise gain are introduced, and a range of optimal beamformers for spherical arrays, includi...

  5. In situ x-ray diffraction study on AgI nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yinhai; Ye Changhui; Wang Guozhong; Zhang Lide; Liu Yanmei; Zhao Zhongyan

    2003-01-01

    The AgI nanowire arrays were prepared in the ordered porous alumina membrane by an electrochemical method. Transmission electron microscopy observation shows that the AgI nanowires are located in the channels of the alumina membrane. In situ x-ray diffractions show that the nanowire arrays possess hexagonal close-packed structure (β-AgI) at 293 K, orienting along the (002) plane, whereas at 473 K, the nanowire arrays possess a body-centered cubic structure (α-AgI), orienting along the (110) plane. The AgI nanowire arrays exhibit a negative thermal expansion property from 293 to 433 K, and a higher transition temperature from the β to α phase. We ascribe the negative thermal expansion behavior to the phase transition from the β to α phase, and the elevated transition temperature to the radial restriction by the channels of alumina membrane

  6. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  7. Plasmonic photo-thermal therapy (PPTT)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xiaohua Huang

    of silver nitrate, with increased amount of silver ions for nano- cages of larger sizes. ... irradiation with laser pulses lead to destruction of over 90%. Of the cells, visible .... Targeted PPTT of melanoma xenografted tumors on mice was studied by ...

  8. Thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT) for thermal-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Allen; Swartz, Stephen; Huff, Michael; Gross, Steven

    2008-04-01

    We have been developing a novel thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT), an uncooled thermal-IR imager that is based on a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI). The FPI-based IR imager can convert a thermal-IR image to a video electronic image. IR radiation that is emitted by an object in the scene is imaged onto an IR-absorbing material that is located within an FPI. Temperature variations generated by the spatial variations in the IR image intensity cause variations in optical thickness, modulating the reflectivity seen by a probe laser beam. The reflected probe is imaged onto a visible array, producing a visible image of the IR scene. This technology can provide low-cost IR cameras with excellent sensitivity, low power consumption, and the potential for self-registered fusion of thermal-IR and visible images. We will describe characteristics of requisite pixelated arrays that we have fabricated.

  9. CMOS gate array characterization procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, James P.

    1993-09-01

    Present procedures are inadequate for characterizing the radiation hardness of gate array product lines prior to personalization because the selection of circuits to be used, from among all those available in the manufacturer's circuit library, is usually uncontrolled. (Some circuits are fundamentally more radiation resistant than others.) In such cases, differences in hardness can result between different designs of the same logic function. Hardness also varies because many gate arrays feature large custom-designed megacells (e.g., microprocessors and random access memories-MicroP's and RAM's). As a result, different product lines cannot be compared equally. A characterization strategy is needed, along with standardized test vehicle(s), methodology, and conditions, so that users can make informed judgments on which gate arrays are best suited for their needs. The program described developed preferred procedures for the radiation characterization of gate arrays, including a gate array evaluation test vehicle, featuring a canary circuit, designed to define the speed versus hardness envelope of the gate array. A multiplier was chosen for this role, and a baseline multiplier architecture is suggested that could be incorporated into an existing standard evaluation circuit chip.

  10. CCD and IR array controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Robert W.; Low, Frank J.

    2000-08-01

    A family of controllers has bene developed that is powerful and flexible enough to operate a wide range of CCD and IR focal plane arrays in a variety of ground-based applications. These include fast readout of small CCD and IR arrays for adaptive optics applications, slow readout of large CCD and IR mosaics, and single CCD and IR array operation at low background/low noise regimes as well as high background/high speed regimes. The CCD and IR controllers have a common digital core based on user- programmable digital signal processors that are used to generate the array clocking and signal processing signals customized for each application. A fiber optic link passes image data and commands to VME or PCI interface boards resident in a host computer to the controller. CCD signal processing is done with a dual slope integrator operating at speeds of up to one Megapixel per second per channel. Signal processing of IR arrays is done either with a dual channel video processor or a four channel video processor that has built-in image memory and a coadder to 32-bit precision for operating high background arrays. Recent developments underway include the implementation of a fast fiber optic data link operating at a speed of 12.5 Megapixels per second for fast image transfer from the controller to the host computer, and supporting image acquisition software and device drivers for the PCI interface board for the Sun Solaris, Linux and Windows 2000 operating systems.

  11. Flexible eddy current coil arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampfner, Y.; Johnson, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    A novel approach was devised to overcome certain limitations of conventional eddy current testing. The typical single-element hand-wound probe was replaced with a two dimensional array of spirally wound probe elements deposited on a thin, flexible polyimide substrate. This provides full and reliable coverage of the test area and eliminates the need for scanning. The flexible substrate construction of the array allows the probes to conform to irregular part geometries, such as turbine blades and tubing, thereby eliminating the need for specialized probes for each geometry. Additionally, the batch manufacturing process of the array can yield highly uniform and reproducible coil geometries. The array is driven by a portable computer-based eddy current instrument, smartEDDY/sup TM/, capable of two-frequency operation, and offers a great deal of versatility and flexibility due to its software-based architecture. The array is coupled to the instrument via an 80-switch multiplexer that can be configured to address up to 1600 probes. The individual array elements may be addressed in any desired sequence, as defined by the software

  12. Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkazalli, G.

    1980-07-01

    Month-by-month energy transfer data between an occupied residence and its energy supply systems are presented. The data were obtained during the first phase of photovoltaic/thermal residential research conducted at the University of Texas at Arlington/Solar Energy Research Facility. This research was part of the US Department of Energy Photovoltaic/Thermal Project managed by the M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory. Energy transfer data are divided into different categories depending on how the energy is consumed. Energy transfers between some system components are also categorized. These components include a flat-plate thermal collector array, a flat-plate photovoltaic array, a dc-to-ac inverter, thermal storage tanks, and a series heat pump. System operations included directing surplus electrical energy (generated by the photovoltaic array) into the local utility grid. The heat pump used off-peak utility power to chill water during the cooling season.

  13. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  14. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  15. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendulić-Slivar Senka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of clients in health spa resorts entails various forms of hydrotherapy. Due to specific properties of water, especially thermal mineral waters, hydrokinesitherapy has a positive effect on the locomotor system, aerobic capabilities of organism and overall quality of human life. The effects of use of water in movement therapy are related to the physical and chemical properties of water. The application of hydrotherapy entails precautionary measures, with an individual approach in assessment and prescription. The benefits of treatment in thermal mineral water should be emphasized and protected, as all thermal mineral waters differ in composition. All physical properties of water are more pronounced in thermal mineral waters due to its mineralisation, hence its therapeutical efficiency is greater, as well.

  16. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  17. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  18. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  19. Fabrication of microlens arrays using a CO2-assisted embossing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tzu-Chien; Chan, Bin-Da; Ciou, Jyun-Kai; Yang, Sen-Yeu

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a method to fabricate microlens arrays with a low processing temperature and a low pressure. The method is based on embossing a softened polymeric substrate over a mold with micro-hole arrays. Due to the effect of capillary and surface tension, microlens arrays can be formed. The embossing medium is CO 2 gas, which supplies a uniform pressing pressure so that large-area microlens arrays can be fabricated. CO 2 gas also acts as a solvent to plasticize the polymer substrates. With the special dissolving ability and isotropic pressing capacity of CO 2 gas, microlens arrays can be fabricated at a low temperature (lower than T g ) and free of thermal-induced residual stress. Such a combined mechanism of dissolving and embossing with CO 2 gas makes the fabrication of microlens arrays direct with complex processes, and is more compatible for optical usage. In the study, it is also found that the sag height of microlens changes when different CO 2 dissolving pressure and time are used. This makes it easy to fabricate microlens arrays of different geometries without using different molds. The quality, uniformity and optical property of the fabricated microlens arrays have been verified with measurements of the dimensions, surface smoothness, focal length, transmittance and light intensity through the fabricated microlens arrays

  20. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  1. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  2. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  3. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  4. A study on the crack inspection signal characteristics for power plant components by phased array UT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Sang; Lim, Sang Gyu; Kil, Du Song

    2001-01-01

    Phased array ultrasonic testing system has become available for practical application in complicated geometry such as turbine blade root, tenon, disc in power industry. This research describes the characteristics of phased array UT signal for various type of blade roots in thermal Power Plant turbines. This application of Phased array ultrasonic testing system has been promoted mainly to save inspection time and labor cost of turbine inspection. The characteristic of phase array UT signal for power plant component is very simple to understand but to difficult for perform the inspection. Since our sophisticated inspection technique and systems are essential for the inspection of steam turbine blade roots that require high reliability, we intend to develop new technology and improve phased array technique based on the wide and much experience for the inspection of turbine components.

  5. Neutron detection using a planar array of superheated superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meagher, G.

    1996-01-01

    A new thermal neutron detector consisting of an indium/mylar PASS array with a filler of boron powder has been tested successfully. A boron nucleus captures a neutron and the α-particle emitted in this reaction nucleates the transition to the normal state in a neighbouring grain. A PASS with grain radius r=12 μm showed very low response to irradiation by 835 keV γ-rays. The same PASS responded to α-particles with high efficiency, and thermal neutrons were detected with good efficiency and very low background. Thermal neutrons were also counted with an R=25 μm PASS. The use of large granules will allow spatial resolution to a single grain to be obtained and a read-out based on conventional inductive coupling and fast electronics to be utilized. (orig.)

  6. Mechanical Development of a Very Non-Standard Patch Array Antenna for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Richard; Chamberlain, Neil; Jakoboski, Julie; Petkov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanical development of patch antenna arrays for the Juno mission. The patch arrays are part of a six-frequency microwave radiometer instrument that will be used to measure thermal emissions from Jupiter. The very harsh environmental conditions in Jupiter orbit, as well as a demanding launch environment, resulted in a design that departs radically from conventional printed circuit patch antennas. The paper discusses the development and qualification of the Juno patch array antennas, with emphasis on the materials approach that was devised to mitigate the effects of electron charging in Jupiter orbit.

  7. Design and testing of a combustion-heated nineteen-converter SAVTEC array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyren, T.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Korringa, M.; McVey, J.; Sahines, T.

    1984-01-01

    The SAVTEC (Self-Adjusting Versatile Thermionic Energy Converter) is a new design approach for achieving very close (<12μ) interelectrode spacing in a thermionic converter. Techniques were developed for fabricating an array of nineteen SAVTEC converters. The array was incorporated in an SiC protective ''hot shell'' which also served as a radiant heat source for the emitter of each converter. The completed assembly was tested with a specially constructed combustion heat source. Electric output was generated by sixteen of the nineteen converters, despite poor thermal contact in a cooling block, which resulted in high collector temperatures. Details of the array design and test results are described

  8. Coded aperture imaging with uniformly redundant arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenimore, E.E.; Cannon, T.M.

