WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal spray science

  1. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  2. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  3. Thermal spray for commercial shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, F. S.

    1997-09-01

    Thermal spraying of steel with aluminum to protect it from corrosion is a technology that has been proven to work in the marine environment. The thermal spray coating system includes a paint sealer that is applied over the thermally sprayed aluminum. This extends the service life of the coating and provides color to the end product. The thermal spray system protects steel both through the principle of isolation (as in painting) and galvanizing. With this dual protection mechanism, steel is protected from corrosion even when the coating is damaged. The thermal- sprayed aluminum coating system has proved the most cost- effective corrosion protection system for the marine environment. Until recently, however, the initial cost of application has limited its use for general application. Arc spray technology has reduced the application cost of thermal spraying of aluminum to below that of painting. Commercial shipbuilders could use this technology to enhance their market position in the marine industry.

  4. The 2016 Thermal Spray Roadmap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vardelle, A.; Moreau, Ch.; Akedo, J.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Berndt, C. C.; Berghaus-Oberste, J.; Boulos, M.; Brogan, J.; Bourtsalas, A.C.; Dolatabadi, A.; Dorfman, M.; Eden, T.J.; Fauchais, P.; Fisher, G.; Gaertner, F.; Gindrat, M.; Henne, R.; Hyland, M.; Irissou, E.; Jordan, E.H.; Khor, K.A.; Killinger, A.; Lau, Y.C.; Li, C.-J.; Li, L.; Longtin, J.; Markocsan, N.; Masset, P.J.; Matějíček, Jiří; Mauer, G.; McDonald, A.; Mostaghimi, J.; Sampath, S.; Schiller, G.; Shinoda, K.; Smith, M.F.; Syed, A.A.; Themelis, N.J.; Toma, F.-L.; Trelles, J.P.; Vassen, R.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 8 (2016), s. 1376-1440 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : anti-wear and anti-corrosion coatings * biomedical * electronics * energy generation * functional coatings * gas turbines * thermal spray processes Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11666-016-0473-x

  5. Thermally sprayed coatings: Aluminum on lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, S.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Zatorski, R.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the feasibility of thermally spraying aluminum on a lead substrate was initiated in support of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) Project for the US Department of Energy. The program consisted of two distinct parts: (1) the characterization of the thermally sprayed coatings, including microhardness testing, effects of heating, and microstructure and porosity determinations, and (2) effects of mercury doping and heat treatments on the thermally sprayed composite. The project determined that aluminum could successfully be thermally sprayed onto the lead. The coatings had a dense microstructure, with a Vicker's Pyramid Hardness (VPH) of about 60, and a maximum porosity (found in strips on the samples) of 12%

  6. 1994 Thermal spray industrial applications: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, C.C.; Sampath, S.

    1994-01-01

    The 7th National Thermal Spray Conference met on June 20--24, 1994, in Boston, Massachusetts. The conference was sponsored by the Thermal Spray Division of ASM International and co-sponsored by the American Welding Society, Deutscher Verband fur Schweisstechnik e.V., High Temperature Society of Japan, International Thermal Spray Association, and Japanese Thermal Spraying Society. The conference covered applications for automobiles, aerospace, petrochemicals, power generation, and biomedical needs. Materials included metals, ceramics, and composites with a broad range of process developments and diagnostics. Other sections included modeling and systems control; spray forming and reactive spraying; post treatment; process, structure and property relationships; mechanical properties; and testing, characterization and wear. One hundred and seventeen papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  7. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  8. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    2018-02-06

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance against corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.

  9. Thermal spray coatings replace hard chrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, M.; Unger, R.

    1997-01-01

    Hard chrome plating provides good wear and erosion resistance, as well as good corrosion protection and fine surface finishes. Until a few years ago, it could also be applied at a reasonable cost. However, because of the many environmental and financial sanctions that have been imposed on the process over the past several years, cost has been on a consistent upward trend, and is projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, it is very important to find a coating or a process that offers the same characteristics as hard chrome plating, but without the consequent risks. This article lists the benefits and limitations of hard chrome plating, and describes the performance of two thermal spray coatings (tungsten carbide and chromium carbide) that compared favorably with hard chrome plating in a series of tests. It also lists three criteria to determine whether plasma spray or hard chrome plating should be selected

  10. Antibacterial characteristics of thermal plasma spray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, M; Saviz, Sh; Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A

    2018-03-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate antibacterial characteristics of a thermal plasma spray system. For this purpose, copper powder was coated on a handmade atmospheric plasma spraying system made by the stainless steel 316 substrate, which is preheated at different temperatures before spraying. A number of deposition characteristics such as antibacterial characteristics, adhesion strength and hardness of coating, was investigated. All of the spray parameters are fixed except the substrate temperature. The chemical composition was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and back scattering electron microscopy (BSE) were used to show the coating microstructure, its thickness and also the powder micrograph. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) was used to analyze the coating particles. Hardness of the deposition was examined by Vickers tester (HV0.1). Its adhesion strength was declared by cross cut tester (TQC). In addition, the percentage of bactericidal coating was evidenced with Staphylococcus aurous and Escherichia coli bacteria. Study results show that as the substrates temperature increases, the number of splats in the shape of pancake increases, the greatness and percentage of the deposition porosity both decrease. The increment of the substrate temperature leads to more oxidation and makes thicker dendrites on the splat. The enhancement of the substrate temperature also enlarges thickness and efficiency of coating. The interesting results are that antibacterial properties of coatings against the Escherichia coli are more than Staphylococcus aurous bacteria. However the bactericidal percentage of the coatings against Staphylococcus aurous and Escherichia coli bacteria roughly does not change with increasing the substrate temperature. Furthermore, by increment of the substrate temperature, coatings with both high adhesion and hardness are obtained. Accordingly, the temperature of substrate can be an

  11. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  12. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  13. Impact Response of Thermally Sprayed Metal Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, J. L.; Hall, A. C.; Moore, N. W.; Pautz, S. D.; Franke, B. C.; Scherzinger, W. M.; Brown, D. W.

    2017-06-01

    Gas-gun experiments have probed the impact response of tantalum specimens that were additively manufactured using a controlled thermal spray deposition process. Velocity interferometer (VISAR) diagnostics provided time-resolved measurements of sample response under one-dimensional (i . e . , uniaxial strain) shock compression to peak stresses ranging between 1 and 4 GPa. The acquired wave-profile data have been analyzed to determine the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), Hugoniot equation of state, and high-pressure yield strength of the thermally deposited samples for comparison to published baseline results for conventionally wrought tantalum. The effects of composition, porosity, and microstructure (e . g . , grain/splat size and morphology) are assessed to explain differences in the dynamic mechanical behavior of spray-deposited versus conventional material. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Identifying Indicators of Progress in Thermal Spray Research Using Bibliometrics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.-T.; Khor, K. A.; Yu, L.-G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the research publications on thermal spray in the period of 1985-2015 using the data from Web of Science, Scopus and SciVal®. Bibliometrics analysis was employed to elucidate the country and institution distribution in various thermal spray research areas and to characterize the trends of topic change and technology progress. Results show that China, USA, Japan, Germany, India and France were the top countries in thermal spray research, and Xi'an Jiaotong University, Universite de Technologie Belfort-Montbeliard, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, ETH Zurich, National Research Council of Canada, University of Limoges were among the top institutions that had high scholarly research output during 2005-2015. The terms of the titles, keywords and abstracts of the publications were analyzed by the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model and visually mapped using the VOSviewer software to reveal the progress of thermal spray technology. It is found that thermal barrier coating was consistently the main research area in thermal spray, and high-velocity oxy-fuel spray and cold spray developed rapidly in the last 10 years.

  15. Thermal spray deposition and evaluation of low-Z coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Swindeman, C.J.; White, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally sprayed low-Z coatings of B 4 C on Al substrates were investigated as candidate materials for first-wall reactor protective surfaces. Comparisons were made to thermally sprayed coatings of B, MgAl 2 O 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and composites. Graded bond layers were applied to mitigate coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Microstructures, thermal diffusivity before and after thermal shock loading, steel ball impact resistance, CO 2 pellet cleaning and erosion tolerance, phase content, stoichiometry by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and relative tensile strengths were measured

  16. Elastic response of thermal spray deposits under indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leigh, S.H.; Lin, C.K.; Berndt, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    The elastic response behavior of thermal spray deposits at Knoop indentations has been investigated using indentation techniques. The ration of hardness to elastic modulus, which is an important prerequisite for the evaluation of indentation fracture toughness, is determined by measuring the elastic recovery of the in-surface dimensions of Knoop indentations. The elastic moduli of thermal spray deposits are in the range of 12%--78% of the comparable bulk materials and reveal the anisotropic behavior of thermal spray deposits. A variety of thermal spray deposits has been examined, including Al 2 O 3 , yttria-stabilized ZrO 2 (YSZ), and NiAl. Statistical tools have been used to evaluate the error estimates of the data

  17. Performances and reliability of WC based thermal spray coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrivani, A.; Rosso, M.; Salvarani, L.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal spray processes are used for a lot of traditional and innovative applications and their importance is becoming higher and higher. WC/CoCr based thermal spray coatings represent one of the most important class of coatings that find application in a wide range of industrial sectors. This paper will address a review of current applications and characteristics of this kind of coating. The most important spraying processes, namely HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) are examined, the characterization of the coatings from the point of view of corrosion and wear resistance is considered. (author)

  18. High-power electronics thermal management with intermittent multijet sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panão, Miguel R.O.; Correia, André M.; Moreira, António L.N.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal management plays a crucial role in the development of high-power electronics devices, e.g. in electric vehicles. The greatest energy demands occur during power peaks, implying dynamic thermal losses within the vehicle’s driving cycle. Therefore, the need for devising intelligent thermal management systems able to efficiently respond to these power peaks has become a technological challenge. Experiments have been performed with methanol in order to quantify the maximum heat flux removed by a multijet spray to keep the 4 cm 2 surface temperature stabilized and below the threshold of 125 °C. A multijet atomization strategy consists in producing a spray through the multiple and simultaneous impact of N j cylindrical jets. Moreover, the spray intermittency is expressed through the duty cycle (DC), which depends on the frequency and duration of injection. Results evidence that: i) a shorter time between consecutive injection cycles enables a better distribution of the mass flow rate, resulting in larger heat transfer coefficient values, as well as higher cooling efficiencies; ii) compared with continuous sprays, the analysis evidences that an intermittent spray allows benefiting more from phase-change convection. Moreover, the mass flux is mainly affecting heat transfer rather than differences induced in the spray structure by using different multijet configurations. - Highlights: ► Intermittent spray cooling (ISC) is advantageous for intelligent thermal management. ► Distributing the mass flow rate through ISC improves heat transfer. ► Multijet sprays with increasing number of jets have higher heat transfer rates. ► ISC with multijet sprays benefit more from phase-change than continuous sprays.

  19. Thermal Spray Applications in Electronics and Sensors: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    Thermal spray has enjoyed unprecedented growth and has emerged as an innovative and multifaceted deposition technology. Thermal spray coatings are crucial to the enhanced utilization of various engineering systems. Industries, in recognition of thermal spray's versatility and economics, have introduced it into manufacturing environments. The majority of modern thermal spray applications are "passive" protective coatings, and they rarely perform an electronic function. The ability to consolidate dissimilar material multilayers without substrate thermal loading has long been considered a virtue for thick-film electronics. However, the complexity of understanding/controlling materials functions especially those resulting from rapid solidification and layered assemblage has stymied expansion into electronics. That situation is changing: enhancements in process/material science are allowing reconsideration for novel electronic/sensor devices. This review critically examines past efforts in terms of materials functionality from a device perspective, along with ongoing/future concepts addressing the aforementioned deficiencies. The analysis points to intriguing future possibilities for thermal spray technology in the world of thick-film sensors.

  20. Unit thermal performance of atmospheric spray cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, R.W.; Jain, M.; Chaturvedi, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal performance of an open atmospheric spray pond or canal depends on the direct-contact evaporative cooling of an individual spray unit (spray nozzle or module) and the interference caused by local heating and humidification. Droplet parameters may be combined into a dimensionless group, number of transfer units (NTU) or equivalent, whereas large-scale air-vapor dynamics determine interference through the local wet-bulb temperature. Quantity NTU were implied from field experiments for a floating module used in steam-condenser spray canals. Previous data were available for a fixed-pipe nozzle assembly used in spray ponds. Quantity NTU were also predicted using the Ranz-Marshall correlations with the Sauter-mean diameter used as the characteristic length. Good agreement with experiments was shown for diameters of 1--1.1 cm (module) and 1.9 mm

  1. Research into Thermal Sprayed Coatings with Ultrasonic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justinas Gargasas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on thermal sprayed coatings with ultrasonic methods is the main object of this thesis. Metal surface coating was applied to modify its mechanical and physical-chemical properties and resistance to external impact and improve aesthetics. Spraying was carried out by scanning the rotating sample of 30 cm/s speed. Surface microstructure, ultrasonic thickness, porosity, micro hardness and surface modulus tests performed. Conclusions were formulated.Article in Lithuanian

  2. Kinematic Optimization of Robot Trajectories for Thermal Spray Coating Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Sihao; Liang, Hong; Cai, Zhenhua; Liao, Hanlin; Montavon, Ghislain

    2014-12-01

    Industrial robots are widely used in the field of thermal spray nowadays. Due to their characteristics of high-accuracy and programmable flexibility, spraying on complex geometrical workpieces can be realized in the equipped spray room. However, in some cases, the robots cannot guarantee the process parameters defined by the robot movement, such as the scanning trajectory, spray angle, relative speed between the torch and the substrate, etc., which have distinct influences on heat and mass transfer during the generation of any thermally sprayed coatings. In this study, an investigation on the robot kinematics was proposed to find the rules of motion in a common case. The results showed that the motion behavior of each axis of robot permits to identify the motion problems in the trajectory. This approach allows to optimize the robot trajectory generation in a limited working envelop. It also minimizes the influence of robot performance to achieve a more constant relative scanning speed which is represented as a key parameter in thermal spraying.

  3. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  4. Failure analysis of thermally cycled columnar thermal barrier coatings produced by high-velocity-air fuel and axial-suspension-plasma spraying: A design perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ganvir, A.; Vaidhyanathan, V.; Markocsan, N.; Gupta, M.; Pala, Zdeněk; Lukáč, František

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2018), s. 3161-3172 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings * Axial Suspension Plasma spraying * Thermal Cyclic Fatigue * High Velocity Air Fuel Spraying Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884217325403

  5. Influence of Microstructure on Thermal Properties of Axial Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ganvir, A.; Curry, N.; Markocsan, N.; Nylen, P.; Joshi, S.; Vilémová, Monika; Pala, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, 1-2 (2016), s. 202-212 ISSN 1059-9630. [ITSC 2015: International Thermal Spray Conference and Exposition. Long Beach, California, 11.05.2015-14.05.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : axial injection * column ar microstructure * porosity * suspension plasma spraying * thermal conductivity * thermal diffusivity Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-015-0355-7

  6. Thermal decomposition of uranylnitrate by the Spray-Dryer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildhagen, G.R.S.; Silva, G.C. da

    1988-01-01

    The proposal of this work consist in the thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate solutions by the Spray-Dryer process aiming the production of highly reactive fluidized UO 3 , adequate for the use in posterior of reduction to UO 2 and hydrofluorination to UF 4 , in a fluidized bed for the obtention of UF 6 in the cicle of nuclear fuels. (author) [pt

  7. Vision-aided Monitoring and Control of Thermal Spray, Spray Forming, and Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapakis, John E.; Bolstad, Jon

    1993-01-01

    Vision is one of the most powerful forms of non-contact sensing for monitoring and control of manufacturing processes. However, processes involving an arc plasma or flame such as welding or thermal spraying pose particularly challenging problems to conventional vision sensing and processing techniques. The arc or plasma is not typically limited to a single spectral region and thus cannot be easily filtered out optically. This paper presents an innovative vision sensing system that uses intense stroboscopic illumination to overpower the arc light and produce a video image that is free of arc light or glare and dedicated image processing and analysis schemes that can enhance the video images or extract features of interest and produce quantitative process measures which can be used for process monitoring and control. Results of two SBIR programs sponsored by NASA and DOE and focusing on the application of this innovative vision sensing and processing technology to thermal spraying and welding process monitoring and control are discussed.

  8. Thermal Spray Coating of Tungsten for Tokamak Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xianliang; Gitzhofer, F; Boulos, M I

    2006-01-01

    Thermal spray, such as direct current (d.c.) plasma spray or radio frequency induced plasma spray, was used to deposit tungsten coatings on the copper electrodes of a tokamak device. The tungsten coating on the outer surface of one copper electrode was formed directly through d.c. plasma spraying of fine tungsten powder. The tungsten coating/lining on the inner surface of another copper electrode could be formed indirectly through induced plasma spraying of coarse tungsten powder. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the cross section and the interface of the tungsten coating. Energy Dispersive Analysis of X-ray (EDAX) was used to analyze the metallic elements attached to a separated interface. The influence of the particle size of the tungsten powder on the density, cracking behavior and adhesion of the coating is discussed. It is found that the coarse tungsten powder with the particle size of 45 ∼ 75 μm can be melted and the coating can be formed only by using induced plasma. The coating deposited from the coarse powder has much higher cohesive strength, adhesive strength and crack resistance than the coating made from the fine powder with a particle size of 5 μm

  9. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-03-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  10. Standard guide for metallographic preparation of thermal sprayed coatings

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers recommendations for sectioning, cleaning, mounting, grinding, and polishing to reveal the microstructural features of thermal sprayed coatings (TSCs) and the substrates to which they are applied when examined microscopically. Because of the diversity of available equipment, the wide variety of coating and substrate combinations, and the sensitivity of these specimens to preparation technique, the existence of a series of recommended methods for metallographic preparation of thermal sprayed coating specimens is helpful. Adherence to this guide will provide practitioners with consistent and reproducible results. Additional information concerning standard practices for metallographic preparation can be found in Practice E 3. 1.2 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitatio...

  11. Epitaxial Growth and Cracking Mechanisms of Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-jun

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, the epitaxial growth and cracking mechanisms of thermally sprayed ceramic splats were explored. We report, for the first time, the epitaxial growth of various splat/substrate combinations at low substrate temperatures (100 °C) and large lattice mismatch (- 11.26%). Our results suggest that thermal spray deposition was essentially a liquid-phase epitaxy, readily forming chemical bonding. The interface temperature was also estimated. The results convincingly demonstrated that atoms only need to diffuse and rearrange over a sufficiently short range during extremely rapid solidification. Concurrently, severe cracking occurred in the epitaxial splat/substrate systems, which indicated high tensile stress was produced during splat deposition. The origin of the tensile stress was attributed to the strong constraint of the locally heated substrate by its cold surroundings.

  12. Advanced homogenization strategies in material modeling of thermally sprayed TBCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Nickel, R.; Kashko, T.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC), obtained by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), have a complex microstructure (lamellar, porous, micro-cracked). Process parameters take an influence on this microstructure. Two methods based on the homogenization for periodic structures are presented in this article. The methods are used to calculate the effective material behavior of APS-TBCs made of partially yttria stabilized zirconia (PYSZ) depending on the microstructure. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. BEHAVIOR OF THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS AGAINST HYDROGEN ATTACK

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Fabio; Latorre, Guillermo; Uribe, Iván

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nickel and chrome alloys applied as thermal spray coatings to be used as protection against embrittlement by hydrogen is studied. Coatings were applied on a carbon steel substrate, under conditions that allow obtain different crystalline structures and porosity levels, in order to determine the effect of these variables on the hydrogen permeation kinetics and as a protection means against embrittlement caused this element. In order to establish behaviors as barriers and protec...

  14. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  15. Electrical properties of pressure quenched silicon by thermal spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, S.Y.; Gambino, R.J.; Sampath, S.; Herman, H.

    2007-01-01

    High velocity thermal spray deposition of polycrystalline silicon film onto single crystal substrates, yields metastable high pressure forms of silicon in nanocrystalline form within the deposit. The phases observed in the deposit include hexagonal diamond-Si, R-8, BC-8 and Si-IX. The peculiar attribute of this transformation is that it occurs only on orientation silicon substrate. The silicon deposits containing the high pressure phases display a substantially higher electrical conductivity. The resistivity profile of the silicon deposit containing shock induced metastable silicon phases identified by X-ray diffraction patterns. The density of the pressure induced polymorphic silicon is higher at deposit/substrate interface. A modified two-layer model is presented to explain the resistivity of the deposit impacted by the pressure induced polymorphic silicon generated by the thermal spraying process. The pressure quenched silicon deposits on the p - silicon substrate, with or without metastable phases, display the barrier potential of about 0.72 eV. The measured hall mobility value of pressure quenched silicon deposits is in the range of polycrystalline silicon. The significance of this work lies in the fact that the versatility of thermal spray may enable applications of these high pressure forms of silicon

  16. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth in Bodies with Thermally Sprayed Coating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářík, O.; Haušild, P.; Medřický, Jan; Tomek, L.; Siegl, J.; Mušálek, Radek; Curry, N.; Björklund, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, 1-2 (2016), s. 311-320 ISSN 1059-9630. [ITSC 2015: International Thermal Spray Conference and Exposition. Long Beach, California, 11.05.2015-14.05.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal barrier coating * fatigue * crack growth * digital image correlation * digital image correlation Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-015-0329-9

  18. High-Performance Molybdenum Coating by Wire–HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Satish; Modi, Ankur; Modi, S. C.

    2018-04-01

    Coating deposition on many industrial components with good microstructural, mechanical properties, and better wear resistance is always a challenge for the thermal spray community. A number of thermal spray methods are used to develop such promising coatings for many industrial applications, viz. arc spray, flame spray, plasma, and HVOF. All these processes have their own limitations to achieve porous free, very dense, high-performance wear-resistant coatings. In this work, an attempt has been made to overcome this limitation. Molybdenum coatings were deposited on low-carbon steel substrates using wire-high-velocity oxy-fuel (W-HVOF; WH) thermal spray system (trade name HIJET 9610®). For a comparison, Mo coatings were also fabricated by arc spray, flame spray, plasma spray, and powder-HVOF processes. As-sprayed coatings were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy for phase, and microstructural analysis, respectively. Coating microhardness, surface roughness, and porosity were also measured. Adhesion strength and wear tests were conducted to determine the mechanical and wear properties of the as-sprayed coatings. Results show that the coatings deposited by W-HVOF have better performance in terms of microstructural, mechanical, and wear resistance properties, in comparison with available thermal spray process (flame spray and plasma spray).

  19. Current situation and development tendency of thermal spraying materials in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Yue-guang

    2005-01-01

    The current situations of thermal spraying materials in China are described in this paper.The thermal spraying technology in China has a great progress over tens of years. More than one hundred varieties of material products serve thermal spraying producing now. They belong to three kinds, powders,wires and rods. Technologies for producing alloy, ceramic and composite powders, alloy and cored wires,and oxide ceramic rods are applied to large-scale production. Many research and development works on advanced materials for thermal spraying are carrying out recent years. They show that the general tendencies of thermal spraying materials in China are composite or low-impurity component, ultrafine or nanosized microstructure, high properties, and specialized and systematized applications. Thermal spraying materials have great prospects with the development of saving society in China.

  20. X-rays characterisation of thermal sprayed bioceramics and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khor, K.A.; Cheang, P.; White, T.

    2000-01-01

    Materials characterization using x-rays plays an important role in the ongoing endeavour to develop superior materials for biomedical devices. Current emphasis on biomaterials worldwide has highlighted the prominence of materials in successful implementation of implants to improve the quality of human lives. A clear example can be seen in the artificial hip implant where a layer of bioactive material, hydroxyapatite (HA), drastically aids the pain during the post-operation recovery process. Thermal spray is a process whereby powders are injected into a high temperature flame. Instantaneous melting takes place and the molten droplets are projected at a very high velocities onto a suitably prepared substrate. The adoption of this process by most biomedical companies manufacturing artificial hip implants is based on the efficacy of the process and the economic benefits such as high production rate and relatively low installation cost. However, material decomposition often occurs in the high temperature environment of thermal spray. Subsequent development of proper process parameters, customised powder characteristics and better process control nonetheless help mitigate this effect. A constant demand in the escalating usage of biomaterials in human body is reliability. Implants should preferably remain in the body for at least 5-10 years with minimal occurrences of revision. To ensure an acceptable level of reliability, materials characterisation is needed at practically every stage of its development and manufacture. The role that x-rays play in biomaterials development can be categorised as: (1) phase identification and structural determination and (2) chemical analysis. This paper will present the characterisation of biomaterials using x-rays in the development of new generation of biomaterials and composites that posses superior properties than the present group of materials. Specifically, this paper will highlight the problems encountered in phase identification

  1. Process-based quality for thermal spray via feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykhuizen, R. C.; Neiser, R. A.

    2006-09-01

    Quality control of a thermal spray system manufacturing process is difficult due to the many input variables that need to be controlled. Great care must be taken to ensure that the process remains constant to obtain a consistent quality of the parts. Control is greatly complicated by the fact that measurement of particle velocities and temperatures is a noisy stochastic process. This article illustrates the application of quality control concepts to a wire flame spray process. A central feature of the real-time control system is an automatic feedback control scheme that provides fine adjustments to ensure that uncontrolled variations are accommodated. It is shown how the control vectors can be constructed from simple process maps to independently control particle velocity and temperature. This control scheme is shown to perform well in a real production environment. We also demonstrate that slight variations in the feed wire curvature can greatly influence the process. Finally, the geometry of the spray system and sensor must remain constant for the best reproducibility.

  2. An electrothermal chemical technology for thermal spray coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wald, S.; Appelbaum, G.; Alimi, R.; Rabani, L.; Zoler, D.; Zhitomirsky, V.; Factor, M.; Roman, I.

    1998-01-01

    A new spray technology for producing hard-coatings, has been developed at the SOREQ Nuclear Research Center. The concept is based on the extensive experience accumulated at SOREQ in the course of the development of Electrothermal (ET), Electrothermal-Chemical (ETC) and Solid-Propellant Electrothermal-Chemical (SPETC) guns(r). High quality coatings may be obtained by thermal spraying powder particles onto a variety of substrates. Mature state-of-the-art technologies such as plasma spray, high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) and detonation gun (D-Gun) are widely used for many applications. As each method has its own drawbacks there is a need for a combination of several parameters which cannot be achieved by any existing individual commercial technology. The method presented is oriented toward a high-quality, multi-step, high-throughput, easily programmable continuous coating process and relatively inexpensive technology. The combustion products of a solid or liquid propellant accelerate the powder particles of the coating material. A pulsed-plasma jet, provided by a confined capillary discharge, ignites the propellant and controls the combustion process. The powder particles are accelerated to velocities over 1000 m/s. Due to the very high carrier gas density, high velocity, high throughput and high powder consumption efficiency are obtained. The plasma jet enables control of the gas temperature and consequently influences the powder temperature

  3. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  4. Applications of thermal spraying for automotive parts. Jidosha ni okeru yosha no tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, K [Toyota Motor Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    1992-10-31

    Application of thermal spraying for automotive parts is described. Outlines of the spraying types that are materialized recently, like 'gel-double spraying of turbo-compressor housing part' and 'iron alloy spraying to outer portion of valve lifter made with Al alloy', are introduced. Gel-double spraying technology is widely used in the jet engine of aeroplane, however its use in automotive turbo was difficult from the reason like quality assurance relating to continuous production of automotives. As a result of the research and development based on the above reasons, a low speed torque is confirmed by the formation of gel-double spray layer. Spraying to the outer part of the valve lifter made from Al alloy is cited as the best example of thermal spraying. Relation between flying speed of spraying particles and degree of flattening, etc., relating to the conformity of adhesion power of coated layer, is explained. Further research topics are given as; improvement of spraying efficiency, improvement of resistance of spraying equipments, unification of equipments standards, quantification of spray coatings, design of spray materials, etc. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Structurally Integrated, Damage-Tolerant, Thermal Spray Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vackel, Andrew; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    Thermal spray coatings are used extensively for the protection and life extension of engineering components exposed to harsh wear and/or corrosion during service in aerospace, energy, and heavy machinery sectors. Cermet coatings applied via high-velocity thermal spray are used in aggressive wear situations almost always coupled with corrosive environments. In several instances (e.g., landing gear), coatings are considered as part of the structure requiring system-level considerations. Despite their widespread use, the technology has lacked generalized scientific principles for robust coating design, manufacturing, and performance analysis. Advances in process and in situ diagnostics have provided significant insights into the process-structure-property-performance correlations providing a framework-enhanced design. In this overview, critical aspects of materials, process, parametrics, and performance are discussed through exemplary studies on relevant compositions. The underlying connective theme is understanding and controlling residual stresses generation, which not only addresses process dynamics but also provides linkage for process-property relationship for both the system (e.g., fatigue) and the surface (wear and corrosion). The anisotropic microstructure also invokes the need for damage-tolerant material design to meet future goals.

  6. Computational homogenisation for thermoviscoplasticity: application to thermally sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Rolf; Denzer, Ralf; Oppermann, Philip; Menzel, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Metal forming processes require wear-resistant tool surfaces in order to ensure a long life cycle of the expensive tools together with a constant high quality of the produced components. Thermal spraying is a relatively widely applied coating technique for the deposit of wear protection coatings. During these coating processes, heterogeneous coatings are deployed at high temperatures followed by quenching where residual stresses occur which strongly influence the performance of the coated tools. The objective of this article is to discuss and apply a thermo-mechanically coupled simulation framework which captures the heterogeneity of the deposited coating material. Therefore, a two-scale finite element framework for the solution of nonlinear thermo-mechanically coupled problems is elaborated and applied to the simulation of thermoviscoplastic material behaviour including nonlinear thermal softening in a geometrically linearised setting. The finite element framework and material model is demonstrated by means of numerical examples.

  7. Thermal stability study of crystalline and novel spray-dried amorphous nilotinib hydrochloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbrink, Maikel; Vromans, Herman; Schellens, Jan Hm; Beijnen, Jos H; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2018-01-01

    The thermal characteristics and the thermal degradation of crystalline and amorphous nilotinib hydrochloride (NH) were studied. The spray drying technique was successfully utilized for the amorphization of NH and was evaluated by spectroscopic techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  8. Thermal spray coating for corrosion under insulation (CUI) prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Razak, Khalil Abdul; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Lah, Nik Khairul Irfan Nik Ab

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the predominant issues affecting process of Oil and Gas and Petrochemical industries. CUI refers to external corrosion, but it is difficult to be detected as the insulation cover masks the corrosion problem. One of the options to prevent CUI is by utilizing the protective coating systems. Thermal spray coating (TSC) is an advanced coating system and it shows promising performance in harsh environment, which could be used to prevent CUI. However, the application of TSC is not attractive due to the high initial cost. This work evaluates the potential of TSC based on corrosion performance using linear polarization resistance (LPR) method and salt spray test (SST). Prior to the evaluation, the mechanical performance of TSC was first investigated using adhesion test and bend test. Microstructure characterization of the coating was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The LPR test results showed that low corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/years was obtained for TSC in compared to the bare steel especially at high temperature of 80 °C, where usually normal coating would fail. For the salt spray test, there was no sign of corrosion products especially at the center (fully coated region) was observed. From SEM images, no corrosion defects were observed after 336 hours of continuous exposure to salt fog test. This indicates that TSC protected the steel satisfactorily by acting as a barrier from a corrosive environment. In conclusion, TSC can be a possible solution to minimize the CUI in a long term. Further research should be done on corrosion performance and life cycle cost by comparing TSC with other conventional coating technology.

  9. Thermal Conductivity Analysis and Lifetime Testing of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Curry

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying (SPS has become an interesting method for the production of thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine components. The development of the SPS process has led to structures with segmented vertical cracks or column-like structures that can imitate strain-tolerant air plasma spraying (APS or electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD coatings. Additionally, SPS coatings can have lower thermal conductivity than EB-PVD coatings, while also being easier to produce. The combination of similar or improved properties with a potential for lower production costs makes SPS of great interest to the gas turbine industry. This study compares a number of SPS thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with vertical cracks or column-like structures with the reference of segmented APS coatings. The primary focus has been on lifetime testing of these new coating systems. Samples were tested in thermo-cyclic fatigue at temperatures of 1100 °C for 1 h cycles. Additional testing was performed to assess thermal shock performance and erosion resistance. Thermal conductivity was also assessed for samples in their as-sprayed state, and the microstructures were investigated using SEM.

  10. A new method for thermal spraying of Zn-Al coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorlach, I.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of the thermal spraying system built on the principles of the high velocity air flame (HVAF) process. HVAF sprayed coatings showed considerably higher bond strength than coatings obtained by the conventional methods, indicating the advantage of this method in areas where the adhesion strength is critically important. The highly dense structure of the coating obtained with HVAF eliminates a need for a top paint coat, which is typically applied on metal sprayed coatings to extend service life. The thermal sprayed coatings were characterized by the standard techniques, such as light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, salt spray and bond strength tests. The results show that thermal sprayed coatings have a dense structure, low presence of oxides and high resistance to corrosion. High spray rate and good coating quality make the HVAF thermal spray method a viable alternative to the conventional thermal spraying technologies, such as Wire Flame and Twin-Wire Arc.

  11. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  12. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Thermal Diffusivity Measurement for Thermal Spray Coating Attached to Substrate Using Laser Flash Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Tanaka, Takashi; Endo, Satoshi; Baba, Tetsuya; Harada, Yoshio; Kojima, Yoshitaka; Kawasaki, Akira; Ono, Fumio

    2011-11-01

    Ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings are used as heat and wear shields of gas turbine blades. There is a strong need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of coating for thermal design and use. The thermal conductivity of a bulk material is obtained as the product of thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and density above room temperature in many cases. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity are unique for a given material because they are sensitive to the structure of the material. Therefore, it is important to measure them in each sample. However it is difficult to measure the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of coatings because coatings are attached to substrates. In order to evaluate the thermal diffusivity of a coating attached to the substrate, we have examined the laser flash method with the multilayer model on the basis of the response function method. We carried out laser flash measurements in layered samples composed of a CoNiCrAlY bond coating and a 8YSZ top coating by thermal spraying on a Ni-based superalloy substrate. It was found that the procedure using laser flash method with the multilayer model is useful for the thermal diffusivity evaluation of a coating attached to a substrate.

  14. Thermal spraying of polyethylene-based polymers: Processing and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterson, David Mark

    This research explores the development of a flame-spray process map as it relates to polymers. This work provides a more complete understanding of the thermal history of the coating material from injection, to deposition and finally to cooling. This was accomplished through precise control of the processing conditions during deposition. Mass flow meters were used to monitor air and fuel flows as they were systematically changed, while temperatures were simultaneously monitored along the length of the flame. A process model was then implemented that incorporated this information along with measured particle velocities, particle size distribution, the polymer's melting temperature and its enthalpy of melting. This computational model was then used to develop a process map that described particle softening, melting and decomposition phenomena as a function of particle size and standoff distance. It demonstrated that changes in particle size caused significant variations in particle states achieved in-flight. A series of experiments were used to determine the range of spray parameters within which a cohesive coating without visible signs of degradation could be sprayed. These results provided additional information that complimented the computational processing map. The boundaries established by these results were the basis for a Statistical Design of Experiments that tested the effects that subtle processing changes had on coating properties. A series of processing maps were developed that combined the computational and the experimental results to describe the manner in which processing parameters interact to determine the degree of melting, polymer degradation and coating porosity. Strong interactions between standoff distance and traverse rate can cause the polymer to degrade and form pores in the coating. A clear picture of the manner in which particle size and standoff distance interact to determine particle melting was provided by combining the computational

  15. Thermal plasma spraying for SOFCs: Applications, potential advantages, and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui, Rob; Wang, Zhenwei; Jankovic, Jasna; Yick, Sing; Maric, Radenka; Ghosh, Dave [National Research Council Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, 4250 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5 (Canada); Kesler, Olivera [National Research Council Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, 4250 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, 2054-6250 Applied Science Lane, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Rose, Lars [National Research Council Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, 4250 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1W5 (Canada); Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2007-07-10

    In this article, the applications, potential advantages, and challenges of thermal plasma spray (PS) processing for nanopowder production and cell fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are reviewed. PS processing creates sufficiently high temperatures to melt all materials fed into the plasma. The heated material can either be quenched into oxide powders or deposited as coatings. This technique has been applied to directly deposit functional layers as well as nanopowder for SOFCs application. In particularly, low melting point and highly active electrodes can be directly fabricated on zirconia-based electrolytes. This is a simple processing technique that does not require the use of organic solvents, offering the opportunity for flexible adjustment of process parameters, and significant time saving in production of the cell and cost reduction compared with tape casting, screen printing and sintering processing steps. Most importantly, PS processing shows strong potential to enable the deposition of metal-supported SOFCs through the integrated fabrication of membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA) on porous metallic substrates with consecutive deposition steps. On the other hand, the application of PS processing to produce SOFCs faces some challenges, such as insufficient porosity of the electrodes, the difficulty of obtaining a thin (<10 {mu}m) and dense electrolyte layer. Fed with H{sub 2} as the fuel gas and oxygen as the oxidant gas, the plasma sprayed cell reached high power densities of 770 mW cm{sup -2} at 900 C and 430 mW cm{sup -2} at 800 C at a cell voltage of 0.7 V. (author)

  16. Combating Wear of ASTM A36 Steel by Surface Modification Using Thermally Sprayed Cermet Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Shibe, Vineet; Chawla, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Thermal spray coatings can be applied economically on machine parts to enhance their requisite surface properties like wear, corrosion, erosion resistance, and so forth. Detonation gun (D-Gun) thermal spray coatings can be applied on the surface of carbon steels to improve their wear resistance. In the present study, alloy powder cermet coatings WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr have been deposited on ASTM A36 steel with D-Gun thermal spray technique. Sliding wear behavior of uncoated ASTM A36 ste...

  17. Quality control of thermal spray coatings in diesel engines; Qualitaetskontrolle an thermisch gespritzten Beschichtungen in Dieselmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carstensen, Jesper Vejloe [MAN Diesel and Turbo, Copenhagen (Denmark). Material Technology and Research Dept.; Lindegren, Maria [Struers A/S, Ballerup (Denmark). Application Dept.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal spraying is a method, which is suitable for coating of large components. The coatings can e.g. improve the wear, friction and/or corrosion properties of components so that they can withstand the increased loads. The quality of the coatings is essential to ensure reliable operation of the components. However, quality control of thermally sprayed coatings is indeed nontrivial and sample preparation is a key issue. This paper shows examples of thermal spray coated components in large diesel engines and provides insight into the methods used in preparing samples for quality control. (orig.)

  18. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Heimgartner, P.; Gustafsson, S.; Irons, G.; Miller, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  19. Structure Analysis Of Corrosion Resistant Thermal Sprayed Coatings On Low Alloy Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Metallic coatings have been proved to reduce the rate of corrosion of steel in various atmospheres. In this work the structure of Al, Cu-Al and Zn thermal sprayed coatings is examined. The as formed coatings are extremely rough, and they are composed of several phases which increase corrosion resistance as it was determined Salt Spray Chamber tests.

  20. ZrO2 coatings on stainless steel by aerosol thermal spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giampaolo, A.R.; Reveron, H.; Ruiz, H.; Poirier, T.; Lira, J.

    1998-01-01

    Zirconia coatings, with a wide range of thickness (1 to 80 μ) have been obtained by spraying a ZrO 2 sol with an oxyacetylenic flame, on stainless steel substrates. The sol was prepared by mixing Zr-n-propoxide and acetic acid in order to obtain a zirconium oxyacetate precipitate, which was filtrated, washed with 1-propanol, dryed and subjected to an hydrothermal treatment. A new sol-gel based ceramic deposition process , aerosol thermal spraying was developed based on previous thermal spray work. A compressed air spray gun was used to produce a fine aerosol flow which was injected in the flame of the thermal spray torch and deposited on polished and sand blasted substrates. This original technique allows simultaneous spraying, drying and partial sintering of the zirconia nanometric particles. The maximum working temperature necessary to yield a resistant coating is 1000 deg C. This method produced crack-free homogeneous layers of monoclinic ZrO 2 with good adhesion to the substrate and low porosity, as shown by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Oxidation test, carried out by heat treatments in air atmosphere at 800 deg C indicated good protection, mainly for low thickness coatings deposited in polished substrates. This original deposition technique offers several advantages when compared with classical thermal spraying techniques, such as plasma spraying. Copyright (1998) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  1. Demonstration of Thermally Sprayed Metal and Polymer Coatings for Steel Structures at Fort Bragg, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ER D C/ CE RL T R- 17 -3 0 DoD Corrosion Prevention and Control Program Demonstration of Thermally Sprayed Metal and Polymer Coatings...and Polymer Coatings for Steel Structures at Fort Bragg, NC Final Report on Project F07-AR10 Larry D. Stephenson, Alfred D. Beitelman, Richard G...5 2.1.2 Thermoplastic polymer coating (flame spray

  2. Review of US Nanocorp - SNL Joint Development of Thermal-Sprayed Thin-Film Cathodes for Thermal Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID E.

    2000-11-14

    The use of plasma spray to deposit thin metal-sulfide cathode films is described in this paper. Conventional electroactive stack components in thermal batteries are constructed from pressed-powder parts that are difficult to fabricate in large diameters in thicknesses <0.010. Plasma-sprayed electrodes do not steer from this difficulty, allowing greater energy densities and specific energies to be realized. Various co-spraying agents have been found suitable for improving the mechanical as well as electrochemical properties of plasma-sprayed cathodes for thermal batteries. These electrodes generally show equal or improved performance over conventional pressed-powder electrodes. A number of areas for future growth and development of plasma-spray technology is discussed.

  3. Residual stress determination in thermally sprayed metallic deposits by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Thomas; Margadant, Nikolaus; Pirling, Thilo; Riegert-Escribano, Maria J.; Wagner, Werner

    2004-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to obtain spatially resolved strain and stress profiles in thermally sprayed metallic 'NiCrAlY' deposits (chemical composition 67 wt.% Ni, 22 wt.% Cr, 10 wt.% Al, 1 wt.% Y) and the underlying steel substrates. Samples of four different spray techniques were analyzed: atmospheric and water stabilized plasma spraying (APS and WSP), flame spraying (FS) and wire arc spraying (WAS). The results are quantitatively compared with the average in-plane residual stress determined by complementary bending tests and the hole drilling technique. While the stress profiles from the surface to the interface in the deposits are similar for all investigated spray techniques, their absolute values and gradients vary strongly. This is attributed to different quenching stresses from the impinging particles, different thermal histories the deposit/substrate systems undergo during the spraying and subsequent cooling, and also to different coating properties. In the water stabilized plasma sprayed and the wire arc sprayed deposits, a gradient in the stress-free lattice parameter was observed. Crack formation is found to be a dominant mechanism for stress relaxation in the surface plane

  4. Residual stress determination in thermally sprayed metallic deposits by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Thomas; Margadant, Nikolaus; Pirling, Thilo; Riegert-Escribano, Maria J.; Wagner, Werner

    2004-05-25

    Neutron diffraction was used to obtain spatially resolved strain and stress profiles in thermally sprayed metallic 'NiCrAlY' deposits (chemical composition 67 wt.% Ni, 22 wt.% Cr, 10 wt.% Al, 1 wt.% Y) and the underlying steel substrates. Samples of four different spray techniques were analyzed: atmospheric and water stabilized plasma spraying (APS and WSP), flame spraying (FS) and wire arc spraying (WAS). The results are quantitatively compared with the average in-plane residual stress determined by complementary bending tests and the hole drilling technique. While the stress profiles from the surface to the interface in the deposits are similar for all investigated spray techniques, their absolute values and gradients vary strongly. This is attributed to different quenching stresses from the impinging particles, different thermal histories the deposit/substrate systems undergo during the spraying and subsequent cooling, and also to different coating properties. In the water stabilized plasma sprayed and the wire arc sprayed deposits, a gradient in the stress-free lattice parameter was observed. Crack formation is found to be a dominant mechanism for stress relaxation in the surface plane.

  5. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on Gas Turbine Engine Components Using Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce D; Legg, Keith O; Schell, Jerry; Bondaruk, Bob; Alford, Charles; Natishan, Paul; Lawrence, Steven; Shubert, Gary; Bretz, Philip; Kaltenhauser, Anne

    2005-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to qualify high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) and plasma thermal spray coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on gas turbine engine components...

  6. Modeling of Thickness and Profile Uniformity of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Deposited on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun, Zhang; Wenbo, Li; Dayu, Li; Jinkun, Xiao; Chao, Zhang

    2018-02-01

    In thermal spraying processes, kinematic parameters of the robot play a decisive role in the coating thickness and profile. In this regard, some achievements have been made to optimize the spray trajectory on flat surfaces. However, few reports have focused on nonholonomic or variable-curvature cylindrical surfaces. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the coating profile, coating thickness, and scanning step, which is determined by the radius of curvature and scanning angle. A mathematical simulation model was developed to predict the thickness of thermally sprayed coatings. Experiments were performed on cylinders with different radiuses of curvature to evaluate the predictive ability of the model.

  7. Combating Wear of ASTM A36 Steel by Surface Modification Using Thermally Sprayed Cermet Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Shibe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spray coatings can be applied economically on machine parts to enhance their requisite surface properties like wear, corrosion, erosion resistance, and so forth. Detonation gun (D-Gun thermal spray coatings can be applied on the surface of carbon steels to improve their wear resistance. In the present study, alloy powder cermet coatings WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr have been deposited on ASTM A36 steel with D-Gun thermal spray technique. Sliding wear behavior of uncoated ASTM A36 steel and D-Gun sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr coatings on base material is observed on a Pin-On-Disc Wear Tester. Sliding wear performance of WC-12% Co coating is found to be better than the Cr3C2-25% NiCr coating. Wear performance of both these cermet coatings is found to be better than uncoated ASTM A36 steel. Thermally sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr cermet coatings using D-Gun thermal spray technique is found to be very useful in improving the sliding wear resistance of ASTM A36 steel.

  8. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating with Bond Coat Species in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungyu Paik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the bond coat species on the delamination or fracture behavior in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs was investigated using the yclic thermal fatigue and thermal-shock tests. The interface microstructures of each TBC showed a good condition without cracking or delamination after flame thermal fatigue (FTF for 1429 cycles. The TBC with the bond coat prepared by the air-plasma spray (APS method showed a good condition at the interface between the top and bond coats after cyclic furnace thermal fatigue (CFTF for 1429 cycles, whereas the TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF and low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS methods showed a partial cracking (and/or delamination and a delamination after 780 cycles, respectively. The TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the APS, HVOF and LPPS methods were fully delaminated (>50% after 159, 36, and 46 cycles, respectively, during the thermal-shock tests. The TGO thickness in the TBCs was strongly dependent on the both exposure time and temperature difference tested. The hardness values were found to be increased only after the CFTF, and the TBC with the bond coat prepared by the APS showed the highest adhesive strength before and after the FTF.

  9. Thermal fatigue behavior of thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Sang; Kim, Eui Hyun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Hyuk [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co. Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Effects of top coat morphology and thickness on thermal fatigue behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) were investigated in this study. Thermal fatigue tests were conducted on three coating specimens with different top coat morphology and thickness, and then the test data were compared via microstructures, cycles to failure, and fracture surfaces. In the air plasma spray specimens (APS1, APS2), top coat were 200 and 300 {mu}m respectively. The thickness of top coat was about 700 {mu}m in the Perpendicular Cracked Specimen (PCS). Under thermal fatigue condition at 1,100 .deg. C, the cycles to top coat failure of APS1, APS2, and PCS were 350, 560 and 480 cycles, respectively. The cracks were initiated at the interface of top coat and Thermally Grown Oxide (TGO) and propagated into TGO or top coat as the number of thermal fatigue cycles increased. For the PCS specimen, additive cracks were initiated and propagated at the starting points of perpendicular cracks in the top coat. Also, the thickness of TGO and the decrease of aluminium concentration in bond coat do not affect the cycles to failure.

  10. Effect of layer thickness on the properties of nickel thermal sprayed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurisna, Zuhri, E-mail: zuhri-nurisna@yahoo.co.id; Triyono,, E-mail: triyonomesin@uns.ac.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@staff.uns.ac.id; Wijayanta, Agung Tri, E-mail: agungtw@uns.ac.id [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Jr. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Thermal arc spray nickel coating is widely used for decorative and functional applications, by improving corrosion resistance, wear resistance, heat resistence or by modifying other properties of the coated materials. There are several properties have been studied. Layer thickness of nickel thermal sprayed steel may be make harder the substrate surface. In this study, the effect of layer thickness of nickel thermal sprayed steel has been investigated. The rectangular substrate specimens were coated by Ni–5 wt.% Al using wire arc spray method. The thickness of coating layers were in range from 0.4 to 1.0 mm. Different thickness of coating layers were conducted to investigate their effect on hardness and morphology. The coating layer was examined by using microvickers and scanning electron microscope with EDX attachment. Generally, the hardness at the interface increased with increasing thickness of coating layers for all specimens due to higher heat input during spraying process. Morphology analysis result that during spraying process aluminum would react with surrounding oxygen and form aluminum oxide at outer surface of splat. Moreover, porosity was formed in coating layers. However, presence porosity is not related to thickness of coating material. The thicker coating layer resulted highesr of hardness and bond strength.

