WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal simulator hppts

  1. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Yang, M. S.; Bae, K. K.; Moon, I. H.; Jung, K. C.; Song, H. S.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, D. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2000-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel was measured using Laser Flash Method in the temperautre range from room temperature to 1350 deg C. Density of simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement of thermal difusivity was 10.16 g/cm 3 (94.2% of theoretical density) at room temperature and diameter and thickness were 10 mm and 1 mm, respectively. Thermal diffusivity decreased from 0.01857 cm 2 /s at room temperature to 0.00523 cm 2 /s at 1350 deg C. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO 2 and simulated spent fuel. The difference of thermal diffusivity between simulated DUPIC fule and UO 2 and simulated spent fuel was high and it decreased due to temperature increase

  2. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Yang, M. S.; Bae, K. K.; Moon, I. H.; Jung, K. C.; Song, H. S.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, D. J.; Kim, H. S

    2000-06-01

    Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel was measured using Laser Flash Method in the temperautre range from room temperature to 1350 deg C. Density of simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement of thermal difusivity was 10.16 g/cm{sup 3} (94.2% of theoretical density) at room temperature and diameter and thickness were 10 mm and 1 mm, respectively. Thermal diffusivity decreased from 0.01857 cm{sup 2}/s at room temperature to 0.00523 cm{sup 2}/s at 1350 deg C. Thermal diffusivity of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel. The difference of thermal diffusivity between simulated DUPIC fule and UO{sub 2} and simulated spent fuel was high and it decreased due to temperature increase.

  3. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  4. Quantification of Uncertainty in Thermal Building Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Haghighat, F.; Frier, Christian

    In order to quantify uncertainty in thermal building simulation stochastic modelling is applied on a building model. An application of stochastic differential equations is presented in Part 1 comprising a general heat balance for an arbitrary number of loads and zones in a building to determine...

  5. Thermal simulation and validation of 8W LED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovenko, J.; Werkhoven, R.J.; Formánek, J.; Kunen, J.M.G.; Bolt, P.J.; Kulha, P.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with thermal simulation and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) LED Lamp in order to get precise 3D thermal models for further lamp thermal optimization. Simulations are performed with ANSYS-CFX and CoventorWare software tools. The simulated thermal distribution has been

  6. Thermal simulation of the magnesium thermal of metallic uranium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, W.A.; Saliba-Silva, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Metallic uranium production is vital to fabricate fuel elements for nuclear research reactors and to produce radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Metallic uranium is got via magnesiothermal reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is carried out inside a closed graphite crucible inserted in a metallic reactor adequately sealed without any outside contact. The assembled set is gradually heated up inside a pit furnace up to reach the reaction ignition temperature (between 600-650 deg C). The optimization of the reactive system depends on the mathematical modeling using simulation by finite elements and computational calculation with specialized programs. In this way, the reactants' thermal behavior is forecast until they reach the ignition temperature. The optimization of the uranium production reaction is based on minimization of thermal losses using better the exo thermal reaction heat. As lower the thermal losses, as higher would be the heat amount to raise the temperature of reaction products. This promotes the adequate melting of uranium and slag, so allowing better metal/slag separation with higher metallic yield. This work shows how the mathematical simulation is made and supplies some preliminary results. (author)

  7. Simulation of thermally activated dislocation glide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roennpagel, D.; Mohles, V.

    1994-01-01

    Solid solution hardening was investigated by simulating the motion of a flexible dislocation in thermal equilibrium while overcoming obstacles by thermal activation. In a first approach, the waiting times before activation were analysed at several temperatures, external stresses and segment lengths. From statistical studies of such activation event, the effective attack frequency, Gibb's free enthalpy of activation and the activation volume were derived in strict analogy to the analysis of experimental data. As a second approach the average velocity of a dislocation gliding over an infinite row of equidistant obstacles was calculated by simulation. The temperature dependence of this speed significantly differs from that of the waiting times, indicating that kinetic effects must not be neglected even at high at high temperatures where dislocation motion is said to be 'overdamped'. (au)

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  9. Advanced wellbore thermal simulator GEOTEMP2 research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.F.

    1982-02-01

    The development of the GEOTEMP2 wellbore thermal simulator is described. The major technical features include a general purpose air and mist drilling simulator and a two-phase steam flow simulator that can model either injection or production.

  10. Thermal Simulations, Open Boundary Conditions and Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnier, Yannis; Florio, Adrien; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Mazur, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    SU(N) gauge theories on compact spaces have a non-trivial vacuum structure characterized by a countable set of topological sectors and their topological charge. In lattice simulations, every topological sector needs to be explored a number of times which reflects its weight in the path integral. Current lattice simulations are impeded by the so-called freezing of the topological charge problem. As the continuum is approached, energy barriers between topological sectors become well defined and the simulations get trapped in a given sector. A possible way out was introduced by Lüscher and Schaefer using open boundary condition in the time extent. However, this solution cannot be used for thermal simulations, where the time direction is required to be periodic. In this proceedings, we present results obtained using open boundary conditions in space, at non-zero temperature. With these conditions, the topological charge is not quantized and the topological barriers are lifted. A downside of this method are the strong finite-size effects introduced by the boundary conditions. We also present some exploratory results which show how these conditions could be used on an algorithmic level to reshuffle the system and generate periodic configurations with non-zero topological charge.

  11. Thermal Transport in Fullerene Derivatives Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Xiaojia; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effects of alkyl chain on the thermal properties of fullerene derivatives, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the thermal conductivity of fullerene (C60) and its derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The results of non-equilibrium MD simulations show a length-dependent thermal conductivity for C60 but not for PCBM. The thermal conductivity of C60, obtained from the linear extrapolation of inverse conductivity vs. inverse length cu...

  12. Thermal Properties of Lunar Regolith Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Ray, Chandra; Rickman, Doug; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Various high temperature chemical processes have been developed to extract oxygen and metals from lunar regolith. These processes are tested using terrestrial analogues of the regolith. But all practical terrestrial analogs contain H2O and/or OH-, the presence of which has substantial impact on important system behaviors. We have undertaken studies of lunar regolith simulants to determine the limits of the simulants to validate key components for human survivability during sustained presence on the Moon. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) yields information on phase transitions and melting temperatures. Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis provides information on evolved gas species and their evolution temperature profiles. The DTA and TGA studies included JSC-1A fine (Johnson Space Center Mare Type 1A simulant), NU-LHT-2M (National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-- United States Geological Survey (USGS)--Lunar Highlands Type 2M simulant) and its proposed feedstocks: anorthosite; dunite; high quality (HQ) glass and the norite from which HQ glass is produced. As an example, the DTA and TGA profiles for anorthosite follow. The DTA indicates exothermic transitions at 355 and 490 C and endothermic transitions at 970 and 1235 C. Below the 355 C transition, water is lost accounting for approximately 0.1 percent mass loss. Just above 490 C a second type of water is lost, presumably bound in lattices of secondary minerals along with other volatile oxides. Limited TGA-FTIR data is available at the time of this writing. For JSC-1A fine, the TGA-FTIR indicates at least two kinds of water are evolved in the 100 to 500 and the 700 to 900 C ranges. Evolution of carbon dioxide types occurs in the 250 to 545, 545 to 705, and 705 to 985 C ranges. Geologically, the results are consistent with the evolution of "water" in its several forms, CO2 from break down of secondary carbonates and magmatic, dissolved gas and glass

  13. Solar thermal simulation and applications in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Taki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a comprehensive review focusing on key strategies of energy saving technologies based on simulation of heat and mass transfer and also artificial intelligent for climate controlling is presented. Following the brief and concise assessment of existing greenhouse systems in terms of their role in total energy consumption; effective shape and structure, energy-efficient and new technologies are analyzed in detail for potential utilization in greenhouses for notable reductions in energy consumption and also go toward the sustainability. The technologies considered within the scope of this research are mainly renewable and sustainable based solutions such as photovoltaic (PV modules, solar thermal (T collectors, hybrid PV/T collectors and systems, phase change material (PCM and underground based heat storage techniques, energy-efficient heat pumps, alternative facade materials for better thermal insulation and power generation. The findings from the research clearly reveal that up to 70% energy saving can be achieved through appropriate retrofit of conventional greenhouses. Using of solar greenhouses in Europe is more popular than others. In some countries in Asia such as Iran, it is very restrict to invest on renewable projects because of cheap fossil fuels. So it is recommended beside of investments by private investors, the Iranian government should also invest in the extension of solar energy in greenhouse by setting up a specialized agency or contracting firms. Those should target the modeling and design the best shape of solar greenhouse for all agricultural areas to receive the maximum solar radiation and decrease the need of fossil fuels.

  14. Modelling and simulation of thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eborn, J.

    1998-02-01

    Mathematical modelling and simulation are important tools when dealing with engineering systems that today are becoming increasingly more complex. Integrated production and recycling of materials are trends that give rise to heterogenous systems, which are difficult to handle within one area of expertise. Model libraries are an excellent way to package engineering knowledge of systems and units to be reused by those who are not experts in modelling. Many commercial packages provide good model libraries, but they are usually domain-specific and closed. Heterogenous, multi-domain systems requires open model libraries written in general purpose modelling languages. This thesis describes a model database for thermal power plants written in the object-oriented modelling language OMOLA. The models are based on first principles. Subunits describe volumes with pressure and enthalpy dynamics and flows of heat or different media. The subunits are used to build basic units such as pumps, valves and heat exchangers which can be used to build system models. Several applications are described; a heat recovery steam generator, equipment for juice blending, steam generation in a sulphuric acid plant and a condensing steam plate heat exchanger. Model libraries for industrial use must be validated against measured data. The thesis describes how parameter estimation methods can be used for model validation. Results from a case-study on parameter optimization of a non-linear drum boiler model show how the technique can be used 32 refs, 21 figs

  15. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  16. Thermal expansion of UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Kang, Kweon; Jin Ryu, Ho; Chan Song, Kee; Seung Yang, Myung

    2002-01-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO 2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO 2 , and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO 2 . For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO 2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471x10 -6 and 10.751x10 -6 K -1 , respectively

  17. Thermal expansion study of simulated DUPIC fuel using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Bae, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.; Choi, Y. N.; Han, Y. S.; Oh, H. S.

    2001-07-01

    The lattice parameters of simulated DUPIC fuel and UO2 were measured from room temperature to 1273 K using neutron diffraction to investigate the thermal expansion and density variation with temperature. The lattice parameter of simulated DUPIC fuel is lower than that of UO2 and the linear thermal expansion of simulated DUPIC fuel is higher than that of UO2. For the temperature range from 298 to 1273 K, the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for UO2 and simulated DUPIC fuel are 10.471 ''10-6 and 10.751 ''10-6 K-1, respectively

  18. Thermal Properties of Lunar Regolith Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth; Ray, Chandra; Rickman, Doug

    2010-01-01

    Various high temperature chemical processes have been developed to extract oxygen and metals from lunar regolith. These processes are tested using terrestrial analogues of the regolith. But all practical terrestrial analogs contain H2O and/or OH-, the presence of which has substantial impact on important system behaviors. We have undertaken studies of lunar regolith simulants to determine the limits of the simulants to validate key components for human survivability during sustained presence on the moon. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) yields information on phase transitions and melting temperatures. Themo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) with mass spectrometric (MS) determination of evolved gas species yields chemical information on various oxygenated volatiles (water, carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides and phosphorus oxides) and their evolution temperature profiles. The DTA and TGAMS studies included JSC-1A fine, NU-LHT-2M and its proposed feed stocks: anorthosite; dunite; HQ (high quality) glass and the norite from which HQ glass is produced. Fig 1 is a data profile for anorthosite. The DTA (Fig 1a) indicates exothermic transitions at 355 and 490 C and endothermic transitions at 970 and 1235 C. Below the 355 C transition, water (Molecular Weight, MW, 18 in Fig 1c) is lost accounting for approximately 0.1% mass loss due to water removal (Fig 1b). Just above 490 C a second type of water is lost, presumably bound in lattices of secondary minerals. Between 490 and the 970 transition other volatile oxides are lost including those of hydrogen (third water type), carbon (MW = 44), sulfur (MW = 64 and 80), nitrogen (MW 30 and 46) and possibly phosphorus (MW = 79, 95 or 142). Peaks at MW = 35 and 19 may be attributable to loss of chlorine and fluorine respectively. Negative peaks in the NO (MW = 30) and oxygen (MW = 32) MS profiles may indicate the production of NO2 (MW = 46). Because so many compounds are volatilized in this temperature range quantification of

  19. Thermal Optical Properties of Lunar Dust Simulants and Their Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Ellis, Shaneise; Hanks, Nichole

    2011-01-01

    The total reflectance spectra of lunar simulant dusts (thermal emittance (epsilon) for the purpose of analyzing the effect of dust on the performance of thermal control surfaces. All of the simulants except one had a wavelength-dependent reflectivity (p (lambda)) near 0.10 over the wavelength range of 8 to 25 microns and so are highly emitting at room temperature and lower. The 300 K emittance (epsilon) of all the lunar simulants except one ranged from 0.78 to 0.92. The exception was Minnesota Lunar Simulant 1 (MLS-1), which has little or no glassy component. In all cases the epsilon was lower for the thermal infrared. As expected, the lunar highlands simulants were more reflective in this wavelength range than the lunar mare simulants. The integrated solar absorptance (alpha) of the simulants ranged from 0.39 to 0.75. This is lower than values reported earlier for larger particles of the same simulants (0.41 to 0.82), and for representative mare and highlands lunar soils (0.74 to 0.91). Since the of some mare simulants more closely matched that of highlands lunar soils, it is recommended that and values be the criteria for choosing a simulant for assessing the effects of dust on thermal control surfaces, rather than whether a simulant has been formulated as a highlands or a mare simulant.

  20. Haptization of molecular dynamics simulation with thermal display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Susumu; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    Thermal display, which is a type of haptic display, is effective in providing intuitive information of temperature. However, in many studies, the user has assumed a sitting position during the use of these devices. In contrast, the user generally watches 3D objects while standing and walking around in large-scale virtual reality system, In addition, in scientific visualization, the response time is very important for observing physical phenomena, especially for dynamic numerical simulation. One solution is to provide two types of thermal information: information about the rate of thermal change and information about the actual temperature. We propose a thermal display with two Peltier elements which can show above two pairs of information and the result (for example energy and temperature, as thermal information) of numerical simulation. Finally, we represent an example of visualizing and haptizing the result of molecular dynamics simulation. (author)

  1. Contact Thermal Analysis and Wear Simulation of a Brake Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nándor Békési

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes an experimental test and a coupled contact-thermal-wear analysis of a railway wheel/brake block system through the braking process. During the test, the friction, the generated heat, and the wear were evaluated. It was found that the contact between the brake block and the wheel occurs in relatively small and slowly moving hot spots, caused by the wear and the thermal effects. A coupled simulation method was developed including numerical frictional contact, transient thermal and incremental wear calculations. In the 3D simulation, the effects of the friction, the thermal expansion, the wear, and the temperature-dependent material properties were also considered. A good agreement was found between the results of the test and the calculations, both for the thermal and wear results. The proposed method is suitable for modelling the slowly oscillating wear caused by the thermal expansions in the contact area.

  2. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  3. Thermal simulation of storage in TSS-Galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lain Huerta, R.; Martinez Santiago, T.; Ramirez Oyangueren, P.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the experiment ''thermal simulation of storage in TSS-galleries'' what is been developed in salt mine of Asse, Germany. The report has 3 part: 1) Analysis of objectives and general description of boundary layers. 2) Geomechanics parameters of salt mine. 3) Thermal modelization, thermomechanics modelization and data acquisition

  4. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  5. DNA - A Thermal Energy System Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    DNA is a general energy system simulator for both steady-state and dynamic simulation. The program includes a * component model library * thermodynamic state models for fluids and solid fuels and * standard numerical solvers for differential and algebraic equation systems and is free and portable...

  6. Micromagnetic simulation of thermally activated switching in fine particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, Werner; Schrefl, Thomas; Fidler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of thermal activation are included in micromagnetic simulations by adding a random thermal field to the effective magnetic field. As a result, the Landau-Lifshitz equation is converted into a stochastic differential equation of Langevin type with multiplicative noise. The Stratonovich interpretation of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz equation leads to the correct thermal equilibrium properties. The proper generalization of Taylor expansions to stochastic calculus gives suitable time integration schemes. For a single rigid magnetic moment the thermal equilibrium properties are investigated. It is found, that the Heun scheme is a good compromise between numerical stability and computational complexity. Small cubic and spherical ferromagnetic particles are studied

  7. Computer Simulation in Problems of Thermal Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga I. Chelyapina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses informative technology of using graphical programming environment LabVIEW 2009 when calculating and predicting the thermal strength of materials with an inhomogeneous structure. Algorithm for processing the experimental data was developed as part of the problem.

  8. RADYN Simulations of Non-thermal and Thermal Models of Ellerman Bombs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jie; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2017-08-20

    Ellerman bombs (EBs) are brightenings in the H α line wings that are believed to be caused by magnetic reconnection in the lower atmosphere. To study the response and evolution of the chromospheric line profiles, we perform radiative hydrodynamic simulations of EBs using both non-thermal and thermal models. Overall, these models can generate line profiles that are similar to observations. However, in non-thermal models we find dimming in the H α line wings and continuum when the heating begins, while for the thermal models dimming occurs only in the H α line core, and with a longer lifetime. This difference in line profiles can be used to determine whether an EB is dominated by non-thermal heating or thermal heating. In our simulations, if a higher heating rate is applied, then the H α line will be unrealistically strong and there are still no clear UV burst signatures.

  9. Simulation of morphologically structured photo-thermal neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Y.; Farah, N.; Shoham, S.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Rational design of next-generation techniques for photo-thermal excitation requires the development of tools capable of modeling the effects of spatially- and temporally-dependent temperature distribution on cellular neuronal structures. Approach. We present a new computer simulation tool for predicting the effects of arbitrary spatiotemporally-structured photo-thermal stimulation on 3D, morphologically realistic neurons. The new simulation tool is based on interfacing two generic platforms, NEURON and MATLAB and is therefore suited for capturing different kinds of stimuli and neural models. Main results. Simulation results are validated using photo-absorber induced neuro-thermal stimulation (PAINTS) empirical results, and advanced features are explored. Significance. The new simulation tool could have an important role in understanding and investigating complex optical stimulation at the single-cell and network levels.

  10. Thermal Transport in Fullerene Derivatives Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Wang, Xiaojia; Kumar, Satish

    2015-08-01

    In order to study the effects of alkyl chain on the thermal properties of fullerene derivatives, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to predict the thermal conductivity of fullerene (C60) and its derivative phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The results of non-equilibrium MD simulations show a length-dependent thermal conductivity for C60 but not for PCBM. The thermal conductivity of C60, obtained from the linear extrapolation of inverse conductivity vs. inverse length curve, is 0.2  W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, while the thermal conductivity of PCBM saturates at ~0.075  W m-1 K-1 around 20 nm. The different length-dependence behavior of thermal conductivity indicates that the long-wavelength and low-frequency phonons have large contribution to the thermal conduction in C60. The decrease in thermal conductivity of fullerene derivatives can be attributed to the reduction in group velocities, the decrease of the frequency range of acoustic phonons, and the strong scattering of low-frequency phonons with the alkyl chains due to the significant mismatch of vibrational density of states in low frequency regime between buckyball and alkyl chains in PCBM.

  11. Advanced thermal energy management: A thermal test bed and heat pipe simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    Work initiated on a common-module thermal test simulation was continued, and a second project on heat pipe simulation was begun. The test bed, constructed from surplus Skylab equipment, was modeled and solved for various thermal load and flow conditions. Low thermal load caused the radiator fluid, Coolanol 25, to thicken due to its temperature avoided by using a regenerator-heat-exchanger. Other possible solutions modeled include a radiator heater and shunting heat from the central thermal bus to the radiator. Also, module air temperature can become excessive with high avionics load. A second preoject concerning advanced heat pipe concepts was initiated. A program was written which calculates fluid physical properties, liquid and vapor pressure in the evaporator and condenser, fluid flow rates, and thermal flux. The program is directed to evaluating newer heat pipe wicks and geometries, especially water in an artery surrounded by six vapor channels. Effects of temperature, groove and slot dimensions, and wick properties are reported.

  12. Numerical Simulation for Thermal Shock Resistance of Thermal Protection Materials Considering Different Operating Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the sensitivities of material properties to temperature and the complexity of service environment of thermal protection system on the spacecraft, ultrahigh-temperature ceramics (UHTCs, which are used as thermal protection materials, cannot simply consider thermal shock resistance (TSR of the material its own but need to take the external constraint conditions and the thermal environment into full account. With the thermal shock numerical simulation on hafnium diboride (HfB2, a detailed study of the effects of the different external constraints and thermal environments on the TSR of UHTCs had been made. The influences of different initial temperatures, constraint strengths, and temperature change rates on the TSR of UHTCs are discussed. This study can provide a more intuitively visual understanding of the evolution of the TSR of UHTCs during actual operation conditions.

  13. Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D

    2008-01-01

    This is the Final Report for LDRD 04-ERD-086, 'Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability'. The accomplishments are well documented in five peer-reviewed publications and six conference presentations and hence will not be detailed here. The purpose of this LDRD was to research and develop numerical algorithms for three-dimensional (3D) Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulations. LLNL has long been a world leader in the area of computational mechanics, and recently several mechanics codes have become 'multiphysics' codes with the addition of fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and chemistry. However, these multiphysics codes do not incorporate the electromagnetics that is required for a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation. There are numerous applications for an ETM simulation capability, such as explosively-driven magnetic flux compressors, electromagnetic launchers, inductive heating and mixing of metals, and MEMS. A robust ETM simulation capability will enable LLNL physicists and engineers to better support current DOE programs, and will prepare LLNL for some very exciting long-term DoD opportunities. We define a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation as a simulation that solves, in a self-consistent manner, the equations of electromagnetics (primarily statics and diffusion), heat transfer (primarily conduction), and non-linear mechanics (elastic-plastic deformation, and contact with friction). There is no existing parallel 3D code for simulating ETM systems at LLNL or elsewhere. While there are numerous magnetohydrodynamic codes, these codes are designed for astrophysics, magnetic fusion energy, laser-plasma interaction, etc. and do not attempt to accurately model electromagnetically driven solid mechanics. This project responds to the Engineering R and D Focus Areas of Simulation and Energy Manipulation, and addresses the specific problem of Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulation for design and analysis of energy manipulation systems

  14. Microscopic simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Aoki, Takayuki; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    On three-dimensional behavior, multi-phase and multi-component thermal-hydraulics co-existing complex phase change and chemical reaction seen at severe accident, and so on under complex systems such as liquid film and drop behavior in a fuel assembly, inside of reactor pressure vessel, and so on, on aiming at further precise analysis on thermal-hydraulics phenomena in a reactor, researches on simulation focusing at microscopic mechanism of the phenomena have been carried out. And, simulations on microscopic thermal-hydraulics phenomena using numerical analysis such as super fine mesh method based on continuous body dynamic procedure, particle method, lattice Boltzmann method, Automaton method, Monte Carlo method at a view point of molecular dynamics, and so on have also become to be found out. This report was summary of previous survey actions under the research special committee on the 'microscopic simulation on reactor thermal-hydraulics' of the Japanese Society of Atomic Energy started in 1996. Here were elucidated a relationship between previous applicable technologies such as macroscopic simulation focusing a motion at local mean field and microscopic simulation one as well as survey and systematization of present condition of microscopic understanding on various physical phenomena, to scope directivity and subject on future research. (G.K.)

  15. Designing solar thermal experiments based on simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huleihil, Mahmoud; Mazor, Gedalya

    2013-01-01

    In this study three different models to describe the temperature distribution inside a cylindrical solid body subjected to high solar irradiation were examined, beginning with the simpler approach, which is the single dimension lump system (time), progressing through the two-dimensional distributed system approach (time and vertical direction), and ending with the three-dimensional distributed system approach with azimuthally symmetry (time, vertical direction, and radial direction). The three models were introduced and solved analytically and numerically. The importance of the models and their solution was addressed. The simulations based on them might be considered as a powerful tool in designing experiments, as they make it possible to estimate the different effects of the parameters involved in these models

  16. Evaluation of thermal radiation simulator rectangular pulse characterization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loucks, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the thermal output of an aluminum powder/liquid oxygen Thermal Radiation Simulator (TRS) which is approximated to that of a rectangular pulse. The output varies as a function of time. The rise and fall times are not relatively abrupt. The problem is how to quantify the thermal output of the TRS into terms of rectangular pulse. Within the nuclear weapons effects community, flux, or the transient intensity of thermal radiation energy onto a surface, and fluence, the total energy irradiated on a surface over a given time, are the determining parameters for specifying or evaluating an article's survivability in the thermal environment. Four methods are used to determine the TRS output for these parameters, assuming the output to be a perfect rectangular pulse. It was essential to determine which of the four methods best quantified the thermal output average flux and fluence. The four methods were compared by a computational experiment run on a personal computer. The experiment was a simulation of five actual TRS traces irradiated onto a fictitious aluminum plate

  17. Numerical simulation of thermal fracture in functionally graded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sahil Garg

    Abstract. In the present work, element-free Galerkin method (EFGM) has been extended and implemented to simulate thermal fracture in functionally graded materials. The thermo-elastic fracture problem is decoupled into two separate parts. Initially, the temperature distribution over the domain is obtained by solving the ...

  18. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  19. Numerical simulation of thermal fracture in functionally graded ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work, element-free Galerkin method (EFGM) has been extended and implemented to simulate thermal fracture in functionally graded materials. The thermo-elastic fracture problem is decoupled into two separate parts. Initially, the temperature distribution over the domain is obtained by solving the heat transfer ...

  20. Simulation and experimental study of thermal performance of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Building concrete roof with vertical cylindrical hole of 0.5 × 0.5 m and array of 3 × 3 filled with phase change material (PCM) was considered for analysis. A detailed thermal analysis was carried by both simulation and experimental study. Results showed that this type of PCM room can decrease the indoor air temperature ...

  1. Optical and thermal simulation chain for LED package

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tapaninen, O.; Myohanen, P.; Majanen, M.; Sitomaniemi, A.; Olkkonen, J.; Hildenbrand, V.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Mackenzie, F.V.; Barink, M.; Smilauer, V.; Patzak, B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a test case for coupling two physical aspects of an LED, optical and thermal, using specific simulation models coupled through an open source platform for distributed multi-physics modelling. The glue code for coupling is written with Python programming language including

  2. SIMULATION OF THERMO-ELASTICS PROPERTIES OF THERMAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2011 ... SIMULATION OF THERMO-ELASTICS PROPERTIES OF THERMAL. BARRIER COATINGS. A. M. Ferouani*, H. I. Faraoun and H. Aourag*. Laboratoire d'Étude et Prédiction des Matériaux, Unité de Recherche Matériaux et. Energies Renouvelables, Faculté des sciences, Département de physique, ...

  3. Impact of modified soil thermal characteristic on the simulated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, the influence of soil thermal characteristics (STC) on the simulated monsoon climate over south Asia is analyzed. The study was motivated by a common warm temperature bias over the plains of northern India that has been noticed in several global and regional climate models. To address this warm ...

  4. A study on the thermal expansion characteristics of simulated spent fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kweon Ho; Ryu, H. J.; Kim, H. S.; Song, K. C.; Yang, M. S.

    2001-10-01

    Thermal expansions of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel were studied using a dilatometer in the temperature range from 298 to 1900 K. The densities of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel used in the measurement were 10.28 g/cm3 (95.35 % of TD) and 10.26 g/cm3 (95.14 % of TD), respectively. Their linear thermal expansions of simulated fuels are higher than that of UO2, and the difference between these fuels and UO2 increases progressively as temperature increases. However, the difference between simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel can hardly be observed. For the temperature range from 298 to 1900 K, the values of the average linear thermal expansion coefficients for simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel are 1.391 10-5 and 1.393 10-5 K-1, respectively. As temperature increases to 1900 K, the relative densities of simulated spent PWR fuel and simulated DUPIC fuel decrease to 93.81 and 93.76 % of initial densities at 298 K, respectively

  5. Thermal transport in semicrystalline polyethylene by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tingyu; Kim, Kyunghoon; Li, Xiaobo; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Gang; Liu, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Recent research has highlighted the potential to achieve high-thermal-conductivity polymers by aligning their molecular chains. Combined with other merits, such as low-cost, corrosion resistance, and light weight, such polymers are attractive for heat transfer applications. Due to their quasi-one-dimensional structural nature, the understanding on the thermal transport in those ultra-drawn semicrystalline polymer fibers or films is still lacking. In this paper, we built the ideal repeating units of semicrystalline polyethylene and studied their dependence of thermal conductivity on different crystallinity and interlamellar topology using the molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the conventional models, such as the Choy-Young's model, the series model, and Takayanagi's model, cannot accurately predict the thermal conductivity of the quasi-one-dimensional semicrystalline polyethylene. A modified Takayanagi's model was proposed to explain the dependence of thermal conductivity on the bridge number at intermediate and high crystallinity. We also analyzed the heat transfer pathways and demonstrated the substantial role of interlamellar bridges in the thermal transport in the semicrystalline polyethylene. Our work could contribute to the understanding of the structure-property relationship in semicrystalline polymers and shed some light on the development of plastic heat sinks and thermal management in flexible electronics.

  6. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2009-07-15

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  7. GOTHIC code simulation of thermal stratification in POOLEX facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Kudinov, P.

    2009-07-01

    Pressure suppression pool is an important element of BWR containment. It serves as a heat sink and steam condenser to prevent containment pressure buildup during loss of coolant accident or safety relief valve opening during normal operations of a BWR. Insufficient mixing in the pool, in case of low mass flow rate of steam, can cause development of thermal stratification and reduction of pressure suppression pool capacity. For reliable prediction of mixing and stratification phenomena validation of simulation tools has to be performed. Data produced in POOLEX/PPOOLEX facility at Lappeenranta University of Technology about development of thermal stratification in a large scale model of a pressure suppression pool is used for GOTHIC lumped and distributed parameter validation. Sensitivity of GOTHIC solution to different boundary conditions and grid convergence study for 2D simulations of POOLEX STB-20 experiment are performed in the present study. CFD simulation was carried out with FLUENT code in order to get additional insights into physics of stratification phenomena. In order to support development of experimental procedures for new tests in the PPOOLEX facility lumped parameter pre-test GOTHIC simulations were performed. Simulations show that drywell and wetwell pressures can be kept within safety margins during a long transient necessary for development of thermal stratification. (au)

  8. Engineering-Based Thermal CFD Simulations on Massive Parallel Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Frisch, Jérôme

    2015-05-22

    The development of parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is a challenging task that entails efficient parallelization concepts and strategies in order to achieve good scalability values when running those codes on modern supercomputers with several thousands to millions of cores. In this paper, we present a hierarchical data structure for massive parallel computations that supports the coupling of a Navier–Stokes-based fluid flow code with the Boussinesq approximation in order to address complex thermal scenarios for energy-related assessments. The newly designed data structure is specifically designed with the idea of interactive data exploration and visualization during runtime of the simulation code; a major shortcoming of traditional high-performance computing (HPC) simulation codes. We further show and discuss speed-up values obtained on one of Germany’s top-ranked supercomputers with up to 140,000 processes and present simulation results for different engineering-based thermal problems.

  9. Thermal Fluctuations in Smooth Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of mesoscopic thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Yang, Jun

    2013-11-01

    The SDPD-DV is implemented in our work for arbitrary 3D wall bounded geometries. The particle position and momentum equations are integrated with a velocity-Verlet algorithm and the entropy equation is integrated with a Runge-Kutta algorithm. Simulations of nitrogen gas are performed to evaluate the effects of timestep and particle scale on temperature, self-diffusion coefficient and shear viscosity. The hydrodynamic fluctuations in temperature, density, pressure and velocity from the SDPD-DV simulations are evaluated and compared with theoretical predictions. Steady planar thermal Couette flows are simulated and compared with analytical solutions. Simulations cover the hydrodynamic and mesocopic regime and show thermal fluctuations and their dependence on particle size.

  10. Design and simulation of a new energy conscious system, (ventilation and thermal performance simulation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadi, Mohamed B. [Nottingham Univ., School of the Built Environment, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents the results of simulating the ventilation and thermal performance of a new passive cooling and heating system. The new systems was integrated into the roof of a typical contemporary North African house, which was modelled and mounted inside a wind tunnel, for natural ventilation simulation. Thermal performance of the new systems was simulated using a new computer programme (BTS), developed by the author. Results are presented in terms of indoor temperature and CATD and HATD, which are newly introduced concepts in defining the building cooling and heating loads. (Author)

  11. Advances in Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management and Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing demands for vehicle dynamic performance, economy, safety and comfort, and with ever stricter laws concerning energy conservation and emissions, vehicle power systems are becoming much more complex. To pursue high efficiency and light weight in automobile design, the power system and its vehicle integrated thermal management (VITM system have attracted widespread attention as the major components of modern vehicle technology. Regarding the internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV, its integrated thermal management (ITM mainly contains internal combustion engine (ICE cooling, turbo-charged cooling, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR cooling, lubrication cooling and air conditioning (AC or heat pump (HP. As for electric vehicles (EVs, the ITM mainly includes battery cooling/preheating, electric machines (EM cooling and AC or HP. With the rational effective and comprehensive control over the mentioned dynamic devices and thermal components, the modern VITM can realize collaborative optimization of multiple thermodynamic processes from the aspect of system integration. Furthermore, the computer-aided calculation and numerical simulation have been the significant design methods, especially for complex VITM. The 1D programming can correlate multi-thermal components and the 3D simulating can develop structuralized and modularized design. Additionally, co-simulations can virtualize simulation of various thermo-hydraulic behaviors under the vehicle transient operational conditions. This article reviews relevant researching work and current advances in the ever broadening field of modern vehicle thermal management (VTM. Based on the systematic summaries of the design methods and applications of ITM, future tasks and proposals are presented. This article aims to promote innovation of ITM, strengthen the precise control and the performance predictable ability, furthermore, to enhance the level of research and development (R&D.

  12. Integrated EM & Thermal Simulations with Upgraded VORPAL Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.N. Smithe, D. Karipides, P. Stoltz, G. Cheng, H. Wang

    2011-03-01

    Nuclear physics accelerators are powered by microwaves which must travel in waveguides between room-temperature sources and the cryogenic accelerator structures. The ohmic heat load from the microwaves is affected by the temperature-dependent surface resistance and in turn affects the cryogenic thermal conduction problem. Integrated EM & thermal analysis of this difficult non-linear problem is now possible with the VORPAL finite-difference time-domain simulation tool. We highlight thermal benchmarking work with a complex HOM feed-through geometry, done in collaboration with researchers at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, and discuss upcoming design studies with this emerging tool. This work is part of an effort to generalize the VORPAL framework to include generalized PDE capabilities, for wider multi-physics capabilities in the accelerator, vacuum electronics, plasma processing and fusion R&D fields, and we will also discuss user interface and algorithmic upgrades which facilitate this emerging multiphysics capability.

  13. The thermal pressure distribution of a simulated cold neutral medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazol, Adriana, E-mail: a.gazol@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A. P. 3-72, c.p. 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    We numerically study the thermal pressure distribution in a gas with thermal properties similar to those of the cold neutral interstellar gas by analyzing three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in boxes with sides of 100 pc with turbulent compressible forcing at 50 pc and different Mach numbers. We find that at high pressures and for large Mach numbers, both the volume-weighted and the density-weighted distributions can be appropriately described by a log-normal distribution, whereas for small Mach numbers they are better described by a power law. Thermal pressure distributions resulting from similar simulations but with self-gravity differ only for low Mach numbers; in this case, they develop a high pressure tail.

  14. TERRA Battery Thermal Control Anomaly - Simulation and Corrective Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    The TERRA spacecraft was launched in December 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, becoming the flagship of NASA's Earth Observing System program to gather data on how the planet's processes create climate. Originally planned as a 5 year mission, it still provides valuable science data after nearly 10 years on orbit. On October 13th, 2009 at 16:23z following a routine inclination maneuver, TERRA experienced a battery cell failure and a simultaneous failure of several battery heater control circuits used to maintain cell temperatures and gradients within the battery. With several cells nearing the minimum survival temperature, preventing the electrolyte from freezing was the first priority. After several reset attempts and power cycling of the control electronics failed to reestablish control authority on the primary side of the controller, it was switched to the redundant side, but anomalous performance again prevented full heater control of the battery cells. As the investigation into the cause of the anomaly and corrective action continued, a battery thermal model was developed to be used in determining the control ability remaining and to simulate and assess corrective actions. Although no thermal model or detailed reference data of the battery was available, sufficient information was found to allow a simplified model to be constructed, correlated against pre-anomaly telemetry, and used to simulate the thermal behavior at several points after the anomaly. It was then used to simulate subsequent corrective actions to assess their impact on cell temperatures. This paper describes the rapid development of this thermal model, including correlation to flight data before and after the anomaly., along with a comparative assessment of the analysis results used to interpret the telemetry to determine the extent of damage to the thermal control hardware, with near-term corrective actions and long-term operations plan to overcome the anomaly.

  15. Simulating thermal motion in crystalline phase-I ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony M; Habershon, Scott; Morrison, Carole A; Rankin, David W H

    2010-04-07

    Path-integral molecular dynamics have been used to simulate the phase-I crystalline form of ammonia, using an empirical force field. This method allows quantum-mechanical effects on the average geometry and vibrational quantities to be evaluated. When these are used to adjust the output of a high-temperature density functional theory simulation, the results are consistent with those given by the most recent structural refinement based on powder neutron diffraction data. It is clear that the original refinement overestimated thermal motion, and therefore also overestimated the equilibrium N-{H/D} bond length.