    1980-01-01

    A system is described which uses uniformly redundant arrays to image non-focusable radiation. The array is used in conjunction with a balanced correlation technique to provide a system with no artifacts so that virtually limitless signal-to-noise ratio is obtained with high transmission characteristics. The array is mosaicked to reduce required detector size over conventional array detectors. 15 claims

  9. CFD investigations of data centers’ thermal performance for different configurations of CRACs units and aisles separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Nada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal performance of data centers is numerically studied for different configurations of computer room air conditioning (CRAC units and physical separations of cold and hot aisles. Temperature distribution, air flow characteristics and thermal management of data centers racks array are predicted and evaluated for the different arrangements. Measureable performance indices: supply/return heat index (SHI/RHI, return temperature index (RTI and return cooling index (RCI are used to measure the thermal management effectiveness of data center racks. The results showed that: (i hot air recirculation, cold air bypass and the measurable performance indices of the racks strongly depend on the racks location in the racks array, (ii the CRACs units layout affects the thermal managements of the racks array especially the sides and middle racks in the array, and (iii using cold aisle containments enhances the thermal performance of the data center.

  10. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zayyad, T. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Aida, R. [University of Yamanashi, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, Kofu, Yamanashi (Japan); Allen, M.; Anderson, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Azuma, R. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J.W.; Bergman, D.R.; Blake, S.A.; Cady, R. [University of Utah, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Cheon, B.G. [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chiba, J. [Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Chikawa, M. [Kinki University, Higashi Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Cho, E.J. [Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, W.R. [Yonsei University, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Fujii, H. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fujii, T. [Osaka City University, Osaka, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo (Japan); Fukushima, M. [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); University of Tokyo, Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Gorbunov, D. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2012-10-11

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah, USA, is designed for the observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  11. The surface detector array of the Telescope Array experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J.W.; Bergman, D.R.; Blake, S.A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B.G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E.J.; Cho, W.R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gorbunov, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment, located in the western desert of Utah, USA, is designed for the observation of extensive air showers from extremely high energy cosmic rays. The experiment has a surface detector array surrounded by three fluorescence detectors to enable simultaneous detection of shower particles at ground level and fluorescence photons along the shower track. The TA surface detectors and fluorescence detectors started full hybrid observation in March, 2008. In this article we describe the design and technical features of the TA surface detector.

  12. Successive Standardization of Rectangular Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Olshen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this note we illustrate and develop further with mathematics and examples, the work on successive standardization (or normalization that is studied earlier by the same authors in [1] and [2]. Thus, we deal with successive iterations applied to rectangular arrays of numbers, where to avoid technical difficulties an array has at least three rows and at least three columns. Without loss, an iteration begins with operations on columns: first subtract the mean of each column; then divide by its standard deviation. The iteration continues with the same two operations done successively for rows. These four operations applied in sequence completes one iteration. One then iterates again, and again, and again, ... In [1] it was argued that if arrays are made up of real numbers, then the set for which convergence of these successive iterations fails has Lebesgue measure 0. The limiting array has row and column means 0, row and column standard deviations 1. A basic result on convergence given in [1] is true, though the argument in [1] is faulty. The result is stated in the form of a theorem here, and the argument for the theorem is correct. Moreover, many graphics given in [1] suggest that except for a set of entries of any array with Lebesgue measure 0, convergence is very rapid, eventually exponentially fast in the number of iterations. Because we learned this set of rules from Bradley Efron, we call it “Efron’s algorithm”. More importantly, the rapidity of convergence is illustrated by numerical examples.

  13. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  14. Retrieval of Mir Solar Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; deGroh, Kim K.

    1999-01-01

    A Russian solar array panel removed in November 1997 from the non-articulating photovoltaic array on the Mir core module was returned to Earth on STS-89 in January 1998. The panel had been exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) for 10 years prior to retrieval. The retrieval provided a unique opportunity to study the effects of the LEO environment on a functional solar array. To take advantage of this opportunity, a team composed of members from RSC-Energia (Russia), the Boeing Company, and the following NASA Centers--Johnson Space Center, Kennedy Space Center, Langley Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Lewis Research Center--was put together to analyze the array. After post-retrieval inspections at the Spacehab Facility at Kennedy in Florida, the array was shipped to Lewis in Cleveland for electrical performance tests, closeup photodocumentation, and removal of selected solar cells and blanket material. With approval from RSC-Energia, five cell pairs and their accompanying blanket and mesh material, and samples of painted handrail materials were selected for removal on the basis of their ability to provide degradation information. Sites were selected that provided different sizes and shapes of micrometeoroid impacts and different levels of surface contamination. These materials were then distributed among the team for round robin testing.

  15. Dynamics of Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadley, P.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamics of Josephson junction arrays is a topic that lies at the intersection of the fields of nonlinear dynamics and Josephson junction technology. The series arrays considered here consist of several rapidly oscillating Josephson junctions where each junction is coupled equally to every other junction. The purpose of this study is to understand phaselocking and other cooperative dynamics of this system. Previously, little was known about high dimensional nonlinear systems of this sort. Numerical simulations are used to study the dynamics of these arrays. Three distinct types of periodic solutions to the array equations were observed as well as period doubled and chaotic solutions. One of the periodic solutions is the symmetric, in-phase solution where all of the junctions oscillate identically. The other two periodic solutions are symmetry-broken solutions where all of the junction do not oscillate identically. The symmetry-broken solutions are highly degenerate. As many as (N - 1) stable solutions can coexist for an array of N junctions. Understanding the stability of these several solutions and the transitions among them is vital to the design of useful devices

  16. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  17. Structural anomalies induced by the metal deposition methods in 2D silver nanoparticle arrays prepared by nanosphere lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shengli, E-mail: huangsl@xmu.edu.cn [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yang, Qianqian [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); State Key Lab of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, Chunjing; Kong, Lingqi; Li, Shuping; Kang, Junyong [Fujian Provincial Key Lab of Semiconductors and Applications, Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Silver nanoparticle arrays with 2-dimensional hexagonal arrangement were fabricated on the silicon substrates by nanosphere lithography. The silver film was deposited either by thermal evaporation or by magnetron sputtering under different conditions. The nanostructures of the achieved sphere template and the array units were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and were found to be anomalous under different deposition parameters. Comparative study indicated that the formation of the various 2-dimensional silver nanoparticle array structures was dominated by the thermal energy (temperature), kinetic energy and deposition direction of the deposited metal atoms as well as the size and nanocurvature of the colloidal particles and the metal clusters. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticle arrays with different nanostructures on silicon substrates. • Various deposition parameters in arrays formation systematically examined. • Possible mechanisms and optimization of nanostructures formation addressed.

  18. X-ray detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The object of the invention (an ionization chamber X-ray detector array for use with high speed computerised tomographic imaging apparatus) is to reduce the time required to produce a tomographic image. The detector array described determines the distribution of X-ray intensities in one or more flat, coplanar X-ray beams. It comprises three flat anode sheets parallel to the X-ray beam, a plurality of rod-like cathodes between the anodes, a detector gas between the electrodes and a means for applying a potential between the electrodes. Each of the X-ray sources is collimated to give a narrow, planar section of X-ray photons. Sets of X-ray sources in the array are pulsed simultaneously to obtain X-ray transmission data for tomographic image reconstruction. (U.K.)

  19. Innovations in IR projector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Barry E.; Higashi, B.; Ridley, Jeff A.; Holmen, J.; Newstrom, K.; Zins, C.; Nguyen, K.; Weeres, Steven R.; Johnson, Burgess R.; Stockbridge, Robert G.; Murrer, Robert Lee; Olson, Eric M.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Kircher, James R.; Flynn, David S.

    2000-07-01

    In the past year, Honeywell has developed a 512 X 512 snapshot scene projector containing pixels with very high radiance efficiency. The array can operate in both snapshot and raster mode. The array pixels have near black body characteristics, high radiance outputs, broad band performance, and high speed. IR measurements and performance of these pixels will be described. In addition, a vacuum probe station that makes it possible to select the best die for packaging and delivery based on wafer level radiance screening, has been developed and is in operation. This system, as well as other improvements, will be described. Finally, a review of the status of the present projectors and plans for future arrays is included.

  20. Sensitivity of Pulsar Timing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Xavier

    2015-08-01

    For the better part of the last decade, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) has been using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes to monitor millisecond pulsars. NANOGrav, along with similar international collaborations, the European Pulsar Timing Array and the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array in Australia, form a consortium of consortia: the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA). The goal of the IPTA is to directly detect low-frequency gravitational waves which cause small changes to the times of arrival of radio pulses from millisecond pulsars. In this talk I will discuss the work of NANOGrav and the IPTA as well as our sensitivity to gravitational waves from astrophysical sources. I will show that a detection is possible by the end of the decade.

  1. Hybrid Arrays for Chemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kirsten E.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.; Johnson, Kevin J.; Minor, Christian P.

    In recent years, multisensory approaches to environment monitoring for chemical detection as well as other forms of situational awareness have become increasingly popular. A hybrid sensor is a multimodal system that incorporates several sensing elements and thus produces data that are multivariate in nature and may be significantly increased in complexity compared to data provided by single-sensor systems. Though a hybrid sensor is itself an array, hybrid sensors are often organized into more complex sensing systems through an assortment of network topologies. Part of the reason for the shift to hybrid sensors is due to advancements in sensor technology and computational power available for processing larger amounts of data. There is also ample evidence to support the claim that a multivariate analytical approach is generally superior to univariate measurements because it provides additional redundant and complementary information (Hall, D. L.; Linas, J., Eds., Handbook of Multisensor Data Fusion, CRC, Boca Raton, FL, 2001). However, the benefits of a multisensory approach are not automatically achieved. Interpretation of data from hybrid arrays of sensors requires the analyst to develop an application-specific methodology to optimally fuse the disparate sources of data generated by the hybrid array into useful information characterizing the sample or environment being observed. Consequently, multivariate data analysis techniques such as those employed in the field of chemometrics have become more important in analyzing sensor array data. Depending on the nature of the acquired data, a number of chemometric algorithms may prove useful in the analysis and interpretation of data from hybrid sensor arrays. It is important to note, however, that the challenges posed by the analysis of hybrid sensor array data are not unique to the field of chemical sensing. Applications in electrical and process engineering, remote sensing, medicine, and of course, artificial

  2. The OncoArray Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amos, Christopher I; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Zhaoming

    2017-01-01

    by Illumina to facilitate efficient genotyping. The consortium developed standard approaches for selecting SNPs for study, for quality control of markers, and for ancestry analysis. The array was genotyped at selected sites and with prespecified replicate samples to permit evaluation of genotyping accuracy...... among centers and by ethnic background. RESULTS: The OncoArray consortium genotyped 447,705 samples. A total of 494,763 SNPs passed quality control steps with a sample success rate of 97% of the samples. Participating sites performed ancestry analysis using a common set of markers and a scoring...