  11. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Love, Norman [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  12. Modeling of droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour during spray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modeling Studies Volume 26 Issue 3 April 2003 pp 355-364 ... Mathematical modeling of supersonic gas atomization for spray forming has been investigated. ... Department of Mechanical Engineering, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 054, India; Department of Mechanical Engineering, University ...

  13. Advances in Thermal Spray Deposition of Billets for Particle Reinforced Light Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzelburger, Martin; Zimmermann, Christian; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Forming of light-metals in semi-solid state offers some advantages like low process temperatures, improved mould durability, good flow behavior and fine, globular microstructure of the final material. By the introduction of ceramic particles, increased elastic modulus and yield strength as well as wear resistance and creep behavior can be obtained. By semi-solid forging or semi-solid casting, particle reinforced metals (PRM) can be produced with improved matrix microstructure and beneficial forming process parameters compared to conventional MMC manufacturing techniques. The production of this kind of light metal matrix composites requires the supply of dense semi-finished parts with well defined volume fractions of homogeneously distributed particulate reinforcement. A manufacturing method for cylindrical light metal billets is described that applies thermal spraying as a build-up process for simultaneous deposition of matrix and reinforcement phase with cored wires as spraying material. Thermal spraying leads to small grain sizes and prevents dendrite formation. However, long process cycle times lead to billet heating and recrystallization of the matrix microstructure. In order to preserve small grain sizes that enable semi-solid forming, the thermal spraying process was analyzed by in-flight particle analysis and thermography. As a consequence, the deposition process was optimized by adaptation of the thermal spraying parameters and by application of additional cooling, leading to lower billet temperatures and finer PRM billet microstructure

  14. In Situ Acoustic Monitoring of Thermal Spray Process Using High-Frequency Impulse Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Walther, Frank; Luo, Weifeng; Haack, Matthias; Nellesen, Jens; Knyazeva, Marina

    2018-01-01

    In order to guarantee their protective function, thermal spray coatings must be free from cracks, which expose the substrate surface to, e.g., corrosive media. Cracks in thermal spray coatings are usually formed because of tensile residual stresses. Most commonly, the crack occurrence is determined after the thermal spraying process by examination of metallographic cross sections of the coating. Recent efforts focus on in situ monitoring of crack formation by means of acoustic emission analysis. However, the acoustic signals related to crack propagation can be absorbed by the noise of the thermal spraying process. In this work, a high-frequency impulse measurement technique was applied to separate different acoustic sources by visualizing the characteristic signal of crack formation via quasi-real-time Fourier analysis. The investigations were carried out on a twin wire arc spraying process, utilizing FeCrBSi as a coating material. The impact of the process parameters on the acoustic emission spectrum was studied. Acoustic emission analysis enables to obtain global and integral information on the formed cracks. The coating morphology and coating defects were inspected using light microscopy on metallographic cross sections. Additionally, the resulting crack patterns were imaged in 3D by means of x-ray microtomography.

  15. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS. The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ′phases, β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  16. Preparation of high critical temperature YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting coatings by thermal spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacombe, Jacques

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is the elaboration of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 superconducting coatings by thermal spray. These coatings must have a high adherence, a high cohesion, and the best possible electrical characteristics. The author first briefly presents physical-chemical characteristics of this ceramic, and proposes a bibliographical synthesis on thick coatings prepared by thermal spray. In the next parts, he studies and describes conditions of elaboration of poly-granular coatings of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 , and their structural and electric characteristics [fr

  17. Thermal failure of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings with cold sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S.L.; Wang, X.R.; Yang, G.J.; Li, C.X.; Li, C.J. [Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an (China)

    2008-07-01

    Nanostructured YSZ is expected to exhibit a high strain tolerability due to its low Young's modulus and consequently high durability. In this study, a porous YSZ as the thermal barrier coating was deposited by plasma spraying using an agglomerated nanostructured YSZ powder on a Ni-based superalloy Inconel 738 substrate with a cold-sprayed nanostructured NiCrAlY as the bond coat. The heat treatment in Ar atmosphere was applied to the cold-sprayed bond coat before deposition of YSZ. The isothermal oxidation and thermal cycling tests were applied to examine failure modes of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ. The results showed that YSZ coating was deposited by partially melted YSZ particles. The nonmelted fraction of spray particles retains the porous nanostructure of the starting powder into the deposit. YSZ coating exhibits a bimodal microstructure consisting of nanosized particles retained from the powder and micro-columnar grains formed through the solidification of the melted fraction in spray particles. The oxidation of the bond coat occurs during the heat treatment in Ar atmosphere. The uniform oxide at the interface between the bond coat and YSZ can be formed during isothermal test. The cracks were observed at the interface between TGO/BC or TGO/YSZ after thermal cyclic test. However, the failure of TBCs mainly occurred through spalling of YSZ within YSZ coating. The failure characteristics of plasma-sprayed nanostructured YSZ are discussed based on the coating microstructure and formation of TGO on the bond coat surface. (orig.)

  18. Suspension thermal spraying of hydroxyapatite: Microstructure and in vitro behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolelli, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.bolelli@unimore.it [Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena, MO (Italy); Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sola, Antonella [Department of Engineering “Enzo Ferrari”, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena, MO (Italy); Stiegler, Nico; Müller, Philipp; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer [Institute for Manufacturing Technologies of Ceramic Components and Composites (IMTCCC), Universität Stuttgart, Allmandring 7b, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Altomare, Lina; De Nardo, Luigi [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “G. Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, Via Mancinelli 7, I-20131 Milano (Italy)

    2014-01-01

    In cementless fixation of metallic prostheses, bony ingrowth onto the implant surface is often promoted by osteoconductive plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. The present work explores the use of the innovative High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) process to coat Ti substrates with thin homogeneous hydroxyapatite coatings. The HVSFS hydroxyapatite coatings studied were dense, 27–37 μm thick, with some transverse microcracks. Lamellae were sintered together and nearly unidentifiable, unlike conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Crystallinities of 10%–70% were obtained, depending on the deposition parameters and the use of a TiO{sub 2} bond coat. The average hardness of layers with low (< 24%) and high (70%) crystallinity was ≈ 3.5 GPa and ≈ 4.5 GPa respectively. The distributions of hardness values, all characterised by Weibull modulus in the 5–7 range, were narrower than that of conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite, with a Weibull modulus of ≈ 3.3. During soaking in simulated body fluid, glassy coatings were progressively resorbed and replaced by a new, precipitated hydroxyapatite layer, whereas coatings with 70% crystallinity were stable up to 14 days of immersion. The interpretation of the precipitation behaviour was also assisted by surface charge assessments, performed through Z-potential measurements. During in vitro tests, HA coatings showed no cytotoxicity towards the SAOS-2 osteoblast cell line, and surface cell proliferation was comparable with proliferation on reference polystyrene culture plates. - Highlights: • Thin, dense HA layers were originated by HVSFS deposition of molten agglomerates of ≈ 1 μm. • Tensile adhesion strength of HVSFS HA onto Ti well above the threshold of ISO 13779-2 • Crystallinity (10–70%) is determined by system temperature during deposition. • Crystallinity controls the reactivity during immersion in simulated body fluid. • SAOS-2 osteoblast-like cells adhered well and

  19. Method and closing pores in a thermally sprayed doped lanthanum chromite interconnection layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1995-01-01

    A dense, substantially gas-tight electrically conductive interconnection layer is formed on an air electrode structure of an electrochemical cell by (A) providing an air electrode surface; (B) forming on a selected portion of the electrode surface, a layer of doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles doped with an element or elements selected from Ca, Sr, Ba, Mg, Co, Ni, Al and mixtures thereof by thermal spraying doped LaCrO.sub.3 particles, either by plasma arc spraying or flame spraying; (C) depositing a mixture of CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 on the surface of the thermally sprayed layer; and (D) heating the doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer coated with CaO and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3 surface deposit at from about 1000.degree. C. to 1200.degree. C. to substantially close the pores, at least at a surface, of the thermally sprayed doped LaCrO.sub.3 layer. The result is a dense, substantially gas-tight, highly doped, electrically conductive interconnection material bonded to the electrode surface. A solid electrolyte layer can be applied to the nonselected portion of the air electrode. A fuel electrode can be applied to the solid electrolyte, to form an electrochemical cell, for example for generation of electrical power.

  20. Deposition of Coating to Protect Waste Water Reservoir in Acidic Solution by Arc Thermal Spray Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion characteristics of 304 stainless steel (SS and titanium (Ti coatings deposited by the arc thermal spray process in pH 4 solution were assessed. The Ti-sprayed coating exhibits uniform, less porous, and adherent coating morphology compared to the SS-sprayed coating. The electrochemical study, that is, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, revealed that as exposure periods to solution were increased, the polarization resistance (Rp decreased and the charge transfer resistance (Rct increased owing to corrosion of the metallic surface and simultaneously at the same time the deposition of oxide films/corrosion on the SS-sprayed surface, while Ti coating transformed unstable oxides into the stable phase. Potentiodynamic studies confirmed that both sprayed coatings exhibited passive tendency attributed due to the deposition of corrosion products on SS samples, whereas the Ti-sprayed sample formed passive oxide films. The Ti coating reduced the corrosion rate by more than six times compared to the SS coating after 312 h of exposure to sulfuric acid- (H2SO4- contaminated water solution, that is, pH 4. Scanning electron microscope (SEM results confirmed the uniform and globular morphology of the passive film on the Ti coating resulting in reduced corrosion. On the other hand, the corrosion products formed on SS-sprayed coating exhibit micropores with a net-like microstructure. X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed the presence of the composite oxide film on Ti-sprayed samples and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH on the SS-coated surface. The transformation of TiO and Ti3O into TiO2 (rutile and anatase and Ti3O5 after 312 h of exposure to H2SO4 acid reveals the improved corrosion resistance properties of Ti-sprayed coating.

  1. Suspension thermal spraying of hydroxyapatite: microstructure and in vitro behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolelli, Giovanni; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sola, Antonella; Stiegler, Nico; Müller, Philipp; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer; Altomare, Lina; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In cementless fixation of metallic prostheses, bony ingrowth onto the implant surface is often promoted by osteoconductive plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. The present work explores the use of the innovative High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) process to coat Ti substrates with thin homogeneous hydroxyapatite coatings. The HVSFS hydroxyapatite coatings studied were dense, 27-37μm thick, with some transverse microcracks. Lamellae were sintered together and nearly unidentifiable, unlike conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Crystallinities of 10%-70% were obtained, depending on the deposition parameters and the use of a TiO2 bond coat. The average hardness of layers with low (hydroxyapatite, with a Weibull modulus of ≈3.3. During soaking in simulated body fluid, glassy coatings were progressively resorbed and replaced by a new, precipitated hydroxyapatite layer, whereas coatings with 70% crystallinity were stable up to 14days of immersion. The interpretation of the precipitation behaviour was also assisted by surface charge assessments, performed through Z-potential measurements. During in vitro tests, HA coatings showed no cytotoxicity towards the SAOS-2 osteoblast cell line, and surface cell proliferation was comparable with proliferation on reference polystyrene culture plates. © 2013.

  2. Influence of Roughness on Quality Molybdenum Deposit Layer by Thermal Spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marián Bujna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with the impact of roughness on the quality of molybdenum layer. Insufficient cleaning may result in a poor quality of the sprayed layer. Our aim is to analyze the influence of surface roughness on the quality of molybdenum layer thickness applied by thermal spraying. Thermal spraying influence several physical and chemical properties of the coating surface. The most important ones include: hardness, density, porosity, corrosion resistance and adhesion. This technology of surface treatment of material is often used for its high degree of hardness. Hardness and erosion resistance are the parameters that need to be achieved particularly in working conditions where there is excessive depreciation of a component.

  3. Development and evaluation of suspension plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings as thermal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Every, Kent J.

    The insulating effects from thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines allow for increased operational efficiencies and longer service lifetimes. Consequently, improving TBCs can lead to enhanced gas turbine engine performance. This study was conducted to investigate if yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, the standard industrial choice for TBCs, produced from nano-sized powder could provide better thermal insulation than current commericial YSZ coatings generated using micron-sized powders. The coatings for this research were made via the recently developed suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process. With SPS, powders are suspended in a solvent containing dispersing agents; the suspension is then injected directly into a plasma flow that evaporates the solvent and melts the powder while transporting it to the substrate. Although related to the industrial TBC production method of air plasma spraying (APS), SPS has two important differences---the ability to spray sub-micron diameter ceramic particles, and the ability to alloy the particles with chemicals dissolved in the solvent. These aspects of SPS were employed to generate a series of coatings from suspensions containing ˜100 nm diameter YSZ powder particles, some of which were alloyed with neodymium and ytterbium ions from the solvent. The SPS coatings contained columnar structures not observed in APS TBCs; thus, a theory was developed to explain the formation of these features. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was tested to evaluate the effects of these unique microstructures and the effects of the alloying process. The results for samples in the as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions were compared to conventional YSZ TBCs. This comparison showed that, relative to APS YSZ coatings, the unalloyed SPS samples typically exhibited higher as-sprayed and lower heat-treated thermal conductivities. All thermal conductivity values for the alloyed samples were lower than conventional YSZ TBCs

  4. High Temperature Oxidation of Spark Plasma Sintered and Thermally Sprayed FeAl-Based Iron Aluminides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haušild, P.; Karlík, M.; Skiba, T.; Sajdl, P.; Dubský, Jiří; Palm, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 465-468 ISSN 0587-4246. [International Symposium on Physics of Materials (ISPMA)/12./. Prague, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : thermal spraying * plasma sintering Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  5. Performance Testing of Suspension Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Produced with Varied Suspension Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Curry

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Suspension plasma spraying has become an emerging technology for the production of thermal barrier coatings for the gas turbine industry. Presently, though commercial systems for coating production are available, coatings remain in the development stage. Suitable suspension parameters for coating production remain an outstanding question and the influence of suspension properties on the final coatings is not well known. For this study, a number of suspensions were produced with varied solid loadings, powder size distributions and solvents. Suspensions were sprayed onto superalloy substrates coated with high velocity air fuel (HVAF -sprayed bond coats. Plasma spray parameters were selected to generate columnar structures based on previous experiments and were maintained at constant to discover the influence of the suspension behavior on coating microstructures. Testing of the produced thermal barrier coating (TBC systems has included thermal cyclic fatigue testing and thermal conductivity analysis. Pore size distribution has been characterized by mercury infiltration porosimetry. Results show a strong influence of suspension viscosity and surface tension on the microstructure of the produced coatings.

  6. Characterisation of WC-12Co thermal spray powders and HPHVOF wear resistant coatings

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lovelock, HDL

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available were selected for the deposition of thermal spray coatings using the JP 5000 high pressure high velocity oxyfuel (HPHVOF) system. Dry sand rubber wheel abrasion tests were performed on the coatings in order to determine the effect of powder...

  7. Assessment of thermal spray coatings for wear and abrasion resistance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karode, Ishaan Nitin

    Thermal spray cermet and metallic coatings are extensively used for wear, abrasion and corrosion control in a variety of industries. The first part of the thesis focuses mainly on testing of sand erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings on carbon composites used in the manufacture of helicopter rotor blades. The test set-up employed is a sand blasting machine and is an effort to duplicate the in-flight conditions especially those encountered in hot arid conditions. The technique adopted follows the Department of Defence test method standard. Carbon Composites have excellent stiffness, strength and low weight/density. The strength to weight ratio is high. Hence, these are used in aerospace applications to a large extent. However, the biggest problem encountered with carbon composites is its low abrasion resistance as its surface is very weak. Hence, thermal spray coatings are used to improve the surface properties of CFRP. Zinc bond coats and WC-Co coatings were tested. However, high amount of thermal stresses were developed between the substrate and the coating due to large differences in the CTE's of the both, leading to high mass losses within two minutes and just 130 grams of sand sprayed on to the coatings with the sand blasting machine built; and hence the coatings with CC as a substrate could not qualify for the application. The second part of the thesis focuses on the assessment of different thermal spray coatings used for manufacture of mechanical seals in pumps and analyze the best coating material for the wear resistance application through detail quantification of material loss by block-on-ring test set-up. A machine based on Block-on-ring test set-up following ASTM G77 (Measurement of Adhesive wear resistance of thermal spray coatings) standards was built to duplicate the pump conditions. Thermally sprayed coated materials were tested in different conditions (Load, time, abrasive). WC-Co had the highest wear resistance (lower volume losses) and

  8. Role of oxides and porosity on high temperature oxidation of liquid fuelled HVOF thermal sprayed Ni50Cr coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K.T.; Hussain, Tanvir

    2017-01-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid fuelled high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using...

  9. Sealing of thermally-sprayed stainless steel coatings against corrosion using nickel electroplating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hathaipat Koiprasert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc spraying (EAS is one of the thermal spray techniques used for restoration and to providecorrosion resistance. It can be utilized to build up coatings to thicknesses of several millimeters, It is easy to use on-site. Most importantly, the cost of this technique is lower than other thermal spraying techniques thatmay be suitable for part restoration. A major disadvantage associated with the electric arc sprayed coating is its high porosity, which can be as high as 3-8% making it not appropriate for use in immersion condition. This work was carried out around the idea of using electroplating to seal off the pore of the EAS coating, with an aim to improve the corrosion resistance of the coating in immersion condition. This research compared the corrosion behavior of a stainless steel 316 electric arc sprayed coating in 2M NaOH solution at 25oC. It was found that the Ni plating used as sealant can improve the corrosion resistance of the EAS coating. Furthermore, the smoothened and plated stainless steel 316 coating has a better corrosion resistance than the plated EAS coating that was not ground to smoothen the surface before plating.

  10. Aluminium-12wt% silicon coating prepared by thermal spraying technique: Part 1 optimization of spray condition based on a design of experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, thermal spray technology is used for maintenance parts of various machines in many industries. This technology can be used to improve the surface wear resistance. Therefore, this technology can significantly reduce cost of manufacturing. Al-12wt%Si alloy is an interesting and popular material used in the automotive industry. This research studies the suitable condition for spraying of Al-12wt%Si powder. This powder was sprayed by a flame spray technique onto low carbon steel substrates. The suitable conditions for spraying can be achieved by a design of experiment (DOE principle, which provided statistical data defined at 90% confidence. This research used control factors, which were oxygen flow rate, acetylene flow rate and spray distance. The satisfaction levels of these factors were set at 3 levels, i.e. low, medium and high, in order to determine suitable responses, which were hardness, thickness, wear rate and percentage volume fraction of porosity. It was found that the optimized condition for spraying Al-12wt%Si powder consisted of 38 ft3/hr (1.026 m3/hr of oxygen flow rate, 27 ft3/hr (0.729 m3/hr of acetylene flow rate and 58 mm of spray distance.

  11. In vitro characterization of hydroxyapatite layers deposited by APS and HVOF thermal spraying methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Alexandru Roşu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Titanium alloys are successfully used in medicine as implants due to their high mechanical properties and good biocompatibility. To improve implant osseointegration of titanium alloys, they are covered with hydroxyapatite because of its bioactive properties. Coating the implants with hydroxyapatite by thermal spraying, due to the temperatures developed during the deposition process, the structure can be degraded, leading to formation of secondary phases, such as TCP, TT CP, CaO. The paper presents the experimental results of hydroxyapatite layers deposition by two thermal spraying methods: Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF. The microstructure of the deposited layers is characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and electronic microscopy. The bioactivity of the hydroxyapatite layers was investigated in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF by immersing the covered samples deposited by the two thermal spraying methods. In both cases the coatings did not present defects as cracks or microcracks. X-ray diffraction performed on hydroxyapatite deposited layers shows that the structure was strongly influenced by plasma jet temperature, the structure consisting mainly of TCP (Ca3PO42. The samples deposited by HVO F after immersing in SBF lead to formation of biological hydroxyapatite, certifying the good bioactivity of the coatings.

  12. The role of nano-particles in the field of thermal spray coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, Stephan; Leparoux, Marc; Rohr, Lukas

    2005-06-01

    Nano-particles play not only a key role in recent research fields, but also in the public discussions about health and safety in nanotechnology. Nevertheless, the worldwide activities in nano-particles research increased dramatically during the last 5 to 10 years. There are different potential routes for the future production of nano-particles at large scale. The main directions envisaged are mechanical milling, wet chemical reactions or gas phase processes. Each of the processes has its specific advantages and limitations. Mechanical milling and wet chemical reactions are typically time intensive and batch processes, whereas gas phase productions by flames or plasma can be carried out continuously. Materials of interest are mainly oxide ceramics, carbides, nitrides, and pure metals. Nano-ceramics are interesting candidates for coating technologies due to expected higher coating toughness, better thermal shock and wear resistance. Especially embedded nano-carbides and-nitrides offer homogenously distributed hard phases, which enhance coatings hardness. Thermal spraying, a nearly 100 years old and world wide established coating technology, gets new possibilities thanks to optimized, nano-sized and/or nano-structured powders. Latest coating system developments like high velocity flame spraying (HVOF), cold gas deposition or liquid suspension spraying in combination with new powder qualities may open new applications and markets. This article gives an overview on the latest activities in nano-particle research and production in special relation to thermal spray coating technology.

  13. Supplementary Microstructural Features Induced During Laser Surface Melting of Thermally Sprayed Inconel 625 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nauman; Voisey, K. T.; McCartney, D. G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser surface melting of thermally sprayed coatings has the potential to enhance their corrosion properties by incorporating favorable microstructural changes. Besides homogenizing the as-sprayed structure, laser melting may induce certain microstructural modifications (i.e., supplementary features) in addition to those that directly improve the corrosion performance. Such features, being a direct result of the laser treatment process, are described in this paper which is part of a broader study in which high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed Inconel 625 coatings on mild-steel substrates were treated with a diode laser and the modified microstructure characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The laser treated coating features several different zones, including a region with a microstructure in which there is a continuous columnar dendritic structure through a network of retained oxide stringers.

  14. Modeling of droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour during spray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Supersonic atomization; droplets; thermal history; solid fraction; secondary dendrite arm spacing. 1. Introduction .... velocity with distance as illustrated in (1) (Eon-Sik Lee and Ahn ...... Uhlenwinkel and U Fritsching (Bremen, Germany: Univer-.

  15. Thermal stability study of crystalline and novel spray-dried amorphous nilotinib hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrink, Maikel; Vromans, Herman; Schellens, Jan; Beijnen, Jos; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2018-01-30

    The thermal characteristics and the thermal degradation of crystalline and amorphous nilotinib hydrochloride (NH) were studied. The spray drying technique was successfully utilized for the amorphization of NH and was evaluated by spectroscopic techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The ethanolic spray drying process yielded amorphous NH with a glass transition temperature (T g ) of 147°C. Thermal characterization of the amorphous phase was performed by heat capacity measurements using modulated DSC (mDSC). Thermal degradation was studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The derived thermodynamic properties of the amorphous NH indicate fragile behaviour and a low crystallization tendency. NH was found to be molecularly stable up to 193°C. After which, the thermal degradation displayed two phases. The values of the thermal degradation parameters were estimated using the Ozawa-Flynn-Wall and Friedman non-isothermal, model-free, isoconversional methods The results indicate the two phases to be single-step reactions. The examination of the physical stability of amorphous NH during storage and at elevated temperatures showed stability at 180°C for at least 5h and at 20-25°C/60% RH for at least 6 months. During these periods, no crystallization was observed. This study is the first to report the thermal characteristics of NH. Additionally, it is also the first to describe the full thermal analysis of a spray-dried amorphous drug. The thermal data may be used in the projection of future production processes and storage conditions of amorphous NH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A contribution to understanding the results of instrumented indentation on thermal spray coatings - Case study on Al2O3 and stainless steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nohava, J.; Mušálek, Radek; Matějíček, Jiří; Vilémová, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 240, February (2014), s. 243-249 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872; GA ČR(CZ) GPP108/12/P552 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal spray coating * Instrumented indentation * Al2O3 * Stainless steel * Scale effect Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.998, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0257897213011869#

  17. High level waste forms: glass marbles and thermal spray coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Oma, K.H.; Slate, S.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process that converts high-level waste to glass marbles and then coats the marbles has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The process consists of a joule-heated glass melter, a marble-making device based on a patent issued to Corning Glass Works, and a coating system that includes a plasma spray coater and a marble tumbler. The process was developed under the Alternative Waste Forms Program which strived to improve upon monolithic glass for immobilizing high-level wastes. Coated glass marbles were found to be more leach-resistant, and the marbles, before coating were found to be very homogeneous, highly impact resistant, and conductive to encapsulation in a metal matric for improved heat transfer and containment. Marbles are also ideally suited for quality assurance and recycling. However, the marble process is more complex, and marbles require a larger number of canisters for waste containment and have a higher surface area than do glass monoliths

  18. Mueller matrix polarimetry on plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for porosity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, David A; Barraza, Enrique T; Kudenov, Michael W

    2017-12-10

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the most widely used material for thermal plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used to protect gas turbine engine parts in demanding operation environments. The superior material properties of YSZ coatings are related to their internal porosity level. By quantifying the porosity level, tighter control on the spraying process can be achieved to produce reliable coatings. Currently, destructive measurement methods are widely used to measure the porosity level. In this paper, we describe a novel nondestructive approach that is applicable to classify the porosity level of plasma sprayed YSZ TBCs via Mueller matrix polarimetry. A rotating retarder Mueller matrix polarimeter was used to measure the polarization properties of the plasma sprayed YSZ coatings with different porosity levels. From these measurements, it was determined that a sample's measured depolarization ratio is dependent on the sample's surface roughness and porosity level. To this end, we correlate the depolarization ratio with the samples' surface roughness, as measured by a contact profilometer, as well as the total porosity level, in percentage measured using a micrograph and stereological analysis. With the use of this technique, a full-field and rapid measurement of porosity level can be achieved.

  19. Experimental evidence of the thermal effect of lubricating oil sprayed in sliding-vane air compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valenti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A way to increase the efficiency of positive-displacement air compressor is spraying the lube oil to exploit it not only as lubricating and sealing agent but also as thermal ballast. This work seeks the experimental evidence in sliding-vane compressors by measuring the air standard volume flow rate and the electrical power input of three diverse configurations. The first configuration, taken as the reference, employs a conventional injection system comprising calibrated straight orifices. The other two, referred to as advanced, adopt smaller orifices and pressure-swirl full-cone nozzles designed for the purpose; the third configuration utilizes a pump to boost the oil pressure. The laser imagining technique shows that the nozzles generate sprays that break-up within a short distance into spherical droplets, ligaments, ramifications and undefined structures. Tests on the packaged compressors reveal that the advanced configurations provide almost the same air flow rate while utilizing half of the oil because the sprays generate a good sealing. Moreover, the sprayed oil is acting as a thermal ballast because the electrical input is reduced by 3.5% and 3.0%, respectively, if the pump is present or not , while the specific energy requirement, accounting for the slightly reduced air flow, by 2.4% and 2.9%, respectively.

  20. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  1. Failure Analysis of Multilayered Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Rocchio-Heller, R.; Liu, J.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-02-01

    Improvement in the performance of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the key objectives for further development of gas turbine applications. The material most commonly used as TBC topcoat is yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). However, the usage of YSZ is limited by the operating temperature range which in turn restricts the engine efficiency. Materials such as pyrochlores, perovskites, rare earth garnets are suitable candidates which could replace YSZ as they exhibit lower thermal conductivity and higher phase stability at elevated temperatures. The objective of this work was to investigate different multilayered TBCs consisting of advanced topcoat materials fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The investigated topcoat materials were YSZ, dysprosia-stabilized zirconia, gadolinium zirconate, and ceria-yttria-stabilized zirconia. All topcoats were deposited by TriplexPro-210TM plasma spray gun and radial injection of suspension. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue and thermal shock testing. Microstructure analysis of as-sprayed and failed specimens was performed with scanning electron microscope. The failure mechanisms in each case have been discussed in this article. The results show that SPS could be a promising route to produce multilayered TBCs for high-temperature applications.

  2. Practical Aspects of Suspension Plasma Spray for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Potential Gas Turbine Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Ruggiero, P.

    2018-04-01

    Suspension plasma spray (SPS) process has attracted extensive efforts and interests to produce fine-structured and functional coatings. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied by SPS process gain increasing interest due to its potential for superior thermal protection of gas turbine hot sections as compared to conventional TBCs. Unique columnar architectures and nano- and submicrometric grains in the SPS-TBC demonstrated some advantages of thermal shock durability, low thermal conductivity, erosion resistance and strain-tolerant microstructure. This work aimed to look into some practical aspects of SPS processing for TBC applications before it becomes a reliable industry method. The spray capability and applicability of SPS process to achieve uniformity thickness and microstructure on curved substrates were emphasized in designed spray trials to simulate the coating fabrication onto industrial turbine parts with complex configurations. The performances of the SPS-TBCs were tested in erosion, falling ballistic impact and indentational loading tests as to evaluate SPS-TBC performances in simulated turbine service conditions. Finally, a turbine blade was coated and sectioned to verify SPS sprayability in multiple critical sections. The SPS trials and test results demonstrated that SPS process is promising for innovative TBCs, but some challenges need to be addressed and resolved before it becomes an economic and capable industrial process, especially for complex turbine components.

  3. Tribological Properties of Ti(Al,O)/Al2O3 Composite Coating by Thermal Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Asma; Gabbitas, Brian; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Deliang

    The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity air fuel (HVAF) thermally sprayed wear resistant Ti(Al,O)/Al2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting and dummy blocks aluminium extrusion. A feedstock of Ti(Al,O)/Al2O3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of Al and TiO2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700°C). The wear resistance of the coating was investigated by a tribometer using a spherical ended alumina pin as a counter body under dry and lubricating conditions. The results showed that composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature than at room temperature without using lubricant. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.

  4. The structure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Bartlett, A.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being studied for in situ repair of damaged Be and W plasma facing surfaces for ITER, the next generation magnetic fusion energy device, and is also being considered for fabricating Be and W plasma-facing components for the first wall of ITER. Investigators at LANL's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility have concentrated on investigating the structure-property relation between as-deposited microstructures of plasma sprayed Be coatings and resulting thermal properties. In this study, the effect of initial substrate temperature on resulting thermal diffusivity of Be coatings and the thermal diffusivity at the coating/Be substrate interface (interface thermal resistance) was investigated. Results show that initial Be substrate temperatures above 600 C can improve the thermal diffusivity of the Be coatings and minimize any thermal resistance at the interface between the Be coating and Be substrate

  5. Wear Resistant Thermal Sprayed Composite Coatings Based on Iron Self-Fluxing Alloy and Recycled Cermet Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki SARJAS

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spray and WC-Co based coatings are widely used in areas subjected to abrasive wear. Commercial  cermet thermal spray powders for HVOF are relatively expensive. Therefore applying these powders in cost-sensitive areas like mining and agriculture are hindered. Nowadays, the use of cheap iron based self-fluxing alloy powders for thermal spray is limited. The aim of this research was to study properties of composite powders based on self-fluxing alloys and recycled cermets and to examine the properties of thermally sprayed (HVOF coatings from composite powders based on iron self-fluxing alloy and recycled cermet powders (Cr3C2-Ni and WC-Co. To estimate the properties of  recycled cermet powders, the sieving analysis, laser granulometry and morphology were conducted. For deposition of coatings High Velocity Oxy-Fuel spray was used. The structure and composition of powders and coatings were estimated by SEM and XRD methods. Abrasive wear performance of coatings was determined and compared with wear resistance of coatings from commercial powders. The wear resistance of thermal sprayed coatings from self-fluxing alloy and recycled cermet powders at abrasion is comparable with wear resistance of coatings from commercial expensive spray powders and may be an alternative in tribological applications in cost-sensitive areas.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1338

  6. Thermal Shock Resistance of Stabilized Zirconia/Metal Coat on Polymer Matrix Composites by Thermal Spraying Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Huang, Wenzhi; Cheng, Haifeng; Cao, Xueqiang

    2014-12-01

    Stabilized zirconia/metal coating systems were deposited on the polymer matrix composites by a combined thermal spray process. Effects of the thicknesses of metal layers and ceramic layer on thermal shock resistance of the coating systems were investigated. According to the results of thermal shock lifetime, the coating system consisting of 20 μm Zn and 125 μm 8YSZ exhibited the best thermal shock resistance. Based on microstructure evolution, failure modes and failure mechanism of the coating systems were proposed. The main failure modes were the formation of vertical cracks and delamination in the outlayer of substrate, and the appearance of coating spallation. The residual stress, thermal stress and oxidation of substrate near the substrate/metal layer interface were responsible for coating failure, while the oxidation of substrate near the substrate/coating interface was the dominant one.

  7. Study on Metal Microfilter Coated with Ceramics by Using Plasma Thermal Spray Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Gyu; Shin, Hyun Myung; Choi, Hae Woon; Lee, Young Min

    2011-01-01

    This research was performed on a microfilter made of a hybrid material (ceramic + metal) that was coated with ceramics on the metal-filter surface by using the thermal spray method. The ceramic powders used were Al 2 O 3 +40TiO 2 powder with a particle size of 20 μm and Al 2 O 3 (98%+)powder with a particle size of 45 μm. The metal filters were filter-grade 20 μm, 30 μm, and 50 μm sintered metal powder filters (SIKA-R 20 IS, 30 IS, 50 IS: Sinter Metals Filters) and filter-grade 75 μm sintered mesh filter with five layers. Ceramic-coated filters that were coated using the thermal spray method had a great influence on powder material, particle size, and coating thickness. However, these filters showed a fine performance when used as micro-filters

  8. Validation of HVOF WC/Co Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Aircraft Landing Gear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to quality high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray WC/Co coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on landing gear components...

  9. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resis...

  10. Evaluation of thermal sprayed metallic coatings for use on the structures at Launch Complex 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of the evaluation program is presented. The objective was to evaluate the applicability of Thermal Sprayed Coatings (TSC) to protect the structures in the high temperature acid environment produced by exhaust of the Solid Rocket Boosters during the launches of the Shuttle Transportation System. Only the relatively low cost aluminum TSC which provides some cathodic protection for steel appears to be a practical candidate for further investigation.

  11. Spray freeze-dried nanofibrillated cellulose aerogels with thermal superinsulating properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Saelices, Clara; Seantier, Bastien; Cathala, Bernard; Grohens, Yves

    2017-02-10

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) aerogels were prepared by spray freeze-drying (SFD). Their structural, mechanical and thermal insulation properties were compared to those of NFC aerogels prepared by conventional freeze-drying (CFD). The purpose of this investigation is to develop superinsulating bioaerogels by reducing their pore size. Severe reduction of the aerogel pore size and skeleton architecture were observed by SEM, aerogels prepared by SFD method show a fibril skeleton morphology, which defines a mesoporous structure. BET analyses confirm the appearance of a new organization structure with pores of nanometric sizes. As a consequence, the thermal insulation properties were significantly improved for SFD materials compared to CFD aerogel, reaching values of thermal conductivity as low as 0.018W/(mK). Moreover, NFC aerogels have a thermal conductivity below that of air in ambient conditions, making them one of the best cellulose based thermal superinsulating material. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study on modernization processes in the coating metal surfaces (plain bearings by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena IRIMIE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge accumulated within the metal coating through thermal spraying allows the understanding of aspects related to the coat structure phenomena, in this case of the routs that need to be followed in order to create strong and stabile connections between the coats subsided through thermal spraying, between the particles that compose those coats, respectively. However, all this knowledge does not ensure the understanding of some practical situations that are apparently paradoxes, as for instance the absence of tin bronze adherence to ignobly steel holders, the perfect adherence of bronze to the aluminum on the same types of holders, in the context in which both elements, tin and aluminum, respectively are found in equal quantity in the two type of bonze that maintain them in solid solutions (below 10%.The parallel study in the sinter antifriction domain has offered information regarding the optimal correlation between the composition of antifriction material and the required type of application, the optimal pinches level and the way that this morphological characteristic may be influenced. By experimental research it is necessary to determine the conditions under which such coverage can be obtained by thermal spraying of the metal coatings.

  13. Integrated thermal control and system assessment in plug-chip spray cooling enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wei-Wei; Cheng, Wen-Long; Shao, Shi-Dong; Jiang, Li-Jia; Hong, Da-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel multi-heat source plug-chip spray cooling enclosure was designed. • Enhanced surfaces with different geometric were analyzed in integrated enclosure. • Overall thermal control with adjustable parameters in enclosure was studied. • Temperature disequilibrium of multi-heat source in enclosure was tested. • A comprehensive assessment system used to evaluate the practicality was proposed. - Abstract: Practical and integrated spray cooling system is urgently needed for the cooling of high-performance electronic chips due to the growth requirements of thermal management in workstation. The integration of multi heat sources and the management of integral system are particularly lacking. In order to fill the vacancies in the study of plug-chip spray cooling, an integrated cooling enclosure was designed in this paper. Multi heat sources were placed in sealed space and the heat was removed by spray. The printed circuit board plug-ins and radio frequency resistors were used as analog motherboards and chips, respectively. The enhanced surfaces with four different geometries and the plain surface were studied under the conditions of different inclination angles. The results were compared and the maximum critical heat flux (CHF) was obtained. Moreover, with the intention of the overall management of multi-heat source in integrated enclosure, the effect of the flow rate and the temperature disequilibrium, and the pulse heating in the process of transient cooling were also analyzed. In addition, a comprehensive assessment system, used to evaluate the practicality of spray cooling experimental devices, was proposed and the performance of enclosure was evaluated.

  14. Effects of service condition on rolling contact fatigue failure mechanism and lifetime of thermal spray coatings—A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Huawei; Cui, Xiufang; Wang, Haidou; Xing, Zhiguo; Jin, Guo

    2015-01-01

    The service condition determines the Rolling Contact Fatigue(RCF) failure mechanism and lifetime under ascertain material structure integrity parameter of thermal spray coating. The available literature on the RCF testing of thermal spray coatings under various condition services is considerable; it is generally difficult to synthesize all of the result to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the parameters which has a great effect on a thermal spray coating's resistance of RCF. The effects of service conditions(lubrication states, contact stresses, revolve speed, and slip ratio) on the changing of thermal spray coatings' contact fatigue lifetime is introduced systematically. The effects of different service condition on RCF failure mechanism of thermal spray coating from the change of material structure integrity are also summarized. Moreover, In order to enhance the RCF performance, the parameter optimal design formula of service condition and material structure integrity is proposed based on the effect of service condition on thermal spray coatings' contact fatigue lifetime and RCF failure mechanism. The shortage of available literature and the forecast focus in future researches are discussed based on available research. The explicit result of RCF lifetime law and parameter optimal design formula in term of lubrication states, contact stresses, revolve speed, and slip ratio, is significant to improve the RCF performance on the engineering application.

  15. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  16. Microstructure and properties of thermally sprayed Al-Sn-based alloys for plain bearing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, T.; Driver, L. C.; Harris, S. J.; McCartney, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    Al-Sn plain bearings for automotive applications traditionally comprise a multilayer structure. Conventionally, bearing manufacturing involves casting the Al-Sn alloy and roll-bonding to a steel backing strip. Recently, high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spraying has been used as a novel alternative manufacturing route. The present project extends previous work on ternary Al-Sn-Cu alloys to quaternary systems, which contain specific additions for potentially enhanced properties. Two alloys were studied in detail, namely, Al-20wt.%Sn-1wt.%Cu-2wt.%Ni and Al-20wt.%Sn-1wt.%Cu-7wt.%Si. This article will describe the microstructural evolution of these alloys following HVOF spraying onto steel substrates and subsequent heat treatment. The microstructures of powders and coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, and the phases were identified by x-ray diffraction. Coating microhardnesses were determined under both as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions, and by the differences related to the microstructures that developed. Finally, the wear behavior of the sprayed and heat-treated coatings in hot engine oil was measured using an industry standard test and was compared with that of previous work on a ternary alloy.

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To protect aluminum parts in vehicle engines, metal-based thermal barrier coatings in the form of Fe59Cr12Nb5B20Si4 amorphous coatings were prepared by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying under two different conditions. The microstructure, thermal transport behavior, and wear behavior of the coatings were characterized simultaneously. As a result, this alloy shows high process robustness during spraying. Both Fe-based coatings present dense, layered structure with porosities below 0.9%. Due to higher amorphous phase content, the coating H-1 exhibits a relatively low thermal conductivity, reaching 2.66 W/(m·K, two times lower than the reference stainless steel coating (5.85 W/(m·K, indicating a good thermal barrier property. Meanwhile, the thermal diffusivity of amorphous coatings display a limited increase with temperature up to 500 °C, which guarantees a steady and wide usage on aluminum alloy. Furthermore, the amorphous coating shows better wear resistance compared to high carbon martensitic GCr15 steel at different temperatures. The increased temperature accelerating the tribological reaction, leads to the friction coefficient and wear rate of coating increasing at 200 °C and decreasing at 400 °C.

  18. Microstructural Analysis and Transport Properties of Thermally Sprayed Multiple-Layer Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Haynes, J. Allen; Porter, Wallace D.; England, Roger D.; Hays, Michael; Dwivedi, Gopal; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-02-01

    Multilayer, graded ceramic/metal coatings were prepared by an air plasma spray method on Ti-6Al-4V, 4140 steel and graphite substrates. The coatings were designed to provide thermal barriers for diesel engine pistons to operate at higher temperatures with improved thermal efficiency and cleaner emissions. A systematic, progressive variation in the mixture of yttria-stabilized zirconia and bondcoat alloys (NiCoCrAlYHfSi) was designed to provide better thermal expansion match with the substrate and to improve thermal shock resistance and cycle life. Heat transfer through the layers was evaluated by a flash diffusivity technique based on a model of one-dimensional heat flow. The aging effect of the as-sprayed coatings was captured during diffusivity measurements, which included one heating and cooling cycle. The hysteresis of thermal diffusivity due to aging was not observed after 100-h annealing at 800 °C. The measurements of coatings on substrate and freestanding coatings allowed the influence of interface resistance to be evaluated. The microstructure of the multilayer coating was examined using scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalysis.

  19. Optimizing Compliance and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings via Controlled Powders and Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Srinivasan, Vasudevan; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay; Bertrand, Pierre; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2012-09-01

    The properties and performance of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are strongly dependent on the microstructural defects, which are affected by starting powder morphology and processing conditions. Of particular interest is the use of hollow powders which not only allow for efficient melting of zirconia ceramics but also produce lower conductivity and more compliant coatings. Typical industrial hollow spray powders have an assortment of densities resulting in masking potential advantages of the hollow morphology. In this study, we have conducted process mapping strategies using a novel uniform shell thickness hollow powder to control the defect microstructure and properties. Correlations among coating properties, microstructure, and processing reveal feasibility to produce highly compliant and low conductivity TBC through a combination of optimized feedstock and processing conditions. The results are presented through the framework of process maps establishing correlations among process, microstructure, and properties and providing opportunities for optimization of TBCs.

  20. Evaluation of bond strength of isothermally aged plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jin; Lee, Dong Hoon; Koo, Jae Mean; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [Korea Plant Service and Engineering Co., Ltd., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    In this study, disk type of thermal barrier coating system for gas turbine blade was isothermally aged in the furnace changing exposure time and temperature. For each aging condition, bond tests for three samples were conducted for evaluating degradation of adhesive or cohesive strength of thermal barrier coating system. For as-sprayed condition, the location of fracture in the bond test was in the middle of epoxy which have bond strength of 57 MPa. As specimens are degraded by thermal aging, bond strength gradually decreased and the location of failure was also changed from within top coat at the earlier stage of thermal aging to the interface between top coat and TGO at the later stage due to the delamination in the coating.

  1. Thermal conductivity of spray-on foam insulations for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Matt; Vanderlaan, Mark; Van Sciver, Steven

    2012-06-01

    A guarded-hot-plate apparatus [1] has been developed to measure the thermal conductivity of spray-on foam insulations (SOFI) at temperatures ranging from 30 K to 300 K. The foam tested in the present study is NCFI 24-124, a polyisocyanurate foam used on the External Tanks of the Space Shuttle. The foam was tested first in ambient pressure air, then evacuated and tested once more. These thermal conductivities were compared to the thermal conductivity taken from a sample immediately after being subjected to conditions similar to those experienced by the foam while on the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center. To mimic the conditions experienced on the launch pad, an apparatus was built to enclose one side of the foam sample in a warm, humid environment while the other side of the sample contacts a stainless steel surface held at 77 K. The thermal conductivity data obtained is also compared to data found in the literature.

  2. Demands, Potentials, and Economic Aspects of Thermal Spraying with Suspensions: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Potthoff, Annegret; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Leyens, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Research and development work for about one decade have demonstrated many unique thermal spray coating properties, particularly for oxide ceramic coatings by using suspensions of fine powders as feedstock in APS and HVOF processes. Some particular advantages are direct feeding of fine nano- and submicron-scale particles avoiding special feedstock powder preparation, ability to produce coating thicknesses ranging from 10 to 50 µm, homogeneous microstructure with less anisotropy and lower surface roughness compared to conventional coatings, possibility of retention of the initial crystalline phases, and others. This paper discusses the main aspects of thermal spraying with suspensions which have been taken into account in order to produce these coatings on an economical way. The economic efficiency of the process depends on the availability of suitable additional system components (suspension feeder, injectors), on the development and handling of stable suspensions, as well as on the high process stability for acceptance at industrial scale. Special focus is made on the development and processability of highly concentrated water-based suspensions. While costs and operational safety clearly speak for use of water as a liquid media for preparing suspensions on an industrial scale, its use is often critically discussed due to the required higher heat input during spraying compared to alcoholic suspensions.

  3. Optical monitoring systems for thermal spray processes: droplets behavior and substrate pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Tanaka, J.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-11-01

    Thermal spray is a technique to form molten droplets using either plasma- or combustion-heating, which impinge upon substrates to form coating layers for various purposes, such as anti-corrosion and anti-wear layers. Although it is an established technique having a history of more than a century, operations of spray guns together with preparing suitable substrate surfaces for obtaining good coating layers still rely on experienced technicians. Because of the necessity of meeting more and more stringent requirements for coating quality and cost from customers, there has been a strong need to try to monitor spray processes, so as to obtain the best possible spray coating layers. The basic requirements for such monitoring systems are *reasonably cheap, *easy operation for laypersons, *easy access to targets to be investigated, and *an in-situ capability. The purpose of the present work is to provide suitable optical monitoring systems for (1) droplets behavior and (2) substrate pre-treatments. For the former (1), the first result was already presented at the 17th laser-aided plasma diagnostics meeting (LAPD17) in 2015 in Sapporo, and the results of its subsequent applications into real spray environments are shown in this article in order to validate the previous proposal. Topic (2) is new in the research program, and the proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method yielded a favorable result. Based on this positive result, an overall strategy is being planned to fulfill the final objective of the optical monitoring of substrate pre-treatments. Details of these two programs (1) and (2) together with the present status are described.

  4. An investigation of the effects of droplet impact angle in thermal spray deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely held that spraying at off-normal angles can influence deposition efficiency and the properties of the deposited material. However, little quantitative information on such effects has been published. This paper reports on a series of experiments to investigate the angular dependence of deposition efficiency, surface roughness, and porosity for several thermal spray materials and processes at incidence angles ranging from 90 degree to 30 degree relative to the substrate surface. At incidence angles from 90 degree out to 60 degree, the observed changes were small and often statistically insignificant. Some significant changes began to appear at 45 degree, and at 30 degree significant changes were observed for nearly all materials and processes: deposition efficiency decreased while surface roughness and porosity increased. It is proposed that droplet splashing may cause some of the observed effects

  5. Tribological properties of thermally sprayed TiAl-Al2O3 composite coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A.; Gabbitas, B.; Li, J.; Zhang, D.

    2009-08-01

    The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed wear resistant TiAl/Al2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting. A feedstock of TiAl/Al2O3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of Al and TiO2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700°C). The results showed that the composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature (700°C) than the uncoated H13 sample. At Room temperature without using lubricant there is no much significant difference between the wear rate of the coated and uncoated samples. The experimental results showed that the composite coating has great potential for high temperature application due to its lower wear rate at high temperature in comparison with the uncoated sample at the same temperature. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.

  6. Tribological properties of thermally sprayed TiAl-Al2O3 composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salman, A; Gabbitas, B; Zhang, D; Li, J

    2009-01-01

    The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed wear resistant TiAl/Al 2 O 3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting. A feedstock of TiAl/Al 2 O 3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of Al and TiO 2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700 deg. C). The results showed that the composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature (700deg. C) than the uncoated H13 sample. At Room temperature without using lubricant there is no much significant difference between the wear rate of the coated and uncoated samples. The experimental results showed that the composite coating has great potential for high temperature application due to its lower wear rate at high temperature in comparison with the uncoated sample at the same temperature. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.

  7. Experiment and numerical analysis of the NPP pressurizer auxiliary spray line submitted to large thermal shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couterot, C.; Geyer, P.; Proix, J.M.