  16. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  17. Thermal properties of graphene from path-integral simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2018-03-01

    Thermal properties of graphene monolayers are studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, which take into account the quantization of vibrational modes in the crystalline membrane and allow one to consider anharmonic effects in these properties. This system was studied at temperatures in the range from 12 to 2000 K and zero external stress, by describing the interatomic interactions through the LCBOPII effective potential. We analyze the internal energy and specific heat and compare the results derived from the simulations with those yielded by a harmonic approximation for the vibrational modes. This approximation turns out to be rather precise up to temperatures of about 400 K. At higher temperatures, we observe an influence of the elastic energy due to the thermal expansion of the graphene sheet. Zero-point and thermal effects on the in-plane and "real" surface of graphene are discussed. The thermal expansion coefficient α of the real area is found to be positive at all temperatures, in contrast to the expansion coefficient αp of the in-plane area, which is negative at low temperatures and becomes positive for T ≳ 1000 K.

  18. Overall Thermal Performance of Flexible Piping Under Simulated Bending Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (k(sub oafi)) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  19. Characterizing Thermal Properties of Melting Te Semiconductor: Thermal Diffusivity Measurements and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Li, C.; Lin, B.; Ben, H.; Scripa, R. N.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tellurium is an element for many II-VI and I-III-VI(sub 2) compounds that are useful materials for fabricating many devises. In the melt growth techniques, the thermal properties of the molten phase are important parameter for controlling growth process to improve semiconducting crystal quality. In this study, thermal diffusivity of molten tellurium has been measured by a laser flash method in the temperature range from 500 C to 900 C. A pulsed laser with 1064 nm wavelength is focused on one side of the measured sample. The thermal diffusivity can be estimated from the temperature transient at the other side of the sample. A numerical simulation based on the thermal transport process has been also performed. By numerically fitting the experimental results, both the thermal conductivity and heat capacity can be derived. A relaxation phenomenon, which shows a slow drift of the measured thermal conductivity toward the equilibrium value after cooling of the sample, was observed for the first time. The error analysis and the comparison of the results to published data measured by other techniques will be discussed in the presentation.

  20. Minerve: thermal-hydraulic phenomena simulation and virtual reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laffont, A.; Pentori, B.

    2003-01-01

    MINERVE is a 3D interactive application representing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena happening in a nuclear plant. Therefore, the 3D geometric model of the French 900 MW PWR installations has been built. The users can interact in real time with this model to see at each step of the simulation what happens in the pipes. The thermal-hydraulic simulation is made by CATHARE-2, which calculates at every time step data on about one thousand meshes (the whole primary circuit, a part of the second circuit, and the Residual Heat Removal System). The simulation covers incidental and accidental cases on these systems. There are two main innovations in MINERVE: In the domain of nuclear plant's visualization, it is to introduce interactive 3D software mechanisms to visualize results of a physical simulation. In the domain of real-time 3D, it is to visualize fluids in a pipe, while they can have several configurations, like bubbles or single liquid phase. These mechanisms enable better comprehension and better visual representation of the possible phenomena. This paper describes the functionalities of MINERVE, and the difficulties to represent fluids with several characteristics like speed, configuration,..., in 3D. On the end, we talk about the future of MINERVE, and more widely of the possible futures of such an application in scientific visualization. (authors)

  1. Simulation and test of the thermal behavior of pressure switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifang; Chen, Daner; Zhang, Yao; Dai, Tingting

    2018-04-01

    Little, lightweight, low-power microelectromechanical system (MEMS) pressure switches offer a good development prospect for small, ultra-long, simple atmosphere environments. In order to realize MEMS pressure switch, it is necessary to solve one of the key technologies such as thermal robust optimization. The finite element simulation software is used to analyze the thermal behavior of the pressure switch and the deformation law of the pressure switch film under different temperature. The thermal stress releasing schemes are studied by changing the structure of fixed form and changing the thickness of the substrate, respectively. Finally, the design of the glass substrate thickness of 2.5 mm is used to ensure that the maximum equivalent stress is reduced to a quarter of the original value, only 154 MPa when the structure is in extreme temperature (80∘C). The test results show that after the pressure switch is thermally optimized, the upper and lower electrodes can be reliably contacted to accommodate different operating temperature environments.

  2. Simulation and measurement of thermal comfort; Simulation und Messung der thermischen Behaglichkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelker, Conrad; Kornadt, Oliver [Bauhaus-Universitaet Weimar, Professur Bauphysik (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    An approach is introduced, which enables the assessment of thermal comfort considering the complex and inhomogeneous climatic conditions in buildings as well as the human physiology. Computational fluid dynamic is linked with a numerical model representing the thermophysiological behavior of the human body (UC Berkeley Comfort Model). By dint of CFD, the climatic conditions in buildings are simulated with a detailed resolution. Basing on the simulations, the thermophysiological model is able to determine the temperature distribution of the human body, the heat flux to the environment as well as thermal comfort. The approach is used for the exemplified investigation of thermal comfort and sensation in a room equipped with a radiant cooling floor. (Copyright copyright 2010 Ernst and Sohn Verlag fuer Architektur und technische Wissenschaften GmbH and Co. KG, Berlin)

  3. Thermal hydraulic simulations of the Angra 2 PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Mantecón Javier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angra 2, the second Brazilian nuclear power plant, began the commercial operation in 2001. The plant is a pressurized water reactor (PWR type with electrical output of about 1350 MW. In the present work, the thermal hydraulic RELAP5-3D code was used to develop a model of this reactor. The model was performed using geometrical and material data from the Angra 2 final safety analysis report (FSAR. Simulations of the reactor behavior during steady state and loss of coolant accident were performed. Results of temperature distribution within the core, inlet and outlet coolant temperatures, coolant mass flow, and other parameters have been compared with the reference data and demonstrated to be in good agreement with each other. This study demonstrates that the developed RELAP5-3D model is capable of reproducing the thermal hydraulic behavior of the Angra 2 PWR and it can contribute to the process of the plant safety analysis.

  4. Manufactured Homes Simulated Thermal Analysis and Cost Effectiveness Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylon, David

    1990-05-17

    In 1988 and 1989, 150 manufactured homes were built to comply with Super Good Cents (SGC) specifications adapted from the existing specifications for site-built homes under the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP). Engineering calculations and computer simulations were used to estimate the effects of the SGC specifications on the thermal performance of the homes. These results were compared with consumer costs to establish the cost-effectiveness of individual measures. Heat loss U-factors for windows, walls, floors and ceilings were established using the standard ASHRAE parallel heat flow method. Adjustments resulted in higher U-factors for ceilings and floors than assumed at the time the homes were approved as meeting the SGC specifications. Except for those homes which included heat pumps, most of the homes did not meet the SGC compliance standards. Nonetheless these homes achieved substantial reductions in overall heat loss rate (UA) compared to UAs estimated for the same homes using the standard insulation packages provided by the manufacturers in the absence of the RCDP program. Homes with conventional electric furnaces showed a 35% reduction in total UA while homes with heat pumps had a 25% reduction. A regression analysis showed no significant relationship between climate zone, manufacturer and UA. A modified version of SUNDAY building simulation program which simulates duct and heat pump performance was used to model the thermal performance of each RCDP home as built and the same home as it would have been built without SGC specifications (base case). Standard assumptions were used for thermostat setpoint, thermal mass, internal gains and infiltration rates. 11 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Combining building thermal simulation methods and LCA methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Frank; Hansen, Klaus; Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    2008-01-01

    Thsi paper describes recent efforts made by the Danish Building Research Institute regarding the integration of a life cycle assessment (LCA) method into a whole building hygro-thermal simulation tool. The motivation for the work is that the increased requirements to the energy performance...... of buildings (as expressed in EU Directive 2002/91/EC), may in the future be supplemented by requirements to the environmental impact of buildings. This can be seen by the fact that EU recently has given EN mandate to prepare standards for environmental assessment of buildings (CEN/TC 350)....

  6. Optical and thermal simulation for wide acceptance angle CPV module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nawwar; Ota, Yasuyuki; Araki, Kenji; Lee, Kan-Hua; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Nishioka, Kensuke

    2017-09-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) technology has the potential to decrease the cost of systems in the near future by using less expensive optical elements in the system which replace the receiving surface aperture and concentrate the sunlight onto small solar cells. One of the main concerns of CPV is the need for high precision tracking system and the relation to the acceptance angle. In this paper, we proposed a CPV module with concentration ratio larger than 100 times and wide acceptance angle. An optical simulation for the module with S-TIM2 glass as a lens material was conducted to estimate the optical performance of the module. Thermal and electrical simulation was also conducted using COMSOL Multiphysics and SPICE respectively to evaluate the working temperature and electrical characteristics of the multijunction solar cell under concentration conditions.

  7. Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C. Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases.

  8. CFD simulation of a cabin thermal environment with and without human body - thermal comfort evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danca, Paul; Bode, Florin; Nastase, Ilinca; Meslem, Amina

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays, thermal comfort became one of the criteria in choosing a vehicle. In last decades time spent by people in vehicles had risen substantially. During each trip, thermal comfort must to be ensured for a good psychological and physical state of the passengers. Also, a comfortable environment leads to a higher power concentration of the driver thereby to a safe trip for vehicle occupants and for all traffic participants. The present study numerically investigated the effect of human body sited in the driver's place, over the air velocity distribution and over the thermal comfort in a passenger compartment. CFD simulations were made with different angles of the left inlet grill, in both cases, with and without driver presence. In majority of the actual vehicles environment studies, are made without consideration of human body geometry, in this case, the results precision can be affected. The results show that the presence of human body, lead to global changing of the whole flow pattern inside the vehicular cabin. Also, the locations of the maximum velocities are changing with the angle of the guiding vanes. The thermal comfort PMV/PPD indexes were calculated for each case. The presence of human body leads to a more comfortable environment.

  9. Simulation and parametric optimisation of thermal power plant cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse parametric studies and optimum steam extraction pressures of three different (subcritical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant cycles at a particular main steam temperature of 600 °C by keeping the reheat temperature at 537 °C and condenser pressure at 0.09 bar as constant. In order to maximize the heat rate gain possible with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions, eight stages of feed water heater arrangement with single reheater is considered. The system is optimized in such a way that the percentage exergetic losses are reduced for the increase of the exergetic efficiency and higher fuel utilization. The plant cycles are simulated and optimized by using Cycle Tempo 5.0 simulation software tool. From the simulation study, it is observed that the thermal efficiency of the three different power plant cycles obtained as 41.40, 42.48 and 43.03%, respectively. The specific coal consumption for three different power plant cycles are 0.56, 0.55 and 0.54 Tonnes/MWh. The improvement in feed water temperatures at the inlet of steam generator of respective cycles are 291, 305 and 316 °C.

  10. A Thermal Simulation Tool for Building and Its Interoperability through the Building Information Modeling (BIM Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicolle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes potential challenges and opportunities for using thermal simulation tools to optimize building performance. After reviewing current trends in thermal simulation, it outlines major criteria for the evaluation of building thermal simulation tools based on specifications and capabilities in interoperability. Details are discussed including workflow of data exchange of multiple thermal analyses such as the BIM-based application. The present analysis focuses on selected thermal simulation tools that provide functionalities to exchange data with other tools in order to obtain a picture of its basic work principles and to identify selection criteria for generic thermal tools in BIM. Significances and barriers to integration design with BIM and building thermal simulation tools are also discussed.

  11. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  12. Note: local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresme, F; Armstrong, J

    2014-01-07

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the "local" thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

  13. Space nuclear reactor SP-100 thermal-hydraulic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Camillo, Giannino P.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1983 it has been under development in the USA the project SP-100 of space nuclear reactors for electric generation in a range of 100 to 1000 KWe. In this project the heat is generated at the core of a fast compact liquid lithium refrigerated reactor. Thermoelectric converters produce direct current electric energy and the primary and secondary loops flow is controlled by electromagnetic thermoelectric pumps (EMTE). In this work it is studied a system with a fast nuclear reactor, with similar characteristics to the SP-100, aiming at generating high electric power in space for a future application on the TERRA (Advanced Fast Reactor Technology) Project of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies). It will be presented the working principles, basic structure and operation characteristics of an electromagnetic thermoelectric pump (EMTE) for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor refrigeration loops flow control. In order to determine the operating point of the reactor, it is indispensable the simulation of the EMTE pump along with the other components of the system, once all the working parameters are connected. So, it has been developed a computer system, named BEMTE-3 (a FORTRAN micro-computer code), which simulates the primary and secondary refrigeration components of liquid metal cooled fast space reactor. This computer code also simulates the thermoelectric conversion, with the flow being controlled by the EMTE pump with thermoelectric converters, determining the system operation point for a given nominal operating power. The BEMTE-3 is used for the study of the SP-100 primary and secondary loops thermal-hydraulic simulation and for the calculation of the operating point of the system based on data from available projects. (author)

  14. Thermal simulation of different construction types in six climatic regions on heating and cooling loads

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A thermal simulation model was prepared for a “typical” suburban building of 120 square meters and nine different passive designs were simulated to evaluate their impact on the heating and cooling load....

  15. High performance thermal stress analysis on the earth simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriyuki, Kushida; Hiroshi, Okuda; Genki, Yagawa

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the thermal stress finite element analysis code optimized for the earth simulator was developed. A processor node of which of the earth simulator is the 8-way vector processor, and each processor can communicate using the message passing interface. Thus, there are two ways to parallelize the finite element method on the earth simulator. The first method is to assign one processor for one sub-domain, and the second method is to assign one node (=8 processors) for one sub-domain considering the shared memory type parallelization. Considering that the preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method, which is one of the suitable linear equation solvers for the large-scale parallel finite element methods, shows the better convergence behavior if the number of domains is the smaller, we have determined to employ PCG and the hybrid parallelization, which is based on the shared and distributed memory type parallelization. It has been said that it is hard to obtain the good parallel or vector performance, since the finite element method is based on unstructured grids. In such situation, the reordering is inevitable to improve the computational performance [2]. In this study, we used three reordering methods, i.e. Reverse Cuthil-McKee (RCM), cyclic multicolor (CM) and diagonal jagged descending storage (DJDS)[3]. RCM provides the good convergence of the incomplete lower-upper (ILU) PCG, but causes the load imbalance. On the other hand, CM provides the good load balance, but worsens the convergence of ILU PCG if the vector length is so long. Therefore, we used the combined-method of RCM and CM. DJDS is the method to store the sparse matrices such that longer vector length can be obtained. For attaining the efficient inter-node parallelization, such partitioning methods as the recursive coordinate bisection (RCM) or MeTIS have been used. Computational performance of the practical large-scale engineering problems will be shown at the meeting. (author)

  16. Simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities in silicon structures at the rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, F.F.; Komarov, A.F.; Mironov, A.M.; Makarevich, Yu.V.; Miskevich, S.A.; Zayats, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models and numerical simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities during rapid thermal treatment of silicon structures are discussed. The calculation results correspond to the experimental results with a sufficient accuracy. A simulation software system has been developed that is integrated into ATHENA simulation system developed by Silvaco Inc. This program can simulate processes of the low-energy implantation of B, BF 2 , P, As, Sb, C ions into the silicon structures and subsequent rapid thermal annealing. (authors)

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  18. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of High Thermal Conductivity Synthetic Spider Silk for Thermal Management in Space

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal management is crucial to space technology. Because electronic and other thermally sensitive materials will be located in an essentially airless environment,...

  19. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  20. Simulation and experimental study of thermal performance of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and solidification cycles (Hashem & Esam 2013). Pasupathy & Velraj (2008) presented the thermal performance of an inorganic eutectic PCM based thermal storage system for thermal management in a residential building. Esam & Hashem. (2011) incorporated the PCM into the roof structure with vertical cone frustum holes ...

  1. Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Models capture the force response for single-cell and cell-string levels to within 15%-20% accuracy and predict the location for the origin of failure based on the deformation data from the experiments. At the module level, there is some discrepancy due to poor mechanical characterization of the packaging material between the cells. The thermal response (location and value of maximum temperature) agrees qualitatively with experimental data. In general, the X-plane results agree with model predictions to within 20% (pending faulty thermocouples, etc.); the Z-plane results show a bigger variability both between the models and test-results, as well as among multiple repeats of the tests. The models are able to capture the timing and sequence in voltage drop observed in the multi-cell experiments; the shapes of the current and temperature profiles need more work to better characterize propagation. The cells within packaging experience about 60% less force under identical impact test conditions, so the packaging on the test articles is robust. However, under slow-crush simulations, the maximum deformation of the cell strings with packaging is about twice that of cell strings without packaging.

  2. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Numerical Simulations of Thermal Convection in Rapidly Rotating Spherical Shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenkov, Constantine; Peltier, Richard, E-mail: nenkov@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca, E-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics, University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel numerical model used to simulate convection in the atmospheres of the Gas Giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. Nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependant solutions of the anelastic hydrodynamic equations are presented for a stratified, rotating spherical fluid shell heated from below. This new model is specified in terms of a grid-point based methodology which employs a hierarchy of tessellations of the regular icosahedron onto the sphere through the process of recurrent dyadic refinements of the spherical surface. We describe discretizations of the governing equations in which all calculations are performed in Cartesian coordinates in the local neighborhoods of the almost uniform icosahedral grid, a methodology which avoids the potential mathematical and numerical difficulties associated with the pole problem in spherical geometry. Using this methodology we have built our model in primitive equations formulation, whereas the three-dimensional vector velocity field and temperature are directly advanced in time. We show results of thermal convection in rapidly rotating spherical shell which leads to the formation of well pronounced prograde zonal jets at the equator, results which previous experiments with two-dimensional models in the limit of freely evolving turbulence were not able to achieve.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  5. Design and simulation of a low concentrating photovoltaic/thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosell, J.I.; Vallverdu, X.; Lechon, M.A.; Ibanez, M.

    2005-01-01

    The advantages of photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) collectors and low solar concentration technologies are combined into a photovoltaic/thermal system to increase the solar energy conversion efficiency. This paper presents a prototype 11X concentration rate and two axis tracking system. The main novelty is the coupling of a linear Fresnel concentrator with a channel photovoltaic/thermal collector. An analytical model to simulate the thermal behaviour of the prototype is proposed and validated. Measured thermal performance of the solar system gives values above 60%. Theoretical analysis confirms that thermal conduction between the PV cells and the absorber plate is a critical parameter

  6. Thermal dynamic simulation of wall for building energy efficiency under varied climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejin; Zhang, Yujin; Hong, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at different kind of walls in five cities of different zoning for thermal design, using thermal instantaneous response factors method, the author develops software to calculation air conditioning cooling load temperature, thermal response factors, and periodic response factors. On the basis of the data, the author gives the net work analysis about the influence of dynamic thermal of wall on air-conditioning load and thermal environment in building of different zoning for thermal design regional, and put forward the strategy how to design thermal insulation and heat preservation wall base on dynamic thermal characteristic of wall under different zoning for thermal design regional. And then provide the theory basis and the technical references for the further study on the heat preservation with the insulation are in the service of energy saving wall design. All-year thermal dynamic load simulating and energy consumption analysis for new energy-saving building is very important in building environment. This software will provide the referable scientific foundation for all-year new thermal dynamic load simulation, energy consumption analysis, building environment systems control, carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy -saving walls building. Based on which, we will not only expediently design system of building energy, but also analyze building energy consumption and carry through scientific energy management. The study will provide the referable scientific foundation for carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy saving walls building.

  7. The thermal conductivity and thermal rectification of carbon nanotubes studied using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Algaer, Elena; Böhm, Michael C; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2009-03-18

    The thermal conductivity of single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated as a function of the tube length L, temperature and chiral index using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. In the ballistic-diffusive regime the thermal conductivity follows a L(alpha) law. The exponent alpha is insensitive to the diameter of the carbon nanotube; alpha approximately 0.77 has been derived for short carbon nanotubes at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity shows a peak before falling at higher temperatures (>500 K). The phenomenon of thermal rectification in nanotubes has been investigated by gradually changing the atomic mass in the tube-axial direction as well as by loading extra masses on the terminal sites of the tube. A higher thermal conductivity occurs when heat flows from the low-mass to the high-mass region.

  8. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450 0 C to 1100 0 C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour from an 1100 0 C melt down to 500 0 C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7 0 C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO 2 and (Ni, Mn, Fe) 2 O 4 form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500 0 C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300 0 C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so

  9. Thermal phase stability of some simulated Defense waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.P.

    1981-04-01

    Three simulated defense waste glass compositions developed by Savannah River Laboratories were studied to determine viscosity and compositional effects on the comparative thermal phase stabilities of these glasses. The glass compositions are similar except that the 411 glasses are high in lithium and low in sodium compared to the 211 glass, and the T glasses are high in iron and low in aluminum compared to the C glass. Specimens of these glasses were heat treated using isothermal anneals as short as 10 min and up to 15 days over the temperature range of 450/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C. Additionally, a specimen of each glass was cooled at a constant cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour from an 1100/sup 0/C melt down to 500/sup 0/C where it was removed from the furnace. The following were observed. The slow cooling rate of 7/sup 0/C/hour is possible as a canister centerline cooling rate for large canisters. Accordingly, it is important to note that a short range diffusion mechanism like cooperative growth phenomena can result in extensive devitrification at lower temperatures and higher yields than a long-range diffusion mechanism can; and can do it without the growth of large crystals that can fracture the glass. Refractory oxides like CeO/sub 2/ and (Ni, Mn, Fe)/sub 2/O/sub 4/ form very rapidly at higher temperatures than silicates and significant yields can be obtained at sufficiently high temperatures that settling of these dense phases becomes a major microstructural feature during slow cooling of some glasses. These annealing studies further show that below 500/sup 0/C there is but little devitrification occurring implying that glass canisters stored at 300/sup 0/C may be kinetically stable despite not being thermodynamically so.

  10. A Fast Electro-Thermal Co-Simulation Modeling Approach for SiC Power MOSFETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceccarelli, Lorenzo; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    the FEM simulation of the DUT’s structure, performed in ANSYS Icepack. A MATLAB script is used to process the simulation data and feed the needed settings and parameters back into the simulation. The parameters for a CREE 1.2 kV/30 A SiC MOSFET have been identified and the electro-thermal model has been...

  11. Simulation and experimental study of thermal performance of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Building energy conservation; phase change material; concrete roof with PCM. 1. Introduction. In hot climates ... The latent heat thermal energy storage with a phase change material (PCM) is an effective way of thermal storage system due to its ..... Renewable and Sustainable Energy Rev. 18: 607–625. Atul Sharma, Tyagi ...

  12. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect different parts in compressors and turbines from heat. They are generally composed of two layers, one metallic layer providing resistance to heat corrosion and oxidation, and one thermally insulating ceramic layer. Two different techniques are industrially used. Plasma spray ...

  13. Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresme, F.; Armstrong, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation

  14. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....

  15. Coupled Aeroheating and Ablative Thermal Response Simulation Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal protection system (TPS) performance requirements for atmospheric entry vehicles on current and future NASA missions preclude the use of heritage reusable...

  16. PCB-level Electro thermal Coupling Simulation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Runjing; Shao, Xuchen

    2017-10-01

    Power transmission network needs to transmit more current with the increase of the power density. The problem of temperature rise and the reliability is becoming more and more serious. In order to accurately design the power supply system, we must consider the influence of the power supply system including Joule heat, air convection and other factors. Therefore, this paper analyzes the relationship between the electric circuit and the thermal circuit on the basis of the theory of electric circuit and thermal circuit.

  17. Simulating a thermal water quality trading market for education and model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Asmeret

    2010-12-01

    Thermal water quality trading is an emerging policy tool that allows thermal polluters to comply with effluent restrictions by paying landowners to plant shade trees. A simulation game was created to help participants understand the structure, dynamics, benefits, and drawbacks of thermal water quality trading markets. Simulation participants negotiate to make trades, and their decisions are entered into a system dynamics model that simulates tree growth and water temperature. A debriefing session allows the participants to discuss outcomes and strategies. The exercise has been performed twice and has proven to be a useful teaching tool. These simulations provided valuable insight into decision-making strategies in thermal water quality trading markets, suggesting decision rules that the researchers used for subsequent model development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Experimental determinations of the pre- and postirradiation thermal transport and thermal expansion properties of simulated fuel rods for an HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.P.; Godfrey, T.G.; Graves, R.S.; Weaver, F.J.; Eatherly, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, volume, and Seebeck coefficient of simulated fuel rods for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) have been measured before and after neutron irradiations to 13.5 X 10 25 n/m 2 at nominal irradiation temperatures of 1220 K. These measurements were made as functions of volume particle loading, temperature, and neutron fluence. The thermal conductivities decrease with increasing particle loading at all measurement temperatures. The large difference between the properties of specimens from two fabrication processes (extrusion and slug injection) is attributed to the fact that the densities of the continuous phases within the elements differ by a factor of 2.6. Increases in the thermal conductivity with initial neutron fluence of some of the extruded specimens are attributed to partial ordering of carbonaceous material within the composites, but an unambiguous quantitative analysis is difficult. (Auth.)

  19. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions measurement in thermal column of TRR using an experimental-simulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeli, Ruhollah; Kasesaz, Yaser; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman; Ezaty, Arsalan

    2018-03-01

    For designing an appropriate neutron beam, the determination of neutron flux at any irradiation facility is an important key factor. Due to the importance of determining the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes in a typical thermal column of a reactor, a simple and accurate technique is introduced in this study. Absolute thermal and epithermal fluxes were measured experimentally at a certain point using the foil activation method by neutron bombardment of bare and cadmium covered Au foils. The relative neutron fluxes were also derived simply by means of Monte Carlo simulation by accurate modelling of the reactor components. Finally, by normalization of the relative distribution flux with regard to information about the absolute neutron flux, the accurate thermal and epithermal neutron distributions were derived, separately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Modeling and Simulation of Thermal Analysis at Hydro Generator Stator Winding Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Raduca

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling and simulation of thermal analysis at hydro generator stator winding. The winding stator is supplied at high voltage of 11 kV for high power hydro generator. To present the thermal analysis for stator winding is presented at supply of coil by 11 kV, when coil is heat and thermal transfer in insulation at ambient temperature.

  1. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory's BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release.

  2. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory’s BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO 2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release

  3. Improved Hyperthermia Treatment Control using SAR/Temperature Simulation and PRFS Magnetic Resonance Thermal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Vogel, Martin; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Stakhursky, Vadim; Soher, Brian J.; Craciunescu, Oana I.; Das, Shiva; Arabe, Omar A.; Joines, Williams T.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This article explores the feasibility of using coupled electromagnetic and thermodynamic simulations to improve planning and control of hyperthermia treatments for cancer. The study investigates the usefulness of preplanning to improve heat localization in tumor targets in treatments monitored with PRFS-based Magnetic Resonance Thermal Imaging (MRTI). . Methods Heating capabilities of a cylindrical radiofrequency (RF) mini-annular phased array (MAPA) applicator were investigated with electromagnetic and thermal simulations of SAR in homogeneous phantom models and two human leg sarcomas. HFSS (Ansoft Corp) was used for electromagnetic simulations and SAR patterns were coupled into EPhysics (Ansoft Corp) for thermal modeling with temperature dependent variable perfusion. Simulations were accelerated by integrating tumor specific anatomy into a pre-gridded whole body tissue model. To validate this treatment planning approach, simulations were compared with MR thermal images in both homogenous phantoms and heterogeneous tumors. Results SAR simulations demonstrated excellent agreement with temperature rise distributions obtained with MR thermal imaging in homogeneous phantoms, and clinical treatments of large soft-tissue sarcomas. The results demonstrate feasibility of preplanning appropriate relative phases of antennas for localizing heat in tumor. Conclusions Advances in the accuracy of computer simulation and non-invasive thermometry via MR thermal imaging have provided powerful new tools for optimization of clinical hyperthermia treatments. Simulations agree well with MR thermal images in both homogeneous tissue models and patients with lower leg tumors. This work demonstrates that better quality hyperthermia treatments should be possible when simplified hybrid model simulations are performed routinely as part of the clinical pretreatment plan. PMID:21070140

  4. Effect of Simulant Type on the Absorptance and Emittance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program the effects of lunar dust on thermal control surfaces was found to be more significant than anticipated, with several systems overheating due to deposition of dust on them. In an effort to reduce risk to future missions, a series of tests has been initiated to characterize the effects of dust on these surfaces, and then to develop technologies to mitigate that risk. Given the variations in albedo across the lunar surface, one variable that may be important is the darkness of the lunar dust, and this study was undertaken to address that concern. Three thermal control surfaces, AZ-93 white paint and AgFEP and AlFEP second surface mirrors were dusted with three different lunar dust simulants in a simulated lunar environment, and their integrated solar absorptance ( ) and thermal emittance ( ) values determined experimentally. The three simulants included JSC-1AF, a darker mare simulant, NU-LHT-1D, a light highlands simulant, and 1:1 mixture of the two. The response of AZ-93 was found to be slightly more pronounced than that of AgFEP. The increased with fractional dust coverage in both types of samples by a factor of 1.7 to 3.3, depending on the type of thermal control surface and the type of dust. The of the AZ-93 decreased by about 10 percent when fully covered by dust, while that of AgFEP increased by about 10 percent. It was found that / varied by more than a factor of two depending on the thermal control surface and the darkness of the dust. Given that the darkest simulant used in this study may be lighter than the darkest dust that could be encountered on the lunar surface, it becomes apparent that the performance degradation of thermal control surfaces due to dust on the Moon will be strongly dependent on the and of the dust in the specific locality

  5. Converter-level FEM simulation for lifetime prediction of an LED driver with improved thermal modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, H.; Wang, H.; Ye, X.

    2017-01-01

    application. A converter-level finite element simulation (FEM) simulation is carried out to obtain the ambient temperature of electrolytic capacitors and power MOSFETs used in the LED driver, which takes into account the impact of the driver enclosure and the thermal coupling among different components....... Therefore, the proposed method bridges the link between the global ambient temperature profile outside of the enclosure and the local ambient temperature profiles of the components of interest inside the driver. A quantitative comparison of the estimated annual lifetime consumptions of MOSFETs...... and capacitors are given based on the proposed thermal modelling process, and the datasheet thermal impedance models and the global ambient temperature....

  6. Experiments and simulation of thermal behaviors of the dual-drive servo feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Mei, Xuesong; Feng, Bin; Zhao, Liang; Ma, Chi; Shi, Hu

    2015-01-01

    The machine tool equipped with the dual-drive servo feed system could realize high feed speed as well as sharp precision. Currently, there is no report about the thermal behaviors of the dual-drive machine, and the current research of the thermal characteristics of machines mainly focuses on steady simulation. To explore the influence of thermal characterizations on the precision of a jib boring machine assembled dual-drive feed system, the thermal equilibrium tests and the research on thermal-mechanical transient behaviors are carried out. A laser interferometer, infrared thermography and a temperature-displacement acquisition system are applied to measure the temperature distribution and thermal deformation at different feed speeds. Subsequently, the finite element method (FEM) is used to analyze the transient thermal behaviors of the boring machine. The complex boundary conditions, such as heat sources and convective heat transfer coefficient, are calculated. Finally, transient variances in temperatures and deformations are compared with the measured values, and the errors between the measurement and the simulation of the temperature and the thermal error are 2 °C and 2.5 μm, respectively. The researching results demonstrate that the FEM model can predict the thermal error and temperature distribution very well under specified operating condition. Moreover, the uneven temperature gradient is due to the asynchronous dual-drive structure that results in thermal deformation. Additionally, the positioning accuracy decreases as the measured point became further away from the motor, and the thermal error and equilibrium period both increase with feed speeds. The research proposes a systematical method to measure and simulate the boring machine transient thermal behaviors.

  7. Thermal plume above a simulated sitting person with different complexity of body geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew J.

    2007-01-01

    Occupants are one of the main heat sources in rooms. They generate thermal plumes with characteristics, which depend on geometry, surface temperature and area of the human body in contact with the surrounding air as well as temperature, velocity and turbulence intensity distribution in the room....... The characteristics of the thermal plume generated by a sitting person were studied using four human body simulators with different complexity of geometry but equal surface area: a vertical cylinder, a rectangular box, a dummy, and a thermal manikin. The results show that the dummy and the thermal manikin generate...

  8. Experimental simulation of a martensitic stainless steel coating subjected to thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revel, P.; Laboratoire Systemes et Machines de Haute Precision; Necib, K.; Beranger, G.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this work was the experimental simulation of the thermal fatigue of mechanical components such as continuous casting rolls. In order to protect the roll against surface degradation due to thermal fatigue, a stainless steel coating was deposited. Initially a temperature map was constructed from experimental measurements. The coating microstructure was then characterized in its initial state and after a few thermal fatigue cycles. Isothermal mechanical tests were performed on the coating and on the base material in the temperature range 20-700 deg C. Residual stresses were shown to decrease rapidly with an increased number of thermal cycles. Decreases in hardness were also correlated with lower yield strengths. (authors)

  9. Numerical simulation of thermal behaviors of a clothed human body with evaluation of indoor solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Aihua; Luo, Jie; Li, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar radiation evaluation is integrated with the thermal transfer in clothed humans. • Thermal models are developed for clothed humans exposed in indoor solar radiation. • The effect of indoor solar radiation on humans can be predicted in different situations in living. • The green solar energy can be efficiently utilized in the building development. - Abstract: Solar radiation is a valuable green energy, which is important in achieving a successful building design for thermal comfort in indoor environment. This paper considers solar radiation indoors into the transient thermal transfer models of a clothed human body and offers a new numerical method to analyze the dynamic thermal status of a clothed human body under different solar radiation incidences. The evaluation model of solar radiation indoors and a group of coupled thermal models of the clothed human body are developed and integrated. The simulation capacities of these integrated models are validated through a comparison between the predicted results and the experimental data in reference. After that, simulation cases are also conducted to show the influence of solar radiation on the thermal status of individual clothed body segments when the human body is staying indoors in different seasons. This numerical simulation method provides a useful tool to analyze the thermal status of clothed human body under different solar radiation incidences indoors and thus enables the architect to efficiently utilize the green solar energy in building development.

  10. Long duration blade loss simulations including thermal growths for dual-rotor gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyoung; Palazzolo, Alan; Provenza, A.; Lawrence, C.; Carney, K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents an approach for blade loss simulation including thermal growth effects for a dual-rotor gas turbine engine supported on bearing and squeeze film damper. A nonlinear ball bearing model using the Hertzian formula predicts ball contact load and stress, while a simple thermal model estimates the thermal growths of bearing components during the blade loss event. The modal truncation augmentation method combined with a proposed staggered integration scheme is verified through simulation results as an efficient tool for analyzing a flexible dual-rotor gas turbine engine dynamics with the localized nonlinearities of the bearing and damper, with the thermal growths and with a flexible casing model. The new integration scheme with enhanced modeling capability reduces the computation time by a factor of 12, while providing a variety of solutions with acceptable accuracy for durations extending over several thermal time constants.

  11. Thermal Expansion of Ni3Al Intermetallic Compound: Experiment and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Peng; Lü Peng; Zhou Kai; Wei Bing-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is determined by a thermal dilatometer and simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results of the linear thermal expansion coefficients are presented from 200 K up to the maximum temperature of 1600 K. The single phase of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is confirmed by x-ray diffraction together with DSC melting and solidification peaks, from which the solidus and the liquidus temperatures are obtained to be 1660 and 1695 K, respectively. The measured linear thermal expansion coefficient increases from 1.5 × 10 −5 to 2.7 × 10 −5 K −1 in the experimental temperature range, in good agreement with the data obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation, just a slight difference from the temperature dependence coefficient. Furthermore, the atomic structure and position are presented to reveal the atom distribution change during thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al compound. (paper)

  12. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  13. Investigation on electromagnetic characteristics of modeling thermal fatigue cracks in numerical simulation by eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Yusa, Noritaka; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Pan Hongliang; Kemppainen, Mika; Virkkuen, Iikka

    2012-01-01

    The present study discusses electromagnetic characteristics of modeling thermal fatigue crack in numerical simulation from view point of eddy current testing. Two thermal fatigue cracks introduced into SUS304 stainless steel plates are investigated. Eddy current signals are gathered by a differential plus point probe with several frequencies, 50 kHz, 100 kHz and 400 kHz. In the numerical simulation thermal fatigue crack is modeled as a region with constant width, true profile revealed by results of destructive testing, and uniform conductivity firstly. Further simulations are carried out to consider the possibility of variation of electromagnetic characteristics around the edge of crack. The results show that thermal fatigue cracks should be modeled as an almost nonconductive region no matter how the frequency is utilized. (author)

  14. Rotor drop and following thermal growth simulations using detailed auxiliary bearing and damper models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyoung

    2006-01-01

    Catcher bearings (CBs) or auxiliary bearings provide mechanical backup protection in the events of magnetic bearing failure. This paper presents numerical analysis for a rotor drop on CBs and following thermal growths due to their mechanical rub using detailed CB and damper models. The detailed CB model is determined based on its material, geometry, speed and preload using the nonlinear Hertzian load-deflection formula, and the thermal growths of bearing components during the rotor drop are estimated using a 1D thermal model. A finite-element squeeze film damper provides the pressure profile of an annular oil film and the resulting viscous damping force. Numerical simulations of an energy storage flywheel with magnetic suspensions failed reveal that an optimal CB design using the detailed simulation models stabilizes the rotor drop dynamics and lowers the thermal growths while preventing the high-speed backward whirl. Furthermore, CB design guides based on the simulation results are presented.

  15. Energy improvement of a conventional dwelling in Argentina through thermal simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippin, C. [CONICET-CC302, Santa Rosa 6300, La Pampa (Argentina); Flores Larsen, S. [INENCO-Instituto de Investigaciones en Energias No Convencionales, Universidad Nacional de Salta, CONICET, Avda. Bolivia 5150, CP 4400 Salta Capital (Argentina); Lopez Gay, E.