  3. Phased Arrays 1985 Symposium - Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    anjl with an1 au~ U lar fy b)eanir. ( mice the 1311 0 ,0 - (a ) ,[ -40.0. -80𔃺 , -90.0 -45.0 0𔃺 45.0 90.0 ANGLE FROM BROADSIDE (DEGREES) aii ia -40,0...Electronic Scanning", RADC-TR-83-128, Dec. 1983. AL) A138808 222 m " ; . . . • " - " - . . . . -" ARRAYS OF COAXIALIY-FED MONOPOLE ELEMENTS IN A PARALLEL...Research Institute Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 Farmingdale, NY 11735 AB ST RAC U Arrays of coaxially-fed monopoles radiating into a parallel plate region

  4. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  5. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  6. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  7. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  8. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  9. Testing of ITER central solenoid coil insulation in an array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.; Martovetsky, N.N.; Perfect, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    A glass-polyimide insulation system has been proposed by the US team for use in the Central Solenoid (CS) coil of the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) machine and it is planned to use this system in the CS model coil inner module. The turn insulation will consist of 2 layers of combined prepreg and Kapton. Each layer is 50% overlapped with a butt wrap of prepreg and an overwrap of S glass. The coil layers will be separated by a glass-resin composite and impregnated in a VPI process. Small scale tests on the various components of the insulation are complete. It is planned to fabricate and test the insulation in a 4 x 4 insulated CS conductor array which will include the layer insulation and be vacuum impregnated. The conductor array will be subjected to 20 thermal cycles and 100000 mechanical load cycles in a Liquid Nitrogen environment. These loads are similar to those seen in the CS coil design. The insulation will be electrically tested at several stages during mechanical testing. This paper will describe the array configuration, fabrication: process, instrumentation, testing configuration, and supporting analyses used in selecting the array and test configurations

  10. Fabrication of cell container arrays with overlaid surface topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truckenmüller, Roman; Giselbrecht, Stefan; Escalante-Marun, Maryana; Groenendijk, Max; Papenburg, Bernke; Rivron, Nicolas; Unadkat, Hemant; Saile, Volker; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Albert; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Wessling, Matthias; de Boer, Jan; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents cell culture substrates in the form of microcontainer arrays with overlaid surface topographies, and a technology for their fabrication. The new fabrication technology is based on microscale thermoforming of thin polymer films whose surfaces are topographically prepatterned on a micro- or nanoscale. For microthermoforming, we apply a new process on the basis of temporary back moulding of polymer films and use the novel concept of a perforated-sheet-like mould. Thermal micro- or nanoimprinting is applied for prepatterning. The novel cell container arrays are fabricated from polylactic acid (PLA) films. The thin-walled microcontainer structures have the shape of a spherical calotte merging into a hexagonal shape at their upper circumferential edges. In the arrays, the cell containers are arranged densely packed in honeycomb fashion. The inner surfaces of the highly curved container walls are provided with various topographical micro- and nanopatterns. For a first validation of the microcontainer arrays as in vitro cell culture substrates, C2C12 mouse premyoblasts are cultured in containers with microgrooved surfaces and shown to align along the grooves in the three-dimensional film substrates. In future stem-cell-biological and tissue engineering applications, microcontainers fabricated using the proposed technology may act as geometrically defined artificial microenvironments or niches.

  11. Remedy and Recontamination Assessment Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    instruments pre-installed from the R/V Ecos during the April 22, 2016 event. .................................................................... 38...Environmental Security Technology Certification Program IBI Index of Benthic Integrity ISMA In situ Microcosm Arrays HOC Hydrophobic Organic Compound...system was successfully designed and constructed based on the goal of providing an integrated technology for assessing the effectiveness of

  12. Solar array flight dynamic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Solar Array Flight Dynamic Experiment (SAFDE) is to demonstrate the feasibility of on-orbit measurement and ground processing of large space structures' dynamic characteristics. Test definition or verification provides the dynamic characteristic accuracy required for control systems use. An illumination/measurement system was developed to fly on space shuttle flight STS-41D. The system was designed to dynamically evaluate a large solar array called the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE) that had been scheduled for this flight. The SAFDE system consisted of a set of laser diode illuminators, retroreflective targets, an intelligent star tracker receiver and the associated equipment to power, condition, and record the results. In six tests on STS-41D, data was successfully acquired from 18 retroreflector targets and ground processed, post flight, to define the solar array's dynamic characteristic. The flight experiment proved the viability of on-orbit test definition of large space structures dynamic characteristics. Future large space structures controllability should be greatly enhanced by this capability.

  13. Multiwall carbon nanotube microcavity arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Butt, Haider, E-mail: h.butt@bham.ac.uk [Nanotechnology Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Rifat, Ahmmed A. [Integrated Lightwave Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun [Harvard Medical School and Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 65 Landsdowne Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dai, Qing [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-03-21

    Periodic highly dense multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays can act as photonic materials exhibiting band gaps in the visible regime and beyond terahertz range. MWCNT arrays in square arrangement for nanoscale lattice constants can be configured as a microcavity with predictable resonance frequencies. Here, computational analyses of compact square microcavities (≈0.8 × 0.8 μm{sup 2}) in MWCNT arrays were demonstrated to obtain enhanced quality factors (≈170–180) and narrow-band resonance peaks. Cavity resonances were rationally designed and optimized (nanotube geometry and cavity size) with finite element method. Series (1 × 2 and 1 × 3) and parallel (2 × 1 and 3 × 1) combinations of microcavities were modeled and resonance modes were analyzed. Higher order MWCNT microcavities showed enhanced resonance modes, which were red shifted with increasing Q-factors. Parallel microcavity geometries were also optimized to obtain narrow-band tunable filtering in low-loss communication windows (810, 1336, and 1558 nm). Compact series and parallel MWCNT microcavity arrays may have applications in optical filters and miniaturized optical communication devices.

  14. PHARUS : PHased ARray Universal SAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paquay, M.H.A.; Vermeulen, B.C.B.; Koomen, P.J.; Hoogeboom, P.; Snoeij, P.; Pouwels, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands, a polarimetric C-band aircraft SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) has been developed. The project is called PHARUS, an acronm for PHased ARray Universal SAR. This instrument serves remote sensing applications. The antenna system contains 48 active modules (expandable to 96). A module

  15. Gamma-ray array physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    In this contribution I am going to discuss the development of large arrays of Compton Suppressed, High Purity Germanium (HpGe) detectors and the physics that has been, that is being, and that will be done with them. These arrays and their science have dominated low-energy nuclear structure research for the last twenty years and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. John Sharpey Schafer played a visionary role in convincing a skeptical world that the development of these arrays would lead to a path of enlightenment. The extent to which he succeeded can be seen both through the world-wide propagation of ever more sophisticated devices, and through the world-wide propagation of his students. I, personally, would not be working in research if it were not for Johns inspirational leadership. I am eternally grateful to him. Many excellent reviews of array physics have been made in the past which can provide detailed background reading. The review by Paul Nolan, another ex-Sharpey Schafer student, is particularly comprehensive and clear

  16. Directivity of basic linear arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Henning

    1970-01-01

    For a linear uniform array ofnelements, an expression is derived for the directivity as a function of the spacing and the phase constants. The cases of isotropic elements, collinear short dipoles, and parallel short dipoles are included. The formula obtained is discussed in some detail and contour...

  17. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  18. Optically Controlled Phased Array Antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garafalo, David

    1998-01-01

    .... The antenna is a 3-foot by 9 foot phased array capable of a scan angle of 120 degrees. The antenna was designed to be conformal to the cargo door of a large aircraft and is designed to operate in the frequency range of 830 - 1400 MHz with a 30...

  19. Optoacoustic detection of thermal lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Michel G.; Kolios, Michael C.; Whelan, William M.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive thermal therapy is being investigated as an alternative cancer treatment. It involves heating tissues to greater than 55°C over a period of a few minutes, which results in tissue coagulation. Optoacoustic (OA) imaging is a new imaging technique that involves exposing tissues to pulsed light and detecting the acoustic waves that are generated. In this study, adult bovine liver tissue samples were heated using continuous wave laser energy for various times, then scanned using an optoacoustic imaging system. Large optoacoustic signal variability was observed in the native tissue prior to heating. OA signal amplitude increased with maximum tissue temperature achieved, characterized by a correlation coefficient of 0.63. In this study we show that there are detectable changes in optoacoustic signal strength that arise from tissue coagulation, which demonstrates the potential of optoacoustic technology for the monitoring of thermal therapy delivery.

  20. Microcoil Spring Interconnects for Ceramic Grid Array Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, S. M.; Hester, J. D.; Gowan, A. K.; Montgomery, R. K.; Geist, D. L.; Blanche, J. F.; McGuire, G. D.; Nash, T. S.

    2011-01-01

    As integrated circuit miniaturization trends continue, they drive the need for smaller higher input/output (I/O) packages. Hermetically sealed ceramic area array parts are the package of choice by the space community for high reliability space flight electronic hardware. Unfortunately, the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the ceramic area array package and the epoxy glass printed wiring board limits the life of the interconnecting solder joint. This work presents the results of an investigation by Marshall Space Flight Center into a method to increase the life of this second level interconnection by the use of compliant microcoil springs. The design of the spring and its attachment process are presented along with thermal cycling results of microcoil springs (MCS) compared with state-of-the-art ball and column interconnections. Vibration testing has been conducted on MCS and high lead column parts. Radio frequency simulation and measurements have been made and the MCS has been modeled and a stress analysis performed. Thermal cycling and vibration testing have shown MCS interconnects to be significantly more reliable than solder columns. Also, MCS interconnects are less prone to handling damage than solder columns. Future work that includes shock testing, incorporation into a digital signal processor board, and process evaluation of expansion from a 400 I/O device to a device with over 1,100 I/O is identified.

  1. Realization of cantilever arrays for parallel proximity imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarov, Y; Ivanov, Tz; Frank, A; Zoellner, J-P; Nikolov, N; Rangelow, I W

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the fabrication and characterisation of self-actuating, and self-sensing cantilever arrays for large-scale parallel surface scanning. Each cantilever is integrated with a sharp silicon tip, a thermal-driven bimorph actuator, and a piezoresistive deflection sensor. Thus, the tip to the sample distance can be controlled individually for each cantilever. A radius of the tips below 10 nm is obtained, which enables nanometre in-plane surface imaging by Angstrom resolution in vertical direction. The fabricated cantilever probe arrays are also applicable for large-area manipulation, sub-10 nm metrology, bottom-up synthesis, high-speed gas analysis, for different bio-applications like recognition of DNA, RNA, or various biomarkers of a single disease, etc.