    1994-03-01

    The pressurizer auxiliary spray line of PWR nuclear power plants may be submitted to severe temperature transients during upset conditions: a 325 deg C cold thermal shock in one second is followed by a 200 deg C hot thermal shock. For such transients, the RCC-M French design code rules that prevent the ratcheting deformation hazard are not respected for the components with thickness transition. Consequently, Electricite de France has realized twenty thermal cycles under pressure on a representative mock-up. During these tests, many temperature, strain and diametral variations were measured. No significant ratcheting deformation was detected on all components, except on the 6'' x 2'' x 6'' T-piece, where a weak progressive diameter increase was observed during a few cycles. Moreover, computations of a 2'' socket welding were made with the non linear kinematic hardening Chaboche model which also showed a weak progressive deformation behaviour. (authors). 7 figs., 7 refs

  8. Impact of sea spray on the Yellow and East China Seas thermal structure during the passage of Typhoon Rammasun (2002)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianxin; Zhang, Xuefeng; Chu, P. C.; Guan, Changlong; Fu, Hongli; Chao, Guofang; Han, Guijun; Li, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Strong winds lead to large amounts of sea spray in the lowest part of the atmospheric boundary layer. The spray droplets affect the air-sea heat fluxes due to their evaporation and the momentum due to the change of sea surface, and in turn change the upper ocean thermal structure. In this study, impact of sea spray on upper ocean temperatures in the Yellow and East China Seas (YES) during typhoon Rammasun's passage is investigated using the POMgcs ocean model with a sea spray parameterization scheme, in which the sea spray-induced heat fluxes are based on an improved Fairall's sea spray heat fluxes algorithm, and the sea spray-induced momentum fluxes are derived from an improved COARE version 2.6 bulk model. The distribution of the sea spray mediated turbulent fluxes was primarily located at Rammasun eye-wall region, in accord with the maximal wind speeds regions. When Rammasun enters the Yellow sea, the sea spray mediated latent (sensible) heat flux maximum is enhanced by 26% (13.5%) compared to that of the interfacial latent (sensible) heat flux. The maximum of the total air-sea momentum fluxes is enhanced by 43% compared to the counterpart of the interfacial momentum flux. Furthermore, the sea spray plays a key role in enhancing the intensity of the typhoon-induced "cold suction" and "heat pump" processes. When the effect of sea spray is considered, the maximum of the sea surface cooling in the right side of Rammasun's track is increased by 0.5°C, which is closer to the available satellite observations.

  9. Thermal plasma spheroidization and spray deposition of barium titanate powder and characterization of the plasma sprayable powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakseresht, A.H., E-mail: amirh_pak@yahoo.com [Department of Ceramics, Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box 31787-316, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimipour, M.R. [Department of Ceramics, Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box 31787-316, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vaezi, M.R. [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, P.O. Box 31787-316, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, P.O. Box 84156-83111, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, atmospheric plasma spray method was used to produce dense plasma sprayable powder and thick barium titanate film. In this regard, the commercially feedstock powders were granulated and spheroidized by the organic binder and the thermal spray process, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the produced powders and the final deposits. X-ray diffraction was also implemented to characterize phase of the sprayed powder. The results indicated that spheroidized powder had suitable flowability as well as high density. The micro-hardness of the film produced by the sprayed powders was higher than that of the film deposited by the irregular granules. Additionally, relative permittivity of the films was increased by decreasing the defects from 160 to 293 for film deposited using spheroidized powder. The reduction in the relative permittivity of deposits, in comparison with the bulk material, was due to the existence of common defects in the thermal spray process. - Highlights: • We prepare sprayable BaTiO{sub 3} powder with no or less inside voids for plasma spray application for first time. • The sprayable powder has good flow characteristics and high density. • Powder spheroidization via plasma spray improves the hardness and dielectric properties of the deposited film.

  10. Thermal plasma spheroidization and spray deposition of barium titanate powder and characterization of the plasma sprayable powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakseresht, A.H.; Rahimipour, M.R.; Vaezi, M.R.; Salehi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, atmospheric plasma spray method was used to produce dense plasma sprayable powder and thick barium titanate film. In this regard, the commercially feedstock powders were granulated and spheroidized by the organic binder and the thermal spray process, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the produced powders and the final deposits. X-ray diffraction was also implemented to characterize phase of the sprayed powder. The results indicated that spheroidized powder had suitable flowability as well as high density. The micro-hardness of the film produced by the sprayed powders was higher than that of the film deposited by the irregular granules. Additionally, relative permittivity of the films was increased by decreasing the defects from 160 to 293 for film deposited using spheroidized powder. The reduction in the relative permittivity of deposits, in comparison with the bulk material, was due to the existence of common defects in the thermal spray process. - Highlights: • We prepare sprayable BaTiO_3 powder with no or less inside voids for plasma spray application for first time. • The sprayable powder has good flow characteristics and high density. • Powder spheroidization via plasma spray improves the hardness and dielectric properties of the deposited film.

  11. Thermal-fluid assessment of multijet atomization for spray cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panao, Miguel R.O.; Moreira, Antonio L.N.; Durao, Diamantino F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal management is a particularly difficult challenge to the miniaturization of electronic components because it requires high performance cooling systems capable of removing large heat loads at fast rates in order to keep the operating temperature low and controlled. To meet this challenge, the Intermittent Spray Cooling (ISC) concept has been suggested as a promising technology which uses a proper match between the frequency and duration of consecutive injection cycles to control heat transfer. This concept also depends on: the atomization strategy; a homogeneous dispersion of droplets impinging on the hot surface; and the quantitative control of the liquid deposited, avoiding excessive secondary atomization or pre-impingement-evaporation. In this work, the use of liquid atomization by multiple jets impact, also referred as multijet atomization, is the subject of a thermal-fluid assessment using heat transfer correlations previously derived for intermittent sprays. Simultaneous measurements of droplet size and velocity are provided as input for the correlations and the analysis explores the influence of the number of impinging jets on the heat removal pattern and magnitude. Emphasis is put on the promising applicability of multijet atomization for promoting an intelligent use of energy in the thermal management of electronic devices.

  12. Validation of HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings as a Replacement for Hard Chrome Plating on Hydraulic/Pneumatic Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Projects Agency (DARPA). The program evaluated HVOF, physical vapor deposition (PVD) and laser cladding , and concluded that HVOF was the best overall...components such as titanium flap tracks. 5 2.0 TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION 2.1 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION Technology background and...theory of operation: High-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) is a standard commercial thermal spray process in which a powder of the material to be sprayed

  13. Corrosion characteristics of several thermal spray cermet-coating/alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashary, A.A.; Tucker, R.C. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion characteristics of a thermal spray multiphase cermet coating can be quite complex. Factors such as porosity and galvanic effects between different phases in the coating and the substrate, as well as the inherent general and localized corrosion resistance of each phase, can play an important role. The present paper describes the corrosion of several cermet-coating/alloy systems as studied by a potentiodynamic cyclic polarization technique. The corrosion of these coating systems was found to be most often dominated by corrosion of the metallic phases in the coating or of the substrate alloy. (orig.)

  14. Production of nanocrystalline cermet thermal spray powders for wear resistant coatings by high-energy milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eigen, N.; Klassen, T.; Aust, E.; Bormann, R.; Gaertner, F.

    2003-01-01

    TiC-Ni based nanocrystalline cermet powders for thermal spraying were produced by high-energy milling. Milling experiments were performed in an attrition mill and a vibration mill in kilogram scale, and powder morphologies and microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and laser scattering for particle size analysis. Milling time and powder input were optimized with respect to the desired microstructure and particle sizes, and the results using both types of mill were compared. Powders with homogeneously dispersed hard phase particles below 300 nm could be produced in both mills. Additional processes for the refinement of powder morphology and particle size distribution are discussed

  15. Numerical analysis of partially molten splat during thermal spray process using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirari, M.; Abdellah El-Hadj, A.; Bacha, N.

    2010-03-01

    A finite element method is used to simulate the deposition of the thermal spray coating process. A set of governing equations is solving by a volume of fluid method. For the solidification phenomenon, we use the specific heat method (SHM). We begin by comparing the present model with experimental and numerical model available in the literature. In this study, completely molten or semi-molten aluminum particle impacts a H13 tool steel substrate is considered. Next we investigate the effect of inclination of impact of a partially molten particle on flat substrate. It was found that the melting state of the particle has great effects on the morphologies of the splat.

  16. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  17. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  18. Metal-Matrix Hardmetal/Cermet Reinforced Composite Powders for Thermal Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri GOLJANDIN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of materials is becoming increasingly important as industry response to public demands, that resources must be preserved and environment protected. To produce materials competitive in cost with primary product, secondary producers have to pursue new technologies and other innovations. For these purposes different recycling technologies for composite materials (oxidation, milling, remelting etc are widely used. The current paper studies hardmetal/cermet powders produced by mechanical milling technology. The following composite materials were studied: Cr3C2-Ni cermets and WC-Co hardmetal. Different disintegrator milling systems for production of powders with determined size and shape were used. Chemical composition of produced powders was analysed.  To estimate the properties of recycled hardmetal/cermet powders, sieving analysis, laser granulometry and angularity study were conducted. To describe the angularity of milled powders, spike parameter–quadric fit (SPQ was used and experiments for determination of SPQ sensitivity and precision to characterize particles angularity were performed. Images used for calculating SPQ were taken by SEM processed with Omnimet Image Analyser 22. The graphs of grindability and angularity were composed. Composite powders based on Fe- and Ni-self-fluxing alloys for thermal spray (plasma and HVOF were produced. Technological properties of powders and properties of thermal sprayed coatings from studied powders were investigated. The properties of spray powders reinforced with recycled hardmetal and cermet particles as alternatives for cost-sensitive applications were demonstrated.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.1.1348

  19. In-situ observation of crack propagation in thermally sprayed coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mušálek, R.; Kovářík, O.; Matějíček, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 7 (2010), s. 1807-1811 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : coating fracture * in-situ observation * alumina * stainless steel * plasma spraying Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.135, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=GatewayURL&_method=citationSearch&_uoikey=B6TVV-4YTFBCY-5&_origin=SDEMFRHTML&_version=1&md5=896533bcc989ebaa374ff209558fbcf1

  20. Thermal spraying of corrosion protection layers in biogas plants; Erzeugung von Korrosionsschutzschichten fuer Bioenergieanlagen mittels Thermischen Spritzens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crimmann, P.; Dimaczek, G.; Faulstich, M. [ATZ Entwicklungszentrum, Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Corrosion in plants for the energetic conversion of biomass is a severe problem that often causes premature damage of components. Thermal spraying is a process for the creation of corrosion protection layer. An advantage of thermal spraying is that as well as each material can be used as layer material. First practical results demonstrated that thermal spraying has the potential to create coatings to protect components against high temperature corrosion as well as biocorrosion. Layer materials are for example nickel base alloys (high temperature corrosion) and titan alloys (biocorrosion). Further investigations are necessary in order to examine whether cost-efficient coatings also contribute to the corrosion protection (e.g. polymer materials against biocorrosion). (orig.)

  1. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  2. Enhanced ductility in thermally sprayed titania coating synthesized using a nanostructured feedstock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R.S.; Marple, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured and conventional titania (TiO 2 ) feedstock powders were thermally sprayed via high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF). The microstructure, porosity, Vickers hardness, crack propagation resistance, bond strength (ASTM C633), abrasion behavior (ASTM G65) and the wear scar characteristics of these two types of coatings were analyzed and compared. The coating made from the nanostructured feedstock exhibited a bimodal microstructure, with regions containing particles that were fully molten (conventional matrix) and regions with embedded particles that were semi-molten (nanostructured zones) during the thermal spraying process. The bimodal coating also exhibited higher bond strength and higher wear resistance when compared to the conventional coating. By comparing the wear scars of both coatings (via scanning electron microscopy and roughness measurements) it was observed that when the coatings were subjected to the same abrasive conditions the wear scar of the bimodal coating was smoother, with more plastically deformed regions than the conventional coating. It was concluded that this enhanced ductility of the bimodal coating was caused by its higher toughness. The results suggest that nanostructured zones randomly distributed in the microstructure of the bimodal coating act as crack arresters, thereby enhancing toughness and promoting higher critical depth of cut, which provides a broader plastic deformation range than that exhibited by the conventional coating. This work provides evidence that the enhanced ductility of the bimodal coating is a nanostructured-related property, not caused by any other microstructural artifact

  3. DURABILITY AND TRIBOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF THERMALLY SPRAYED WC CERMET COATING IN LUBRICATED ROLLING WITH SLIDING CONTACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Durability and tribological properties of thermally sprayed WC-Cr-Ni cermet coating were investigated experimentally in lubricated rolling with sliding contact conditions. By means of the high energy type flame spraying (Hi-HVOF method, the coating was formed onto the axially ground and circumferentially ground roller specimens made of a thermally refined carbon steel. In the experiments, the WC cermet coated steel roller was mated with the carburized hardened steel roller without coating in line contact condition. The coated roller was mated with the smooth non-coated roller under a contact pressure of 1.0 or 1.2 GPa, and it was mated with the rough non-coated roller under a contact pressure of 0.6 or 0.8 GPa. As a result, it was found that in general, the coating on the circumferentially ground substrate shows a lower durability compared with that on the axially ground substrate and this difference appears more distinctly for the higher contact pressure for both smooth mating surface and rough mating surface. It was also found that there are significant differences in the tribological properties of WC cermet coating depending on the contact pressure. In addition, depending on the smooth or rough mating surface, remarkable differences in the tribological properties were found.

  4. Thermally sprayed prepregs for thixoforging of UD fiber reinforced light metal MMCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Martin; Wenzelburger, Martin; Gadow, Rainer

    2007-04-01

    Low density and good mechanical properties are the basic requirements for lightweight structures in automotive and aerospace applications. With their high specific strength and strain to failure values, aluminum alloys could be used for such applications. Only the insufficient stiffness and thermal and fatigue strength prevented their usage in high-end applications. One possibility to solve this problem is to reinforce the light metal with unidirectional fibers. The UD fiber allows tailoring of the reinforcement to meet the direction of the component's load. In this study, the production of thermally sprayed prepregs for the manufacturing of continuous fiber reinforced MMC by thixoforging is analysed. The main aim is to optimize the winding procedure, which determines the fiber strand position and tension during the coating process. A method to wind and to coat the continuous fibers with an easy-to-use handling technique for the whole manufacturing process is presented. The prepregs were manufactured by producing arc wire sprayed AlSi6 coatings on fibers bundles. First results of bending experiments showed appropriate mechanical properties.

  5. Overview on Recent Developments of Bondcoats for Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, D.; Pillai, R.; Chyrkin, A.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) bondcoats for atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) is substantially affected by the contents of Co, Ni, Cr, and Al as well as minor additions of Y, Hf, Zr, etc., but also by manufacturing-related properties such as coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, and oxygen content. The latter properties depend in turn on the exact technology and set of parameters used for bondcoat deposition. The well-established LPPS process competes nowadays with alternative technologies such as HVOF and APS. In addition, new technologies have been developed for bondcoats manufacturing such as high-velocity APS or a combination of HVOF and APS for application of a flashcoat. Future developments of the bondcoat systems will likely include optimization of thermal spraying methods for obtaining complex bondcoat roughness profiles required for extended APS-TBC lifetimes. Introduction of the newest generation single-crystal superalloys possessing low Cr and high Al and refractory metals (Re, Ru) contents will require definition of new bondcoat compositions and/or multilayered bondcoats to minimize interdiffusion issues. The developments of new bondcoat compositions may be substantially facilitated using thermodynamic-kinetic modeling, the vast potential of which has been demonstrated in recent years.

  6. Study on Metal Microfilter Coated with Ceramics by Using Plasma Thermal Spray Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Gyu; Shin, Hyun Myung; Choi, Hae Woon [Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Min [Korea Polytechincs VI, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    This research was performed on a microfilter made of a hybrid material (ceramic + metal) that was coated with ceramics on the metal-filter surface by using the thermal spray method. The ceramic powders used were Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}+40TiO{sub 2} powder with a particle size of 20 {mu}m and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (98%+)powder with a particle size of 45 {mu}m. The metal filters were filter-grade 20 {mu}m, 30 {mu}m, and 50 {mu}m sintered metal powder filters (SIKA-R 20 IS, 30 IS, 50 IS: Sinter Metals Filters) and filter-grade 75 {mu}m sintered mesh filter with five layers. Ceramic-coated filters that were coated using the thermal spray method had a great influence on powder material, particle size, and coating thickness. However, these filters showed a fine performance when used as micro-filters.

  7. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken

  8. Modification of Bonding Strength Test of WC HVOF Thermal Spray Coating on Rocket Nozzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondan Sofyan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One way to reduce structural weight of RX-100 rocket is by modifying the nozzle material and processing. Nozzle is the main target in weight reduction due to the fact that it contributes 30 % to the total weight of the structur. An alternative for this is by substitution of massive graphite, which is currently used as thermal protector in the nozzle, with thin layer of HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel thermal spray layer. This paper presents the characterization of nozzle base material as well as the modification of bonding strength test, by designing additional jig to facilitate testing processes while maintaining level of test accuracy. The results showed that the material used for  RX-100 rocket nozzle is confirmed to be S45C steel. Modification of the bonding strength test was conducted by utilizing chains, which improve test flexibility and maintains level of accuracy of the test.

  9. Characteristics and Thermal Efficiency of a Non-transferred DC Plasma Spraying Torch Under Low Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shicong; Ye Minyou; Zhang Xiaodong; Guo Wenkang; Xu Ping

    2008-01-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of a non-transferred DC arc plasma spray torch operated in argon at vacuum are reported. The arc voltage is of negative characteristics for a current below 200 A, flat for a current between 200 A to 250 A and positive for a current beyond 250 A. The voltage increases slowly with the increase in carrier gas of arc. The rate of change in voltage with currents is about 3∼4 V/100 A at a gas flow rate of about 1∼1.5 V/10 standard liter per minute (slpm). The I-V characteristics of the DC plasma torch are of a shape of hyperbola. Arc power increases with the argon flow rate, and the thermal efficiency of the torch acts in a similar way. The thermal efficiency of the non-transferred DC plasmatron is about 65∼78%. (low temperature plasma)

  10. Calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) dielectrics prepared by plasma spray and post-deposition thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ctibor, Pavel [Materials Engineering Department, Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Kotlan, Jiri, E-mail: kotlan@ipp.cas.cz [Materials Engineering Department, Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Electrotechnology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Pala, Zdenek [Materials Engineering Department, Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Sedlacek, Josef [Department of Electrotechnology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Hajkova, Zuzana; Grygar, Tomas Matys [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry ASCR, v.v.i., Husinec-Rez 1001, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Calcium titanate was sprayed by two different plasma spray systems. • Significant improvement of dielectric properties after annealing was observed. • Calcium titanate self-supporting parts can be fabricated by plasma spraying. - Abstract: This paper studies calcium titanate (CaTiO{sub 3}) dielectrics prepared by plasma spray technology. A water stabilized plasma gun (WSP) as well as a widely used gas stabilized plasma gun (GSP) were employed in this study to deposit three sample sets at different spray conditions. Prepared specimens were annealed in air at atmospheric pressure for 2 h at various temperatures from 530 to 1170 °C. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements were used for sample characterization. Dielectric spectroscopy was applied to obtain relative permittivity, conductivity and loss factor frequency dependence. Band gap energy was estimated from reflectance measurements. The work is focused on the explanation of changes in microstructure and properties of a plasma sprayed deposit after thermal annealing. Obtained results show significant improvement of dielectric properties after thermal annealing.

  11. UNA REVISIÓN DEL SPRAY TÉRMICO COMO TÉCNICA DE DEPOSICIÓN PARA CAPAS DE BARRERAS TÉRMICAS // THE THERMAL SPRAY AS A DEPOSITION TECHNIQUE FOR THERMAL BARRIER COATING: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Rondón Briceño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know the thermal barrier deposition techniques since materials with low thermal conductivity in the barrier can be obtained from them. The dependence of the thermal conductivity with the temperature can be divided into four regions. In this work, we were interested in the study of used techniques for the manufacture of materials with a desirable low thermal conductivity that will be exposed to high temperatures that is to say, materials found in the III and IV region. In these regions the thermal conductivity can be reduced increasing the porosity of the material. Through the study of the thermal barrier deposition techniques we found that the thermal spray produces a coat with high porosity, being the low velocity flame spray technique the best to produce coat of La2Zr2O7 with a minimal thermal conductivity. The thermal spray technique is low cost and almost any material can be thermally sprayed, so this can be considered a very attractive technique for industrial applications. // RESUMEN Es importante conocer las técnicas de deposición de barreras térmicas ya que de ellas depende la obtención de materiales con baja conductividad térmica en la barrera. La dependencia de la conductividad térmica con la temperatura puede dividirse en cuatro regiones. En este trabajo estuvimos interesados en el estudio de las técnicas que se utilizan para la fabricación de materiales sometidos a muy altas temperaturas y donde se desea que su conductividad térmica sea baja, es decir, materiales que se encuentran en la región III y IV. En estas regiones se puede disminuir la conductividad térmica aumentando la porosidad del material. A través del estudio de las técnicas de deposición de barreras térmica, hemos encontrado que la técnica del spray térmico produce una alta porosidad en el recubrimiento, siendo el método de rociado con baja velocidad el mejor método para producir capas de La2Zr2O7 con mínima conductividad t

  12. Corrosion resistance and characterization of metallic coatings deposited by thermal spray on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sá Brito, V.R.S.; Bastos, I.N.; Costa, H.R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Five combinations of metallic coatings and intermediate bonds were deposited on carbon steels. ► High strength was reached in adhesion tests. ► Epoxy sealing of coatings improves corrosion resistance. -- Abstract: Carbon steels are not resistant to corrosion and several methods are used in surface engineering to protect them from aggressive environments such as marine. The main objective of this work is the evaluation of mechanical and metallurgical properties of five metallic coatings produced by thermal spray on carbon steel. Five chemical compositions were tested in order to give a large panel of possibility. Coatings were characterized by several methods to result in a screening of their performance. At first, the assessment of microstructural morphology by optical microscopy (OM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was made. OM and SEM results showed uniformity of deposited layer, low amount of oxides and porosity. The physical properties of coatings were also evaluated by microhardness measurement, adhesion and porosity quantification. The corrosion resistance was analyzed in salt spray and electrochemical polarization tests. In the polarization test, as well as in the salt spray, all sealed conditions presented low corrosion. A new intermediate 78.3Ni20Cr1.4Si0.3Fe alloy was studied in order to reduce pores and microcracks that are frequently found in ordinary 95Ni5Al alloy. Based on the performed characterizations, the findings suggested that the FeCrCo deposition, with an epoxy sealing, is suitable to be used as an efficient coating of carbon steel in aggressive marine environments.

  13. Thermal decomposition study of uranyl nitrate and cerium hydroxide in a spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Wildhagen, G.R. da.

    1993-05-01

    A study, in a spray dryer system based on drying and thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate solutions aiming the production of uranium trioxide adequate for the use in posterior steps of reduction and hydro fluorination in nuclear fuel cycle; and cerium hydroxide suspensions for the production of cerium oxide with high surface area is presented. Thus, the project and construction of a countercurrent spray dryer was elaborated for capacity of 10 Kg U O 3 /h and 3,5 k Ce O 2 /h. The methodology used in these experiments consisted in the analysis of several parameters (concentration and flow rate of the feed, atomization pressure and inlet temperature of the dryer) over the physical and chemical properties of the products. Using the obtained results, with the help of a mathematical model, it was developed the project of a continuous pilot unity for the production of uranium trioxide or cerium oxide, with capacity of 20 Kg U O 3 /h or 10 Kg Ce O 2 /h, respectively. (author)

  14. Thermal response of plasma sprayed tungsten coating to high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Yang, L.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Xu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the thermal response of tungsten coating on carbon and copper substrates by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) or inert gas plasma spray (IPS), annealing and cyclic heat load experiments of these coatings were conducted. It is indicated that the multi-layered tungsten and rhenium interface of VPS-W/CFC failed to act as a diffusion barrier at elevated temperature and tungsten carbides were developed after 1 h incubation time when annealing temperature was higher than 1600 deg. C. IPS-W/Cu and W/C without an intermediate bonding layer were failed by the detachment of the tungsten coating at 900 and 1200 deg. C annealing for several hours, respectively. Cyclic heat load of electron beam with 35 MW/m 2 and 3-s pulse duration indicated that IPS-W/Cu samples failed with local detachment of the tungsten coating within 200 cycles and IPS-W/C showed local cracks by 300 cycles, but VPS-W/CFC withstood 1000 cycles without visible damages. However, crack creation and propagation in VPS-W/CFC were also observed under higher heat load

  15. Study of thermal and electrical parameters of workpieces during spray coating by electrolytic plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khafizov, A A; Shakirov, Yu I; Valiev, R A; Valiev, R I; Khafizova, G M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of thermal and electrical parameters of products in the system bottom layer - intermediate layer when applying protective coatings of ferromagnetic powder by plasma spray produced in an electric discharge with a liquid cathode, on steel samples. Temperature distribution and gradients in coating and intermediate coating were examined. Detailed descriptions of spray coating with ferromagnetic powder by plasma jet obtained in electrical discharge with liquid cathode and the apparatus for obtaining thereof is provided. Problem has been solved by using of Fourier analysis. Initial data for calculations is provided. Results of numerical analysis are provided as temporal functions of temperature in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating as well as temporal function of the value Q=q-φ; where q is density of heat current directed to the free surface of intermediate coating, φ is density of heat current in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating. The analysis of data given shows that in the systems of contact heat exchange bottom layer-intermediate layer with close values of the thermophysical characteristics of constituting materials is observed a slow increase of the temperature of the contact as a function of time. (paper)

  16. Yb2Si2O7 Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited by Various Thermal Spray Techniques: A Preliminary Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Marcano, Diana; Zhou, Dapeng; Sohn, Yoo Jung; Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Dense, crack-free, uniform, and well-adhered environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) are required to enhance the environmental durability of silicon (Si)-based ceramic matrix composites in high pressure, high gas velocity combustion atmospheres. This paper represents an assessment of different thermal spray techniques for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 EBCs. The Yb2Si2O7 coatings were deposited by means of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying (HVOF), suspension plasma spraying (SPS), and very low-pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) techniques. The initial feedstock, as well as the deposited coatings, were characterized and compared in terms of their phase composition. The as-sprayed amorphous content, microstructure, and porosity of the coatings were further analyzed. Based on this preliminary investigation, the HVOF process stood out from the other techniques as it enabled the production of vertical crack-free coatings with higher crystallinity in comparison with the APS and SPS techniques in atmospheric conditions. Nevertheless, VLPPS was found to be the preferred process for the deposition of Yb2Si2O7 coatings with desired characteristics in a controlled-atmosphere chamber.

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  18. Experimental Comparison of the Tribological Properties of Selected Surfaces Created by Thermal Spraying Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    František Tóth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific article titled “Experimental comparison of the tribological properties of selected surfaces created by thermal spraying technology” deals with the surface condition of selected pairs working within the mixed friction before and after experimental tests. Based on the chosen methodology, the experimental tests were performed on the Tribotestor M’06 testing machine. The ecological oil MOGUL HEES 46 (manufactured by Paramo was used as a lubricant. The tests were performed on selected material pairs. The first friction element was a shaft of steel 14 220. The second friction element was a steel plate of steel 11 373 with a friction surface created by two materials, i.e. CuSn10 and NP 40. The results are statistically elaborated and illustrated in figures and tables.

  19. Comparison of performance coatings thermally sprayed subject to testing adhesive wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marangoni, G.F.; Arnt, A.B.C.; Rocha, M.R. da

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the microstructural changes and wear resistance adhesive coatings obtained from powders thermally sprayed by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) were evaluated. Based coatings chrome-nickel and tungsten-cobalt are applied in conditions subject to intense wear especially abrasive. With the aim of evaluate the performance of these coatings under conditions of adhesive wear, these coatings samples were tested by the standard ASTM G99. As test parameters were used: Tungsten carbide pin (SAE 52100) with 6 mm diameter, normal load of 50N and a tangential velocity of 0.5 m / s. The worn surfaces of the coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that the performance front wear is related to the conditions of adhesion and uniformity of the coating applied. (author)

  20. Thermally Sprayed Aluminum Coatings for the Protection of Subsea Risers and Pipelines Carrying Hot Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Ce

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of boiling synthetic seawater on the performance of damaged Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA on carbon steel. Small defects (4% of the sample’s geometric surface area were drilled, exposing the steel, and the performance of the coating was analyzed for corrosion potential for different exposure times (2 h, 335 h, and 5000 h. The samples were monitored using linear polarization resistance (LPR in order to obtain their corrosion rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used for post-test characterization. The results showed that a protective layer of Mg(OH2 formed in the damaged area, which protected the underlying steel. Additionally, no coating detachment from the steel near the defect region was observed. The corrosion rate was found to be 0.010–0.015 mm/year after 5000 h in boiling synthetic seawater.

  1. Positioning system of a torch used in thermal spray coatings applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Absalón Torres-Barahona

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction and performance evaluation of a positioning system used for the deposition of coatings with molten particles, by using a torch CastoDyn Ds 8000 thermal spray with oxyacetylene combustion. The design has been done with parameters obtained in the laboratory of materials of the Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, and the information determined from the evaluation of the device, allows to control the main process variables as the projection distance, flow powder, torch speed and rotation speed of the sample holder; this has been seen in coatings made in application tests zirconia / nickel on a carbon steel substrate and analyzed with Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM.

  2. Construction of mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces by thermal spray deposition and further surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiuyong; Gong, Yongfeng; Suo, Xinkun; Huang, Jing; Liu, Yi; Li, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Here we report a simple and cost-effective technical route for constructing superhydrophobic surfaces with excellent abrasion resistance on various substrates. Rough surface structures were fabricated by thermal spray deposition of a variety of inorganic materials, and further surface modification was made by applying a thin layer of polytetrafluoroethylene. Results show that the Al, Cu, or NiCrBSi coatings with the surface roughness of up to 13.8 μm offer rough surface profile to complement the topographical morphology in micro-/nano-scaled sizes, and the hydrophobic molecules facilitate the hydrophobicity. The contact angles of water droplets of ∼155° with a sliding angle of up to 3.5° on the samples have been achieved. The newly constructed superhydrophobic coatings tolerate strong abrasion, giving clear insight into their long-term functional applications.

  3. Constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocks, A.C.F.; Fleck, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    A micromechanical model is presented for the constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed, thermal barrier coating upon a thick superalloy substrate. The coating comprises random splats with intervening penny-shaped cracks. The crack faces make contact at asperities, which progressively sinter in-service by interfacial diffusion, accommodated by bulk creep. Diffusion is driven by the reduction in interfacial energy at the developing contacts and by the local asperity contact stress. At elevated operating temperature, both sintering and creep strains accumulate within the plane of the coating. The sensitivities of sintering rate and microstructure evolution rate to the kinetic parameters and thermodynamic driving forces are explored. It is demonstrated that the sintering response is governed by three independent timescales, as dictated by the material and geometric properties of the coating. Finally, the role of substrate constraint is assessed by comparing the rate of constrained sintering with that for free sintering.

  4. Measurement of the non-thermal properties in a low-pressure spraying plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho; Chung, Kyu Sun

    2002-01-01

    The non-thermal properties of a low-pressure spraying plasma have been characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy and single probes installed in a fast scanning probe system. A two-temperature model of the electrons is introduced to explain their non-isothermal properties, which are measured using single probes. The excitation temperatures of the atomic and the ionic lines are calculated from measurements of the emission intensities of Ar (I) and Ar (II), and those temperatures can be explained by using a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) or a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) model. In order to deduce more reasonable values (excitation temperatures), we introduce a multi-thermodynamic equilibrium (MTE) model, which gives different temperatures, depending upon the atomic excitation states

  5. WC-Co coatings deposited by the electro-thermal chemical spray method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Faculty of Engineering; Wald, S.; Rabani, L.; Zoler, D. [Propulsion Physics Division, SOREQ NRC, 81800, Yavne (Israel); Factor, M.; Roman, I. [School of Applied Sciences, The Hebrew University, 91904, Jerusalem (Israel); Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, 69978, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2000-10-02

    A novel thermal spray technology - an electro-thermal chemical spray (ETCS) for producing hard coatings is presented. The experimental coating apparatus consists of a machine gun barrel, a cartridge containing the coating material in powder form, a solid propellant, and a plasma ignition system. The plasma ignition system produces plasma in pulsed mode to ignite the solid propellant. On ignition, the drag force exerted by the combustion gases accelerates the powder particles towards the substrate. Using the ETCS technique, the process of single-shot WC-Co coating deposition on stainless steel substrate was studied. The influence of process parameters (plasma energy, mass of the solid propellant and the coated powder, distance between the gun muzzle and the substrate) on the coating structure and some of its properties were investigated. It was shown that ECTS technique effectively deposited the WC-Co coating with deposition thicknesses of 100-200 {mu}m per shot, while deposition yield of {proportional_to}70% was attained. The WC-Co coatings consisted of carbide particles distributed in amorphous matrix. The powder particle velocity was found to depend on the solid propellant mass and was weakly dependent on the plasma energy, while the particle processing temperature was strongly dependent on the plasma energy and almost independent of the solid propellant mass. Whilst increasing the solid propellant mass from 5 to 7 g, the deposition rate and yield correspondingly increased. When increasing the plasma energy, the temperature of the powder particles increased, the average carbide particle size decreased and their shape became more rounded. The deposition yield and microhardness at first increased and then achieved saturation by increasing the plasma energy. (orig.)

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the passive films formed on thermally sprayed and wrought Inconel 625

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakare, M.S. [Materials, Mechanics and Structures Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Voisey, K.T., E-mail: Katy.voisey@nottingham.ac.uk [Materials, Mechanics and Structures Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Roe, M.J.; McCartney, D.G. [Materials, Mechanics and Structures Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    There is a well known performance gap in corrosion resistance between thermally sprayed corrosion resistant coatings and the equivalent bulk materials. Interconnected porosity has an important and well known effect, however there are additional relevant microstructural effects. Previous work has shown that a compositional difference exists between the regions of resolidified and non-melted material that exist in the as-sprayed coatings. The resolidified regions are depleted in oxide forming elements due to formation of oxides during coating deposition. Formation of galvanic cells between these different regions is believed to decrease the corrosion resistance of the coating. In order to increase understanding of the details of this effect, this work uses X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the passive films formed on thermally sprayed coatings (HVOF) and bulk Inconel 625, a commercially available corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo-Nb alloy. Passive films produced by potentiodynamic scanning to 400 mV in 0.5 M sulphuric acid were compared with air-formed films. The poorer corrosion performance of the thermally sprayed coatings was attributed to Ni(OH){sub 2}, which forms a loose, non-adherent and therefore non-protective film. The good corrosion resistance of wrought Inconel 625 is due to formation of Cr, Mo and Nb oxides.

  7. Improving dielectric properties of plasma sprayed calcium titanate (CaTiO3) coatings by thermal annealing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlan, Jiří; Ctibor, Pavel; Pala, Zdeněk; Homola, P.; Nehasil, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 8 (2014), s. 13049-13055 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : X-raymethods * Dielectricproperties * Perovskites * Plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.605, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027288421400724X

  8. Effect of thermal spray processing techniques on the microstructure and properties of Ni-based amorphous coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.M.; Moon, B.M.; Fleury, E.; Ahn, H.S.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, W.T.; Sordelet, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Metallic amorphous materials have been widely developed thanks to the outstanding properties including high chemical stability, mechanical strength, and magnetic properties. However, with the exception of a few compositions, the limiting factor is the critical cooling rate for the formation of the amorphous phase. For many applications, it is only the contact surface properties that are important, thus the use, of coating techniques such as thermal sprayings has several attractive features. In this paper, we present the microstructure of Ni-based amorphous coatings prepared by laser cladding and vacuum plasma spraying. The utilization of plasma spraying to deposit atomized powder enabled the formation of fully amorphous coating, laser cladding resulted in mostly crystallized structures. Glass forming ability and wear properties of the coatings were discussed as a function of the coating microstructure. (orig.)

  9. Spatially-resolved velocities of thermally-produced spray droplets using a velocity-divided Abel inversion of photographed streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-10-01

    Droplet velocities of thermal spray are known to have profound effects on important coating qualities, such as adhesive strength, porosity, and hardness, for various applications. For obtaining the droplet velocities, therefore, the TOF (time-of-flight) technique has been widely used, which relies on observations of emitted radiation from the droplets, where all droplets along the line-of-sight contribute to signals. Because droplets at and near the flow axis mostly contribute coating layers, it has been hoped to get spatially resolved velocities. For this purpose, a velocity-divided Abel inversion was devised from CMOS photographic data. From this result, it has turned out that the central velocity is about 25% higher than that obtained from the TOF technique for the case studied (at the position 150 mm downstream of the plasma spray gun, where substrates for spray coatings are usually placed). Further implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  10. The evaluation of integrity and elasticity of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings by ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1997-12-31

    Thermally sprayed ceramic coatings are widely used in industrial applications where the coated component is subject to, e.g. high thermal loads or mechanical wear. The mechanical properties of the coating are finally created in the coating process and the chemical composition of the powder used as raw material can only give some hints about the properties of the final coating. Several non-destructive testing techniques are available for the detection of defects in ceramic materials or for the evaluation of density and density variations. In addition to this, ultrasonic techniques can be used for quantitative evaluation of elastic properties of materials. This evaluation is based on the measurement of sound velocities of different wave modes in the material and is normally applied only to relatively simple-shaped specimens having parallel surfaces. Acoustic microscopy operating at very high (> 100 MHz) frequencies has been used to measure the sound velocities in homogeneous and thin coatings. With this type of equipment, reliable and accurate results have been achieved in laboratory measurements. A lot of development work has been carried out world-wide to develop the measurement techniques and acoustic lenses (transducers) used in acoustic microscopy. However, less attention has been paid on the development of techniques for industrial applications on-site. The present work was focused on the development of measurement techniques for industrial applications. A new type of large-aperture low-frequency transducer was designed and constructed for the measurement of sound velocities in thermally sprayed ceramic coatings. The major difference to the lenses used in acoustic microscopy is that in the new transducer no separate lens is needed for focusing the sound beam. The piezoelectric element in the new transducer is a plastic (PVDF)-film that can be shaped to create the required focus. The practical measurement of the sound velocity is based on a modification of the V

  11. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.

    1980-03-01

    Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950 0 C (1562 to 1742 0 F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required

  12. Comparison between alkali heat treatment and sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on thermally-sprayed rough Ti surface in rabbit model: Effects on bone-bonding ability and osteoconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshiyuki; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Masashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of different surface treatments (hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, alkali heat treatment, and no treatment) on the ability of bone to bond to a rough arc-sprayed Ti metal surface, using rabbit models. The bone-to-implant contacts for untreated, HA-coated, and alkali heat-treated implants were 21.2%, 72.1%, and 33.8% at 4 weeks, 21.8%, 70.9%, and 30.0% at 8 weeks, and 16.3%, 70.2%, and 29.9% at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). HA -coated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than the untreated and alkali heat-treated implants at all the time point, whereas alkali heat-treated implants showed significantly higher bone-to-implant contacts than untreated implants at 4 and 16 weeks. The failure loads in a mechanical test for untreated, HA coated, alkali heat-treated plates were 65.4 N, 70.7 N, and 90.8 N at 4 weeks, 76.1 N, 64.7 N, and 104.8 N at 8 weeks and 88.7 N, 92.6 N, and 118.5 N at 16 weeks, respectively (n = 8). The alkali heat-treated plates showed significantly higher failure loads than HA-coated plates at 8 and 16 weeks. The difference between HA-coated plates and untreated plates were not statistically significant at any time point. Thus HA coating, although it enables high bone-to-implant contact, may not enhance the bone-bonding properties of thermally-sprayed rough Ti metal surfaces. In contrast, alkali heat treatment can be successfully applied to thermally-sprayed Ti metal to enhance both bone-to-implant contact and bone-bonding strength. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Review and evaluation of information on the thermal performance of ultimate heat sinks: spray ponds and cooling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.L.

    1975-09-01

    A report is presented which identifies and evaluates available information and data useful in validating and improving existing models for the thermal performance of ultimate heat sinks. Included are discussions of the thermal elements of cooling ponds and spray ponds, the available information and data pertinent to the problem, and the requirements and needs for further research and performance data. An outline is presented of the necessary elements required for a performance test of an ultimate heat sink before the system is thermally approved. (auth)

  14. Study by X-ray diffraction and mechanical analysis of the residual stress generation during thermal spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, J.; Dias, A.; Lebrun, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are formed by the deposition of molten or partially molten particles, propelled onto a substrate where they impact, spread and solidify rapidly. Residual stresses are expected within the sprayed deposit as a consequence of the release of thermal and kinetic energies. A wide range of materials and two spraying techniques are considered in this study, namely atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high-velocity oxygen fuel. Stresses were determined by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The results were compared with those calculated by mechanical analysis of stress relief in coatings detached from the substrate. Comparison of the results for adherent and free-standing coatings shows that the residual stress state can be resolved in terms of the components suggested by models that propose two stages of stress generation: quenching stresses and secondary-cooling stresses. The in-depth distribution of residual stresses, through the coating thickness, is discussed in terms of the nature of the coating system

  15. Physical chemistry of WC-12 %Co coatings deposited by thermal spraying at different standoff distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Ahmed, Furqan; Anwar, Muhammad Yousaf; Ali, Liaqat; Ajmal, Muhammad [Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, Aamer Nusair [Institute of Industrial and Control System, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2015-09-15

    In the present research, WC-12 %Co cermet coatings were deposited on AISI-321 stainless steel substrate using air plasma spraying. During the deposition process, the standoff distance was varied from 80 to 130 mm with 10 mm increments. Other parameters such as current, voltage, time, carrier gas flow rate and powder feed rate etc. were kept constant. The objective was to study the effects of spraying distance on the microstructure of as-sprayed coatings. The microscopic analyses revealed that the band of spraying distance ranging from 90 to 100 mm was the threshold distance for optimum results, provided that all the other spraying parameters were kept constant. In this range of threshold distance, minimum percentages of porosity and defects were observed. Further, the formation of different phases, at six spraying distances, was studied using X-ray diffraction, and the phase analysis was correlated with hardness results.

  16. Preparation of the Wire of ZChSnSb11-6 Used for Remanufacturing Thermal Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Yang, Z. Y.; Fu, D. X.; Li, X. F.; Chen, W.

    Tin base Babbitt alloy widely used in bearing bush production and repair, the performance of ZChSnSb11-6 is better than ZChSnSb8-4.But as a result of as-cast structure of ZChSnSb11-6 is rich in big hard phase, its processing performance is bad, in this paper, through the optimization of smelting, casting, extrusion, drawing and other processes we have been successfully prepared ZChSnSb11-6 wire suitable for thermal spraying. Through metallographic examination, micro hardness, bond strength and porosity testing, it was proved that the wire meet the requirements of bearing manufacturing thermal spraying.

  17. Replacement of Chromium Electroplating on C-2, E-2, P-3 and C-130 Propeller Hub Components Using HVOF Thermal Spray Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sartwell, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    .... This document constitutes the final report on a project to qualify high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings as a replacement for hard chrome plating on propeller hub components from various military aircraft...

  18. Mars Science Laboratory Rover System Thermal Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Keith S.; Kempenaar, Joshua E.; Liu, Yuanming; Bhandari, Pradeep; Dudik, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    On November 26, 2011, NASA launched a large (900 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars. The MSL rover is scheduled to land on Mars on August 5, 2012. Prior to launch, the Rover was successfully operated in simulated mission extreme environments during a 16-day long Rover System Thermal Test (STT). This paper describes the MSL Rover STT, test planning, test execution, test results, thermal model correlation and flight predictions. The rover was tested in the JPL 25-Foot Diameter Space Simulator Facility at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Rover operated in simulated Cruise (vacuum) and Mars Surface environments (8 Torr nitrogen gas) with mission extreme hot and cold boundary conditions. A Xenon lamp solar simulator was used to impose simulated solar loads on the rover during a bounding hot case and during a simulated Mars diurnal test case. All thermal hardware was exercised and performed nominally. The Rover Heat Rejection System, a liquid-phase fluid loop used to transport heat in and out of the electronics boxes inside the rover chassis, performed better than predicted. Steady state and transient data were collected to allow correlation of analytical thermal models. These thermal models were subsequently used to predict rover thermal performance for the MSL Gale Crater landing site. Models predict that critical hardware temperatures will be maintained within allowable flight limits over the entire 669 Sol surface mission.

  19. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  20. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-06-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials and their stability at high neutron doses enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for waste package and drip shield applications, although the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas-atomized powders and applied as near full density, nonporous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This article summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers and as neutron absorbers. This article also presents a simple cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  1. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials

  2. Study of different biocomposite coatings on Ti alloy by a subsonic thermal spraying technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Muqin [Provincial Key Laboratory of Biomaterials, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154007 (China); Zhang Rui [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Wang Jianping [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Yang Shiqin [State Key Laboratory Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 (China)

    2007-03-01

    A subsonic thermal spraying technique (STS) was used to make different biocomposite coatings on titanium alloys for preparing three kinds of implants: 8Ti2G, HA and 8H2B, respectively. The implants were embedded in a region of jaw of dogs whose teeth were pulled out three months previously. The dogs, in two groups, were killed 30 days and 90 days, respectively, after they were operated on. Osteointegration between the implants and host bone was investigated by x-ray, histology and the SEM technique. The results showed that the three kinds of coatings all exhibited good biocompatibility and synostosis, but their osteointegration capability showed a difference and decreased in the sequence of 8H2B, HA and 8Ti2G. The activity of coating, which promoted the reactions between implants and bone tissue, was further increased by the addition of bioglass in the 8H2B coating. Subsequently, chemical bonding was formed, and the osteointegration strength was increased. The study provided a new approach to prepare biocomposite coatings. The 8H2B implants, which formed an integral functional biocomposite coating on Ti alloys, showed a better osteointegration capability with bioactivity and pore gradient variation. A theoretical base was provided for the biocomposite coating application.

  3. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  4. The corrosion resistance of 140MXC, 530AS and 560AS coatings produced by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Alexis López Covaleda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial materials were deposited using electric arc thermal spraying: 140MXC (with Fe, W, Cr, Nb, 530AS (AISI 1015 steel and 560AS (AISI 420 steel on AISI 4340 steel. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the best strategy for improving a coating-substrate system’s corrosion resistance, using the following combinations: homogeneous single coatings, bilayers consisting of 530AS or 560AS under 140MXC and 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS coatings deposited simultaneously. The coatings were characterised using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion resistance was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarisation and hardness by using the Vickers test. Corrosion resistance depends on the amount of microstructure defects, the deposition strategy and the alloy elements. However, corrosion resistance was similar in single coatings of 140MXC and bilayers, having -630 V corrosion potential and 708 nA corrosion current. The details and corrosion mechanism of the coatings so produced are described in this paper.

  5. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  6. Stress analysis of thermal sprayed coatings using a semi-destructive hole-drilling strain gauge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolhof, V.; Musil, J.; Cepera, M.; Zeman, J.

    1995-01-01

    Residual stress is an important parameter in coating technology since it often relates to the maximum coating thickness which can be deposited without spallation, and this applies to coatings produced by different thermal spray and thin film technologies. Indeed, the mechanisms by which residual stress is built up or locked into a coating depends markedly on the deposition process and coating structure (growth structure, phase composition) in the same way too. Methods for determining residual stresses in materials include both destructive and non-destructive methods. This contribution describes semi-destructive hole-drilling strain gauge method modified for measurement of residual stresses in thermal sprayed coatings. This method of stress analysis was used for determination of stress levels in thermal sprayed WC-17% Co coatings onto 13% Cr steel substrates. Results show that deposition conditions and final coating structure influence directly the residual stress level in the coatings. It is proved that semi-destructive hole-tube drilling measurement is effective reproducible method of coating stress analysis and good solution for optimization of deposition process

  7. A two-wavelength imaging pyrometer for measuring particle temperature, velocity and size in thermal spray processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.E.; Parker, R.A.; Lee, D.Y.; Biancaniello, F.; Ridder, S.