    2008-10-15

    This paper analyses the design, technology, thermal behaviour, and energy consumption of both a conventional and a refurbished dwelling located in a region with a temperate-cold climate in central Argentina. The thermal behaviour and the energy consumption of the conventional building were monitored during winter. The experimental data were analysed and included in a simulation of the transient thermal behaviour of the house. Measurements and simulation were in agreement, showing a mean deviation below 0.5{sup o}C. To reduce the heating and cooling loads, the dwelling was refurbished and its thermal behaviour was studied through a computer simulation, for the critical seasons (winter and summer) and for two occupancy schedules (with and without inhabitants). The refurbishment included passive solar heating, shading, and an insulated envelope. These successful changes allowed energy savings of 66% and 52% for winter and summer, respectively. (author)

  16. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  17. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    simulated and understood pertaining to various land and atmospheric characteristics. A theoreti- cal modelling exercise is carried out with an aim to simulate the at-sensor radiance for the proposed thermal channels of the Imager payload of INSAT-. 3D satellite over the land surfaces using a radiative transfer model (RTM).

  18. Thermal Characterization of the Air Force Institute of Technology Solar Simulation Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    VACUUM CHAMBER I. Introduction Motivation The CubeSat class of nanosatellites continues to become a preferred choice for Department of Defense...DoD) and university research satellites. A CubeSat is specifically defined as a nanosatellite made of a combination of one to six approximately...School (NPS), Smith generated a thermal model of the NPS Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) nanosatellite [4]. Smith developed the thermal model in

  19. Electromagnetic and Thermal Simulations of Human Neurons for SAR Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Felipe; Millholland, Gilbert; Peddinti, Seshasai Vamsi Krishna; Thella, Ashok Kumar; Rizkalla, James; Salama, Paul; Rizkalla, Maher; Morisaki, Jorge; Rizkalla, Maher E

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the electromagnetic waves (EM) on human neurons (HN) has been under investigation for decades, in efforts to understand the impact of cell phones (radiation) on human health, or radiation absorption by HN for medical diagnosis and treatment. Research issues including the wave frequency, power intensity, reflections and scattering, and penetration depths are of important considerations to be incorporated into the research study. In this study, computer simulation for the EM exposure to HN was studied for the purpose of determining the upper limits of the electric and magnetic field intensities, power consumption, reflections and transmissions, and the change in temperature resulting from the power absorption by human neurons. Both high frequency structural simulators (HFSS) from ANSYS software, and COMSOL multi-physics were used for the simulation of the EM transmissions and reflections, and the temperature profile within the cells, respectively. For the temperature profile estimation, the study considers an electrical source of 0.5 watt input power, 64 MHz. The EM simulation was looking into the uniformity of the fields within the sample cells. The size of the waveguide was set to be appropriate for a small animal model to be conducted in the future. The incident power was fully transmitted throughout the waveguide, and less than 1% reflections were observed from the simulation. The minimum reflected power near the sample under investigation was found to be with negligible reflected field strengths. The temperature profile resulting from the COMSOL simulation was found to be near 0.25 m°K, indicating no change in temperature on the neuro cells under the EM exposure. The paper details the simulation results for the EM response determined by HFSS, and temperature profile simulated by COMSOL.

  20. The Development of Dispatcher Training Simulator in a Thermal Energy Generation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, D. L.; Abdullah, A. G.; Mulyadi, Y.; Hasan, B.

    2018-01-01

    A dispatcher training simulator (DTS) is a real-time Human Machine Interface (HMI)-based control tool that is able to visualize industrial control system processes. The present study was aimed at developing a simulator tool for boilers in a thermal power station. The DTS prototype was designed using technical data of thermal power station boilers in Indonesia. It was then designed and implemented in Wonderware Intouch 10. The resulting simulator came with component drawing, animation, control display, alarm system, real-time trend, historical trend. This application used 26 tagnames and was equipped with a security system. The test showed that the principles of real-time control worked well. It is expected that this research could significantly contribute to the development of thermal power station, particularly in terms of its application as a training simulator for beginning dispatchers.

  1. Simulation of a thermal battery using Phoenics {sup registered}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Giancarlo C.S.; Vianna, Ardson S. Jr. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Secao de Ensino de Engenharia Quimica, Praca General Tiburcio, 80, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Peixoto, Fernando C. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Escola de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - Bloco D - Sala 307, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-04-15

    Thermal batteries are primary disposable systems specially designed to develop a high energy density in a short period. In the present work, the modeling of heat generation and propagation within three Ca/CaCrO{sub 4} thermal batteries has been carried out, using a transient model. The commercial CFD software Phoenics {sup registered} has been used and, through a typical finite volume approach, the related 2D transport equations have been solved, giving the time-dependent temperature profiles. To check the quality of the model, the temperature of pseudo-equilibrium state (a typical thermodynamic parameter), has been analyzed. The temperatures related in the literature were close to those calculated. The results also indicate that the fusion of electrolytes is virtually an instantaneous process when compared to the time to reach the pseudo-equilibrium state, which indicates that the generation of electrical current occurs immediately after the thermite burning. (author)

  2. Thermal hydraulic simulation of the CANDU nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Athos M.S.S. de; Ramos, Mario C.; Costa, Antonella L.; Fernandes, Gustavo H.N., E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) is a Canadian-designed power reactor of PHWR type (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) that uses heavy water (deuterium oxide) for moderator and coolant, and natural uranium for fuel. There are about 47 reactors of this type in operation around the world generating more than 23 GWe, highlighting the importance of this kind of device. In this way, the main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic model for a CANDU reactor to aggregate knowledge in this line of research. In this way, a core modeling was performed using RELAP5-3D code. Results were compared with reference data to verify the model behavior in steady state operation. Thermal hydraulic parameters as temperature, pressure and mass flow rate were verified and the results are in good agreement with reference data, as it is being presented in this work. (author)

  3. Simulation of thermal indoor climate in buildings by using human Projected Area Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2009-01-01

    to these large windows on a cold winter day it is recognized that this can cause thermal discomfort. The calculation of this discomfort needs to be taken properly into account in the simulation of the thermal indoor climate and energy consumption of the rooms. The operative temperature can be used as a simple...... measure for thermal environ-ment. The operative temperature is a function of the air temperature, the mean radiant temperature and the relative air velocity. However, in many programs for calculation of energy consumption and thermal indoor climate the model for calculating the mean radiant temperature...... for dynamic building thermal analysis. The method is demonstrated in a newer apartment with windows from floor to ceiling and shows how impotent it is to include the radiant effect from the glass sur-faces and how it influences the indoor thermal climate significantly....

  4. Shock initiated thermal and chemical responses of HMX crystal from ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tingting; Song, Huajie; Liu, Yi; Huang, Fenglei

    2014-07-21

    To gain an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal and chemical responses of condensed energetic materials under thermal shock, we developed a thermal shock reactive dynamics (TS-RD) computational protocol using molecular dynamics simulation coupled with ReaxFF force field. β-Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) was selected as a a target explosive due to its wide usage in the military and industry. The results show that a thermal shock initiated by a large temperature gradient between the "hot" region and the "cold" region results in thermal expansion of the particles and induces a thermal-mechanical wave propagating back and forth in the system with an averaged velocity of 3.32 km s(-1). Heat propagating along the direction of thermal shock leads to a temperature increment of the system and thus chemical reaction initiation. Applying a continuum reactive heat conduction model combined with the temperature distribution obtained from the RD simulation, a heat conduction coefficient is derived as 0.80 W m(-1) K(-1). The chemical reaction mechanisms during thermal shock were analyzed, showing that the reaction is triggered by N-NO2 bond breaking followed by HONO elimination and ring fission. The propagation rates of the reaction front and reaction center are obtained to be 0.069 and 0.038 km s(-1), based on the time and spatial distribution of NO2. The pressure effect on the thermal shock was also investigated by employing uniaxial compression before the thermal shock. We find that compression significantly accelerates thermal-mechanical wave propagation and heat conduction, resulting in higher temperature and more excited molecules and thus earlier initiation and faster propagation of chemical reactions.

  5. TRISO fuel thermal simulations in the LS-VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Mario C.; Scari, Maria E.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: melizabethscari@yahoo.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR) is a reactor that presents very good characteristics in terms of energy production and safety aspects. It uses as fuel the TRISO particles immersed in a graphite matrix with a cylindrical shape called fuel compact, as moderator graphite and as coolant liquid salt Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} called Flibe. This work evaluates the thermal hydraulic performance of the heat removal system and the reactor core by performing different simplifications to represent the reactor core and the fuel compact under steady-state conditions, starting the modeling from a single fuel element, until complete the studies with the entire core model developed in the RELAP5-3D code. Two models were considered for representation of the fuel compact, homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, as well as different geometries of the heat structures was considered. The aim to develop several models was to compare the thermal hydraulic characteristics resulting from the construction of a more economical and less discretized model with much more refined models that can lead to more complexes analyzes to representing TRISO effect particles in the fuel compact. The different results found, mainly, for the core temperature distributions are presented and discussed. (author)

  6. Impact of geometry of a sedentary occupant simulator on the generated thermal plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska-Tejsen, Daria; Melikov, Arsen; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of the thermal plume generated by a sitting person were experimentally studied using four human body simulators with different complexities of geometry but equal surface area and heat generation: a vertical cylinder, a rectangular box, a dummy, and a thermal manikin. The exper......The characteristics of the thermal plume generated by a sitting person were experimentally studied using four human body simulators with different complexities of geometry but equal surface area and heat generation: a vertical cylinder, a rectangular box, a dummy, and a thermal manikin...... of a sitting human without a clear indication of legs, such as a cylinder and a rectangular box, are not recommended for use. The plume of the cylinder is symmetrical and concentrated, while the plume above the rectangular box is sensitive to the surroundings and can have two maximums of air speed distribution....

  7. Computational Simulation of Thermal and Spattering Phenomena and Microstructure in Selective Laser Melting of Inconel 625

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Tuğrul; Arısoy, Yiğit M.; Criales, Luis E.

    Computational modelling of Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) processes such as Selective laser Melting (SLM) can reveal information that is hard to obtain or unobtainable by in-situ experimental measurements. A 3D thermal field that is not visible by the thermal camera can be obtained by solving the 3D heat transfer problem. Furthermore, microstructural modelling can be used to predict the quality and mechanical properties of the product. In this paper, a nonlinear 3D Finite Element Method based computational code is developed to simulate the SLM process with different process parameters such as laser power and scan velocity. The code is further improved by utilizing an in-situ thermal camera recording to predict spattering which is in turn included as a stochastic heat loss. Then, thermal gradients extracted from the simulations applied to predict growth directions in the resulting microstructure.

  8. The SCAR project - accidental thermal-hydraulics: from the simulation to the simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farvacque, M.; Faydide, B.; Parent, M.; Iffenecker, F.; Pentori, B.; Dumas, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    The integration of the CATHARE code in the reactor simulators was completed in the beginning of the years 1990 with the design of the simulators SIPA1 and SIPA2. The SCAR project (Simulator CAthare Release), presented in this paper, is the following of this application. The objective is the adaptation of a reference CATHARE code version to the simulators environment, in order to realize the convergence between the safety analysis tool and the simulator. (A.L.B.)

  9. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Non-thermal Pressure Profiles of Galaxy Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Kaylea; Lau, Erwin T.; Nagai, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate....

  10. Coupled large-eddy simulation of thermal mixing in a T-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloeren, D.; Laurien, E.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing thermal fatigue due to thermal mixing in T-junctions is part of the safety assessment of nuclear power plants. Results of two large-eddy simulations of mixing flow in a T-junction with coupled and adiabatic boundary condition are presented and compared. The temperature difference is set to 100 K, which leads to strong stratification of the flow. The main and the branch pipe intersect horizontally in this simulation. The flow is characterized by steady wavy pattern of stratification and temperature distribution. The coupled solution approach shows highly reduced temperature fluctuations in the near wall region due to thermal inertia of the wall. A conjugate heat transfer approach is necessary in order to simulate unsteady heat transfer accurately for large inlet temperature differences. (author)

  11. Study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer using Thermal Large Eddy Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Husson, S.; Bataille, F.; Ducros, F.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate Thermal Large Eddy Simulation in a complex case using Trio U. We develop a thermal turbulent inflow condition based on parallel flows in order to simulate a turbulent thermal boundary layer. This inflow condition is tested with a turbulent channel flow. We show that it produces fine profiles for velocity and temperature. Later, this inlet condition is used in the case of blowing through a porous plate. Two different blowing regimes are studied: the classical turbulent boundary layer and the blown off boundary layer. Comparisons show that we obtain similar experimental and numerical profiles (Brillant, G., Husson, S., Bataille, F., 2008. Experimental study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 51 (7-8), 1996-2005.). We finish with additional results obtained only through numerical simulations

  12. Study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer using Thermal Large Eddy Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, G. [CEA/Grenoble DEN/DER/SSTH/LMDL, 17 rue des Martyrs 38054, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Husson, S. [INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bataille, F. [INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francoise.Daumas-Bataille@univ-perp.fr; Ducros, F. [CEA/Grenoble DEN/DER/SSTH/LMDL, 17 rue des Martyrs 38054, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-12-15

    We investigate Thermal Large Eddy Simulation in a complex case using Trio U. We develop a thermal turbulent inflow condition based on parallel flows in order to simulate a turbulent thermal boundary layer. This inflow condition is tested with a turbulent channel flow. We show that it produces fine profiles for velocity and temperature. Later, this inlet condition is used in the case of blowing through a porous plate. Two different blowing regimes are studied: the classical turbulent boundary layer and the blown off boundary layer. Comparisons show that we obtain similar experimental and numerical profiles (Brillant, G., Husson, S., Bataille, F., 2008. Experimental study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 51 (7-8), 1996-2005.). We finish with additional results obtained only through numerical simulations.

  13. Simulation of Temperature Field in HDPE Pipe Thermal Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Li-jun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For high density polyethylene pipe connection,welding technology is the key of the high density engineering plastic pressure pipe safety. And the temperature distribution in the welding process has a very important influence on the welding quality. Polyethylene pipe weld joints of one dimensional unsteady overall heat transfer model is established by MARC software and simulates temperature field and stress field distribution of the welding process,and the thermocouple temperature automatic acquisition system of welding temperature field changes were detected,and compared by simulation and experiment .The results show that,at the end of the heating,the temperature of the pipe does not reach the maximum,but reached the maximum at 300 s,which indicates that the latent heat of phase change in the process of pressure welding. In the process of pressure welding, the axial stress of the pipe is gradually changed from tensile stress to compressive stress.

  14. Experimental Preparation and Numerical Simulation of High Thermal Conductive Cu/CNTs Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsan Ali Samer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid growth of high performance electronics devices accompanied by overheating problem, heat dissipater nanocomposites material having ultra-high thermal conductivity and low coefficient of thermal expansion was proposed. In this work, a nanocomposite material made of copper (Cu reinforced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs up to 10 vol. % was prepared and their thermal behaviour was measured experimentally and evaluated using numerical simulation. In order to numerically predict the thermal behaviour of Cu/CNTs composites, three different prediction methods were performed. The results showed that rules of mixture method records the highest thermal conductivity for all predicted composites. In contrast, the prediction model which takes into account the influence of the interface thermal resistance between CNTs and copper particles, has shown the lowest thermal conductivity which considered as the closest results to the experimental measurement. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities showed remarkable increase after adding 5 vol.% CNTs and higher than the thermal conductivities predicted via Nan models, indicating that the improved fabrication technique of powder injection molding that has been used to produced Cu/CNTs nanocomposites has overcome the challenges assumed in the mathematical models.

  15. Thermal transport characterization of hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons using molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asir Intisar Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to similar atomic bonding and electronic structure to graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN has broad application prospects such as the design of next generation energy efficient nano-electronic devices. Practical design and efficient performance of these devices based on h-BN nanostructures would require proper thermal characterization of h-BN nanostructures. Hence, in this study we have performed equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD simulation using an optimized Tersoff-type interatomic potential to model the thermal transport of nanometer sized zigzag hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons (h-BNNRs. We have investigated the thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs as a function of temperature, length and width. Thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs shows strong temperature dependence. With increasing width, thermal conductivity increases while an opposite pattern is observed with the increase in length. Our study on h-BNNRs shows considerably lower thermal conductivity compared to GNRs. To elucidate these aspects, we have calculated phonon density of states for both h-BNNRs and GNRs. Moreover, using EMD we have explored the impact of different vacancies, namely, point vacancy, edge vacancy and bi-vacancy on the thermal conductivity of h-BNNRs. With varying percentages of vacancies, significant reduction in thermal conductivity is observed and it is found that, edge and point vacancies are comparatively more destructive than bi-vacancies. Such study would contribute further into the growing interest for accurate thermal transport characterization of low dimensional nanostructures.

  16. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  17. Thermal comfort range of a military cold protection glove: database by thermophysiological simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Carsten; Uedelhoven, Wolfgang H; Kurz, Bernhard; Glitz, Karl Jochen

    2008-09-01

    The thermal insulation properties of a military wet/cold protection glove of the German Bundeswehr were investigated using the thermophysiological simulation device CYBOR with a heated full-scale hand model. The aim of this study was the physiology related and more reliable estimation of a database for the thermal comfort range of the glove in terms of environmental limit temperatures and maximum safe wearing times (limit times). For that purpose the simulation device CYBOR is equipped with a control feature allowing the simulation of the physiological effect that the blood flow into the hands as the dominant heat source is reduced with decreasing skin temperature (vasoconstriction effect). In the simulation test, the criterion defining the thermal comfort range of the glove was the maintenance of a minimum hand phantom skin temperature of 15 degrees C. For various assumed metabolic rates between 50 and 175 W m(-2) and environmental temperatures down to -22 degrees C, the maximum safe wearing times within the thermal comfort range of the military glove were estimated between only 20 min and almost 1 h. The used simulation scenario for the prediction of environmental limit temperatures, however, tends to deliver too low values in correlation to the estimated limit times and needs further critical consideration. The estimated data concerning the thermal comfort range of the wet/cold protection glove of the German Bundeswehr leads to the recommendation for a use of this model in mild cold climatic regions. The presented thermophysiological simulation procedure for the evaluation of the cold protection properties of gloves in terms of maximum safe wearing times within the thermal comfort range can be a useful tool to establish practical operating instructions for soldiers or civilians acting in cold environments.

  18. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  19. Numerical simulation of thermal loading produced by shaped high power laser onto engine parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hongwei; Li Shaoxia; Zhang Ling; Yu Gang; Zhou Liang; Tan Jiansong

    2010-01-01

    Recently a new method for simulating the thermal loading on pistons of diesel engines was reported. The spatially shaped high power laser is employed as the heat source, and some preliminary experimental and numerical work was carried out. In this paper, a further effort was made to extend this simulation method to some other important engine parts such as cylinder heads. The incident Gaussian beam was transformed into concentric multi-circular patterns of specific intensity distributions, with the aid of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). By incorporating the appropriate repetitive laser pulses, the designed transient temperature fields and thermal loadings in the engine parts could be simulated. Thermal-structural numerical models for pistons and cylinder heads were built to predict the transient temperature and thermal stress. The models were also employed to find the optimal intensity distributions of the transformed laser beam that could produce the target transient temperature fields. Comparison of experimental and numerical results demonstrated that this systematic approach is effective in simulating the thermal loading on the engine parts.

  20. Simulation study of negative thermal expansion in yttrium tungstate Y2W3O12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Leila H N; Dove, Martin T

    2015-05-13

    A simulation study of negative thermal expansion in Y2W3O12 was carried out using calculations of phonon dispersion curves through the application of density functional perturbation theory. The mode eigenvectors were mapped onto flexibility models and results compared with calculations of the mode Grüneisen parameters. It was found that many lower-frequency phonons contribute to negative thermal expansion in Y2W3O12, all of which can be described in terms of rotations of effectively rigid WO4 tetrahedra and Y-O rods. The results are strikingly different from previous phonon studies of higher-symmetry materials that show negative thermal expansion.

  1. Numerical Algorithms for System Level Electro-Thermal Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Culpo, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    In den kommenden Jahren wird eine genaue elektro-thermische Analyse von integrierten Schaltungen der Schlüssel zu ihrem zuverlässigen und kostengünstigen Design werden. Werkzeuge im Computer-Aided-Design müssen daher Methoden zur Simulation elektro-thermischer Effekte zur Verfügung stellen. Ein robuster Algorithmus zur Lösung dieser Probleme erfordert einerseits ein hohes Maß an Integration in die Designprozesse der Industrie, um effektiv einsetzbar zu sein und andererseits die Möglichkeit...

  2. Assessment of the thermal environment in a simulated aircraft cabin using thermal manikin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Zukowska, Daria; Jama, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    investigation in which 4 groups of 17 subjects participated, each group being exposed to the same three temperature conditions during simulated 7-hour transatlantic flights. The assessments indicate that an air temperature increase in the middle of a 7-hour flight period followed by a decrease before landing...

  3. Thermal Field Analysis and Simulation of an Infrared Belt Furnace Used for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During solar cell firing, volatile organic compounds (VOC and a small number of metal particles were removed using the gas flow. When the gas flow was disturbed by the thermal field of infrared belt furnace and structure, the metal particles in the discharging gas flow randomly adhered to the surface of solar cell, possibly causing contamination. Meanwhile, the gas flow also affected the thermal uniformity of the solar cell. In this paper, the heating mechanism of the solar cell caused by radiation, convection, and conduction during firing was analyzed. Afterward, four 2-dimensional (2D models of the furnace were proposed. The transient thermal fields with different gas inlets, outlets, and internal structures were simulated. The thermal fields and the temperature of the solar cell could remain stable and uniform when the gas outlets were installed at the ends and in the middle of the furnace, with the gas inlets being distributed evenly. To verify the results, we produced four types of furnaces according to the four simulated results. The experimental results indicated that the thermal distribution of the furnace and the characteristics of the solar cells were consistent with the simulation. These experiments improved the efficiency of the solar cells while optimizing the solar cell manufacturing equipment.

  4. A simplified tool for building layout design based on thermal comfort simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort aspects of indoor spaces are crucial during the design stages of building layout planning. This study presents a simplified tool based on thermal comfort using predicted mean vote (PMV index. Thermal comfort simulations were performed for 14 different possible room layouts based on window configurations. ECOTECT 12 was used to determine the PMV of these rooms for one full year, leading to 17,808 simulations. Simulations were performed for three different climatic zones in India and were validated using in-situ measurements from one of these climatic zones. For moderate climates, rooms with window openings on the south façade exhibited the best thermal comfort conditions for nights, with comfort conditions prevailing for approximately 79.25% of the time annually. For operation during the day, windows on the north façade are favored, with thermal comfort conditions prevailing for approximately 77.74% of the time annually. Similar results for day and night time operation for other two climatic zones are presented. Such an output is essential in deciding the layout of buildings on the basis of functionality of the different rooms (living room, bedroom, kitchen corresponding to different operation times of the day.

  5. Simulation of thermal environment in a three-layer vinyl greenhouse by natural ventilation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tea-Hwan; Shin, Ki-Yeol; Yoon, Si-Won; Im, Yong-Hoon; Chang, Ki-Chang

    2017-11-01

    A high energy, efficient, harmonious, ecological greenhouse has been highlighted by advanced future agricultural technology recently. This greenhouse is essential for expanding the production cycle toward growth conditions through combined thermal environmental control. However, it has a negative effect on farming income via huge energy supply expenses. Because not only production income, but operating costs related to thermal load for thermal environment control is important in farming income, it needs studies such as a harmonious ecological greenhouse using natural ventilation control. This study is simulated for energy consumption and thermal environmental conditions in a three-layered greenhouse by natural ventilation using window opening. A virtual 3D model of a three-layered greenhouse was designed based on the real one in the Gangneung area. This 3D model was used to calculate a thermal environment state such as indoor temperature, relative humidity, and thermal load in the case of a window opening rate from 0 to 100%. There was also a heat exchange operated for heating or cooling controlled by various setting temperatures. The results show that the cooling load can be reduced by natural ventilation control in the summer season, and the heat exchange capacity for heating can also be simulated for growth conditions in the winter season.

  6. Experimental thermal hydraulic facility for simulating LOCA behaviour of pressurised heavy water power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, M.K.; John, P.K.; Jayaraj, N.; Chatterjee, P.B.; Das, Sandeep; John, Benny; Sharma, A.K.; Prasad, N.; Singhal, M.; Malhotra, P.K.; Haldar, S.C.; Bhambra, H.S.; Chadda, S.K.; Chandra, Umesh

    2006-01-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic facility being set up adjacent to R and D Centre at Tarapur is a 13 MW full-elevation scaled down facility having the key components of PHT System of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The objective of the facility is to study thermal hydraulic behaviour of PHT System of PHWR by simulating various transients and accidental scenarios, to conduct safety related and operational transient studies and validation of various thermal hydraulic computer codes developed for analysis. The design of thermal hydraulic facility is based on the process parameters of a large PHWR with respect to fluid mass flux, transit time, flow velocity, pressure, temperature and enthalpy in PHT System. Experiments would be conducted in the facility to gain an improved understanding of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of large size PHWR during loss of coolant accident scenarios with forced and natural thermo-siphoning circulation modes etc. The data collected from the experiments would be used in validating computer codes developed for safety analysis. The facility is extensively instrumented to measure parameters such as temperature, pressure, flow, level, void-fraction at key locations. This paper gives the design philosophy used for scaling, design of major components of primary and secondary circuit of Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Facility and details of simulated experiments to be carried out. (author)

  7. Comparison of fabric skins for the simulation of sweating on thermal manikins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelblen, Barbara; Psikuta, Agnes; Bogdan, Anna; Annaheim, Simon; Rossi, René M.

    2017-09-01

    Sweating is an important thermoregulatory process helping to dissipate heat and, thus, to prevent overheating of the human body. Simulations of human thermo-physiological responses in hot conditions or during exercising are helpful for assessing heat stress; however, realistic sweating simulation and evaporative cooling is needed. To this end, thermal manikins dressed with a tight fabric skin can be used, and the properties of this skin should help human-like sweat evaporation simulation. Four fabrics, i.e., cotton with elastane, polyester, polyamide with elastane, and a skin provided by a manikin manufacturer (Thermetrics) were compared in this study. The moisture management properties of the fabrics have been investigated in basic tests with regard to all phases of sweating relevant for simulating human thermo-physiological responses, namely, onset of sweating, fully developed sweating, and drying. The suitability of the fabrics for standard tests, such as clothing evaporative resistance measurements, was evaluated based on tests corresponding to the middle phase of sweating. Simulations with a head manikin coupled to a thermo-physiological model were performed to evaluate the overall performance of the skins. The results of the study showed that three out of four evaluated fabrics have adequate moisture management properties with regard to the simulation of sweating, which was confirmed in the coupled simulation with the head manikin. The presented tests are helpful for comparing the efficiency of different fabrics to simulate sweat-induced evaporative cooling on thermal manikins.

  8. Development of the NSSS thermal-hydraulic program for YGN unit 1 simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Doo; Jeong, Jae Jun; Lee, Won Jae; Chung, Bub Dong; Ha, Kwi Seok; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2000-09-01

    The NSSS thermal-hydraulic programs installed in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually adopt very simplified physical models for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic phenomena, which entails inaccurate results and the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS T/H program (named 'ARTS' code) for use in YongGwang Nuclear Unit 1 full-scope simulator. The best-estimate code RETRAN03, developed by EPRI and approved by USNRC, was selected as a reference code of ARTS. For the development of ARTS, the followings have been performed: -Improvement of the robustness of RETRAN - Improvement of the real-time simulation capability of RETRAN - Optimum input data generation for the NSSS simulation - New model development that cannot be efficiently modeled by RETRAN - Assessment of the ARTS code. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted in both personal computers (Windows 98, Visual fortran) and the simulator development environment (Windows NT, GSE simulator development tool). The results were resonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation and robustness.

  9. Model of natural ventilation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a model of natural ventilation of buildings at the stage of design and a consequence of the behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is made by coupling multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others...

  10. Fast thermal simulations and temperature optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning, including realistic 3D vessel networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H. P.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Bel, A.; Crezee, J.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate thermal simulations in hyperthermia treatment planning require discrete modeling of large blood vessels. The very long computation time of the finite difference based DIscrete VAsculature model (DIVA) developed for this purpose is impractical for clinical applications. In this work, a fast

  11. Advances in thermal hydraulic and neutronic simulation for reactor analysis and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.M.; Blomquist, R.N.; Canfield, T.R.; Ewing, T.F.; Garner, P.L.; Gelbard, E.M.; Gross, K.C.; Minkoff, M.; Valentin, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes several large-scale computational models developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation and analysis of thermal-hydraulic and neutronic events in nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced parallel computing technologies on these computational models is emphasized

  12. Thermal simulation of surface micromachined polysilicon hot plates of low power consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumitrescu, Marius; Cobianu, Cornel; Lungu, Dan; Pascu, Adrian; Kolev, Spas; van den Berg, Albert

    1999-01-01

    A simple, IC compatible, surface micromachined polysilicon membrane was technologically designed and thermally simulated by 3D finite element ‘COSMOS' program in order to investigate its capability to work as a micro hot plate for a gas sensing test structure of low power consumption. For an

  13. Layout to circuit extraction for three-dimensional thermal-electrical circuit simulation of device structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbenborg, B.H.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bosma, A.; de Graaff, H.C.; de Graaff, H.C.; Mouthaan, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed for extraction of coupled networks from layout information for simulation of electrothermal device behavior. The networks represent a three-dimensional (3-D) device structure with circuit elements. The electrical and thermal characteristics of this circuit

  14. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 1. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model. M R Pandya D B Shah H J Trivedi S Panigrahy. Volume 120 Issue 1 February 2011 pp 19-25 ...

  15. Parallel linear solvers for simulations of reactor thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Antal, S.P.; Edge, B.; Keyes, D.E.; Shaver, D.; Bolotnov, I.A.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE-CMFD, performs multiphase flow simulations in complex domains using implicit nonlinear treatment of the governing equations and in parallel, which is a very challenging environment for the linear solver. The present work illustrates how the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) and scalable Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) preconditioner from Hypre can be utilized to construct robust and scalable linear solvers for the Newton correction equation obtained from the discretized system of governing conservation equations in NPHASE-CMFD. The overall long-tem objective of this work is to extend the NPHASE-CMFD code into a fully-scalable solver of multiphase flow and heat transfer problems, applicable to both steady-state and stiff time-dependent phenomena in complete fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors and, eventually, the entire reactor core (such as the Virtual Reactor concept envisioned by CASL). This campaign appropriately begins with the linear algebraic equation solver, which is traditionally a bottleneck to scalability in PDE-based codes. The computational complexity of the solver is usually superlinear in problem size, whereas the rest of the code, the “physics” portion, usually has its complexity linear in the problem size. (author)

  16. Dynamical building simulation: A low order model for thermal bridges losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y. [School of Environment and Energy, Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Beijing 100044 (China); Roux, J.J. [Centre de thermique de Lyon, CNRS-UMR 5008 - UCBL - INSA de LYON, Domaine scientifique de la Doua, Bat. Reyssinet, 40 rue des arts, Villeurbanne 69100 (France); Zhao, L.H. [Department of Architecture, South China University of Technology, GuangZhou 510640 (China); Jiang, Y. [School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-07-01

    Thermal bridges losses represent an increasing part of heat losses owing to significant three-dimensional heat transfer characteristics in modern buildings, but one-dimensional models are used in most simulation software for thermal analyses to simplify the calculations. State model reduction techniques were used to develop low-order three-dimensional heat transfer model for additional losses of thermal bridges, which is efficient and accuracy. Coupling this technique with traditional one-dimensional model for walls losses, it is possible to reduce a large amount of time simulations. Low-order model was validated from frequency response and time-domain output. And the effect of this model was shown with its implementation in software ''TRNSYS''. (author)

  17. Fuel-element simulator for investigating thermal-hydraulic accidents in water-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, S.M.; Kumskoi, V.V.; Pavlov, A.M.; Ulanovskii, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel-element simulator should provide the necessary environmental parameters (thermal flux, and temperature at the cladding surface) and satisfy the requirements of reliability and modeling an actual fuel element, according to a formulated research problem. A universal simulator design, which could be used in a wide range of research, does not exist up to now and it is hardly useful in general. In developing fuel-element simulators to study loss-of-coolant accidents in water-water reactors, the most important condition from the modeling point of view is that the overall heat capacity of the simulator should correspond to that of the fuel element. The overall heat capacity and the temperature distribution over the reactor cross section determine the reserve of accumulated energy, which cannot be modeled by simply increasing the supplied electrical power. Experiments showed the magnesium oxide, as compared to other materials, is the best model of uranium oxide due to the closeness of the heat transfer coefficient and the thermal conductivity of these materials. Moreover, MgO has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, close to that of stainless steel. The construction of fuel-element simulators often uses boron nitride powder, which is densified by one means or another. Boron nitride has the highest thermal conductivity (besides beryllium oxide), but it has a lower electrical conductivity than magnesium oxide. These materials simultaneously fulfill the function of electrically insulating the heating element from the cladding. The basic disadvantage of this design is that the simulator has no gas gap; however, this is compensated by its simplicity, reliability, and long lifetime. This article presents several test designs for analysis and solving problems characteristic of loss-of-coolant accidents. Test results from VVER-440 fuel rod simulators using 19-rod assemblies an presented

  18. The effect of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in heat transfer simulations of frozen biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Y

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity value of pure water ice is inversely proportional to the temperature and decreases about 5-fold as the temperature increases from the liquid nitrogen boiling temperature (77 K to the freezing point of pure water. The temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is typically overlooked in bioheat transfer simulations. A closed-form solution of the one-dimensional temperature distribution in frozen water and blood is presented in this study, based on a new thermal conductivity model. Results indicate that temperatures are overestimated up to 38K, and heat fluxes through the frozen region boundaries are underestimated by a factor of 2, when the temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity is neglected.

  19. Effect of point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2: molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel is an important materials property that affects fuel performance since it is a key parameter determining the temperature distribution in the fuel, thus governing, e.g., dimensional changes due to thermal expansion, fission gas release rates, etc. [1] The thermal conductivity of UO2 nuclear fuel is also affected by fission gas, fission products, defects, and microstructural features such as grain boundaries. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to determine quantitatively, the effect of irradiation induced point defects on the thermal conductivity of UO2, as a function of defect concentrations, for a range of temperatures, 300 – 1500 K. The results will be used to develop enhanced continuum thermal conductivity models for MARMOT and BISON by INL. These models express the thermal conductivity as a function of microstructure state-variables, thus enabling thermal conductivity models with closer connection to the physical state of the fuel [2].

  20. TRSM-a thermal-hydraulic real-time simulation model for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weichang

    1997-01-01

    TRSM (a Thermal-hydraulic Real-time Simulation Model) has been developed for PWR real-time simulation and best-estimate prediction of normal operating and abnormal accident conditions. It is a non-equilibrium two phase flow thermal-hydraulic model based on five basic conservation equations. A drift flux model is used to account for the unequal velocities of liquid and gaseous mixture, with or without the presence of the noncondensibles. Critical flow models are applied for break flow and valve flow calculations. A 5-regime two phase heat convection model is applied for clad-to-coolant as well as fluid-to-tubing heat transfer. A rigorous reactor coolant pump model is used to calculate the pressure drop and rise for the suction and discharge ends with complete pump characteristics curves included. The TRSM model has been adapted in the full-scale training simulator of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant 300 MW unit to simulate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the NSSS. The simulation results of a cold leg LOCA and a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident are presented

  1. interThermalPhaseChangeFoam—A framework for two-phase flow simulations with thermally driven phase change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The volume-of-fluid (VOF approach is a mature technique for simulating two-phase flows. However, VOF simulation of phase-change heat transfer is still in its infancy. Multiple closure formulations have been proposed in the literature, each suited to different applications. While these have enabled significant research advances, few implementations are publicly available, actively maintained, or inter-operable. Here, a VOF solver is presented (interThermalPhaseChangeFoam, which incorporates an extensible framework for phase-change heat transfer modeling, enabling simulation of diverse phenomena in a single environment. The solver employs object oriented OpenFOAM library features, including Run-Time-Type-Identification to enable rapid implementation and run-time selection of phase change and surface tension force models. The solver is packaged with multiple phase change and surface tension closure models, adapted and refined from earlier studies. This code has previously been applied to study wavy film condensation, Taylor flow evaporation, nucleate boiling, and dropwise condensation. Tutorial cases are provided for simulation of horizontal film condensation, smooth and wavy falling film condensation, nucleate boiling, and bubble condensation. Validation and grid sensitivity studies, interfacial transport models, effects of spurious currents from surface tension models, effects of artificial heat transfer due to numerical factors, and parallel scaling performance are described in detail in the Supplemental Material (see Appendix A. By incorporating the framework and demonstration cases into a single environment, users can rapidly apply the solver to study phase-change processes of interest.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  3. The effects of pen partitions and thermal pig simulators on airflow in a livestock test room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B.; Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of pen partitions and heated simulated pigs on airflow in a slot ventilated test room and to evaluate computer fluid dynamics (CFD) as a tool to predict airflow in livestock rooms. To obtain two-dimensional flow in the occupied zone, four...... partitions which divided the room into four equal-sized pens. The guiding plates beneath the ceiling were efficient in creating two-dimensional how in the occupied zone, but they increased the differences between measured and simulated air velocity close to the ceiling and close to the floor. Both...... measurements and CFD simulations showed that the introduction of pen partitions and thermal pig simulators reduced the air velocities in the occupied zone of the test room. Detailed geometric modelling of the animals might often be unnecessary for simulation of airflow in livestock rooms. This will especially...