  2. Matrix-assisted energy conversion in nanostructured piezoelectric arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirbuly, Donald J.; Wang, Xianying; Wang, Yinmin

    2013-01-01

    A nanoconverter is capable of directly generating electricity through a nanostructure embedded in a polymer layer experiencing differential thermal expansion in a stress transfer zone. High surface-to-volume ratio semiconductor nanowires or nanotubes (such as ZnO, silicon, carbon, etc.) are grown either aligned or substantially vertically aligned on a substrate. The resulting nanoforest is then embedded with the polymer layer, which transfers stress to the nanostructures in the stress transfer zone, thereby creating a nanostructure voltage output due to the piezoelectric effect acting on the nanostructure. Electrodes attached at both ends of the nanostructures generate output power at densities of .about.20 nW/cm.sup.2 with heating temperatures of .about.65.degree. C. Nanoconverters arrayed in a series parallel arrangement may be constructed in planar, stacked, or rolled arrays to supply power to nano- and micro-devices without use of external batteries.

  3. Development of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.; Krumweide, Duane; Gaddy, Edward; Katz, Ira

    2000-01-01

    The results of design, analysis, and qualification of an Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panel are described. The objective of the ECSA design is to provide an electrostatic environment that does not interfere with sensitive instruments on scientific spacecraft. The ECSA design uses large, ITO-coated coverglasses that cover multiple solar cells, an aperture grid that covers the intercell areas, stress-relieved interconnects for connecting the aperture grid to the coverglasses, and edge clips to provides an electromagnetically shielded enclosure for the solar array active circuitry. Qualification coupons were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic response, conductivity, and survivability to launch acoustic and thermal cycling environments simulating LEO and GEO missions. The benefits of reducing solar panel interaction with the space environment are also discussed.

  4. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel.

  5. Impact of Improved Heat Sinking of an X-Ray Calorimeter Array on Crosstalk, Noise, and Background Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, C. A.; Adams, J. S.; Brekosky, R. P.; Chervenak, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Kelley, R. L.; Kelly, D. P.; Porter, F. S.

    2011-01-01

    The x-ray calorimeter array of the Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) of the Astro-H satellite will incorporate a silicon thermistor array produced during the development of the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) of the Suzaku satellite. On XRS, inadequate heat sinking of the array led to several non-ideal effects. The thermal crosstalk, while too small to be confused with x-ray signals, nonetheless contributed a noise term that could be seen as a degradation in energy resolution at high flux. When energy was deposited in the silicon frame around the active elements of the array, such as by a cosmic ray, the resulting pulse in the temperature of the frame resulted in coincident signal pulses on most of the pixels. In orbit, the resolution was found to depend on the particle background rate. In order to minimize these effects on SXS, heat-sinking gold was applied to areas on the front and back of the array die, which was thermally anchored to the gold of its fanout board via gold wire bonds. The thermal conductance from the silicon chip to the fanout board was improved over that of XRS by an order of magnitude. This change was sufficient for essentially eliminating frame events and allowing high-resolution to be attained at much higher counting rates. We will present the improved performance, the measured crosstalk, and the results of the thermal characterization of such arrays.

  6. The Design, Implementation, and Performance of the Astro-H SXS Calorimeter Array and Anti-Coincidence Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Adams, Joseph S.; Brekosky, Regis P.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chervenak, James A.; Eckart, Megan E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Galeazzi, Masimilliano; Grein, Christoph; Jhabvala, Christine A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The calorimeter array of the JAXA Astro-H (renamed Hitomi) Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) was designed to provide unprecedented spectral resolution of spatially extended cosmic x-ray sources and of all cosmic x-ray sources in the Fe-K band around 6 keV, enabling essential plasma diagnostics. The SXS has a square array of 36 microcalorimeters at the focal plane. These calorimeters consist of ion-implanted silicon thermistors and HgTe thermalizing x-ray absorbers. These devices have demonstrated a resolution of better than 4.5 eV at 6 keV when operated at a heat-sink temperature of 50 mK. We will discuss the basic physical parameters of this array, including the array layout, thermal conductance of the link to the heat sink, resistance function, absorber details, and means of attaching the absorber to the thermistor-bearing element. We will also present the thermal characterization of the whole array, including thermal conductance and crosstalk measurements and the results of pulsing the frame temperature via alpha particles, heat pulses, and the environmental background. A silicon ionization detector is located behind the calorimeter array and serves to reject events due to cosmic rays. We will briefly describe this anti-coincidence detector and its performance.

  7. Extremely Black Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Solar Steam Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhe; Wang, Huimin; Jian, Muqiang; Li, Yanshen; Xia, Kailun; Zhang, Mingchao; Wang, Chunya; Wang, Qi; Ma, Ming; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Zhang, Yingying

    2017-08-30

    The unique structure of a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) array makes it behave most similarly to a blackbody. It is reported that the optical absorptivity of an extremely black VACNT array is about 0.98-0.99 over a large spectral range of 200 nm-200 μm, inspiring us to explore the performance of VACNT arrays in solar energy harvesting. In this work, we report the highly efficient steam generation simply by laminating a layer of VACNT array on the surface of water to harvest solar energy. It is found that under solar illumination the temperature of upper water can significantly increase with obvious water steam generated, indicating the efficient solar energy harvesting and local temperature rise by the thin layer of VACNTs. We found that the evaporation rate of water assisted by VACNT arrays is 10 times that of bare water, which is the highest ratio for solar-thermal-steam generation ever reported. Remarkably, the solar thermal conversion efficiency reached 90%. The excellent performance could be ascribed to the strong optical absorption and local temperature rise induced by the VACNT layer, as well as the ultrafast water transport through the VACNT layer due to the frictionless wall of CNTs. Based on the above, we further demonstrated the application of VACNT arrays in solar-driven desalination.

  8. DNA electrophoresis through microlithographic arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevick, E.M.; Williams, D.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophoresis is one of the most widely used techniques in biochemistry and genetics for size-separating charged molecular chains such as DNA or synthetic polyelectrolytes. The separation is achieved by driving the chains through a gel with an external electric field. As a result of the field and the obstacles that the medium provides, the chains have different mobilities and are physically separated after a given process time. The macroscopically observed mobility scales inversely with chain size: small molecules move through the medium quickly while larger molecules move more slowly. However, electrophoresis remains a tool that has yet to be optimised for most efficient size separation of polyelectrolytes, particularly large polyelectrolytes, e.g. DNA in excess of 30-50 kbp. Microlithographic arrays etched with an ordered pattern of obstacles provide an attractive alternative to gel media and provide wider avenues for size separation of polyelectrolytes and promote a better understanding of the separation process. Its advantages over gels are (1) the ordered array is durable and can be re-used, (2) the array morphology is ordered and can be standardized for specific separation, and (3) calibration with a marker polyelectrolyte is not required as the array is reproduced to high precision. Most importantly, the array geometry can be graduated along the chip so as to expand the size-dependent regime over larger chain lengths and postpone saturation. In order to predict the effect of obstacles upon the chain-length dependence in mobility and hence, size separation, we study the dynamics of single chains using theory and simulation. We present recent work describing: 1) the release kinetics of a single DNA molecule hooked around a point, frictionless obstacle and in both weak and strong field limits, 2) the mobility of a chain impinging upon point obstacles in an ordered array of obstacles, demonstrating the wide range of interactions possible between the chain and

  9. Microfabricated Multianalyte Sensor Arrays for Metabolic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pishko, Michael V

    2006-01-01

    ...(ethylene glycol) diacrylate or PEG-DA on the array electrodes. The fabricated microarray sensors were individually addressable and with no cross-talk between adjacent array elements as assessed using cyclic voltammetry...

  10. Microfabricated Multianalyte Sensor Arrays for Metabolic Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pishko, Michael V

    2007-01-01

    ...(ethylene glycol) diacrylate or PEG-DA on the array electrodes. The fabricated microarray sensors were individually addressable and with no cross-talk between adjacent array elements as assessed using cyclic voltammetry...

  11. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Fahmy, Hossam Aly Hassan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2014-01-01

    the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  12. Statistical monitoring of linear antenna arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The paper concerns the problem of monitoring linear antenna arrays using the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test. When an abnormal event (fault) affects an array of antenna elements, the radiation pattern changes and significant deviation from

  13. Photovoltaic array: Power conditioner interface characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Hill, G. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The electrical output (power, current, and voltage) of flat plate solar arrays changes constantly, due primarily to changes in cell temperature and irradiance level. As a result, array loads such as dc-to-ac power conditioners must be capable of accommodating widely varying input levels while maintaining operation at or near the maximum power point of the array. The array operating characteristics and extreme output limits necessary for the systematic design of array load interfaces under a wide variety of climatic conditions are studied. A number of interface parameters are examined, including optimum operating voltage, voltage energy, maximum power and current limits, and maximum open circuit voltage. The effect of array degradation and I-V curve fill factor or the array power conditioner interface is also discussed. Results are presented as normalized ratios of power conditioner parameters to array parameters, making the results universally applicable to a wide variety of system sizes, sites, and operating modes.

  14. Heat Sinking, Cross Talk, and Temperature Stability for Large, Close-Packed Arrays of Microcalorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Naoko; Bandler, SImon; Brekosky, Regis; Chervenak, James; Figueroa-Felicano, Enectali; Finkbeiner, Frederick; Kelley, Richard; Kilbourne, Caroline; Porter, Frederick; Sadleir, Jack; hide

    2007-01-01

    We are developing large, close-packed arrays of x-ray transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters. In such a device, sufficient heat sinking is important to to minimize thermal cross talk between pixels and to stabilize the bath temperature for all pixels. We have measured cross talk on out 8 x 8 arrays and studied the shape and amount of thermal crosstalk as a function of pixel location and efficiency of electrothermal feedback. In this presentation, we will compare measurements made on arrays with and without a backside, heat-sinking copper layer, as well as results of devices on silicon-nitride membranes and on solid substrates, and we will discuss the implications for energy resolution and maximum count rate. We will also discuss the dependence of pulse height upon bath temperature, and the measured and required stability of the bath temperature.

  15. Multiobjective Optimization Method for Multichannel Microwave Components of Active Phased Array Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multichannel microwave components are widely used and the active phased array antenna is a typical representative. The high power generated from T/R modules in active phased array antenna (APAA leads to the degradation of its electrical performances, which seriously restricts the development of high-performance APAA. Therefore, to meet the demand of thermal design for APAA, a multiobjective optimization design model of cold plate is proposed. Furthermore, in order to achieve temperature uniformity and case temperature restrictions of APAA simultaneously, optimization model of channel structure is developed. Besides, an airborne active phased array antenna was tested as an example to verify the validity of the optimization model. The valuable results provide important reference for engineers to enhance thermal design technology of antennas.