    1999-01-01

    An imaging pyrometer has been developed to measure the surface temperature of hot metal objects and to measure particle temperature, velocity and size in thermal spray, spray-fonning and atomization processes. The two-wavelength surface imaging pyrometer provides true temperature measurement with high resolution, even when the surface has emissivity variation caused by roughness or oxidation. The surface imaging pyrometer has been calibrated for use in a material processing lab calibration over the range of 1000 to 3000 deg K, and these results are described. The particle imaging pyrometer has a field of view that spans the entire particle stream in typical thermal spray devices, and provides continuous measurement of the entire particle stream. Particle temperature and velocity are critical parameters for producing high quality spray coatings efficiently and reliably. The software locates the particle streaks in the image, and determines the intensity ratio for each particle streak pair to obtain the temperature. The dimensions of the particle streak image are measured to determine the velocity and size. Because the vision-based sensor samples the entire particle stream in every video frame, the particle temperature, velocity and size data are updated at 30 Hz at all points in the particle stream. Particle measurements in a plasma spray at NIST are described. In this paper, we will describe our experiments with ceramic powders, in which measurements have been made at several positions along the particle stream. The particle data are represented as profiles across the particle stream, histograms of the full particle stream or time histories of the full-stream average. The results are compared and calibrated with other temperature and diagnostic measurement systems. (author)

  8. The history and future of thermal sprayed galvanically active metallic anticorrosion coatings used on pipelines and steel structures in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodijnen, Fred van [Sulzer Metco, Duisburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since its invention by M. U. Schoop in the beginning of the 20th century, thermal spray has been used for corrosion protection applications in naval, on-shore, submerged and atmospheric environments. Thermally sprayed coatings of zinc, zinc alloys, aluminum and aluminum alloys are currently the most popular materials used for active corrosion protection of steel and concrete, which can be applied using either of the widely known thermal spray processes of combustion wire or electric arc wire. In the oil and gas exploration and production industry, corrosion protection applications using these technologies have evolved since the early sixties. Thermal spray technology has successfully been used to protect steel-based materials from corrosion in many different fields of application like platforms and pipelines. The most used material in the oil and gas industry is TSA (Thermally Sprayed Aluminum) coating. TSA coatings, with a lifetime of 25 to 30 years, require no maintenance except for cosmetic reasons when painted. The surface temperature of a TSA can go as high as 480 deg C. Although TS (Thermal Spray) is an older process, the number of applications and the number of m{sup 2} it is applied to is still increasing resulting from its maintenance-free and reliable active corrosion-protection features. (author)

  9. Effects caused by thermal shocks in plasma sprayed protective coatings from materials based on Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorski, L.; Wolski, T.; Gostynski, D.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma sprayed coatings from the materials based on Al 2 O 3 with addition of NiO and TiO 2 have been studied. Thermal shock resistance of these coatings has been tested on special experimental arrangement in the stream of hot and cold gases. Changes in coating microstructure has been determined by light microscopy methods. Phase transition caused by the experiments are revealed by X-ray diffraction methods. The resistance for thermal fatigue processes depends on used coatings materials. (author). 21 refs, 21 figs, 1 tab

  10. In situ spray deposition of cell-loaded, thermally and chemically gelling hydrogel coatings for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivaner Kara, Meryem O; Ekenseair, Adam K

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the efficacy of creating cellular hydrogel coatings on warm tissue surfaces through the minimally invasive, sprayable delivery of thermoresponsive liquid solutions was investigated. Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based (pNiPAAm) thermogelling macromers with or without addition of crosslinking polyamidoamine (PAMAM) macromers were synthesized and used to produce in situ forming thermally and chemically gelling hydrogel systems. The effect of solution and process parameters on hydrogel physical properties and morphology was evaluated and compared to poly(ethylene glycol) and injection controls. Smooth, fast, and conformal hydrogel coatings were obtained when pNiPAAm thermogelling macromers were sprayed with high PAMAM concentration at low pressure. Cellular hydrogel coatings were further fabricated by different spraying techniques: single-stream, layer-by-layer, and dual stream methods. The impact of spray technique, solution formulation, pressure, and spray solution viscosity on the viability of fibroblast and osteoblast cells encapsulated in hydrogels was elucidated. In particular, the early formation of chemically crosslinked micronetworks during bulk liquid flow was shown to significantly affect cell viability under turbulent conditions compared to injectable controls. The results demonstrated that sprayable, in situ forming hydrogels capable of delivering cell populations in a homogeneous therapeutic coating on diseased tissue surfaces offer promise as novel therapies for applications in regenerative medicine. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2383-2393, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Processing, structure, property and performance relationships for the thermal spray of the internal surface of aluminum cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David James

    The increased need for automotive weight reduction has necessitated the use of aluminum for engine blocks. Conventional aluminum alloys cannot survive the constant wear from a piston ring reciprocating on the surface. However, a wear resistant thermal spray coating can be applied on the internal surface of the cylinder bore, which has significant advantages over other available options. Thermal spray is a well-established process for depositing molten, semi-molten, or solid particles onto a substrate to form a protective coating. For this application, the two main challenges were obtaining good wear resistance, and achieving good adhesion. To design a system capable of producing a well-adhered, wear resistant coating for this high volume application it is necessary to identify the overall processing, structure, properties, and performance relationships. The results will demonstrate that very important relationships exist among particle characteristics, substrate conditions, and the properties of the final coating. However, it is the scientific studies to understand some of the process physics in these relationships that allow recognition of the critical processing conditions that need to be controlled to ensure a consistent, reliable thermal spray coating. In this investigation, it will be shown that the critical microstructural aspect of the coating that produced the required tribological properties was the presence of wuestite (FeO). It was found that by using a low carbon steel material with compressed air atomizing gas, it was possible to create an Fe/FeO structure that exhibited excellent tribological properties. This study will also show that traditional thermal spray surface preparation techniques were not ideal for this application, therefore a novel alternative approach was developed. The application of a flux to the aluminum surface prior to thermal spray promotes excellent bond strengths to non-roughened aluminum. Analysis will show that this flux strips

  12. Optimized functionally graded La2Zr2O7/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings fabricated by suspension plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Fan, Shan; You, Yuan; Wang, Liang; Yang, Changlong; Sun, Xiaoguang; Li, Xuewei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an optimized functionally graded coating (OFGC) was successfully fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) with feedstocks of the suspension of nanoparticles. La 2 Zr 2 O 7 /8YSZ OFGC with gradual compositional variation along the through-thickness direction is proposed to mitigate spallation and crack formation owing to the high residual stresses caused by frequent thermal cycling for TBCs. The single ceramic layer coatings (SCLC) of LZ and double ceramic layer coatings (DCLC) of LZ/8YSZ were fabricated by SPS as comparison. The phase composition and microstructure of the SCLC, OFGC and DCLC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). Moreover, the thermal cycling tests were carried out to evaluate their thermal shock behavior. Changes in weight and morphology of specimens were analyzed during thermal cycling tests. The results showed that OFGC has extended lifetime compared with SCLC and DCLC. The failure of DCLC with clear interface between different ceramic layers occurred via delamination mode, as a result of crack initiation and propagation generated by thermal mismatch between LZ and 8YSZ. While the failure of OFGC occurred in thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers, indicating that the gradual compositional variation avoided thermal stress concentration in the top ceramic layers. - Highlights: • Optimized functionally graded coatings and double ceramic layer coatings were deposited by suspension plasma spray. • The graded area of OFGC is continuously changed from inner 8YSZ to outer La 2 Zr 2 O 7 (LZ). • The OFGC shows a more extended thermal cycling life than the LZ SCLC and LZ/8YSZ DCLC. • Various failure mechanisms were proposed to explain thermal cycling behavior

  13. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Wong, F; Ji, X; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Marshall, M C; Meacham, B E; Buffa, E J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Beardsley, M B; Weaver, D T; Aprigliano, L F; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E J; Wolejsza, T M; Martin, F J; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A H; Ernst, F; Michal, G M; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E J

    2004-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an ''integral drip shield'' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  14. Engineering a new class of thermal spray nano-based microstructures from agglomerated nanostructured particles, suspensions and solutions: an invited review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauchais, P; Montavon, G; Lima, R S; Marple, B R

    2011-01-01

    From the pioneering works of McPherson in 1973 who identified nanometre-sized features in thermal spray conventional alumina coatings (using sprayed particles in the tens of micrometres size range) to the most recent and most advanced work aimed at manufacturing nanostructured coatings from nanometre-sized feedstock particles, the thermal spray community has been involved with nanometre-sized features and feedstock for more than 30 years. Both the development of feedstock (especially through cryo-milling, and processes able to manufacture coatings structured at the sub-micrometre or nanometre sizes, such as micrometre-sized agglomerates made of nanometre-sized particles for feedstock) and the emergence of thermal spray processes such as suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques have been driven by the need to manufacture coatings with enhanced properties. These techniques result in two different types of coatings: on the one hand, those with a so-called bimodal structure having nanometre-sized zones embedded within micrometre ones, for which the spray process is similar to that of conventional coatings and on the other hand, sub-micrometre or nanostructured coatings achieved by suspension or solution spraying. Compared with suspension spraying, solution precursor spraying uses molecularly mixed precursors as liquids, avoiding a separate processing route for the preparation of powders and enabling the synthesis of a wide range of oxide powders and coatings. Such coatings are intended for use in various applications ranging from improved thermal barrier layers and wear-resistant surfaces to thin solid electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cell systems, among other numerous applications. Meanwhile these processes are more complex to operate since they are more sensitive to parameter variations compared with conventional thermal spray processes. Progress in this area has resulted from the unique combination of modelling activities, the evolution of

  15. Engineering a new class of thermal spray nano-based microstructures from agglomerated nanostructured particles, suspensions and solutions: an invited review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchais, P.; Montavon, G.; Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2011-03-01

    From the pioneering works of McPherson in 1973 who identified nanometre-sized features in thermal spray conventional alumina coatings (using sprayed particles in the tens of micrometres size range) to the most recent and most advanced work aimed at manufacturing nanostructured coatings from nanometre-sized feedstock particles, the thermal spray community has been involved with nanometre-sized features and feedstock for more than 30 years. Both the development of feedstock (especially through cryo-milling, and processes able to manufacture coatings structured at the sub-micrometre or nanometre sizes, such as micrometre-sized agglomerates made of nanometre-sized particles for feedstock) and the emergence of thermal spray processes such as suspension and liquid precursor thermal spray techniques have been driven by the need to manufacture coatings with enhanced properties. These techniques result in two different types of coatings: on the one hand, those with a so-called bimodal structure having nanometre-sized zones embedded within micrometre ones, for which the spray process is similar to that of conventional coatings and on the other hand, sub-micrometre or nanostructured coatings achieved by suspension or solution spraying. Compared with suspension spraying, solution precursor spraying uses molecularly mixed precursors as liquids, avoiding a separate processing route for the preparation of powders and enabling the synthesis of a wide range of oxide powders and coatings. Such coatings are intended for use in various applications ranging from improved thermal barrier layers and wear-resistant surfaces to thin solid electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cell systems, among other numerous applications. Meanwhile these processes are more complex to operate since they are more sensitive to parameter variations compared with conventional thermal spray processes. Progress in this area has resulted from the unique combination of modelling activities, the evolution of

  16. Structural and photocatalytic characteristics of TiO2 coatings produced by various thermal spray techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Štengl, Václav; Pala, Zdeněk

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2013), s. 218-226 ISSN 2226-4108 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : plasma spraying * high velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) spraying * flame spraying * titanium dioxide (TiO2) * photocatalysis * band gap Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UACH-T) http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&id=doi:10.1007/s40145-013-0063-z

  17. Improved methods for testing bond and intrinsic strength and fatigue of thermally sprayed metallic and ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, K.K.; Ziehl, M.H.; Schwaminger, C.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional bond strength tests for thermally sprayed coatings represent only a rough means of obtaining overall strength values, with no differentiation between adhesion at the interface and intrinsic coating properties. In order to obtain information about the influence of substrate surface preparation on the adhesion of a Tribaloy T700 coating, tensile bond strength and modified crack-opening displacement (COD) specimens were tested by deliberate crack initiation at the interface. Crack initiation was achieved by weakening of the interface at the outer diameter in the case of bond strength specimens or at the notch root in the case of COD specimens. This made it possible to look at the influence of surface roughness and grit contamination on the coating adhesion separately. Modified COD specimens with the notch in the centre of the coating were used to determine crack-opening energies and critical stress intensity factors of atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiAl and low pressure plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY bond coatings and a ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 thermal barrier coating (TBC). Additionally, bond strength specimens were stressed dynamically, and it could be demonstrated that Woehler (S/N) diagrams can be established for a metallic NiAl bond coating and even for a ceramic ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 TBC. (orig.)

  18. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Mg-Al alloys with thermal spray Al/SiCp composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, A.; Feliu Jr, S.; Merino, M. C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P.; Arrabal, R.

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion protection of Mg-Al alloys by flame thermal spraying of Al/SiCp composite coatings was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The volume fraction of SiC particles (SiCp) varied between 5 and 30%. The as-sprayed Al/SiCp composite coatings revealed a high number of micro-channels, largely in the vicinity of the SiC particles, that facilitated the penetration of the electrolyte and the subsequent galvanic corrosion of the magnesium substrates. The application of a cold-pressing post-treatment reduced the degree of porosity of the coatings and improved the bonding at the coating/substrate and Al/SiC interfaces. This resulted in improved corrosion resistance of the coated specimens. The effectiveness of the coatings slightly decreased with the addition of 5-30 vol.% SiCp compared with the un reinforced thermal spray aluminium coatings. (Author) 31 refs.

  19. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Champagne have demonstrated this use of the cold spray technique in the repair of helicopter mast supports in U.S. Army aircraft, with over 50...Process: Fundamentals and Applications, Champagne , V. K., Ed., Woodhead, Boca Raton, FL Chap. 3. [3] Schiel, J. F., 2014, “The cold gas-dynamic spray... Champagne , V. K., Ed., Woodhead, Boca Raton, FL Chap. 2. [15] Han, W., Meng, X. M., Zhang, J. B., and Zhao, J., 2012, “Elastic modulus of 304 stainless

  20. SiC fiber and yttria-stabilized zirconia composite thick thermal barrier coatings fabricated by plasma spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rongbin; Cheng, Xudong; Ye, Weiping

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 4 mm-thick SiC fiber/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) composite thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spray (APS). The composite coatings have a 'reinforced concrete frame structure', which can protect the coating from failure caused by increasing thickness of coating. The SiC fiber plays an important role in reducing the residual stress level of the composite coatings. The thermal conductivity (TC) value of the composite coatings is 0.632 W/m K, which is about 50% reduction compared to that of typical APS YSZ TBCs. And the composite coatings have higher fracture toughness and better thermal shock resistance than the YSZ TBCs.

  1. Yttria-stabilized zirkonia / gadolinium zirconate double-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakan, Emine

    2015-07-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) research and development is driven by the desirability of further increasing the maximum inlet temperature in a gas turbine engine. A number of new top coat ceramic materials have been proposed during the last decades due to limited temperature capability (1200 C) of the state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (7 wt. % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}, YSZ) at long term operation. Zirconate pyrochlores of the large lanthanides((Gd → La){sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) have been particularly attractive due to their higher temperature phase stability than that of the YSZ. Nonetheless, the issues related with the implementation of pyrochlores such as low fracture toughness and formation of deleterious interphases with thermally grown oxide (TGO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were reported. The implication was the requirement of an interlayer between the pyrochlores and TGO, which introduced double-layer systems to the TBC literature. Furthermore, processability issues of pyrochlores associated with the different evaporation rates of lanthanide oxides and zirconia resulting in unfavorable composition variations in the coatings were addressed in different studies. After all, although the material properties are available, there is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the properties of the coatings made of pyrochlores. From the processability point of view the most reported pyrochlore is La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Hence, the goal of this research was to investigate plasma-sprayed Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (GZO) coatings and YSZ/GZO double-layer TBC systems. Three main topics were examined based on processing, performance and properties: (i) the plasma spray processing of the GZO and its impact on the microstructural and compositional properties of the GZO coatings; (ii) the cycling lifetime of the YSZ/GZO double-layer systems under thermal gradient at a surface temperature of 1400 C; (iii) the properties of the GZO and YSZ coatings such as

  2. Yttria-stabilized zirkonia / gadolinium zirconate double-layer plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakan, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) research and development is driven by the desirability of further increasing the maximum inlet temperature in a gas turbine engine. A number of new top coat ceramic materials have been proposed during the last decades due to limited temperature capability (1200 C) of the state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (7 wt. % Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 , YSZ) at long term operation. Zirconate pyrochlores of the large lanthanides((Gd → La) 2 Zr 2 O 7 ) have been particularly attractive due to their higher temperature phase stability than that of the YSZ. Nonetheless, the issues related with the implementation of pyrochlores such as low fracture toughness and formation of deleterious interphases with thermally grown oxide (TGO, Al 2 O 3 ) were reported. The implication was the requirement of an interlayer between the pyrochlores and TGO, which introduced double-layer systems to the TBC literature. Furthermore, processability issues of pyrochlores associated with the different evaporation rates of lanthanide oxides and zirconia resulting in unfavorable composition variations in the coatings were addressed in different studies. After all, although the material properties are available, there is a paucity of data in the literature concerning the properties of the coatings made of pyrochlores. From the processability point of view the most reported pyrochlore is La 2 Zr 2 O 7 . Hence, the goal of this research was to investigate plasma-sprayed Gd 2 Zr 2 O 7 (GZO) coatings and YSZ/GZO double-layer TBC systems. Three main topics were examined based on processing, performance and properties: (i) the plasma spray processing of the GZO and its impact on the microstructural and compositional properties of the GZO coatings; (ii) the cycling lifetime of the YSZ/GZO double-layer systems under thermal gradient at a surface temperature of 1400 C; (iii) the properties of the GZO and YSZ coatings such as thermal conductivity, coefficient of thermal expansion as well

  3. Higher Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings with the Combined Use of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet and the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Wang, Jiwen; Kumar, Rishi; Roth, Jeffery; Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.

    2018-02-01

    Gas-turbine engines are widely used in transportation, energy and defense industries. The increasing demand for more efficient gas turbines requires higher turbine operating temperatures. For more than 40 years, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been the dominant thermal barrier coating (TBC) due to its outstanding material properties. However, the practical use of YSZ-based TBCs is limited to approximately 1200 °C. Developing new, higher temperature TBCs has proven challenging to satisfy the multiple property requirements of a durable TBC. In this study, an advanced TBC has been developed by using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process that generates unique engineered microstructures with the higher temperature yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) to produce a TBC that can meet and exceed the major performance standards of state-of-the-art air plasma sprayed YSZ, including: phase stability, sintering resistance, CMAS resistance, thermal cycle durability, thermal conductivity and erosion resistance. The temperature improvement for hot section gas turbine materials (superalloys & TBCs) has been at the rate of about 50 °C per decade over the last 50 years. In contrast, SPPS YAG TBCs offer the near-term potential of a > 200 °C improvement in temperature capability.

  4. Higher Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings with the Combined Use of Yttrium Aluminum Garnet and the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Maurice; Wang, Jiwen; Kumar, Rishi; Roth, Jeffery; Jiang, Chen; Jordan, Eric H.

    2018-04-01

    Gas-turbine engines are widely used in transportation, energy and defense industries. The increasing demand for more efficient gas turbines requires higher turbine operating temperatures. For more than 40 years, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) has been the dominant thermal barrier coating (TBC) due to its outstanding material properties. However, the practical use of YSZ-based TBCs is limited to approximately 1200 °C. Developing new, higher temperature TBCs has proven challenging to satisfy the multiple property requirements of a durable TBC. In this study, an advanced TBC has been developed by using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process that generates unique engineered microstructures with the higher temperature yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) to produce a TBC that can meet and exceed the major performance standards of state-of-the-art air plasma sprayed YSZ, including: phase stability, sintering resistance, CMAS resistance, thermal cycle durability, thermal conductivity and erosion resistance. The temperature improvement for hot section gas turbine materials (superalloys & TBCs) has been at the rate of about 50 °C per decade over the last 50 years. In contrast, SPPS YAG TBCs offer the near-term potential of a > 200 °C improvement in temperature capability.

  5. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  6. Fabrication of Water Jet Resistant and Thermally Stable Superhydrophobic Surfaces by Spray Coating of Candle Soot Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qahtan, Talal F; Gondal, Mohammed A; Alade, Ibrahim O; Dastageer, Mohammed A

    2017-08-08

    A facile synthesis method for highly stable carbon nanoparticle (CNP) dispersion in acetone by incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame is presented. The synthesized CNP dispersion is the mixture of graphitic and amorphous carbon nanoparticles of the size range of 20-50 nm and manifested the mesoporosity with an average pore size of 7 nm and a BET surface area of 366 m 2 g -1 . As an application of this material, the carbon nanoparticle dispersion was spray coated (spray-based coating) on a glass surface to fabricate superhydrophobic (water contact angle > 150° and sliding angle fabricated from direct candle flame soot deposition (candle-based coating). This study proved that water jet resistant and thermally stable superhydrophobic surfaces can be easily fabricated by simple spray coating of CNP dispersion gathered from incomplete combustion of paraffin candle flame and this technique can be used for different applications with the potential for the large scale fabrication.

  7. Corrosion Resistance of a Cast-Iron Material Coated With a Ceramic Layer Using Thermal Spray Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, C. D.; Bejinariu, C.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Toma, S. L.; Alexandru, A.; Cimpoesu, R.

    2018-06-01

    Cast-iron 250 used for breake systems present many corrosion signs after a mean usage time based on the environment conditions they work. In order to improve them corrosion resistance we propose to cover the active part of the material using a ceramic material. The deposition process is an industrial deposition system based on thermal spraying that can cover high surfaces in low time. In this articol we analyze the influence of a ceramic layer (40-50 µm) on the corrosion resistance of FC250 cast iron. The results were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive (EDS) and linear and cyclic potentiometry.

  8. Application of thermal spray coatings for jet engines. Kokuki sangyo eno yosha no oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Y [All Nippon Airways Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1992-10-31

    Application condition of spray coating on jet engine parts and characteristics of spray reparing process are explained. Spray coating used for jet engine is classified as recovery of dimension, crevice adjustment, improvement of resistance to friction, improvement of fretting resistance and heat resistance. Titanium alloy having better adhesion and acid resistance, is used as coating for dimensional recovery, where as nickel-crome-aluminium coating is used for the improvement of heat resistance of stainless steel, etc. Crevice adjustment coatings are used in rotating parts of jet engines, and they are of two types are; gel-double coating of aluminium, nickel-aluminium, etc., abrasive coating of aluminium oxide. Tungsten carbide and cobalt are used as coatings for the friction improvement. Nickel and indium, etc., are used as fretting resistance coating. Various types of ceramics together with heat resistance steels like HS-188 are used as coating for heat resistance improvement. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. On the Fracture Toughness and Crack Growth Resistance of Bio-Inspired Thermal Spray Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Michael Murray

    Surface exploration of the Moon and Asteroids can provide important information to scientists regarding the origins of the solar-system and life . Small robots and sensor modules can enable low-cost surface exploration. In the near future, they are the main machines providing these answers. Advanced in electronics, sensors and actuators enable ever smaller platforms, with compromising functionality. However similar advances haven't taken place for power supplies and thermal control system. The lunar south pole has temperatures in the range of -100 to -150 °C. Similarly, asteroid surfaces can encounter temperatures of -150 °C. Most electronics and batteries do not work below -40 °C. An effective thermal control system is critical towards making small robots and sensors module for extreme environments feasible. In this work, the feasibility of using thermochemical storage materials as a possible thermal control solution is analyzed for small robots and sensor modules for lunar and asteroid surface environments. The presented technology will focus on using resources that is readily generated as waste product aboard a spacecraft or is available off-world through In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). In this work, a sensor module for extreme environment has been designed and prototyped. Our intention is to have a network of tens or hundreds of sensor modules that can communicate and interact with each other while also gathering science data. The design contains environmental sensors like temperature sensors and IMU (containing accelerometer, gyro and magnetometer) to gather data. The sensor module would nominally contain an electrical heater and insulation. The thermal heating effect provided by this active heater is compared with the proposed technology that utilizes thermochemical storage chemicals. Our results show that a thermochemical storage-based thermal control system is feasible for use in extreme temperatures. A performance increase of 80% is predicted for

  10. Structure and properties of plasma sprayed BaTiO3 coatings after thermal posttreatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Pala, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 6 (2015), s. 7453-7460 ISSN 0272-8842 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Electrical properties * BaTiO3 * Plasma spraying * Annealing * Microstructure Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.758, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ceramint.2015.02.065

  11. Review of Thermal Spray Coating Applications in the Steel Industry: Part 2—Zinc Pot Hardware in the Continuous Galvanizing Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; James, B.

    2010-12-01

    This two-part article series reviews the application of thermal spray coating technology in the production of steel and steel sheet products. Part 2 of this article series is dedicated to coating solutions in the continuous galvanizing line. The corrosion mechanisms of Fe- and Co-based bulk materials are briefly reviewed as a basis for the development of thermal spray coating solutions. WC-Co thermal spray coatings are commonly applied to low Al-content galvanizing hardware due to their superior corrosion resistance compared to Fe and Co alloys. The effect of phase degradation, carbon content, and WC grain size are discussed. At high Al concentrations, the properties of WC-Co coatings degrade significantly, leading to the application of oxide-based coatings and corrosion-resistant boride containing coatings. The latest results of testing are summarized, highlighting the critical coating parameters.

  12. Comparative of the Tribological Performance of Hydraulic Cylinders Coated by the Process of Thermal Spray HVOF and Hard Chrome Plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Castro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the necessity of obtaining a surface that is resistant to wear and oxidation, hydraulic cylinders are typically coated with hard chrome through the process of electroplating process. However, this type of coating shows an increase of the area to support sealing elements, which interferes directly in the lubrication of the rod, causing damage to the seal components and bringing oil leakage. Another disadvantage in using the electroplated hard chromium process is the presence of high level hexavalent chromium Cr+6 which is not only carcinogenic, but also extremely contaminating to the environment. Currently, the alternative process of high-speed thermal spraying (HVOF - High Velocity Oxy-Fuel, uses composite materials (metal-ceramic possessing low wear rates. Research has shown that some mechanical properties are changed positively with the thermal spray process in industrial applications. It is evident that a coating based on WC has upper characteristics as: wear resistance, low friction coefficient, with respect to hard chrome coatings. These characteristics were analyzed by optical microscopy, roughness measurements and wear test.

  13. Implementation and Development of the Incremental Hole Drilling Method for the Measurement of Residual Stress in Thermal Spray Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, T.; Bartuli, C.; Sebastiani, M.; Loreto, A.

    2005-12-01

    The experimental measurement of residual stresses originating within thick coatings deposited by thermal spray on solid substrates plays a role of fundamental relevance in the preliminary stages of coating design and process parameters optimization. The hole-drilling method is a versatile and widely used technique for the experimental determination of residual stress in the most superficial layers of a solid body. The consolidated procedure, however, can only be implemented for metallic bulk materials or for homogeneous, linear elastic, and isotropic materials. The main objective of the present investigation was to adapt the experimental method to the measurement of stress fields built up in ceramic coatings/metallic bonding layers structures manufactured by plasma spray deposition. A finite element calculation procedure was implemented to identify the calibration coefficients necessary to take into account the elastic modulus discontinuities that characterize the layered structure through its thickness. Experimental adjustments were then proposed to overcome problems related to the low thermal conductivity of the coatings. The number of calculation steps and experimental drilling steps were finally optimized.

  14. Deposition and characterization of plasma sprayed Ni-5A1/ magnesia stabilized zirconia based functionally graded thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baig, M N; Khalid, F A

    2014-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are employed to protect hot section components in industrial and aerospace gas turbine engines. Conventional TBCs frequently fail due to high residual stresses and difference between coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the substrate and coatings. Functionally graded thermal barrier coatings (FG-TBCs) with gradual variation in composition have been proposed to minimize the problem. In this work, a five layered functionally graded thermal barrier coating system was deposited by atmospheric plasma spray (APS) technique on Nimonic 90 substrates using Ni-5Al as bond coat (BC) and magnesia stabilized zirconia as top coat (TC). The coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD and optical profilometer. Microhardness and coefficient of thermal expansion of the five layers deposited as individual coatings were also measured. The deposited coating system was oxidized at 800°C. SEM analysis showed that five layers were successfully deposited by APS to produce a FG-TBC. The results also showed that roughness (Ra) of the individual layers decreased with an increase in TC content in the coatings. It was found that microhardness and CTE values gradually changed from bond coat to cermet layers to top coat. The oxidized coated sample revealed parabolic behavior and changes in the surface morphology and composition of coating

  15. Corrosion prevention of the rail by thermal spray coating of Zn-Al alloy; Zn-Al gokin yosha hifuku ni yoru reru no boshoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizoguchi, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)] Urashima, C. [Kyushu Techno Research Corp., Fukuoka (Japan); Itai, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Technical Research Inst. of Yawata Works; Ichiriki, T.; Nishiki, M. [Kyushu Rail way comdany, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-30

    Replacement of the rail in under-sea tunnel such as the Kammon Tunnel is carried out very five years because of the severe corrosion caused by the humid state due to the leakage of sea water or the mist of sea water swept up by the passing trains. In this study, salt water spraying or sea water spraying test is carried out using Zn-Al alloy with the corrosion resistance and thermal spray efficiency even higher than those of Zn or Al. A rail coated by thermal spray of Zn-15mass%Al alloy has been laid by trial in the practical rail road of Kammon Tunnel for 5 years and 3 months, the deterioration degree of the coating, pitting depth, actual fatigue strength, etc. are evaluated. Further, these factors of a rail re-coated by Zincrich Primer+Tar Epoxy and a bare rail laid at the same time are evaluated for comparison. It is presumed by the results of the examination about the service life of a rail coated by the thermal spray of Zn-Al alloy based on the pitting depth in the rail base that the service life of such coated rail is more than twice as that of the bare rails used currently. 5 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. High temperature oxidation and corrosion in marine environments of thermal spray deposited coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaliampalias, D.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Skolianos, S.; Chrissafis, K.

    2008-01-01

    Flame spraying is a widely used technique for depositing a great variety of materials in order to enforce the mechanical or the anticorrosion characteristics of the substrate. Its high rate application is due to the rapidity of the process, its effectiveness and its low cost. In this work, flame-sprayed Al coatings are deposited on low carbon steels in order to enhance their anticorrosion performance. The main adhesion mechanism of the coating is mechanical anchorage, which can provide the necessary protection to steel used in several industrial and constructive applications. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating, the as-coated samples are subjected in a salt spray chamber and in elevated temperature environments. The examination and characterization of the corroded samples is done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The as-formed coatings are extremely rough and have a lamellic homogeneous morphology. It is also found that Al coatings provide better protection in marine atmospheres, while at elevated temperatures a thick oxide layer is formed, which can delaminate after long oxidation periods due to its low adherence to the underlying coating, thus eliminating the substrate protection

  17. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  18. Protection by high velocity thermal spraying coatings on thick walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs 'SHARK'. Overview at the end of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, Sabine; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion protection of the internal space of thick-walled interim and permanent storage facility components, such as Castor copyright containers, are ensured nowadays by a galvanic nickel layer. The method has proved itself and protects the base material of the containers at the underwater loading in the Nuclear power station from a corrosive attack. Although, the galvanic nickel plating is a relatively time consuming method, it lasts for several days for each container, and is with a layer thickness of 1,000 μm also expensive. To develop an alternative, faster and more economical method, a BMBF research project named - 'SHARK - protection by high velocity thermal spraying layers on thick-walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs' in cooperation between Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH and the Institute of Materials Science of the Leibniz University of Hanover was established to investigate the suitability of the high velocity oxy fuel spraying technology (HVOF) for the corrosion protective coating of thickwalled interim and permanent storage facility components. Since the permanent storage depot components are manufactured from cast iron with globular graphite, this material was exclusively used as a base material in this project. The evaluation of the economical features of the application of different nickel base spraying materials on cast iron substratum was in focus, as well as the scientific characterization of the coating systems with regard to the corrosion protective properties. Furthermore, the feasibility of the transfer of the laboratory results on a large industrial setup as well as a general suitability of the coating process for a required repair procedure was to be investigated. The preliminary examination program identified chromium containing spraying materials as successful. Results of the preliminary examination program have been used for investigations with the CASOIK demonstration

  19. Effect of Microstructure on the Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Y2O3 Stabilized Zirconia (8% YSZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of microstructure on the thermal conductivity of plasma-sprayed Y2O3 stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ thermal barrier coatings (TBCs is investigated. Nine freestanding samples deposited on aluminum alloys are studied. Cross-section morphology such as pores, cracks, m-phase content, grain boundary density of the coated samples are examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD. Multiple linear regressions are used to develop quantitative models that describe the relationship between the particle parameters, m-phase content and features of the microstructure such as porosity, crack-porosity, and the length density of small and big angle-cracks. Moreover, the relationship between the microstructure and thermal conductivity is investigated. Results reveal that the thermal conductivity of the coating is mainly determined by the microstructure and grain boundary density at room temperature (25 °C, and by the length density of big-angle-crack, monoclinic phase content and grain boundary density at high temperature (1200 °C.

  20. Y2O3-MgO Nano-Composite Synthesized by Plasma Spraying and Thermal Decomposition of Solution Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoto, Chigozie Kenechukwu

    This research aims to identify the key feedstock characteristics and processing conditions to produce Y2O3-MgO composite coatings with high density and hardness using solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes, and also, to explore the phenomena involved in the production of homogenized nano-composite powders of this material system by thermal decomposition of solution precursor mixtures. The material system would find potential application in the fabrication of components for optical applications such as transparent windows. It was shown that a lack of major endothermic events during precursor decomposition and the resultant formation of highly dense particles upon pyrolysis are critical precursor characteristics for the deposition of dense and hard Y2O3-MgO coatings by SPPS. Using these principles, a new Y2O3-MgO precursor solution was developed, which yielded a coating with Vickers hardness of 560 Hv. This was a considerable improvement over the hardness of the coatings obtained using conventional solution precursors, which was as low as 110 Hv. In the thermal decomposition synthesis process, binary solution precursor mixtures of: yttrium nitrate (Y[n]) or yttrium acetate (Y[a]), with magnesium nitrate (Mg[n]) or magnesium acetate (Mg[a]) were used in order to study the effects of precursor chemistry on the structural characteristics of the resultant Y2O3-MgO powders. The phase domains were coarse and distributed rather inhomogeneously in the materials obtained from the Y[n]Mg[n] and Y[a]Mg[a] mixtures; finer and more homogeneously-distributed phase domains were obtained for ceramics produced from the Y[a]Mg[n] and Y[n]Mg[a] mixtures. It was established that these phenomena were related to the thermal characteristics for the decomposition of the precursors and their effect on phase separation during oxide crystallization. Addition of ammonium acetate to the Y[n[Mg[n] mixture changed the endothermic process to exothermic

  1. The Tribological Performance of Hardfaced/ Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Increasing the Wear Resistance of Ventilation Mill Working Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During the coal pulverizing, the working parts of the ventilation mill are being worn by the sand particles. For this reason, the working parts are usually protected with materials resistant to wear (hardfaced/thermal sprayed coatings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of four different types of coatings as candidates for wear protection of the mill’s working parts. The coatings were produced by using the filler materials with the following nominal chemical composition: NiFeBSi-WC, NiCrBSiC, FeCrCTiSi, and FeCrNiCSiBMn, and by using the plasma arc welding and flame and electric arc spraying processes. The results showed that Ni-based coatings exhibited higher wear resistance than Fe-based coatings. The highest wear resistance showed coating produced by using the NiFeBSi-WC filler material and plasma transferred arc welding deposition process. The hardness was not the only characteristic that affected the wear resistance. In this context, the wear rate of NiFeBSi-WC coating was not in correlation with its hardness, in contrast to other coatings. The different wear performance of NiFeBSi-WC coating was attributed to the different type and morphological features of the reinforcing particles (WC.

  2. Can Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Mitigate Corrosion of Carbon Steel in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Syrek-Gerstenkorn, B.

    2017-01-01

    Transport of CO2 for carbon capture and storage (CCS) uses low-cost carbon steel pipelines owing to their negligible corrosion rates in dry CO2. However, in the presence of liquid water, CO2 forms corrosive carbonic acid. In order to mitigate wet CO2 corrosion, use of expensive corrosion-resistant alloys is recommended; however, the increased cost makes such selection economically unfeasible; hence, new corrosion mitigation methods are sought. One such method is the use of thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA), which has been used to mitigate corrosion of carbon steel in seawater, but there are concerns regarding its suitability in CO2-containing solutions. A 30-day test was carried out during which carbon steel specimens arc-sprayed with aluminum were immersed in deionized water at ambient temperature bubbled with 0.1 MPa CO2. The acidity (pH) and potential were continuously monitored, and the amount of dissolved Al3+ ions was measured after completion of the test. Some dissolution of TSA occurred in the test solution leading to nominal loss in coating thickness. Potential measurements revealed that polarity reversal occurs during the initial stages of exposure which could lead to preferential dissolution of carbon steel in the case of coating damage. Thus, one needs to be careful while using TSA in CCS environments.

  3. Role of thermal spray processing method on the microstructure, residual stress and properties of coatings:an integrated study for Ni-5wt.% Al bond coats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sampath, S.; Jiang, X.; Matějíček, Jiří; Prchlík, L.; Kulkarni, A.; Vaidya, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 364, 1-2 (2004), s. 216-231 ISSN 0921-5093 Grant - others:NSF(US) DMR9632570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : bond coats, thermal spraying, microstructure Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  4. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL MODES OF MAGNETIC-ELECTRIC GRINDING ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF GAS-THERMAL SPRAYED NI–CR–B–SI-COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Spiridonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of technological modes of magnetic-electric grinding on structural changes in a surface layer of gas-thermal sprayed coatings is investigated in the paper. The paper presents optimum modes of  coating roughing and finishing processes.

  5. Tribological Behavior of Thermal Spray Coatings, Deposited by HVOF and APS Techniques, and Composite Electrodeposits Ni/SiC at Both Room Temperature and 300 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lanzutti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Both the thermal spray and the electroplating coatings are widely used because of their high wear resistance combined with good corrosion resistance. In particular the addition of both micro particles or nano‐particles to the electro deposited coatings could lead to an increase of the mechanical properties, caused by the change of the coating microstructure. The thermal spray coatings were deposited following industrial standards procedures, while the Ni/SiC composite coatings were produced at laboratory scale using both micro‐and nano‐sized ceramic particles. All the produced coatings were characterized regarding their microstructure,mechanical properties and the wear resistance. The tribological properties were analyzed using a tribometer under ball on disk configuration at both room temperature and 300oC. The results showed that the cermet thermal spray coatings have a high wear resistance, while the Ni nano‐composite showed good anti wear properties compared to the harder ceramic/cermet coatings deposited by thermal spray technique.

  6. Impact of probing volume from different mechanical measurement methods on elastic properties of thermally sprayed Ni-based coatings on a mesoscopic scale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margadant, N.; Neuenschwander, J.; Stauss, S.; Kaps, H.; Kulkarni, A.; Matějíček, Jiří; Rössler, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 8 (2006), s. 2805-2820 ISSN 0257-8972 Grant - others:Evropská unie Eureka 1973 “Thermetcoat” (EU) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Elastic Pro perties * Defects * Thermal spraying * Nickel alloy Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2006

  7. Assessment of properties thermal sprayed coatings realised using cermet blend powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brezinová

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the assessment of selected properties of plasma sprayed coatings based on ZrSiO4 doped with different volume fractions of metal dopant (Ni. Mixed powders are cermet blends. Aim of the work consists of verificating the possibility to replace the application of Ni interlayer by adding Ni directly to the ceramic powder and apply them together in a single technological operation. The coatings were studied from point of view of their structure, porosity, adhesion of the coatings in relation to the volume of dopant added and wear resistance. The best properties reached composite coating doped with 12 % Ni.

  8. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  9. Role of Oxides and Porosity on High-Temperature Oxidation of Liquid-Fueled HVOF Thermal-Sprayed Ni50Cr Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K. T.; Hussain, T.

    2017-02-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high-temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid-fueled high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using oxygen content analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Short-term air oxidation tests (4 h) of freestanding coatings (without boiler steel substrate) in a thermogravimetric analyzer at 700 °C were performed to obtain the kinetics of oxidation of the as-sprayed coating. Long-term air oxidation tests (100 h) of the coated substrates were performed at same temperature to obtain the oxidation products for further characterization in detail using SEM/EDX and XRD. In all samples, oxides of various morphologies developed on top of the Ni50Cr coatings. Cr2O3 was the main oxidation product on the surface of all three coatings. The coating with medium porosity and medium oxygen content has the best high-temperature oxidation performance in this study.

  10. Improved Thermally Grown Oxide Scale in Air Plasma Sprayed NiCrAlY/Nano-YSZ Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daroonparvar, M.; Yajid, M.A.M.; Yusof, N.M.; Hussain, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation has been considered as one of the principal disruptive factors in thermal barrier coating systems during service. So, oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems with nano structured and micro structured YSZ coatings was investigated at 1000 degree c for 24 h, 48 h, and 120 h. Air plasma sprayed nano-YSZ coating exhibited a tri modal structure. Microstructural characterization also demonstrated an improved thermally grown oxide scale containing lower spinels in nano-TBC system after 120 h of oxidation. This phenomenon is mainly related to the unique structure of the nano-YSZ coating, which acted as a strong barrier for oxygen diffusion into the TBC system at elevated temperatures. Nearly continues but thinner Al 2 O 3 layer formation at the NiCrAlY/nano-YSZ interface was seen, due to lower oxygen infiltration into the system. Under this condition, spinels formation and growth on the Al 2 O 3 oxide scale were diminished in nano-TBC system compared to normal TBC system.

  11. Thermal performance experiments on ultimate heat sinks, spray ponds, and cooling ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadlock, R.K.

    1976-12-01

    A program of measurement on a Battelle-Northwest (BNW) spray pond has been completed to prove an integrated instrumentation system for application in future field experiments. The measurement programs in the field will produce data of relevance to the design and understanding of performance for ultimate heat sinks as components of emergency core cooling systems. In the absence of active emergency cooling systems, the data will be obtained on analog systems--prime candidates among these are the naturally-occurring hot ponds at Yellowstone National Park and man-made hot cooling ponds at Savannah River National Laboratory as well as spray ponds at various industrial facilities. The proof experiment has provided data that not only illustrate the effectiveness of the instrumentation system but also display interesting site-specific heat transfer processes. The data to be obtained in the field will also be site specific but must be of generic applicability in modeling for design and performance purposes. The integrated instrumentation system will evolve, through modest modifications and substantial supplementation, to provide the requisite data for the more demanding situation of work in and about hot water

  12. Thermophysical Properties of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Cu-Cr-X Alloys, NiAl and NiCrAlY Coatings. Part 1; Electrical and Thermal Conductivity, Thermal Diffusivity, and Total Hemispherical Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    This two-part paper reports the thermophysical properties of several cold and vacuum plasma sprayed monolithic Cu and Ni-based alloy coatings. Part I presents the electrical and thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and total hemispherical emissivity data while Part II reports the specific heat capacity data for these coatings. Metallic copper alloys, stoichiometric NiAl and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold sprayed or the vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal property measurements between 77 and 1223 K. The temperature dependencies of the thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivities, electrical conductivities and total hemispherical emissivities of these cold and vacuum sprayed monolithic coatings are reported in this paper. The electrical and thermal conductivity data correlate reasonably well for Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and NiAl in accordance with the Wiedemann-Franz (WF) law although a better fit is obtained using the Smith-Palmer relationship. The Lorentz numbers determined from the WF law are close to the theoretical value.

  13. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  14. Aspects of industrial production of solid electrolyte fuel cells (SOFC) by thermal spraying technology; Aspekte industrieller Fertigung von Festelektrolyt-Brennstoffzellen (SOFC) mittels thermischer Beschichtungsverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weckmann, Hannes

    2010-07-01

    The present thesis deals with measures to optimize the large-volume production of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) based on thermal spraying technology. Based on the well-established Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) at DLR the potential of alternative thermal spraying techniques as well as alternative base materials was investigated in order to deposit SOFC-anode, electrolyte and insulating layers. Production costs, reproducibility and long-term stability of the production process as well as the fuel cell performance were major target criteria. Depending on the parameter set applied when using the cost efficient Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (APS) in combination with Nickel-Graphite as base material a significant improvement of gas permeability and electrical conductivity was achieved in comparison to the VPS sprayed reference anode. The power density of a fuel cell with an APS-Nickel-Graphite anode (184 mW/cm{sup 2}) was slightly better than the performance with a VPS reference anode (159 mW/cm{sup 2}). In comparison to the VPS process, ceramic electrolyte layers of fully stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) with significantly higher gas tightness could be demonstrated when high energy processes such as Low Pressure Plasma Spraying (LPPS). Thin-film Low Pressure Plasma Spraying (LPPS-Thin-film) and High Velocity Oxy Fuel Spraying (HVOF) were applied. The power density of a fuel cell equipped with an HVOF electrolyte was significantly improved to 234 mW/cm{sup 2} as compared to 187 mW/cm{sup 2} with the VPS sprayed reference cell. Further improvement of the power density was achieved with an LPPS-electrolyte (273 mW/cm{sup 2}). HVOF and VPS sprayed layers of pure Spinel in composite with metallic active braze (equivalent to the sealing between individual layers in the fuel cell stack) could exceed the demanded charge transfer resistance of >1 k{omega}cm{sup 2} at 800 C operating temperature only in few cases. When blended base powder of Spinel and Magnesia in combination with the VPS

  15. Solar heating. Vol. 1. Basic knowledge of thermal science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauffret, C.

    1982-01-01

    This document deals with general basic knowledge of thermal sciences: basics of thermodynamics, heat transfer, studies of thermal exchanges in the building industry including ventilation and the effects of the wind, basics and techniques of central heating and refrigeration (technologies, calculations, thermodynamic cycles and refrigerating machines).

  16. Intermetallic Al-, Fe-, Co- and Ni-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Prepared by Cold Spray for Applications on Low Heat Rejection Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchinsky, E.; Sobiesiak, A.; Maev, R.

    2018-02-01

    Conventional thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems consist of a duplex structure with a metallic bond coat and a ceramic heat insulating topcoat. They possess the desired low thermal conductivity, but at the same time they are very brittle and sensitive to thermal shock and thermal cycling due to the inherently low coefficient of thermal expansion. Recent research activities are focused on the developing of multilayer TBC structures obtained using cold spraying and following annealing. Aluminum intermetallics have demonstrated thermal and mechanical properties that allow them to be used as the alternative TBC materials, while the intermetallic layers can be additionally optimized to achieve superior thermal physical properties. One example is the six layer TBC structure in which cold sprayed Al-based intermetallics are synthesized by annealing in nitrogen atmosphere. These multilayer coating systems demonstrated an improved thermal fatigue capability as compared to conventional ceramic TBC. The microstructures and properties of the coatings were characterized by SEM, EDS and mechanical tests to define the TBC material properties and intermetallic formation mechanisms.

  17. Thermal spraying of functionally graded calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Khor, K. A.; Cheang, P.

    1998-03-01

    Biomedical requirements in a prosthesis are often complex and diverse in nature. Biomaterials for implants have to display a wide range of adaptability to suit the various stages of the bio-integration process of any foreign material into the human body. Often, a combination of materials is needed. The preparation of a functionally graded bioceramic coating composed of essentially calcium phosphate compounds is explored. The coating is graded in accordance to adhesive strength, bioactivity, and bioresorbability. The bond coat on the Ti-6Al-4V stub is deposited with a particle range of the hydroxyapatite (HA) that will provide a high adhesive strength and bioactivity but have poor bioresorption properties. The top coat, however, is composed of predominantly α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) that is highly bioresorbable. This arrangement has the propensity of allowing accelerated bio-integration of the coating by the body tissues as the top layer is rapidly resorbed, leaving the more bioactive intermediate layer to facilitate the much needed bioactive properties for proper osteoconduction. The processing steps and problems are highlighted, as well as the results of post-spray heat treatment.

  18. High-temperature resistant, thermally sprayed diffusion barrier coatings on CFC lightweight materials; Hochtemperaturbestaendige, thermisch gespritzte Diffusionsbarriereschichten auf CFC-Leichtbauchargiergestellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drehmann, Rico; Rupprecht, Christian; Wielage, Bernhard; Lampke, Thomas [Technische Univ. Chemnitz (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft und Werkstofftechnik (IWW); Gilbert, Maria; Uhlig, Volker; Trimis, Dimosthenis [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Waermetechnik und Thermodynamik (IWTT); Heuer, Volker [ALD Vacuum Technologies GmbH, Hanau (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    In heat treating processes as well as in high temperature brazing processes, charge carriers enable the positioning and transport of work pieces. Recently, charge carriers consisting of graphite or carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) are used. The main disadvantage of charge carriers based on CFC is the undesirable carburization of the overlying components due to diffusion processes. Under this aspect, thermally sprayed coatings are applied on CFC and tested with respect to their suitability as a high-temperature diffusion barrier. The ceramic powders aluminium oxide, aluminium oxide/chromium oxide, aluminium oxide/titanium oxide and zirconium oxide/yttrium oxide are used as a coating material which is processed by means of the powder flame spraying as well as atmospheric plasma spraying. Molybdenum and silicon carbide are used as an adhesive layer. The coating materials aluminium oxide and aluminium oxide/chromium oxide on siliconized CFC presented excellent results. This supplies a large potential of application for thermally sprayed ceramic coatings on carbon-based lightweight materials.

  19. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  20. Thermal and structural properties of spray pyrolysed CdS thin film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Thermal diffusivity and conductivity in these films decrease at least two orders compared with bulk. ... Afifi et al. (1986) prepared evaporated thin film on glass substrate. ... phase of CdS and the identification of the peaks indicate that the film is ...

  1. Mikrostruktur dan Karakterisasi Sifat Mekanik Lapisan Cr3C2-NiAl-Al2O3 Hasil Deposisi Dengan Menggunakan High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Riyanto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface coating processing of industrial component with thermal spray coatings have been applied in many industrial fields. Ceramic matrix composite coating which consists of Cr3C2-Al2O3-NiAl had been carried out to obtain layers of material that has superior mechanical properties to enhance component performance. Deposition of CMC with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF thermal spray coating has been employed. This study aims to determine the effect of powder particle size on the microstructure, surface roughness and hardness of the layer, by varying the NiAl powder particle size. Test results show NiAl powder particle size has an influence on the mechanical properties of CMC coating. Hardness of coating increases and surface roughness values of coating decrease with smaller NiAl particle size.  