  4. A model selection support system for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Shimizu, Kenji; Sugano, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1990-01-01

    In order to execute efficiently a dynamic simulation of a large-scaled engineering system such as a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to develop intelligent simulation support system for all phases of the simulation. This study is concerned with the intelligent support for the program development phase and is engaged in the adequate model selection support method by applying AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques to execute a simulation consistent with its purpose and conditions. A proto-type expert system to support the model selection for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics in the case of cold leg small break loss-of-coolant accident of PWR plant is now under development on a personal computer. The steps to support the selection of both fluid model and constitutive equations for the drift flux model have been developed. Several cases of model selection were carried out and reasonable model selection results were obtained. (author)

  5. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  6. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  7. HELIOSEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY OF SIMULATED SUNSPOTS: MAGNETIC AND THERMAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO TRAVEL TIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, T. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D. [NorthWest Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Birch, A. C., E-mail: tobias@iac.es [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  8. Standard Practice for Solar Simulation for Thermal Balance Testing of Spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1973-01-01

    1.1 Purpose: 1.1.1 The primary purpose of this practice is to provide guidance for making adequate thermal balance tests of spacecraft and components where solar simulation has been determined to be the applicable method. Careful adherence to this practice should ensure the adequate simulation of the radiation environment of space for thermal tests of space vehicles. 1.1.2 A corollary purpose is to provide the proper test environment for systems-integration tests of space vehicles. An accurate space-simulation test for thermal balance generally will provide a good environment for operating all electrical and mechanical systems in their various mission modes to determine interferences within the complete system. Although adherence to this practice will provide the correct thermal environment for this type of test, there is no discussion of the extensive electronic equipment and procedures required to support systems-integration testing. 1.2 Nonapplicability—This practice does not apply to or provide inco...

  9. A non-equilibrium simulation of thermal constriction in a cascaded arc hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, K S C; Goedheer, W J; Van Dijk, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    The cascaded arc hydrogen plasma of Pilot-PSI is studied in a non-LTE model. We demonstrate that the effect of vibrationally excited molecules on the heavy-particle-assisted dissociation is crucial for obtaining thermal constriction. To the best of our knowledge, thermal constriction has not been obtained before in a non-LTE simulation. Probably, realistic numerical studies of this type of plasma were hindered by numerical problems, preventing the non-LTE simulations to show characteristic physical mechanisms such as thermal constriction. In this paper we show that with the help of appropriate numerical strategies thermal constriction can be obtained in a non-LTE simulation. To this end, a new source term linearization technique is developed, which ensures physical solutions even near chemical equilibrium where the composition is dominated by chemical source terms. Results of the model are compared with experiments on Pilot-PSI and show good agreement with pressure and voltage measurements in the source. (paper)

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of a coded-aperture thermal neutron camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2011-01-01

    We employed the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to simulate image formation in a coded-aperture thermal-neutron camera. The camera, developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), consists of a 20 x 17 cm 2 active area 3 He-filled position-sensitive wire chamber in a cadmium enclosure box. The front of the box is a coded-aperture cadmium mask (at present with three different resolutions). We tested the detector experimentally with various arrangements of moderated point-neutron sources. The purpose of using the Monte Carlo modeling was to develop an easily modifiable model of the device to predict the detector's behavior using different mask patterns, and also to generate images of extended-area sources or large numbers (up to ten) of them, that is important for nonproliferation and arms-control verification, but difficult to achieve experimentally. In the model, we utilized the advanced geometry capabilities of the MCNPX code to simulate the coded aperture mask. Furthermore, the code simulated the production of thermal neutrons from fission sources surrounded by a thermalizer. With this code we also determined the thermal-neutron shadow cast by the cadmium mask; the calculations encompassed fast- and epithermal-neutrons penetrating into the detector through the mask. Since the process of signal production in 3 He-filled position-sensitive wire chambers is well known, we omitted this part from our modeling. Simplified efficiency values were used for the three (thermal, epithermal, and fast) neutron-energy regions. Electronic noise and the room's background were included as a uniform irradiation component. We processed the experimental- and simulated-images using identical LabVIEW virtual instruments. (author)

  11. Thermal-hydraulic simulation and analysis of Research Reactor Cooling Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Khatib, H.H.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to formulate a model to simulate the thermal hydraulic behavior of integrated cooling system in a typical material testing reactor (MTR) under loss of ultimate heat sink, the model involves three interactively coupled sub-models for reactor core, heat exchanger and cooling tower. The developed model predicts the temperature profiles in addition it predicts inlet and outlet temperatures of the hot and cold stream as well as the heat exchangers and cooling tower. The model is validated against PARET code for steady-state operation and also verified by the reactor operational records, and then the model is used to simulate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor under a loss of ultimate heat sink. The simulation is performed for two operational regimes named regime I of (11 MW) thermal power and three operated cooling tower cells and regime II of (22 MW) thermal power and six operated cooling tower cells. In regime I, the simulation is performed for 1, 2 and 3 cooling tower failed cells while in regime II, it is performed for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 cooling tower failed cells. The safety action is conducted by the reactor protection system (RPS) named power reduction safety action, it is triggered to decrease the reactor power by amount of 20% of the present power when the water inlet temperature to the core reaches 43 degree C and a scram (emergency shutdown) is triggered in case of the inlet temperature reaches 44 degree C. The model results are analyzed and discussed. The temperature profiles of fuel, clad and coolant are predicted during transient where its maximum values are far from thermal hydraulic limits.

  12. Computer simulation of thermal conductivity in vulcanized polyisoprene at variable strain and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Sven; Meyer, Jan; Hentschke, Reinhard

    2017-08-01

    We study the thermal conductivity tensor in an atomistic model of vulcanized cis-1,4-polyisoprene (PI) rubber via molecular dynamics simulations. Our polymer force field is based on V. A. Harmandaris et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 436 (2002), 10.1063/1.1416872], whereas the polymerization algorithm follows the description in J. Hager et al. [Macromolecules 48, 9039 (2015), 10.1021/acs.macromol.5b01864]. The polymer chains are chemically cross linked via sulfur bridges of adjustable cross-link density. A volume-conserving uniaxial strain of up to 200% is applied to the systems. The widely used GROMACS simulation package is adapted to allow using the Green-Kubo approach to calculate the thermal conductivity tensor components. Our analysis of the heat flux autocorrelation functions leads to the conclusion that the thermal conductivity in PI is governed by short-lived phonon modes at low wave numbers due to deformation of the monomers along the polymer backbone. Applying uniaxial strain causes increased orientation of monomers along the strain direction, which enhances the attendant thermal conductivity component. We find an exponential increase of the conductivity in stretch direction in terms of an attendant orientation order parameter. This is accompanied by a simultaneous decline of thermal conductivity in the orthogonal directions. Increase of the cross-link density only has a weak effect on thermal conductivity in the unstrained system, even at high cross-link density. In the strained system we do observed a rising thermal conductivity in the limit of high stress. This increase is attributed to enhanced coupling between chains rather than to their orientation.

  13. Read/write simulation of thermally stabilized magnetic recording media with a thin film head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanosu, S.; Abe, T.; Yoneyama, Y.; Fujiwara, N.; Shinagawa, K.

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the thermal stability of an antiferromagnetically coupled medium and a keepered one with a soft magnetic underlayer, a finite element read/write simulation based on the Poisson equation is performed on the 2D model of the medium and a thin film head system. The model used for the recording layer is a Stoner-Wohlfarth model extended at finite temperatures. As a result, it is found that both media have high thermal stability compared with the conventional medium

  14. Finger temperature as a predictor of thermal comfort for sedentary passengers in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a simulated aircraft cabin with 21 seats installed in a climate chamber, to determine the extent to which passengers’ perception of cabin air quality is affected by air temperature. The temperature inside the cabin was set at three different levels, 20.6, 23.3 and 26...... that were made included finger temperature. The purpose of the present paper is to show that mean finger temperature is a good predictor of mean thermal vote (MTV) on the seven-point scale of thermal sensation. The results indicate that women and younger subjects have slightly colder fingers....

  15. Applying measured reflection from the ground to simulations of thermal perfromance of solar collectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation on tilted and vertical surfaces in the Arctic is, in large parts of the year, strongly influenced by reflection from snow. In connection with planning and optimization of energy efficient buildings and solar energy systems in the Arctic, it is important to have an accurate...... and the azimuth of the surface in question. The paper will present an analysis of simulations of the thermal performance of solar collectors using the standard description of the albedo and using the albedo determined by the measurements. It will be elucidated how important an accurate description...... of the reflection from the ground is for the thermal performance of solar collectors....

  16. The effects of volcanic eruptions on simulated ocean heat content and thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P.; Achutarao, K.; Barnett, T.; Gregory, J.; Pierce, D.; Santer, B.; Taylor, K.; Wigley, T.

    2006-12-01

    We examine the ocean heat content in a recent suite of coupled ocean-atmosphere model simulations of the 20th Century. Our results suggest that 20th Century increases in ocean heat content and sea-level (via thermal expansion) were substantially reduced by the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa. The volcanically-induced cooling of the ocean surface is subducted into deeper ocean layers, where it persists for decades. Temporary reductions in ocean heat content associated with the comparable eruptions of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) were much shorter lived because they occurred relative to a non-stationary background of large, anthropogenically-forced ocean warming. To understand the response of these simulations to volcanic loadings, we focus on multiple realizations of the 20th Century experiment with three models (NCAR CCSM3, GFDL 2.0, and GISS HYCOM). By comparing these runs to control simulations of each model, we track the three dimensional oceanic response to Krakatoa using S/N analysis. Inter-model differences in the oceanic thermal response to Krakatoa are large and arise from differences in external forcing, model physics, and experimental design. Our results suggest that inclusion of the effects of Krakatoa (and perhaps even earlier eruptions) is important for reliable simulation of 20th century ocean heat uptake and thermal expansion. Systematic experimentation will be required to quantify the relative importance of these factors.

  17. Peculiar features of modeling of thermal processes of the cutting area in the SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepchin Ya.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of thermo-physical process of cutting zone by changing certain parameters of the cutting regime, tool geometry or coolant using allows to achieve a higher level of handling performance. The forecasting of thermal processes during metal cutting is characterized by the multifactor of the model and the nonlinearity of the connection between the temperature field of the cutting zone and the processing parameters. Therefore realistic modeling of these processes with regard to the maximum number of influencing factors which will minimize the time and cost of experimental studies is very important. The research investigates the use of computer-aided design SolidWorks Simulation system to analyze the thermal processes occurring in the cutting zone during finishing turning of hardened circular steel cutting blade of superhard material. While modeling, the distribution of heat generated in cut (in the zone of plastic deformation of the workpiece and on the surfaces of friction of the cutting blade with chips and the treated surface is observed by four flows: to the tool, chips, workpiece and the environment. The limiting conditions for the existence of the developed model-geometric, physical and temporal limits are defined. Simulation is performed in steady and transient modes. Control of adequacy of simulation results is made. The conclusions of the analysis of opportunities of CAD SolidWorks Simulation System for research of thermal processes the cutting zone are drawn.

  18. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal conductance at solid-gas interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi; Evans, William; Keblinski, Pawel

    2013-02-01

    The thermal conductance at solid-gas interfaces with different interfacial bonding strengths is calculated through Green-Kubo equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations. Due to the finite size of the simulation system, the long-time integral of the time correlation function of heat power across the solid-gas interface exhibits an exponential decay, which contains the information on interfacial thermal conductance. If an adsorbed gas layer is formed on the solid surface, it is found that the solid-gas interface needs to be defined at a plane outside the adsorbed layer so as to obtain the correct result from the Green-Kubo formula. The EMD simulation result agrees very well with that obtained from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. By calculating the average solid-gas interaction time as a function of solid-gas interaction strength, we find the incident gas atoms thermalize with the metal surface much more rapidly when the surface is covered by adsorbed gas molecules.

  19. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  20. Evaluation of the litcit software for thermal simulation of superficial lasers such as hair removal lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirkavand A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : In this study, we evaluate LITCIT software for its application as a thermal simulation software for superficial hair removal laser systems. Materials and Methods: Two articles were used as our references. Complete information regarding the tissues, such as optical/thermal properties and geometrical modeling and also the laser systems such as wavelength, spot size, pulse duration and fluence were extracted from these texts. Then, this information regarding the tissues and systems was entered into the LITCIT simulation software. Further, we ran the program and saved the results. Finally, we compared our results with the results in references and evaluated the. Results : Output results of the LITCIT show that they are consistent with the results of references that were calculated with a different thermal modeling. Such a small average error shows the accuracy of the software for simulation and calculating the temperature. Conclusions : This simulating software has a good ability to be used as a treatment planning software for superficial lasers. Thus, it can be used for the optimization of treatment parameters and protocols.

  1. Hydrodynamic simulation of non-thermal pressure profiles of galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Kaylea; Nagai, Daisuke [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Lau, Erwin T., E-mail: kaylea.nelson@yale.edu [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Cosmological constraints from X-ray and microwave observations of galaxy clusters are subjected to systematic uncertainties. Non-thermal pressure support due to internal gas motions in galaxy clusters is one of the major sources of astrophysical uncertainties. Using a mass-limited sample of galaxy clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, we characterize the non-thermal pressure fraction profile and study its dependence on redshift, mass, and mass accretion rate. We find that the non-thermal pressure fraction profile is universal across redshift when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe instead of the commonly used critical density. We also find that the non-thermal pressure is predominantly radial, and the gas velocity anisotropy profile exhibits strong universality when galaxy cluster radii are defined with respect to the mean matter density of the universe. However, we find that the non-thermal pressure fraction is strongly dependent on the mass accretion rate of the galaxy cluster. We provide fitting formulae for the universal non-thermal pressure fraction and velocity anisotropy profiles of gas in galaxy clusters, which should be useful in modeling astrophysical uncertainties pertinent to using galaxy clusters as cosmological probes.

  2. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  3. Large eddy simulation on thermal fluid mixing in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, R.; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Kernenergie und Energiesysteme (IKE)

    2014-11-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage caused in piping systems is an important problem encountered in the context of nuclear safety and lifetime management of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The T-junction piping system present in the Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) is more vulnerable to thermal fatigue cracking. In this numerical study, thermal mixing of fluids at temperature difference (?T) of 117 K between the mixing fluids is analyzed. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed with conjugate heat transfer between the fluid and structure. LES is performed based on the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at University of Stuttgart. The results show an intense turbulent mixing of fluids downstream of T-junction. Amplitude of temperature fluctuations near the wall region and its corresponding frequency distribution is analyzed. LES is performed using commercial CFD software ANSYS CFX 14.0.

  4. Comparative thermal cyclic test of different beryllium grades previously subjected to simulated disruption loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervash, A.; Giniyatulin, R.; Mazul, I.

    1999-01-01

    Considering beryllium as plasma facing armour this paper presents recent results obtained in Russia. A special process of joining beryllium to a Cu-alloy material structure is described and recent results of thermal cycling tests of such joints are presented. Summarizing the results, the authors show that a Cu-alloy heat sink structure armoured with beryllium can survive high heat fluxes (≥10 MW/m 2 ) during 1000 heating/cooling cycles without serious damage to the armour material and its joint. The principal feasibility of thermal cycling of beryllium grades and their joints directly in the core of a nuclear reactor is demonstrated and the main results of this test are presented. The paper also describes the thermal cycling of different beryllium grades having cracks initiated by previously applied high heat loads simulating plasma disruptions. (orig.)

  5. Numerical Simulation of the Thermal Performance of a Dry Storage Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heui-Yung Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat flow characteristics and thermal performance of a dry storage cask were investigated via thermal flow experiments and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation. The results indicate that there are many inner circulations in the flow channel of the cask (the channel width is 10 cm. These circulations affect the channel airflow efficiency, which in turn affects the heat dissipation of the dry storage cask. The daily operating temperatures at the top concrete lid and the upper locations of the concrete cask are higher than those permitted by the design specification. The installation of the salt particle collection device has a limited negative effect on the thermal dissipation performance of the dry storage cask.

  6. Survival of juvenile fishes receiving thermal and mechanical stresses in a simulated power plant condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedl, R.J.; Coutant, C.C.

    Experiments were conducted in a water-recirculating loop to determine the effects of fluid-induced stresses (e.g., turbulence, pressure, and vacuum) on six species of larval fish and one species each of frog tadpoles and zooplankton. These stresses simulate the insults developed in the condenser portion, but not including the pump, of a steam power plant. Some experiments were conducted with thermal stresses superimposed on fluid-induced stresses. Fluid-induced stresses of the magnitude developed in these experiments were generally not fatal to the larval fish within the precision of the experiments, although some sublethal effects were noted. When thermal stress was superimposed on the fluid-induced stresses, the mortalities were equivalent to those resulting from thermal stress alone. Fluid-induced stresses of low magnitude were not fatal to Daphnia magna, but fluid-induced stresses of higher magnitude were responsible for significant mortalities. (U.S.)

  7. The CFD Simulation on Thermal Comfort in a library Building in the Tropics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, Y. H.; Ghazali, N. N. N.; Badarudin, A.; Goh, F. C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analysis for thermal comfort in a library. The room model includes library layout, equipment and peripheral positions as well as the positions of inlet and outlet air for IAQ controls. Cold clean air is supplied to the room through ceiling-mounted air grilles and exhausted through air grilles situated on the same ceiling. A commercial CFD package was used in this study to achieve solutions of the distribution of airflow velocity and temperature. Using high quality meshes is vital to the overall accuracy of the results. Simulation results show a good agreement with experimental data from the literature. This study has thoroughly analysed the indoor thermal conditions and airflow characteristics of the building. In addition, verification of the CFD program with experimental data showed that the program can provide reasonable and reliable predictions on thermal comfort performance with the help of precise boundary conditions.

  8. On the collaborative design and simulation of space camera: stop structural/thermal/optical) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Pengfei; Lei, Wenping

    2017-11-01

    A number of disciplines (mechanics, structures, thermal, and optics) are needed to design and build Space Camera. Separate design models are normally constructed by each discipline CAD/CAE tools. Design and analysis is conducted largely in parallel subject to requirements that have been levied on each discipline, and technical interaction between the different disciplines is limited and infrequent. As a result a unified view of the Space Camera design across discipline boundaries is not directly possible in the approach above, and generating one would require a large manual, and error-prone process. A collaborative environment that is built on abstract model and performance template allows engineering data and CAD/CAE results to be shared across above discipline boundaries within a common interface, so that it can help to attain speedy multivariate design and directly evaluate optical performance under environment loadings. A small interdisciplinary engineering team from Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics and Electricity has recently conducted a Structural/Thermal/Optical (STOP) analysis of a space camera with this collaborative environment. STOP analysis evaluates the changes in image quality that arise from the structural deformations when the thermal environment of the camera changes throughout its orbit. STOP analyses were conducted for four different test conditions applied during final thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing of the payload on the ground. The STOP Simulation Process begins with importing an integrated CAD model of the camera geometry into the collaborative environment, within which 1. Independent thermal and structural meshes are generated. 2. The thermal mesh and relevant engineering data for material properties and thermal boundary conditions are then used to compute temperature distributions at nodal points in both the thermal and structures mesh through Thermal Desktop, a COTS thermal design and analysis code. 3. Thermally induced structural

  9. Absorbed Heat-flux Method for Ground Simulation of On-orbit Thermal Environment of Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Soo Kim

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available An absorbed heat-flux method for ground simulation of on-orbit thermal environment of satellite is addressed in this paper. For satellite ground test, high vacuum and extremely low temperature of deep space are achieved by space simulation chamber, while spatial environmental heating is simulated by employing the absorbed heat-flux method. The methodology is explained in detail with test requirement and setup implemented on a satellite. Developed heat-load control system is presented with an adjusted PID-control logic and the system schematic realized is shown. A practical and successful application of the heat simulation method to KOMPSAT(Korea Multi-purpose Satellitethermal environmental test is demonstrated, finally.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations for the motion of evaporative droplets driven by thermal gradients along nanochannels

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Congmin

    2013-04-04

    For a one-component fluid on a solid substrate, a thermal singularity may occur at the contact line where the liquid-vapor interface intersects the solid surface. Physically, the liquid-vapor interface is almost isothermal at the liquid-vapor coexistence temperature in one-component fluids while the solid surface is almost isothermal for solids of high thermal conductivity. Therefore, a temperature discontinuity is formed if the two isothermal interfaces are of different temperatures and intersect at the contact line. This leads to the so-called thermal singularity. The localized hydrodynamics involving evaporation/condensation near the contact line leads to a contact angle depending on the underlying substrate temperature. This dependence has been shown to lead to the motion of liquid droplets on solid substrates with thermal gradients (Xu and Qian 2012 Phys. Rev. E 85 061603). In the present work, we carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as numerical experiments to further confirm the predictions made from our previous continuum hydrodynamic modeling and simulations, which are actually semi-quantitatively accurate down to the small length scales in the problem. Using MD simulations, we investigate the motion of evaporative droplets in one-component Lennard-Jones fluids confined in nanochannels with thermal gradients. The droplet is found to migrate in the direction of decreasing temperature of solid walls, with a migration velocity linearly proportional to the temperature gradient. This agrees with the prediction of our continuum model. We then measure the effect of droplet size on the droplet motion. It is found that the droplet mobility is inversely proportional to a dimensionless coefficient associated with the total rate of dissipation due to droplet movement. Our results show that this coefficient is of order unity and increases with the droplet size for the small droplets (∼10 nm) simulated in the present work. These findings are in semi

  11. Simulation of passive thermal management system for lithium-ion battery packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew; Al-Hallaj, Said

    A passive thermal management system that uses a phase change material (PCM) is designed and simulated for a lithium-ion (Li-ion) laptop battery pack. The problem of low thermal conductivity of the PCM was significantly improved by impregnating an expanded graphite (EG) matrix with the PCM. The heat generation rate for a commercial 186502.2 Ah Li-ion battery was experimentally measured for various constant power discharges. Simulation of the battery pack, composed of six Li-ion batteries, shows that safe operation of the battery pack during the most extreme case requires the volume of the battery pack be almost doubled to fit sufficient PCM in the pack. Improving the properties of the PCM composite have the potential to significantly reduce the volume increase in comparison to the original battery pack volume.

  12. A fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation in subsurface cold CO2 injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunde Yin

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of thermal fracturing during cold CO2 injection involves the coupled processes of heat transfer, mass transport, rock deforming as well as fracture propagation. To model such a complex coupled system, a fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation is presented. This framework is based on the theory of non-isothermal multiphase flow in fracturing porous media. It takes advantage of recent advances in stabilized finite element and extended finite element methods. The stabilized finite element method overcomes the numerical instability encountered when the traditional finite element method is used to solve the convection dominated heat transfer equation, while the extended finite element method overcomes the limitation with traditional finite element method that a model has to be remeshed when a fracture is initiated or propagating and fracturing paths have to be aligned with element boundaries.

  13. Simulation studies on structural and thermal properties of alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, J Meena

    2017-06-01

    The structural and thermal properties of the passivated gold nanoparticles were explored employing molecular dynamics simulation for the different surface coverage densities of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol. The structural properties of the monolayer protected gold nanoparticles such us overall shape, organization and conformation of the capping alkane thiol chains were found to be influenced by the capping density. The structural order of the thiol capped gold nanoparticles enhances with the increase in the surface coverage density. The specific heat capacity of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles was found to increase linearly with the thiol coverage density. This may be attributed to the enhancement in the lattice vibrational energy. The present simulation results suggest, that the structural and thermal properties of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles may be modified by the suitable selection of the SAM coverage density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulating Physiological Response with a Passive Sensor Manikin and an Adaptive Thermal Manikin to Predict Thermal Sensation and Comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, John P [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chaney, Larry [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hepokoski, Mark [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Curran, Allen [ThermoAnalytics Inc.; Burke, Richard [Measurement Technology NW; Maranville, Clay [Ford Motor Company

    2015-04-14

    Reliable assessment of occupant thermal comfort can be difficult to obtain within automotive environments, especially under transient and asymmetric heating and cooling scenarios. Evaluation of HVAC system performance in terms of comfort commonly requires human subject testing, which may involve multiple repetitions, as well as multiple test subjects. Instrumentation (typically comprised of an array of temperature sensors) is usually only sparsely applied across the human body, significantly reducing the spatial resolution of available test data. Further, since comfort is highly subjective in nature, a single test protocol can yield a wide variation in results which can only be overcome by increasing the number of test replications and subjects. In light of these difficulties, various types of manikins are finding use in automotive testing scenarios. These manikins can act as human surrogates from which local skin and core temperatures can be obtained, which are necessary for accurately predicting local and whole body thermal sensation and comfort using a physiology-based comfort model (e.g., the Berkeley Comfort Model). This paper evaluates two different types of manikins, i) an adaptive sweating thermal manikin, which is coupled with a human thermoregulation model, running in real-time, to obtain realistic skin temperatures; and, ii) a passive sensor manikin, which is used to measure boundary conditions as they would act on a human, from which skin and core temperatures can be predicted using a thermophysiological model. The simulated physiological responses and comfort obtained from both of these manikin-model coupling schemes are compared to those of a human subject within a vehicle cabin compartment transient heat-up scenario.

  15. A mathematical model for the simulation of thermal transients in the water loop of IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontedeiro, A.C.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for simulation of thermal transients in the water loop at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, Brasil, is developed. The model is based on energy equations applied to the components of the experimental water loop. The non-linear system of first order diferencial equations and of non-linear algebraic equations obtained through the utilization of the IBM 'System/360-Continous System Modeling Program' (CSMP) is resolved. An optimization of the running time of the computer is made and a typical simulation of the water loop is executed. (Author) [pt

  16. Studies on thermal decomposition behaviors of polypropylene using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Tong, Hong; Pan, Guiying

    2017-11-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is one of the main components of waste plastics. In order to understand the mechanism of PP thermal decomposition, the pyrolysis behaviour of PP has been simulated from 300 to 1000 K in periodic boundary conditions by molecular dynamic method, based on AMBER force field. The simulation results show that the pyrolysis process of PP can mostly be divided into three stages: low temperature pyrolysis stage, intermediate temperature stage and high temperature pyrolysis stage. PP pyrolysis is typical of random main-chain scission, and the possible formation mechanism of major pyrolysis products was analyzed.

  17. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Scalerandi, M; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model.

  18. Stress induced conditioning and thermal relaxation in the simulation of quasi-static compression experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalerandi, M; Delsanto, P P; Johnson, P A

    2003-01-01

    Local interaction simulation approach simulations of the ultrasonic wave propagation in multi-grained materials have succeeded in reproducing most of the recently observed nonclassical nonlinear effects, such as stress-strain hysteresis and discrete memory in quasi-static experiments and a downwards shift of the resonance frequency and the generation of odd harmonics at specific amplitude rates in dynamics experiments. By including a simple mechanism of thermally activated random transitions, we can predict the occurrence of experimentally observed effects, such as the conditioning and relaxation of the specimen. Experiments are also suggested for a quantitative assessment of the validity of the model

  19. Thermal radiators with embedded pulsating heat pipes: Infra-red thermography and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj A.; Gupta, Ashish; Khandekar, Sameer

    2011-01-01

    With the aim of exploring potential applications of Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHP), for space/terrestrial sectors, experimental study of embedded PHP thermal radiators, having two different effective Biot numbers respectively, and subjected to conjugate heat transfer conditions on their surface, i.e., natural convection and radiation, has been carried out under different thermo-mechanical boundary conditions. High resolution infrared camera is used to obtain spatial temperature profiles of the radiators. To complement the experimental study, detailed 3D computational heat transfer simulation has also been undertaken. By embedding PHP structures, it was possible to make the net thermal resistance of the mild steel radiator plate equivalent to the aluminum radiator plate, in spite of the large difference in their respective thermal conductivities (k Al ∼ 4k MS ). The study reveals that embedded PHP structures can be beneficial only under certain boundary conditions. The degree of isothermalization achieved in these structures strongly depends on its effective Biot number. The relative advantage of embedded PHP is appreciably higher if the thermal conductivity of the radiator plate material itself is low. The study indicates that the effective thermal conductivity of embedded PHP structure is of the order of 400 W/mK to 2300 W/mK, depending on the operating conditions. - Research highlights: → Study of radiator plates with embedded Pulsating Heat Pipe by infrared thermography. → Radiator is subjected to natural convection and radiation boundary conditions. → Experimental study is supported by 3D simulation. → Effective thermal conductivity of PHPs of the order of 2000 W/mK is obtained. → Efficacy of embedded PHPs depends on the effective Biot number of the system.

  20. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  1. Measurement and simulation of thermal neutron flux distribution in the RTP core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie B.; Jalal Bayar, Abi Muttaqin B.; Hamzah, Na’im Syauqi B.; Mustafa, Muhammad Khairul Ariff B.; Karim, Julia Bt. Abdul; Zin, Muhammad Rawi B. Mohamed; Ismail, Yahya B.; Hussain, Mohd Huzair B.; Mat Husin, Mat Zin B.; Dan, Roslan B. Md; Ismail, Ahmad Razali B.; Husain, Nurfazila Bt.; Jalil Khan, Zareen Khan B. Abdul; Yakin, Shaiful Rizaide B. Mohd; Saad, Mohamad Fauzi B.; Masood, Zarina Bt.

    2018-01-01

    The in-core thermal neutron flux distribution was determined using measurement and simulation methods for the Malaysian’s PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP). In this work, online thermal neutron flux measurement using Self Powered Neutron Detector (SPND) has been performed to verify and validate the computational methods for neutron flux calculation in RTP calculations. The experimental results were used as a validation to the calculations performed with Monte Carlo code MCNP. The detail in-core neutron flux distributions were estimated using MCNP mesh tally method. The neutron flux mapping obtained revealed the heterogeneous configuration of the core. Based on the measurement and simulation, the thermal flux profile peaked at the centre of the core and gradually decreased towards the outer side of the core. The results show a good agreement (relatively) between calculation and measurement where both show the same radial thermal flux profile inside the core: MCNP model over estimation with maximum discrepancy around 20% higher compared to SPND measurement. As our model also predicts well the neutron flux distribution in the core it can be used for the characterization of the full core, that is neutron flux and spectra calculation, dose rate calculations, reaction rate calculations, etc.

  2. Calculations of the thermal conductivities of ionic materials by simulation with polarizable interaction potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtori, Norikazu; Salanne, Mathieu; Madden, Paul A

    2009-03-14

    Expressions for the energy current of a system of charged, polarizable ions in periodic boundary conditions are developed in order to allow the thermal conductivity in such a system to be calculated by computer simulation using the Green-Kubo method. Dipole polarizable potentials for LiCl, NaCl, and KCl are obtained on a first-principles basis by "force matching" to the results of ab initio calculations on suitable condensed-phase ionic configurations. Simulation results for the thermal conductivity, and also other transport coefficients, for the melts are compared with experimental data and with results obtained with other interaction potentials. The agreement with experiment is almost quantitative, especially for NaCl and KCl, indicating that these methodologies, perhaps with more sophisticated forms for the potential, can be used to predict thermal conductivities for melts for which experimental determination is very difficult. It is demonstrated that the polarization effects have an important effect on the energy current and are crucial to a predictive scheme for the thermal conductivity.

  3. 2-D CFD time-dependent thermal-hydraulic simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi Zadeh, Foad [Department of Engineering Physics/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Étienne, Stéphane [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Teyssedou, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.teyssedou@polymtl.ca [Department of Engineering Physics/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • 2-D time-dependent CFD simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows are presented. • A thermal-hydraulic code using thermal physical fluid properties is used. • The numerical approach and convergence is validated against available data. • Flow configurations are correlated using Richardson’s number. • Frequency components indicate moderator flow oscillations vs. Richardson numbers. - Abstract: The distribution of the fluid temperature and mass density of the moderator flow in CANDU-6 nuclear power reactors may affect the reactivity coefficient. For this reason, any possible moderator flow configuration and consequently the corresponding temperature distributions must be studied. In particular, the variations of the reactivity may result in major safety issues. For instance, excessive temperature excursions in the vicinity of the calandria tubes nearby local flow stagnation zones, may bring about partial boiling. Moreover, steady-state simulations have shown that for operating condition, intense buoyancy forces may be dominant, which can trigger a thermal stratification. Therefore, the numerical study of the time-dependent flow transition to such a condition, is of fundamental safety concern. Within this framework, this paper presents detailed time-dependent numerical simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flow for a wide range of flow conditions. To get a better insight of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, the simulations were performed by covering long physical-time periods using an open-source code (Code-Saturne V3) developed by Électricité de France. The results show not only a region where the flow is characterized by coherent structures of flow fluctuations but also the existence of two limit cases where fluid oscillations disappear almost completely.

  4. Occupant evaluation of 7-hour exposures in a simulated aircraft cabin - Part 2: Thermal effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a simulated section of an aircraft cabin with 21 seats installed in a climate chamber, to determine the extent to which passengers’ perception of cabin air quality is affected by air temperature. The temperature inside the cabin was set at three differ-ent levels, 20......, and thermal sensation - the lower the temperature, the higher the perceived air quality and freshness....

  5. Liquid-Crystal Display (LCD) Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    ARL-TN-0723 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Liquid - Crystal Display (LCD) Screen Thermal Testing to Simulate Solar Gain...longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0723 ● DEC 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Liquid - Crystal Display (LCD...1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) December 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Liquid - Crystal

  6. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of fluid flow induced by thermal effect in heterogeneity porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a coupled lattice Boltzmann model is used to visually study fluid flow induced by thermal effect in heterogeneity porous media reconstructed by the quartet structure generation set. The fluid flow behavior inside porous media is presented and analyzed under different conditions. The simulation results indicate that the pore morphological properties of porous media and the Rayleigh number have noticeable impact on the velocity distribution and flow rate of fluid.

  7. RF-THERMAL COMBINED SIMULATIONS OF A SUPERCONDUCTING HOM COAXIAL COUPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangfeng Cheng, Haipeng Wang, David Smithe

    2011-09-01

    To benchmark a multi-physics code VORPAL developed by Tech-X, the High Order Mode (HOM) coaxial coupler design implemented in Jefferson Lab?s 12GeV upgrade cryomodules is analyzed by use of commercial codes, such as ANSYS, HFSS and Microwave Studio. Testing data from a Horizontal Test Bench (HTB) experiment on a dual-cavity prototype are also utilized in the verification of simulation results. The work includes two stages: first, the HOM feedthrough that has a high RRR niobium probe and sapphire insulator is analyzed for the RF-thermal response when there is travelling wave passing through; second, the HTB testing condition is simulated and results from simulation are compared to thermal measurements from HTB tests. The analyses are of coupled-field nature and involve highly nonlinear temperature dependent thermal conductivities and electric resistivities for the eight types of materials used in the design. Accuracy and efficiency are the main factors in evaluation of the performance of the codes.

  8. Thermal simulations of the new design for the BELLE silicon vertex detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragic, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The experienced imperfections of the BELLE silicon vertex detector, SVD1 motioned the design of a new detector, SVD2, which targets on improving the main weaknesses encountered in the old design. In this report we focus on tile thermal aspects of the SVD2 ladder, whereby sufficient cooling of the detector is necessary in order to minimise the detector leakage currents. It is estimated that reducing the temperature of the silicon detector from 25 deg C to 15 deg C would result in a 50% reduction in leak current. Further, cooling the detector would help minimize mechanical stresses from the thermal cycling. Our task is to ensure that the heat generated by the readout chips is conducted down the SVD hybrid unit effectively, such that the chip and the hybrid temperature does not overbear the SVD silicon sensor temperature. We considered the performance of two materials to act as a heat spreading plate which is glued between the two hybrids in order to improve the heat conductivity of the hybrid unit, namely Copper and Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG). The effects of other ladder components were also considered in order to enhance the cooling of the silicon detectors. Finite element analysis with ANSYS software was used to simulate the thermal conditions of the SVD2 hybrid unit, in accordance with the baseline design for the mechanical structure of the ladder. It was found that Cu was a preferred material as it achieved equivalent silicon sensor cooling (3.6 deg C above cooling point), while its mechanical properties rendered it a lot more practical. Suppressing, the thermal path via a rib support block, by increasing its thermal resistivity, as well as increasing thermal conductivity of the ribs in the hybrid region, were deemed essential in the effective cooling of the silicon sensors

  9. Semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Alexander V.; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Cantarero, Andres

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed description of semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of stochastic dynamics of a system of interacting particles. Within this approach, the dynamics of the system is described with the use of classical Newtonian equations of motion in which the effects of phonon quantum statistics are introduced through random Langevin-like forces with a specific power spectral density (the color noise). The color noise describes the interaction of the molecular system with the thermostat. We apply this technique to the simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in different low-dimensional nanostructures. We describe the determination of temperature in quantum lattice systems, to which the equipartition limit is not applied. We show that one can determine the temperature of such a system from the measured power spectrum and temperature- and relaxation-rate-independent density of vibrational (phonon) states. We simulate the specific heat and heat transport in carbon nanotubes, as well as the heat transport in molecular nanoribbons with perfect (atomically smooth) and rough (porous) edges, and in nanoribbons with strongly anharmonic periodic interatomic potentials. We show that the effects of quantum statistics of phonons are essential for the carbon nanotube in the whole temperature range T<500K, in which the values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the nanotube are considerably less than that obtained within the description based on classical statistics of phonons. This conclusion is also applicable to other carbon-based materials and systems with high Debye temperature like graphene, graphene nanoribbons, fullerene, diamond, diamond nanowires, etc. We show that the existence of rough edges and quantum statistics of phonons change drastically the low-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanoribbon in comparison with that of the nanoribbon with perfect edges and classical phonon dynamics and statistics. The semiquantum molecular

  10. Thermal monitoring, simulation and evaluation of a low-cost housing prototype built in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroca, C.; Kruger, E.L. [Parana Federal Technical Univ., Parana (Brazil). UTFPR; Monteiro de Matos, J.L. [Parana Federal Technical Univ., Parana (Brazil). UFPR

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a building prototype that was developed to meet the requirements of a low-cost housing project in Canoinhas, Santa Catarina in southern Brazil. It presented the results of simulations and measurements regarding the thermal performance of the one-storey house. The prototype was created as part of a subsidized low-cost housing initiative with a maximum subsidy of US$2,500 for the construction of do-it-yourself units. This paper presented the results of a study that involved 3 stages. The first stage involved the measurement of outdoor and indoor temperatures of the prototype. The second stage involved thermal simulations performed with IDA Indoor Climate and Energy (ICE) thermal simulation software developed by EQUA in Sweden. The thermal simulations were initially performed using the original properties and characteristics of the prototype. In the third stage, the thermal simulations were performed with modified parameters, notably different climatic conditions and changes in the composition of the external wall panels. The 3 stages provided the opportunity to evaluate the thermal performance of the prototype and select the most suitable building configuration for each case, for both winter and summer conditions. Results of thermal monitoring indicated that the thermal comfort of a wood prototype would be acceptable for various climatic regions of Brazil. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  11. Study on impact properties of creep-resistant steel thermally simulated heat affected zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Radivoje M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The steam pipe line (SPL and steam line material, along with its welded joints, subject to damage that accumulates during operation in coal power plants. As a result of thermal fatigue, dilatation of SPL at an operating temperature may lead to cracks initiation at the critical zones within heat affected zone (HAZ of steam pipe line welded joints. By registration of thermal cycle during welding and subsequent HAZ simulation is possible to obtain target microstructure. For the simulation is chosen heat resisting steel, 12H1MF (designation 13CrMo44 according to DIN standard. From the viewpoint of mechanical properties, special attention is on impact toughness mostly because very small number of available references. After simulation of single run and multi run welding test on instrumented Charpy pendulum. Metallographic and fractographic analysis is also performed, on simulated 12H1MF steel from service and new, unused steel. The results and correlation between microstructure and impact toughness is discussed, too.