  16. Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF) for Sparse Aperture Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Daniel W.; Miller, David W.; Sedwick, Raymond J.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining relative orientation. Additional problems posed by propellant include optical contamination, plume impingement, thermal emission, and vibration excitation. For these missions where control of relative degrees of freedom is important, we consider using a system of electromagnets, in concert with reaction wheels, to replace the consumables. Electromagnetic Formation Flight sparse apertures, powered by solar energy, are designed differently from traditional propulsion systems, which are based on V. This paper investigates the design of sparse apertures both inside and outside the Earth's gravity field.

  17. Electrical power system integrated thermal/electrical system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper adds thermal properties to previously developed electrical Saber templates and incorporates these templates into a functional Electrical Power Subsystem (EPS) simulation. These combined electrical and thermal templates enable the complete and realistic simulation of a vehicle EPS on-orbit. Applications include on-orbit energy balance determinations for system load changes, initial array and battery EPS sizing for new EPS development, and array and battery technology trade studies. This effort proves the versatility of the Saber simulation program in handling varied and complex simulations accurately and in a reasonable amount of computer time. 9 refs

  18. Leakage analysis of crossbar memristor arrays

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2014-07-01

    Crossbar memristor arrays provide a promising high density alternative for the current memory and storage technologies. These arrays suffer from parasitic current components that significantly increase the power consumption, and could ruin the readout operation. In this work we study the trade-off between the crossbar array density and the power consumption required for its readout. Our analysis is based on simulating full memristor arrays on a SPICE platform.

  19. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravitz, Stanley H [Placitas, NM; Ingersoll, David [Albuquerque, NM; Schmidt, Carrie [Los Lunas, NM; Flemming, Jeb [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  20. 3D Printing of Ball Grid Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Hines, Daniel; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Das, Siddhartha

    Ball grid arrays (BGA) are interconnects between an integrated circuit (IC) and a printed circuit board (PCB), that are used for surface mounting electronic components. Typically, lead free alloys are used to make solder balls which, after a reflow process, establish a mechanical and electrical connection between the IC and the PCB. High temperature processing is required for most of these alloys leading to thermal shock causing damage to ICs. For producing flexible circuits on a polymer substrate, there is a requirement for low temperature processing capabilities (around 150 C) and for reducing strain from mechanical stresses. Additive manufacturing techniques can provide an alternative methodology for fabricating BGAs as a direct replacement for standard solder bumped BGAs. We have developed aerosol jet (AJ) printing methods to fabricate a polymer bumped BGA. As a demonstration of the process developed, a daisy chain test chip was polymer bumped using an AJ printed ultra violet (UV) curable polymer ink that was then coated with an AJ printed silver nanoparticle laden ink as a conducting layer printed over the polymer bump. The structure for the balls were achieved by printing the polymer ink using a specific toolpath coupled with in-situ UV curing of the polymer which provided good control over the shape, resulting in well-formed spherical bumps on the order of 200 um wide by 200 um tall for this initial demonstration. A detailed discussion of the AJ printing method and results from accelerated life-time testing will be presented

  1. FEBA - flooding experiments with blocked arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihle, P.; Rust, K.

    1984-03-01

    Flooding Experiments with Blocked Arrays (FEBA) were conducted to study the effectiveness of the emergency core cooling of PWR with deformed claddings of some fuel rod clusters. Full length bundles of 1x5 as well as 5x5 electrically heated rods of PWR dimensions were used for a number of separate effect test series with various blockage geometries simulating ballooned fuel rod claddings. The results of the eight test series performed with the 5x5 rod bundle using full decay heat show the effects of grid spacers and coplanar coolant channel blockages with and without bypass on reflood heat transfer. The cooling enhancement downstream of grid spacers as well as within and downstream of blockages of 62% blockage ratio mainly occurs during the early portion of reflood. For the 90% blockage ratio only maximum cladding temperatures downstream of the blockage were slightly higher (max. 50 K) than in the bypass area. The purpose of the investigations was to obtain an insight into the most important heat transfer mechanisms to broaden the data base for the development and assessment of improved thermal-hydraulic models. (orig.) [de

  2. Human location estimation using thermopile array sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnin, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    2017-11-01

    Utilization of Thermopile sensor at an early stage of human detection is challenging as there are many things that produce thermal heat other than human such as electrical appliances and animals. Therefrom, an algorithm for early presence detection has been developed through the study of human body temperature behaviour with respect to the room temperature. The change in non-contact detected temperature of human varied according to body parts. In an indoor room, upper parts of human body change up to 3°C whereas lower part ranging from 0.58°C to 1.71°C. The average changes in temperature of human is used as a conditional set-point value in the program algorithm to detect human presence. The current position of human and its respective angle is gained when human is presence at certain pixels of Thermopile’s sensor array. Human position is estimated successfully as the developed sensory system is tested to the actuator of a stand fan.

  3. Development of Electrostatically Clean Solar Array Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    Certain missions require Electrostatically Clean Solar Array (ECSA) panels to establish a favorable environment for the operation of sensitive scientific instruments. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ECSA panel that minimizes panel surface potential below 100mV in LEO and GEO charged particle environments, prevents exposure of solar cell voltage and panel insulating surfaces to the ambient environment, and provides an equipotential, grounded structure surrounding the entire panel. An ECSA panel design was developed that uses a Front Side Aperture-Shield (FSA) that covers all inter-cell areas with a single graphite composite laminate, composite edge clips for connecting the FSA to the panel substrate, and built-in tabs that interconnect the FSA to conductive coated coverglasses using a conductive adhesive. Analysis indicated the ability of the design to meet the ECSA requirements. Qualification coupons and a 0.5m x 0.5m prototype panel were fabricated and tested for photovoltaic performance and electrical grounding before and after exposure to acoustic and thermal cycling environments. The results show the feasibility of achieving electrostatic cleanliness with a small penalty in mass, photovoltaic performance and cost, with a design is structurally robust and compatible with a wide range of current solar panel technologies.

  4. Antenna Arrays and Automotive Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rabinovich, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This book throws a lifeline to designers wading through mounds of antenna array patents looking for the most suitable systems for their projects. Drastically reducing the research time required to locate solutions to the latest challenges in automotive communications, it sorts and systematizes material on cutting-edge antenna arrays that feature multi-element communication systems with enormous potential for the automotive industry. These new systems promise to make driving safer and more efficient, opening up myriad applications, including vehicle-to-vehicle traffic that prevents collisions, automatic toll collection, vehicle location and fine-tuning for cruise control systems. This book’s exhaustive coverage begins with currently deployed systems, frequency ranges and key parameters. It proceeds to examine system geometry, analog and digital beam steering technology (including "smart" beams formed in noisy environments), maximizing signal-to-noise ratios, miniaturization, and base station technology that ...

  5. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  6. Invasive tightly coupled processor arrays

    CERN Document Server

    LARI, VAHID

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces new massively parallel computer (MPSoC) architectures called invasive tightly coupled processor arrays. It proposes strategies, architecture designs, and programming interfaces for invasive TCPAs that allow invading and subsequently executing loop programs with strict requirements or guarantees of non-functional execution qualities such as performance, power consumption, and reliability. For the first time, such a configurable processor array architecture consisting of locally interconnected VLIW processing elements can be claimed by programs, either in full or in part, using the principle of invasive computing. Invasive TCPAs provide unprecedented energy efficiency for the parallel execution of nested loop programs by avoiding any global memory access such as GPUs and may even support loops with complex dependencies such as loop-carried dependencies that are not amenable to parallel execution on GPUs. For this purpose, the book proposes different invasion strategies for claiming a desire...

  7. High voltage load resistor array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Monty Ray [Smithfield, VA

    2005-01-18

    A high voltage resistor comprising an array of a plurality of parallel electrically connected resistor elements each containing a resistive solution, attached at each end thereof to an end plate, and about the circumference of each of the end plates, a corona reduction ring. Each of the resistor elements comprises an insulating tube having an electrode inserted into each end thereof and held in position by one or more hose clamps about the outer periphery of the insulating tube. According to a preferred embodiment, the electrode is fabricated from stainless steel and has a mushroom shape at one end, that inserted into the tube, and a flat end for engagement with the end plates that provides connection of the resistor array and with a load.

  8. Thermal crosstalk investigation in an integrated InP multiwavelength laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilardi, G.; Wale, M.J.; Smit, M.K.

    2012-01-01

    We numerically investigate the thermal crosstalk effects in an integrated InP multiwavelength laser. The multiwavelength laser under investigation consists of a number of Distributed Bragg Reflector lasers and an Arrayed Waveguide Grating. Each laser generates a fixed wavelength and the Arrayed

  9. Thermalization and cooling of plasmon-exciton polaritons : towards quantum condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, S.R.K.; Feist, J.; Verschuuren, M.A.; Garcia Vidal, F.J.; Gomez Rivas, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present indications of thermalization and cooling of quasiparticles, a precursor for quantum condensation, in a plasmonic nanoparticle array. We investigate a periodic array of metallic nanorods covered by a polymer layer doped with an organic dye at room temperature. Surface lattice resonances

  10. Cavity syncronisation of underdamped Josephson junction arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbara, P.; Filatrella, G.; Lobb, C.

    2003-01-01

    the junctions in the array and an electromagnetic cavity. Here we show that a model of a one-dimensional array of Josephson junctions coupled to a resonator can produce many features of the coherent be havior above threshold, including coherent radiation of power and the shape of the array current...

  11. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  12. Microneedle array electrode for human EEG recording.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüttge, Regina; van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria; Vander Sloten, Jos; Verdonck, Pascal; Nyssen, Marc; Haueisen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Microneedle array electrodes for EEG significantly reduce the mounting time, particularly by circumvention of the need for skin preparation by scrubbing. We designed a new replication process for numerous types of microneedle arrays. Here, polymer microneedle array electrodes with 64 microneedles,

  13. Calibration strategies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaug, M.; Berge, D.; Daniel, M.; Doro, M.; Förster, A.; Hofmann, W.; Maccarone, M.C.; Parsons, D.; de los Reyes Lopez, R.; van Eldik, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Central Calibration Facilities workpackage of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy defines the overall calibration strategy of the array, develops dedicated hardware and software for the overall array calibration and coordinates the calibration

  14. Principles of Adaptive Array Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    ACE with and without tapering (homogeneous case). These analytical results are less suited to predict the detection performance of a real system ...Nickel: Adaptive Beamforming for Phased Array Radars. Proc. Int. Radar Symposium IRS’98 (Munich, Sept. 1998), DGON and VDE /ITG, pp. 897-906.(Reprint also...strategies for airborne radar. Asilomar Conf. on Signals, Systems and Computers, Pacific Grove, CA, 1998, IEEE Cat.Nr. 0-7803-5148-7/98, pp. 1327-1331. [17

  15. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  16. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  17. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  18. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-01-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  19. Blending of phased array data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Arno; van Groenestijn, Gert-Jan; van Neer, Paul; Blacquière, Gerrit; Volker, Arno

    2018-04-01

    The use of phased arrays is growing in the non-destructive testing industry and the trend is towards large 2D arrays, but due to limitations, it is currently not possible to record the signals from all elements, resulting in aliased data. In the past, we have presented a data interpolation scheme `beyond spatial aliasing' to overcome this aliasing. In this paper, we present a different approach: blending and deblending of data. On the hardware side, groups of receivers are blended (grouped) in only a few transmit/recording channels. This allows for transmission and recording with all elements, in a shorter acquisition time and with less channels. On the data processing side, this blended data is deblended (separated) by transforming it to a different domain and applying an iterative filtering and thresholding. Two different filtering methods are compared: f-k filtering and wavefield extrapolation filtering. The deblending and filtering methods are demonstrated on simulated experimental data. The wavefield extrapolation filtering proves to outperform f-k filtering. The wavefield extrapolation method can deal with groups of up to 24 receivers, in a phased array of 48 × 48 elements.