  2. High-speed flame spraying, an alternative process for producing thermal insulation layers; Hochgeschwindigkeitsflammspritzen - Ein alternatives Verfahren zum Herstellen von Waermedaemmschichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffens, H.D.; Wilden, J.; Josefiak, L.; Moebus, S. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie

    1996-12-31

    Ceramic thermal insulation layers on a ZrO{sub 2} basis produced by high-speed flame spraying differ in their structure from layers produced by atmospheric plasma spraying. If suitable powder modifications are chosen, the reulting layer structure can compensate thermally induced stresses efficiently. The layers also had a higher thermoshock resistance than APS layers. [Deutsch] Mittels Hochgeschwindigkeitsflammspritzens erzeugte keramische Waermedaemmschichten auf Basis von ZrO{sub 2} unterscheiden sich bezueglich ihrer Gefuegestruktur deutlich von atmosphaerisch plasmagespritzten WDS. Bei der Wahl geeigneter Pulvermodifikationen ermoeglicht die entstehende Schichtstruktur in hohem Mass den Ausgleich thermisch induzierter Spannungen. In vergleichenden Thermoschockversuchen erreichten HGFS-gespritzte WDS bei gleicher thermischer Isolationsfaehigkeit bessere Werte der Thermoschockbestaendigkeit als ASP-gespritzte. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of Degradation of Isothermally Aged Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Jae Mean; Seok, Chang Sung; Kang, Min Sung; Kim, Dae Jin [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hoon [HYUNDAI STEEL CO., Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mun Young [KPS Gas Turbine Technology Service Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The thermal barrier coating of a gas turbine blade was degraded by isothermal heating in a furnace and by varying the exposure time and temperature. Then, a micro-Vickers hardness test was conducted on the cross section of the bond coat and Ni-based superalloy substrate. Further, the thickness of TGO(Thermally Grown Oxide) was measured by using an image analyzer, and the changes in the microstructure and element contents in the coating were analyzed by using an optical microscope and by performing SEM-EDX analysis. No significant change was observed in the Vickers hardness of the bond coat when the coated specimen was degraded at a high temperature: delamination was observed between the top coat and the bond coat when the coating was degraded for 50 h at a temperature 1,151 .deg. C.

  4. Application of Structure-Based Models of Mechanical and Thermal Properties on Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilémová, Monika; Matějíček, Jiří; Mušálek, Radek; Nohava, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, 3-4 (2012), s. 372-382 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : analytical model * elastic modulus * finite element modeling * image analysis * modeling of properties * thermal conductivity * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.481, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/3m24812367315142/fulltext. pdf

  5. Re-emission and thermal desorption of deuterium from plasma sprayed tungsten coatings for application in ASDEX-upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Rosales, C.; Franzen, P.; Plank, H.; Roth, J.; Gauthier, E.

    1996-01-01

    The trapping and release of deuterium implanted with an energy of 100 eV in wrought and in plasma sprayed tungsten of different manufacture and structure has been investigated by means of re-emission as well as thermal and isothermal desorption spectroscopy. The experimental data for wrought tungsten are compared with model calculations with the PIDAT code in order to estimate the parameters governing diffusion, surface recombination and trapping in tungsten. The amount of retained deuterium in tungsten is of the same order of magnitude as in graphite for the implantation parameters used in this work. The mobile hydrogen concentration in tungsten during the implantation is of the same order of magnitude than the trapped one, being released after the termination of the implantation. The fraction of deuterium trapped to defects increases strongly with the porosity of the samples. The temperature needed for the release of the trapped deuterium (∝600 K) are considerably lower than for graphite, due to the smaller trapping energy (≤1.5 eV). (orig.)

  6. Corrosion Resistance Properties of Aluminum Coating Applied by Arc Thermal Metal Spray in SAE J2334 Solution with Exposure Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arc thermal metal spray coating provides excellent corrosion, erosion and wear resistance to steel substrates. This paper incorporates some results of aluminum coating applied by this method on plain carbon steel. Thereafter, coated panels were exposed to an environment known to form stable corrosion products with aluminum. The coated panels were immersed in Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE J2334 for different periods of time. This solution consists of an aqueous solution of NaCl, CaCl2 and NaHCO3. Various electrochemical techniques, i.e., corrosion potential-time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and the potentiodynamic were used to determine the performance of stimulants in improving the properties of the coating. EIS studies revealed the kinetics and mechanism of corrosion and potentiodynamic attributed the formation of a passive film, which stifles the penetration of aggressive ions towards the substrate. The corrosion products that formed on the coating surface, identified using Raman spectroscopy, were Dawsonite (NaAlCO3(OH2 and Al(OH3. These compounds of aluminum are very sparingly soluble in aqueous solution and protect the substrate from pitting and uniform corrosion. The morphology and composition of corrosion products determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses indicated that the environment plays a decisive role in improving the corrosion resistance of aluminum coating.

  7. Fabrication of samarium strontium aluminate ceramic and deposition of thermal barrier coatings by air plasma spray process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC with the metallic NiCrAlY bond coat are often used in many aircraft engines to protect superalloy components from high-temperature corrosion thereby to improve the life of gas turbine components. The search for new TBC material has been intensified in recent years due to lack of thermo-physical properties of conventionally used Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ TBCs. Recently, the rare earth containing Samarium Strontium Aluminate (SSA based ceramic was proposed as a new TBC material due to its matching thermo-physical properties with the substrate. The present work focused on the synthesis of SSA ceramics for TBCs application and its coatings development on Ni-based superalloy Inconel 718 substrate by air plasma spray process. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS result confirmed the formation of single phase SSA ceramic after synthesis. The surface morphology of SSA TBCs is mainly composed of melted splats, semi and un-melted particles. The cross-sectional SEM micrographs did not show any spallation at the interface which indicated good mechanical interlocking between the bond coat and ceramic top coat. The Young’s modulus and hardness of SSA TBCs were found to be 80 and 6.1 GPa, respectively. The load-depth curve of SSA TBC showed good elastic recovery about 47 %.

  8. Optimization of the Deposition Parameters of HVOF FeMnCrSi+Ni+B Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bavaresco Sucharski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHVOF thermal spray process produces coatings with low porosity and low oxide content, as well as high substrate adhesion. Small variations on the parameters of the HVOF process can generate coatings with different characteristics and properties, which also is chemical composition depended of the alloy. FeMnCrSi alloy is a cavitation resistant class of material with a great potential for HVOF deposition use. The main goal of this article is to study the influence of some HVOF parameters deposition, as standoff distance, powder feed rate and carrier gas pressure on three different alloys. FeMnCrSi experimental alloys with some variations in nickel and boron content were studied. Taguchi experimental design with L9 orthogonal array was used in this work. Porosity, oxide content, tensile adhesion strength and microhardness of the coatings were evaluated. The results indicated that all factors have significant influence on these properties. Chemical composition of the alloys was the most important factor, followed by the carrier gas pressure, standoff distance and powder feed rate. The addition of Ni, produces coatings with lower levels of oxide content and porosity. An experiment with improved parameters was conducted, and a great improvement on the coating properties was observed.

  9. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Peng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ-based thermal barrier coating (TBC has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm; a photo-multiplier tube (PMT and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  10. Structural, optical and thermal properties of {beta}-SnS{sub 2} thin films prepared by the spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelia, C.; Ben Nasrallah, T.; Amlouk, M.; Belgacem, S. [Faculte des Sciences, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique de la Matiere Condensee; Maiz, F. [Equipe de Photothermique de Nabeul, Inst. Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieur de Nabeul (Tunisia); Mnari, M. [Lab. de Chimie Analytique, Campus Univ., Tunis (Tunisia)

    2000-03-01

    Tin disulfide {beta}-SnS{sub 2} thin films have been prepared on pyrex substrates by the spray pyrolysis technique using tin tetrachloride and thiourea as starting materials. The depositions were carried out in the range of substrate temperatures from 240 to 400 C. Highly c-axis oriented {beta}-SnS{sub 2} films, having a strong (001) X-ray diffraction line are obtained at temperature 280 C and using concentration ratio in solution R = [S]/[Sn] = 2.5. Films surfaces were analyzed by contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to understand the effect of the deposited temperature on the surface structure. On the other hand, from transmission and reflection spectra, the band gap energy determined is about 2.71 eV. Finally using the photodeflection spectroscopy technique, the thermal conductivity K{sub c} and diffusivity D{sub c} were obtained. Their values are 10 Wm{sup -1}K{sup -1} and 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}s{sup -1} respectively. (orig.)

  11. Prediction of soot and thermal radiation in a model gas turbine combustor burning kerosene fuel spray at different swirl levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Prakash; Patra, Jitendra; Datta, Amitava; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya

    2016-05-01

    Combustion of kerosene fuel spray has been numerically simulated in a laboratory scale combustor geometry to predict soot and the effects of thermal radiation at different swirl levels of primary air flow. The two-phase motion in the combustor is simulated using an Eulerian-Lagragian formulation considering the stochastic separated flow model. The Favre-averaged governing equations are solved for the gas phase with the turbulent quantities simulated by realisable k-ɛ model. The injection of the fuel is considered through a pressure swirl atomiser and the combustion is simulated by a laminar flamelet model with detailed kinetics of kerosene combustion. Soot formation in the flame is predicted using an empirical model with the model parameters adjusted for kerosene fuel. Contributions of gas phase and soot towards thermal radiation have been considered to predict the incident heat flux on the combustor wall and fuel injector. Swirl in the primary flow significantly influences the flow and flame structures in the combustor. The stronger recirculation at high swirl draws more air into the flame region, reduces the flame length and peak flame temperature and also brings the soot laden zone closer to the inlet plane. As a result, the radiative heat flux on the peripheral wall decreases at high swirl and also shifts closer to the inlet plane. However, increased swirl increases the combustor wall temperature due to radial spreading of the flame. The high incident radiative heat flux and the high surface temperature make the fuel injector a critical item in the combustor. The injector peak temperature increases with the increase in swirl flow mainly because the flame is located closer to the inlet plane. On the other hand, a more uniform temperature distribution in the exhaust gas can be attained at the combustor exit at high swirl condition.

  12. Thermal Spray Deposition, Phase Stability and Mechanical Properties of La2Zr2O7/LaAlO3 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Mandujano, D.; Poblano-Salas, C. A.; Ruiz-Luna, H.; Esparza-Esparza, B.; Giraldo-Betancur, A. L.; Alvarado-Orozco, J. M.; Trápaga-Martínez, L. G.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the deposition of La2Zr2O7 (LZO) and LaAlO3 (LAO) mixtures by air plasma spray (APS). The raw material for thermal spray, single phase LZO and LAO in a 70:30 mol.% ratio mixture was prepared from commercial metallic oxides by high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and high-temperature solid-state reaction. The HEBM synthesis route, followed by a spray-drying process, successfully produced spherical agglomerates with adequate size distribution and powder-flow properties for feeding an APS system. The as-sprayed coating consisted mainly of a crystalline LZO matrix and partially crystalline LAO, which resulted from the high cooling rate experienced by the molten particles as they impact the substrate. The coatings were annealed at 1100 °C to promote recrystallization of the LAO phase. The reduced elastic modulus and hardness, measured by nanoindentation, increased from 124.1 to 174.7 GPa and from 11.3 to 14.4 GPa, respectively, after the annealing treatment. These values are higher than those reported for YSZ coatings; however, the fracture toughness ( K IC) of the annealed coating was only 1.04 MPa m0.5.

  13. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines: morphology, processing and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenling, H.W.; Mannsmann, W.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings out of fully or partially stabilized zirconia offer a unique chance in gas turbines to increase the gas inlet temperature significantly while keeping the temperature of the structural material of the component within conventional limits. The protection of combustor parts and transition pieces as well as of some stationary gas turbine parts however is state of the art. As a consequence of still insufficient reliability, the application for hot rotating parts is very limited. The introduction as a design element requires safe life within defined time intervals. These depend on the overhaul and repair intervals of the engines. For large land based industrial or utility gas turbines, for example, coating life between 25.000 and 30.000 hrs. is a minimum requirement. Premature failure of a coating by e.g. local spalling causes local overheating of the component with the consequence of its total destruction or even more expensive secondary damages. Life limiting is the corrosion rate at the ceramic-metal interface and the behavior of the coated system under transient operating conditions, where multiaxial strain and stress distributions are generated. Sufficient strain tolerance of the coating both under tensile as well as compressive conditions is required. The properties of thermal barrier coating systems depend strongly on the structure and phase composition of the coating layers and the morphology of and the adhesion at the ceramic-metal interface. They have to be controlled by the process itself, the process parameters and the characteristics of the applied materials (e.g. chemical composition, processing, morphology, particle size and size distribution). It will be reviewed, how properties and structures of coating systems correlate and how structures can be modified by careful control of the process parameters. (orig.)

  14. Optimized functionally graded La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/8YSZ thermal barrier coatings fabricated by suspension plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chaohui [Laboratory of Nano Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Wang, You, E-mail: wangyou@hit.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nano Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fan, Shan; You, Yuan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Wang, Liang [Key Laboratory of Inorganic Coating Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201899 (China); Yang, Changlong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Qiqihar University, Qiqihar 161006 (China); Sun, Xiaoguang [National Engineering Research Center for High-speed EMU, CSR Qingdao Sifang Co. Ltd., Qingdao 266111 (China); Li, Xuewei [Laboratory of Nano Surface Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, an optimized functionally graded coating (OFGC) was successfully fabricated by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) with feedstocks of the suspension of nanoparticles. La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}/8YSZ OFGC with gradual compositional variation along the through-thickness direction is proposed to mitigate spallation and crack formation owing to the high residual stresses caused by frequent thermal cycling for TBCs. The single ceramic layer coatings (SCLC) of LZ and double ceramic layer coatings (DCLC) of LZ/8YSZ were fabricated by SPS as comparison. The phase composition and microstructure of the SCLC, OFGC and DCLC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). Moreover, the thermal cycling tests were carried out to evaluate their thermal shock behavior. Changes in weight and morphology of specimens were analyzed during thermal cycling tests. The results showed that OFGC has extended lifetime compared with SCLC and DCLC. The failure of DCLC with clear interface between different ceramic layers occurred via delamination mode, as a result of crack initiation and propagation generated by thermal mismatch between LZ and 8YSZ. While the failure of OFGC occurred in thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers, indicating that the gradual compositional variation avoided thermal stress concentration in the top ceramic layers. - Highlights: • Optimized functionally graded coatings and double ceramic layer coatings were deposited by suspension plasma spray. • The graded area of OFGC is continuously changed from inner 8YSZ to outer La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZ). • The OFGC shows a more extended thermal cycling life than the LZ SCLC and LZ/8YSZ DCLC. • Various failure mechanisms were proposed to explain thermal cycling behavior.

  15. Evaluation of tribological wear and corrosion in coatings of diamalloy 4060NS deposited by thermal spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña R, S. M.; Moreno T, C. M.; Espinosa C, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Surface engineering seeks the development of new techniques to improve the performance and life of components of machines or industrial facilities, always looking for low costs and the least possible environmental damage. Thermal projection is one of the techniques that is based on the projection of particles of compounds and alloys on properly prepared and heated substrates, these particles are driven by a stream of air passing through an oxyacetylene flame which gives the energy to the process; These coatings give the possibility to improve the properties of the materials or the maintenance of components to maximize the availability of service. In order to reduce the damage caused by wear and corrosion of a low carbon AISI 1020 steel, they were coated with a metal based alloy, studying the effect of the cobalt-chromium-silicon-tungsten carbide alloy coating (DIAMALLLOY 4060 NS). The coating was deposited with two different pressures in the gases supplied to the torch, obtaining two flames and working three thicknesses of coating that oscillate between 100-500μm, according to the number of deposited layers, making use of a projection gun Castolin Eutectic. Powder and substrate characterization was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), spark emission spectroscopy and metallographic analysis. The results confirm the chemical nature and structure of the powder of the alloy and the substrate to be used, in addition, the thermal stability of the system was verified. The evaluation of the adhesion of the deposited layers was carried out by the implementation of pull-off tests according to ASTM D4541, in order to determine the type of failure that is presented. Mechanical wear was determined using a MT/60/NI microtest tribometer while electrochemical tests were performed using a suitable experimental unit for this purpose, confirming that the substrate exhibits lower wear levels when coated with

  16. Corrosion characteristics of thermal sprayed coating of stainless alloys in chloride solution; Taishoku gokin yosha himaku no enkabutsu yoekichu ni okeru fushoku tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, T. [Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Ishikawa, K. [Tokyo Metallikon Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kitamura, Y. [Kitamura Technical Consultant Office, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1994-12-15

    With an objective to develop a thermal sprayed coating of environment interruption type that can be sprayed at sites, electrochemical discussions, SEM observation, and EPMA surface analysis were performed on corrosion characteristics in chloride solution of coatings of SUS 304, 316 and Hastelloy C thermally sprayed onto test pieces made of structural steel SS400, as well as the effect of improvement in corrosion resistance by means of a coating reforming treatment. The following conclusions were obtained: the degradation in corrosion resistance of the coatings is attributable to increase in anodic solubility due to appearance of innumerable crevices as a result of deposited particles forming porous structure and due to drop of Cr content in the matrix caused by generation of oxides on the surface of the crevices, by which the corrosion progresses in the form of crevice corrosion; and denseness of the passive coating is lost on the surface of the deposited particles, accelerating the cathodic reaction. A suitable means that could be used practically in chloride solution would be a method to use a material with less crevice susceptibility such as Hastelloy C as a base material, and seal the crevice structure with epoxy resin, etc. 7 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Electrical characteristics and preparation of (Ba0.5Sr0.5)TiO3 films by spray pyrolysis and rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Horngshow; Ku, Hongkou; Kawai, Tomoji; Chen Mi

    2007-01-01

    Functional films of (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 on Pt (1000 A)/Ti (100 A)/SiO 2 (2000 A)/Si substrates are prepared by spray pyrolysis and subsequently rapid thermal annealing. Barium nitrate, strontium nitrate and titanium isopropoxide are used as starting materials with ethylene glycol as solvent. For (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 functional thin film, thermal characteristics of the precursor powder scratched from as-sprayed films show a remarkable peak around 300-400degC and 57.7% weight loss up to 1000degC. The as-sprayed precursor film with coffee-like color and amorphous-like phase is transformed into the resultant film with white, crystalline perovskite phase and characteristic peaks (110) and (100). The resultant films show correspondent increases of dielectric constant, leakage current and dissipation factor with increasing annealing temperatures. The dielectric constant is 264 and tangent loss is 0.21 in the resultant films annealed at 750degC for 5 min while leakage current density is 1.5x10 -6 A/cm 2 in the film annealed at 550degC for 5 min. (author)

  18. Thermophysical properties of YSZ and YCeSZ suspension plasma sprayed coatings having different microstructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokołowski, P.; Björklund, S.; Mušálek, Radek; Candidato, Jr., R.T.; Pawłowski, L.; Nait-Ali, B.; Smith, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 28-38 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) * Suspension Plasma Spraying * Thermal conductivity * Specific heat * Thermal dilatation * Response function method Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0257897217302086

  19. SPRAY CASTING

    OpenAIRE

    SALAMCI, Elmas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper is designed to provide a basic review of spray casting. A brief overview of the historical development of spray  casting and the description of plant and equipment have been given. Following metallurgical characteristics of spray formed alloys, process parameters and solidification mechanism of spray deposition have been discussed in detail. Finally, microstructure and mechanical properties of the selected spray cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys have been presented and comp...

  20. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  1. The use of electrochemical measurement techniques towards quality control and optimisation of corrosion properties of thermal spray coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreijling, M.P.W.; Hofman, R.; Westing, E.P.M. van; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    Metal spray coatings are ever more recognised as a possible superior means of corrosion protection in many environments. Extended service life combined with little or no maintenance provides interesting opportunities for both environmentalists and corrosion engineers. Although many successful

  2. 7th European Thermal-Sciences Conference (Eurotherm2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the seventh European Thermal-Sciences Conference (EUROTHRERM 2016) held in Krakow, Poland from 19-23 June 2016 and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The European Thermal-Sciences Conferences have been taking place since 1992, a full twenty four years. This year's follows successful conferences in Birmingham (1992, 2004), Rome (1996), Heidelberg (2000), Eindhoven (2008), Poitiers - Futuroscope (2012). The seventh European Thermal-Sciences Conference is being organized under the auspices of the EUROTHERM Committee. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in heat transfer, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to: Fundamentals: Heat and Mass Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamic Processes, Measurement Techniques, Numerical Methods including: adsorption and desorption, boiling and evaporation, combustion, computational/numerical methods, condensation, conduction, convection, electrochemical transport, jets, mass transfer and drying, measurement techniques, micro-/nano-scale heat transfer, molecular transport, MHD and plasma, optimal control/theory, phase change, porous media, radiation, solidification, thermal - solar energy, turbulent transport, two-phase/multiphase flows, Applications: Aerospace Technology, Advanced Energy Systems, Advanced Environmental Systems, Biotechnology and Medical Engineering, Cryogenics, Education, Heat Exchangers, Interactive Computational and Experimental Methodologies, Inverse Problems, Manufacturing Processes, Material Processing, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems, Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, Miscellaneous, Nanotechnology. Within the general subjects of this conference the mini-symposium and special sessions are organized. The topics include: Clean Coal and Gas Technologies, Fuel Cell

  3. High temperature corrosion of thermally sprayed NiCr- and amorphous Fe-based coatings covered with a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Tuurna, S.; Ruusuvuori, K.; Holmstroem, S.; Salonen, J. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bankiewicz, D.; Yrjas, P. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    New process conditions due to the requirement of higher efficiency together with the use of high-chlorine and alkali containing fuels such as biomass and waste fuels for heat and electricity production will challenge the resistance and life of tube materials. In conventional materials the addition of alloying elements to increase the corrosion resistance in aggressive combustion conditions increases costs relatively rapidly. Thermally sprayed coating offer promising, effective, flexible and cost efficient solutions to fulfill the material needs for the future. Some heat exchanger design alteractions before global commercialization have to be overcome, though. High temperature corrosion in combustion plants can occur by a variety of mechanisms including passive scale degradation with subsequent rapid scaling, loss of adhesion and scale detachment, attack by melted or partly melted deposits via fluxing reactions and intergranular-/interlamellar corrosion. A generally accepted model of the ''active oxidation'' attributes the responsibility for inducing corrosion to chlorine. The active oxidation mechanism plays a key role in the thermally sprayed coatings due to their unique lamellar structure. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of NiCr (HVOF and Wire Arc), amorphous Fe-based, and Fe13Cr (Wire Arc) thermally sprayed coatings, were tested in the laboratory under simplified biomass combustion conditions. The tests were carried out by using a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt mixture as a synthetic biomass ash, which was placed on the materials and then heat treated for one week (168h) at two different temperatures (550{sup 0}C and 600 C) and in two different gas atmospheres (air and air+30%H{sub 2}O). After the exposures, the metallographic cross sections of the coatings were studied with SEM/EDX analyzer. The results showed that the coatings behaved relatively well at the lower test temperature while critical corrosion through the lamella boundaries

  4. Measurement of the non-thermal properties of a low pressure spraying plasma by electric and spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ho

    2003-02-01

    For the case of an atmospheric plasma, the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model can be applied to plasmas at a nozzle entrance and to those on the axis of the plasma flame, but it is not easy to justify applying the LTE model to off-center plasma and to a low-pressure spraying plasma. Although the energy distribution of the electrons is assumed to be Maxwellian for the most of spraying plasmas, the non-Maxwellian distribution is possible for the case of low-pressure spaying plasma and edge plasma of atmospheric spraying plasma. In this work, the non-Maxwellian distribution of electrons was measured by using an electric probe installed on the fast scanning probe system, and non-LTE effects were measured by using the optical emission spectroscopy system. Distribution of the electrons of a low-pressure spraying plasma is observed not as Maxwellian but as bi-Maxwellian by the measurement of the single probe. Bi-Maxwellian distribution appears in the edge of a low pressure spraying plasma and seems to be due to the reduction of the collisonality by the drastic variation of the plasma density. Non-LTE characteristics of a low-pressure spraying plasma can be deuced from the measured results of the optical emission spectroscopy and is analyzed by the collisional radiative equilibrium (CRE) model, where the Maxwellian and the non-Maxwellian distributions are assumed for comparison. For the electron temperature, the results from optical emission spectroscopy were similar to the results from the single probe (3∼5 % in error)

  5. In situ Measurements of Residual Stresses and Elelastic Moduli in Thermal Sprayed Coatings. Part 1: Apparatus and Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Sampath, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2003), s. 863-872 ISSN 1359-6454 Grant - others:NSF(US) DMR9632570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : coatings plasma spraying, mechanical properties testing, elastic modulus Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.059, year: 2003

  6. Protection of 310l Stainless Steel from Wear at Elevated Temperatures using Conicraly Thermal Spray Coatings with and without Sic Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Kaiyang; Li, Dongyang

    2017-10-01

    Due to its high oxidation resistance, 310L stainless steel is often used for thermal facilities working at high-temperatures. However, the steel may fail prematurely at elevated temperatures when encounter surface mechanical attacks such as wear. Thermal spray coatings have been demonstrated to be effective in protecting the steel from wear at elevated temperatures. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of high velocity oxy-fuel(HVOF) spraying CoNiCrAlY/SiC coatings in resisting wear of 310L stainless steel at elevated temperature using a pin-on-disc wear tester. In order to further improve the performance of the coating, 5%SiC was added to the coating. It was demonstrated that the CoNiCrAlY/SiC coating after heat treatment markedly suppressed wear. However, the added SiC particles did not show benefits to the wear resistance of the coating. Microstructures of CoNiCrAlY coatings with and without the SiC addition were characterized in order to understand the mechanism responsible for the observed phenomena.

  7. CaTs Lab (CHAOS and Thermal Sciences Laboratory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    2002-01-01

    The CHAOS and Thermal Sciences Laboratory (CaTs) at James Madison University evolved into a noteworthy effort to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten students and faculty directly, and nearly 50 students indirectly, CaTs, through recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring programs, tutorial services and research and computational laboratories, fulfilled its intent to initiate an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self-actualization skills of undergraduate students with potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The stated goal of the program was to increase by 5% the number of enrolled mathematics and science students into the program. Success far exceeded the program goals by producing 100% graduation rate of all supported recipients during its tenure, with 30% of the students subsequently in pursuit of graduate degrees. Student retention in the program exceeded 90% and faculty participation exceeded the three members involved in mentoring and tutoring, gaining multi-disciplinary support. Aggressive marketing of the program resulted in several paid summer internships and commitments from NASA and an ongoing relationship with CHROME, a nationally recognized organization which focuses on developing minority students in the sciences and mathematics. Success of the program was only limited by the limited fiscal resources at NASA which resulted in phasing out of the program.

  8. Wear behaviour of coating of aluminium matrix composites fabricated by thermal spray method; Comportamiento a desgaste de recubrimientos de material compuesto de matriz de aluminio fabricados por proyeccion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, M.; Escalera, M. D.; Torres, B.; Rams, J.; Urena, A.

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the wear behaviour of coatings made of aluminium matrix composites reinforced with 20% of SiC particles and manufactured by thermal spray method with oxyacetylene flame has been investigated. the wear behaviour between coating with uncoated particles and sol-gel silica coated ones heat treated at 500 degree centigree and 725 degree centigree have been compared. The sprayed coatings with silica coated particles are more homogeneous and less porous due to increase of wettability by molten aluminium that takes place on coated particles. The microstructure of the sprayed coatings, the wear surfaces and the wear debris have been analysed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and micro-analysis techniques (EDX). The results show a smaller wear rate, a lower friction coefficient and more reduced loss of mass for the coatings sprayed with particles with sol-gel silica coatings than those made with uncoated particles. (Author) 15 refs.

  9. Progressive damage during thermal shock cycling of D-gun sprayed thermal barrier coatings with hollow spherical ZrO{sub 2}-8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, P.L. [State Key Lab for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China) and School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: csun@imr.ac.cn; Wang, Q.M. [State Key Lab for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Gong, J. [State Key Lab for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, C. [State Key Lab for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhou, Y.C. [State Key Lab for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2006-11-05

    Thermal shock cycling behaviors of D-gun sprayed TBCs with a hollow spherical ZrO{sub 2}-8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (HSP-YSZ) top coat and NiCrAlY bond coat on directionally solidified Ni-base superalloys DZ125 were investigated at high temperature (1100 deg. C) {r_reversible} room temperature (RT) repeatedly by water quenching. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the coating microstructure and failure morphology. The results showed that failure of the D-gun sprayed TBC starts with crack initiation along the splats boundary in the ceramic top coat and the non-alumina oxides. The cracks propagate and coalesce with the increasing thermal cycling. The extensive cracking of the rapidly formed non-alumina oxides, resulting from the depletion of aluminum in the bond coat, aids to delamination of the outer ceramic layer. The stress distributions in TGO layer at different thermal shock cycles was measured by luminescence spectroscopy to investigate the failure mechanism of TBC system.

  10. Protection by high velocity thermal spraying coatings on thick walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs 'SHARK'. Overview at the end of the project; Schutz durch Hochgeschwindigkeitsflammspritzschichten auf dickwandigen End- und Zwischenlagerbauteilen zur Reduktion von Reparaturen, Korrosion und Kosten 'SHARK'. Ein Ueberblick zum Abschluss des Projektes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, Sabine; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm [Unterwassertechnikum Hannover, Garbsen (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde; Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Dyllong, Nobert; Tragsdorf, Inga Maren [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Krefeld (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    The corrosion protection of the internal space of thick-walled interim and permanent storage facility components, such as Castor {sup copyright} containers, are ensured nowadays by a galvanic nickel layer. The method has proved itself and protects the base material of the containers at the underwater loading in the Nuclear power station from a corrosive attack. Although, the galvanic nickel plating is a relatively time consuming method, it lasts for several days for each container, and is with a layer thickness of 1,000 {mu}m also expensive. To develop an alternative, faster and more economical method, a BMBF research project named - 'SHARK - protection by high velocity thermal spraying layers on thick-walled permanent and interim store components for the diminution of repairs, corrosion and costs' in cooperation between Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH and the Institute of Materials Science of the Leibniz University of Hanover was established to investigate the suitability of the high velocity oxy fuel spraying technology (HVOF) for the corrosion protective coating of thickwalled interim and permanent storage facility components. Since the permanent storage depot components are manufactured from cast iron with globular graphite, this material was exclusively used as a base material in this project. The evaluation of the economical features of the application of different nickel base spraying materials on cast iron substratum was in focus, as well as the scientific characterization of the coating systems with regard to the corrosion protective properties. Furthermore, the feasibility of the transfer of the laboratory results on a large industrial setup as well as a general suitability of the coating process for a required repair procedure was to be investigated. The preliminary examination program identified chromium containing spraying materials as successful. Results of the preliminary examination program have been used for investigations with the CASOIK

  11. Study of thermal phenomena in niobium superconducting cavities when stiffened by thermal spray coating; Etude des phenomenes thermiques dans les cavites acceleratrices supraconductrices en niobium rigidifiees par projection thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousson, S

    2000-02-01

    The first objective of this thesis is to study a new superconducting cavity stiffening method based on thermal spraying. The principle is to add on the cavity external walls a copper layer using the thermal spraying process. Several tests on samples allowed to measure the thermal and mechanical properties of the layers deposited by several different processes. Measurements performed on 3 and 1.3 GHz niobium cavities, before and after copper deposition, proved the interest and feasibility of the method. The study showed the need to have very dense layers (porosity reduced to the minimum in order to have good mechanical characteristics), and not oxidised (to reduce the coating thermal resistance). As a conclusion, the spraying process performed under controlled atmosphere seems to be the most suited for superconducting cavity stiffening. The tools and analysing methods which have been developed for this study allowed to investigate other phenomena involved in the cavity thermal stability, and particularly the quench, a phenomenon often studied but not in its dynamic. A model is proposed in this thesis to analyse the quench dynamic behaviour using only the fast RF signal measurement during a quench. It has been shown that the quench propagation velocity depends essentially on the accelerating field and the niobium thermal conductivity. A study on the thermometer response time used as diagnostics on cavities proved that the transients during a quench are not efficiently measured with Allen-Bradley sensors: for this application Cernox thermometers are to be preferred due to their lower time response. The development of a thermometer acquisition device for the 3 GHz cavities, used for the study on cavity stiffening, has been adapted for anomalous heating measurements on high gradient 1.3 GHz cavities. It has been possible to prove that anomalous RF losses are responsible of the quality factor degradation, that they are not localised in a small of the cavity, but

  12. Thermal science under extreme conditions. Proceedings of the annual congress of the French Society of Thermal science - SFT 2012, 29 May-1 June, Bordeaux-Talence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendrhi, Philippe; Perrin, Bernard; Journeau, Christophe; MOST, Jean-Michel; Nicolai, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    This publication proposes the contributions made during plenary sessions, and those made on various themes (Multi-physical couplings combustion; Contacts and interfaces; Natural, hybrid and forced convection, Energy and the environment; High temperatures and high flows; Metrology and identification; Micro- and nano-thermal science; Radiation; Control of systems and thermal process; System thermal science; Life thermal science; Transfer in multi-phase media; Transfer in porous media). Among the plenary session conferences some authors more particularly addressed the following issues: Thermal science at the heart of thermonuclear fusion (presentation of thermonuclear fusion by magnetic confinement); Thermal science of severe accidents of nuclear reactors (study of the thermal science of corium-water interaction which could result in a thermal detonation, study of corium baths at the vessel bottom or in interaction with the vessel well concrete, proposition of technological solutions for corium recovery); Fusion by inertial confinement and associated energy exchanges (case of inertial confinement by power lasers, presentation of needed conditions to obtain an energetic gain, of different energy and heat transfers under extreme conditions)

  13. Laser-assisted selective fusing of thermal sprayed Ni-based self-fluxing alloys by using high-power diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Eun-Joon; Kim, Min-Su; Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Park, Changkyoo; Suh, Jeong

    2018-03-01

    Fusing treatment of Ni-based self-fluxing alloys (Metco-16C and 1276F) was performed using high-power diode lasers to control the temperature of the substrate's surface in real time. The effects of the fusing treatment temperature on the microstructural change and hardness distribution were also investigated. For Metco-16C and 1276F, the macrostructural inhomogeneity (voids) within the thermal sprayed layer decreased considerably as the fusing temperature increased. For both self-fluxing alloys, the optimal temperature for fusing was approximately 1423 K (for Metco-16C) and 1373 K (for 1276F), both of which are within the solid state temperature range; these temperatures maximize the alloy hardness together with the macrostructural homogeneity. In this temperature range, the microstructure consists of a lamellar-structured matrix phase with fine (diode laser system.

  14. Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures of Waste Water Treatment Reservoirs with Stainless Steel Coating Using Arc Thermal Spraying Technique in Acidified Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Waste water treatment reservoirs are contaminated with many hazardous chemicals and acids. Reservoirs typically comprise concrete and reinforcement steel bars, and the main elements responsible for their deterioration are hazardous chemicals, acids, and ozone. Currently, a variety of techniques are being used to protect reservoirs from exposure to these elements. The most widely used techniques are stainless steel plating and polymeric coating. In this study, a technique known as arc thermal spraying was used. It is a more convenient and economical method for protecting both concrete and reinforcement steel bar from deterioration in waste water treatment reservoirs. In this study, 316L stainless steel coating was applied to a concrete surface, and different electrochemical experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of coatings in different acidic pH solutions. The coating generated from the arc thermal spraying process significantly protected the concrete surface from corrosion in acidic pH solutions, owing to the formation of a double layer capacitance—a mixture of Cr3+ enriched with Cr2O3 and Cr-hydroxide in inner and Fe3+ oxide on the outer layer of the coating. The formation of this passive film is defective owing to the non-homogeneous 316L stainless steel coating surface. In the pH 5 solution, the growth of a passive film is adequate due to the presence of un-dissociated water molecules in the aqueous sulfuric acid solution. The coated surface is sealed with alkyl epoxide, which acts as a barrier against the penetration of acidic solutions. This coating exhibits higher impedance values among the three studied acidic pH solutions.

  15. A laser-treatment condition of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings on nickel-base superalloy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Yasuo; Fukaya, Kiyoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1987-06-01

    In order to seal the surface pores, two plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings (containing 8 wt.% CaC 2 and 8 wt.% Y 2 O 3 ) of about 200 microns thickness were partially melted with a CO 2 laser. Preliminary experiment had shown that the laser beam with a power density of 35 W/mm 2 could melt plasma-sprayed zirconia to depth of 50 to 80 microns at a scanning speed of about 300 mm/min. There was little porosity in the laser-treated region. However, straiations and mud-flat cracking of about 50 microns in depth were produced by the laser-treatment. Numerous fine particles of a few microns diameter were formed on the laser-treated surface, and microcracks were propagated between these fine particles. In the CaC 2 /ZrO 2 ceramic coating system, calcium content of the laser-treated region became less compared with that of the nontreated region. While, in the Y 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 system, yttrium distribution in the laser-treated area was more uniform than that in the nontreated area. This indicates that Y 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 system is more stable than CaC 2 /ZrO 2 system to laser treatment. (author)

  16. Flame spraying of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs

  17. Feasibility of suspension spraying of yttria-stabilized zirconia with water-stabilized plasma torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mušálek, Radek; Bertolissi, Gabriele; Medřický, J.; Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Curry, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 268, April (2015), s. 58-62 ISSN 0257-8972. [Rencontres Internationales de la Projection Thermique/6./. Limoges, 11.12.2013-13.12.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP108/12/P552 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal spray coating * Suspension spray ing * Thermal barrier coating * Water-stabilized plasma * High enthalpy plasma Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S025789721400680X

  18. Post-deposition thermal treatment of sprayed ZnO:Al thin films for enhancing the conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasia, Sebin; Athma, P. V.; Shaji, Manu; Kumar, M. C. Santhosh; Anila, E. I.

    2018-03-01

    Here, we report the enhanced conductivity of Aluminium doped (2at.%) zinc oxide thin films prepared by simple spray pyrolysis technique. The structural, optical, electrical, morphological and compositional investigations confirm the better quality of films that can be a potential candidate for application in transparent electronics. Most importantly, the film demonstrates an average transmittance of 90 percent with a low resistivity value which was dropped from 1.39 × 10-2 to 5.10 × 10-3 Ω .cm, after annealing, and a very high carrier concentration in the order of 10 × 20cm-3. Further, we have used the Swanepoel envelop method to calculate thickness, refractive index and extinction coefficient from the interference patterns observed in the transmission spectra. The calculated figure of merit of the as-deposited sample was 1.4 × 10-3Ω-1 which was improved to 2.5 × 10-3Ω-1 after annealing.

  19. Substrate system for spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Men G. (Export, PA); Chernicoff, William P. (Harrisburg, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  20. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  1. Spray-Dried Cellulose Nanofibril-Reinforced Polypropylene Composites for Extrusion-Based Additive Manufacturing: Nonisothermal Crystallization Kinetics and Thermal Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Isotactic polypropylene (iPP is a versatile polymer. It accounts for the second-largest polymer consumption worldwide. However, iPP is difficult to 3D print via extrusion-based processing. This is attributable to its rapid crystallization rate. In this study, spray-dried cellulose nanofibrils (SDCNF and maleic anhydride polypropylene (MAPP were investigated to reveal their effects on the nonisothermal crystallization kinetics and thermal expansion of iPP. SDCNF at 3 wt % and 30 wt % accelerated the crystallization rate of iPP, while SDCNF at 10 wt % retarded the crystallization rate by restricting crystal growth and moderately increasing the nucleation density of iPP. Additionally, adding MAPP into iPP/SDCNF composites accelerated the crystallization rate of iPP. The effective activation energy of iPP increased when more than 10 wt % SDCNF was added. Scanning electron microscopy and polarized light microscopy results indicated that high SDCNF content led to a reduced gap size among SDCNF, which hindered the iPP crystal growth. The coefficient of thermal expansion of iPP/SDCNF10% was 11.7% lower than the neat iPP. In summary, SDCNF, at 10 wt %, can be used to reduce the warping of iPP during extrusion-based additive manufacturing.

  2. Erosion-oxidation behavior of thermal sprayed Ni20Cr alloy and WC and Cr3C2 cermet coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Terui Kunioshi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus to conduct high temperature erosion-oxidation studies up to 850 °C and with particle impact velocities up to 15 m.s-1 was designed and constructed in the Corrosion Laboratories of IPEN. The erosion-oxidation behavior of high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF sprayed alloy and cermet coatings of Ni20Cr, WC 20Cr7Ni and Cr3C2 Ni20Cr on a steel substrate has been studied. Details of this apparatus and the erosion-oxidation behavior of these coatings are presented and discussed. The erosion-oxidation behavior of HVOF coated Cr3C2 25(Ni20Cr was better than that of WC 20Cr7Ni, and the erosion-oxidation regimes have been identified for these coatings at particle impact velocity of 3.5 m.s-1, impact angle of 90° and temperatures in the range 500 to 850 °C.

  3. Slurry Erosion Performance of Ni-Al2O3 Based Thermal-Sprayed Coatings: Effect of Angle of Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, H. S.; Agrawal, Anupam; Singh, H.; Shollock, B. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, slurry erosion performance of high velocity flame-sprayed Ni-Al2O3 based coatings was evaluated. The coatings were deposited on a hydroturbine steel (CA6NM) by varying the content of Al2O3 in Ni. Using jet-type test rig, erosion behavior of coatings and bare steel was evaluated at different impingement angles. Detailed investigation of the surface morphology of the eroded specimens was undertaken using SEM/EDS to identify potential erosion mechanism. A parameter named "erosion mechanism identifier" (ξ) was used to predict the mode of erosion. It was observed that the coating prepared using 40 wt.% of Al2O3 showed a highest resistance to erosion. This coating enhanced the erosion resistance of the steel by 2 to 4 times. Spalling in the form of splats and chunks of material (formed by interlinking of cracks) along with fracture of Al2O3 splats were identified as primary mechanisms responsible for the loss of coating material. The erosion mechanism of coatings and bare steel predicted by ξ was in good agreement with that observed experimentally. Among different parameters,, a function of fracture toughness ( K IC) and hardness ( H) showed excellent correlation with erosion resistance of coatings at both the impingement angles.

  4. Study of the tribological properties of ZrO2 obtained by thermal spraying using the interferometric microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Armada, S.; Miguel, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have a limited mechanical and tribological properties. The sintering thermal treatments can be used to improve these properties. in the present paper the evolution of some mechanical and tribological properties with different time of sintering at 1000 degree centigree is evaluated. It was observed that the sintering thermal treatment produce an increase of the wear resistance, the hardness and the Young modulus. The Ball on disk test were done using a sliding pair of ZrO 2 and steel and the main wear mechanisms for each case were studied. It was observed that the intersplat delamination and the brittle fracture where the main wear mechanisms during sliding process. The wear tracks were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning white light interferometry (SWLI) so as to quantify the wear for each case. It was necessary to do a gold sputtering to increase the electric conductivity and reflection of the ZrO 2 samples for their study by SEM and SWLI respectively. (Author) 6 refs

  5. Solvent-free preparation of polylactic acid fibers by melt electrospinning using umbrella-like spray head and alleviation of problematic thermal degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melt electrospinning is an even simpler and safer method compared with the solution electrospinning in the production of ultra-fine fibers. Polylactic acid (PLA is a biodegradable and resorbable aliphatic ester that has received significant attention in recent years. PLA is easily degradable at high temperature in the process of melt electrospinning. High efficient fibers were made using our designed umbrella-like spray head spinning facility in this work. To find how to alleviate the problematic degradation and what factors could be relevant to degradation, temperature, relative molecular mass, Differential Scanning Calorimeter and X-ray Diffraction patterns before and after spinning were investigated and compared with each other. Results showed that fibers were facile shorten and fractured when spun at 245°C while the relative molecular mass of PLA fibers decreased markedly as compared with that spun at 210°C. To hinder the degradation, couple of experimental efforts were implemented with adding antioxidants, raising spinning voltage, lowering temperature, and reducing residence time. After such efforts, it was observed that the relative molecular mass of the PLA fibers was higher than those without inputting any efforts. The effect of antioxidant 1010 was found the most promising on the alleviation of PLA problematic thermal degradation.

  6. Tailoring a High Temperature Corrosion Resistant FeNiCrAl for Oxy-Combustion Application by Thermal Spray Coating and HIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarkko Metsäjoki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxy-fuel combustion combined with CCS (carbon capture and storage aims to decrease CO2 emissions in energy production using fossil fuels. Oxygen firing changes power plant boiler conditions compared to conventional firing. Higher material temperatures and harsher and more variable environmental conditions cause new degradation processes that are inadequately understood at the moment. In this study, an Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy was developed based on thermodynamic simulations. The chosen composition was manufactured as powder by gas atomization. The powder was sieved into two fractions: The finer was used to produce thermal spray coatings by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF and the coarser to manufacture bulk specimens by hot isostatic pressing (HIP. The high temperature corrosion properties of the manufactured FeNiCrAl coating and bulk material were tested in laboratory conditions simulating oxy-combustion. The manufacturing methods and the results of high temperature corrosion performance are presented. The corrosion performance of the coating was on average between the bulk steel references Sanicro 25 and TP347HFG.

  7. Calcium titanate (CaTiO3) dielectrics prepared by plasma spray and post-deposition thermal treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Sedláček, J.; Hájková, Zuzana; Matys Grygar, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 72, December (2015), s. 123-132 ISSN 0025-5408 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : Ceramics * Plasma deposition * Impedance spectroscopy * Raman spectroscopy * Dielectrics Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass; JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass (UACH-T) Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025540815300623

  8. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Ramachandran. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 4 August 2002 pp ... Volume 27 Issue 5 October 2004 pp 403-407 Phase Transitions. Phase transition in L-alaninium oxalate by ... Thermal and structural properties of spray pyrolysed CdS thin film · P Raji C Sanjeeviraja K Ramachandran.

  9. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO and DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-01-01

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  10. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  11. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of Mg-Al alloys with thermal spray Al/SiCp composite coatings; Comportamiento a la corrosion electroquimica de aleaciones MgAl con recubrimientos de materiales compuestos Al/SiCp mediante proyeccion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Feliu Jr, S.; Merino, M. C.; Mohedano, M.; Casajus, P.; Arrabal, R.

    2010-07-01

    The corrosion protection of Mg-Al alloys by flame thermal spraying of Al/SiCp composite coatings was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The volume fraction of SiC particles (SiCp) varied between 5 and 30%. The as-sprayed Al/SiCp composite coatings revealed a high number of micro-channels, largely in the vicinity of the SiC particles, that facilitated the penetration of the electrolyte and the subsequent galvanic corrosion of the magnesium substrates. The application of a cold-pressing post-treatment reduced the degree of porosity of the coatings and improved the bonding at the coating/substrate and Al/SiC interfaces. This resulted in improved corrosion resistance of the coated specimens. The effectiveness of the coatings slightly decreased with the addition of 5-30 vol.% SiCp compared with the un reinforced thermal spray aluminium coatings. (Author) 31 refs.

  12. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  13. Effect of Mn content on structural, optical, opto-thermal and electrical properties of ZnO:Mn sprayed thin films compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimouni, R.; Kamoun, O.; Yumak, A.; Mhamdi, A.; Boubaker, K.; Petkova, P.; Amlouk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposing an original explanation to the difference between manganese-doped zinc oxide and undoped behavior. • Presenting an original effective electrical and fluorescence-related calculation scheme. • Outlining original AC–DC investigation protocol. - Abstract: Manganese-doped zinc oxide thin films (ZnO:Mn) at different percentages (0–3%) were deposited on glass substrates using a chemical spray technique. The effects of manganese element content on structural, optical, opto-thermal and electrical conductivity of ZnO:Mn thin films were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, optical measurement, Photoluminescence spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. XRD analysis revealed that all films consist of single phase ZnO and were well crystallized in würtzite phase with the crystallites preferentially oriented towards (0 0 2) direction parallel to c-axis. Doping manganese resulted in a slight decrease in the optical band gap energy of the films and a noticeably change in optical constants. The UV peak positions for ZnO:Mn samples slightly red shift to the longer wavelength in comparison with the pure ZnO which can be attributed to the change in the acceptor level induced by the substitutional Mn 2+ and the band-gap narrowing of ZnO with the Mn dopant. We have performed original AC and DC conductivity studies inspired from Jonscher and small polaron models. These studies helped establishing significant correlation between temperature and activation energy and Mn content. From the spectroscopy impedance analysis we investigated the frequency relaxation phenomenon and the circuit equivalent circuit of such thin films. Finally, all results have been discussed, as an objective of the actual work, in terms of the manganese doping concentration

  14. Cold Spray for Repair of Magnesium Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Readiness Center East GM General Motors He helium hex-Cr hexavalent chromium HP-Al High Purity Aluminum HVOF High Velocity Oxygen Fuel ID inner...process is the hexavalent chromium (hex-Cr) permissible exposure limit (PEL) as established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA...project related to replacement of hard chrome plating on helicopter dynamic components using HVOF thermal spray coatings. FRC-E has a thermal spray

  15. Microstructure and sliding wear properties of HVOF sprayed, laser remelted and laser clad Stellite 6 coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houdková, Š.; Pala, Zdeněk; Smazalová, E.; Vostřák, M.; Česánek, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 129-141 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Stellite 6 * HVOF * Laser remelting * Laser clad * Wear * Phase transformation Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0257897216308817

  16. [Human health and pesticides used in the spraying of illicit crops: an issue of science or politics?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo, Alvaro Javier

    2004-01-01

    The potential adverse effects on human health associated with pesticides used in the program of eradication of illicit crops in Colombia are controversial. From the beginning of the 80's the pesticides paraquat, triclopyr, imazapyr, glyphosate and tebuthiuron have been used in eradication programs or experimentally. The objective of this study was to identify a reasonable approach which could be adopted by public health on this problem. A qualitative content analysis was carried out of the speeches of social actors involved in this debate, to classify them according to Suppes' expectations, or lay approach to risk. Social actors were identified by means of available documents in hard copies or on the internet; afterwards, ideally typical texts were selected and analysed. Skin lesions, conjunctivitis, and gastrointestinal and respiratory infections were identified as the most frequent illnesses. The analysis of speeches identified the affected groups as vulnerable populations. The Colombian and American governments present reports, based on the "medical model", which indicate no association between glyphosate exposure and human health. Guerrilla groups do not show a clear relationship between pesticides and effects on health; the national and international scientific communities criticize the eradication program based on concepts from ecology and the Latin American Social Medicine; environmentalist groups criticize any use of pesticides, and human right defenders point out that sprayings violate Colombian and American laws. In conclusion the different positions are opposed and none can be considered irrefutable. A rational position from the public health standpoint is to support the adoption of the precaution principle.