  12. Laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence: optical, thermal, and tissue damage simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Chang, Chun-Hung; Myers, Erinn M.; Kennelly, Michael J.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of female stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by laser thermal remodeling of subsurface tissues is studied. Light transport, heat transfer, and thermal damage simulations were performed for transvaginal and transurethral methods. Monte Carlo (MC) provided absorbed photon distributions in tissue layers (vaginal wall, endopelvic fascia, urethral wall). Optical properties (n,μa,μs,g) were assigned to each tissue at λ=1064 nm. A 5-mm-diameter laser beam and power of 5 W for 15 s was used, based on previous experiments. MC output was converted into absorbed energy, serving as input for ANSYS finite element heat transfer simulations of tissue temperatures over time. Convective heat transfer was simulated with contact cooling probe set at 0 °C. Thermal properties (κ,c,ρ) were assigned to each tissue layer. MATLAB code was used for Arrhenius integral thermal damage calculations. A temperature matrix was constructed from ANSYS output, and finite sum was incorporated to approximate Arrhenius integral calculations. Tissue damage properties (Ea,A) were used to compute Arrhenius sums. For the transvaginal approach, 37% of energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia layer with 0.8% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 71°C, treatment zone was 0.8-mm-diameter, and almost all of 2.7-mm-thick vaginal wall was preserved. For transurethral approach, 18% energy was absorbed in endopelvic fascia with 0.3% deposited beyond it. Peak temperature was 80°C, treatment zone was 2.0-mm-diameter, and only 0.6 mm of 2.4-mm-thick urethral wall was preserved. A transvaginal approach is more feasible than transurethral approach for laser treatment of SUI.

  13. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  14. Phase-field simulations of pore migration and morphology change in thermal gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, Ian W.; Millett, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Here we present a phase-field simulation model that captures the thermal-gradient-driven migration of pores in oxide fuel associated with fuel restructuring. The model utilizes a Cahn-Hilliard equation supplemented with an advection term to describe the vapor transport of fuel material through the pore interior due to gradients in vapor pressure. Simulations demonstrate that the model not only predicts pore migration towards the centerline of the fuel, but also a concurrent change in pore shape during migration from an initially isotropic morphology to either a lenticular morphology or a prolate morphology depending on the vapor transport conditions. This model is a necessary first step to conducting accurate simulations of the microscopic changes that occur during the complicated process of oxide fuel restructuring.

  15. 3D thermal simulations and modeling of multi-finger InP DHBTs for millimeter-wave power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midili, Virginio; Nodjiadjim, V.; Johansen, Tom Keinicke

    2017-01-01

    of devices with up to 8 emitter fingers. The surface temperature profile was then used to compute the average thermal resistance of the multi-finger devices. The comparison with the corresponding results obtained by electrical measurements show a good agreement. The temperature profiles from several......This paper presents the comparison between the simulated and measured thermal resistance of InP Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (DHBT). 3D thermal simulations were carried out in order to compute the temperature distribution across the full structure due to a constant power excitation...... simulations are used to extract the thermal resistance matrix used in the electro-thermal coupling network of a compact large-signal model....

  16. Thermal stabilization of dihydrofolate reductase using monte carlo unfolding simulations and its functional consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Tian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Design of proteins with desired thermal properties is important for scientific and biotechnological applications. Here we developed a theoretical approach to predict the effect of mutations on protein stability from non-equilibrium unfolding simulations. We establish a relative measure based on apparent simulated melting temperatures that is independent of simulation length and, under certain assumptions, proportional to equilibrium stability, and we justify this theoretical development with extensive simulations and experimental data. Using our new method based on all-atom Monte-Carlo unfolding simulations, we carried out a saturating mutagenesis of Dihydrofolate Reductase (DHFR, a key target of antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs. The method predicted more than 500 stabilizing mutations, several of which were selected for detailed computational and experimental analysis. We find a highly significant correlation of r=0.65-0.68 between predicted and experimentally determined melting temperatures and unfolding denaturant concentrations for WT DHFR and 42 mutants. The correlation between energy of the native state and experimental denaturation temperature was much weaker, indicating the important role of entropy in protein stability. The most stabilizing point mutation was D27F, which is located in the active site of the protein, rendering it inactive. However for the rest of mutations outside of the active site we observed a weak yet statistically significant positive correlation between thermal stability and catalytic activity indicating the lack of a stability-activity tradeoff for DHFR. By combining stabilizing mutations predicted by our method, we created a highly stable catalytically active E. coli DHFR mutant with measured denaturation temperature 7.2°C higher than WT. Prediction results for DHFR and several other proteins indicate that computational approaches based on unfolding simulations are useful as a general technique to discover

  17. Thermal Hydraulic Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Brian [AREVA Federal Services, Lynchburg, VA (United States); Jackson, R. Brian [TerraPower, Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The project, Toward a Longer Life Core: Thermal Hydraulic CFD Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Deformed Fuel Assemblies, DOE Project code DE-NE0008321, was a verification and validation project for flow and heat transfer through wire wrapped simulated liquid metal fuel assemblies that included both experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulations of those experiments. This project was a two year collaboration between AREVA, TerraPower, Argonne National Laboratory and Texas A&M University. Experiments were performed by AREVA and Texas A&M University. Numerical simulations of these experiments were performed by TerraPower and Argonne National Lab. Project management was performed by AREVA Federal Services. The first of a kind project resulted in the production of both local point temperature measurements and local flow mixing experiment data paired with numerical simulation benchmarking of the experiments. The project experiments included the largest wire-wrapped pin assembly Mass Index of Refraction (MIR) experiment in the world, the first known wire-wrapped assembly experiment with deformed duct geometries and the largest numerical simulations ever produced for wire-wrapped bundles.

  18. Measurements of Regolith Simulant Thermal Conductivity Under Asteroid and Mars Surface Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, A. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Laboratory measurements have been necessary to interpret thermal data of planetary surfaces for decades. We present a novel radiometric laboratory method to determine temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of complex regolith simulants under rough to high vacuum and across a wide range of temperatures. This method relies on radiometric temperature measurements instead of contact measurements, eliminating the need to disturb the sample with thermal probes. We intend to determine the conductivity of grains that are up to 2 cm in diameter and to parameterize the effects of angularity, sorting, layering, composition, and eventually cementation. We present the experimental data and model results for a suite of samples that were selected to isolate and address regolith physical parameters that affect bulk conductivity. Spherical glass beads of various sizes were used to measure the effect of size frequency distribution. Spherical beads of polypropylene and well-rounded quartz sand have respectively lower and higher solid phase thermal conductivities than the glass beads and thus provide the opportunity to test the sensitivity of bulk conductivity to differences in solid phase conductivity. Gas pressure in our asteroid experimental chambers is held at 10^-6 torr, which is sufficient to negate gas thermal conduction in even our coarsest of samples. On Mars, the atmospheric pressure is such that the mean free path of the gas molecules is comparable to the pore size for many regolith particulates. Thus, subtle variations in pore size and/or atmospheric pressure can produce large changes in bulk regolith conductivity. For each sample measured in our martian environmental chamber, we repeat thermal measurement runs at multiple pressures to observe this behavior. Finally, we present conductivity measurements of angular basaltic simulant that is physically analogous to sand and gravel that may be present on Bennu. This simulant was used for OSIRIS-REx TAGSAM Sample Return

  19. Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface thermal behavior with 3D dynamic gap element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Koo, Yang Hyun; Kang, Chang Hak; Lee Sung Uk; Yang, Dong Yol

    2014-01-01

    Most of the fuel performance codes that are able to simulate a multidimensional analysis are used to calculate the radial temperature distribution and perform a multidimensional mechanical analysis based on a one-dimensional (1D) temperature result. The FRAPCON-FRAPTRAN code system incorporates a 1D thermal module and two-dimensional (2D) mechanical module when FEM option is activated. In this method, the multidimensional gap conductance model is not required because one-dimensional thermal analysis is carried out. On the other hand, a gap conductance model for a multi-dimension should be developed in the code to perform a multidimensional thermal analysis. ALCYONE developed by CEA introduces an equivalent heat convection coefficient that represents the multidimensional gap conductance. However, the code does not employ dynamic gap conductance which is a function of gap thickness and gap characteristics in direct. The BISON code, which has been developed by INL (Idaho National Laboratory), employed a thermo-mechanical contact method that is specifically designed for tightly-coupled implicit solutions that employ Jacobian-free solution methods. Owing to tightly-coupled implicit solutions, the BISON code solves gap conductance and gap thickness simultaneously with given boundary conditions. In this paper, 3D dynamic gap element has been proposed to resolve convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. To evaluate 3D dynamic gap element module, 3D thermomechanical module using FORTRAN77 has been implemented incorporating 3D dynamic gap element. To demonstrate effect of 3D dynamic gap element, thermal behavior of missing pellet surface (MPS) has been simulated by the developed module. LWR fuel performance codes should incorporate thermo-mechanical loop to solve gap conductance problem, iteratively. However, gap conductance in multidimensional model is difficult issue owing to its nonlinearity and convergence characteristics. In

  20. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  1. Design, simulation and optimization of a solar dish collector with spiral-coil thermal absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Saša R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient conversion of solar radiation into heat at high temperature levels requires the use of concentrating solar collectors. The goal of this paper is to present the optical and the thermal analysis of a parabolic dish concentrator with a spiral coil receiver. The parabolic dish reflector consists of 11 curvilinear trapezoidal reflective petals constructed by PMMA with silvered mirror layer and has a diameter of 3.8 m, while its focal distance is 2.26m. This collector is designed with commercial software SolidWorks and simulated, optically and thermally in its Flow Simulation Studio. The optical analysis proved that the ideal position of the absorber is at 2.1m from the reflector in order to maximize the optical efficiency and to create a relative uniform heat flux over the absorber. In thermal part of the analysis, the energetic efficiency was calculated approximately 65%, while the exergetic efficiency is varied from 4% to 15% according to the water inlet temperature. Moreover, other important parameters as the heat flux and temperature distribution over the absorber are presented. The pressure drop of the absorber coil is calculated at 0.07bar, an acceptable value.

  2. Two-dimensional simulation of the thermal stress effect on static and dynamic VDMOS characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, M.; Beydoun, B.; Ketata, K.; Zoaeter, M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional simulator, the effect of the thermal stress on static and dynamic vertical double-diffusion metal oxide semiconductor (VDMOS) characteristics have been investigated. The use of the device under certain thermal stress conditions can produce modifications of its physical and electrical properties. Based on physics and 2D simulations, this paper proposes an analysis of this stress effect observed on the electrical characteristics of the device. Parameters responsible of these modifications are determined. Approximate expressions of the ionization coefficients and breakdown voltage in terms of temperature are proposed. Non-punch-through junction theory is used to express the breakdown voltage and the space charge extension with respect to the impurity concentration and the temperature. The capacitances of the device have been also studied. The effect of the stress on C-V characteristics is observed and analyzed. We notice that the drain-gate, drain-source and gate-source capacitances are shifted due to the degradation of device physical properties versus thermal stress

  3. Strong coupling of a building thermal model with a controlled electical heater for an hybrid energy simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gaaloul, Sana; Delinchant, Benoît; Wurtz, Frédéric; Thiers, Stéphane; Peuportier, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The context of this study is the coupling of thermal and electrical models in order to efficiently simulate energy consumption in buildings, which requires managing interoperability problems between simulation environments. The coupling is accomplished in MATLAB™ tool between a thermal model of a building envelope using COMFIE software and an electrical heater model. Our purpose is to study and generalize the interoperability between these two domains governed by pheno...

  4. Numerical Simulations of Thermo-Mechanical Processes during Thermal Spallation Drilling for Geothermal Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, D.; Walsh, S. D. C.; Rudolf von Rohr, P.; Saar, M. O.

    2017-12-01

    Drilling expenses constitute a significant share of the upfront capital costs and thereby the associated risks of geothermal energy production. This is especially true for deep boreholes, as drilling costs per meter increase significantly with depth. Thermal spallation drilling is a relatively new drilling technique, particularly suited to the hard crystalline (e.g., basement) rocks in which many deep geothermal resources are located. The method uses a hot jet-flame to rapidly heat the rock surface, which leads to large temperature gradients in the rock. These temperature gradients cause localized thermal stresses that, in combination with the in situ stress field, lead to the formation and ejection of spalls. These spalls are then transported out of the borehole with the drilling mud. Thermal spallation not only in principle enables much faster rates of penetration than traditional rotary drilling, but is also contact-less, which significantly reduces the long tripping times associated with conventional rotary head drilling. We present numerical simulations investigating the influence of rock heterogeneities on the thermal spallation process. Special emphasis is put on different mineral compositions, stress regimes, and heat sources.

  5. Thermal shock evaluation of metals in a simulated disruption test for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kny, E.; Kneringer, G.; Koizlik, K.; Nickel, H.

    1989-01-01

    Different metals have been tested with respect to their thermal shock behavior simulating the slow energy deposition regime of NET. The metals evaluated for grain growth phenomena, melting, crack formation, recrystallization and partly their tensile properties after testing were W, W26Re, Mo, TZM, Nb, Ta, 1.4311 steel, Cu, and Ti6Al4V. Thermal shock testing was performed using a 150 kV electron beam with a maximum input power density of 200 MW/m 2 and a pulse length of 10 to 2000 ms. The tendency for crack formation is highest for W followed by TZM and W26Re. Mo samples formed only a few cracks during testing. No cracks could be observed on Cu, Ti, Nb, Ta, and steel samples. The tendency for crack formation for refractory metals is strongly dependent on grain orientation. The substrate temperature affects the tendency for crack formation too. Above a certain temperature, crack formation was not observed on W and Mo and their alloys. Thermal shock testing of tensile specimens, according to the slow energy deposition regime of NET, changes only to a small extent the UTS and strain. However, tensile strain is more affected than UTS by thermal shock testing above the melting threshold line. (orig.)

  6. The Calculation of Thermal Conductivities by Three Dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin-Peng; Li, Zeng-Yao; Liu, He; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    Three dimensional direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method with the variable soft sphere (VSS) collision model is implemented to solve the Boltzmann equation and to acquire the heat flux between two parallel plates (Fourier Flow). The gaseous thermal conductivity of nitrogen is derived based on the Fourier's law under local equilibrium condition at temperature from 270 to 1800 K and pressure from 0.5 to 100,000 Pa and compared with the experimental data and Eucken relation from Chapman and Enskog (CE) theory. It is concluded that the present results are consistent with the experimental data but much higher than those by Eucken relation especially at high temperature. The contribution of internal energy of molecule to the gaseous thermal conductivity becomes significant as increasing the temperature.

  7. Simulation and optimisation of a position sensitive scintillation detector with wavelength shifting fibers for thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzkamp, Matthias; Engels, Ralf; Kemmerling, Guenter [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Brueckel, Thomas [JCNS, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Stahl, Achim [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Waasen, Stefan van [ZEA-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Faculty of Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In neutron scattering experiments it is important to have position sensitive large scale detectors for thermal neutrons. A detector based on a neutron scintillator with wave length shifting fibers is a new kind of such a detector. We present the simulation of the detector based on the microscopic structure of the scintillation material of the mentioned detector. It consists of a converter and a scintillation powder bound in a matrix. The converter in our case is lithium fluoride with enriched lithium 6, to convert thermal neutrons into high energetic alpha and triton particles. The scintillation material is silver doped zinc sulfide. We show that pulse height spectra obtained by these scintillators can be be explained by the simple model of randomly distributed spheres of zinc sulfide and lithium fluoride. With this model, it is possible to optimise the mass ratio of zinc sulfide to lithium fluoride with respect to detection efficiency and/or energy deposition in zinc sulfide.

  8. Advanced Coupled Simulation of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Systems and Above Ground Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal thermal energy storage in borehole heat exchanger arrays is a promising technology to reduce primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. These systems usually consist of several subsystems like the heat source (e.g. solarthermics or a combined heat and power plant), the heat consumer (e.g. a heating system), diurnal storages (i.e. water tanks), the borehole thermal energy storage, additional heat sources for peak load coverage (e.g. a heat pump or a gas boiler) and the distribution network. For the design of an integrated system, numerical simulations of all subsystems are imperative. A separate simulation of the borehole energy storage is well-established but represents a simplification. In reality, the subsystems interact with each other. The fluid temperatures of the heat generation system, the heating system and the underground storage are interdependent and affect the performance of each subsystem. To take into account these interdependencies, we coupled a software for the simulation of the above ground facilities with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the borehole heat exchangers. This allows for a more realistic view on the entire system. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system components and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be ensured.

  9. AN EOS-BASED NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THERMAL RECOVERY PROCESS USING UNSTRUCTURED MESHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Marcondes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the past thirty years, the development of compositional reservoir simulators using an equation of state (EOS has been addressed in the literature. However, the development of compositional thermal simulators in conjunction with the EOS formulation, in particular, has not been addressed extensively. In this work, a fully implicit, thermal, compositional EOS-based simulator in conjunction with unstructured meshes has been developed. In this model, an equation of state is used for equilibrium calculations among phases. Also, the physical properties are calculated based on an EOS, hence obviating the need for using steam tables for calculation of water/steam properties. The governing equations for the model comprise fugacity equations, material balance, pore volume constraint and energy equation. The governing partial differential equations are solved using the EbFVM (Element based Finite Volume Method. Results for several case studies consisting of 2D and 3D reservoirs are presented in order to demonstrate the applicability of the method.

  10. Effects of deformability and thermal motion of lipid membrane on electroporation: By molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Effects of mechanical properties and thermal motion of POPE lipid membrane on electroporation were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. Among simulations in which specific atoms of lipids were artificially constrained at their equilibrium positions using a spring with force constant of 2.0kcal/(molÅ2) in the external electric field of 1.4kcal/(molÅe), only constraint on lateral motions of lipid tails prohibited electroporation while non-tail parts had little effects. When force constant decreased to 0.2kcal/(molÅ2) in the position constraints on lipid tails in the external electric field of 2.0kcal/(molÅe), water molecules began to enter the membrane. Position constraints of lipid tails allow water to penetrate from both sides of membrane. Thermal motion of lipids can induce initial defects in the hydrophobic core of membrane, which are favorable nucleation sites for electroporation. Simulations at different temperatures revealed that as the temperature increases, the time taken to the initial pore formation will decrease. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Numerical simulation of a passive scalar transport from thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issakhov, Alibek; Baitureyeva, Aiymzhan

    2017-06-01

    The active development of the industry leads to an increase in the number of factories, plants, thermal power plants, nuclear power plants, thereby increasing the amount of emissions into the atmosphere. Harmful chemicals are deposited on the soil surface, remain in the atmosphere, which leads to a variety of environmental problems which are harmful for human health and the environment, flora and fauna. Considering the above problems, it is very important to control the emissions to keep them at an acceptable level for the environment. In order to do that it is necessary to investigate the spread of harmful emissions. The best way to assess it is the creating numerical simulation of gaseous substances' motion. In the present work the numerical simulation of the spreading of emissions from the thermal power plant chimney is considered. The model takes into account the physical properties of the emitted substances and allows to calculate the distribution of the mass fractions, depending on the wind velocity and composition of emissions. The numerical results were performed using the ANSYS Fluent software package. As a result, the results of numerical simulations and the graphs are given.

  12. CFD SIMULATION FOR DEMILITARIZATION OF RDX IN A ROTARY KILN BY THERMAL DECOMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI H. LEE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Demilitarization requires the recovery and disposal of obsolete ammunition and explosives. Since open burning/detonation of hazardous waste has caused serious environmental and safety problems, thermal decomposition has emerged as one of the most feasible methods. RDX is widely used as a military explosive due to its high melting temperature and detonation power. In this work, the feasible conditions under which explosives can be safely incinerated have been investigated via a rotary kiln simulation. To solve this problem, phase change along with the reactions of RDX has been incisively analyzed. A global reaction mechanism consisting of condensed phase and gas phase reactions are used in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. User Defined Functions in FLUENT is utilized in this study to inculcate the reactions and phase change into the simulation. The results divulge the effect of temperature and the varying amounts of gas produced in the rotary kiln during the thermal decomposition of RDX. The result leads to the prospect of demilitarizing waste explosives to avoid the possibility of detonation.

  13. The relevance of thermal hydraulics pipeline simulation as a regulatory support tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Patricia Mannarino; Santos, Almir Beserra dos [Agencia Nacional do Petroleo, Gas Natural e Biocombustiveis (ANP), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The capacity definition of a pipeline, along with its allocation, is very relevant to assure market transparency, nondiscriminatory access, security of supply, and also to give consistent signs for expansion needs. Nevertheless, the capacity definition is a controversial issue, and may widely vary depending on the technical and commercial assumptions made. To calculate a pipeline's nominal capacity, there are a variety of simulation tools, which include steady state, transient and on-line computer programs. It is desirable that the simulation tool is robust enough to predict the pipeline's capacity under different conditions. There are many variables that impact the flow through a pipeline, like gas characteristics, pipe and environmental variables. Designing a thermal model is a time-consuming task that requests understanding the level of detail need, in order to achieve success in its application. This article discusses the capacity definition, its role and calculation guidelines, describes ANP's experience with capacity calculation and further challenges according to the new regulation, and debates the role of thermal hydraulic simulation as a regulatory tool. (author)

  14. Improved thermal lattice Boltzmann model for simulation of liquid-vapor phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Zhou, P.; Yan, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an improved thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is proposed for simulating liquid-vapor phase change, which is aimed at improving an existing thermal LB model for liquid-vapor phase change [S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012), 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.04.037]. First, we emphasize that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇.(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) is an inappropriate treatment for diffuse interface modeling of liquid-vapor phase change. Furthermore, the error terms ∂t 0(T v ) +∇ .(T vv ) , which exist in the macroscopic temperature equation recovered from the previous model, are eliminated in the present model through a way that is consistent with the philosophy of the LB method. Moreover, the discrete effect of the source term is also eliminated in the present model. Numerical simulations are performed for droplet evaporation and bubble nucleation to validate the capability of the model for simulating liquid-vapor phase change. It is shown that the numerical results of the improved model agree well with those of a finite-difference scheme. Meanwhile, it is found that the replacement of ∇ .(λ ∇ T ) /∇ .(λ ∇ T ) ρ cV ρ cV with ∇ .(χ ∇ T ) leads to significant numerical errors and the error terms in the recovered macroscopic temperature equation also result in considerable errors.

  15. Simulation, design and thermal analysis of a solar Stirling engine using MATLAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shazly, J.H.; Hafez, A.Z.; El Shenawy, E.T.; Eteiba, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling and simulation for a prototype of the solar-powered Stirling engine. • The solar-powered Stirling engine working at the low temperature range. • Estimating output power from the solar Stirling engine using Matlab program. • Solar radiation simulation program presents a solar radiation data using MATLAB. - Abstract: This paper presents the modeling and simulation for a prototype of the solar-powered Stirling engine working at the low temperature range. A mathematical model for the thermal analysis of the solar-powered low temperature Stirling engine with heat transfer is developed using Matlab program. The model takes into consideration the effect of the absorber temperature on the thermal analysis like as radiation and convection heat transfer between the absorber and the working fluid as well as radiation and convection heat transfer between the lower temperature plate and the working fluid. Hence, the present analysis provides a theoretical guidance for designing and operating of the solar-powered low temperature Stirling engine system, as well as estimating output power from the solar Stirling engine using Matlab program. This study attempts to demonstrate the potential of the low temperature Stirling engine as an option for the prime movers for Photovoltaic tracking systems. The heat source temperature is 40–60 °C as the temperature available from the sun directly

  16. Simulation of Thermal Flow Problems via a Hybrid Immersed Boundary-Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM is presented in this work to simulate the thermal flow problems. In current approach, the flow field is resolved by using our recently developed boundary condition-enforced IB-LBM (Wu and Shu, (2009. The nonslip boundary condition on the solid boundary is enforced in simulation. At the same time, to capture the temperature development, the conventional energy equation is resolved. To model the effect of immersed boundary on temperature field, the heat source term is introduced. Different from previous studies, the heat source term is set as unknown rather than predetermined. Inspired by the idea in (Wu and Shu, (2009, the unknown is calculated in such a way that the temperature at the boundary interpolated from the corrected temperature field accurately satisfies the thermal boundary condition. In addition, based on the resolved temperature correction, an efficient way to compute the local and average Nusselt numbers is also proposed in this work. As compared with traditional implementation, no approximation for temperature gradients is required. To validate the present method, the numerical simulations of forced convection are carried out. The obtained results show good agreement with data in the literature.

  17. SB LOCA thermal-hydraulic analyses for Krsko Full Scope Simulator validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosek, A.; Parzer, I.

    2005-01-01

    The Krsko nuclear power plant (NPP), which is a two-loop pressurized water reactor, Westinghouse type, before modernization in 2000 obtained plant specific full scope simulator. The purpose of the presented analyses was to perform Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) reference calculations for KFSS validation in 2004. In addition, the thermal-hydraulic response of the reactor coolant system (RCS) was studied in detail. For the thermal-hydraulic analysis the RELAP5/MOD3.3 code and input model delivered from Krsko NPP were used. The RELAP5 calculated reference results showed that the plant system response to breaks with small break area is slower compared to breaks with larger break area. The comparison of the KFSS data with calculated results suggest that the simulator validation testing in the year 2004 for this kind of accident was successful. Nevertheless, when comparing the physical phenomena and processes, the RELAP5/MOD3.3 predicted smaller core uncovery compared to the KFSS measurement. One reason is different core cycles. Finally, this finding suggests that even for simulator reference calculations the quantification of model uncertainties would be useful. (author)

  18. Development of the Real-time Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Kori-1 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hwang, Do Hyun; Byon, Soo Jin

    2010-01-01

    The operation of the Kori-Unit 1 (1723.5MWt) is expanded to additional 10 years with upgrades of the Main Control Room (MCR). Therefore, the revision of the procedures, performance tests and works related with the exchange of the Main Control Board (MCB) are currently carried out. And as a part of it, the fullscope simulator for the Kori-1 is being developed for the purpose of the pre-operation and emergence response capability for the operators. The purpose of this paper is to report on the performance of the developed neutronics and thermal-hydraulic (TH) models of Kori Unit 1 simulator. The neutronics model is based on the NESTLE code and TH model based on the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulics analysis code which was funded as FY-93 LDRD Project 7201 and is running on the commercial simulator environment tool (the 3KeyMaster TM of the WSC). As some examples for the verification of the developed neutronics and TH models, some figures are provided. The outputs of the developed neutronics and TH models are in accord with the Nuclear Design Report (NDR) and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the reference plant

  19. 3D COMSOL Simulations for Thermal Deflection of HFIR Fuel Plate in the "Cheverton-Kelley" Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    Three dimensional simulation capabilities are currently being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element modeling software, to investigate thermal expansion of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) s low enriched uranium fuel plates. To validate simulations, 3D models have also been developed for the experimental setup used by Cheverton and Kelley in 1968 to investigate the buckling and thermal deflections of HFIR s highly enriched uranium fuel plates. Results for several simulations are presented in this report, and comparisons with the experimental data are provided when data are available. A close agreement between the simulation results and experimental findings demonstrates that the COMSOL simulations are able to capture the thermal expansion physics accurately and that COMSOL could be deployed as a predictive tool for more advanced computations at realistic HFIR conditions to study temperature-induced fuel plate deflection behavior.

  20. Large-eddy simulations of mechanical and thermal processes within boundary layer of the Graciosa Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, G.; Collis, S. M.; Ghate, V. P.

    2017-12-01

    Three-dimensional numerical experiments are performed to explore the mechanical and thermal impacts of Graciosa Island on the sampling of oceanic airflow and cloud evolution. Ideal and real configurations of flow and terrain are planned using high-resolution, large-eddy resolving (e.g., Δ cold-pool formation upstream of an ideal two-kilometer island, with von Kármán like vortices propagation downstream. Although the peak height of Graciosa is less than half kilometer, the Azores island chain has a mountain over 2 km, which may be leading to more complex flow patterns when simulations are extended to a larger domain. Preliminary idealized low-resolution moist simulations indicate that the cloud field is impacted due to the presence of the island. Longer simulations that are performed to capture diurnal evolution of island boundary layer show distinct land/sea breeze formations under quiescent flow conditions. Further numerical experiments are planned to extend moist simulations to include realistic atmospheric profiles and observations of surface fluxes coupled with radiative effects. This work is intended to produce a useful simulation framework coupled with instruments to guide airborne and ground sampling strategies during the ACE-ENA field campaign which is aimed to better characterize marine boundary layer clouds.

  1. Characterization of the thermal expansion properties of graphene using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahabul Islam, M; Mahboob, Monon; Robert Lowe, L; Stephen Bechtel, E

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the temperature-dependent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a graphene sheet (GS) is determined using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our simulations show that the CTE of a GS (i) varies non-linearly with temperature, (ii) is negative over a temperature range of 0–500 K and (iii) differs by no more than 9% in the armchair and zigzag directions. We find good agreement between our MD results and recent experimental data. The present study also investigates the effect of missing atoms (vacancy defects) on the CTE of a GS. In our MD simulations of a 4.9 nm × 4.9 nm GS, we find that the presence of two vacant atoms (about 1.56% by volume) increases the negative CTE by as much as 40%. Correlations between the CTE and the number of missing atoms have been developed based on MD simulation results for a perfect GS and a GS with 1.56% defects by volume. Predictions of the CTE of a defective GS from the correlations compare favourably with MD simulations at 3.13% defects by volume. (paper)

  2. Atomistic simulations of void migration under thermal gradient in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tapan G.; Millett, Paul; Tonks, Michael; Wolf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that within a few hours after startup of a nuclear reactor, the temperature gradient within a fuel element causes migration of voids/bubbles radially inwards to form a central hole. To understand the atomic processes that control this migration of voids, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on single crystal UO 2 with voids of diameter 2.2 nm. An external temperature gradient was applied across the simulation cell. At the end of the simulation run, it was observed that the voids had moved towards the hot end of the simulation cell. The void migration velocity obtained from the simulations was compared with the available phenomenological equations for void migration due to different transport mechanisms. Surface diffusion of the slowest moving specie, i.e. uranium, was found to be the dominant mechanism for void migration. The contribution from lattice diffusion and the thermal stress gradient to the void migration was analyzed and found to be negligible. By extrapolation, a crossover from the surface-diffusion-controlled mechanism to the lattice-diffusion-controlled mechanism was found to occur for voids with sizes in the μm range.

  3. 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel coupled with neutronic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uddin, Rizwan [UNIV OF ILLINIOS

    2010-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) is widely considered as one of the top candidates identified in the Next Generation Nuclear Power-plant (NGNP) Technology Roadmap under the U.S . Depanment of Energy's Generation IV program. TRlSO particle is a common element among different VHTR designs and its performance is critical to the safety and reliability of the whole reactor. A TRISO particle experiences complex thermo-mechanical changes during reactor operation in high temperature and high burnup conditions. TRISO fuel performance analysis requires evaluation of these changes on micro scale. Since most of these changes are temperature dependent, 3D thermal modeling of TRISO fuel is a crucial step of the whole analysis package. In this paper, a 3D numerical thermal model was developed to calculate temperature distribution inside TRISO and pebble under different scenarios. 3D simulation is required because pebbles or TRISOs are always subjected to asymmetric thermal conditions since they are randomly packed together. The numerical model was developed using finite difference method and it was benchmarked against ID analytical results and also results reported from literature. Monte-Carlo models were set up to calculate radial power density profile. Complex convective boundary condition was applied on the pebble outer surface. Three reactors were simulated using this model to calculate temperature distribution under different power levels. Two asymmetric boundary conditions were applied to the pebble to test the 3D capabilities. A gas bubble was hypothesized inside the TRISO kernel and 3D simulation was also carried out under this scenario. Intuition-coherent results were obtained and reported in this paper.

  4. Relativistic, Viscous, Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations of Geometrically Thin Disks. I. Thermal and Other Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Etheridge, Sarina M.; Anninos, Peter; Mishra, Bhupendra; Kluźniak, Włodek

    2018-04-01

    We present results from two-dimensional, general relativistic, viscous, radiation hydrodynamic numerical simulations of Shakura–Sunyaev thin disks accreting onto stellar-mass Schwarzschild black holes. We consider cases on both the gas- and radiation-pressure-dominated branches of the thermal equilibrium curve, with mass accretion rates spanning the range from \\dot{M}=0.01{L}Edd}/{c}2 to 10L Edd/c 2. The simulations directly test the stability of this standard disk model on the different branches. We find clear evidence of thermal instability for all radiation-pressure-dominated disks, resulting universally in the vertical collapse of the disks, which in some cases then settle onto the stable, gas-pressure-dominated branch. Although these results are consistent with decades-old theoretical predictions, they appear to be in conflict with available observational data from black hole X-ray binaries. We also find evidence for a radiation-pressure-driven instability that breaks the unstable disks up into alternating rings of high and low surface density on a timescale comparable to the thermal collapse. Since radiation is included self-consistently in the simulations, we are able to calculate light curves and power density spectra (PDS). For the most part, we measure radiative efficiencies (ratio of luminosity to mass accretion rate) close to 6%, as expected for a nonrotating black hole. The PDS appear as broken power laws, with a break typically around 100 Hz. There is no evidence of significant excess power at any frequencies, i.e., no quasi-periodic oscillations are observed.

  5. Simulation of classical thermal states on a quantum computer: A transfer-matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Nagaj, Daniel; Whitfield, James D.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-01-01

    We present a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm to simulate thermal states of classical Hamiltonians on a quantum computer. Our scheme employs a sequence of locally controlled rotations, building up the desired state by adding qubits one at a time. We identified a class of classical models for which our method is efficient and avoids potential exponential overheads encountered by Grover-like or quantum Metropolis schemes. Our algorithm also gives an exponential advantage for two-dimensional Ising models with magnetic field on a square lattice, compared with the previously known Zalka's algorithm.

  6. Ventilated buildings optimisation by using a coupled thermal-airflow simulation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    2011-01-01

    This work shows the optimization of natural ventilation within buildings at the stage of design and behaviour of the occupants. An evaluation is done by coupled multizone air modelling and thermal building simulation by using a deterministic set of input factors comprising among others climate......, local environment, building characteristics, building systems, behaviour of occupants, heat loads. Selected deterministic input factors were varied to generate additional information applied in an optimization loop. With that, it is found that the optimal solution depends to a great deal...

  7. Thermal environment in a simulated double office room with convective and radiant cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Rezgals, Lauris

    2017-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and overhead mixing total volume ventilation (MTVV) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. Design (peak......) and usual (average) heat load from solar radiation, office equipment, lighting and occupants was simulated, respectively at 62 W/m2 and 38 W/m2 under four different workstation layouts. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured...

  8. Thermal environment in simulated offices with convective and radiant cooling systems under cooling (summer) mode of operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2016-01-01

    calculated. Manikin-based equivalent temperature (MBET) was determined by using two thermal manikins to identify the impact of the local thermal conditions generated by the studied systems on occupants' thermal perception. The results revealed that the differences in the thermal conditions achieved...... and occupants were simulated to obtain two different heat load conditions: 38 W/m2 and 64 W/m2 in the case of office room, and 71 W/m2 and 86 W/m2 in the case of meeting room. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured and draught rate...

  9. Effect of lattice relaxation on thermal conductivity of fcc-based structures: an efficient procedure of molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Min Young; Choi, Garam; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Hyo Seok; Park, Sang Hyun; Lee, Won Bo

    2017-07-01

    This work studied the computational details of the Green-Kubo method with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for thermal conductivity prediction. In MD thermal conductivity calculation, little consensus has been made about the inclusion of zero-pressure volume relaxation in the isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble, which determines the simulation lattice parameters. Simulations of fcc-based structures with different lattice parameters were performed to calculate lattice thermal conductivities and phonon density of states, and the results were compared to experimental reports and ab initio results to conclude that NpT volume relaxation is crucial for accurate prediction of thermal conductivity. In addition, the relation between thermal conductivity and interatomic potential cutoff distance was also analysed in the context of lattice relaxation. The results suggested that calculated thermal conductivity is strictly dependent on the lattice parameter and essentially independent of the cutoff distance. It was also shown that reducing the cutoff distance can greatly accelerate the thermal conductivity calculation, even without sacrificing the accuracy of thermal conductivity.