  20. LOFAR, the low frequency array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, R. C.

    2012-09-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope designed by ASTRON, with antenna stations concentrated in the north of the Netherlands and currently spread into Germany, France, Sweden and the United Kingdom; plans for more LOFAR stations exist in several other countries. Utilizing a novel, phased-array design, LOFAR is optimized for the largely unexplored low frequency range between 30 and 240 MHz. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid re-pointing of the telescopes as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. Processing (e.g. cross-correlation) takes place in the LOFAR BlueGene/P supercomputer, and associated post-processing facilities. With its dense core (inner few km) array and long (more than 1000 km) interferometric baselines, LOFAR reaches unparalleled sensitivity and resolution in the low frequency radio regime. The International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) is now issuing its first call for observing projects that will be peer reviewed and selected for observing starting in December. Part of the allocations will be made on the basis of a fully Open Skies policy; there are also reserved fractions assigned by national consortia in return for contributions from their country to the ILT. In this invited talk, the gradually expanding complement of operationally verified observing modes and capabilities are reviewed, and some of the exciting first astronomical results are presented.

  1. Anodic Fabrication of Ti-Ni-O Nanotube Arrays on Shape Memory Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification with oxide nanostructures is one of the efficient ways to improve physical or biomedical properties of shape memory alloys. This work reports a fabrication of highly ordered Ti-Ni-O nanotube arrays on Ti-Ni alloy substrates through pulse anodization in glycerol-based electrolytes. The effects of anodization parameters and the annealing process on the microstructures and surface morphology of Ti-Ni-O were studied using scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. The electrolyte type greatly affected the formation of nanotube arrays. A formation of anatase phase was found with the Ti-Ni-O nanotube arrays annealed at 450 °C. The oxide nanotubes could be crystallized to rutile phase after annealing treatment at 650 °C. The Ti-Ni-O nanotube arrays demonstrated an excellent thermal stability by keeping their nanotubular structures up to 650 °C.

  2. Thin randomly aligned hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays as ultrablack metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Francesco; Hines, Peter; De Crescenzi, Maurizio; Motta, Nunzio

    2017-07-01

    Ultrablack metamaterials are artificial materials able to harvest all the incident light regardless of wavelength, angle, or polarization. Here, we show the ultrablack properties of randomly aligned hierarchical carbon nanotube arrays with thicknesses below 200 nm. The thin coatings are realized by solution processing and dry-transfer deposition on different substrates. The hierarchical surface morphology of the coatings is biomimetic and provides a large effective area that improves the film optical absorption. Also, such a morphology is responsible for the moth-eye effect, which leads to the omnidirectional and polarization-independent suppression of optical reflection. The films exhibit an emissivity up to 99.36% typical of an ideal black body, resulting in the thinnest ultrablack metamaterial ever reported. Such a material may be exploited for thermal, optical, and optoelectronic devices such as heat sinks, optical shields, solar cells, light and thermal sensors, and light-emitting diodes.

  3. AUTOGENIC THERAPY IN TENSION HEADACHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amruthraj, Brunda; Mishra, H.; Kumaraiah, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Ten subjects diagnosed as Psychalgia were taken for study. A multiple baseline design was adapted and clients were subjected to 30 sessions of autogenic training. They were assessed using physiological (EMG and thermal change) and behavioural measures (Visual analogue scale and behavioural symptom checklist). Findings revealed autogenic therapy to be effective in reducing tension headache. PMID:21927245

  4. AUTOGENIC THERAPY IN TENSION HEADACHE

    OpenAIRE

    Amruthraj, Brunda; Mishra, H.; Kumaraiah, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Ten subjects diagnosed as Psychalgia were taken for study. A multiple baseline design was adapted and clients were subjected to 30 sessions of autogenic training. They were assessed using physiological (EMG and thermal change) and behavioural measures (Visual analogue scale and behavioural symptom checklist). Findings revealed autogenic therapy to be effective in reducing tension headache.

  5. Microbial Diagnostic Array Workstation (MDAW: a web server for diagnostic array data storage, sharing and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yung-Fu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are becoming a very popular tool for microbial detection and diagnostics. Although these diagnostic arrays are much simpler when compared to the traditional transcriptome arrays, due to the high throughput nature of the arrays, the data analysis requirements still form a bottle neck for the widespread use of these diagnostic arrays. Hence we developed a new online data sharing and analysis environment customised for diagnostic arrays. Methods Microbial Diagnostic Array Workstation (MDAW is a database driven application designed in MS Access and front end designed in ASP.NET. Conclusion MDAW is a new resource that is customised for the data analysis requirements for microbial diagnostic arrays.

  6. A novel method to design sparse linear arrays for ultrasonic phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Bin; Shi, Ke-Ren

    2006-12-22

    In ultrasonic phased array testing, a sparse array can increase the resolution by enlarging the aperture without adding system complexity. Designing a sparse array involves choosing the best or a better configuration from a large number of candidate arrays. We firstly designed sparse arrays by using a genetic algorithm, but found that the arrays have poor performance and poor consistency. So, a method based on the Minimum Redundancy Linear Array was then adopted. Some elements are determined by the minimum-redundancy array firstly in order to ensure spatial resolution and then a genetic algorithm is used to optimize the remaining elements. Sparse arrays designed by this method have much better performance and consistency compared to the arrays designed only by a genetic algorithm. Both simulation and experiment confirm the effectiveness.

  7. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang, E-mail: sgyang@nju.edu.cn

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  8. A general melt-injection-decomposition route to oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Dongqiang; Zhang, Xinwei; Hua, Zhenghe; Yang, Shaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route is proposed for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. • Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays have been realized as examples through the developed MID route. • The mechanism of the developed MID route is discussed using Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis technique. • The MID route is a versatile, simple, facile and effective way to prepare different kinds of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays in the future. - Abstract: In this manuscript, a general melt-injection-decomposition (MID) route has been proposed and realized for the fabrication of oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Nitrate was used as the starting materials, which was injected into the nanopores of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane through the capillarity action in its liquid state. At higher temperature, the nitrate decomposed into corresponding metal oxide within the nanopores of the AAO membrane. Oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays were formed within the AAO membrane as a result of the confinement of the nanopores. Four kinds of metal oxide (CuO, Mn_2O_3, Co_3O_4 and Cr_2O_3) nanowire arrays are presented here as examples fabricated by this newly developed process. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies showed clear evidence of the formations of the oriented metal oxide nanowire arrays. Formation mechanism of the metal oxide nanowire arrays is discussed based on the Thermogravimetry and Differential Thermal Analysis measurement results.

  9. BASIMO - Borehole Heat Exchanger Array Simulation and Optimization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Daniel O.; Bastian, Welsch; Wolfram, Rühaak; Kristian, Bär; Ingo, Sass

    2017-04-01

    Arrays of borehole heat exchangers are an increasingly popular source for renewable energy. Furthermore, they can serve as borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) systems for seasonally fluctuating heat sources like solar thermal energy or district heating grids. The high temperature level of these heat sources prohibits the use of the shallow subsurface for environmental reasons. Therefore, deeper reservoirs have to be accessed instead. The increased depth of the systems results in high investment costs and has hindered the implementation of this technology until now. Therefore, research of medium deep BTES systems relies on numerical simulation models. Current simulation tools cannot - or only to some extent - describe key features like partly insulated boreholes unless they run fully discretized models of the borehole heat exchangers. However, fully discretized models often come at a high computational cost, especially for large arrays of borehole heat exchangers. We give an update on the development of BASIMO: a tool, which uses one dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for the borehole heat exchangers coupled with a numerical finite element model for the subsurface heat transport in a dual-continuum approach. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh bypasses the limitations of structured grids for borehole path geometries, while the thermal resistance and capacity model is improved to account for borehole heat exchanger properties changing with depth. Thereby, partly insulated boreholes can be considered in the model. Furthermore, BASIMO can be used to improve the design of BTES systems: the tool allows for automated parameter variations and is readily coupled to other code like mathematical optimization algorithms. Optimization can be used to determine the required minimum system size or to increase the system performance.

  10. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  11. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan's investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra) n , where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan's aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays

  12. Magnetomicrofluidics Circuits for Organizing Bioparticle Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh

    Single-cell analysis (SCA) tools have important applications in the analysis of phenotypic heterogeneity, which is difficult or impossible to analyze in bulk cell culture or patient samples. SCA tools thus have a myriad of applications ranging from better credentialing of drug therapies to the analysis of rare latent cells harboring HIV infection or in Cancer. However, existing SCA systems usually lack the required combination of programmability, flexibility, and scalability necessary to enable the study of cell behaviors and cell-cell interactions at the scales sufficient to analyze extremely rare events. To advance the field, I have developed a novel, programmable, and massively-parallel SCA tool which is based on the principles of computer circuits. By integrating these magnetic circuits with microfluidics channels, I developed a platform that can organize a large number of single particles into an array in a controlled manner. My magnetophoretic circuits use passive elements constructed in patterned magnetic thin films to move cells along programmed tracks with an external rotating magnetic field. Cell motion along these tracks is analogous to the motion of charges in an electrical conductor, following a rule similar to Ohm's law. I have also developed asymmetric conductors, similar to electrical diodes, and storage sites for cells that behave similarly to electrical capacitors. I have also developed magnetophoretic circuits which use an overlaid pattern of microwires to switch single cells between different tracks. This switching mechanism, analogous to the operation of electronic transistors, is achieved by establishing a semiconducting gap in the magnetic pattern which can be changed from an insulating state to a conducting state by application of electrical current to an overlaid electrode. I performed an extensive study on the operation of transistors to optimize their geometry and minimize the required gate currents. By combining these elements into

  13. Acoustic array systems theory, implementation, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Mingsian R; Benesty, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Presents a unified framework of far-field and near-field array techniques for noise source identification and sound field visualization, from theory to application. Acoustic Array Systems: Theory, Implementation, and Application provides an overview of microphone array technology with applications in noise source identification and sound field visualization. In the comprehensive treatment of microphone arrays, the topics covered include an introduction to the theory, far-field and near-field array signal processing algorithms, practical implementations, and common applic

  14. The hyperion particle-γ detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.O.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Ota, S. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Fisher, S.; Parker, J. [Science, Technology and Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Beausang, C.W. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Dag, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Humby, P. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Surrey GU27XH (United Kingdom); Koglin, J. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); McCleskey, E.; McIntosh, A.B.; Saastamoinen, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Tamashiro, A.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Wilson, E. [Department of Physics, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Wu, T.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City UT 84112-0830 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Hyperion is a new high-efficiency charged-particle γ-ray detector array which consists of a segmented silicon telescope for charged-particle detection and up to fourteen high-purity germanium clover detectors for the detection of coincident γ rays. The array will be used in nuclear physics measurements and Stockpile Stewardship studies and replaces the STARLiTeR array. This article discusses the features of the array and presents data collected with the array in the commissioning experiment.