  17. Temporal frequency of knockdown resistance mutations, F1534C and V1016G, in Aedes aegypti in Chiang Mai city, Thailand and the impact of the mutations on the efficiency of thermal fogging spray with pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plernsub, Suriya; Saingamsook, Jassada; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2016-10-01

    In Thailand, control of dengue outbreaks is currently attained by the use of space sprays, particularly thermal fogging using pyrethroids, with the aim of killing infected Aedes mosquito vectors in epidemic areas. However, the principal dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, is resistant to pyrethroids conferred mainly by mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, F1534C and V1016G, termed knockdown resistance (kdr). The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal frequencies of F1534C and V1016G in Ae. aegypti populations in relation to pyrethroid resistance in Chiang Mai city, and to evaluate the impact of the mutations on the efficacy of thermal fogging with the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Larvae and pupae were collected from several areas around Chiang Mai city during 2011-2015 and reared to adulthood for bioassays for deltamethrin susceptibility. These revealed no trend of increasing deltamethrin resistance during the study period (mortality 58.0-69.5%, average 62.8%). This corresponded to no overall change in the frequencies of the C1534 allele (0.55-0.66, average 0.62) and G1016 allele (0.34-0.45, average 0.38), determined using allele specific amplification. Only three genotypes of kdr mutations were detected: C1534 homozygous (VV/CC); G1016/C1534 double heterozygous (VG/FC); and G1016 homozygous (GG/FF) indicating that the F1534C and V1016G mutations occurred on separate haplotypic backgrounds and a lack of recombination between them to date. The F1 progeny females were used to evaluate the efficacy of thermal fogging spray with Damthrin-SP(®) (deltamethrin+S-bioallethrin+piperonyl butoxide) using a caged mosquito bioassay. The thermal fogging spray killed 100% and 61.3% of caged mosquito bioassay placed indoors and outdoors, respectively. The outdoor spray had greater killing effect on C1534 homozygous and had partially effect on double heterozygous mosquitoes, but did not kill any G1016 homozygous mutants living outdoors. As this selection

  18. Effect of heat treatment on the wear and corrosion behaviors of a gray cast iron coated with a COLMONOY 88 alloy deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Öz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present work has been conducted in order to determine the influence of heat treatment on the wear and corrosion behaviours of a gray cast iron substrate coated with a Ni base coating deposited by HVOF thermal spray. The wear resistance of the coatings was obtained using a reciprocating wear tester by rubbing a 10 mm diameter steel ball on the coatings at normal atmospheric conditions. Corrosion tests were performed using potentiodynamic polarization measurements in a 3,5 % NaCl solution. It was observed that the corrosion and wear resistance of the coatings increased along with the reduction of porosity and roughness by the heat treatment.

  19. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  20. HVOF Thermal Spray TiC/TiB2 Coatings for AUSC Boiler/Turbine Components for Enhanced Corrosion Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Kanchan [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes; Koc, Rasit [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes; Fan, Chinbay [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-12-07

    The high temperatures of operations still pose significant risk of degradation and fatigue from oxidizing, corroding and eroding environment. In addition to unused O2, water from combustion and SOx from the coal sulfur oxidation that result in highly corrosive environment, acid gases such as HCl and other sulfur compounds may also be present. These adverse effects are further accelerated due to the elevated temperatures. In addition, ash particulates and unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur can cause erosion of the surface and thus loss of material. Unburnt carbon and pyritic sulfur may also cause localized reduction sites. Thus, fireside corrosion protection and steam oxidation protection alternatives to currently used Ni-Cr overlays need to be identified and evaluated. Titanium carbide (TiC) is a suitable alternative on account of the material features such as the high hardness, the high melting point, the high strength and the low density for the substitution or to be used in conjunction with NiCr for enhancing the fireside corrosion and erosion of the materials. Another alternative is the use of titanium boride as a coating for chemical stability required for long-term service and high erosion resistance over the state-of-the-art, high fracture toughness (K1C ~12 MPam1/2) and excellent corrosion resistance (kp~1.9X10-11 g2/cm4/s at 800°C in air). The overarching aim of the research endeavor was to synthesize oxidation, corrosion and wear resistant TiC and TiB2 coating powders, apply thermal spray coating on existing boiler materials and characterize the coated substrates for corrosion resistance for applications at high temperatures (500 -750 °C) and high pressures (~350 bars) using the HVOF process and to demonstrate the feasibility of these coating to be used in AUSC boilers and turbines.

  1. Spray characteristics and spray cooling heat transfer in the non-boiling regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Han, Feng-Yun; Liu, Qi-Nie; Fan, Han-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Spray cooling is an effective method for dissipating high heat fluxes in the field of electronics thermal control. In this study, experiments were performed with distilled water as a test liquid to study the spray cooling heat transfer in non-boiling regime. A Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) was used to study the spray characteristics. The effects of spray flow rate, spray height, and inlet temperature on spray cooling heat transfer were investigated. It was found that the parameters affect heat transfer of spray cooling in non-boiling regime by the spray characteristics and working fluid thermophysical properties. Then the corresponding droplet axial velocity and Sauter mean diameter (SMD) were successfully correlated with mean absolute error of 15%, which were based upon the orifice diameter, the Weber and Reynolds numbers of the orifice flow prior to liquid breakup, dimensionless spray height and spray cross-section radius. The heat transfer in non-boiling regime was correlated with a mean absolute error of 7%, which was mainly associated with the working fluid thermophysical properties, the Weber and Reynolds numbers hitting the heating surface, dimensionless heating surface temperature and diameter. -- Highlights: → The spray flow rate, spray height, and inlet temperature affect heat transfer of spray cooling in non-boiling regime by the spray characteristics and the working fluid thermophysical properties. → Then the corresponding droplet axial velocity and Sauer mean diameter (SMD) were successfully correlated with mean absolute error of 15%. → The heat transfer in non-boiling regime was correlated with a mean absolute error of 7%.

  2. A review of second law techniques applicable to basic thermal science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, M. Kevin; Zamorski, Joseph R.

    1988-11-01

    This paper reports the results of a review of second law analysis techniques which can contribute to basic research in the thermal sciences. The review demonstrated that second law analysis has a role in basic thermal science research. Unlike traditional techniques, second law analysis accurately identifies the sources and location of thermodynamic losses. This allows the development of innovative solutions to thermal science problems by directing research to the key technical issues. Two classes of second law techniques were identified as being particularly useful. First, system and component investigations can provide information of the source and nature of irreversibilities on a macroscopic scale. This information will help to identify new research topics and will support the evaluation of current research efforts. Second, the differential approach can provide information on the causes and spatial and temporal distribution of local irreversibilities. This information enhances the understanding of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat and mass transfer, and may suggest innovative methods for reducing irreversibilities.

  3. Pumped Fluid Loop Heat Rejection and Recovery Systems for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Pauken, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the heat rejection and heat recovery system for thermal control of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL mission will use mechanically pumped fluid loop based architecture for thermal control of the spacecraft and rover. The architecture is designed to harness waste heat from an Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermo-electric Generator (MMRTG) during Mars surface operations for thermal control during cold conditions and also reject heat during the cruise aspect of the mission. There are several test that are being conducted that will insure the safety of this concept. This architecture can be used during any future interplanetary missions utilizing radioisotope power systems for power generation.

  4. Influence of process parameters on the cavitation resistance of arc thermally sprayed cobalt stainless steel; Influencia dos parametros de processo na resistencia a cavitacao de uma liga inoxidavel com cobalto aspergido a arco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukasiewicz, A. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Capra, A.R.; Chandelier, J. da L. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: anderson.geraldo@lactec.org.br; Paredes, R.S.C. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2006-07-01

    In this work the influence of the arc thermal spraying process on the microstructure, oxide volumetric fraction, porosity and cavitation resistance was studied. The characterization was performed by optical and electrical microscopy, microhardness and ultrasonic cavitation test, ASTM G32-96 in AS895HY cobalt stainless steel. The increase in air pressure, 280 to 410 kPa, modified the oxide fraction from 17,2 +- 3,6% to 10,9 +-1,8%, in the samples without pre-heating treatment. With 120 deg C pre-heating treatment the oxide fraction increase from 24,1 +- 2,8% to 12,8 +- 1,9% when the air pressure was modified from 280 to 550 kPa. The mass loss in vibration-induced cavitation were 1,55 and 1,42 mg/h for 410 kPa AS895HY samples, with and without pre heating treatment, and 2,12 mg/h for 280 kPa samples without pre heating treatment. The results showed that the process parameters modified the microstructure and the cavitation resistance of the arc thermal spraying coatings. (author)

  5. Spray deposition using impulse atomization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellendt, N.; Schmidt, R.; Knabe, J.; Henein, H.; Uhlenwinkel, V.

    2004-01-01

    A novel technique, impulse atomization, has been used for spray deposition. This single fluid atomization technique leads to different spray characteristics and impact conditions of the droplets compared to gas atomization technique which is the common technique used for spray deposition. Deposition experiments with a Cu-6Sn alloy were conducted to evaluate the appropriateness of impulse atomization to produce dense material. Based on these experiments, a model has been developed to simulate the thermal history and the local solidification rates of the deposited material. A numerical study shows how different cooling conditions affect the solidification rate of the material

  6. Thermal Stress and Toxicity | Science Inventory | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at subthermoneutral temperatures of —22 °C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress tan nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable

  7. Mullite and Mullite/ZrO2-7wt.%Y2O3 Powders for Thermal Spraying of Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E.; Mesquita-Guimarães, J.; Miranzo, P.; Osendi, M. I.; Wang, Y.; Lima, R. S.; Moreau, C.

    2010-01-01

    Mullite and mullite/ZrO2-7wt.%Y2O3 coatings could be thought among the main protective layers for environment barrier coatings (EBCs) to protect Si-based substrates in future gas turbine engines. Considering that feedstock of the compound powder is not commercially available, two powder processing routes Spray Drying (SD) and Flame Spheroidization (FS) were implemented for both types of powders. For each method the particle size, the morphology, and microstructure of the powder particles was determined. In addition, the effect of the heat treatment on the powder crystallinity and microstructure of FS powders was also investigated. To evaluate their suitability as feedstock materials, the powders were plasma sprayed and their in-flight particle characteristics monitored for coatings production. The powder morphology was correlated to the in-flight particle characteristics and splat morphology to gain insight about into the influence of powder characteristics on the coating formation.

  8. Optical fuel spray measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillamo, H.

    2011-07-01

    Diesel fuel sprays, including fuel/air mixing and the physics of two-phase jet formation, are discussed in the thesis. The fuel/air mixing strongly affects emissions formation in spray combustion processes where the local combustion conditions dictate the emission formation. This study comprises optical measurements both in pressurized spray test rigs and in a running engine.The studied fuel injection was arranged with a common rail injection system and the injectors were operated with a solenoid-based injection valve. Both marine and heavy-duty diesel engine injectors were used in the study. Optical fuel spray measurements were carried out with a laser-based double-framing camera system. This kind of equipments is usually used for flow field measurements with Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV) as well as for backlight imaging. Fundamental fuel spray properties and spray formation were studied in spray test rigs. These measurements involved studies of mixing, atomization, and the flow field. Test rig measurements were used to study the effect of individual injection parameters and component designs. Measurements of the fuel spray flow field, spray penetration, spray tip velocity, spray angle, spray structure, droplet accumulation, and droplet size estimates are shown. Measurement campaign in a running optically accessible large-bore medium-speed engine was also carried out. The results from engine tests were compared with equivalent test rig measurements, as well as computational results, to evaluate the level of understanding of sprays. It was shown that transient spray has an acceleration and a deceleration phase. Successive flow field measurements (PIV) in optically dense diesel spray resulted in local and average velocity data of diesel sprays. Processing fuel spray generates a flow field to surrounding gas and entrainment of surrounding gas into fuel jet was also seen at the sides of the spray. Laser sheet imaging revealed the inner structure of diesel

  9. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  10. Hair spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002705.htm Hair spray poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) ...

  11. Air Plasma-Sprayed La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 Composite Thermal Barrier Coating Subjected to CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lili; Ma, Wen; Ma, Bole; Guo, Feng; Chen, Weidong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-08-01

    La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by air plasma spray (APS). The La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs covered with calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) powder, as well as the powder mixture of CMAS and spray-dried La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite powder, were heat-treated at 1250 °C in air for 1, 4, 8, and 12 h. The phase constituents and microstructures of the reaction products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Experimental results showed that the La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs had higher CMAS resistance than 8YSZ coating. A dense new layer developed between CMAS and La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs during interaction, and this new layer consisted mostly of apatite (Ca2La8(SiO4)6O2) and c-ZrO2. The newly developed layer effectively protected the La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs from further CMAS attack.

  12. An evaluation of the electric arc spray and (HPPS) processes for the manufacturing of high power plasma spraying MCrAIY coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacriste, D.; Goubot, N.; Dhers, J.; Ducos, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2001-06-01

    The high power plasma torch (PlazJet) can be used to spray refractory ceramics with high spray rates and deposition efficiency. It can provide dense and hard coating with high bond strengths. When manufacturing thermal barrier coatings, the PlazJet gun is well adapted to spraying the ceramic top coat but not the MCrAIY materials that are used as bond coat. Arc spraying can compete with plasma spraying for metallic coatings since cored wires can be used to spray alloys and composites. In addition, the high production rate of arc spraying enables a significant decrease in coating cost. This paper discusses the performances of the PlazJet gun, and a twin-wire are spray system, and compares the properties and cost of MCrAIY coatings made with these two processes. For arc spraying, the use of air or nitrogen as atomizing gas is also investigated.

  13. Remotely controlled spray gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  14. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--cobalt permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high-temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating cobalt--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--cobalt magnets, sprayed from samarium-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million gauss-oersteds and coercive forces of approximately 6000 oersteds. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates. (auth)

  15. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--Co permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating Co--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--Co magnets, sprayed from Sm-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million G-Oe and coercive forces of approximately 6000 Oe. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates

  16. LSPRAY-IV: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    LSPRAY-IV is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray. Some important research areas covered as a part of the code development are: (1) the extension of combined CFD/scalar-Monte- Carlo-PDF method to spray modeling, (2) the multi-component liquid spray modeling, and (3) the assessment of various atomization models used in spray calculations. The current version contains the extension to the modeling of superheated sprays. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers.

  17. Development of Nb2O5|Cu composite as AISI 1020 steel thermal spray coating for protection against corrosion by soil in buried structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regis Junior, Oscar; Silva, Jose Maurilio da; Portella, Kleber Franke; Paredes, Ramon Sigifredo Cortes

    2012-01-01

    An Nb 2 O|Cu corrosion-resistant coating was developed and applied onto AISI 1020 steel substrate by Powder Flame Spray. A galvanostatic electrochemical technique was employed, with and without ohmic drop, in four different soils (two corrosively aggressive and two less aggressive). Behavior of coatings in different soils was compared using a cathodic hydrogen reduction reaction (equilibrium potential, overvoltage and exchange current density) focusing on the effect of ohmic drop. Results allow recommendation of Nb 2 O 5 |Cu composite for use in buried structure protection. (author)

  18. Plasma-sprayed tantalum/alumina cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.M.

    1977-12-01

    Cermets of tantalum and alumina were fabricated by plasma spraying, with the amount of alumina varied from 0 to 65 percent (by volume). Each of four compositions was then measured for tensile strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of thermal expansion. In general, strength and strain to failure decreased with increasing alumina content: 62 MPa for 100 percent Ta to 19 MPa for 35 v percent Ta. A maximum of 0.1 percent strain was observed for the sprayed 100 percent Ta specimens. The coefficient of thermal expansion measured for the pure Ta was 6.2 (10 -6 )/K

  19. LSPRAY-V: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    LSPRAY-V is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with unstructured grids and massively parallel computers. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray encountered over a wide range of operating conditions in modern aircraft engine development. It could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-V, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  20. Comparison of the Characteristics and Performance of Flurbiprofen 8.75 mg Spray for Sore Throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Shephard, Adrian; Adams, Verity; Lidster, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Sore throat sprays provide targeted relief by delivering the active ingredient directly to the site of pain. Different sprays vary in characteristics, thus affecting delivery of the active ingredient to the throat, which can impact compliance. The characteristics and performance of FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY were compared with 12 other sprays. Parameters assessed included spray angle and pattern, droplet size distribution, shot weight uniformity and shot weight throughout life. Among all sprays tested WICK Sulagil Halsspray had the smallest spray angle (46°) and also the smallest diameter spray pattern (X=32.8 mm; Y=34.4 mm). Thiovalone® Buccal Spray Suspension had both the largest spray angle (82°) and largest diameter spray pattern (X=62.6 mm; Y=78.0 mm). Hasco Sept® Aerosol Spray had the smallest droplet size (Dv90=118.4 μm) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray had the largest (Dv90=214.34 μm). In terms of shot weight uniformity, TANTUM® VERDE GOLA 0.25% spray showed the least variation (2% RSD) between shots and UNIBEN Aerosol Spray the most (23.4% RSD). Shot weight throughout life studies showed that FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the least deviation from shot weight (1.77%) whereas OKi infiammazione e dolore® 0.16% spray deviated the most (44.9%). FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY had the second smallest spray angle/pattern and droplet size distribution and also the least variation in shot weight. Different sore throat sprays vary in different attributes, affecting delivery of the active ingredient. FLURBIPROFEN 8.75 mg SPRAY performed well overall, ranking first among all sprays tested, and providing a dose which is targeted and uniformly delivered throughout the life of the bottle. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. The influence of substrate temperature and spraying distance on the properties of plasma sprayed tungsten and steel coatings deposited in a shrouding chamber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Vilémová, Monika; Nevrlá, Barbara; Kocmanová, Lenka; Veverka, Jakub; Halasová, Martina; Hadraba, Hynek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 217-223 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : Tungsten * Steel * Atmospheric plasma spraying * Shrouding * Substrate temperature * Fusion reactor materials * Plasma facing components Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials; JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials (UFM-A) OBOR OECD: Coating and films; Coating and films (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0257897216310520

  2. Heat jettisoning from solar-thermal driven LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorber cooling units by pulsed spraying a dry cooler with water; Waermeabwurf aus einer solarthermisch getriebenen LiBr- H{sub 2}O Absorptionskaeltemaschine durch gepulstes Bespruehen eines Trockenkuehlers mit Wasser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gantenbein, P.; Helfenberger, R.; Frank, E.

    2010-07-01

    This short, illustrated final report discusses the removal of heat from solar-thermal driven LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorber cooling units by pulsed spraying a dry cooler with water. The reduction of electricity consumption for room cooling using conventional chillers is examined. Heat dissipation using open cooling towers and the disadvantages encountered are compared with heat dissipation using a dry cooler with heat-exchanger and fans. Additional evaporation cooling achieved by spraying the heat exchanger with water is described and discussed. The results of measurements made at the Institute for Solar Technology in Rapperswil, Switzerland, are presented and discussed.

  3. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum-4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  4. Plasma spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum-silver alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Elliott, K.E.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary investigation on plasma-spraying of beryllium and a beryllium-aluminum 4% silver alloy was done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility (BATSF). Spherical Be and Be-Al-4%Ag powders, which were produced by centrifugal atomization, were used as feedstock material for plasma-spraying. The spherical morphology of the powders allowed for better feeding of fine (<38 μm) powders into the plasma-spray torch. The difference in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the two plasma-sprayed powders will be discussed along with the effect of processing parameters on the as-deposited microstructure of the Be-Al-4%Ag. This investigation represents ongoing research to develop and characterize plasma-spraying of beryllium and beryllium-aluminum alloys for magnetic fusion and aerospace applications

  5. CO2 Insulation for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Karlmann, Paul; Anderson, Kevin; Novak, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is sending a large (>850 kg) rover as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to Mars in 2011. The rover's primary power source is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) that generates roughly 2000 W of heat, which is converted to approximately 110 W of electrical power for use by the rover electronics, science instruments, and mechanism-actuators. The large rover size and extreme thermal environments (cold and hot) for which the rover is designed for led to a sophisticated thermal control system to keep it within allowable temperature limits. The pre-existing Martian atmosphere of low thermal conductivity CO2 gas (8 Torr) is used to thermally protect the rover and its components from the extremely cold Martian environment (temperatures as low as -130 deg C). Conventional vacuum based insulation like Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) is not effective in a gaseous atmosphere, so engineered gaps between the warm rover internal components and the cold rover external structure were employed to implement this thermal isolation. Large gaps would lead to more thermal isolation, but would also require more of the precious volume available within the rover. Therefore, a balance of the degree of thermal isolation achieved vs. the volume of rover utilized is required to reach an acceptable design. The temperature differences between the controlled components and the rover structure vary from location to location so each gap has to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to arrive at an optimal thickness. For every configuration and temperature difference, there is a critical thickness below which the heat transfer mechanism is dominated by simple gaseous thermal conduction. For larger gaps, the mechanism is dominated by natural convection. In general, convection leads to a poorer level of thermal isolation as compared to conduction. All these considerations play important roles in the

  6. Babbitt Casting and Babbitt Spraying Processes Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jalali Azizpour; S.Norouzi H. Mohammadi Majd

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the babbitting of a bearing in boiler feed pump of an electromotor has been studied. These bearings have an important role in reducing the shut down times in the pumps, compressors and turbines. The most conventional method in babbitting is casting as a melting method. The comparison between thermal spray and casting methods in babbitting shows that the thermal spraying babbitt layer has better performance and tribological behavior. The metallurgical and tribological analysis s...

  7. Effects of substrate temperature on sprayed ZnO thin films optical and morphological properties in terms of Amlouk-Boubaker opto-thermal expansivity psi{sub AB}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amlouk, A.; Boubaker, K. [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Amlouk, M., E-mail: mmbb11112000@yahoo.f [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-08-12

    In this study, ZnO thin films have been grown using spray pyrolysis technique on glass substrates under various substrate temperature (400, 420, 440, 460, 480 and 500 deg. C). The Precursors were Propan-2-ol C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O and zinc acetate zinc Zn(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2} in acidified medium (acetic acid CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}H, pH = 5). XRD analyses yielded a strong (0 0 2) X-ray diffraction line for low substrate temperatures (400-420 deg. C). This c-axis preferential orientation was not observed for substrate temperature beyond 440 deg. C. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses monitored clusters with variable shapes (pyramidal for high temperatures and rounded concentrated ones for temperatures below 440 deg. C). Finally, the optical measurements were carried out via transmittance T(lambda) and reflectance R(lambda) spectra inside 250-2500 nm domain. Thanks to optical measurements, the conjoint optical and thermal properties were deduced using the Amlouk-Boubaker opto-thermal expansively psi{sub AB}.

  8. Fullerene monolayer formation by spray coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervenka, J.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many large molecular complexes are limited in thin film applications by their insufficient thermal stability, which excludes deposition via commonly used vapour phase deposition methods. Here we demonstrate an alternative way of monolayer formation of large molecules by a simple spray coating method

  9. Plasma Sprayed Coatings for RF Wave Absorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matějíček, Jiří; Žáček, František; Stöckel, Jan; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    307-311, - (2002), s. 1334-1338 ISSN 0022-3115 Grant - others: COST (XE) Euratom DV4/04(TWO) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide, thermal spray coatings, fusion materials, RF wave absorption Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2002

  10. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  11. Plasma sprayed coatings on crankshaft used steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahu, G.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Benchea, M.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma spray coatings may be an alternative to conventional heat treatment of main journals and crankpins of the crankshaft. The applications of plasma coatings are various and present multiple advantages compared to electric arc wire spraying or flame spraying. The study examines the layers sprayed with the following powders: Cr3C2- 25(Ni 20Cr), Al2O3- 13TiO2, Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 on the surface of steels used in the construction of a crankshaft (C45). The plasma spray coatings were made with the Spray wizard 9MCE facility at atmospheric pressure. The samples were analyzed in terms of micro and morphological using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests on samples that have undergone simulates extreme working conditions of the crankshafts. In order to emphasize adherence to the base material sprayed layer, were carried out tests of microscratches and micro-indentation. Results have showed a relatively compact morphological aspect given by the successive coatings with splat-like specific structures. Following the microscratch analysis it can be concluded that Al2O3-13TiO2 coating has a higher purpose in terms of hardness compared to Cr3C2-(Ni 20Cr) and Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 powders. Thermal coatings of the deposited powders have increased the mechanical properties of the material. The results stand to confirm that plasma sprayed Al2O3-13TiO2 powder is in fact a efficient solution for preventing mechanical wear, even with a faulty lubrication system.

  12. Managing the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Vacuum Test for Safety and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory is a NASA/JPL mission to send the next generation of rover to Mars. Originally slated for launch in 2009, development problems led to a delay in the project until the next launch opportunity in 2011. Amidst the delay process, the Launch/Cruise Solar Thermal Vacuum Test was undertaken as risk reduction for the project. With varying maturity and capabilities of the flight and ground systems, undertaking the test in a safe manner presented many challenges. This paper describes the technical and management challenges and the actions undertaken that led to the ultimate safe and successful execution of the test.

  13. High-Performance Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells by Using a Combination of Ultrasonic Spray-Coating and Low Thermal Budget Photonic Curing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjib, Das [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yang, Bin [ORNL; Gu, Gong [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Joshi, Pooran C [ORNL; Ivanov, Ilia N [ORNL; Rouleau, Christopher [ORNL; Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the commercialization of high-performance and robust perovskite solar cells urgently requires the development of economically scalable processing techniques. Here we report a high-throughput ultrasonic spray-coating (USC) process capable of fabricating perovskite film-based solar cells on glass substrates with power conversion efficiency (PCE) as high as 13.04%. Perovskite films with high uniformity, crystallinity, and surface coverage are obtained in a single step. Moreover, we report USC processing on TiOx/ITO-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates to realize flexible perovskite solar cells with PCE as high as 8.02% that are robust under mechanical stress. In this case, an optical curing technique was used to achieve a highly-conductive TiOx layer on flexible PET substrates for the first time. The high device performance and reliability obtained by this combination of USC processing with optical curing appears very promising for roll-to-roll manufacturing of high-efficiency, flexible perovskite solar cells.

  14. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  15. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  16. Evaluating the toughness of APS and HVOF-sprayed Al2O3-ZrO2-coatings by in-situ- and macroscopic bending

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kiilakoski, J.; Mušálek, Radek; Lukáč, František; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2018), s. 1908-1918 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Thermal spray * Al2O3-ZrO2 * Toughening * Fracture * Mechanical testing Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0955221917308051

  17. Quality characteristic of spray-drying egg white powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang; Zhao, Songning; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Yiding; Liu, Jingbo; Xu, Menglei

    2013-10-01

    Spray drying is a useful method for developing egg process and utilization. The objective of this study was to evaluate effects on spray drying condition of egg white. The optimized conditions were spraying flow 22 mL/min, feeding temperature 39.8 °C and inlet-air temperature 178.2 °C. Results of sulfydryl (SH) groups measurement indicated conformation structure have changed resulting in protein molecule occur S-S crosslinking phenomenon when heating. It led to free SH content decreased during spray drying process. There was almost no change of differential scanning calorimetry between fresh egg white and spray-drying egg white powder (EWP). For a given protein, the apparent SH reactivity is in turn influenced by the physico-chemical characteristics of the reactant. The phenomenon illustrated the thermal denaturation of these proteins was unrelated to their free SH contents. Color measurement was used to study browning level. EWP in optimized conditions revealed insignificant brown stain. Swelling capacity and scanning electron micrograph both proved well quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP. Results suggested spray drying under the optimized conditions present suitable and alternative method for egg processing industrial implementation. Egg food industrialization needs new drying method to extend shelf-life. The purpose of the study was to provide optimal process of healthy and nutritional instant spray-drying EWP and study quality characteristic of spray-drying EWP.

  18. Study of the mechanical stability of superconducting cavities and stiffening of these cavities by copper coating performed with thermal spray techniques; Etudes de la stabilite mecanique des cavites supraconductrices et de la methode de rigidification par projection thermique de cuivre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassot, H

    2001-12-01

    Today's research in nuclear physics and in particle physics needs high energy or high intensity accelerators; the use of superconducting cavities constitutes a very important technological advance for the design of such facilities, allowing high accelerating gradient with few dissipation. One of the major problems is the frequency shift under Lorentz forces: since the quality factor of the superconducting cavities is much higher than the external factor depending on the beam charge, their bandwidths are very narrow (several Hertz). Even very small mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces could induce a frequency shift which exceeds the bandwidth when the accelerating gradient becomes very high. The contribution of this thesis consists at first in a numerical analysis of this problem, then in a mechanical study of a new method for stiffening superconducting cavities: a copper coating over their external surface by thermal spray techniques. As it was a new experiment, the choice of the process and the optimization of the parameters have been carried out. An important part of this thesis has been dedicated to the systematic mechanical characterizations of the copper coatings since they are indispensable for the evaluation of the stiffening efficiency, some links between copper coating properties and thermal projection parameters have been established. The mechanical calculations are a prerequisite to obtain an effective reduction of mechanical deformations under Lorentz forces: they permit to localize the maximum deformations, to find the ideal position and the optimised shape of the stiffener. The methods implemented in this thesis allow to compare the different kinds of coating design and then to propose an interesting solution. Finally, an original approach concerning the frequency shift in pulsed mode has been developed recently, allowing to interpret some experimental observations. (author)

  19. Electro Spray Method for Flexible Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0095 Electro Spray Method for Flexible Display Yukiharu Uraoka NARA INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Final Report 11/26/2016...DATES COVERED (From - To)  20 Mar 2013 to 19 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electro Spray Method for Flexible Display 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT...NUMBER FA2386-13-1-4024 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Yukiharu Uraoka 5d.  PROJECT NUMBER 5e.  TASK NUMBER 5f.   WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  20. Electrostatically atomised hydrocarbon sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yule, A.J.; Shrimpton, J.S.; Watkins, A.P.; Balachandran, W.; Hu, D. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom). Thermofluids Division, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    A burner using an electrostatic method to produce and control a fuel spray is investigated for non-burning sprays. The burner has a charge injection nozzle and the liquid flow rate and charge injection rate are varied using hydrocarbon liquids of differing viscosities, surface tensions and electrical conductivities (kerosene, white spirit and diesel oil). Droplet size distributions are measured and it is shown how the dropsize, spray pattern, breakup mechanism and breakup length depend on the above variables, and in particular on the specific charge achieved in the spray. The data are valuable for validating two computer models under development. One predicts the electric field and flow field inside the nozzle as a function of emitter potential, geometry and flow rate. The other predicts the effect of charge on spray dispersion, with a view to optimizing spray combustion. It is shown that electrostatic disruptive forces can be used to atomize oils at flow rates commensurate with practical combustion systems and that the charge injection technique is particularly suitable for highly resistive liquids. Possible limitations requiring further research include the need to control the wide spray angle, which may provide fuel-air mixtures too lean near the nozzle, and the need to design for maximum charge injection rate, which is thought to be limited by corona breakdown in the gas near the nozzle orifice. 30 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Reactor container spray device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Ryoichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable decrease in the heat and the concentration of radioactive iodine released from the reactor vessel into the reactor container in the spray device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: A plurality of water receiving trays are disposed below the spray nozzle in the dry well and communicated to a pressure suppression chamber by way of drain pipeways passing through a diaphragm floor. When the recycling system is ruptured and coolants in the reactor vessel and radioactive iodine in the reactor core are released into the dry well, spray water is discharged from the spray nozzle to eliminate the heat and the radioactive iodine in the dry well. In this case, the receiving trays collect the portions of spray water whose absorption power for the heat and radioactive iodine is nearly saturated and falls them into the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber. Consequently, other portions of the spray water that still possess absorption power can be jetted with no hindrance, to increase the efficiency for the removal of the heat and iodine of the spray droplets. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Thermal analysis simulation for a spin-motor used in the advanced main combustion chamber vacuum plasma spray project using the SINDA computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gary H.

    1990-01-01

    One of the many design challenges of this project is predicting the thermal effects due to the environment inside the vacuum chamber on the turntable and spin motor spindle assembly. The objective of the study is to model the spin motor using the computer program System Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA). By formulating the appropriate input information concerning the motor's geometry, coolant flow path, material composition, and bearing and motor winding characteristics, SINDA should predict temperatures at various predefined nodes. From these temperatures, hopefully, one can predict if the coolant flow rate is sufficient or if certain mechanical elements such as bearings, O ring seals, or motor windings will exceed maximum design temperatures.

  3. Resistencia al desgaste de recubrimientos de bronce al aluminio producidos con técnica de proyección térmica//Wear resistance of aluminum bronze coatings produced by thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayan Carolina Cárdenas-Feria

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la resistencia al desgaste adhesivo de recubrimientos de bronce al aluminio depositados con la técnica de proyección térmica por llama sobre bronce fosforado SAE 62. Los recubrimientos fueron fabricados variando las presiones parciales de los gases de combustión, oxígeno y acetileno. El material utilizado fue caracterizado estructuralmente mediante difracción de rayosX (X-ray diffraction, XRD y el estudio morfológico mediante microscopía electrónica de barrido (Scanning electron microscopy, SEM. La resistencia al desgaste adhesivo de los recubrimientos se determinó por medio del ensayo de bola sobre disco, utilizando como bola una esférica de acero 100Cr6. Los resultados obtenidos permiten establecer que los recubrimientos proyectados con una presión de oxigeno de 78 psi y una presión de acetileno de 8 psi presentan la mejor resistencia al desgaste en comparación a los tratamientos producidos. El modo de falla de desgaste en los recubrimientos producidos es discutido en esta investigación.Palabras clave: desgaste abrasivo y adhesivo,  proyección térmica,  recubrimientos.______________________________________________________________________________AbstractWe studied the adhesive wear resistance of aluminum bronze coatings deposited by thermal spray on phosphor bronze SAE 62 substrates. The coatings were deposited by varying the partial pressures of the combustion gases: oxygen and acetylene. The structural characterization was made through X-ray diffraction (XRD and the morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The adhesive wear resistance of the coatings was determined by the bole on disc test using a spherical ball made of steel 100Cr6 and with a diameter of 6 mm. The results obtained show that the coating projected with an oxygen pressure of 78 psi and an acetylene pressure of 8 psi have the better wear resistance compared with the substrate and the others treatments deposited

  4. Study of ytterbium doping effects on structural, mechanical and opto-thermal properties of sprayed ZnO thin films using the Boubaker Polynomials Expansion Scheme (BPES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amlouk, A. [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Boubaker, K., E-mail: mmbb11112000@yahoo.f [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Amlouk, M. [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouhafs, M. [Unite de Recherche MA2I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, B.P. 37 Le Belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2009-10-19

    In this work, ZnO thin films have been grown on glass substrates by using a solution of propanol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O), water (H{sub 2}O) and zinc acetate (Z{sub n}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}) in acidified medium (pH 5). The obtained films were n doped with ytterbium (Yb) at the rates of 100, 200 and 300 ppm. The structural features of the doped films were investigated using XRD, atomic force microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy techniques. XRD analysis shows a strong (0 0 2) X-ray diffraction line for increasing Yb-doping amounts. This c-axis preferential orientation of ZnO crystallites is naturally required to use this oxide as transparent conductor in optoelectronic applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis shows an enhancement in the surface roughness of the doped ZnO:Yb thin films. Optical measurements were performed in 300-1800 nm domain via transmittance T(lambda) and reflectance R(lambda) spectra. Conjoint optical and thermal properties were deduced from the optical measurements in reference to the Amlouk-Boubaker opto-thermal expansivity psi{sub AB}. Optically relevant ytterbium doping effects have been discussed. Finally, mechanical measurements have been carried out using Vickers standard disposal. The results confirmed the structural and functional changes that several recent studies attributed to ytterbium doping.

  5. Dynamics of flare sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable pass-band filters, multi-slit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronographs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occured between 1969-1974 we conclude that (i) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (ii) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumably magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the material draining back down along one or both legs of the loop. (orig.)

  6. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... 5 sprays into the air away from the face. If you have not used it for 2 ...

  7. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... your thumb. Point the applicator away from your face. If you are using the spray for the ...

  8. Flunisolide Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... your thumb. Point the applicator away from your face. If you are using the spray for the ...

  9. An experimental methodology to quantify the spray cooling event at intermittent spray impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Antonio L.N.; Carvalho, Joao; Panao, Miguel R.O.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes an experimental methodology devised to study spray cooling with multiple-intermittent sprays as those found in fuel injection systems of spark-ignition and diesel engines, or in dermatologic surgery applications. The spray characteristics and the surface thermal behaviour are measured by combining a two-component phase-Doppler anemometer with fast response surface thermocouples. The hardware allows simultaneous acquisition of Doppler and thermocouple signals which are processed in Matlab to estimate the time-varying heat flux and fluid-dynamic characteristics of the spray during impact. The time resolution of the acquisition system is limited by the data rate of validation of the phase-Doppler anemometer, but it has been shown to be accurate for the characterization of spray-cooling processes with short spurt durations for which the transient period of spray injection plays an important role. The measurements are processed in terms of the instantaneous heat fluxes, from which phase-average values of the boiling curves are obtained. Two of the characteristic parameters used in the thermal analysis of stationary spray cooling events, the critical heat flux (CHF) and Leidenfrost phenomenon, are then inferred in terms of operating conditions of the multiple-intermittent injections, such as the frequency, duration and pressure of injection. An integral method is suggested to describe the overall process of heat transfer, which accounts for the fluid-dynamic heterogeneities induced by multiple and successive droplet interactions within the area of spray impact. The method considers overall boiling curves dependant on the injection conditions and provides an empirical tool to characterize the heat transfer processes on the impact of multiple-intermittent sprays. The methodology is tested in a preliminary study of the effect of injection conditions on the heat removed by a fuel spray striking the back surface of the intake valve as in spark

  10. ROTARY SPRAY DUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Nechaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of researches of hydraulic resistance, ablation of splashes and efficiency of dedusting in the rotor spray dust collector are given. Influence of frequency of rotation of the spray, the specified speed of gas and diameter of spattering holes on hydraulic resistance, size ablation of splashes and efficiency of a dedusting the device by diameter 0,25 m is investigated. As model liquid water is used. Results of mathematical processing are presented.

  11. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  12. Thirteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Fluid/thermal processes, systems analysis and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term mission-oriented research in the Department. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are: (1) to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, for prolonging useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and for developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing with emphasis on reducing costs with improved industrial production and performance quality; and (2) to expand the store of fundamental concepts for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in the energy technologies. The meeting covered the following areas: (1) fluid mechanics 1--fundamental properties; (2) fluid mechanics 2--two phase flow; (3) thermal processes; (4) fluid mechanics 3; (5) process analysis and control; (6) fluid mechanics 4--turbulence; (7) fluid mechanics 5--chaos; (8) materials issues; and (9) plasma processes. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Corrosion performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed alumina coatings on AZ31B magnesium alloy under immersion environment

    OpenAIRE

    D. Thirumalaikumarasamy; K. Shanmugam; V. Balasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic coatings are successfully used in many industrial applications, where high wear and corrosion resistance with thermal insulation are required. The alumina powders were plasma sprayed on AZ31B magnesium alloy with three different plasma spraying parameters. In the present work, the influence of plasma spray parameters on the corrosion behavior of the coatings was investigated. The corrosion behavior of the coated samples was evaluated by immersion corrosion test in 3.5 w...

  14. Vapor generator steam drum spray heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasnacht, F.A. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of the invention provides a combination feedwater and cooldown water spray head that is centrally disposed in the lower portion of a nuclear power plant steam drum. This structure not only discharges the feedwater in the hottest part of the steam drum, but also increases the time required for the feedwater to reach the steam drum shell, thereby further increasing the feedwater temperature before it contacts the shell surface, thus reducing thermal shock to the steam drum structure

  15. Automated Plasma Spray (APS) process feasibility study: Plasma spray process development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    An automated plasma spray (APS) process was developed to apply two layer (NiCrAlY and ZrO2-12Y2O3) thermal-barrier coatings to aircraft gas turbine engine blade airfoils. The APS process hardware consists of four subsystems: a mechanical blade positioner incorporating two interlaced six-degree-of-freedom assemblies; a noncoherent optical metrology subsystem; a microprocessor-based adaptive system controller; and commercial plasma spray equipment. Over fifty JT9D first stage turbine blades specimens were coated with the APS process in preliminary checkout and evaluation studies. The best of the preliminary specimens achieved an overall coating thickness uniformity of + or - 53 micrometers, much better than is achievable manually. Factors limiting this performance were identified and process modifications were initiated accordingly. Comparative evaluations of coating thickness uniformity for manually sprayed and APS coated specimens were initiated. One of the preliminary evaluation specimens was subjected to a torch test and metallographic evaluation.

  16. Spray boom for selectively spraying a herbicidal composition onto dicots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a method and spray boom for discriminating cereal crop (monocot) and weeds (dicots). The spray boom includes means for digitally recording an image of a selected area to be treated by a nozzle on the spray boom, whereby a plant material is identified based on a segmentation proc...

  17. GO evaluation of a PWR spray system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, W.T.

    1975-08-01

    GO is a reliability analysis methodology developed over the years from 1960 to the present by Kaman Sciences Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado. In this report the GO methodology is presented and its application demonstrated by performing a reliability analysis of a conceptual PWR Containment Spray System. Certain numerical results obtained are compared with those of a prior fault tree analysis of the same system as documented in the 11 January 1973 draft report, A Fault Tree Evaluation of a PWR Spray System

  18. Metallization of Various Polymers by Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hanqing; Chu, Xin; Vo, Phuong; Yue, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Previous results have shown that metallic coatings can be successfully cold sprayed onto polymeric substrates. This paper studies the cold sprayability of various metal powders on different polymeric substrates. Five different substrates were used, including carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyethylenimine (PEI); mild steel was also used as a benchmark substrate. The CFRP used in this work has a thermosetting matrix, and the ABS, PEEK and PEI are all thermoplastic polymers, with different glass transition temperatures as well as a number of distinct mechanical properties. Three metal powders, tin, copper and iron, were cold sprayed with both a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system at various conditions. In general, cold spray on the thermoplastic polymers rendered more positive results than the thermosetting polymers, due to the local thermal softening mechanism in the thermoplastics. Thick copper coatings were successfully deposited on PEEK and PEI. Based on the results, a method is proposed to determine the feasibility and deposition window of cold spraying specific metal powder/polymeric substrate combinations.

  19. Synergistic Use of Thermal Infrared Field and Satellite Data: Eruption Detection, Monitoring and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The ASTER-based observational success of active volcanic processes early in the Terra mission later gave rise to a funded NASA program designed to both increase the number of ASTER scenes following an eruption and perform the ground-based science needed to validate that data. The urgent request protocol (URP) system for ASTER grew out of this initial study and has now operated in conjunction with and the support of the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the University of Hawaii, the USGS Land Processes DAAC, and the ASTER science team. The University of Pittsburgh oversees this rapid response/sensor-web system, which until 2011 had focused solely on the active volcanoes in the North Pacific region. Since that time, it has been expanded to operate globally with AVHRR and MODIS and now ASTER visible and thermal infrared (TIR) data are being acquired at numerous active volcanoes around the world. This program relies on the increased temporal resolution of AVHRR/MODIS midwave infrared data to trigger the next available ASTER observation, which results in ASTER data as frequently as every 2-5 days. For many new targets such as Mt. Etna, the URP has increased the observational frequency by as much 50%. Examples of these datasets will be presented, which have been used for operational response to new eruptions as well as longer-term scientific studies. These studies include emplacement of new lava flows, detection of endogenous dome growth, and interpretation of hazardous dome collapse events. As a means to validate the ASTER TIR data and capture higher-resolution images, a new ground-based sensor has recently been developed that consists of standard FLIR camera modified with wavelength filters similar to the ASTER bands. Data from this instrument have been acquired of the lava lake at Kilauea and reveal differences in emissivity between molten and cooled surfaces confirming prior laboratory results and providing important constraints on lava

  20. Atrito e desgaste de recobrimentos de PET, politeraftalato de etileno, pós-consumo processados por aspersão térmica Friction and wear of a thermal sprayed PET - poly(ethylene teraphthalate coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério A. X. Nunes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A aspersão térmica envolve processos de recobrimentos que podem utilizar materiais cerâmicos, poliméricos, metálicos ou misturas destes. O material a ser depositado é fundido total ou parcialmente. As partículas aquecidas são aceleradas e projetadas em direção a uma superfície devidamente preparada, onde se formam camadas com estrutura lamelar. Os efeitos das variáveis do processo de aspersão, pressão dos gases de combustão, taxa de alimentação e gás de arraste no transporte do material, sobre a resistência ao desgaste e atrito de filmes PET foram investigados. Os recobrimentos de PET foram caracterizados através do desgaste micro-abrasivo, utilizando o ensaio de caloteste, e da medida dos coeficientes de atrito, com o ensaio de pino-sobre-disco. Os valores do coeficiente de desgaste abrasivo e do coeficiente de atrito dos recobrimentos são comparados com os valores da garrafa PET utilizada como referência. Os coeficientes de desgaste encontrados foram similares aos valores de garrafas PET da ordem de 10-5. As análises estatísticas dos resultados deste trabalho indicam que os efeitos das interações das três variáveis, pressão dos gases de combustão, taxa de alimentação e gás de arraste foram significativos para o coeficiente de desgaste e não significativos para o coeficiente de atrito.The thermal spray technique involves coating processes that can use ceramic, polymers, metallic materials or a blend of these. The material to be deposited is melted totally or partially, where the heated particles are accelerated and projected toward a prepared surface forming layers with a lamellar structure. The effect of the spray process parameters such as, combustion pressure, feed rate and carrier gas, on the wear resistance and friction of PET films was evaluated. The PET coatings were characterized by measuring the wear coefficient through the calowear type testing and the friction coefficients using pin-on-disk testing

  1. Sprayed concrete linings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-12-01

    Sprayed concrete, or shotcrete, was invented in the 1920s for preserving dinosaur skeletons and was used underground initially in coalmines for the preservation and fine proofing of timber supports. Its use as a support lining in rock tunnelling was developed in the 1950s and 60s. The article surveys equipment available from major manufacturers and suppliers of concrete spraying equipment (Aliva, Cifa, GIA, Industri, Ingersoll Rand, etc.), specialist cement and additive manufacturers (Castle, Cement, Moria Carbotech). manufacturers of lattice girders and fibre reinforcement, and manufacturers of instrumentation for tunnel linings. 5 tabs., 9 photos.

  2. SPRAY code user's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shire, P.R.

    1977-03-01

    The SPRAY computer code has been developed to model the effects of postulated sodium spray release from LMFBR piping within containment chambers. The calculation method utilizes gas convection, heat transfer and droplet combustion theory to calculate the pressure and temperature effects within the enclosure. The applicable range is 0-21 mol percent oxygen and .02-.30 inch droplets with or without humidity. Droplet motion and large sodium surface area combine to produce rapid heat release and pressure rise within the enclosed volume

  3. The microstructural studies of suspension plasma sprayed zirconia coatings with the use of high-energy plasma torches

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sokołowski, P.; Nylen, P.; Mušálek, Radek; Łatka, L.; Kozerski, S.; Dietrich, D.; Lampke, T.; Pawłowski, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 250-261 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Water-stabilized plasma (WSP) * Gas-stabilized plasma (GSP) * Suspension injection * Columnar microstructure * Two-zones microstructure * Electron backscatter diffraction Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0257897217302645

  4. Analysis of inadvertent containment spray actuation for NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, D.; Spalj, S.; Fancev, T.