  10. Numerical simulation of combined natural and forced convection during thermal-hydraulic transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanus, H.M.; Sha, W.T.

    1981-01-01

    The single-phase COMMIX (COMponent MIXing) computer code performs fully three-dimensional, transient, thermal-hydraulic analyses of liquid-sodium LMFBR components. It solves the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy as a boundary-value problem in space and as an initial-value problem in time. The concepts of volume porosity, surface permeability and distributed resistance, and heat source have been employed in quasi-continuum (rod-bundle) applications. Results from three transient simulations involving forced and natural convection are presented: (1) a sodium-filled horizontal pipe initially of uniform temperature undergoing an inlet velocity rundown transient, as well as an inlet temperature transient; (2) a 19-pin LMFBR rod bundle undergoing a velocity transient; and, (3) a simulation of a water test of a 1/10-scale outlet plenum undergoing both velocity and temperature transients

  11. ATTIRE (analytical tools for thermal infrared engineering): A sensor simulation and modeling package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Sensor Development Laboratory (ASDL) at the Stennis Space Center develops, maintains and calibrates remote sensing instruments for the National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA). To perform system design trade-offs, analysis, and establish system parameters, ASDL has developed a software package for analytical simulation of sensor systems. This package called 'Analytical Tools for Thermal InfraRed Engineering' - ATTIRE, simulates the various components of a sensor system. The software allows each subsystem of the sensor to be analyzed independently for its performance. These performance parameters are then integrated to obtain system level information such as Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Noise Equivalent Radiance (NER), Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) etc. This paper describes the uses of the package and the physics that were used to derive the performance parameters.

  12. Numerical simulations of conjugate convection combined with surface thermal radiation using an Immersed-Boundary Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, F.; Colomer, G.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Oliva, A.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic and thermal interaction problems involving fluids and solids were studied through a finite volume-based Navier-Stokes solver, combined with immersed-boundary techniques and the net radiation method. Source terms were included in the momentum and energy equations to enforce the non-slip condition and the conjugate boundary condition including the radiative heat exchange. Code validation was performed through the simulation of two cases from the literature: conjugate natural convection in a square cavity with a conducting side wall; and a cubical cavity with conducting walls and a heat source. The accuracy of the methodology and the validation of the inclusion of moving bodies into the simulation was performed via a theoretical case (paper)

  13. Finite Element Simulation of Residual Stress Development in Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhoriny, Mohamed; Wenzelburger, Martin; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The coating buildup process of Al2O3/TiO2 ceramic powder deposited on stainless-steel substrate by atmospheric plasma spraying has been simulated by creating thermomechanical finite element models that utilize element death and birth techniques in ANSYS commercial software and self-developed codes. The simulation process starts with side-by-side deposition of coarse subparts of the ceramic layer until the entire coating is created. Simultaneously, the heat flow into the material, thermal deformation, and initial quenching stress are computed. The aim is to be able to predict—for the considered spray powder and substrate material—the development of residual stresses and to assess the risk of coating failure. The model allows the prediction of the heat flow, temperature profile, and residual stress development over time and position in the coating and substrate. The proposed models were successfully run and the results compared with actual residual stresses measured by the hole drilling method.

  14. Randomized quasi-Monte Carlo simulation of fast-ion thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höök, L J; Johnson, T; Hellsten, T

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the applicability of the randomized quasi-Monte Carlo method for simulation of fast-ion thermalization processes in fusion plasmas, e.g. for simulation of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. In contrast to the standard Monte Carlo method, the quasi-Monte Carlo method uses deterministic numbers instead of pseudo-random numbers and has a statistical weak convergence close to O(N -1 ), where N is the number of markers. We have compared different quasi-Monte Carlo methods for a neutral beam injection scenario, which is solved by many realizations of the associated stochastic differential equation, discretized with the Euler-Maruyama scheme. The statistical convergence of the methods is measured for time steps up to 2 14 . (paper)

  15. Randomized quasi-Monte Carlo simulation of fast-ion thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höök, L. J.; Johnson, T.; Hellsten, T.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the applicability of the randomized quasi-Monte Carlo method for simulation of fast-ion thermalization processes in fusion plasmas, e.g. for simulation of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. In contrast to the standard Monte Carlo method, the quasi-Monte Carlo method uses deterministic numbers instead of pseudo-random numbers and has a statistical weak convergence close to {O}(N^{-1}) , where N is the number of markers. We have compared different quasi-Monte Carlo methods for a neutral beam injection scenario, which is solved by many realizations of the associated stochastic differential equation, discretized with the Euler-Maruyama scheme. The statistical convergence of the methods is measured for time steps up to 214.

  16. Empirical Validation of Heat Transfer Performance Simulation of Graphite/PCM Concrete Materials for Thermally Activated Building System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hee Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To increase the heat capacity in lightweight construction materials, a phase change material (PCM can be introduced to building elements. A thermally activated building system (TABS with graphite/PCM concrete hollow core slab is suggested as an energy-efficient technology to shift and reduce the peak thermal load in buildings. An evaluation of heat storage and dissipation characteristics of TABS in graphite/PCM concrete has been conducted using dynamic simulations, but empirical validation is necessary to acceptably predict the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete. This study aimed to validate the thermal behavior of graphite/PCM concrete through a three-dimensional transient heat transfer simulation. The simulation results were compared to experimental results from previous studies of concrete and graphite/PCM concrete. The overall thermal behavior for both materials was found to be similar to experiment results. Limitations in the simulation modeling, which included determination of the indoor heat transfer coefficient, assumption of constant thermal conductivity with temperature, and assumption of specimen homogeneity, led to slight differences between the measured and simulated results.

  17. Mathematical modelling and simulation of the thermal performance of a solar heated indoor swimming pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mančić Marko V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Buildings with indoor swimming pools have a large energy footprint. The source of major energy loss is the swimming pool hall where air humidity is increased by evaporation from the pool water surface. This increases energy consumption for heating and ventilation of the pool hall, fresh water supply loss and heat demand for pool water heating. In this paper, a mathematical model of the swimming pool was made to assess energy demands of an indoor swimming pool building. The mathematical model of the swimming pool is used with the created multi-zone building model in TRNSYS software to determine pool hall energy demand and pool losses. Energy loss for pool water and pool hall heating and ventilation are analyzed for different target pool water and air temperatures. The simulation showed that pool water heating accounts for around 22%, whereas heating and ventilation of the pool hall for around 60% of the total pool hall heat demand. With a change of preset controller air and water temperatures in simulations, evaporation loss was in the range 46-54% of the total pool losses. A solar thermal sanitary hot water system was modelled and simulated to analyze it's potential for energy savings of the presented demand side model. The simulation showed that up to 87% of water heating demands could be met by the solar thermal system, while avoiding stagnation. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 42006: Research and development of energy and environmentally highly effective polygeneration systems based on using renewable energy sources

  18. Streamline three-dimensional thermal model of a lithium titanate pouch cell battery in extreme temperature conditions with module simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaguemont, Joris; Omar, Noshin; Martel, François; Van den Bossche, Peter; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the development of a three-dimensional (3D) lithium titanium oxide (LTO) pouch cell is presented to first better comprehend its thermal behavior within electrified vehicle applications, but also to propose a strong modeling base for future thermal management system. Current 3D-thermal models are based on electrochemical reactions which are in need for elaborated meshing effort and long computational time. There lacks a fast electro-thermal model which can capture voltage, current and thermal distribution variation during the whole process. The proposed thermal model is a reduce-effort temperature simulation approach involving a 0D-electrical model accommodating a 3D-thermal model to exclude electrochemical processes. The thermal model is based on heat-transfer theory and its temperature distribution prediction incorporates internal conduction and heat generation effect as well as convection. In addition, experimental tests are conducted to validate the model. Results show that both the heat dissipation rate and surface temperature uniformity data are in agreement with simulation results, which satisfies the application requirements for electrified vehicles. Additionally, a LTO battery pack sizing and modeling is also designed, applied and displays a non-uniformity of the cells under driving operation. Ultimately, the model will serve as a basis for the future development of a thermal strategy for LTO cells that operate in a large temperature range, which is a strong contribution to the existing body of scientific literature.

  19. Impact of Thermal Plumes Generated by Occupant Simulators with Different Complexity of Body Geometry on Airflow Pattern in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    The impact of thermal plumes generated by human body simulators with different geometry on the airflow pattern in a full scale room with displacement ventilation (supply air temperature 21.6°C, total flow rate 80 L/s) was studied when two seated occupants were simulated first by two thermal...... manikins resembling accurately human body shape and then by two heated cylinders. The manikins and the cylinders had the same surface area of 1.63 m2 and the same heat generation of 73 W. CO2 supplied from the top of the heat sources was used for simulating bio-effluents. CO2 concentration was measured...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column and beam tube of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.com [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Karimzadeh, S.; Stummer, T.; Boeck, H. [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Neutronics parameters of the reactor shielding. > Biological shielding of the TRIGA reactor. > Thermal flux measurement in the thermal column and BT-A. > MCNP model validation. - Abstract: The Monet Carlo simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor core has been performed employing the radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The model has been confirmed experimentally in the PhD research work at the Atominstitute (ATI) of the Vienna University of Technology. The MCNP model has been extended to complete biological shielding of the reactor including the thermal column, radiographic collimator and four beam tubes. This paper presents the MCNP simulated results in the thermal column and one of the beam tubes (beam tube A) of the reactor. To validate these theoretical results, thermal neutron flux density measurements using the gold foil activation method have been performed in the thermal column and beam tube A (BT-A). In the thermal column, the theoretical and experimental results are in fairly good agreement i.e. maximum thermal flux density in the centre decreases in radial direction. Further, it is also agreed that thermal flux densities in the lower part is greater than the upper part of the thermal column. In the BT-A experiment, the thermal flux density distribution is measured using gold foil. The experimental and theoretical diffusion lengths have been determined as 10.77 cm and 9.36 cm respectively with only 13% difference, reflecting good agreement between the experimental and simulated results. To save the computational cost and to incorporate the accurate and complete information of each individual Monte Carlo MC particle tracks, the surface source writing capability of MCNP has been utilized to the TRIGA shielding model. The variance reduction techniques have been applied to improve the statistics of the problem and to save computational efforts.

  1. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  2. MHD SIMULATIONS OF CORONAL SUPRA-ARCADE DOWNFLOWS INCLUDING ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurbriggen, E.; Costa, A.; Schneiter, M.; Cécere, M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Astronomía Teórica y Experimental (IATE), Córdoba (Argentina); Esquivel, A., E-mail: ezurbriggen@unc.edu.ar, E-mail: acosta@unc.edu.ar [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)

    2016-11-20

    Coronal supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are observed as dark trails descending toward hot turbulent-fan-shaped regions. Due to the large temperature values and gradients in these fan regions, the thermal conduction (TC) should be very efficient. While several models have been proposed to explain the triggering and the evolution of SADs, none of these scenarios address a systematic consideration of TC. Thus, we accomplish this task numerically simulating the evolution of SADs within this framework. That is, SADs are conceived as voided (subdense) cavities formed by nonlinear waves triggered by downflowing bursty localized reconnection events in a perturbed hot fan. We generate a properly turbulent fan, obtained by a stirring force that permits control of the energy and vorticity input in the medium where SADs develop. We include anisotropic TC and consider plasma properties consistent with observations. Our aim is to study whether it is possible to prevent SADs from vanishing by thermal diffusion. We find that this will be the case, depending on the turbulence parameters, in particular if the magnetic field lines are able to envelope the voided cavities, thermally isolating them from the hot environment. Velocity shear perturbations that are able to generate instabilities of the Kelvin–Helmholtz type help to produce magnetic islands, extending the lifetime of SADs.

  3. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  4. Hydraulic and thermal conduction phenomena in soils at the particle-scale: Towards realistic FEM simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narsilio, G A; Yun, T S; Kress, J; Evans, T M

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes a method to characterize conduction properties in soils at the particle-scale. The method set the bases for an alternative way to estimate conduction parameters such as thermal conductivity and hydraulic conductivity, with the potential application to hard-to-obtain samples, where traditional experimental testing on large enough specimens becomes much more expensive. The technique is exemplified using 3D synthetic grain packings generated with discrete element methods, from which 3D granular images are constructed. Images are then imported into the finite element analyses to solve the corresponding governing partial differential equations of hydraulic and thermal conduction. High performance computing is implemented to meet the demanding 3D numerical calculations of the complex geometrical domains. The effects of void ratio and inter-particle contacts in hydraulic and thermal conduction are explored. Laboratory measurements support the numerically obtained results and validate the viability of the new methods used herein. The integration of imaging with rigorous numerical simulations at the pore-scale also enables fundamental observation of particle-scale mechanisms of macro-scale manifestation.

  5. Biodegradation of cis-1,2-Dichloroethene in Simulated Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhuobiao; van Gaans, Pauline; Smit, Martijn; Rijnaarts, Huub; Grotenhuis, Tim

    2015-11-17

    Underground thermal energy storage (UTES) use has showed a sharp rise in numbers in the last decades, with aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) and borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) most widely used. In many urban areas with contaminated aquifers, there exists a desire for sustainable heating and cooling with UTES and a need for remediation. We investigated the potential synergy between UTES and bioremediation with batch experiments to simulate the effects of changing temperature and liquid exchange that occur in ATES systems, and of only temperature change occurring in BTES systems on cis-DCE reductive dechlorination. Compared to the natural situation (NS) at a constant temperature of 10 °C, both UTES systems with 25/5 °C for warm and cold well performed significantly better in cis-DCE (cis-1,2-dichloroethene) removal. The overall removal efficiency under mimicked ATES and BTES conditions were respectively 13 and 8.6 times higher than in NS. Inoculation with Dehalococcoides revealed that their initial presence is a determining factor for the dechlorination process. Temperature was the dominating factor when Dehalococcoides abundance was sufficient. Stimulated biodegradation was shown to be most effective in the mimicked ATES warm well because of the combined effect of suitable temperature, sustaining biomass growth, and regular cis-DCE supply.

  6. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONALMETHODS FOR COMPLEX SIMULATION OF THERMAL PROCESSES IN POWER ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risto V. Filkoski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The overall frame and principal steps of complex numerical modelling of thermal processes in power boiler furnaces on pulverised coal with tangential disposition of the burners are presented in the paper. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD technique is used as a tool to perform comprehensive thermal analysis in two test cases. The methodology for creation of three-dimensional models of boiler furnaces is briefly described. Standard steady k- model is employed for description of the turbulent flow. The coupling of continuity and momentum is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Coal combustion is modelled by the mixture fraction/probability density function approach for the reaction chemistry, with equilibrium assumption applied for description of the system chemistry. Thermal radiation is computed by means of the simplified P-N model, based on expansion of the radiation intensity into an orthogonal series of spherical harmonics.Comparison between the simulation predictions and available site measurements leads to a conclusion that the model produces realistic insight into the furnace processes. Qualitative agreement of the results indicates reasonability of the calculations and validates the employed sub-models. The described test cases and other experiences with CFD modelling stress the advantages over a purely field data study, such as the ability to quickly and cheaply analyse a variety of design options without actually modifying the object and the availability of significantly more data to interpret the results.

  7. Optimization of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System Design Using Comprehensive Coupled Simulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Bastian; Rühaak, Wolfram; Schulte, Daniel O.; Formhals, Julian; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is a promising technology in the development of sustainable, renewable and low-emission district heating concepts. Such systems consist of several components and assemblies like the borehole heat exchangers (BHE), other heat sources (e.g. solarthermics, combined heat and power plants, peak load boilers, heat pumps), distribution networks and heating installations. The complexity of these systems necessitates numerical simulations in the design and planning phase. Generally, the subsurface components are simulated separately from the above ground components of the district heating system. However, as fluid and heat are exchanged, the subsystems interact with each other and thereby mutually affect their performances. For a proper design of the overall system, it is therefore imperative to take into account the interdependencies of the subsystems. Based on a TCP/IP communication we have developed an interface for the coupling of a simulation package for heating installations with a finite element software for the modeling of the heat flow in the subsurface and the underground installations. This allows for a co-simulation of all system components, whereby the interaction of the different subsystems is considered. Furthermore, the concept allows for a mathematical optimization of the components and the operational parameters. Consequently, a finer adjustment of the system can be ensured and a more precise prognosis of the system's performance can be realized.

  8. Simulation of regimes of convection and plume dynamics by the thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Yuen, David A.

    2018-02-01

    We present 2D simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) of a fluid in a rectangular box being heated from below, and cooled from above. We observe plumes, hot narrow upwellings from the base, and down-going cold chutes from the top. We have varied both the Rayleigh numbers and the Prandtl numbers respectively from Ra = 1000 to Ra =1010 , and Pr = 1 through Pr = 5 ×104 , leading to Rayleigh-Bénard convection cells at low Rayleigh numbers through to vigorous convection and unstable plumes with pronounced vortices and eddies at high Rayleigh numbers. We conduct simulations with high Prandtl numbers up to Pr = 50, 000 to simulate in the inertial regime. We find for cases when Pr ⩾ 100 that we obtain a series of narrow plumes of upwelling fluid with mushroom heads and chutes of downwelling fluid. We also present simulations at a Prandtl number of 0.7 for Rayleigh numbers varying from Ra =104 through Ra =107.5 . We demonstrate that the Nusselt number follows power law scaling of form Nu ∼Raγ where γ = 0.279 ± 0.002 , which is consistent with published results of γ = 0.281 in the literature. These results show that the LBM is capable of reproducing results obtained with classical macroscopic methods such as spectral methods, and demonstrate the great potential of the LBM for studying thermal convection and plume dynamics relevant to geodynamics.

  9. Modeling a Naturally Ventilated Double Skin Façade with a Building Thermal Simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Kalyanova, Olena; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    to predict. This is manly due to the very transient and complex air flow in the naturally ventilated double skin façade cavity. In this paper the modelling of the DSF using a thermal simulation program, BSim, is discussed. The simulations are based on the measured weather boundary conditions...... the possibility to calibrate the simulation model with measured data the risk of generating poor results is imminent. Therefore further work including both measurements and more detailed and robust simulation programs are necessary......, and the simulation results are compared to the measurement results like energy consumption for cooling, air temperature, temperature gradient and mass flow rate in the DSF cavity, etc. Details about the measurements are reported in \\Kalyanova et al. 2008\\. The thermal simulation program does not at the moment...

  10. Large-eddy simulation of flows over idealized urban areas in thermal stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mr.; Liu, Dr.

    2012-04-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) equipped with the one-equation subgrid-scale model was employed to investigate the mean wind and turbulence over idealized two-dimensional (2D) street canyons in various thermal stratifications. The prevailing wind is driven by a background pressure gradient above the roof level that is perpendicular to the axis of street canyons. The building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratio is kept unity so the flows fall into the skimming flow regime. Cyclic boundary conditions are assigned to the domain inlet and outlet, simulating the infinite horizontally homogenous building structures. The buoyancy force is modeled by Boussinesq approximation. Building geometry is the key factor governing the wind flow behaviors aloft. Its effects on the flow structures in isothermal conditions are widely studied. Whereas, thermal stratification, which is caused by the temperature difference between the urban fabrics and the prevailing wind, plays another important role in the wind flow behaviors. The presence of buoyancy force drives/suppresses convective flows that substantially modify the vertical transport processes. In stable stratification, e.g. nighttime, a cooler urban surface favors subsidence that reduces turbulence intensities subsequently. While in unstable stratification, e.g. daytime, a hotter urban surface induces buoyancy and convective current that in turn promotes turbulence. In isothermal conditions, it is well known that the mean flows exhibit a log-law region over an aerodynamically smooth surface where the mean wind profile is in a logarithmic form (law of the wall). The logarithmic wind profile is also observed over homogenously rough surfaces, such as the idealized two-dimensional street canyons used in this study. However, in thermal stratification (both stable and unstable), the mean wind profile deviates from the isothermal one whose extent depends on the intensity of thermal stratification compared with the mean wind (measured by

  11. Review of turbulence modelling for numerical simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Haapalehto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The report deals with the modelling of turbulent flows in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic applications. The goal is to give tools and knowledge about turbulent flows and their modelling in practical applications for engineers, and especially nuclear engineers. The emphasize is on the theory of turbulence, the existing different turbulence models, the state-of-art of turbulence in research centres, the available models in the commercial code CFD-FLOW3D, and the latest applications of turbulence modelling in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. It turns out that it is difficult to elaborate an universal turbulence model and each model has its advantages and drawbacks in each application. However, the increasing power of computers can permit the emergence of new methods of turbulence modelling such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which open new horizons in this field. These latter methods are beginning to be available in commercial codes and are used in different nuclear applications such as 3-D modelling of the nuclear reactor cores and the steam generators. (orig.) (22 refs.)

  12. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  13. Modeling and simulation of wetted porous thermal barriers operating under high temperature or high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, V.A.F. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Mendonca, M.L. [Escola Superior de Tecnologia e Gestao de Agueda, Universidade de Aveiro, Zona Industrial da Alagoa, Apartado 473, 3754-909 Agueda (Portugal); Figueiredo, A.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade de Coimbra, Polo II, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-201 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2008-07-01

    Porous media with high water content can be successfully used as thermal barriers to operate under high exposure temperatures and/or high heat fluxes. Modeling and simulation of such systems presents difficulties and challenges, which are pointed and worked out in this work. Liquid water and water vapor transfers are considered, including the capillary effects for the liquid phase, as well as the air transfer inside the porous medium. Heat transfer model includes conduction, radiation, enthalpy convection, sensible heating and phase change. A realistic model is considered at the exposed boundary in what concerns mass transfer: the outflow mass transfer is dictated by the water effusion and not by the convection transfer mechanism between the exposed surface and the environment. A set of numerical aspects is detailed, concerning both the numerical modeling and the solution of the discretization equations, which are crucial to obtain successful simulations. Some illustrative results are presented, showing the potential of the wetted porous media when used as thermal barriers, as well as the capabilities of the presented physical and numerical models to deal with such systems. (author)

  14. Adsorption of ethylene on graphitized thermal carbon black and in slit pores: a computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D D; Do, H D

    2004-08-17

    In this paper, we studied vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) and adsorption of ethylene on graphitized thermal carbon black and in slit pores whose walls are composed of graphene layers. Simple models of a one-center Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential and a two-center united atom (UA)-LJ potential are investigated to study the impact of the choice of potential models in the description of VLE and adsorption behavior. Here, we used a Monte Carlo simulation method with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo ensembles. The one-center potential model cannot describe adequately the VLE over the practical range of temperature from the triple point to the critical point. On the other hand, the two-center potential model (Wick et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 8008-8016) performs well in the description of VLE (saturated vapor and liquid densities and vapor pressure) over the wide range of temperature. This UA-LJ model is then used in the study of adsorption of ethylene on graphitized thermal carbon black and in slit pores. Agreement between the GCMC simulation results and the experimental data on graphitized thermal carbon black for moderate temperatures is excellent, demonstrating that the potential of the GCMC method and the proper choice of potential model are essential to investigate adsorption. For slit pores of various sizes, we have found that the behavior of ethylene exhibits a number of features that are not manifested in the study of spherical LJ particles. In particular, the singlet density distribution versus distance across the pore and the angle between the molecular axis and the z direction provide rich information about the way molecules arrange themselves when the pore width is varied. Such an arrangement has been found to be very sensitive to the pore width.

  15. Application of large-eddy simulation to pressurized thermal shock: Assessment of the accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loginov, M.S.; Komen, E.M.J.; Hoehne, T.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We compare large-eddy simulation with experiment on the single-phase pressurized thermal shock problem. → Three test cases are considered, they cover entire range of mixing patterns. → The accuracy of the flow mixing in the reactor pressure vessel is assessed qualitatively and quantitatively. - Abstract: Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) is identified as one of the safety issues where Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can bring real benefits. The turbulence modeling may impact overall accuracy of the calculated thermal loads on the vessel walls, therefore advanced methods for turbulent flows are required. The feasibility and mesh resolution of LES for single-phase PTS are assessed earlier in a companion paper. The current investigation deals with the accuracy of LES approach with respect to the experiment. Experimental data from the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing (ROCOM) facility is used as a basis for validation. Three test cases with different flow rates are considered. They correspond to a buoyancy-driven, a momentum-driven, and a transitional coolant mixing pattern in the downcomer. Time- and frequency-domain analysis are employed for comparison of the numerical and experimental data. The investigation shows a good qualitative prediction of the bulk flow patterns. The fluctuations are modeled correctly. A conservative estimate of the temperature drop near the wall can be obtained from the numerical results with safety factor of 1.1-1.3. In general, the current LES gives a realistic and reliable description of the considered coolant mixing experiments. The accuracy of the prediction is definitely improved with respect to earlier CFD simulations.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Glass-Fibre-Reinforced Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Jiang, Xu; Zhang, Qilin; Wang, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Glass-Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (GFRP), as a developing construction material, has a rapidly increasing application in civil engineering especially bridge engineering area these years, mainly used as decorating materials and reinforcing bars for now. Compared with traditional construction material, these kinds of composite material have obvious advantages such as high strength, low density, resistance to corrosion and ease of processing. There are different processing methods to form members, such as pultrusion and resin transfer moulding (RTM) methods, which process into desired shape directly through raw material; meanwhile, GFRP, as a polymer composite, possesses several particular physical and mechanical properties, and the thermal property is one of them. The matrix material, polymer, performs special after heated and endue these composite material a potential hot processing property, but also a poor fire resistance. This paper focuses on thermal performance of GFRP as panels and corresponding researches are conducted. First, dynamic thermomechanical analysis (DMA) experiment is conducted to obtain the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the object GFRP, and the curve of bending elastic modulus with temperature is calculated according to the experimental data. Then compute and estimate the values of other various thermal parameters through DMA experiment and other literatures, and conduct numerical simulation under two condition respectively: (1) the heat transfer process of GFRP panel in which the panel would be heated directly on the surface above Tg, and the hot processing under this temperature field; (2) physical and mechanical performance of GFRP panel under fire condition. Condition (1) is mainly used to guide the development of high temperature processing equipment, and condition (2) indicates that GFRP’s performance under fire is unsatisfactory, measures must be taken when being adopted. Since composite materials’ properties differ from each other

  17. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  18. JPL Thermal Design Modeling Philosophy and NASA-STD-7009 Standard for Models and Simulations - A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    The Standard JPL thermal engineering practice prescribes worst-case methodologies for design. In this process, environmental and key uncertain thermal parameters (e.g., thermal blanket performance, interface conductance, optical properties) are stacked in a worst case fashion to yield the most hot- or cold-biased temperature. Thus, these simulations would represent the upper and lower bounds. This, effectively, represents JPL thermal design margin philosophy. Uncertainty in the margins and the absolute temperatures is usually estimated by sensitivity analyses and/or by comparing the worst-case results with "expected" results. Applicability of the analytical model for specific design purposes along with any temperature requirement violations are documented in peer and project design review material. In 2008, NASA released NASA-STD-7009, Standard for Models and Simulations. The scope of this standard covers the development and maintenance of models, the operation of simulations, the analysis of the results, training, recommended practices, the assessment of the Modeling and Simulation (M&S) credibility, and the reporting of the M&S results. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) project thermal control system M&S activity was chosen as a case study determining whether JPL practice is in line with the standard and to identify areas of non-compliance. This paper summarizes the results and makes recommendations regarding the application of this standard to JPL thermal M&S practices.

  19. Numerical modeling of coupled thermal chemical reactive transport: simulation of a heat storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H.; Watanabe, N.; Singh, A. K.; Nagel, T.; Linder, M.; Woerner, A.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    As a carbon-free energy supply technology, the operation time and final energy output of thermal solar power plants can be greatly extended if efficient thermal storage systems are applied. One of the proposed design of such system is to utilize reversible thermochemical reactions and its embedded reaction enthalpy, e.g. the Ca(OH)2/CaO hydration circle, in a fixed-bed gas-solid reactor (Schaube et al. 2011) The modeling of such a storage system involves multiple strongly-coupled physical and chemical processes. Seepage velocity is calculated by the nonlinear Forchheimer law. Gas phase density and viscosity are temperature, pressure and composition dependent. Also, heat transfer between gas and solid phases is largely influenced by the exothermal heat produced by the hydration of calcium oxide. Numerical solution of four governing PDEs include the mass balance, reactive transport, heat balance equations for gas and solid phases, which are implemented into the open source scientific software OpenGeoSys in a monolithic way. Based on it, a 2D numerical model, considering the boundary heat loss of the system, was set up to simulate the energy-storage and release circle. The high performance computing techniques were employed in two stages. First, the dynamic behavior of the heat storage system is simulated on a parallel platform. Second, a large number of processors are employed to perform sensitivity analysis, whereas the reaction rates and efficiency factor of heat transfer are parameterized so that the measured and simulated temperature profile fit with each other. The model showed that heat transfer coefficient between solid and gas phase, grain size of the filling material will influence the final performance greatly. By varying these factors, the calibrated model will be further applied to optimize the design of such energy storage system.

  20. Thermal-hydraulic numerical simulation of fuel sub-assembly for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Aakanksha

    2014-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the numerical simulation of sodium flow in wire wrapped sub-assembly of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). First calculations were carried out by a time averaging approach called RANS (Reynolds- Averaged Navier-Stokes equations) using industrial code STAR-CCM+. This study gives a clear understanding of heat transfer between the fuel pin and sodium. The main variables of the macroscopic flow are in agreement with correlations used hitherto. However, to obtain a detailed description of temperature fluctuations around the spacer wire, more accurate approaches like LES (Large Eddy Simulation) and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) are clearly needed. For LES approach, the code TRIO U was used and for the DNS approach, a research code was used. These approaches require a considerable long calculation time which leads to the need of representative but simplified geometry. The DNS approach enables us to study the thermal hydraulics of sodium that has very low Prandtl number inducing a very different behavior of thermal field in comparison to the hydraulic field. The LES approach is used to study the local region of sub-assembly. This study shows that spacer wire generates the local hot spots (∼20 C) on the wake side of spacer wire with respect to the sodium flow at the region of contact with the fuel pin. Temperature fluctuations around the spacer wire are low (∼1 C-2 C). Under nominal operation, the spectral analysis shows the absence of any dominant peak for temperature oscillations at low frequency (2-10 Hz). The obtained spectra of temperature oscillations can be used as an input for further mechanical studies to determine its impact on the solid structures. (author) [fr

  1. A 3-D wellbore simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) to determine the thermal diffusivity of rock-formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Loya, J. A.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2017-06-01

    Acquiring thermophysical properties of rock-formations in geothermal systems is an essential task required for the well drilling and completion. Wellbore thermal simulators require such properties for predicting the thermal behavior of a wellbore and the formation under drilling and shut-in conditions. The estimation of static formation temperatures also needs the use of these properties for the wellbore and formation materials (drilling fluids and pipes, cements, casings, and rocks). A numerical simulator (WELLTHER-SIM) has been developed for modeling the drilling fluid circulation and shut-in processes of geothermal wellbores, and for the in-situ determination of thermal diffusivities of rocks. Bottomhole temperatures logged under shut-in conditions (BHTm), and thermophysical and transport properties of drilling fluids were used as main input data. To model the thermal disturbance and recovery processes in the wellbore and rock-formation, initial drilling fluid and static formation temperatures were used as initial and boundary conditions. WELLTHER-SIM uses these temperatures together with an initial thermal diffusivity for the rock-formation to solve the governing equations of the heat transfer model. WELLTHER-SIM was programmed using the finite volume technique to solve the heat conduction equations under 3-D and transient conditions. Thermal diffusivities of rock-formations were inversely computed by using an iterative and efficient numerical simulation, where simulated thermal recovery data sets (BHTs) were statistically compared with those temperature measurements (BHTm) logged in some geothermal wellbores. The simulator was validated using a well-documented case reported in the literature, where the thermophysical properties of the rock-formation are known with accuracy. The new numerical simulator has been successfully applied to two wellbores drilled in geothermal fields of Japan and Mexico. Details of the physical conceptual model, the numerical

  2. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRACRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto

    2011-01-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC R T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC R T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC R T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  3. Magnon and phonon dispersion, lifetime, and thermal conductivity of iron from spin-lattice dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xufei; Liu, Zeyu; Luo, Tengfei

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, the fundamental physics of spin-lattice (e.g., magnon-phonon) interaction has attracted significant experimental and theoretical interests given its potential paradigm-shifting impacts in areas like spin-thermoelectrics, spin-caloritronics, and spintronics. Modelling studies of the transport of magnons and phonons in magnetic crystals are very rare. In this paper, we use spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to model ferromagnetic crystalline iron, where the spin and lattice systems are coupled through the atomic position-dependent exchange function, and thus the interaction between magnons and phonons is naturally considered. We then present a method combining SLD simulations with spectral energy analysis to calculate the magnon and phonon harmonic (e.g., dispersion, specific heat, and group velocity) and anharmonic (e.g., scattering rate) properties, based on which their thermal conductivity values are calculated. This work represents an example of using SLD simulations to understand the transport properties involving coupled magnon and phonon dynamics.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Single Bubble Pool Boiling with Influence of Heater Thermal Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu; Zhang, Liang; Li, Zhen-Dong

    The model of single bubble pool boiling is used to simulate nucleate pool boiling phenomenon in the present paper. Local convection and heat transfer around a single vapour bubble which is growing from a nucleus bubble planted artificially on the surface of heaters with different thicknesses, as well as transient heat conduction inside the heater’s wall, are simulated numerically with sharp interface representation. Multi-cycle simulation is adopted to eliminate the effect of un-physical initial conditions. It’s found that the thermal response of wall is found to affect the bubble growth and boiling heat transfer. During the process of bubble growth, a sharp temperature drop inside the solid wall is evident near the contact line underneath the growing bubble because of the strong evaporation in micro-region. The temperature and heat flux profiles change with the move of the contact line, and twice sharp temperature drops at a certain location are observed, which correspond to the expanding and recoiling processes, respectively. During the waiting period after the bubble detached from the wall, the temperature field is recovered by heat conduction inside the solid wall. As a part of preparation of the SOBER project onboard the Chinese recoverable satellite SJ-10, which will be launched in the end of 2015, the gravity influence is also studied.

  5. Numerical simulation of thermal behavior of a ventilated arc greenhouse during a solar day

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fidaros, D.K.; Baxevanou, C.A.; Bartzanas, T. [Centre for Research and Technology-Thessaly, Institute of Technology and Management of Agricultural ecosystems, Technology Park of Thessaly, 1st Industrial Area of Volos, 38500 Volos (Greece); Kittas, C. [Centre for Research and Technology-Thessaly, Institute of Technology and Management of Agricultural ecosystems, Technology Park of Thessaly, 1st Industrial Area of Volos, 38500 Volos (Greece); University of Thessaly, School of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Agriculture, Crop Production and Rural Environment, Fytokou St., N. Ionia, GR-38446, Magnesia (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    In the present study the transport phenomena occurring inside a ventilated arc type tunnel greenhouse are simulated during a solar day taking into account the optical properties of plants only in the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) band. The simulation concerns the day of autumn equinox for an area of central Greece. Two cases are investigated: in the first case the external temperature is considered to be constant while in the second is considered to vary during the day. In order to solve the equations describing the transport phenomena inside the greenhouse a finite volume method is used. Tomato crop inside the greenhouse is simulated as porous material while radiation transport is modelled by the Discrete Ordinates (DO) model. Flow is considered to be incompressible, unsteady and turbulent. From the results it comes out that the consideration of external temperature variation is very important since the internal thermal field is determined by the convection induced by the entering stream except the area covered by a big recirculation in the middle of the greenhouse close to the cover and the close to ground corners where the effect of the entering stream is weak. The distribution of PAR is independent of the external temperature and presents symmetrical time behavior ensuring capable amounts of radiation in all the crops during at least 8 h a day. (author)

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Thermal Simulations of a Nuclear Fuel Canister During Drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Corey

    Drying of nuclear fuel canisters is essential to ensure the long-term integrity and safety of nuclear fuel. Vacuum drying, which is one of the drying processes applied to nuclear fuel canisters, consists of lowering the gas pressure in the canister. This introduces a temperature-jump thermal resistance at the gas-solid interface that can cause the cladding temperature to rise beyond the regulated limits. In this thesis, the details of a numerical model of a TN24 PWR nuclear fuel canister filled with Westinghouse 15x15 assemblies is discussed. The model was constructed in ANSYS/Fluent to assess the peak cladding temperatures during vacuum drying and is geometrically-accurate and three-dimensional with distinct regions for the fuel, cladding, backfill, steel basket, and aluminum support. Considerations have been made for conduction in the solid and fluid regions as well as radiation in the fluid regions. A uniform temperature boundary condition of 101.7°C is used at the outside of the canister to conservatively model canister immersed in boiling water. Symmetry boundary conditions were employed such that only one-eighth of the canister was modeled. Steady-state simulations are performed for different fuel heat generation rates and helium pressures, ranging from atmospheric pressure to 100 Pa. Constant thermal accommodation coefficients, which characterize the effect of the temperature-jump thermal resistance at the gas-surface interface are employed. The peak cladding temperature and its radial and axial locations are reported. The maximum allowable heat generation that brings the cladding temperatures to the radial hydride formation limit (TRH = 400°C) is also reported. The results of the three-dimensional model simulations are compared to two-dimensional simulations for the same heat generation rate and pressures. The results show that the rarefaction condition causes the temperature of the rods to significantly increase compared to the continuum condition, which

  7. Application of process simulation for evaluation of ecologically benefical developments in thermal power plant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, G.