  15. HIFU Monitoring and Control with Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Andrew Jacob

    The biological effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been known and studied for decades. HIFU has been shown capable of treating a wide variety of diseases and disorders. However, despite its demonstrated potential, HIFU has been slow to gain clinical acceptance. This is due, in part, to the difficulty associated with robustly monitoring and controlling the delivery of the HIFU energy. The non-invasive nature of the surgery makes the assessment of treatment progression difficult, leading to long treatment times and a significant risk of under treatment. This thesis research develops new techniques and systems for robustly monitoring HIFU therapies for the safe and efficacious delivery of the intended treatment. Systems and algorithms were developed for the two most common modes of HIFU delivery systems: single-element and phased array applicators. Delivering HIFU with a single element transducer is a widely used technique in HIFU therapies. The simplicity of a single element offers many benefits in terms of cost and overall system complexity. Typical monitoring schemes rely on an external device (e.g. diagnostic ultrasound or MRI) to assess the progression of therapy. The research presented in this thesis explores using the same element to both deliver and monitor the HIFU therapy. The use of a dual-mode ultrasound transducer (DMUT) required the development of an FPGA based single-channel arbitrary waveform generator and high-speed data acquisition unit. Data collected from initial uncontrolled ablations led to the development of monitoring and control algorithms which were implemented directly on the FPGA. Close integration between the data acquisition and arbitrary waveform units allowed for fast, low latency control over the ablation process. Results are presented that demonstrate control of HIFU therapies over a broad range of intensities and in multiple in vitro tissues. The second area of investigation expands the DMUT research to an

  16. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  17. Single-electron tunnel junction array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likharev, K.K.; Bakhvalov, N.S.; Kazacha, G.S.; Serdyukova, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have carried out an analysis of statics and dynamics of uniform one-dimensional arrays of ultrasmall tunnel junctions. The correlated single-electron tunneling in the junctions of the array results in its behavior qualitatively similar to that of the Josephson transmission line. In particular, external electric fields applied to the array edges can inject single-electron-charged solitons into the array interior. Shape of such soliton and character of its interactions with other solitons and the array edges are very similar to those of the Josephson vortices (sine-Gordon solitons) in the Josephson transmission line. Under certain conditions, a coherent motion of the soliton train along the array is possible, resulting in generation of narrowband SET oscillations with frequency f/sub s/ = /e where is the dc current flowing along the array

  18. Integrating Scientific Array Processing into Standard SQL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misev, Dimitar; Bachhuber, Johannes; Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    We live in a time that is dominated by data. Data storage is cheap and more applications than ever accrue vast amounts of data. Storing the emerging multidimensional data sets efficiently, however, and allowing them to be queried by their inherent structure, is a challenge many databases have to face today. Despite the fact that multidimensional array data is almost always linked to additional, non-array information, array databases have mostly developed separately from relational systems, resulting in a disparity between the two database categories. The current SQL standard and SQL DBMS supports arrays - and in an extension also multidimensional arrays - but does so in a very rudimentary and inefficient way. This poster demonstrates the practicality of an SQL extension for array processing, implemented in a proof-of-concept multi-faceted system that manages a federation of array and relational database systems, providing transparent, efficient and scalable access to the heterogeneous data in them.

  19. Design of circular differential microphone arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Cohen, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a completely novel and efficient way to design differential beamforming algorithms for linear microphone arrays. Thanks to this very flexible approach, any order of differential arrays can be designed. Moreover, they can be made robust against white noise amplification, which is the main inconvenience in these types of arrays. The other well-known problem with linear arrays is that electronic steering is not really feasible.  In this book, we extend all these fundamental ideas to circular microphone arrays and show that we can design small and compact differential arrays of any order that can be electronically steered in many different directions and offer a good degree of control of the white noise amplification problem, high directional gain, and frequency-independent response. We also present a number of practical examples, demonstrating that differential beamforming with circular microphone arrays is likely one of the best candidates for applications involving speech enhancement (i....

  20. Advanced materials for thermal management of electronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2011-01-01

    The need for advanced thermal management materials in electronic packaging has been widely recognized as thermal challenges become barriers to the electronic industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. With increased performance requirements for smaller, more capable, and more efficient electronic power devices, systems ranging from active electronically scanned radar arrays to web servers all require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires that the materials have high capability of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility

  1. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  2. Thermal neutron flux distribution in ET-RR-2 reactor thermal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mahmoud M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal column in the ET-RR-2 reactor is intended to promote a thermal neutron field of high intensity and purity to be used for following tasks: (a to provide a thermal neutron flux in the neutron transmutation silicon doping, (b to provide a thermal flux in the neutron activation analysis position, and (c to provide a thermal neutron flux of high intensity to the head of one of the beam tubes leading to the room specified for boron thermal neutron capture therapy. It was, therefore, necessary to determine the thermal neutron flux at above mentioned positions. In the present work, the neutron flux in the ET-RR-2 reactor system was calculated by applying the three dimensional diffusion depletion code TRITON. According to these calculations, the reactor system is composed of the core, surrounding external irradiation grid, beryllium block, thermal column and the water reflector in the reactor tank next to the tank wall. As a result of these calculations, the thermal neutron fluxes within the thermal column and at irradiation positions within the thermal column were obtained. Apart from this, the burn up results for the start up core calculated according to the TRITION code were compared with those given by the reactor designer.

  3. Innovative Solar Tracking Concept by Rotating Prism Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become one of the most promising renewable energies and is the most widely used nowadays. In order to achieve an optimum performance, both photovoltaic and solar thermal applications are required to track the position of the sun throughout the day and year in the most effective way possible to avoid a high negative impact on the system efficiency. The present paper attempts to describe a novel semipassive solar tracking concentrator (SPSTC in which, in order to track the sun, two independent arrays of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA prisms are implemented to refract sunlight by rotating said prisms, thus being able to redirect solar radiation as desired. The first set is responsible for eliminating one of the directional components of the solar radiation; the task is achieved by rotating the prisms within the array at a specific angle. The second set deals with another of the sunlight’s directional components, transforming its direction into a completely perpendicular pattern to the array. Having downward vertical radiation makes it possible to implement a stationary Fresnel lens to concentrate the solar radiation for any application desired. The system is designed and validated using simulation software to prove the feasibility of the concept.

  4. Subharmonic structure of Shapiro steps in frustrated superconducting arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, B.J.; Choi, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional superconducting arrays with combined direct and alternating applied currents are studied both analytically and numerically. In particular, we investigate in detail current-voltage characteristics of a square array with 1/2 flux quantum per plaquette and triangular arrays with 1/2 and 1/4 flux quantum per plaquette. At zero temperature reduced equations of motion are obtained through the use of the translational symmetry present in the systems. The reduced equations lead to a series of subharmonic steps in addition to the standard integer and fractional giant Shapiro steps, producing devil's staircase structure. This devil's staircase structure reflects the existence of dynamically generated states in addition to the states originating from degenerate ground states in equilibrium. Widths of the subharmonic steps as functions of the amplitudes of alternating currents display Bessel-function-type behavior. We also present results of extensive numerical simulations, which indeed reveal the subharmonic steps together with their stability against small thermal fluctuations. Implications for topological invariance are also discussed

  5. The FPGA Pixel Array Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromalik, Marianne S.; Green, Katherine S.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2013-01-01

    A proposed design for a reconfigurable x-ray Pixel Array Detector (PAD) is described. It operates by integrating a high-end commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) into a 3-layer device along with a high-resistivity diode detection layer and a custom, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) layer. The ASIC layer contains an energy-discriminating photon-counting front end with photon hits streamed directly to the FPGA via a massively parallel, high-speed data connection. FPGA resources can be allocated to perform user defined tasks on the pixel data streams, including the implementation of a direct time autocorrelation function (ACF) with time resolution down to 100 ns. Using the FPGA at the front end to calculate the ACF reduces the required data transfer rate by several orders of magnitude when compared to a fast framing detector. The FPGA-ASIC high-speed interface, as well as the in-FPGA implementation of a real-time ACF for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments has been designed and simulated. A 16×16 pixel prototype of the ASIC has been fabricated and is being tested. -- Highlights: ► We describe the novelty and need for the FPGA Pixel Array Detector. ► We describe the specifications and design of the Diode, ASIC and FPGA layers. ► We highlight the Autocorrelation Function (ACF) for speckle as an example application. ► Simulated FPGA output calculates the ACF for different input bitstreams to 100 ns. ► Reduced data transfer rate by 640× and sped up real-time ACF by 100× other methods.

  6. X-ray source array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Lanza, R.C.; Sohval, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    A circular array of cold cathode diode X-ray sources, for radiation imaging applications, such as computed tomography includes electrically conductive cathode plates each of which cooperates with at least two anodes to form at least two diode sources. In one arrangement, two annular cathodes are separated by radially extending, rod-like anodes. Field enhancement blades may be provided on the cathodes. In an alternative arrangement, the cathode plates extend radially and each pair is separated by an anode plate also extending radially. (author)

  7. Study of rectenna array connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, T.; Shinohara, N.; Matsumoto, H. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Engineering Research Inst.

    1997-11-01

    A study was conducted in which a new rectenna working at 2.45 GHz microwave was developed for ground-to-ground microwave power transmission. The new rectenna consists of an antenna section and a rectifying section. The new design is simple and therefore more accurate than a micro-strip type patch antenna. The efficiency of conversion of microwave power to direct current depends on the mutual dependence of antenna elements and circuit conditions of rectifying sections. A series of experiments were conducted to analyze the rectenna characteristics and a method for efficiently connecting rectenna arrays was proposed. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs.