    2000-01-01

    Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) supplies borated water to the Chemical and Volume Control System, Emergency Core Cooling System and Containment Spray System. In the analyses of the containment external pressure the spray temperature is assumed to be equal to the RWST lower temperature limit. This value ensures that the design negative containment pressure will not be exceeded in the event of inadvertent actuation of the Containment Spray. For NPP Kriko the negative containment pressure has to be kept below 0.1 kp/cm2 to avoid the loss of containment integrity. This paper pursuents the analysis of Inadvertent Containment Spray Actuation in order to check the influence of change in RWST water temperature on containment negative pressure. GOTHIC computer code was used for calculation of containment thermal hydraulic behavior during this accident. (author)

  5. Development of Process for Plasma Spray:Case Study for Molybdenum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sampath, S.; Jiang, X.; Kulkarni, A.; Matějíček, Jiří; Gilmore, D. L.; Neiser, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 348, 1-2 (2003), s. 54-66 ISSN 0921-5093 Grant - others:NSF(US) DMR9632570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : process maps, plasma spray, thermal spray Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.365, year: 2003

  6. Power and Thermal Technologies for Air and Space - Scientific Research Program. Delivery Order 0020: Advanced Conductors and Thermal Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    power devices in modern aircrafts . Compared to Al2O3, when using SiO2 as buffer layer, less dense and shorter CNTs are produced under the same...generators for the recovery of high- temperature waste-heat emitted as exhaust by aircraft , automobiles and similar sources, but also to portable...legs would be subsequently backfilled with thermal insulation Aerogel . In one of our early experiments for proof-of-concept, the 2 μm thick SiO2

  7. Crack growth in thermally sprayed ceramic coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, František; Náhlík, Luboš; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2004), s. 149-168 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP106/04/P084; GA ČR GA101/03/0331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : ceramic coatings, fracture mechanics, crack extension Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  8. Evaluation of mechanical properties of Aluminum-Copper cold sprayed and alloy 625 wire arc sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashirzadeh, Milad

    This study examines microstructural-based mechanical properties of Al-Cu composite deposited by cold spraying and wire arc sprayed nickel-based alloy 625 coating using numerical modeling and experimental techniques. The microhardness and elastic modulus of samples were determined using the Knoop hardness technique. Hardness in both transverse and longitudinal directions on the sample cross-sections has been measured. An image-based finite element simulation algorithm was employed to determine the mechanical properties through an inverse analysis. In addition mechanical tests including, tensile, bending, and nano-indentation tests were performed on alloy 625 wire arc sprayed samples. Overall, results from the experimental tests are in relatively good agreement for deposited Al-Cu composites and alloy 625 coating. However, results obtained from numerical simulation are significantly higher in value than experimentally obtained results. Examination and comparison of the results are strong indications of the influence of microstructure characteristics on the mechanical properties of thermally spray deposited coatings.

  9. Plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeper, T.J.; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.; Riggs, W.L. II; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the air plasma spraying (APS) of alumina-titania powder using argon-hydrogen working gases. This powder system is being used in the fabrication of heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coatings. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, surface profilometry, image analysis, optical metallography, and x-ray diffraction. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. attempts are made to correlate the features of the coatings with the changes in operating parameters

  10. Advanced Durable Flexible Ultra Low Outgassing Thermal Control Coatings for NASA Science Missions, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I program proposes to synthesize novel nanoengineered ultra low out gassing elastomers and formulate high temperature capable flexible thermal control...

  11. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  12. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  13. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  14. Plasma sprayed thermoregulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, V.V.; Puzanov, A.A.; Zambrzhitskij, A.P.; Soboleva, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Shown is the possibility of plasma spraying application for thermoregulating coating formation. Given are test results of service properties of BeO, Al 2 O 2 plasma coatings on the substrates of the MA2-1 magnesium alloy. Described is a device for studying durability of coating optical parameters under ultraviolet irradiation in deep vacuum. Dynamics of absorption coefficient, growth caused by an increase in absorption centers amount under such irradiation is investigated

  15. Emulsions from Aerosol Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengelmolen; Vincent; Hassall

    1997-12-01

    An electrostatic emulsification apparatus has been designed for the purpose of studying diffusion from oil droplets which have a mean size in the range of approximately 1.5-3.5 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of 40-50%. The emulsification technique involves the collection of a spray of electrically charged oil droplets onto a rotating water film which is sustained from a reservoir. In this way, emulsions with volume fractions of approximately 10(-3) are produced within several minutes at oil flow rates of around 10(-2) ml min-1. Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to assess droplet size distributions for the sprays and emulsions. Results show that the mean emulsion droplet size was smaller than the mean spray droplet size by several orders of magnitude. At flow rates around 10(-2) ml min-1, the spray droplet size distribution was little affected by the applied potential between about -4.20 and -4.65 kV (mean droplet size between approximately 7.6 and 7.8 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of approximately 20%), whereas the mean droplet size of the corresponding emulsion decreased more rapidly with applied potential. Above an applied potential of approximately -4.30 kV, which corresponded to an emulsion droplet size below approximately 2 &mgr;m, the measured volume fraction of the emulsion decreased with respect to the volume fraction as calculated on the basis of total amount of injected oil. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  16. Radiolysis of spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habersbergerova, A.; Janovsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The factors were studied affecting thiosulfate radiolysis in the so-called spray solution for nuclear power plant containments. The reaction mechanism of primary radiolytic reactions leading to thiosulfate decomposition was studied using pulse radiolysis. Also measured was hydrazine loss in the irradiation of the bubbling solution intended for the capture of volatile chemical forms of radioiodine. Pulse radiolysis was used to study the kinetics of hydrazine reaction with elemental iodine. (author)

  17. Materials and Manufacturing Technology Directorate Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch (Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Molecular Mechanics for thermo-mechanical response Materials Characterization • CNT modified durable thermal interface ( DTI ) • MEMS-based RTD micro...stabilization. Surface Characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy: Probing Thermal, Electrical, and Mechanical Properties Heater Current Path Anchor Leg 50 µm

  18. The effects of a spray slurry nozzle on copper CMP for reduction in slurry consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Da Sol; Jeong, Hae Do [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Seop [Tongmyong University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The environmental impact of semiconductor manufacturing has been a big social problem, like greenhouse gas emission. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a wet process which consumes chemical slurries, seriously impacts environmental sustain ability and cost-effectiveness. This paper demonstrates the superiority of a full-cone spray slurry nozzle to the conventional tube-type slurry nozzle in Cu CMP. It was observed that the spray nozzle made a weak slurry wave at the retaining ring unlike a conventional nozzle, because the slurry was supplied uniformly in broader areas. Experiments were implemented with different slurry flow rates and spray nozzle heights. Spray nozzle performance is controlled by the spray angle and spray height. The process temperature was obtained with an infrared (IR) sensor and an IR thermal imaging camera to investigate the cooling effect of the spray. The results show that the spray nozzle provides a higher Material removal rate (MRR), lower non-uniformity (NU), and lower temperature than the conventional nozzle. Computational fluid dynamics techniques show that the turbulence kinetic energy and slurry velocity of the spray nozzle are much higher than those of the conventional nozzle. Finally, it can be summarized that the spray nozzle plays a significant role in slurry efficiency by theory of Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

  19. The effects of a spray slurry nozzle on copper CMP for reduction in slurry consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Da Sol; Jeong, Hae Do; Lee, Hyun Seop

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impact of semiconductor manufacturing has been a big social problem, like greenhouse gas emission. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a wet process which consumes chemical slurries, seriously impacts environmental sustain ability and cost-effectiveness. This paper demonstrates the superiority of a full-cone spray slurry nozzle to the conventional tube-type slurry nozzle in Cu CMP. It was observed that the spray nozzle made a weak slurry wave at the retaining ring unlike a conventional nozzle, because the slurry was supplied uniformly in broader areas. Experiments were implemented with different slurry flow rates and spray nozzle heights. Spray nozzle performance is controlled by the spray angle and spray height. The process temperature was obtained with an infrared (IR) sensor and an IR thermal imaging camera to investigate the cooling effect of the spray. The results show that the spray nozzle provides a higher Material removal rate (MRR), lower non-uniformity (NU), and lower temperature than the conventional nozzle. Computational fluid dynamics techniques show that the turbulence kinetic energy and slurry velocity of the spray nozzle are much higher than those of the conventional nozzle. Finally, it can be summarized that the spray nozzle plays a significant role in slurry efficiency by theory of Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

  20. MITEE: A Compact Ultralight Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Engine for Planetary Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J.; Maise, G.; Paniagua, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new approach for a near-term compact, ultralight nuclear thermal propulsion engine, termed MITEE (Miniature Reactor Engine) is described. MITEE enables a wide range of new and unique planetary science missions that are not possible with chemical rockets. With U-235 nuclear fuel and hydrogen propellant the baseline MITEE engine achieves a specific impulse of approximately 1000 seconds, a thrust of 28,000 newtons, and a total mass of only 140 kilograms, including reactor, controls, and turbo-pump. Using higher performance nuclear fuels like U-233, engine mass can be reduced to as little as 80 kg. Using MITEE, V additions of 20 km/s for missions to outer planets are possible compared to only 10 km/s for H2/O2 engines. The much greater V with MITEE enables much faster trips to the outer planets, e.g., two years to Jupiter, three years to Saturn, and five years to Pluto, without needing multiple planetary gravity assists. Moreover, MITEE can utilize in-situ resources to further extend mission V. One example of a very attractive, unique mission enabled by MITEE is the exploration of a possible subsurface ocean on Europa and the return of samples to Earth. Using MITEE, a spacecraft would land on Europa after a two-year trip from Earth orbit and deploy a small nuclear heated probe that would melt down through its ice sheet. The probe would then convert to a submersible and travel through the ocean collecting samples. After a few months, the probe would melt its way back up to the MITEE lander, which would have replenished its hydrogen propellant by melting and electrolyzing Europa surface ice. The spacecraft would then return to Earth. Total mission time is only five years, starting from departure from Earth orbit. Other unique missions include Neptune and Pluto orbiter, and even a Pluto sample return. MITEE uses the cermet Tungsten-UO2 fuel developed in the 1960's for the 710 reactor program. The W-UO2 fuel has demonstrated capability to operate in 3000 K hydrogen for

  1. Optimization and Characterization of High Velocity Oxy-fuel Sprayed Coatings: Techniques, Materials, and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work High Velocity Oxy-fuel (HVOF thermal spray techniques, spraying process optimization, and characterization of coatings are reviewed. Different variants of the technology are described and the main differences in spray conditions in terms of particle kinetics and thermal energy are rationalized. Methods and tools for controlling the spray process are presented as well as their use in optimizing the coating process. It will be shown how the differences from the starting powder to the final coating formation affect the coating microstructure and performance. Typical properties of HVOF sprayed coatings and coating performance is described. Also development of testing methods used for the evaluation of coating properties and current status of standardization is presented. Short discussion of typical applications is done.

  2. Reactor Containment Spray Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1968-12-15

    The design basis accident in water moderated power reactors is a loss-of-coolant accident in which water sprays are generally employed to control the containment pressure transient by condensing the released steam-air mixture. Additives to the spray have been proposed as a way to increase their usefulness by enhancing the removal of various forms of radioiodine from the containment atmosphere. A program to investigate the gas-liquid systems involved is co-ordinated by ORNL for the US Atomic Energy Commission. A basic part of the program is the search for various chemical additives that will increase the spray affinity for molecular iodine and methyl iodide. A method for evaluating additives was developed that measures equilibrium distribution coefficients for iodine between air and aqueous solutions. Additives selected are used in single drop-wind tunnel experiments where the circulating gas contains iodine or CH{sub 3}I. Mass transfer coefficients and transient distribution coefficients have been determined as a function of relative humidity, temperature, drop size, and solution pH and concentration. Tests have shown that surfactants and organic amines increase the solution ability to getter CH{sub 3}l. Results from single drop tests help in planning spray experiments in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant, a large ({approx}38 m{sup 3}) facility, where accident conditions are closely simulated. Iodine and CH{sub 3}I removal rates have been determined for a number of solutions, including 1 wt% Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH and 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH. The additive has very little effect in removal of I{sub 2} with half-lives of less than 1 mm typical for any aqueous solution. These same solutions remove CH{sub 3}I with a half-life of one hour. Analytical models for the removal processes have been developed. Consideration is also being given to corrosion, thermal and radiation stability of the solutions. Radiation studies have indicated the loss

  3. Characterization of plasma sprayed beryllium ITER first wall mockups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Material Science and Technology Div.

    1998-01-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/m{sup 2} without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface. (author)

  4. Characterization of Plasma Sprayed Beryllium ITER First Wall Mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Richard G.; Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Hollis, Kendall J.

    1997-10-01

    ITER first wall beryllium mockups, which were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying the beryllium armor, have survived 3000 thermal fatigue cycles at 1 MW/sq m without damage during high heat flux testing at the Plasma Materials Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratory in New Mexico. The thermal and mechanical properties of the plasma sprayed beryllium armor have been characterized. Results are reported on the chemical composition of the beryllium armor in the as-deposited condition, the through thickness and normal to the through thickness thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, the four-point bend flexure strength and edge-notch fracture toughness of the beryllium armor, the bond strength between the beryllium armor and the underlying heat sink material, and ultrasonic C-scans of the Be/heat sink interface

  5. Status of emergency spray modelling in the integral code ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumecocq, W.; Passalacqua, R.

    2001-01-01

    Containment spray systems are emergency systems that would be used in very low probability events which may lead to severe accidents in Light Water Reactors. In most cases, the primary function of the spray would be to remove heat and condense steam in order to reduce pressure and temperature in the containment building. Spray would also wash out fission products (aerosols and gaseous species) from the containment atmosphere. The efficiency of the spray system in the containment depressurization as well as in the removal of aerosols, during a severe accident, depends on the evolution of the spray droplet size distribution with the height in the containment, due to kinetic and thermal relaxation, gravitational agglomeration and mass transfer with the gas. A model has been developed taking into account all of these phenomena. This model has been implemented in the ASTEC code with a validation of the droplets relaxation against the CARAIDAS experiment (IPSN). Applications of this modelling to a PWR 900, during a severe accident, with special emphasis on the effect of spray on containment hydrogen distribution have been performed in multi-compartment configuration with the ASTEC V0.3 code. (author)

  6. Process development for synthesis and plasma spray deposition of LaPO4 and YPO4 for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarthy, Y.; Sreekumar, K.P.; Jayakumar, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Das, A.K.; Gantayet, L.M.; Krishnan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Rare earth phosphates are geologically very stable and considered as potential matrix material for nuclear waste disposal and also for many high temperature thermal barrier and corrosion barrier applications involving molten metals. This paper focuses on developmental studies related to synthesis, thermal stability and plasma spray deposition of LaPO 4 and YPO 4 . The rare earth phosphates were synthesized by chemical method from their respective oxide materials using ortho phosphoric acid. The as-precipitated powders were converted to thermal spray grade powder by compaction, sintering and crushing. Thermal stability of these phosphates up to their melting point was determined by arc plasma melting, followed by X-ray diffraction. Results indicate that LaPO 4 and YPO 4 melt congruently without decomposition. Plasma spray deposition was carried out using the in-house 40 kW atmospheric plasma spray system. Adherent coatings could be deposited on various substrates by optimizing the plasma spray parameters. (author)

  7. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  8. Characteristics of wetting temperature during spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Yuichi; Monde, Masanori; Hidaka, Shinichirou

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study has been done to elucidate the effects of mass flux and subcooling of liquid and thermal properties of solid on the wetting temperature during cooling of a hot block with spray. A water spray was impinged at one of the end surfaces of a cylindrical block initially heated at 400 or 500degC. The experimental condition was mass fluxes G=1-9 kg/m 2 s and degrees of subcooling ΔT sub =20, 50, 80 K. Three blocks of copper, brass and carbon steel were prepared. During spray cooling internal block temperature distribution and sputtering sound pressure level were recorded and the surface temperature and heat flux were evaluated with 2D inverse heat conducting analysis. Cooling process on cooling curves is divided into four regimes categorized by change in a flow situation and the sound level. The wetting temperature defined as the wall temperature at a minimum heat flux point was measured over an extensive experimental range. The wetting wall temperature was correlated well with the parameter of GΔT sub . The wetting wall temperature increases as GΔT sub increases and reaches a constant value depending on the material of the surface at higher region of GΔT sub . (author)

  9. Thermal neutron inelastic scattering and it's application to the material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhuqi

    1986-01-01

    A brief description of the elementary scattering theory of the interaction between the thermal neutrons and the condensed matter is given and the characteristics related to the experimental method of the thermal neutrons inelastic scattering is described. Expressions of the phonons dispersion, density of the phonon state and the self-diffusion coefficient at the some conditions are also introduced. Some examples of describing diagram of the phonon dispersion, density of the phonons state and selfdiffusion coefficient measured by different authors are given

  10. Influence of powder and spray parameters on erosion and corrosion properties of HVOF sprayed WC-Co-Cr coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berget, John

    1998-07-01

    Thermal spraying is a generic term including various processes used to deposit coatings on surfaces. The coating material is in the form of powder or a wire and is melted or softened by means of a heat source. A gas stream accelerates the material towards a prepared surface and deposits it there to form the coating. Examples of components being maintained by application of thermal spray coatings are gate valves and ball valves for the offshore industry and turbine blades in power generations installations. Recent investigation has shown that the commonly used coating material WC-Co is not corrosion resistant. But it can be improved by the addition of Cr. The main objective of this thesis is to study the influence of spray process control variables and powder characteristics on the erosion and erosion-corrosion properties of the coatings. Spray process variables investigated include energy input, powder feed rate and spray distance. Powder characteristics studied are average size of the WC particles, relative proportions of Co and Cr in the metal phase and powder grain size distribution.

  11. Spray-formed tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, K. M.; Key, J. F.

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be designed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  12. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  13. Porosity and wear resistance of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed coatings offer practical and economical solutions for corrosion and wear protection of components or tools. To improve the coating properties, heat treatment such as preheat is applied. The selection of coating and substrate materials is a key factor in improving the quality of the coating morphology after the heat treatment. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of preheat temperatures, i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C, on porosity and wear resistance of tungsten carbide (WC) coating sprayed by flame thermal coating. The powders and coatings morphology were analyzed by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDS), whereas the phase identification was performed by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD). In order to evaluate the quality of the flame spray obtained coatings, the porosity, micro-hardness and wear rate of the specimens was determined. The results showed that WC coating gives a higher surface hardness from 1391 HVN up to 1541 HVN compared to that of the non-coating. Moreover, the wear rate increased from 0.072 mm3/min. to 0.082 mm3/min. when preheat temperature was increased. Preheat on H13 steel substrate can reduce the percentage of porosity level from 10.24 % to 3.94% on the thermal spray coatings.

  14. Spray rolling aluminum alloy strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Delplanque, J.-P.; Johnson, S.B.; Lavernia, E.J.; Zhou, Y.; Lin, Y

    2004-10-10

    Spray rolling combines spray forming with twin-roll casting to process metal flat products. It consists of atomizing molten metal with a high velocity inert gas, cooling the resultant droplets in flight and directing the spray between mill rolls. In-flight convection heat transfer from atomized droplets teams with conductive cooling at the rolls to rapidly remove the alloy's latent heat. Hot deformation of the semi-solid material in the rolls results in fully consolidated, rapidly solidified product. While similar in some ways to twin-roll casting, spray rolling has the advantage of being able to process alloys with broad freezing ranges at high production rates. This paper describes the process and summarizes microstructure and tensile properties of spray-rolled 2124 and 7050 aluminum alloy strips. A Lagrangian/Eulerian poly-dispersed spray flight and deposition model is described that provides some insight into the development of the spray rolling process. This spray model follows droplets during flight toward the rolls, through impact and spreading, and includes oxide film formation and breakup when relevant.

  15. Characterization of Sodium Spray Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C. T.; Koontz, R. L.; Silberberg, M. [Atomics International, North American Rockwell Corporation, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1968-12-15

    The consequences of pool and spray fires require evaluation in the safety analysis of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Sodium spray fires are characterized by high temperature and pressure, produced during the rapid combustion of sodium in air. Following the initial energy release, some fraction of the reaction products are available as aerosols which follow the normal laws of agglomeration, growth, settling, and plating. An experimental study is underway at Atomics International to study the characteristics of high concentration sprays of liquid sodium in reduced oxygen atmospheres and in air. The experiments are conducted in a 31.5 ft{sup 3} (2 ft diam. by 10 ft high) vessel, certified for a pressure of 100 lb/in{sup 2} (gauge). The spray injection apparatus consists of a heated sodium supply pot and a spray nozzle through which liquid sodium is driven by nitrogen pressure. Spray rate and droplet size can be varied by the injection velocity (nozzle size, nitrogen pressure, and sodium temperature). Aerosols produced in 0, 4, and 10 vol. % oxygen environments have been studied. The concentration and particle size distribution of the material remaining in the air after the spray injection and reaction period are measured. Fallout rates are found to be proportional to the concentration of aerosol which remains airborne following the spray period. (author)

  16. Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor containment spray by largescale facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoki, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Kitani, S.; Naritomi, M.; Nishio, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1983-01-01

    Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment spray were carried out to investigate effectiveness of the depressurization by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute model containment (7-m diameter, 20 m high, and 708-m 3 volume) with PWR spray nozzles. The depressurization rate is influenced by the spray heat transfer efficiency and the containment wall surface heat transfer coefficient. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was investigated with respect to spray flow rate, weight ratio of steam/air, and spray height. The spray droplet heat transfer efficiency was investigated whether the overlapping of spray patterns gives effect or not. The effect was not detectable in the range of large value of steam/air, however, it was better in the range of small value of it. The experimental results were compared with the calculated results by computer code CONTEMPT-LT/022. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was almost 100% in the containment pressure, ranging from 2.5 to 0.9 kg/cm 2 X G, so that the code was useful on the prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of containment atmosphere in a PWR accident condition

  17. Strontium Zirconate TBC Sprayed by a High Feed-Rate Water-Stabilized Plasma Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctibor, P.; Nevrla, B.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.

    2017-12-01

    A novel thermal barrier coating (TBC) material, strontium zirconate SrZrO3, was sprayed by a high feed-rate water-stabilized plasma torch WSP 500. Stainless steel coupons were used as substrates. Coatings with a thickness of about 1.2 mm were produced, whereas the substrates were preheated over 450 °C. The torch worked at 150 kW power and was able to spray SrZrO3 with a high spray rate over 10 kg per hour. Microstructure and microhardness, phase composition, adhesion, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were evaluated. The coating has low thermal conductivity under 1 W/m K in the interval from room temperature up to 1200 °C. Its crystallite size is slightly over 400 nm and thermal expansion 12.3 µm K-1 in the similar temperature range.

  18. Gene Expression, Bacteria Viability and Survivability Following Spray Drying of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hunter Lauten

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We find that Mycobacterium smegmatis survives spray drying and retains cell viability in accelerated temperature stress (40 °C conditions with a success rate that increases with increasing thermal, osmotic, and nutrient-restriction stresses applied to the mycobacterium prior to spray drying. M.smegmatis that are spray dried during log growth phase, where they suffer little or no nutrient-reduction stress, survive for less than 7 days in the dry powder state at accelerated temperature stress conditions, whereas M. smegmatis that are spray dried during stationary phase, where cells do suffer nutrient reduction, survive for up to 14 days. M. smegmatis that are spray dried from stationary phase, subjected to accelerated temperature stress conditions, regrown to stationary phase, spray dried again, and resubmitted to this same process four consecutive times, display, on the fourth spray drying iteration, an approximate ten-fold increase in stability during accelerated temperature stress testing, surviving up to 105 days. Microarray tests revealed significant differences in genetic expression of M. smegmatis between log phase and stationary phase conditions, between naïve (non spray-dried and multiply cycled dried M. smegmatis (in log and stationary phase, and between M. smegmatis in the dry powder state following a single spray drying operation and after four consecutive spray drying operations. These differences, and other phenotypical differences, point to the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway as a probable pathway contributing to bacteria survival in the spray-dried state and suggests strategies for spray drying that may lead to significantly greater room-temperature stability of mycobacteria, including mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG, the current TB vaccine.

  19. Spray deposition and spray drift in orchard spraying by multiple row sprayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Zande, van de J.C.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Stallinga, H.; Velde, van P.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the latest data on spray drift in orchard spraying in the Netherlands, and measurements of surface water quality parameters show that the current legislation and measures are insufficient to protect the surface water. To meet the national and European objectives regarding surface

  20. Development & characterization of alumina coating by atmospheric plasma spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Jobin; Scaria, Abyson; Kurian, Don George

    2018-03-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on metals to prevent them from oxidation and corrosion at room as well as elevated temperatures. The service environment, mechanisms of protection, chemical and mechanical compatibility, application method, control of coating quality and ability of the coating to be repaired are the factors that need to be considered while selecting the required coating. The coatings based on oxide materials provides high degree of thermal insulation and protection against oxidation at high temperatures for the underlying substrate materials. These coatings are usually applied by the flame or plasma spraying methods. The surface cleanliness needs to be ensured before spraying. Abrasive blasting can be used to provide the required surface roughness for good adhesion between the substrate and the coating. A pre bond coat like Nickel Chromium can be applied on to the substrate material before spraying the oxide coating to avoid chances of poor adhesion between the oxide coating and the metallic substrate. Plasma spraying produces oxide coatings of greater density, higher hardness, and smooth surface finish than that of the flame spraying process Inert gas is often used for generation of plasma gas so as to avoid the oxidation of the substrate material. The work focuses to develop, characterize and optimize the parameters used in Al2O3 coating on transition stainless steel substrate material for minimizing the wear rate and maximizing the leak tightness using plasma spray process. The experiment is designed using Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. The parameters that are to be optimized are plasma voltage, spraying distance and the cooling jet pressure. The characterization techniques includes micro-hardness and porosity tests followed by Grey relational analysis of the results.

  1. NACOM - a code for sodium spray fire analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, P.M.; Kannan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), leakage of sodium can result in a spray fire. Because of higher burning rates in droplet form combustion of sodium in spray fire, thermal consequences are more severe than that in a sodium pool fire. The code NACOM was developed for the analysis of sodium spray fires in LMFBRs facilities. The code uses the validated model for estimating the falling droplet burning rates in pre-ignition and vapour phase combustion stages. It uses a distribution system to generate the droplet groups of different diameters that represent the spray. The code requires about 20 input parameters like sodium leak rates, sodium temperature, initial cell conditions like oxygen concentration, temperature and dimensions. NACOM is a validated code based on experiments with sodium inventory up to 650 kg in 0 to 21 % O 2 atmospheres. The paper brings out the salient features of the code along with the sensitivity analysis of the main input parameters like spray volume mean diameter, oxygen concentration etc. based on the results obtained. The limitations of the code and the confidence margins applicable to results obtained are also brought out

  2. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  3. A unified spray forming model for the prediction of billet shape geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a unified model for simulating the spray forming process has been developed. Models for the atomization and the deposition processes have been coupled together in order to obtain a new unified description of the spray forming process. The model is able to predict the shape...... and the temperatures of a spray-formed billet and takes into account the thermal coupling between the gas and the droplets, the change in droplet size distribution along the r-axis in the spray cone and the shading effect. The deposition describes the evolution of the preform with time. For this stage a novel 3D model......, which allows the atomizer to be placed asymmetrically over the substrate and also includes the withdrawal of the deposit, was developed. This makes it possible to model not only the growth of a Gaussian shaped preform in which case the spray axis and the rotation axis coincide, but also the surface...

  4. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: experimental study in the TOSQAN facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcheron, E.; Lemaitre, P.; Malet, J.; Nuboer, A.; Brun, P.; Bouilloux, L.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Surete des Usines, des laboratoires, des transports et des dechets, Saclay, BP 68 - 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and steam wall condensation. In order to assess the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, hydrogen distribution in the containment has to be known. The TOSQAN experimental program has been created to simulate typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work is devoted to study the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation mean in order to reduce containment pressure and to produce a mixing of air, steam and hydrogen induced by spray entrainment and condensation on droplet. In order to have a better understanding of physical phenomena, we need to make a detailed characterization of the spray and the gas. The TOSQAN facility that is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics consists in a closed cylindrical vessel (7 m{sup 3} volume, 4 m high, 1.5 m i.d.) into which steam is injected. Water droplets size is measured in the vessel by the Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing technique. Droplet velocity is obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, and droplet temperature is measured by global rainbow refractometry. Gas concentration measurements are performed by Spontaneous Raman Scattering. The walls of the vessel are thermostatically controlled by heated oil circulation. Inner spray system that is located on the top of the enclosure on the vertical axis, is composed of a single nozzle producing a full cone water spray. Spray test scenario consists of water spray injection in TOSQAN that is first pressurized with a steam injection (steam injection is stopped before spray injection). Water spray falling into the sump is removed to avoid accumulation and evaporation

  5. Physico-chemical aspects of radionuclide removal under accident conditions in nuclear power plants by means of containment-building spray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm, M.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on industrial spray solutions, their thermal and radiation stability, drop effects, and the corrosion behaviour of reactor and containment materials. From the hitherto known spray experiments it may be concluded that (1) spray solutions can be used for the effective decontamination of the containment atmosphere in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident, (2) the spray efficiency for the removal of gaseous and volatile fission products can be assessed by means of simplified model considerations, (3) further work is necessary to optimize the technology of the spray process. (author)

  6. Estudo das características de revestimentos poliméricos aplicados por aspersão térmica para proteção contra desgaste e corrosão de substratos metálicos Study of the characteristics of thermally sprayed polymer coatings for wear and corrosion protection of metallic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Camello Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Revestimentos poliméricos vêm sendo crescentemente considerados como solução na proteção de materiais metálicos contra corrosão e desgaste. A tecnologia de aspersão térmica permite a aplicação de polímeros sobre diversos materiais de substrato, em diversas espessuras, para várias condições ambientais. Polímeros depositados por este processo têm potencial, tanto para reduzir custos com materiais, como para melhorar o desempenho do revestimento em ambientes agressivos. Neste trabalho, foram aplicados revestimentos poliméricos poli-éter-éter-cetona (PEEK e Poliamida 12 sobre substratos de aço carbono, utilizando o processo de aspersão térmica a chama de baixa velocidade. Revestimentos de alta qualidade foram obtidos por esta técnica. Foram avaliadas as características dos materiais e dos revestimentos obtidos, especialmente quanto às propriedades mecânicas, de desgaste e corrosão. De acordo com os resultados obtidos, pode-se afirmar que os revestimentos estudados podem ser utilizados com sucesso em aplicações que envolvam desgaste e corrosão, com uma pequena vantagem para o polímero PEEK.Polymer coatings have been widely considered as a solution in the protection of metallic substrates against both wear and corrosion. Thermal spray technology allows the deposition of polymers onto several substrate materials for various thicknesses at several environmental conditions. Thermal sprayed polymers have high potential for material cost reduction as well as to improve coating performance in drastic environments. In this work, poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK and Polyamide 12 were flame sprayed on carbon steel substrates. High quality coatings were obtained. Several tests were carried out to evaluate the coatings mainly related to wear and corrosion performance. According to the obtained results, it can be stated that the studied coatings can be successfully used in applications involving wear and corrosion, with a slight edge

  7. Residual stress measurements of 2-phase sprayed coating layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Masayuki; Hanabusa, Takao

    1997-01-01

    In a series of the already reported single phase metal and ceramic melt sprayed films, on two phase melt sprayed films, their stress and thermal stress changes due to their bending load are tried to test. In order to prepare two phase state, austenitic stainless steel wire is used by a laser melt spraying method. In this method, CO 2 laser is used for a thermal source, and proceeding direction of its laser is selected to cross melt spraying direction. As a result, the following facts can be elucidated. The stress values at α- and γ-phase in the stainless steel film are linearly responsive to the bending load, and the stress change in α-phase is smaller than that in γ-phase. In a heat and cool cycle, α-phase shows a trend of extension with increasing temperature but γ-phase shows a trend of compression inversely. And, stress behavior at α- and γ-phases in the stainless steel film does not agree with a mixing rule in common two-phase materials. (G.K.)

  8. Modifications Of A Commercial Spray Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial spray gun modified to increase spray rate and make sprayed coats more nearly uniform. Consists of gun head and pneumatic actuator. Actuator opens valves for two chemical components, called "A" and "B," that react to produce foam. Components flow through orifices, into mixing chamber in head. Mixture then flows through control orifice to spray tip. New spray tip tapered to reduce area available for accumulation of foam and makes tip easier to clean.

  9. Metal-ceramic composite coatings obtained by new thermal spray technologies: Cold Gas Spray (CGS) and its wear resistance; Recubrimientos de materiales compuestos metal-ceramico obtenidos por nuevas tecnologias de proyeccion termica: Proyeccion fria (CGS) y su resistencia al desgaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, J. M.; Vizcaino, S.; Dosta, S.; Cinca, N.; Lorenzana, C.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, composite coatings composed by an aluminum bronze metal matrix and a hard ceramic alumina phase obtained by cold spray technique were obtained in order to increase the tribological properties of the pure bronze coatings. The different processes that occur during the coating formation (hardening of the metal particles, fragmentation of the ceramic particles, shot peening on the metal substrate, etc) are described and their effects on the coating properties are studied. Wear tests consisting on Ball-on-Disk tests, abrasion Rubber Wheel tests and erosion tests as well as microhardness and adhesion tests are carried out and the results are correlated with the ceramic phase content of the coatings. It can be concluded that the hard ceramic phase increases the tribological properties with relation of the initial bronze coating. Finally, main wear mechanisms during the tribological tests are described. (Author) 21 refs.

  10. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  11. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  12. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  13. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chong Tak; Lee, Chan Bock; Fielding, R.S.; Kennedy, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 °C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y 2 O 3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 °C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y 2 O 3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y 2 O 3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y 2 O 3 coating

  14. CFD Analysis for Assessing the Effect of Wind on the Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Anderson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The challenging range of landing sites for which the Mars Science Laboratory Rover was designed, requires a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 C and as warm as 38 C, the rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Rover Heat Rejection System (RHRS) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 C to 50 C range. The RHRS harnesses some of the waste heat generated from the rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), for use as survival heat for the rover during cold conditions. The MMRTG produces 110 W of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 W. Heat exchanger plates (hot plates) positioned close to the MMRTG pick up this survival heat from it by radiative heat transfer. Winds on Mars can be as fast as 15 m/s for extended periods. They can lead to significant heat loss from the MMRTG and the hot plates due to convective heat pick up from these surfaces. Estimation of this convective heat loss cannot be accurately and adequately achieved by simple textbook based calculations because of the very complicated flow fields around these surfaces, which are a function of wind direction and speed. Accurate calculations necessitated the employment of sophisticated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer codes. This paper describes the methodology and results of these CFD calculations. Additionally, these results are compared to simple textbook based calculations that served as benchmarks and sanity checks for them. And finally, the overall RHRS system performance predictions will be shared to show how these results affected the overall rover thermal performance.

  15. EXTASE - An Experimental Thermal Probe for Applications in Snow Research and Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeer, K.; Seiferlin, K.; Marczewski, W.; Gadomski, S.; Spohn, T.

    2002-12-01

    EXTASE is a spin-off project from the Rosetta Lander (MUPUS) thermal probe, funded by DLR. The application of this probe is to be tested in different fields, e.g. in snow research, agriculture, permafrost etc. The system consists of the probe itself with a portable field electronic and a computer for control of the system and storage of the data. The probe penetrates the surface ca. 32 cm deep and provides a temperature profile (16 sensors) and thermal conductivity profile of the penetrated layer. The main advantages of the probe in comparison to common temperature profile measurement methods are: - no need to excavate material - minimized influence of the probe on the temperature field - minimized modification of the microstructure of the studied medium. Presently we are concentrating on agriculture (soil humidity) and snow research. Further applications could be e.g.: monitoring waste deposits and the heat released by decomposition, volcanology and ground truth for remote sensing. We present the general concept of the probe and also data obtained during different field measurement campaigns with prototypes of the probe.

  16. Macro controlling of copper oxide deposition processes and spray mode by using home-made fully computerized spray pyrolysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa, Mohammed Sh.; Chiad, Bahaa T.; Shafeeq, Omer Sh.

    2017-09-01

    Thin Films of Copper Oxide (CuO) absorption layer have been deposited using home-made Fully Computerized Spray Pyrolysis Deposition system FCSPD on glass substrates, at the nozzle to substrate distance equal to 20,35 cm, and computerized spray mode (continues spray, macro-control spray). The substrate temperature has been kept at 450 °c with the optional user can enter temperature tolerance values ± 5 °C. Also that fixed molar concentration of 0.1 M, and 2D platform speed or deposition platform speed of 4mm/s. more than 1000 instruction program code, and specific design of graphical user interface GUI to fully control the deposition process and real-time monitoring and controlling the deposition temperature at every 200 ms. The changing in the temperature has been recorded during deposition processes, in addition to all deposition parameters. The films have been characterized to evaluate the thermal distribution over the X, Y movable hot plate, the structure and optical energy gap, thermal and temperature distribution exhibited a good and uniform distribution over 20 cm2 hot plate area, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement revealed that the films are polycrystalline in nature and can be assigned to monoclinic CuO structure. Optical band gap varies from 1.5-1.66 eV depending on deposition parameter.

  17. Microstructure formation and corrosion behaviour in HVOF-sprayed Inconel 625 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Harris, S.J.; McCartney, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    The nickel-based alloy Inconel 625 was thermally sprayed by two different variants of the high velocity oxy-fuel process. In this study, coatings deposited by a liquid-fuelled gun were compared with those produced by a gas-fuelled system; in general, the former generates higher particle velocities but lower particle temperatures. Investigations into the microstructural evolution of the coatings, using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, are presented along with results on their aqueous corrosion behaviour, obtained from salt spray and potentiodynamic tests. It is inferred from coating microstructures that, during spraying, powder particles generally comprised three separate zones as follows: fully melted regions; partially melted zones; and an unmelted core. However, the relative proportions formed in an individual powder particle depended on its size, trajectory through the gun, the gas dynamics (velocity/temperature) of the thermal spray gun and the type of gun employed. Cr 2 O 3 was the principal oxide phase formed during spraying and the quantity appeared to be directly related to the degree to which particles were melted. The salt spray test provides a sensitive means of determining the presence of interconnected porosity in coatings and those produced with the liquid-fuelled gun exhibited reduced interconnected porosity and increased corrosion resistance compared with deposits obtained from the gas-fuelled system. In addition, potentiodynamic tests revealed that passive current densities are 10-20 times lower in liquid-fuel coatings than in those sprayed with the gas-fuelled gun

  18. From drop impact physics to spray cooling models: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Jan; Roisman, Ilia V.; Tropea, Cameron

    2018-03-01

    Spray-wall interaction is an important process encountered in a large number of existing and emerging technologies and is the underlying phenomenon associated with spray cooling. Spray cooling is a very efficient technology, surpassing all other conventional cooling methods, especially those not involving phase change and not exploiting the latent heat of vaporization. However, the effectiveness of spray cooling is dependent on a large number of parameters, including spray characteristics like drop size, velocity and number density, the surface morphology, but also on the temperature range and thermal properties of the materials involved. Indeed, the temperature of the substrate can have significant influence on the hydrodynamics of drop and spray impact, an aspect which is seldom considered in model formulation. This process is extremely complex, thus most design rules to date are highly empirical in nature. On the other hand, significant theoretical progress has been made in recent years about the interaction of single drops with heated walls and improvements to the fundamentals of spray cooling can now be anticipated. The present review has the objective of summarizing some of these recent advances and to establish a framework for future development of more reliable and universal physics-based correlations to describe quantities involved in spray cooling.

  19. Sequential cryogen spraying for heat flux control at the skin surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majaron, Boris; Aguilar, Guillermo; Basinger, Brooke; Randeberg, Lise L.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2001-05-01

    Heat transfer rate at the skin-air interface is of critical importance for the benefits of cryogen spray cooling in combination with laser therapy of shallow subsurface skin lesions, such as port-wine stain birthmarks. With some cryogen spray devices, a layer of liquid cryogen builds up on the skin surface during the spurt, which may impair heat transfer across the skin surface due to relatively low thermal conductivity and potentially higher temperature of the liquid cryogen layer as compared to the spray droplets. While the mass flux of cryogen delivery can be adjusted by varying the atomizing nozzle geometry, this may strongly affect other spray properties, such as lateral spread (cone), droplet size, velocity, and temperature distribution. We present here first experiments with sequential cryogen spraying, which may enable accurate mass flux control through variation of spray duty cycle, while minimally affecting other spray characteristics. The observed increase of cooling rate and efficiency at moderate duty cycle levels supports the above described hypothesis of isolating liquid layer, and demonstrates a novel approach to optimization of cryogen spray devices for individual laser dermatological applications.

  20. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  1. Spray Lakes reclamation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacaruk, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    When the level of the Spray Lakes (Alberta) reservoir was lowered by four metres, 208 ha of shoreline was exposed offering little to no wildlife benefit and only limited recreation potential. A reclamation plan for 128 ha of shoreline was therefore developed. A wild life-palatable, self-sustaining vegetation cover was established. Approximately 90 ha was scarified, and/or had tree stumps removed prior to seeding, while approximately 40 ha was seeded and fertilized only. The remaining 80 ha of shoreline was not revegetated due to limited access; these areas will be allowed to re-establish naturally from the forested edge. The species were selected based on their adaptation to alkaline soils, drought tolerance, persistence in a stand and rooting characteristics, as well as palatability to wildlife. Alfalfa, white clover and fall rye were seeded. In general, all areas of the reclamation plan are successfully revegetated. Areas which were recontoured are stable and non-eroding. Success was most significant in areas which had been scarified, then seeded and trackpacked. Areas that were seeded and fertilized only were less well established at the end of the first year, but showed improvement in the second and third years. The area will be monitored to ensure the reclaimed vegetation is self-sustaining

  2. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus casei by spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rebeka Cristiane Silva; Finkler, Leandro; Finkler, Christine Lamenha Luna

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the use of spray drying to produce microparticles of Lactobacillus casei. Microorganism was cultivated in shaken flasks and the microencapsulation process was performed using a laboratory-scale spray dryer. A rotational central composite design was employed to optimise the drying conditions. High cell viability (1.1 × 10(10) CFU/g) was achieved using an inlet air temperature of 70 °C and 25% (w/v) of maltodextrin. Microparticles presented values of solubility, wettability, water activity, hygroscopicity and humidity corresponding to 97.03 ± 0.04%, 100% (in 1.16 min), 0.14 ± 0.0, 35.20 g H2O/100 g and 4.80 ± 0.43%, respectively. The microparticles were spherical with a smooth surface and thermally stable. Encapsulation improved the survival of L. casei during storage. After 60 days, the samples stored at -8 °C showed viable cell concentrations of 1.0 × 10(9) CFU/g.

  3. Vacuum-plasma-sprayed silicon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Bancke, G.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Romanoski, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying produces well-bonded dense stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this study, silicon metal was deposited on graphite to study the feasibility of preventing corrosion and oxidation of graphite components for nuclear reactors. Operating parameters were varied in a Taguchi design of experiments to display the range of the plasma processing conditions and their effect on the measured coating characteristics. The coating attributes evaluated were thickness, porosity, microhardness and phase content. This paper discusses the influence of the processing parameters on as-sprayed coating qualities. The paper also discusses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere. The diffraction spectrum for a sample that experienced a 1600degC temperature cycle indicated that more than 99% of the coating transformed to β-SiC. The silicon coatings protected the graphite substrates from oxidation in one experiment. (orig.)

  4. Molybdenum disilicide composites produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.; Bartlett, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    The intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) is being considered for high temperature structural applications because of its high melting point and superior oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. The lack of high temperature strength, creep resistance and low temperature ductility has hindered its progress for structural applications. Plasma spraying of coatings and structural components of MoSi 2 -based composites offers an exciting processing alternative to conventional powder processing methods due to superior flexibility and the ability to tailor properties. Laminate, discontinuous and in situ reinforced composites have been produced with secondary reinforcements of Ta, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 and Mo 5 Si 3 . Laminate composites, in particular, have been shown to improve the damage tolerance of MoSi 2 during high temperature melting operations. A review of research which as been performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory on plasma spraying of MoSi 2 -based composites to improve low temperature fracture toughness, thermal shock resistance, high temperature strength and creep resistance will be discussed

  5. Bioinspired hybrid materials from spray-formed ceramic templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Flynn, Katherine; Resnick, Michael; Sampath, Sanjay; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2015-05-20

    Thermally sprayed ceramics, when infiltrated with polymer, exhibit synergistic increases in strength and toughness. The structure of such composites-a dense, brick-mortar arrangement-is strikingly similar to that of nacre, as are the mechanisms underlying the robust mechanical behavior. This industrial-scale process thus presents an exciting tool for bio-mimetic exploration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Production of cocrystals in an excipient matrix by spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; Serrano, Dolores R; Worku, Zelalem Ayenew; Norris, Brid A; Healy, Anne Marie

    2018-01-30

    Spray drying is a well-established scale-up technique for the production of cocrystals. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effect of introducing a third component into the feed solution during the spray drying process has never been investigated. Cocrystal formation in the presence of a third component by a one-step spray drying process has the potential to reduce the number of unit operations which are required to produce a final pharmaceutical product (e.g. by eliminating blending with excipient). Sulfadimidine (SDM), a poorly water soluble active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), and 4-aminosalicylic acid (4ASA), a hydrophilic molecule, were used as model drug and coformer respectively to form cocrystals by spray drying in the presence of a third component (excipient). The solubility of the cocrystal in the excipient was measured using a thermal analysis approach. Trends in measured solubility were in agreement with those determined by calculated Hansen Solubility Parameter (HSP) values. The ratio of cocrystal components to excipient was altered and cocrystal formation at different weight ratios was assessed. Cocrystal integrity was preserved when the cocrystal components were immiscible with the excipient, based on the difference in Hansen Solubility Parameters (HSP). For immiscible systems (difference in HSP > 9.6 MPa 0.5 ), cocrystal formation occurred even when the proportion of excipient was high (90% w/w). When the excipient was partly miscible with the cocrystal components, cocrystal formation was observed post spray drying, but crystalline API and coformer were also recovered in the processed powder. An amorphous dispersion was formed when the excipient was miscible with the cocrystal components even when the proportion of excipient used as low (10% w/w excipient). For selected spray dried cocrystal-excipient systems an improvement in tableting characteristics was observed, relative to equivalent physical mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  7. Slurry spray distribution within a simulated laboratory scale spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    It was found that the distribution of liquid striking the sides of a simulated room temperature spray dryer was not significantly altered by the choice of nozles, nor by a variation in nozzle operating conditions. Instead, it was found to be a function of the spray dryer's configuration. A cocurrent flow of air down the drying cylinder, not possible with PNL's closed top, favorably altered the spray distribution by both decreasing the amount of liquid striking the interior of the cylinder from 72 to 26% of the feed supplied, and by shifting the zone of maximum impact from 1.0 to 1.7 feet from the nozzle. These findings led to the redesign of the laboratory scale spray dryer to be tested at the Savannah River Plant. The diameter of the drying chamber was increased from 5 to 8 inches, and a cocurrent flow of air was established with a closed recycle. Finally, this investigation suggested a drying scheme which offers all the advantages of spray drying without many of its limitations

  8. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  9. Passive design solutions to improve thermal and visual indoor environment. Case Study: University of Informatics Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    González Couret, Dania; Rodríguez García, Elizabeth; González Milián, Nataly; Llovet Salazar, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    The results of a research carried out in order to improve sustainability in the University of Informatics Sciences in Havana are presented in the paper. The initial qualitative evaluation of the three more energy consumer buildings allow to identify main problems and to select indoor spaces where temperature and relative humidity were measured. Intervention proposals were elaborated which positive impact was verified by automatized simulation of results and its comparison to the departing situation. The results of the empirical research corroborate the integral qualitative evaluation carries out. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to reduce indoor temperature by modifying the envelope without high investments, if advantage is taken from benefit of green shadow. (author)

  10. A comparative study of tribological behavior of plasma and D-gun sprayed coatings under different wear modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, G.; Rao, D.S.; Prasad, K.U.M.; Joshi, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, thermal sprayed protective coatings have gained widespread acceptance for a variety of industrial applications. A vast majority of these applications involve the use of thermal sprayed coatings to combat wear. While plasma spraying is the most versatile variant of all the thermal spray processes, the detonation gun (D-gun) coatings have been a novelty until recently because of their proprietary nature. The present study is aimed at comparing the tribological behavior of coatings deposited using the two above techniques by focusing on some popular coating materials that are widely adopted for wear resistant applications, namely, WC-12% Co, Al 2 O 3 , and Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr. To enable a comprehensive comparison of the above indicated thermal spray techniques as well as coating materials, the deposited coatings were extensively characterized employing microstructural evaluation, microhardness measurements, and XRD analysis for phase constitution. The behavior of these coatings under different wear modes was also evaluated by determining their tribological performance when subjected to solid particle erosion tests, rubber wheel sand abrasion tests, and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests. Among all the coating materials studied, D-gun sprayed WC-12% Co, in general, yields the best performance under different modes of wear, whereas plasma sprayed Al 2 O 3 shows least wear resistance to every wear mode

  11. Study on Electric field assisted low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasonic spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Ilkyeong; Seong, Baekhoon; Marten, Darmawan; Byun, Doyoung

    2015-11-01

    Ultrasonic spray is one of the fabulous techniques to discharge small size of droplets because it utilizes ultrasonic vibration on nozzle. However, spray patterns and size of ejected droplet is hardly controlled in conventional ultrasonic spray method. Therefore, here we present electric field assisted ultrasonic spray, which combined conventional technique with electric field in order to control spray pattern and droplet size precisely. Six kinds of various liquid (D.I water, Ethanol, Acetone, Iso-propanol, Toluene, Hexane) with various dielectric constants were used to investigate the mechanism of this method. Also, PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) was used and various variables were obtained including spray angle, amplitude of liquid vibration, current, and size distribution of ejected droplets. Our electric field assisted ultrasonic spray show that the standard deviation of atomized droplet was decreased up to 39.6%, and it shows the infinite possibility to be utilized in various applications which require precise control of high transfer efficiency. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2014-023284).