    2000-04-01

    Responsibility for the environment and a sustainable utilization of resources gain also in the production of electric power more and more importance. For this reason existing power generation processes have to be improved and alternatives to existing processes have to be developed. As a first step in this procedure process simulation is a powerful tool to evaluate the potentials of new developments. In this work it is shown, how new thermal power processes are modeled and simulated based on well-known thermodynamic and chemical correlations. Processes for thermal power plants using lignite with high water content and biomass as fuel are studied. In each case simulations are carried out for complete plants including all important unit operations. Based on a conventional thermal power plant for lignite different variants for efficiency improvement by fuel drying are examined. Additionally the potential of a process with gasification and gas turbine is discussed. Compared to a lignite power plant the preconditions for a biomass power plant are different. A promising option for the future seems to be small, decentralized combined heat and power plants. Therefore a process with simple and compact design including gasifier and gas turbine is regarded and sensitivity analyses are carried out. As well as for the lignite processes possible improvements by fuel drying are studied. The basis lignite power plant (drying in an impact rotor mill with hot flue gas) has an overall electric efficiency of 36 %. Alternative fuel drying processes (reducing water content from 54 w % to 10 w %) can increase efficiency to nearly 43 %. Using integrated air-blown gasification combined with gas turbine and steam turbine and additional fuel drying raises the efficiency up to 49 % in the case of cold gas cleanup and up to 50 percent in the case of hot gas cleanup. Efficiencies of the regarded biomass power plants are in the range of about 20 % (with a biomass water content of 25 w %). By

  8. Thermal transport in UO2 with defects and fission products by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lashley, Jason Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byler, Darrin David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-14

    The importance of the thermal transport in nuclear fuel has motivated a wide range of experimental and modelling studies. In this report, the reduction of thermal transport in UO2 due to defects and fission products has been investigated using non-equilibrium MD simulations, with two sets of empirical potentials for studying the degregation of UO2 thermal conductivity including a Buckingham type interatomic potential and a recently developed EAM type interatomic potential. Additional parameters for U5+ and Zr4+ in UO2 have been developed for the EAM potential. The thermal conductivity results from MD simulations are then corrected for the spin-phonon scattering through Callaway model formulations. To validate the modelling results, comparison was made with experimental measurements on single crystal hyper-stoichiometric UO2+x samples.

  9. Simulation of thermal stress and buckling instability in Si/Ge and Ge/Si core/shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvankar; Moitra, Amitava; Bhattacharya, Mishreyee; Dutta, Amlan

    2015-01-01

    The present study employs the method of atomistic simulation to estimate the thermal stress experienced by Si/Ge and Ge/Si, ultrathin, core/shell nanowires with fixed ends. The underlying technique involves the computation of Young's modulus and the linear coefficient of thermal expansion through separate simulations. These two material parameters are combined to obtain the thermal stress on the nanowires. In addition, the thermally induced stress is perceived in the context of buckling instability. The analysis provides a trade-off between the geometrical and operational parameters of the nanostructures. The proposed methodology can be extended to other materials and structures and helps with the prediction of the conditions under which a nanowire-based device might possibly fail due to elastic instability.

  10. Thermal sensation vote simulation on the aged for bus air conditioning; Koreisha wo koryoshita onkan suchi simulation no bus kucho eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, H.; Nishijima, H.; Kitada, M.; Shinma, A. [Denso Corp., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The Numbers of passengers on the aged of sight-seeing buses about 5 times bigger than those of car passengers, have been increasing gradually. The former paper of DENSO in 1994 introduces quantitative method, which simulates passenger heat amount given by sun light at various solar positions. At this time, this paper introduces quantitative method, which simulates passengers thermal sensation skin temperature and also heat amount given by sun light at various solar positions. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Fuel Element Testing in the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). Last year NTREES was successfully used to satisfy a testing milestone for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) project and met or exceeded all required objectives.

  12. A numerical simulation package for analysis of neutronics and thermal fluids of space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J.; Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    A system of computer codes for engineering simulation and in-depth analysis of nuclear and thermal fluid design of nuclear thermal rockets is developed. The computational system includes a neutronic solver package, a thermal fluid solver package and a propellant and materials property package. The Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system code is incorporated with computational modules specific to nuclear powered engines. ROCETS features a component based performance architecture that interfaces component modules into the user designed configuration, interprets user commands, creates an executable FORTRAN computer program, and executes the program to provide output to the user. Basic design features of the Pratt ampersand Whitney XNR2000 nuclear rocket concept and its operational performance are analyzed and simulated

  13. Experiment-based thermal micromagnetic simulations of the magnetization reversal for ns-range clocked nanomagnetic logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemys, Grazvydas; Breitkreutz-v. Gamm, Stephan; Csaba, Gyorgy; Schmitt-Landsiedel, Doris; Becherer, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Extensive thermal micromagnetic simulations, based on experimental data and parameters, were performed to investigate the magnetization reversal in Co/Pt nanomagnets with locally reduced perpendicular anisotropy on the nanosecond range. The simulations were supported by experimental data gained on manufactured Co/Pt nanomagnets, as used in nanomagnetic logic. It is known that magnetization reversal is governed by two mechanisms. At pulse lengths longer than 100 ns, thermal activation dominates the magnetization reversal processes and follows the common accepted Arrhenius law. For pulse lengths shorter than 100 ns, the dynamic reversal dominates. With the help of thermal micro-magnetic simulations we found out that the point where the both mechanisms meet is determined by the damping constant α of the multilayer film stack. The optimization of ferromagnetic multilayer film stacks enables higher clocking rates with lower power consumption and, therefore, further improve the performance of pNML.

  14. Thermal-Hydraulic Simulations of Single Pin and Assembly Sector for IVG- 1M Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Garner, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanan, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Thermal-hydraulic simulations have been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the highly-enriched uranium (HEU) design of the IVG.1M reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) at the National Nuclear Center (NNC) in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Steady-state simulations were performed for both types of fuel assembly (FA), i.e. the FA in rows 1 & 2 and the FA in row 3, as well as for single pins in those FA (600 mm and 800 mm pins). Both single pin calculations and bundle sectors have been simulated for the most conservative operating conditions corresponding to the 10 MW output power, which corresponds to a pin unit cell Reynolds number of only about 7500. Simulations were performed using the commercial code STAR-CCM+ for the actual twisted pin geometry as well as a straight-pin approximation. Various Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models gave different results, and so some validation runs with a higher-fidelity Large Eddy Simulation (LES) code were performed given the lack of experimental data. These singled out the Realizable Two-Layer k-ε as the most accurate turbulence model for estimating surface temperature. Single-pin results for the twisted case, based on the average flow rate per pin and peak pin power, were conservative for peak clad surface temperature compared to the bundle results. Also the straight-pin calculations were conservative as compared to the twisted pin simulations, as expected, but the single-pin straight case was not always conservative with regard to the straight-pin bundle. This was due to the straight-pin temperature distribution being strongly influenced by the pin orientation, particularly near the outer boundary. The straight-pin case also predicted the peak temperature to be in a different location than the twisted-pin case. This is a limitation of the straight-pin approach. The peak temperature pin was in a different location from the peak power pin in every case simulated, and occurred at an

  15. Metropolis–Hastings thermal state sampling for numerical simulations of Bose–Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grišins, Pjotrs; Mazets, Igor E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of the Metropolis–Hastings algorithm to sampling of classical thermal states of one-dimensional Bose–Einstein quasicondensates in the classical fields approximation, both in untrapped and harmonically trapped case. The presented algorithm can be easily generalized to higher dimensions and arbitrary trap geometry. For truncated Wigner simulations the quantum noise can be added with conventional methods (half a quantum of energy in every mode). The advantage of the presented method over the usual analytical and stochastic ones lies in its ability to sample not only from canonical and grand canonical distributions, but also from the generalized Gibbs ensemble, which can help to shed new light on thermodynamics of integrable systems. PMID:25843966

  16. Metropolis-Hastings thermal state sampling for numerical simulations of Bose-Einstein condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grišins, Pjotrs; Mazets, Igor E

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate the application of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to sampling of classical thermal states of one-dimensional Bose-Einstein quasicondensates in the classical fields approximation, both in untrapped and harmonically trapped case. The presented algorithm can be easily generalized to higher dimensions and arbitrary trap geometry. For truncated Wigner simulations the quantum noise can be added with conventional methods (half a quantum of energy in every mode). The advantage of the presented method over the usual analytical and stochastic ones lies in its ability to sample not only from canonical and grand canonical distributions, but also from the generalized Gibbs ensemble, which can help to shed new light on thermodynamics of integrable systems.

  17. Coupling Chemical Kinetics and Flashes in Reactive, Thermal and Compositional Reservoir Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Rode; Gerritsen, Margot G.; Thomsen, Per Grove

    2007-01-01

    of convergence and error test failures by more than 50% compared to direct integration without the new algorithm. To facilitate the algorithmic development we construct a virtual kinetic cell model. We use implicit one-step ESDIRK (Explicit Singly Diagonal Implicit Runge-Kutta) methods for integration...... of the kinetics. The kinetic cell model serves both as a tool for the development and testing of tailored solvers as well as a testbed for studying the interactions between chemical kinetics and phase behavior. A comparison between a Kvalue correlation based approach and a more rigorous equation of state based......Phase changes are known to cause convergence problems for integration of stiff kinetics in thermal and compositional reservoir simulations. We propose an algorithm for detection and location of phase changes based on discrete event system theory. The algorithm provides a robust way for handling...

  18. A Pore-Scale Simulation on Thermal-Hydromechanical Coupling Mechanism of Rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydromechanical (THM coupling process is a key issue in geotechnical engineering emphasized by many scholars. Most existing studies are conducted at macroscale or mesoscale. This paper presents a pore-scale THM coupling study of the immiscible two-phase flow in the perfect-plastic rock. Assembled rock matrix and pore space models are reconstructed using micro-CT image. The rock deformation and fluid flow are simulated using ANSYS and CFX software, respectively, in which process the coupled physical parameters will be exchanged by ANSYS multiphysics platform at the end of each iteration. Effects of stress and temperature on the rock porosity, permeability, microstructure, and the displacing mechanism of water flooding process are analyzed and revealed.

  19. Stochastic simulation of thermally assisted magnetization reversal in sub-100 nm dots with perpendicular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnama, Budi; Koga, Masashi; Nozaki, Yukio; Matsuyama, Kimihide

    2009-01-01

    Thermally assisted magnetization reversal of sub-100 nm dots with perpendicular anisotropy has been investigated using a micromagnetic Langevin model. The performance of the two different reversal modes of (i) a reduced barrier writing scheme and (ii) a Curie point writing scheme are compared. For the reduced barrier writing scheme, the switching field H swt decreases with an increase in writing temperature but is still larger than that of the Curie point writing scheme. For the Curie point writing scheme, the required threshold field H th , evaluated from 50 simulation results, saturates at a value, which is not simply related to the energy barrier height. The value of H th increases with a decrease in cooling time owing to the dynamic aspects of the magnetic ordering process. Dependence of H th on material parameters and dot sizes has been systematically studied

  20. Prototypic Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment in NRU to Simulate Loss-of-Coolant Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, C. L.; Hesson, G. M.; Russcher, G. E.; Marsh, R. K.; King, L. L.; Wildung, N. J.; Rausch, W. N.; Bennett, W. D.

    1981-04-01

    Quick-look test results are reported for the initial test series of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation in the National Research Universal {NRU) test program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This test was devoted to evaluating the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a full-length light water reactor (LWR) fuel bundle during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a LOCA. Experimental results from 28 tests cover reflood rates of 0.74 in./sec to 11 in./sec and delay times to initiate reflood of 3 sec to 66 sec. The results indicate that current analysis methods can predict peak temperatures within 10% and measured quench times for the bundle were significantly less than predicted. For reflood rates of 1 in./sec where long quench times were predicted (>2000 sec}, measured quench times of 200 sec were found.

  1. A correction scheme for thermal conductivity measurement using the comparative cut-bar technique based on 3D numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Changhu; Folsom, Charles; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Marshall, Douglas W

    2014-01-01

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is primarily due to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize the uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars. (paper)

  2. Residual thermal stress simulation in three-dimensional molar crown systems: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Estevam A; Rafferty, Brian T; Silva, Nelson R F A; Hanan, Jay C; Rekow, Elizabeth Dianne; Thompson, Van P; Coelho, Paulo G

    2012-10-01

    To simulate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE)-generated stress fields in monolithic metal and ceramic crowns, and CTE mismatch stresses between metal, alumina, or zirconia cores and veneer layered crowns when cooled from high temperature processing. A 3D computer-aided design model of a mandibular first molar crown was generated. Tooth preparation comprised reduction of proximal walls by 1.5 mm and of occlusal surfaces by 2.0 mm. Crown systems were monolithic (all-porcelain, alumina, metal, or zirconia) or subdivided into a core (metallic, zirconia, or alumina) and a porcelain veneer layer. The model was thermally loaded from 900°C to 25°C. A finite element mesh of three nodes per edge and a first/last node interval ratio of 1 was used, resulting in approximately 60,000 elements for both solids. Regions and values of maximum principal stress at the core and veneer layers were determined through 3D graphs and software output. The metal-porcelain and zirconia-porcelain systems showed compressive fields within the veneer cusp bulk, whereas alumina-porcelain presented tensile fields. At the core/veneer interface, compressive fields were observed for the metal-porcelain system, slightly tensile for the zirconia-porcelain, and higher tensile stress magnitudes for the alumina-porcelain. Increasingly compressive stresses were observed for the metal, alumina, zirconia, and all-porcelain monolithic systems. Variations in residual thermal stress levels were observed between bilayered and single-material systems due to the interaction between crown configuration and material properties. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. A hybrid accident simulation methodology for nuclear power plant by combining thermal-hydraulic program and artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Joon

    2004-02-01

    Compact simulators for nuclear power plants can be used as cost-effective training or analysis tools; generally, they demonstrate overall responses of transients or accidents in real time or faster. In the thermal-hydraulic models of compact simulators, governing equations are simplified with reasonable assumptions and empirical correlations, and approximate solutions are obtained by using appropriate numerical schemes. Moreover, many physical control volumes in plant modeling are lumped to reduce the computing time. The simplification of equations and reduction of control volume numbers usually degrade the accuracy of solutions. A hybrid accident simulation methodology is proposed to enhance the capabilities of a compact simulator by introducing artificial neural networks. A simplified thermal-hydraulic program, playing the role of compact simulator, is designed to calculate the overall responses of transients and accidents. Two neural networks are designed and trained with the target values obtained from the analyses of detailed computer codes and trained results are combined with the simplified thermal-hydraulic program to perform the following roles: (I) compensation for inaccuracy of a simplified thermal-hydraulic program occurring from simplified governing equation and small number of physical control volumes: the auto-associative neural network (AANN), trained with the target values obtained from RELAP5/MOD3 code analyses, improves the calculated results of the simplified thermal-hydraulic program, and (II) prediction of the critical parameter usually calculated from the sophisticated computer code: the back propagation neural network (BPN), trained with the target values obtained from COBRA-IV code analyses, predicts the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) which is not calculated in simplified thermal-hydraulic program. Simulations for the several accidents are carried out to verify the applicability of the proposed methodology. The

  4. Numerical Studies of Thermal Conditions in Cities - Systematic Model Simulations of Idealized Urban Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heene, V.; Buchholz, S.; Kossmann, M.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical studies of thermal conditions in cities based on model simulations of idealized urban domains are carried out to investigate how changes in the characteristics of urban areas influence street level air temperatures. The simulated modifications of the urban characteristics represent possible adaptation measures for heat reduction in cities, which are commonly used in urban planning. Model simulations are performed with the thermodynamic version of the 3-dimensional micro-scale urban climate model MUKLIMO_3. The simulated idealized urban areas are designed in a simplistic way, i. e. defining homogeneous squared cities of one settlement type, without orography and centered in the model domain. To assess the impact of different adaptation measures the characteristics of the urban areas have been systematically modified regarding building height, albedo of building roof and impervious surfaces, fraction of impervious surfaces between buildings, and percentage of green roofs. To assess the impact of green and blue infrastructure in cities, different configurations for parks and lakes have been investigated - e. g. varying size and distribution within the city. The experiments are performed for different combinations of typical German settlement types and surrounding rural types under conditions of a typical summer day in July. The adaptation measures implemented in the experiments show different impacts for different settlement types mainly due to the differences in building density, building height or impervious surface fraction. Parks and lakes implemented as adaptation measure show strong potential to reduce daytime air temperature, with cooling effects on their built-up surroundings. At night lakes generate negative and positive effects on air temperature, depending on water temperature. In general, all adaptation measures implemented in experiments reveal different impacts on day and night air temperature.

  5. Horizontal steam generator thermal hydraulic simulation in typical steady and transient conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiee, Ataollah, E-mail: rabiee@shirazu.ac.ir; Kamalinia, Amir Hossein; Haddad, Kamal

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of the horizontal steam generator with the available code in typical normal and transient operations. • Replacement of tube bundle with a porous media due to the complexity of the SG geometry. • Simulation of typical transient mode of the VVER 440 steam generator, loss of feed water accident. - Abstract: Thermal hydraulic analysis of the steam generators as one of the main components of the power cycle in pressurized water reactor (PWR) is crucial in the design and safety of the nuclear power plants. Two phase flow field simulation near the tube bundles is important in obtaining logical numerical results however the complexity of the tube bundles due to geometry and arrangement makes the numerical analysis complicated. In this research tube bundle has been assumed as the porous media and the outlet boundary condition as the one of the main challenge in these kind of simulations has been optimized according to similar researches. In order to adjust and tune the available computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, pressure drop of the typical kettle reboiler tube bundle in two various heat fluxes and vapor volume fraction distribution in VVER 1000 steam generator in normal operation have been investigated. The typical transient mode of the VVER 440 steam generator, loss of feed water accident, has been studied eventually. It was observed that obtained vapor volume fraction can predict experimental data with more accuracy than the similar researches and would be increased with the elevation during the accident. On the other hand, pressure drop and level of the feed water value reduces through time and show good adoption with the measurements.

  6. Thermal behavior and densification mechanism during selective laser melting of copper matrix composites: Simulation and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Donghua; Gu, Dongdong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal behavior and densification activity during SLM of composites are simulated. • Temperature distributions and melt pool dimensions during SLM are disclosed. • Motion behaviors of gaseous bubbles in laser induced melt pool are elucidated. • Simulation results show good agreement with the obtained experimental results. - Abstract: Simulation of temperature distribution and densification process of selective laser melting (SLM) WC/Cu composite powder system has been performed, using a finite volume method (FVM). The transition from powder to solid, the surface tension induced by temperature gradient, and the movement of laser beam power with a Gaussian energy distribution are taken into account in the physical model. The effect of the applied linear energy density (LED) on the temperature distribution, melt pool dimensions, behaviors of gaseous bubbles and resultant densification activity has been investigated. It shows that the temperature distribution is asymmetric with respect to the laser beam scanning area. The center of the melt pool does not locate at the center of the laser beam but slightly shifts towards the side of the decreasing X-axis. The dimensions of the melt pool are in sizes of hundreds of micrometers and increase with the applied LED. For an optimized LED of 17.5 kJ/m, an enhanced efficiency of gas removal from the melt pool is realized, and the maximum relative density of laser processed powder reaches 96%. As the applied LED surpasses 20 kJ/m, Marangoni flow tends to retain the entrapped gas bubbles. The flow pattern has a tendency to deposit the gas bubbles at the melt pool bottom or to agglomerate gas bubbles by the rotating flow in the melt pool, resulting in a higher porosity in laser processed powder. The relative density and corresponding pore size and morphology are experimentally acquired, which are in a good agreement with the results predicted by simulation

  7. CFD simulation of a dry scroll vacuum pump with clearances, solid heating and thermal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spille-Kohoff, A.; Hesse, J.; Andres, R.; Hetze, F.

    2017-08-01

    Although dry scroll vacuum pumps (DSPV) are essential devices in many different industrial processes, the CFD simulation of such pumps is not widely used and often restricted to simplified cases due to its complexity: The working principle with a fixed and an orbiting scroll leads to working chambers that are changing in time and are connected through moving small radial and axial clearances in the range of 10 to 100 μm. Due to the low densities and low mass flow rates in vacuum pumps, it is important to include heat transfer towards and inside the solid components. Solid heating is very slow compared to the scroll revolution speed and the gas behaviour, thus a special workflow is necessary to reach the working conditions in reasonable simulation times. The resulting solid temperature is then used to compute the thermal deformation, which usually results in gap size changes that influence leakage flows. In this paper, setup steps and results for the simulation of a DSVP are shown and compared to theoretical and experimental results. The time-varying working chambers are meshed with TwinMesh, a hexahedral meshing programme for positive displacement machines. The CFD simulation with ANSYS CFX accounts for gas flow with compressibility and turbulence effects, conjugate heat transfer between gas and solids, and leakage flows through the clearances. Time-resolved results for torques, chamber pressure, mass flow, and heat flow between gas and solids are shown, as well as time- and space-resolved results for pressure, velocity, and temperature for different operating conditions of the DSVP.

  8. DESIGN OF AN EDUCATIONAL SIMULATION PROGRAM USING DIGITAL VIDEO PROCESSING TO DETERMINE THE THERMAL EXPANSION OF MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gökhan BÖCEKÇİ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the realization of an educational simulation program to determine the amount of linear thermal expansion in experimental materials. An interferogram signal derived from an interferometric measurement system was modeled as a video signal in a computer environment. A simulation program was designed from the model signal in order to detect the amount of expansion in materials. The simulation program determined the amount of to heat by detecting the number of fringes in interferogram video signals of the material. This simulation program facilitated experimental studies n academic institutions which are deprived of interferometric measurement systems.

  9. A novel multiphysic model for simulation of swelling equilibrium of ionized thermal-stimulus responsive hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hua; Wang Xiaogui; Yan Guoping; Lam, K.Y.; Cheng Sixue; Zou Tao; Zhuo Renxi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a novel multiphysic mathematical model is developed for simulation of swelling equilibrium of ionized temperature sensitive hydrogels with the volume phase transition, and it is termed the multi-effect-coupling thermal-stimulus (MECtherm) model. This model consists of the steady-state Nernst-Planck equation, Poisson equation and swelling equilibrium governing equation based on the Flory's mean field theory, in which two types of polymer-solvent interaction parameters, as the functions of temperature and polymer-network volume fraction, are specified with or without consideration of the hydrogen bond interaction. In order to examine the MECtherm model consisting of nonlinear partial differential equations, a meshless Hermite-Cloud method is used for numerical solution of one-dimensional swelling equilibrium of thermal-stimulus responsive hydrogels immersed in a bathing solution. The computed results are in very good agreements with experimental data for the variation of volume swelling ratio with temperature. The influences of the salt concentration and initial fixed-charge density are discussed in detail on the variations of volume swelling ratio of hydrogels, mobile ion concentrations and electric potential of both interior hydrogels and exterior bathing solution

  10. Phonon Contribution to Thermal Boundary Conductance at Metal Interfaces Using Embedded Atom Method Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaway, R. N.; Hopkins, P. E.; Norris, P. M.; Stevens, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    The phonon contribution to the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) at metal-metal interfaces is difficult to study experimentally, and it is typically considered negligible. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS), employing an embedded atom method (EAM) potential, are performed to study the phonon contribution to thermal transport across an Al-Cu interface. The embedded atom method provides a realistic model of atomic behavior in metals, while suppressing the effect on conduction electrons. In this way, measurements on the phonon system may be observed that would otherwise be dominated by the electron contribution in experimental methods. The relative phonon contribution to the TBC is calculated by comparing EAM results to previous experimental results which include both electron and phonon contributions. It is seen from the data that the relative phonon contribution increases with decreasing temperature, possibly accounting for more than half the overall TBC at temperatures below 100 K. These results suggest that neglect of interfacial phonon transport may not be a valid assumption at low temperatures, and may have implications in the future development of TBC models for metal interfaces.

  11. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulators and thermal cracking of heavy oil and ultraheavy residues using microreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardini, Andre L.; Bineli, Aulus R.R.; Viadana, Adriana M.; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering; Medina, Lilian C.; Gomes, Alexandre de O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Barros, Ricardo S. [University Foundation Jose Bonifacio (FUJB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the design of microreactor with microfluidics channels has been carried out in Computer Aided Design Software (CAD) and constructed in rapid prototyping system to be used in chemical reaction processing of the heavy oil fractions. The flow pattern properties of microreactor (fluid dynamics, mixing behavior) have been considered through CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. CFD calculations are also used to study the design and specification of new microreactor developments. The potential advantages of using a microreactor include better control of reaction conditions, improved safety and portability. A more detailed crude assay of the raw national oil, whose importance was evidenced by PETROBRAS/CENPES allows establishing the optimum strategies and processing conditions, aiming at a maximum utilization of the heavy oil fractions, towards valuable products. These residues are able to be processed in microreactor, in which conventional process like as hydrotreating, catalytic and thermal cracking may be carried out in a much more intensified fashion. The whole process development involves a prior thermal study to define the possible operating conditions for a particular task, the microreactor design through computational fluid dynamics and construction using rapid prototyping. This gives high flexibility for process development, shorter time, and costumer/task oriented process/product development. (author)

  12. Development of numerical simulation technology for high resolution thermal hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Han Young; Kim, K. D.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, J. T.; Park, I. K.; Bae, S. W.; Song, C. H.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, S. J.; Lee, J. R.; Chung, S. K.; Chung, B. D.; Cho, H. K.; Choi, S. K.; Ha, K. S.; Hwang, M. K.; Yun, B. J.; Jeong, J. J.; Sul, A. S.; Lee, H. D.; Kim, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    A realistic simulation of two phase flows is essential for the advanced design and safe operation of a nuclear reactor system. The need for a multi dimensional analysis of thermal hydraulics in nuclear reactor components is further increasing with advanced design features, such as a direct vessel injection system, a gravity driven safety injection system, and a passive secondary cooling system. These features require more detailed analysis with enhanced accuracy. In this regard, KAERI has developed a three dimensional thermal hydraulics code, CUPID, for the analysis of transient, multi dimensional, two phase flows in nuclear reactor components. The code was designed for use as a component scale code, and/or a three dimensional component, which can be coupled with a system code. This report presents an overview of the CUPID code development and preliminary assessment, mainly focusing on the numerical solution method and its verification and validation. It was shown that the CUPID code was successfully verified. The results of the validation calculations show that the CUPID code is very promising, but a systematic approach for the validation and improvement of the physical models is still needed

  13. Numerical simulation of time-dependent deformations under hygral and thermal transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelfstra, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic concepts of numerical simulation of the formation of the microstructure of HCP are outlined. The aim is to replace arbitrary terms like aging by more realistic terms like bond density in the xerogel and bonds between hydrating particles of HCP. Actual state parameters such as temperature, humidity and degree of hydration can be determined under transient hygral and thermal conditions by solving numerically a series of appropriate coupled differential equations with given boundary conditions. Shrinkage of a composite structure without crack formation, based on calculated moisture distributions, has been determined with numerical concrete codes. The influence of crack formation, tensile strain-hardening and softening on the total deformation of a quasi-homogeneous drying material has been studied by means of model based on FEM. The difference between shrinkage without crack formation and shrinkage with crack formation can be quantified. Drying shrinkage and creep of concrete cannot be separated. The total deformation depends on the superimposed stress fields. Transient hygral deformation can be realistically predicted if the concept of point properties is applied rigorously. Transient thermal deformation has to be dealt with in the same way. (orig./HP)

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Thermal Performance of Solar-Assisted Air Conditioning System under Iraq Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najim Abid Jassim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In Iraq most of the small buildings deployed a conventional air conditioning technology which typically uses electrically driven compressor systems which exhibits several clear disadvantages such as high energy consumption, high electricity at peak loads. In this work a thermal performance of air conditioning system combined with a solar collector is investigated theoretically. The hybrid air conditioner consists of a semi hermetic compressor, water cooled shell and tube condenser, thermal expansion valve and coil with tank evaporator. The theoretical analysis included a simulation for the solar assisted air-conditioning system using EES software to analyze the effect of different parameters on the power consumption of compressor and the performance of system. The results show that refrigeration capacity is increased from 2.7 kW to 4.4kW, as the evaporating temperature increased from 3 to 18 ºC. Also the power consumption is increased from 0.89 kW to 1.08 kW. So the COP of the system is increased from 3.068 to 4.117. The power consumption is increased from 0.897 kW to 1.031 kW as the condensing temperature increased from 35 ºC to 45 ºC. While the COP is decreased from 3.89 to 3.1. The power consumption is decreased from 1.05 kW to 0.7kW as the solar radiation intensity increased from 300 W/m2 to 1000 W/m2, while the COP is increased from 3.15 to 4.8. A comparison between the simulation and available experimental data showed acceptable agreement.

  15. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  16. PIC Simulations of Velocity-space Instabilities in a Decreasing Magnetic Field: Viscosity and Thermal Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Mario; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of a collisionless, electron–ion plasma with a decreasing background magnetic field, {\\boldsymbol{B}}, to study the effect of velocity-space instabilities on the viscous heating and thermal conduction of the plasma. If | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| decreases, the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment gives rise to pressure anisotropies with {p}| | ,j> {p}\\perp ,j ({p}| | ,j and {p}\\perp ,j represent the pressure of species j (electron or ion) parallel and perpendicular to B ). Linear theory indicates that, for sufficiently large anisotropies, different velocity-space instabilities can be triggered. These instabilities in principle have the ability to pitch-angle scatter the particles, limiting the growth of the anisotropies. Our simulations focus on the nonlinear, saturated regime of the instabilities. This is done through the permanent decrease of | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| by an imposed plasma shear. We show that, in the regime 2≲ {β }j≲ 20 ({β }j\\equiv 8π {p}j/| {\\boldsymbol{B}}{| }2), the saturated ion and electron pressure anisotropies are controlled by the combined effect of the oblique ion firehose and the fast magnetosonic/whistler instabilities. These instabilities grow preferentially on the scale of the ion Larmor radius, and make {{Δ }}{p}e/{p}| | ,e≈ {{Δ }}{p}i/{p}| | ,i (where {{Δ }}{p}j={p}\\perp ,j-{p}| | ,j). We also quantify the thermal conduction of the plasma by directly calculating the mean free path of electrons, {λ }e, along the mean magnetic field, finding that {λ }e depends strongly on whether | {\\boldsymbol{B}}| decreases or increases. Our results can be applied in studies of low-collisionality plasmas such as the solar wind, the intracluster medium, and some accretion disks around black holes.

  17. The simulation of glazing systems in the dynamic thermal model HTB2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.K.; Mylona, A.; Jones, P.J. [Cardiff Univ., Cardiff (United Kingdom). Welsh School of Architecture

    2005-07-01

    The existing dynamic thermal simulation code, HTB2, is a general-purpose finite difference simulation code for energy and environmental performance of buildings. This paper presents modifications to, and testing of, the HTB2 to allow more detailed consideration of glazing and solar shading systems. The changes were needed in order to model the effects of placement and specification of horizontal and vertical blinds. As building envelopes become better insulated, the performance of glazing systems play a more critical role in the energy performance of a building. The specification of solar control devices such as slatted blinds still creates controversy in the design industry in terms of the best options for a particular situation. Dark coloured blinds are often used by default, resulting in uncomfortable summer conditions. The modifications to the dynamic thermal model included the development of a data format to enable the specification of optical transmission characteristics with respect to relative altitude and azimuth, the calculation of transmission through slatted blinds and the consideration of recent standard algorithms for cavity and surface heat transfer. A comparison with reference standard software and test-cell measurements indicates that the software can predict total solar transmission of glazing with mid-pane shading combinations, to a root-mean-square error of {+-}0.04 when an anisotropic sky radiance model is applied. The optical characteristics of the blinds can be specified to a resolution of 5 degrees, which is sufficient to distinguish between several glazing options faced during the design stage of a building. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  18. Complete Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Flow Boiling in the Presence of Thermal and Chemical Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.K. Dhir

    2003-04-28

    At present, guidelines for fuel cycle designs to prevent axial offset anomalies (AOA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores are based on empirical data from several operating reactors. Although the guidelines provide an ad-hoc solution to the problem, a unified approach based on simultaneous modeling of thermal-hydraulics, chemical, and nuclear interactions with vapor generation at the fuel cladding surface does not exist. As a result, the fuel designs are overly constrained with a resulting economic penalty. The objective of present project is to develop a numerical simulation model supported by laboratory experiments that can be used for fuel cycle design with respect to thermal duty of the fuel to avoid economic penalty, as well as, AOA. At first, two-dimensional numerical simulation of the growth and departure of a bubble in pool boiling with chemical interaction is considered. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration. The Level Set method is used to capture the evolving liquid-vapor interface. A dilute aqueous boron solution is considered in the simulation. From numerical simulations, the dynamic change in concentration distribution of boron during the bubble growth shows that the precipitation of boron can occur near the advancing and receding liquid-vapor interface when the ambient boron concentration level is 3,000 ppm by weight. Secondly, a complete three-dimensional numerical simulation of inception, growth and departure of a single bubble subjected to forced flow parallel to the heater surface was developed. Experiments on a flat plate heater with water and with boron dissolved in the water were carried out. The heater was made out of well-polished silicon wafer. Numbers of nucleation sites and their locations were well controlled. Bubble dynamics in great details on an isolated nucleation site were obtained while varying the wall superheat, liquid subcooling

  19. Optimal control of building storage systems using both ice storage and thermal mass – Part I: Simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiah, Ali; Krarti, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simulation environment is described to account for both passive and active thermal energy storage (TES) systems. ► Laboratory testing results have been used to validate the predictions from the simulation environment. ► Optimal control strategies for TES systems have been developed as part of the simulation environment. - Abstract: This paper presents a simulation environment that can evaluate the benefits of using simultaneously building thermal capacitance and ice storage system to reduce total operating costs including energy and demand charges while maintaining adequate occupant comfort conditions within commercial buildings. The building thermal storage is controlled through pre-cooling strategies by setting space indoor air temperatures. The ice storage system is controlled by charging the ice tank and operating the chiller during low electrical charge periods and melting the ice during on-peak periods. Optimal controls for both building thermal storage and ice storage are developed to minimize energy charges, demand charges, or combined energy and demand charges. The results obtained from the simulation environment are validated using laboratory testing for an optimal controller.

  20. Scaling for integral simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena in SBWR during LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T.; Dowlati, R [Purdue Univ., West Layfayette, IN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A scaling study has been conducted for simulation of thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) during a loss of coolant accident. The scaling method consists of a three-level scaling approach. The integral system scaling (global scaling or top down approach) consists of two levels, the integral response function scaling which forms the first level, and the control volume and boundary flow scaling which forms the second level. The bottom up approach is carried out by local phenomena scaling which forms the third level scaling. Based on this scaling study the design of the model facility called Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly (PUMA) has been carried out. The PUMA facility has 1/4 height and 1/100 area ratio scaling, corresponding to the volume scaling of 1/400. The PUMA power scaling based on the integral scaling is 1/200. The present scaling method predicts that PUMA time scale will be one-half that of the SBWR. The system pressure for PUMA is full scale, therefore, a prototypic pressure is maintained. PUMA is designed to operate at and below 1.03 MPa (150 psi), which allows it to simulate the prototypic SBWR accident conditions below 1.03 MPa (150 psi). The facility includes models for all components of importance.

  1. Thermal and fluid simulation of the environment under the dashboard, compared with measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C. S.; Sirbu, G. M.; Nita, I. C.

    2017-10-01

    The development of vehicles during the last decade is related to the evolution of electronic systems added in order to increase the safety and the number of services available on board, such as advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS). Cars already have a complex computer network, with electronic control units (ECUs) connected to each other and receiving information from many sensors. The ECUs transfer an important heat power to the environment, while proper operating conditions need to be provided to ensure their reliability at high and low temperature, vibration and humidity. In a car cabin, electronic devices are usually placed in the compartment under the dashboard, an enclosed space designed for functional purposes. In the early stages of the vehicle design it has become necessary to analyse the environment under dashboard, by the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and measurements. This paper presents the cooling of heat sinks by natural convection, a thermal and fluid simulation of the environment under the dashboard compared with test data.

  2. Thermal-hydraulics/thermal-mechanics temporal coupling for unprotected loss of flow accidents simulations on a SFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricot Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of ASTRID designing, unprotected loss of flow (ULOF accidents are considered. As the reactor is not scrammed, power evolution is driven by neutronic feedbacks, among which Doppler effect, linked to fuel temperature, is prominent. Fuel temperature is calculated using thermal properties of fuel pins (we will focus on heat transfer coefficient between fuel pellet and cladding, Hgap, and on fuel thermal conductivity, λfuel which vary with irradiation conditions (neutronic flux, mass flow and history for instance and during transient (mainly because of dilatation of materials with temperature. In this paper, we propose an analysis of the impact of spatial variation and temporal evolution of thermal properties of fuel pins on a CFV-like core [M.S. Chenaud et al., Status of the ASTRID core at the end of the pre-conceptual design phase 1, in Proceedings of ICAPP 2013, Jeju Island, Korea (2013] behavior during an ULOF accident. These effects are usually neglected under some a priori conservative assumptions. The vocation of our work is not to provide a best-estimate calculation of ULOF transient, but to discuss some of its physical aspects. To achieve this goal, we used TETAR, a thermal-hydraulics system code developed by our team to calculate ULOF transients, GERMINAL V1.5, a CEA code dedicated to SFR pin thermal-mechanics calculations and APOLLO3®, a neutronic code in development at CEA.