  8. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  9. rasdaman Array Database: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticariu, George; Toader, Alexandru

    2015-04-01

    rasdaman (Raster Data Manager) is a Free Open Source Array Database Management System which provides functionality for storing and processing massive amounts of raster data in the form of multidimensional arrays. The user can access, process and delete the data using SQL. The key features of rasdaman are: flexibility (datasets of any dimensionality can be processed with the help of SQL queries), scalability (rasdaman's distributed architecture enables it to seamlessly run on cloud infrastructures while offering an increase in performance with the increase of computation resources), performance (real-time access, processing, mixing and filtering of arrays of any dimensionality) and reliability (legacy communication protocol replaced with a new one based on cutting edge technology - Google Protocol Buffers and ZeroMQ). Among the data with which the system works, we can count 1D time series, 2D remote sensing imagery, 3D image time series, 3D geophysical data, and 4D atmospheric and climate data. Most of these representations cannot be stored only in the form of raw arrays, as the location information of the contents is also important for having a correct geoposition on Earth. This is defined by ISO 19123 as coverage data. rasdaman provides coverage data support through the Petascope service. Extensions were added on top of rasdaman in order to provide support for the Geoscience community. The following OGC standards are currently supported: Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Coverage Processing Service (WCPS). The Web Map Service is an extension which provides zoom and pan navigation over images provided by a map server. Starting with version 9.1, rasdaman supports WMS version 1.3. The Web Coverage Service provides capabilities for downloading multi-dimensional coverage data. Support is also provided for several extensions of this service: Subsetting Extension, Scaling Extension, and, starting with version 9.1, Transaction Extension, which

  10. Layout Of Antennas And Cables In A Large Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Layout devised to minimize total land area occupied by large phased array of antennas and to minimize total length of cables in array. In original intended application, array expanded version of array of paraboloidal-dish microwave communication antennas of Deep Space Network. Layout also advantageous for other phased arrays of antennas and antenna elements, including notably printed-circuit microwave antenna arrays.

  11. Large-area gold nanohole arrays fabricated by one-step method for surface plasmon resonance biochemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huijie; Niu, Lihong; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, Shujie; Yang, Jingjing; Guo, Siyi; Lawson, Tom; Shi, Bingyang; Song, Chunpeng

    2018-04-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensors based on metallic nanohole arrays have been widely reported to detect binding interactions in biological specimens. A simple and effective method for constructing nanoscale arrays is essential for the development of SPR nanosensors. In this work, we report a one-step method to fabricate nanohole arrays by thermal nanoimprinting in the matrix of IPS (Intermediate Polymer Stamp). No additional etching process or supporting substrate is required. The preparation process is simple, time-saving and compatible for roll-to-roll process, potentially allowing mass production. Moreover, the nanohole arrays were integrated into detection platform as SPR sensors to investigate different types of biological binding interactions. The results demonstrate that our one-step method can be used to efficiently fabricate large-area and uniform nanohole arrays for biochemical sensing.

  12. Effects of fin pitch and array of the frost layer growth on extended surface of a heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dong Keun; Lee, Kwan Soo

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of the fin array and pitch on the frost layer growth of a heat exchanger. The numerical results are compared with experimental data of a cold plate to validate the present model, and agree well with experimental data within a maximum error of 8%. The characteristics of the frost formation on staggered fin array are somewhat different from those of in-line array. For fin pitch below 10 mm, the frost layer growth of second fin in the staggered array is affected by that of first fin. The heat transfer of single fin deteriorate with decreasing fin pitch regardless of fin array, however, the thermal performance of a heat exchanger, considering increase of heat surface area, becomes better

  13. Characterization of photovoltaic array performance: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jr., R. G.

    1986-09-15

    Characterization of the electrical performance of a photovoltaic array can take many forms depending on the end use of the data. Typical uses include buyer-seller negotiations, system performance prediction, and performance measurement. Buyer-seller negotiations may deal with specifying the size (power) of an array to be purchased under some standard reporting conditions, and may treat the warranty conditions governing allowable degradation of this performance with time. System design, on the other hand, requires prediction of performance under varying field conditions, not standard reporting conditions, and must include the non-ideal realities of operating systems: array shadowing, steep angles of incidence, soiling, and array-load energy utilization. Typical uses of predicted array performance include array sizing tradeoffs, tracking-pointing comparisons, load-array interface analyses and system economic evaluations. The third use, performance measurement, refers to the characterization of an as-built array as opposed to prediction of the performance of an array to be built. This may be done to assess actual array performance or to measure performance degradation over time.

  14. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  15. ArrayBridge: Interweaving declarative array processing with high-performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Haoyuan [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Floratos, Sofoklis [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Blanas, Spyros [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Byna, Suren [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prabhat, Prabhat [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wu, Kesheng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Brown, Paul [Paradigm4, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Scientists are increasingly turning to datacenter-scale computers to produce and analyze massive arrays. Despite decades of database research that extols the virtues of declarative query processing, scientists still write, debug and parallelize imperative HPC kernels even for the most mundane queries. This impedance mismatch has been partly attributed to the cumbersome data loading process; in response, the database community has proposed in situ mechanisms to access data in scientific file formats. Scientists, however, desire more than a passive access method that reads arrays from files. This paper describes ArrayBridge, a bi-directional array view mechanism for scientific file formats, that aims to make declarative array manipulations interoperable with imperative file-centric analyses. Our prototype implementation of ArrayBridge uses HDF5 as the underlying array storage library and seamlessly integrates into the SciDB open-source array database system. In addition to fast querying over external array objects, ArrayBridge produces arrays in the HDF5 file format just as easily as it can read from it. ArrayBridge also supports time travel queries from imperative kernels through the unmodified HDF5 API, and automatically deduplicates between array versions for space efficiency. Our extensive performance evaluation in NERSC, a large-scale scientific computing facility, shows that ArrayBridge exhibits statistically indistinguishable performance and I/O scalability to the native SciDB storage engine.

  16. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J. R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, Navy Operational Support Center New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Jensen, K. L. [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Shiffler, D. A. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Petillo, J. J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  17. Optimal shortening of uniform covering arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Torres-Jimenez

    Full Text Available Software test suites based on the concept of interaction testing are very useful for testing software components in an economical way. Test suites of this kind may be created using mathematical objects called covering arrays. A covering array, denoted by CA(N; t, k, v, is an N × k array over [Formula: see text] with the property that every N × t sub-array covers all t-tuples of [Formula: see text] at least once. Covering arrays can be used to test systems in which failures occur as a result of interactions among components or subsystems. They are often used in areas such as hardware Trojan detection, software testing, and network design. Because system testing is expensive, it is critical to reduce the amount of testing required. This paper addresses the Optimal Shortening of Covering ARrays (OSCAR problem, an optimization problem whose objective is to construct, from an existing covering array matrix of uniform level, an array with dimensions of (N - δ × (k - Δ such that the number of missing t-tuples is minimized. Two applications of the OSCAR problem are (a to produce smaller covering arrays from larger ones and (b to obtain quasi-covering arrays (covering arrays in which the number of missing t-tuples is small to be used as input to a meta-heuristic algorithm that produces covering arrays. In addition, it is proven that the OSCAR problem is NP-complete, and twelve different algorithms are proposed to solve it. An experiment was performed on 62 problem instances, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of solving the OSCAR problem to facilitate the construction of new covering arrays.

  18. Custom ceramic microchannel-cooled array for high-power fiber-coupled application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Jeremy; Feeler, Ryan; Stephens, Ed

    2018-03-01

    A low-SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) diode array has been developed for a high-power fiber-coupled application. High efficiency ( 65%) diodes enable high optical powers while minimizing thermal losses. A large amount of waste heat is still generated and must be extracted. Custom ceramic microchannel-coolers (MCCs) are used to dissipate the waste heat. The custom ceramic MCC was designed to accommodate long cavity length diodes and micro-lenses. The coolers provide similar thermal performance as copper MCCs however they are not susceptible to erosion and can be cooled with standard filtered water. The custom ceramic micro-channel cooled array was designed to be a form/fit replacement for an existing copperbased solution. Each array consisted of three-vertically stacked MCCs with 4 mm CL, 976 nm diodes and beamshaping micro-optics. The erosion and corrosion resistance of ceramic array is intended to mitigate the risk of copperbased MCC corrosion failures. Elimination of the water delivery requirements (pH, resistivity and dissolved oxygen control) further reduces the system SWaP while maintaining reliability. The arrays were fabricated and fully characterized. This work discusses the advantages of the ceramic MCC technology and describes the design parameters that were tailored for the fiber-coupled application. Additional configuration options (form/fit, micro-lensing, alternate coolants, etc.) and on-going design improvements are also discussed.

  19. Conformal atomic layer deposition of alumina on millimeter tall, vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly L; Carroll, Murphy; Padbury, Richard; McCord, Marian; Jur, Jesse S; Bradford, Philip D

    2014-11-12

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to coat high aspect ratio and high surface area substrates with conformal and precisely controlled thin films. Vertically aligned arrays of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with lengths up to 1.5 mm were conformally coated with alumina from base to tip. The nucleation and growth behaviors of Al2O3 ALD precursors on the MWCNTs were studied as a function of CNT surface chemistry. CNT surfaces were modified through a series of post-treatments including pyrolytic carbon deposition, high temperature thermal annealing, and oxygen plasma functionalization. Conformal coatings were achieved where post-treatments resulted in increased defect density as well as the extent of functionalization, as characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Using thermogravimetric analysis, it was determined that MWCNTs treated with pyrolytic carbon and plasma functionalization prior to ALD coating were more stable to thermal oxidation than pristine ALD coated samples. Functionalized and ALD coated arrays had a compressive modulus more than two times higher than a pristine array coated for the same number of cycles. Cross-sectional energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that Al2O3 could be uniformly deposited through the entire thickness of the vertically aligned MWCNT array by manipulating sample orientation and mounting techniques. Following the ALD coating, the MWCNT arrays demonstrated hydrophilic wetting behavior and also exhibited foam-like recovery following compressive strain.

  20. Infrared detectors and focal plane arrays II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 23, 24, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.; Sampson, Robert E.

    The present conference discusses Schottky-barrier IR image sensors, SWIR and MWIR Schottky-barrier imagers, a 640 x 640 PtSi, models of nonlinearities in focal plane arrays, retinal function relative to IRT focal plane arrays, a solid-state pyroelectric imager, and electrolyte electroreflectance spectroscopies for the ion-implanted HgCdTe with thermal annealing. Also discussed are HgCdTe hybrid focal plane arrays for thermoelectrically cooled applications, a novel IR detector plasma-edge detector, and IR detector circuits using monolithic CMOS amps with InSb detectors. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)