  12. Effects of spray parameters on the microstructure and property of Al2O3 coatings sprayed by a low power plasma torch with a novel hollow cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Changjiu; Sun Bo

    2004-01-01

    Al 2 O 3 coating is deposited using a low power plasma torch with a novel hollow cathode through axial powder injection under a plasma power up to several kilowatts. The effects of the main processing parameters including plasma arc power, operating gas flow and spray distance on particle velocity during spraying, and the microstructure and property of the coating are investigated. The microstructure of the Al 2 O 3 coating is examined using optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The property of the coating is characterized by dry rubber wheel abrasive wear test. The velocity of in-flight particle is measured using a velocity/temperature measurement system for spray particle based on thermal radiation from the particle. The dependency of the microstructure and property of the coating on spray particle conditions are examined by comparing the particle velocity, and microstructure and abrasive wear weight loss of subsequent coating deposited by low power plasma spray with those of the coating by conventional plasma spray at a power one order higher. X-ray diffraction analysis of the coating revealed that Al 2 O 3 particles during low power plasma spraying reach to sufficiently melting state prior to impact on the substrate with a velocity comparable to that in conventional plasma spraying. The experiment results have shown that processing parameters have significant influence on the particle conditions and performance of deposited Al 2 O 3 coating. The coating of comparable microstructure and properties to that deposited by conventional plasma spray can be produced under a power one order lower. From the present study, it can be suggested that a comparable coating can be produced despite plasma power level if the comparable particle velocity and molten state are achieved

  13. Amanteigamento por aspersão térmica na soldagem em operação de dutos de pequena espessura: estabilidade e penetração do arco voltaico Buttering by thermal spraying in welding in-service repair of pipes with small thickness: arc stability and penetration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilceu Novicki

    2011-09-01

    thermal spraying. The characteristics of buttering layers deposited by two thermal spraying processes (arc and conventional flame were compared, in special the influence of their degree of oxidation in dependence of the carrying gas (pressurized air or argonium on the arc stability and penetration of weld beads SMAW over plain carbon steels previously buttered with similar composition layers. The results allowed to correlate the stability of the arc to the level of oxidation of the sprayed layers. (Temperature measurements on the surface of the sprayed layers showed that, since the process of thermal spray occur in an non-stopped way until the final thickness of the coating, the superficial temperature is increased with the thickness of the deposit, what results in a higher content of oxides, which is associated to an arc instability and a greater penetration of the molten pool. X-ray diffractrogams and oxygen analysis proved the influence of this element in the changing profile of the fusion zone. As an alternative to the use of compressed air, its substitution by the inert gas argon as carrying gas was evaluated, verifying very benefic effects - significant reduction of penetration e good arc stability - believed coming from the reduction of oxidation in the sprayed layer by the protective effect of the inert gas. The evaluation of the results permitted to establish criteria of welding with lower risks of burn-through compared to a condition without buttering layers.

  14. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermal formation of corundum from aluminium hydroxides prepared from various aluminium salts · J Temuujin Ts ... Gas-chromism in ultrasonic spray pyrolyzed tungsten oxide thin films ... Current–voltage studies on -FeSi2/Si heterojunction.

  15. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: comparison of heat and mass transfer modelling with the TOSQAN spray tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.; Lemaitre, P.; Porcheron, E.; Vendel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and water steam wall condensation. In order to mitigate the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, spray systems are used in the containment. The TOSQAN programme has been created to simulate separate-effect tests representative of typical accidental thermal-hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work concerns the interaction of a water spray, used at the top of the containment in order to reduce the steam partial pressure, with air-steam mixtures. The main phenomena occurring when water spray is used are the mixing induced by spray entrainment and the condensation on droplets. In order to improve the latter phenomena, different levels of modelling can be used. The objective of this paper is to analyze experimental results obtained for water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures using different heat and mass transfer modelling. For this purpose, two modelling issues have been used: the first one is devoted for the determination of the gas thermodynamical properties, and the second one concerns the droplets characterization. In the first one, the gas thermodynamical analysis is performed using depressurization, gas temperature variation and humidity decrease during the spray injection. In this modelling, heat and mass transfer between the spray and the surrounding gas is treated in a global way by energy balance between the total amount of water and the gas. In the second one, droplets characterization is obtained by means of droplet size, temperature and velocities evolutions. In this modelling, the spray is considered as a single droplet falling with an initial velocity. Droplet interactions are neglected. Assessment of these two modelling is performed

  16. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  17. Bulletin of Materials Science | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... films deposited by spray pyrolysis method as a basis of solar thermal absorber ... and surface energy loss functions and optical conductivity were determined. ... Using the transmittance data, other optical quantities were achieved by a ...

  18. Development of a model for spray evaporation based on droplet analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Q.; Thu, K.; Bui, T.D.; Li, Y.; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, K.J.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme flash evaporation occurs when superheated liquid is sprayed into a low pressure zone. This method has high potential to improve the performance of thermally-driven desalination plants. To enable a more in-depth understanding on flash evaporation of a superheated feed water spray, a theoretical model has been developed with key considerations given to droplet motion and droplet size distribution. The model has been validated against 14 experimental data sets from literature sources to within 12% discrepancy. This model is capable of accurately predicting the water productivity and thermal efficiency of existing spray evaporator under specific operating conditions. Employing this model, the effect of several design parameters on system performance was investigated. Key results revealed that smaller droplet enabled faster evaporation process while higher initial droplet velocity promoted water productivity. Thermal utilization marginally changes with the degree of superheat, which renders a quick design calculation of the brine temperature without the need for iterations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Development of a model for spray evaporation based on droplet analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Q.

    2016-08-20

    Extreme flash evaporation occurs when superheated liquid is sprayed into a low pressure zone. This method has high potential to improve the performance of thermally-driven desalination plants. To enable a more in-depth understanding on flash evaporation of a superheated feed water spray, a theoretical model has been developed with key considerations given to droplet motion and droplet size distribution. The model has been validated against 14 experimental data sets from literature sources to within 12% discrepancy. This model is capable of accurately predicting the water productivity and thermal efficiency of existing spray evaporator under specific operating conditions. Employing this model, the effect of several design parameters on system performance was investigated. Key results revealed that smaller droplet enabled faster evaporation process while higher initial droplet velocity promoted water productivity. Thermal utilization marginally changes with the degree of superheat, which renders a quick design calculation of the brine temperature without the need for iterations. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Center for Cold Spray Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the only DoD facility capable of cold spray research and development, production, and field-repair. It features three stationary cold spray systems used for...

  1. Spray casting project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step

  2. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  3. On reactive suspension plasma spraying of calcium titanate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Mušálek, Radek; Ctibor, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2016), s. 4607-4615 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Suspensions * X-raymethods * Perovskites * Substrates * Suspension plasma spraying Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884215022646

  4. CONCHAS-SPRAY, Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloutman, L.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Description of program or function: CONCHAS-SPRAY solves the equations of transient, multicomponent, chemically reactive fluid dynamics, together with those for the dynamics of an evaporating liquid spray. The program was developed with applications to internal combustion engines in mind. The formulation is spatially two-dimensional, and encompasses both planar and axisymmetric geometries. In the latter case, the flow is permitted to swirl about the axis of symmetry. CONCHAS-SPRAY is a time-marching, finite- difference program that uses a partially implicit numerical scheme. Spatial differences are formed with respect to a generalized two- dimensional mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals whose corner locations are specified functions of time. This feature allows a Lagrangian, Eulerian, or mixed description, and is particularly useful for representing curved or moving boundary surfaces. Arbitrary numbers of species and chemical reactions are allowed. The latter are subdivided into kinetic and equilibrium reactions, which are treated by different algorithms. A turbulent law-of-the-wall boundary layer option is provided. CONCHAS-SPRAY calls a number of LANL system subroutines to display graphic or numerical information on microfiche. These routines are not included, but are described in the reference report. Several routines called from LINPACK and SLATEC1.0 are included

  5. Preparation of high critical temperature YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} superconducting coatings by thermal spray; Elaboration par projection a chaud de revetements supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique de type YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacombe, Jacques

    1991-09-20

    The objective of this research thesis is the elaboration of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} superconducting coatings by thermal spray. These coatings must have a high adherence, a high cohesion, and the best possible electrical characteristics. The author first briefly presents physical-chemical characteristics of this ceramic, and proposes a bibliographical synthesis on thick coatings prepared by thermal spray. In the next parts, he studies and describes conditions of elaboration of poly-granular coatings of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and their structural and electric characteristics [French] Des revetements epais de YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} ont ete elabores par projection a chaud sur des substrats d'acier inoxydable revetus d'une sous-couche de Ni-Cr-Al-Y. Les principales etapes du processus de fabrication sont les suivantes: - preparation de la poudre par voie humide selon un procede mis au point au C.E.R.E.M., - realisation des revetements epais par projection a chaud de cette poudre selon trois differentes techniques: projection plasma atmospherique, projection plasma sous pression reduite, projection flamme oxyacetylenique. - traitement thermique en deux etapes des revetements pour recristalliser la phase YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} et la reoxygener (traitement thermique dans un four sous oxygene). Les depots elabores selon cette voie sont adherents et homogenes a la fois en composition et en morphologie. La phase supraconductrice YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} determinee par diffraction de rayons X est bien cristallisee; elle se presente sous forme de plaquettes d'environ 10 μm de long et 1 μm d'epaisseur sans orientation preferentielle. Les revetements realises par projection plasma atmospherique presentent les meilleures caracteristiques electriques: Tc(R=0) = 90.5K; ΔTc = 1K; ρ (300 K) = 0.7 - 0.8 mΩ.cm; Jc(77 K,0 T) = 1000 A/cm{sup 2}. Les proprietes d'ecrantage magnetique ont ete comparees a celles de materiaux utilises pour le blindage magnetique

  6. Systematic Investigation on the Influence of Spray Parameters on the Mechanical Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Markus; Mauer, Georg; Mücke, Robert; Guillon, Olivier; Vaßen, Robert

    2018-04-01

    In the atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process, micro-sized ceramic powder is injected into a thermal plasma where it is rapidly heated and propelled toward the substrate. The coating formation is characterized by the subsequent impingement of a large number of more or less molten particles forming the so-called splats and eventually the coating. In this study, a systematic investigation on the influence of selected spray parameters on the coating microstructure and the coating properties was conducted. The investigation thereby comprised the coating porosity, the elastic modulus, and the residual stress evolution within the coating. The melting status of the particles at the impingement on the substrate in combination with the substrate surface condition is crucial for the coating formation. Single splats were collected on mirror-polished substrates for selected spray conditions and evaluated by identifying different types of splats (ideal, distorted, weakly bonded, and partially molten) and their relative fractions. In a previous study, these splat types were evaluated in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned coating properties. The particle melting status, which serves as a measure for the particle spreading behavior, was determined by in-flight particle temperature measurements and correlated to the coating properties. It was found that the gun power and the spray distance have a strong effect on the investigated coating properties, whereas the feed rate and the cooling show minor influence.

  7. Albendazole Microparticles Prepared by Spray Drying Technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To enhance the dissolution of albendazole (ABZ) using spray-drying technique. Method: ABZ binary mixtures with Kollicoat IR® (KL) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in various drug to polymer ratios (1: 1, 1: 2 and 1; 4) were prepared by spray-drying. The spray-dried particles were characterized for particle shape, ...

  8. 14 CFR 23.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 23.239 Section 23.239 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Handling Characteristics § 23.239 Spray characteristics. Spray may not dangerously obscure the vision of...

  9. 14 CFR 29.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 29.239 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 29.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  10. 14 CFR 27.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 27.239 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 27.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  11. A new method for spray deposit assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester M. Himel; Leland Vaughn; Raymond P. Miskus; Arthur D. Moore

    1965-01-01

    Solid fluorescent particles suspended in a spray liquid are distributed in direct proportion to the size of the spray droplets. Use of solid fluorescent particles is the basis of a new method for visual recognition of the size and number of droplets impinging on target and nontarget portions of sprayed areas.

  12. Experimental Study of Liquid Fuel Spray Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlye, Fredrik Ree

    the specific physical quantities needed in CFD validation of these types of flames. This work is a testament to that fact. The first part of this thesis is an extensive study of optical combustion diagnostics applied to complex transient sprayflames in a high temperature and pressure environment...... by the Danish Council for Strategic Research. Other supporters of the project have been MAN Diesel & Turbo A/S, DTU Mechanical Engineering, DTU Chemical Engineering, Sandia National Laboratories USA, Norwegian University of Science & Technology (NTNU) and University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus.......The physiochemical properties and electromagnetic interactions in flames, of which various optical combustion diagnostics are based, have been reviewed. Key diagnostics have been presented with practical examples of their application which, together with a comprehensive review of fuel spray flames, form...

  13. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H W; Rizoiu, I; Welch, A J

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment

  14. Hard tissue ablation with a spray-assisted mid-IR laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, H. W.; Rizoiu, I.; Welch, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the dominant mechanism(s) for dental enamel ablation with the application of water spray. A free-running Er,Cr:YSGG (yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser was used to ablate human enamel tissue at various radiant exposures. During dental ablation, distilled water was sprayed on the sample surface, and these results were compared to ablation without a spray (dry ablation). In order to identify dominant ablation mechanisms, transient acoustic waves were compared to ablation thresholds and the volume of material removed. The ablation profile and depth were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Irregular surface modification, charring and peripheral cracks were associated with dry ablation, whereas craters for spray samples were relatively clean without thermal damage. In spite of a 60% higher ablation threshold for spray associated irradiations owing to water absorption, acoustic peak pressures were six times higher and ablation volume was up to a factor of 2 larger compared to dry ablation. The enhanced pressure and ablation performance of the spray-assisted process was the result of rapid water vaporization, material ejection with recoil stress, interstitial water explosion and possibly liquid-jet formation. With water cooling and abrasive/disruptive mechanical effects, the spray ablation can be a safe and efficient modality for dental treatment.

  15. Production of Babbitt Coatings by High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, A. R. C.; Ettouil, F. B.; Moreau, C.; Savoie, S.; Schulz, R.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents HVOF as an alternative means to produce dense Babbitt coatings by thermal spray. A radial injection setup and low fuel flow rates were used to minimize heat transfer to the low melting point alloy. In-flight particle diagnostic systems were used to correlate spray parameters with the changes in particle velocity and thermal radiation intensity. The use of particles with larger diameters resulted in higher deposition efficiencies. It was shown that HVOF Babbitt coatings combine a dense structure and a fine distribution of intermetallic phases when compared to more traditional babbitting techniques.

  16. Structure and properties of plasma sprayed BaTiO(3) coatings: Spray parameters versus structure and photocatalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Ageorges, H.; Štengl, Václav; Murafa, Nataliya; Píš, I.; Zahoranová, T.; Nehasil, V.; Pala, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 7 (2011), s. 2561-2567 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Spectroscopy * Optical properties * BaTiO3 * Plasma spraying * Photocatalysis Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.751, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272884211002173

  17. Preparation of polymer-organo clay nano composites through the spray drying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, Paulo R.A.; Pessan, Luiz A.; Carvalho, Antonio J.F. de; Vidotti, Suel E.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the work was the study and preparation of polymer nano composites with montmorillonite organo clays (MMT) through the spray drying process. A new technique was proposed and tested to obtaining polymer nano composites, based on the use of the spray drying process to produce a nano composite with high clay content. The process consisted of the following stages: clay intercalation in water solution, with after addition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and a hydro soluble polyester ionomer (GEROLPS20) as exfoliation agents; spray drying the mixture obtained; incorporation powder in EVOH, PET e PP matrix. The effects of exfoliation agent on morphological and thermal properties of the nano composites were studied by XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and TGA. The results demonstrate that the process of spray drying is an innovative way to obtain a nano composite with high clay content. (author)

  18. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  19. The Properties of Arc-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on Armor-Grade Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Adamiak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of an examination of the properties of arc-sprayed aluminum on alloyed armor-grade steel. Thermal arc spraying was conducted with a EuTronic Arc Spray 4 wire arc sprayer. Aluminum wire 1.6 mm in diameter was used to produce dense, abrasion- and erosion-resistant coatings approx. 1.0 mm thick with and without nickel/5% aluminum-buffered subcoating. Aluminum coatings were characterized in accordance with ASTM G 65-00 abrasion resistance test, ASTM G 76-95 erosion resistance tests, ASTM C 633-01 adhesion strength, HV0.1 hardness tests and metallographic analyses. Results demonstrate properties of arc-sprayed aluminum and aluminum-nickel material coatings that are especially promising in industrial applications where erosion-, abrasion- and corrosion-resistant coating properties are required.

  20. Numerical investigation of micro-pore formation during substrate impact of molten droplets in spraying processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Lavernia, E.J.; Rangel, R.H.; Muehlberger, E.; Sickinger, A.

    1994-01-01

    The porosity that is commonly associated with discrete droplet processes, such as plasma spraying and spray deposition, effectively degrades the quality of the sprayed material. In the present study, micro-pore formation during the deformation and interaction of molten tungsten droplets impinging onto a flat substrate in spraying processes is numerically investigated. The numerical simulation is accomplished on the basis of the full Navier-Stokes equations and the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) function by using a 2-domain method for the thermal field and solidification problem and a two-phase flow continuum model for the flow problem with a growing solid layer. The possible mechanisms governing the formation of micro-pores are discussed. The effects of important processing parameters, such as droplet impact velocity, droplet temperature, substrate temperature, and droplet viscosity, on the micro-pore formation are addressed

  1. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  2. Spray solidification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-08-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine. Operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of high-level and mixed high- and intermediate-level liquid wastes has been demonstrated. Waste concentrations of from near infinite dilution to less than 225 liters per tonne of fuel are calcinable. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Feed concentration, composition, and flowrate can vary rapidly by over a factor of two without requiring operator action. Wastes containing mainly sodium cations can be spray calcined by addition of finely divided silica to the feedstock. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant-scale equipment. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h has been demonstrated in pilot-scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. The volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. Vibrator action maintains the calcine holdup in the calciner at less than 1 kg. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated-wall spray calciner have been demonstrated while processing high-level waste. Radionuclide volatilization was acceptably low

  3. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    market for the delivery system and ongoing development of transdermal sprays for hormone ... (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts ... patches and gels have been very popular owing ... This product was developed for ... In a safety announcement, the US Food and.

  4. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles [ZoomEssence, Inc., Hebron, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  5. Electroform/Plasma-Spray Laminates for X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Melville P.; Graham, Michael; Vaynman, Semyon

    2007-01-01

    Electroform/plasma-spray laminates have shown promise as lightweight, strong, low-thermal-expansion components for xray optics. The basic idea is to exploit both (1) the well-established art of fabrication of optical components by replication and (2) plasma spraying as a means of reinforcing a thin replica optic with one or more backing layer(s) having tailorable thermomechanical properties. In x-ray optics as in other applications, replication reduces the time and cost of fabrication because grinding and polishing can be limited to a few thick masters, from which many lightweight replicas can thereafter be made. The first step in the fabrication of a component of the type in question is to make a replica optic by electroforming a thin layer of nickel on a master. Through proper control of the electroforming process conditions, it is possible to minimize residual stress and, hence, to minimize distortion in the replica. Next, a powder comprising ceramic particles coated with a metal compatible with the electroformed nickel is plasma-sprayed onto the backside of the nickel replica. Then through several repetitions and variations of the preceding steps or perhaps a small compressive stress, alternating layers of electroformed nickel and plasma-sprayed metal-coated ceramic powder are deposited. The thicknesses of the layers and the composition of the metal-coated ceramic powder are chosen to optimize the strength, areal mass density, and toughness of the finished component. An important benefit of using both electroforming and plasma spraying is the possibility of balancing stresses to a minimum level, which could be zero or perhaps a small net compressive stress designed to enhance the function of the component in its intended application.

  6. Sustainability of Metal Structures via Spray-Clad Remanufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory M.; Sampath, Sanjay

    2018-04-01

    Structural reclamation and remanufacturing is an important future design consideration to allow sustainable recovery of degraded structural metals. Heavy machinery and infrastructure components subjected to extended use and/or environment induced degradation require costly and time-consuming replacement. If these parts can be remanufactured to original tolerances, and returned to service with "as good or better" performance, significant reductions in materials, cost, and environmental impact can be achieved. Localized additive restoration via thermal or cold spray methods is a promising approach in recovering and restoring original design strength of degraded metals. The advent of high velocity spray deposition technologies has allowed deposition of near full density materials. In this review, the fundamental scientific and technological elements of such local additive restoration is contemplated including materials, processes, and methodologies to assess the capabilities of such remanufactured systems. This points to sustainable material reclamation, as well as a route toward resource and process sustainability.

  7. Wear resistance of Fe-Nb-Cr-W, Nb, AISI 1020 and AISI 420 coatings produced by thermal spray wire arc; Resistencia al desgaste de recubrimientos Fe-Nb-Cr-W, Nb, AISI 1020 y AISI 420 producidos por proyeccion termica por arco electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Covaleda, E. A.; Mercado-Veladia, J. L.; Olaya-Florez, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The commercial materials 140MXC (with iron, tungsten, chrome, niobium), 530AS (AISI 1015 steel) and 560AS (AISI 420 steel) on AISI 4340 steel were deposited using thermal spray with arc. The aim of work was to evaluate the best strategy abrasive wear resistance of the system coating-substrate using the following combinations: (1) homogeneous coatings and (2) coatings depositing simultaneously 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS. The coatings microstructure was characterized using Optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and Laser con focal microscopy. The wear resistance was evaluated through dry sand rubber wheel test (DSRW). We found that the wear resistance depends on the quantity of defects and the mechanical properties like hardness. For example, the softer coatings have the biggest wear rates and the failure mode was characterized by plastic deformation caused by particles indentation, and the other hand the failure mode at the harder materials was grooving. The details and wear mechanism of the coatings produced are described in this investigation. (Author)

  8. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.; Cowgill, D.F.; Snead, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1--5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits

  9. A study on erosive wear behavior of HVOF sprayed nanostructured WC-CoCr coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet

    2013-01-01

    WC-CoCr cermet coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrate using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The coatings were developed with two different thermal spray powders: one has WC grains of conventional micron size and the other is composed of nanosized (near-nanostructured) grains. HVOF spraying was assisted with in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system to control the process parameters that have resulted in quality coatings. Cavitation erosion testing was performed using a vibratory test apparatus based on ASTM standard G32-98. Surface morphology of powders and coatings was examined using the FESEM images, and phase identification was performed by XRD analysis. The erosion behavior of coatings and mechanism of material removal was discussed by examining the microstructure images of worn-out surfaces. WC-CoCr cermet coating deposited with nanosized WC grains exhibited higher cavitation erosion resistance as compared to conventional coating.

  10. A study on erosive wear behavior of HVOF sprayed nanostructured WC-CoCr coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Lalit; Arora, Navneet [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee (India)

    2013-05-15

    WC-CoCr cermet coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrate using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The coatings were developed with two different thermal spray powders: one has WC grains of conventional micron size and the other is composed of nanosized (near-nanostructured) grains. HVOF spraying was assisted with in-flight particle temperature and velocity measurement system to control the process parameters that have resulted in quality coatings. Cavitation erosion testing was performed using a vibratory test apparatus based on ASTM standard G32-98. Surface morphology of powders and coatings was examined using the FESEM images, and phase identification was performed by XRD analysis. The erosion behavior of coatings and mechanism of material removal was discussed by examining the microstructure images of worn-out surfaces. WC-CoCr cermet coating deposited with nanosized WC grains exhibited higher cavitation erosion resistance as compared to conventional coating.

  11. Selected Parameters of Micro-Jet Cooling Gases in Hybrid Spraying Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczucka-Lasota B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The innovative technology, like thermal spraying with a micro-jet cooling is one of the important modification of classical ultrasonic spraying methods. Using of micro-stream with gases like argon or nitrogen allows to cool the coating immediately after spraying, and thereby reduce the time of transition during the injection of each layer. As a result of the process, the fine dispersive structure of coatings is obtained during the shorter time in comparable to the classical high velocity oxygen fuel process (HVOF. The parameter of process and the type of stream equipment determine the quality of the obtained structure and thermal stress in the coating. The article presents the relationship between selected parameters of hybrid process and properties of the coatings. The presented technology should be adapted to the actual production of protective coating for machines and construction working in wear conditions.

  12. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Hutchings, I.M.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharply reducing the erosive wear at high erodent impact angles, whilst retaining the good erosion resistance of ceramics at low angles. It is shown that the proportion of metal and ceramic at the free surface can be specified so as to optimise the erosion resistance. Experiments have also been carried out on the resistance of the coatings to debonding during four-point bending of the coated substrate. Progress is being made towards the tailoring of composition profiles in graded coatings so as to optimise the combination of erosion resistance and adhesion. (orig.)

  13. The effect of processing parameters on plasma sprayed beryllium for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.W.; Cowgill, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being investigated as a potential coating technique for applying thin (0.1-5mm) layers of beryllium on plasma facing surfaces of blanket modules in ITER and also as an in-situ repair technique for repairing eroded beryllium surfaces in high heat flux divertor regions. High density spray deposits (>98% of theoretical density) of beryllium will be required in order to maximize the thermal conductivity of the beryllium coatings. A preliminary investigation was done to determine the effect of various processing parameters (particle size, particle morphology, secondary gas additions and reduced chamber pressure) on the as-deposited density of beryllium. The deposits were made using spherical beryllium feedstock powder which was produced by centrifugal atomization at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Improvements in the as-deposited densities and deposit efficiencies of the beryllium spray deposits will be discussed along with the corresponding thermal conductivity and outgassing behavior of these deposits. (orig.)

  14. Coating Properties of WC-Ni Cold Spray Coating for the Application in Secondary Piping System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, JeongWon; Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a result of FAC(flow accelerated corrosion), severe accidents, failure of carbon steel like a Mihama Unit-3 occurred. Chemical composition change of carbon steel or coating to inner surface is one of methods to improve corrosion properties. Among them, thermal spray coating is convenient solution to apply at industry. Powder is melted at blast furnace and ejected to substrate. After adhesion, substrate and coating layer is cooled down and coated layer protects steel from corrosion finally. However high thermal energy is transferred to substrate and coating layer so it leads high thermal residual stress in coating procedure. Besides, high temperature for melting powder makes unexpected chemical reaction of powder like an oxidation or carburization. Whereas, cold spray uses low temperature comparing with other thermal spray. Thermal energy is used for not melting powder but high kinetic energy of powder and plastic deformation during collision. Therefore, fuel such as oxygen-acetylene gas is not needed. It needs carrier gas, compressed air, nitrogen or helium, to increase kinetic energy of powder and move powder to substrate. Comparing cold spray with high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF), one of thermal spray, cold spray coating layer contains only WC and Co. One of other problem about WC is brittleness during coating. To improve deformability of WC, binder metal is added. For example, Co, Cr, Ni, Cu, Al, Fe or etc. Additionally, binder metal lowering melting temperature of composite powder increases coating properties. Among them, Co which is widely used as binder metal maintains mechanical properties like a hardness and improves corrosion properties. Therefore Co is not suitable for binder metal of WC coating. In contrast, Ni has better corrosion resistance to alkaline environment and makes lower melting temperature. Moreover, in a view of cold spray, FCC structure has better deformability than BCC or HCP, and BCC has lowest deformability. WC is BCC structure so it

  15. Sprays and Cartan projective connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    Around 80 years ago, several authors (for instance H. Weyl, T.Y. Thomas, J. Douglas and J.H.C. Whitehead) studied the projective geometry of paths, using the methods of tensor calculus. The principal object of study was a spray, namely a homogeneous second-order differential equation, or more generally a projective equivalence class of sprays. At around the same time, E. Cartan studied the same topic from a different point of view, by imagining a projective space attached to a manifold, or, more generally, attached to a `manifold of elements'; the infinitesimal `glue' may be interpreted in modern language as a Cartan projective connection on a principal bundle. This paper describes the geometrical relationship between these two points of view.

  16. Microstructural features and heat flow analysis of atomized and spray-formed Al-Fe-V-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, A.K.; Ranganathan, S.; Ojha, S.N.

    1998-01-01

    Microstructural features of rapidly solidified powders and preforms of Al 80 Fe 10 V 4 Si 6 alloy produced by spray forming process have been studied. The atomization and spray deposition were carried out using a confined gas atomization process and the microstructural features were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The microstructure of a wide size range of atomized powders invariably revealed cellular and dendritic morphology. The extent of dendritic region and the dendritic arm spacing were observed to increase with power particle size. The TEM investigations indicated the presence of ultrafine second-phase particles in the intercellular or interdendritic regions. In contrast, the spray deposits of the alloy showed considerable variation in microstructure and size and dispersion of the second-phase particles at specific distances from the deposit-substrate interface and the exterior regions of the deposit. Nevertheless, considerable homogeneity was observed in the microstructure toward the center of the spray deposit. The formation and distribution of a cubic phase α-Al(Fe, V)Si has been characterized in both atomized powders and spray deposits. A one-dimensional heat flow model has been used to analyze the evolution of microstructure during atomization and also during spray deposition processing of this alloy. The results indicate that thermal history of droplets in the spray on deposition surface and their solidification behavior considerably influence the microstructural features of the spray deposits

  17. 3D-simulation of residual stresses in TBC plasma sprayed coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundas, S.; Kashko, T.; Hurevich, V.E.; Lugscheider, E.; Hayn, G. von; Ilyuschenko, A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used in gas turbine technology in order to protect against overheating of the nickel alloy turbine blades. This coatings allows to increase turbine inlet temperatures and improve their efficiency. Plasma spraying processes are widely used since several years in thermal barrier coating technology. Although the plasma spraying process of TBC's is largely successful, a fundamental understanding of the process parameters influencing the TBC microstructure and mechanical properties is necessary. But this investigation has received much less attention so they could lead to considerable advances in performance of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The main reason of this mate is difficulties in experimental investigation of high temperature and high velocity process. One of the most effective ways to accelerate the process optimization is the application of computer simulation for the modeling of plasma spraying. This enables the achievement of a maximum of information about the investigated process by carrying out a minimum number of experiments. The main problem of plasma spray TBC coatings is crack information during the deposition process and coating cooling. The reasons for this are quenched and residual stresses in the coating-substrate system, and peculiarities of TBC coating properties. The problem of deposition and solidification of plasma sprayed coatings have received little attention to date and remains one of the unintelligible parts of process. A fundamental understanding of heat transfer in the coating-substrate system and particles deformation processes are, however, critical for the prediction of the microstructural characteristics of the deposited coatings, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in formation of thermal stresses and defects (cracks, debonding etc.). (author)

  18. Spray calcination of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine; operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of all commercial fuel reprocessor high-level liquid wastes and mixed high and intermediate-level wastes have been demonstrated. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Thus waste generated during plant startup and shutdown can be blended with normal waste and calcined. Spray calcination of ILLW has also been demonstrated. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant scale equipment. The 6 mm (0.25 inch) orifice and ceramic tip offer freedom from plugging and erosion thus nozzle replacement should be required only after several months operation. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h (20 gal/h) has been demonstrated in pilot scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. Since such a small amount of radionuclides escape the calciner the volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. The noncondensable off-gas volume is also low, less than 0.5 m 3 /min (15 scfm) for a liquid feedrate of 75 l/hr (20 gal/hr). Calcine holdup in the calciner is less than 1 kg, thus the liquid feedrate is directly relatable to calcine flowrate. The calcine produced is very fine and reactive. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated wall spray calciner has been demonstrated while processing actual high-level waste. During these operations radionuclide volatilization from the calciner was acceptably low. 8 figures

  19. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  20. Residual stresses in as-sprayed and heat treated TBCs : measurements and FEM calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolloos, M.F.J.; Houben, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The first part of this paper concerns measurement of through-thickness residual stresses in TBCs by the hole-drilling method. The influences of top coat thickness and different thermal histories (furnace and burner rig) were determined. Low tensile stresses prevailed in the as-sprayed state, and low

  1. High quality ceramic coatings sprayed by high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Sheng; Xu Binshi; Yao JiuKun

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the structure of the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun and the effects of hypersonic plasma jet on the sprayed particles. The optimised spraying process parameters for several ceramic powders such as Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Cr 3 C 2 and Co-WC were listed. The properties and microstructure of the sprayed ceramic coatings were investigated. Nano Al 2 O 3 -TiO 2 ceramic coating sprayed by using the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying was also studied. Compared with the conventional air plasma spraying, high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying improves greatly the ceramic coatings quality but at low cost. (orig.)

  2. Effectiveness of containment sprays in containment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Perez, S.E.; Lehner, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    A limited study has been performed assessing the effectiveness of containment sprays-to mitigate particular challenges which may occur during a severe accident. Certain aspects of three specific topics related to using sprays under severe accident conditions were investigated. The first was the effectiveness of sprays connected to an alternate water supple and pumping source because the actual containment spray pumps are inoperable. This situation could occur during a station blackout. The second topic concerned the adverse as well as beneficial effects of using containment sprays during severe accident scenario where the containment atmosphere contains substantial quantities of hydrogen along with steam. The third topic was the feasibility of using containment sprays to moderate the consequences of DCH

  3. Multiphysics modelling of the spray forming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, J.; Grant, P.S.; Fritsching, U.; Belkessam, O.; Garmendia, I.; Landaberea, A.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated, multiphysics numerical model has been developed through the joint efforts of the University of Oxford (UK), University of Bremen (Germany) and Inasmet (Spain) to simulate the spray forming process. The integrated model consisted of four sub-models: (1) an atomization model simulating the fragmentation of a continuous liquid metal stream into droplet spray during gas atomization; (2) a droplet spray model simulating the droplet spray mass and enthalpy evolution in the gas flow field prior to deposition; (3) a droplet deposition model simulating droplet deposition, splashing and re-deposition behavior and the resulting preform shape and heat flow; and (4) a porosity model simulating the porosity distribution inside a spray formed ring preform. The model has been validated against experiments of the spray forming of large diameter IN718 Ni superalloy rings. The modelled preform shape, surface temperature and final porosity distribution showed good agreement with experimental measurements

  4. New trends in the kitchen: propellants assessment of edible food aerosol sprays used on food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; Augsburger, M

    2014-01-01

    New products available for food creations include a wide variety of "supposed" food grade aerosol sprays. However, the gas propellants used cannot be considered as safe. The different legislations available did not rule any maximum residue limits, even though these compounds have some limits when used for other food purposes. This study shows a preliminary monitoring of propane, butane and dimethyl ether residues, in cakes and chocolate after spraying, when these gases are used as propellants in food aerosol sprays. Release kinetics of propane, butane and dimethyl ether were measured over one day with sprayed food, left at room temperature or in the fridge after spraying. The alkanes and dimethyl ether analyses were performed by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/thermal conductivity detection, using monodeuterated propane and butane generated in situ as internal standards. According to the obtained results and regardingthe extrapolations of the maximum residue limits existing for these substances, different delays should be respected according to the storage conditions and the gas propellant to consume safely the sprayed food. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of Solvent Composition on the Performance of Spray-Dried Co-Amorphous Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Mishra

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ball-milling is usually used to prepare co-amorphous drug–amino acid (AA mixtures. In this study, co-amorphous drug–AA mixtures were produced using spray-drying, a scalable industrially preferred preparation method. The influence of the solvent type and solvent composition was investigated. Mixtures of indomethacin (IND and each of the three AAs arginine, histidine, and lysine were ball-milled and spray-dried at a 1:1 molar ratio, respectively. Spray-drying was performed at different solvent ratios in (a ethanol and water mixtures and (b acetone and water mixtures. Different ratios of these solvents were chosen to study the effect of solvent mixtures on co-amorphous formulation. Residual crystallinity, thermal properties, salt/partial salt formation, and powder dissolution profiles of the IND–AA mixtures were investigated and compared to pure crystalline and amorphous IND. It was found that using spray-drying as a preparation method, all IND–AA mixtures could be successfully converted into the respective co-amorphous forms, irrespective of the type of solvent used, but depending on the solvent mixture ratios. Both ball-milled and spray-dried co-amorphous samples showed an enhanced dissolution rate and maintained supersaturation compared to the crystalline and amorphous IND itself. The spray-dried samples resulting in co-amorphous samples were stable for at least seven months of storage.

  6. Mathematical modelling of heat absorption capacity of containment spray system in a 700 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kota, Sampath Bharadwaj; Ali, Seik Mansoor; Balasubramaniyan, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for estimating the heat removal by containment spray system in the post Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) environment. The procedure involves firstly, the calculation of heat removal rates by droplets of spray dispersed in the air-steam mixture by an appropriate direct contact condensation model accounting for the presence of non-condensable gas (air). Parametric influence of droplet size, ambient pressure and temperature on heat flux is brought out. It was found that the heat flux is inversely proportional to the ambient pressure and diameter. A spray module was subsequently developed and incorporated into an in-house containment thermal hydraulics code. The pressure and temperature transients in a 700 MWe PHWR containment building following a Large Break LOCA was obtained using this code. The efficacy of the spray in condensing the steam is shown by comparing the transients with and without the operation of spray system. Parametric studies are also conducted with respect to droplet size and flow rate of water droplet spray. The details of the investigation are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Experimental Studies of Spray Deposition on a Flat Surface in a Vacuum Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golliher, Eric L.; Yao, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of spacecraft components in the space environment is an on-going research effort. The electronics used in modern spacecraft are always changing and the heat flux is increasing. New, one-of-a-kind missions require new approaches to thermal control. In this research, under vacuum conditions, a pulsed water spray impinged on a small disc, while a high speed data acquisition system recorded the temperature histories of this copper disc. The water droplets froze quickly and accumulated on the disc as the spray continued. After the spray stopped, the frozen water that remained on the disc then sublimated into the vacuum environment and cooled the disc. This paper examines two important aspects of this process: 1) the difference in spray start up and shutdown in a vacuum environment versus in a standard atmospheric pressure environment, and 2) the water utilization efficiency in a vacuum environment due to the effects of drop trajectories and drop bouncing on the surface. Both phenomena play a role during spray cooling in a vacuum. This knowledge should help spacecraft designers plan for spray cooling as an option to cool spacecraft electronics, human metabolic generated heat, and heat from other sources.

  8. Cold Spray Deposition of Freestanding Inconel Samples and Comparative Analysis with Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherifard, Sara; Roscioli, Gianluca; Zuccoli, Maria Vittoria; Hadi, Mehdi; D'Elia, Gaetano; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Kondás, Ján; Guagliano, Mario

    2017-10-01

    Cold spray offers the possibility of obtaining almost zero-porosity buildups with no theoretical limit to the thickness. Moreover, cold spray can eliminate particle melting, evaporation, crystallization, grain growth, unwanted oxidation, undesirable phases and thermally induced tensile residual stresses. Such characteristics can boost its potential to be used as an additive manufacturing technique. Indeed, deposition via cold spray is recently finding its path toward fabrication of freeform components since it can address the common challenges of powder-bed additive manufacturing techniques including major size constraints, deposition rate limitations and high process temperature. Herein, we prepared nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 samples with cold spray technique and compared them with similar samples fabricated by selective laser melting method. The samples fabricated using both methods were characterized in terms of mechanical strength, microstructural and porosity characteristics, Vickers microhardness and residual stresses distribution. Different heat treatment cycles were applied to the cold-sprayed samples in order to enhance their mechanical characteristics. The obtained data confirm that cold spray technique can be used as a complementary additive manufacturing method for fabrication of high-quality freestanding components where higher deposition rate, larger final size and lower fabrication temperatures are desired.

  9. Behaviour of plasma spray coatings under disruption simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, F.; Rigon, G.; Looman, B.

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of metallic and ceramic protective coatings under disruption simulations was studied correlating the damage with their physical and structural parameters. Plasma Spray (PS) and Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) were the techniques used for the production of the coatings. W-5% Re was selected for divertor plates, and TiC, TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , low-Z ceramic materials for the first wall protection on 316 SS, Cu and Al as substrates. An electron beam gun was used to simulate the plasma disruptions. The tests were carried out from 0.6 to 6 MJ/m 2 . The thermal effects were studied by metallographic and EDXA analysis. The damage was observed comparing the degree of protection provided by each coating to discover the minimum thickness necessary to prevent the underlying material from melting. Good protective coatings must have a high melting point, great porosity and low thermal conductivity. Such coatings act as thermal barriers, increasing the surface temperature and radiating back large parts of the energy. (orig.)

  10. Improved bonding strength of bioactive cermet Cold Gas Spray coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardon, M; Concustell, A; Dosta, S; Cinca, N; Cano, I G; Guilemany, J M

    2014-12-01

    The fabrication of cermet biocompatible coatings by means Cold Gas Spray (CGS) provides prosthesis with outstanding mechanical properties and the required composition for enhancing the bioactivity of prosthetic materials. In this study, hydroxyapatite/Titanium coatings were deposited by means of CGS technology onto titanium alloy substrates with the aim of building-up well-bonded homogeneous coatings. Powders were blended in different percentages and sprayed; as long as the amount of hydroxyapatite in the feedstock increased, the quality of the coating was reduced. Besides, the relation between the particle size distribution of ceramic and metallic particles is of significant consideration. Plastic deformation of titanium particles at the impact eased the anchoring of hard hydroxyapatite particles present at the top surface of the coating, which assures the looked-for interaction with the cells. Coatings were immersed in Hank's solution for 1, 4 and 7 days; bonding strength value was above 60 MPa even after 7 days, which enhances common results of HAp coatings obtained by conventional thermal spray technologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Internal Diameter HVAF Spraying for Wear and Corrosion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyphout, C.; Björklund, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) methods are still widely utilized in the printing, automotive and off-shore industries. Alternative methods to EHC have been widely developed in the past decade by conventional HVOF processes and more recently HVAF systems, which are processing at higher kinetic energy and more particularly at lower temperature, significantly increasing wear and corrosion resistance properties. A dedicated internal diameter HVAF system is here presented, and coatings characteristics are compared to the one obtained by standard HVAF coatings. Specially R&D designed fixtures with inside bore of 200 mm have been manufactured for this purpose, with a possibility to spray samples at increasing depth up to 400 mm while simulating closed bottom bore spraying. WC-based and Cr3C2-based powder feedstock materials have been deposited onto high-strength steel substrates. Respective coating microstructures, thermally induced stresses and corrosion resistance are discussed for further optimization of coating performances. The fact that the ID-HVAF system is utilized both for spraying and gritblasting procedures is also given a particular interest.

  12. Advanced Microstructural Study of Suspension Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesak, Harry; Pawlowski, Lech; D'Haese, Romain; Laureyns, Jacky; Lampke, Thomas; Bellayer, Severine

    2010-03-01

    Fine, home-synthesized, hydroxyapatite powder was formulated with water and alcohol to obtain a suspension used to plasma spray coatings onto a titanium substrate. The deposition process was optimized using statistical design of 2 n experiments with two variables: spray distance and electric power input to plasma. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine quantitatively the phase composition of obtained deposits. Raman microscopy and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) enabled localization of the phases in different positions of the coating cross sections. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study associated with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) enabled visualization and analysis of a two-zone microstructure. One zone contained crystals of hydroxyapatite, tetracalcium phosphate, and a phase rich in calcium oxide. This zone included lamellas, usually observed in thermally sprayed coatings. The other zone contained fine hydroxyapatite grains that correspond to nanometric and submicrometric solids from the suspension that were agglomerated and sintered in the cold regions of plasma jet and on the substrate.

  13. Effects of nozzle type and spray angle on spray deposition in ivy pot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foqué, Dieter; Nuyttens, David

    2011-02-01

    Fewer plant protection products are now authorised for use in ornamental growings. Frequent spraying with the same product or a suboptimal technique can lead to resistance in pests and diseases. Better application techniques could improve the sustainable use of the plant protection products still available. Spray boom systems--instead of the still predominantly used spray guns--might improve crop protection management in greenhouses considerably. The effect of nozzle type, spray pressure and spray angle on spray deposition and coverage in ivy pot plants was studied, with a focus on crop penetration and spraying the bottom side of the leaves in this dense crop. The experiments showed a significant and important effect of collector position on deposition and coverage in the plant. Although spray deposition and coverage on the bottom side of the leaves are generally low, they could be improved 3.0-4.9-fold using the appropriate application technique. When using a spray boom in a dense crop, the nozzle choice, spray pressure and spray angle should be well considered. The hollow-cone, the air-inclusion flat-fan and the standard flat-fan nozzle with an inclined spray angle performed best because of the effect of swirling droplets, droplets with a high momentum and droplet direction respectively. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effect of spray application technique on spray deposition in greenhouse strawberries and tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekman, Pascal; Foque, Dieter; Messens, Winy; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2010-02-01

    Increasingly, Flemish greenhouse growers are using spray booms instead of spray guns to apply plant protection products. Although the advantages of spray booms are well known, growers still have many questions concerning nozzle choice and settings. Spray deposition using a vertical spray boom in tomatoes and strawberries was compared with reference spray equipment. Five different settings of nozzle type, size and pressure were tested with the spray boom. In general, the standard vertical spray boom performed better than the reference spray equipment in strawberries (spray gun) and in tomatoes (air-assisted sprayer). Nozzle type and settings significantly affected spray deposition and crop penetration. Highest overall deposits in strawberries were achieved using air-inclusion or extended-range nozzles. In tomatoes, the extended-range nozzles and the twin air-inclusion nozzles performed best. Using smaller-size extended-range nozzles above the recommended pressure range resulted in lower deposits, especially inside the crop canopy. The use of a vertical spray boom is a promising technique for applying plant protection products in a safe and efficient way in tomatoes and strawberries, and nozzle choice and setting should be carefully considered.

  15. Aerial electrostatic spray deposition and canopy penetration in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray deposition on abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces along with canopy penetration are essential for insect control and foliage defoliation in cotton production agriculture. Researchers have reported that electrostatically charged sprays have increased spray deposit onto these surfaces under widel...

  16. Experiment Study on Elastic Indicator of Thermal Shock Ceramic Materials——Implementation of Students’ Innovative Research Project of Shandong University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the quality of undergraduate education and combine theory and practice, Shandong University of science and technology organized innovative research activities project for undergraduates. Combined with the characteristics of engineering mechanics course, teachers of engineering mechanics teaching and research section guided students to take an active part in scientific research and innovation practice teaching, which has obtained a good teaching effect. This paper introduces the concrete implement process of the college students’ innovative scientific research project “Experiment Study on Elastic Indicator of Thermal Shock Ceramic Materials”, which measures elastic indicator of ceramics using the ultrasonic method. This paper studies elastic indicator change rule of the mullite ceramic samples under different factors such as temperature difference, thermal shock times and so on. Studies have shown that in the condition of air-cooling, with the increase of thermal shock temperature difference and thermal shock times, the elastic modulus value, shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio are in a falling trend. The project implementation have proved that implement undergraduate innovation research projects could effectively arouse students’ learning enthusiasm, cultivate students’ scientific research innovation and analytical abilities to solve practical scientific research problems.

  17. Comparison of Global Sizing Velocimetry and Phase Doppler Anemometry measurements of alternative jet fuel sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, Reza; Kannaiyan, Kumaran

    2013-11-01

    Atomization plays a crucial precursor role in liquid fuel combustion that directly affects the evaporation, mixing, and emission levels. Laser diagnostic techniques are often used to study the spray characteristics of liquid fuels. The objective of this work is to compare the spray measurements of Gas-to Liquid (GTL) jet fuels obtained using Global Sizing Velocimetry (GSV) and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) techniques at global and local levels, respectively. The chemical and physical properties of GTL fuels are different from conventional jet fuels, owing to the difference in their production methodology. In this work, the experimental facility, the measurement techniques, and spray characteristics of two different GTL fuels are discussed and compared with those of Jet A-1 fuel. Results clearly demonstrate that although the global measurement gives an overall picture of the spray, fine details are obtained only through local measurements and complement in gaining more inferences into the spray characteristics. The results also show a close similarity in spray characteristics between GTL and Jet A-1 fuels. Funded by Qatar Science and Technology Park.

  18. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  19. Reduction of spray pressure leads to less emission and better deposition of spray liquid at high-volume spraying in greenhouse tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Michielsen, J.M.G.P.; Corver, F.J.M.; Berg, van den J.V.; Bruins, M.A.; Porskamp, H.A.J.; Zande, van de J.C.

    2005-01-01

    In an experimental greenhouse, growing a tomato crop, it was investigated if a reduction in spray pressure could improve the spray result, while, simultaneously, emission to the ground could be reduced. Spray deposition on the leaves and the emission to the ground was evaluated at different spray

  20. Suspensions Plasma Spraying of Ceramics with Hybrid Water-Stabilized Plasma Technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mušálek, Radek; Medřický, Jan; Tesař, T.; Kotlan, Jiří; Pala, Zdeněk; Lukáč, František; Chráska, Tomáš; Curry, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, 1-2 (2017), s. 37-46 ISSN 1059-9630. [ISTC 2016: International Thermal Spray Conference. Shanghai, 10.05.2016-12.05.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-12145S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : alumina * ceramics * dense * hybrid plasma torch * suspension plasma spraying * water-stabilized plasma * yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11666-016-0493-6