  3. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yushou; Conner, Joseph; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-02-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1 μm, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optical boundary behaviors are simulated. This simulation was first validated through measurements of neutron response from lithium glass cylinders. With good expected light collection, an algorithm based upon the features inherent to alpha and triton particle tracks is proposed to reconstruct the neutron reaction position in the glass fiber array. Given a 1 μm fiber diameter and 0.1mm detector thickness, the neutron spatial resolution is expected to reach σ∼1 μm with a Gaussian fit in each lateral dimension. The detection efficiency was estimated to be 3.7% for a glass fiber assembly with thickness of 0.1mm. When the detector thickness increases from 0.1mm to 1mm, the position resolution is not expected to vary much, while the detection efficiency is expected to increase by about a factor of ten. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal hydrodynamic modeling and simulation of hot-gas duct for next-generation nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Injun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, Chansoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bai, Cheolho; Hong, Sungyull [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jaesool, E-mail: jshim@ynu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydrodynamic nonlinear model is presented to examine a hot gas duct (HGD) used in a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor. • Experiments and simulation were compared to validate the nonlinear porous model. • Natural convection and radiation are considered to study the effect on the surface temperature of the HGD. • Local Nusselt number is obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD. - Abstract: A very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor that requires an intermediate loop that consists of a hot-gas duct (HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), and a process heat exchanger for massive hydrogen production. In this study, a mathematical model and simulation were developed for the HGD in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop that was designed and manufactured by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. These were used to investigate the effect of various important factors on the surface of the HGD. In the modeling, a porous model was considered for a Kaowool insulator inside the HGD. The natural convection and radiation are included in the model. For validation, the modeled external surface temperatures are compared with experimental results obtained while changing the inlet temperatures of the nitrogen working fluid. The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiments. The external surface temperatures of the HGD are obtained with respect to the porosity of insulator, emissivity of radiation, and pressure of the working fluid. The local Nusselt number is also obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD.

  6. User's manual for computer code SOLTES-1 (simulator of large thermal energy systems). [For CDC 6600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewell, M.E.; Grandjean, N.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Edenburn, M.W.

    1978-09-01

    SOLTES simulates the steady-state response of thermal energy systems to time-varying data such as weather and loads. Thermal energy system models of both simple and complex systems can easily be modularly constructed from a library of routines. These routines mathematically model solar collectors, pumps, switches, thermal energy storage, thermal boilers, auxiliary boilers, heat exchangers, extraction turbines, extraction turbine/generators, condensers, regenerative heaters, air conditioners, heating and cooling of buildings, process vapor, etc.; SOLTES also allows user-supplied routines. The analyst need only specify fluid names to obtain readout of property data for heat-transfer fluids and constants that characterize power-cycle working fluids from a fluid property data bank. A load management capability allows SOLTES to simulate total energy systems that simultaneously follow heat and power loads and demands. Generalized energy accounting is available, and values for system performance parameters may be automatically determined by SOLTES. Because of its modularity and flexibility, SOLTES can be used to simulate a wide variety of thermal energy systems such as solar power/total energy, fossil fuel power plants/total energy, nuclear power plants/total energy, solar energy heating and cooling, geothermal energy, and solar hot water heaters.

  7. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube-polyamide-6,6 nanocomposites: reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghemandi, Mohammad; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C

    2011-11-14

    The thermal conductivity of composites of carbon nanotubes and polyamide-6,6 has been investigated using reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in a full atomistic resolution. It is found, in line with experiments, that the composites have thermal conductivities, which are only moderately larger than that of pure polyamide. The composite conductivities are orders of magnitude less than what would be expected from naïve additivity arguments. This means that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of isolated nanotubes, which exceed the best-conducting metals, cannot be harnessed for heat transport, when the nanotubes are embedded in a polymer matrix. The main reason is the high interfacial thermal resistance between the nanotubes and the polymer, which was calculated in addition to the total composite thermal conductivity as well as that of the subsystem. It hinders heat to be transferred from the slow-conducting polymer into the fast-conducting nanotubes and back into the polymer. This interpretation is in line with the majority of recent simulation works. An alternative explanation, namely, the damping of the long-wavelength phonons in nanotubes by the polymer matrix is not supported by the present calculations. These modes provide most of the polymers heat conduction. An additional minor effect is caused by the anisotropic structure of the polymer phase induced by the nearby nanotube surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the polymer matrix increases slightly in the direction parallel to the nanotubes, whereas it decreases perpendicular to it. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  8. Nuclear power plant accident simulations of gasket materials under simultaneous radiation plus thermal plus mechanical stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, K.T.; Malone, G.M.

    1997-07-01

    In order to probe the response of silicone door gasket materials to a postulated severe accident in an Italian nuclear power plant, compression stress relaxation (CSR) and compression set (CS) measurements were conducted under combined radiation (approximately 6 kGy/h) and temperature (up to 230{degrees}C) conditions. By making some reasonable initial assumptions, simplified constant temperature and dose rates were derived that should do a reasonable job of simulating the complex environments for worst-case severe events that combine overall aging plus accidents. Further simplification coupled with thermal-only experiments allowed us to derive thermal-only conditions that can be used to achieve CSR and CS responses similar to those expected from the combined environments that are more difficult to simulate. Although the thermal-only simulations should lead to sealing forces similar to those expected during a severe accident, modulus and density results indicate that significant differences in underlying chemistry are expected for the thermal-only and the combined environment simulations. 15 refs., 31 figs., 15 tabs.

  9. Microstructural changes in HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate the heat-affected zone during welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, G.; Fonda, R. W.; Vandermeer, R. A.; Matuszeski, A.

    1995-12-01

    The microstructural changes that occur in a commercial HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate weld heat affected zone (HAZ) behavior were systematically investigated primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eight different weld thermal cycles, with peak temperatures representative of four HAZ regions (the tempered region, the intercritical region, the fine-grained austenitized region, and the coarse-grained austenitized region) and cooling rates characteristic of high heat input (cooling rate (CR) = 5 °C/s) and low heat input (CR = 60 °C/s) welding were simulated in a heating/quenching dilatometer. The as-received base plate consisted of heavily tempered lath martensite, acicular ferrite, and retained austenite matrix phases with precipitates of copper, niobiumcarbonitride, and cementite. The microstructural changes in both the matrix and precipitate phases due to thermal cycling were examined by TEM and correlated with the results of (1) conventional optical microscopy, (2) prior austenite grain size measurements, (3) microhardness testing, and (4) dilatometric analysis. Many of the thermal cycles resulted in dramatic changes in both the microstructures and the properties due to the synergistic interaction between the simulated position in the HAZ and the heat input. Some of these microstructures deviate substantially from those predicted from published continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves. The final microstructure was predominantly dependent upon peak temperature (i.e., position within the HAZ), although the cooling rate (i.e., heat input) strongly affected the microstructures of the simulated intercritical and finegrained austenitized regions.

  10. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal......, taking into account the influences of tank volume, height to diameter ratio, tank insulation, thickness and material property of the tank and initial thermal conditions of the tank. The equation is validated for a tank volume between 150 l and 500 l, a tank height to tank diameter ratio of 1-5, a tank...... wall thickness of 1.5 mm to 3 mm for a stainless steel tank and a tank wall thickness of between 3 mm to 5 mm for a normal steel tank. Accuracy and reliability of the SpiralSol program with the improved prediction of heat loss removal factor will be examined in future investigations....

  11. Influence of thermal treatments simulating cooking processes on the polyphenol content in virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenes, Manuel; García, Aranzazu; Dobarganes, M Carmen; Velasco, Joaquín; Romero, Concepción

    2002-10-09

    Virgin olive oils were subjected to simulated common domestic processing, including frying, microwave heating, and boiling with water in a pressure cooker. The impact of these processes on polyphenol content and physicochemical characteristics of oils was assessed. Thermal oxidation of oils at 180 degrees C caused a significant decrease in hydroxytyrosol- and tyrosol-like substances. In contrast, oils heated for 25 h still retained a high proportion of the lignans 1-acetoxypinoresinol and pinoresinol. Thermal oxidation also resulted in a rapid degradation of alpha-tocopherol and the glyceridic fraction of oils. Microwave heating of oils for 10 min caused only minor losses in polyphenols, and the oil degradation was lower than that in thermoxidation assays. Again, lignans were the least affected polyphenols and did not change during microwave heating. Boiling a mixture of virgin olive oil and water in a pressure cooker for 30 min provoked the hydrolysis of the secoiridoid aglycons and the diffusion of the free phenolics hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol from the oil to the water phase. Losses of polyphenols were detected only at pH lower than 6. Moreover, alpha-tocopherol and the glyceridic fraction of oils were not modified during this process. It is worth noting that all the heating methods assayed resulted in more severe polyphenols losses and oil degradation for Arbequina than for Picual oil, which could be related to the lower content in polyunsaturated fatty acids of the latter olive cultivar. These findings may be relevant to the choice of cooking method and olive oil cultivar to increase the intake of olive polyphenols.

  12. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for

  13. Development of system analysis code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of integral reactor, Rex-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Kim, J. W.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, G. C.

    2010-10-01

    Rex-10 is an environment-friendly and economical small-scale nuclear reactor to provide the energy for district heating as well as the electric power in micro-grid. This integral reactor comprises several innovative concepts supported by advanced primary circuit components, low coolant parameters and natural circulation cooling. To evaluate the system performance and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor, a system analysis code is being developed so that the new designs and technologies adopted in Rex-10 can be reflected. The research efforts are absorbed in programming the simple and fast-running thermal-hydraulic analysis software. The details of hydrodynamic governing equations component models and numerical solution scheme used in this code are presented in this paper. On the basis of one-dimensional momentum integral model, the models of point reactor neutron kinetics for thorium-fueled core, physical processes in the steam-gas pressurizer, and heat transfers in helically coiled steam generator are implemented to the system code. Implicit numerical scheme is employed to momentum and energy equations to assure the numerical stability. The accuracy of simulation is validated by applying the solution method to the Rex-10 test facility. Calculated natural circulation flow rate and coolant temperature at steady-state are compared to the experimental data. The validation is also carried out for the transients in which the sudden reduction in the core power or the feedwater flow takes place. The code's capability to predict the steady-state flow by natural convection and the qualitative behaviour of the primary system in the transients is confirmed. (Author)

  14. Development of system analysis code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of integral reactor, Rex-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Rex-10 is an environment-friendly and economical small-scale nuclear reactor to provide the energy for district heating as well as the electric power in micro-grid. This integral reactor comprises several innovative concepts supported by advanced primary circuit components, low coolant parameters and natural circulation cooling. To evaluate the system performance and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor, a system analysis code is being developed so that the new designs and technologies adopted in Rex-10 can be reflected. The research efforts are absorbed in programming the simple and fast-running thermal-hydraulic analysis software. The details of hydrodynamic governing equations component models and numerical solution scheme used in this code are presented in this paper. On the basis of one-dimensional momentum integral model, the models of point reactor neutron kinetics for thorium-fueled core, physical processes in the steam-gas pressurizer, and heat transfers in helically coiled steam generator are implemented to the system code. Implicit numerical scheme is employed to momentum and energy equations to assure the numerical stability. The accuracy of simulation is validated by applying the solution method to the Rex-10 test facility. Calculated natural circulation flow rate and coolant temperature at steady-state are compared to the experimental data. The validation is also carried out for the transients in which the sudden reduction in the core power or the feedwater flow takes place. The code's capability to predict the steady-state flow by natural convection and the qualitative behaviour of the primary system in the transients is confirmed. (Author)

  15. Changes in the distribution of South Korean forest vegetation simulated using thermal gradient indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungho; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Son, Yowhan; Yoo, Seongjin; Lim, Jong-Hwan

    2010-07-01

    To predict changes in South Korean vegetation distribution, the Warmth Index (WI) and the Minimum Temperature of the Coldest Month Index (MTCI) were used. Historical climate data of the past 30 years, from 1971 to 2000, was obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration. The Fifth-Generation National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) /Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5) was used as a source for future climatic data under the A1B scenario from the Special Report on Emission Scenario (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To simulate future vegetation distribution due to climate change, the optimal habitat ranges of Korean tree species were delimited by the thermal gradient indices, such as WI and MTCI. To categorize the Thermal Analogy Groups (TAGs) for the tree species, the WI and MTCI were orthogonally plotted on a two-dimensional grid map. The TAGs were then designated by the analogue composition of tree species belonging to the optimal WI and MTCI ranges. As a result of the clustering process, 22 TAGs were generated to explain the forest vegetation distribution in Korea. The primary change in distribution for these TAGs will likely be in the shrinkage of areas for the TAGs related to Pinus densiflora and P. koraiensis, and in the expansion of the other TAG areas, mainly occupied by evergreen broad-leaved trees, such as Camellia japonica, Cyclobalanopsis glauca, and Schima superba. Using the TAGs to explain the effects of climate change on vegetation distribution on a more regional scale resulted in greater detail than previously used global or continental scale vegetation models.

  16. Cooling Simulation and Thermal Abuse Modeling of Lithium-Ion Batteries Using the Newman, Tiedemann, Gu, and Kim (NTGK) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed Madani, Seyed; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper gives insight into the cooling simulation and thermal abuse modeling of lithium-ion batteries by ANSYS FLUENT. Cooling strategies are important issues in the thermal management of lithium-ion battery systems, and it is essential to investigate them attentively in order to maintain...... the functioning temperature of batteries within an optimum range. The high temperature is able not only to decrease the efficiency of batteries but also may lead to the thermal runaway. To comprehend further, the thermal abuse behavior of lithium-ion batteries based on The Newman, Tiedemann, Gu, and Kim (NTGK......) model has been implemented in ANSYS FLUENT software. The results show that to achieve an optimum energy consumption for battery cooling, a minimum value of average heat transfer coefficient can be selected in order to keep the functioning temperature of batteries within an optimum range....

  17. Thermal-Hydraulic Results for the Boiling Water Reactor Dry Cask Simulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lindgren, Eric R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The thermal performance of commercial nuclear spent fuel dry storage casks is evaluated through detailed numerical analysis. These modeling efforts are completed by the vendor to demonstrate performance and regulatory compliance. The calculations are then independently verified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Carefully measured data sets generated from testing of full sized casks or smaller cask analogs are widely recognized as vital for validating these models. Recent advances in dry storage cask designs have significantly increased the maximum thermal load allowed in a cask in part by increasing the efficiency of internal conduction pathways and by increasing the internal convection through greater canister helium pressure. These same canistered cask systems rely on ventilation between the canister and the overpack to convect heat away from the canister to the environment for both aboveground and belowground configurations. While several testing programs have been previously conducted, these earlier validation attempts did not capture the effects of elevated helium pressures or accurately portray the external convection of aboveground and belowground canistered dry cask systems. The purpose of this investigation was to produce validation-quality data that can be used to test the validity of the modeling presently used to determine cladding temperatures in modern vertical dry casks. These cladding temperatures are critical to evaluate cladding integrity throughout the storage cycle. To produce these data sets under well-controlled boundary conditions, the dry cask simulator (DCS) was built to study the thermal-hydraulic response of fuel under a variety of heat loads, internal vessel pressures, and external configurations. An existing electrically heated but otherwise prototypic BWR Incoloy-clad test assembly was deployed inside of a representative storage basket and cylindrical pressure vessel that represents a vertical canister system. The symmetric

  18. Development of NSSS Thermal-Hydraulic Model for KNPEC-2 Simulator Using the Best-Estimate Code RETRAN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Doo; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Lee, Seung-Wook; Lee, Myeong-Soo; Suh, Jae-Seung; Hong, Jin-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-Kwan

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) thermal-hydraulic model adopted in the Korea Nuclear Plant Education Center (KNPEC)-2 simulator was provided in the early 1980s. The reference plant for KNPEC-2 is the Yong Gwang Nuclear Unit 1, which is a Westinghouse-type 3-loop, 950 MW(electric) pressurized water reactor. Because of the limited computational capability at that time, it uses overly simplified physical models and assumptions for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic transients. This may entail inaccurate results and thus, the possibility of so-called ''negative training,'' especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS thermal-hydraulic program (named ARTS code) based on the best-estimate code RETRAN-3D. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted by both a stand-alone test and an integrated test in the simulator environment. The non-integrated stand-alone test (NIST) results were reasonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation capability, and robustness. After successful completion of the NIST, ARTS was integrated with a 3-D reactor kinetics model and other system models. The site acceptance test (SAT) has been completed successively and confirmed to comply with the ANSI/ANS-3.5-1998 simulator software performance criteria. This paper presents our efforts for the ARTS development and some test results of the NIST and SAT

  19. Monte Carlo simulation for thermal assisted reversal process of micro-magnetic torus ring with bistable closure domain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: yama@sss.fukushima-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for temperature dependences of closure domain parameter for a magnetic micro-torus ring cluster under magnetic field on limited temperature regions. Simulation results show that magnetic field on tiny limited temperature region can reverse magnetic closure domain structures when the magnetic field is applied at a threshold temperature corresponding to intensity of applied magnetic field. This is one of thermally assisted switching phenomena through a self-organization process. The results show the way to find non-wasteful pairs between intensity of magnetic field and temperature region for reversing closure domain structure by temperature dependence of the fluctuation of closure domain parameter. Monte Carlo method for this simulation is very valuable to optimize the design of thermally assisted switching devices.

  20. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Simulations for the Thermal Characteristics of PCRAMs with Different Buffer Layer Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue-Feng, Gong; Zhi-Tang, Song; Yun, Ling; Yan, Liu; Yi-Jin, Li; Song-Lin, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Simulation of the heat consumption in phase change random access memories (PCRAMs) is investigated by a three-dimensional finite element model. It is revealed that the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of the buffer layer are crucial in controlling the heating efficiency in RESET process. The buffer layer materials W, TiN, WO 3 , TiO 2 and poly-germanium (poly-Ge) are applied in the simulation respectively, and compared with each other. The simulation results show that limitation of electrical conductivity is effective on heating efficiency and the limitation of thermal conductivity is important on the reliable RESET process. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  1. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  2. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  3. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  4. Simulations of thermal-hydraulic processes in heat exchangers- station of the cogeneration power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studovic, M.; Stevanovic, V.; Ilic, M.; Nedeljkovic, S. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of Belgrade (Croatia)

    1995-12-31

    Design of the long district heating system to Belgrade (base load 580 MJ/s) from Thermal Power Station `Nikola Tesla A`, 30 km southwest from the present gas/oil burning boilers in New Belgrade, is being conducted. The mathematical model and computer code named TRP are developed for the prediction of the design basis parameters of heat exchangers station, as well as for selection of protection devices and formulation of operating procedures. Numerical simulations of heat exchangers station are performed for various transient conditions: up-set and abnormal. Physical model of multi-pass, shell and tube heat exchanger in the station represented is by unique steam volume, and with space discretised nodes both for water volume and tube walls. Heat transfer regimes on steam and water side, as well as hydraulic calculation were performed in accordance with TEMA standards for transient conditions on both sides, and for each node on water side. Mathematical model is based on balance equations: mass and energy for lumped parameters on steam side, and energy balances for tube walls and water in each node. Water mass balance is taken as boundary/initial condition or as specified control function. The physical model is proposed for (s) heat exchangers in the station and (n) water and wall volumes. Therefore, the mathematical model consists of 2ns+2, non-linear differential equations, including equations of state for water, steam and tube material, and constitutive equations for heat transfer on steam and water side, solved by the Runge-Kutt method. Five scenarios of heat exchangers station behavior have been simulated with the TRP code and obtained results are presented. (author)

  5. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  6. Numerical simulation of a high temperature thermal storage unit for solar gas turbine applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klein, P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of thermal storage systems allows concentrating solar power plants to generate predictable power delivery to the grid by mitigating the variability of solar energy supply. However, while thermal storage solutions exist for Rankine...

  7. Laser-Based Ignition for a Gunfire Simulator (GUFS): Thermal Transport Properties for Candidate Igniter Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McQuaid, M

    1999-01-01

    ...) the technique developed by Miller and Kotlar ("Technique for Measuring Thermal Diffusivity/Conductivity of Small Thermal Insulator Specimens," Review of Scientific instruments, vol. 64, p. 2954, 1993) and (2...

  8. Thermal resistance of naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores. [Viking spacecraft dry heat decontamination simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puleo, J. R.; Bergstrom, S. L.; Peeler, J. T.; Oxborrow, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    Simulation of a heat process used in the terminal dry-heat decontamination of the Viking spacecraft is reported. Naturally occurring airborne bacterial spores were collected on Teflon ribbons in selected spacecraft assembly areas and subsequently subjected to dry heat. Thermal inactivation experiments were conducted at 105, 111.7, 120, 125, 130, and 135 C with a moisture level of 1.2 mg of water per liter. Heat survivors were recovered at temperatures of 135 C when a 30-h heating cycle was employed. Survivors were recovered from all cycles studied and randomly selected for identification. The naturally occurring spore population was reduced an average of 2.2 to 4.4 log cycles from 105 to 135 C. Heating cycles of 5 and 15 h at temperature were compared with the standard 30-h cycle at 111.7, 120, and 125 C. No significant differences in inactivation (alpha = 0.05) were observed between 111.7 and 120 C. The 30-h cycle differs from the 5- and 15-h cycles at 125 C. Thus, the heating cycle can be reduced if a small fraction (about 0.001 to 0.0001) of very resistant spores can be tolerated.

  9. Oxidative Stability of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil to Simulated Gastric Conditions and Thermal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, Francesco; Addeo, Francesco; Volpe, Maria Grazia; Paolucci, Marina; Picariello, Gianluca

    2016-11-09

    The fatty acid composition of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seed oil (PSO) is dominated by punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (18:3ω-5). As a free fatty acid, punicic acid is rapidly oxidized in air and extensively isomerizes upon acid-catalyzed methylation at 90 °C. In contrast, triacylglycerol-bound punicic acid in PSO was unchanged by simulated gastric conditions and was degraded by 5-7% by severe heating (up to 170 °C for 4 h), as herein assessed by gas chromatography, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 1 H and 13 C NMR, and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Total polar compounds of PSO were slightly affected by thermal stress, accounting for 5.71, 6.35, and 9.53% (w/w) in the unheated, heated at mild temperature (50 °C, 2 h), and heated at frying temperature (170 °C, 4 h) PSO, respectively. These findings support from a structural standpoint the potential use of PSO as a health-promoting edible oil.

  10. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, E. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B., E-mail: behrouz@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); UVSOR Facility (UVSOR), Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  11. Simulation of Thermal Distribution and Airflow for Efficient Energy Consumption in a Small Data Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Data centers have become ubiquitous in the last few years in an attempt to keep pace with the processing and storage needs of the Internet and cloud computing. The steady growth in the heat densities of IT servers leads to a rise in the energy needed to cool them, and constitutes approximately 40% of the power consumed by data centers. However, many data centers feature redundant air conditioning systems that contribute to inefficient air distribution, which significantly increases energy consumption. This remains an insufficiently explored problem. In this paper, a typical, small data center with tiles for an air supply system with a raised floor is used. We use a fluent (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD to simulate thermal distribution and airflow, and investigate the optimal conditions of air distribution to save energy. The effects of the airflow outlet angle along the tile, the cooling temperature and the rate of airflow on the beta index as well as the energy utilization index are discussed, and the optimal conditions are obtained. The reasonable airflow distribution achieved using 3D CFD calculations and the parameter settings provided in this paper can help reduce the energy consumption of data centers by improving the efficiency of the air conditioning.

  12. Simulation of Image Performance Characteristics of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, John; Gerace, Aaron; Brown, Scott; Gartley, Michael; Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    The next Landsat satellite, which is scheduled for launch in early 2013, will carry two instruments: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). Significant design changes over previous Landsat instruments have been made to these sensors to potentially enhance the quality of Landsat image data. TIRS, which is the focus of this study, is a dual-band instrument that uses a push-broom style architecture to collect data. To help understand the impact of design trades during instrument build, an effort was initiated to model TIRS imagery. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool was used to produce synthetic "on-orbit" TIRS data with detailed radiometric, geometric, and digital image characteristics. This work presents several studies that used DIRSIG simulated TIRS data to test the impact of engineering performance data on image quality in an effort to determine if the image data meet specifications or, in the event that they do not, to determine if the resulting image data are still acceptable.

  13. Direct methanol fuel cell bubble transport simulations via thermal lattice Boltzmann and volume of fluid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, K.; Chen, T. S.; Hong, C. W.

    Carbon dioxide bubble removal at the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an important technique especially for applications in the portable power sources. This paper presents numerical investigations of the two-phase flow, CO 2 bubbles in a liquid methanol solution, in the anode microchannels from the aspect of microfluidics using a thermal lattice Boltzmann model (TLBM). The main purpose is to derive an efficient and effective computational scheme to deal with this technical problem. It is then examined by a commercially available software using Navier-Stokes plus volume of fluid (VOF) method. The latter approach is normally employed by most researchers. A simplified microchannel simulation domain with the dimension of 1.5 μm in height (or width) and 16.0 μm in length has been setup for both cases to mimic the actual flow path of a CO 2 bubble inside an anodic diffusion layer in the DMFC. This paper compares both numerical schemes and results under the same operation conditions from the viewpoint of fuel cell engineering.

  14. Thermal hydraulic investigations and optimization on the EVC system of a PWR by CFD simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Mengmeng [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China); Zhang, Dalin, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China); Tang, Mao [China Nuclear Power Design Engineering Co., Ltd., 518124 Shenzhen (China); Wang, Chenglong; Zheng, Meiyin; Qiu, Suizheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi’an (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • This study constructs a full CFD model for the EVC system of a PWR. • The complex fluid and solid coupling is treated in the computation. • Primary characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the EVC system are investigated. • The optimization of the EVC system with different inlet boundaries are performed. - Abstract: In order to optimize the design of Reactor Pit Ventilation (EVC) system in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), it is necessary to study the characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature fields in the EVC system. A full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the EVC system is constructed by a commercial CFD code, where the complex fluid and solid coupling is treated. The Shear Stress Transport (SST) model is adopted to perform the turbulence calculation. This paper numerically investigates the characteristics of the velocity, pressure and temperature distributions in the EVC system. In particular, the effects of inlet air parameters on the thermal hydraulic characteristics and the reactor pit structure are also discussed for the EVC system optimization. Simulations are carried out with different mesh sizes and boundary conditions for sensitivity analysis. The computational results are important references to optimize the design and verify the rationality of the EVC system.

  15. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  16. Three-dimensional simulation of thermal harmonic lasing free electron laser with detuning of the fundamental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, E.; Maraghechi, B.; Mirian, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Detuning of the fundamental is a way to enhance harmonic generation. By this method, the wiggler is composed of two segments in such a way that the fundamental resonance of the second segment to coincide with the third harmonic of the first segment of the wiggler to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation and x-ray emission. A set of coupled, nonlinear, and first-order differential equations in three dimensions describing the evolution of the electron trajectories and the radiation field with warm beam is solved numerically by CYRUS 3D code in the steady-state for two models (1) seeded free electron laser (FEL) and (2) shot noise on the electron beam (self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL). Thermal effects in the form of longitudinal velocity spread are considered. Three-dimensional simulation describes self-consistently the longitudinal spatial dependence of radiation waists, curvatures, and amplitudes together with the evaluation of the electron beam. The evolutions of the transverse modes are investigated for the fundamental resonance and the third harmonic. Also, the effective modes of the third harmonic are studied. In this paper, we found that detuning of the fundamental with shot noise gives more optimistic result than the seeded FEL.

  17. Simulation of the effects of grain boundary fission gas during thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Beiersdorf, B.A.

    1984-11-01

    This report presents the results of an initial set of out-of-cell transient heating experiments performed on unirradiated UO 2 pellets fabricated to simulate the effect of grain boundary fission gas on fuel swelling and cladding failure. The fabrication involved trapping high-pressure argon on internal pores by sintering annular UO 2 pellets in a hot isostatic press (HIP). The pellet stack was subjected to two separate transients (DGF83-03A and -03B). Figures show photomicrographs of HIPped and non-HIPped UO 2 , respectively, and the adjacent cladding after DGF83-03B. Fuel melting occurred at the center of both the HIPped and non-HIPped pellets; however, a dark ring is present near the center in the HIPped fuel but not in the non-HIPped fuel. This dark band is a high-porosity region due to increased grain boundary/edge swelling in that pellet. In contrast, grain boundary/edge swelling did not occur in the non-HIPped pellets. Thus, the presence of the high-pressure argon trapped on internal pores during sintering in the HIP altered the microstructural behavior. Results of these preliminary tests indicate that the microstructural behavior of HIPped fuel during thermal transients is different from the behavior of conventionally fabricated fuel

  18. Development and experimental validation of computational methods to simulate abnormal thermal and structural environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moya, J.L.; Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been actively engaged in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to abnormal thermal and structural environments. These engineered systems contain very hazardous materials. Assessing the degree of safety/risk afforded the public and environment by these engineered systems, therefore, is of upmost importance. The ability to accurately predict the response of these systems to accidents (to abnormal environments) is required to assess the degree of safety. Before the effect of the abnormal environment on these systems can be determined, it is necessary to ascertain the nature of the environment. Ascertaining the nature of the environment, in turn, requires the ability to physically characterize and numerically simulate the abnormal environment. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the level of safety provided by these engineered systems by either of two approaches: (1) a purely regulatory approach, or (2) by a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). This paper will address the latter of the two approaches

  19. Results From an International Simulation Study on Coupled Thermal, Hydrological, and Mechanical (THM) Processes Near Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Rutqvist; D. Barr; J.T. Birkholzer; M. Chijimatsu; O. Kolditz; Q. Liu; Y. Oda; W. Wang; C. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    As part of the ongoing international DECOVALEX project, four research teams used five different models to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and mechanical (THM) processes near waste emplacement drifts of geological nuclear waste repositories. The simulations were conducted for two generic repository types, one with open and the other with back-filled repository drifts, under higher and lower postclosure temperatures, respectively. In the completed first model inception phase of the project, a good agreement was achieved between the research teams in calculating THM responses for both repository types, although some disagreement in hydrological responses is currently being resolved. In particular, good agreement in the basic thermal-mechanical responses was achieved for both repository types, even though some teams used relatively simplified thermal-elastic heat-conduction models that neglected complex near-field thermal-hydrological processes. The good agreement between the complex and simplified process models indicates that the basic thermal-mechanical responses can be predicted with a relatively high confidence level

  20. Simulation and experimental study on thermal optimization of the heat exchanger for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Q. Su

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermoelectric technology has revealed the potential for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG, which contributes to the improvement of the fuel economy of the engine-powered vehicle. As a major factor, thermal capacity and heat transfer of the heat exchanger affect the performance of TEG effectively. With the thermal energy of exhaust gas harvested by thermoelectric modules, a temperature gradient appears on the heat exchanger surface, so as the interior flow distribution of the heat exchanger. In order to achieve uniform temperature distribution and higher interface temperature, the thermal characteristics of heat exchangers with various heat transfer enhancement features are studied, such as internal structure, material and surface area. Combining the computational fluid dynamics simulations and infrared test on a high-performance engine with a dynamometer, the thermal performance of the heat exchanger is evaluated. Simulation and experiment results show that a plate-shaped heat exchanger made of brass with accordion-shaped internal structure achieves a relatively ideal performance, which can practically improve overall thermal performance of the TEG.

  1. Computer simulation of thermal-hydraulic transient events in multi-circuits with multipumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, Marcelo Antonio

    2003-01-01

    PANTERA-2 (from Programa para Analise Termo-hidraulica de Reatores a Agua - Program for Thermal-hydraulic Analysis of Water Reactors, Version 2), whose fundamentals are described in this work, is intended to carry out rod bundle subchannel analysis in conjunction with multiloop simulation. It solves simultaneously the conservation equations of mass, axial and lateral momentum, and energy for subchannel geometry coupled with the balance equations that describe the fluid flows in any number of coolant loops connected to a pressure vessel containing the rod bundle. As far as subchannel analysis is concerned, the basic computational strategy of PANTERA-2 comes from COBRA codes, but an alternative implicit solution method oriented to the pressure field has been used to solve the finite difference approximations for the balance laws. The results provided by the subchannel model comprise the fluid density, enthalpy, flow rate, and pressure fields in the subchannels. The loop model predicts the individual loop flows, total flow through the pressure vessel, and pump rotational speeds as a function of time subsequent to the failure of any number of the coolant pumps. The flow transients in the loops may initiated by partial, total or sequential loss of electric power to the operating pumps. Transient events caused by either shaft break or rotor locking may also be simulated. The changes in rotational speed of the pumps as a function of rime are determined from a torque balance. Pump dynamic head and hydraulic torque are calculated as a function of rotational speed and volumetric flow from two polar homologous curves supplied to the code in the tabular form. In order to illustrate the analytical capability of PANTERA-2, three sample problems are presented and discussed. Comparisons between calculated and measured results indicate that the program reproduces with a good accuracy experimental data for subchannel exit temperatures and critical heat fluxes in 5x5 rod bundles. It

  2. Experimental and DFT simulation study of a novel felodipine cocrystal: Characterization, dissolving properties and thermal decomposition kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Caiqin; Guo, Wei; Lin, Yulong; Lin, Qianqian; Wang, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Yanli

    2018-05-30

    In this study, a new cocrystal of felodipine (Fel) and glutaric acid (Glu) with a high dissolution rate was developed using the solvent ultrasonic method. The prepared cocrystal was characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. To provide basic information about the optimization of pharmaceutical preparations of Fel-based cocrystals, this work investigated the thermal decomposition kinetics of the Fel-Glu cocrystal through non-isothermal thermogravimetry. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations were also performed on the Fel monomer and the trimolecular cocrystal compound for exploring the mechanisms underlying hydrogen bonding formation and thermal decomposition. Combined results of IR spectroscopy and DFT simulation verified that the Fel-Glu cocrystal formed via the NH⋯OC and CO⋯HO hydrogen bonds between Fel and Glu at the ratio of 1:2. The TG/derivative TG curves indicated that the thermal decomposition of the Fel-Glu cocrystal underwent a two-step process. The apparent activation energy (E a ) and pre-exponential factor (A) of the thermal decomposition for the first stage were 84.90 kJ mol -1 and 7.03 × 10 7  min -1 , respectively. The mechanism underlying thermal decomposition possibly involved nucleation and growth, with the integral mechanism function G(α) of α 3/2 . DFT calculation revealed that the hydrogen bonding between Fel and Glu weakened the terminal methoxyl, methyl, and ethyl groups in the Fel molecule. As a result, these groups were lost along with the Glu molecule in the first thermal decomposition. In conclusion, the formed cocrystal exhibited different thermal decomposition kinetics and showed different E a , A, and shelf life from the intact active pharmaceutical ingredient. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of thermal and mechanical parameter’s damage numerical simulation cycling effects on defects in hot metal forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amri, Abdelouahid; el yakhloufi Haddou, Mounir; Khamlichi, Abdellatif

    2017-10-01

    Damage mechanisms in hot metal forming processes are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during Thermal and mechanical properties variations, because it consists of the materials with different thermal and mechanical loadings and swelling coefficients. In this work, 3D finite element models (FEM) are developed to simulate the effect of Temperature and the stresses on the model development, using a general purpose FE software ABAQUS. Explicit dynamic analysis with coupled Temperature displacement procedure is used for a model. The purpose of this research was to study the thermomechanical damage mechanics in hot forming processes. The important process variables and the main characteristics of various hot forming processes will also be discussed.

  4. Large eddy simulation of a T-Junction with upstream elbow: The role of Dean vortices in thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunstall, R.; Laurence, D.; Prosser, R.; Skillen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A T-Junction with an upstream bend is studied using wall-resolved LES and POD. • The bend generates Dean vortices which remain prominent downstream of the junction. • Dean vortex swirl-switching results in an unsteady secondary flow about the pipe axis. • This provides a further mechanism for near-wall temperature fluctuations. • Upstream bends can have a crucial role in T-Junction thermal fatigue problems. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of fluids in a T-Junction can generate oscillating thermal stresses in pipe walls, which may lead to high cycle thermal fatigue. This thermal stripping problem is an important safety issue in nuclear plant thermal-hydraulic systems, since it can lead to unexpected failure of the pipe material. Here, we carry out a large eddy simulation (LES) of a T-Junction with an upstream bend and use proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to identify the dominant structures in the flow. The bend generates an unsteady secondary flow about the pipe axis, known as Dean vortex swirl-switching. This provides an additional mechanism for low-frequency near-wall temperature fluctuations downstream of the T-Junction, over those that would be produced by mixing in the same T-Junction with straight inlets. The paper highlights the important role of neighbouring pipe bends in T-Junction thermal fatigue problems and the need to include them when using CFD as a predictive tool.

  5. Correlation between subjective assessments of local thermal discomfort and thermal manikin measurements in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Jama, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    participated, each being exposed to the same three temperature conditions during simulated 7-hour transatlantic flights. The assessments indicate that an air temperature increase in the middle of a 7-hour flight period followed by a decrease before landing might be preferred. A comparison be-tween manikin...

  6. Numerical Simulation of Thermal-Structural State of the Railway Rail During Hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Pokrovsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of high-strength rails is an extremely urgent problem, because every year increases the speed and weight of rolling stock. It is very important to choose a rational modes of heat treatment, which on the one hand contribute to the formation of the desired structure with a given hardness, and on the other hand do not lead to warping of the rails and destruction in the early stages of operation due to the high level of residual thermal stresses. Experimental methods for research of thermal-structural state rail during heat treatment with a view to rationalizing modes are ineffective because they do not allow to trace the kinetics of structure formation, especially in the internal areas of the rail. Therefore, at the forefront methods of mathematical modeling. In the present work, the developed methods and software for numerical simulation of temperature and structural condition of the railway rail when it is heat treated. The solution to the problem of linear unsteady heat conduction carried out in a bulk formulation using finite-element ANSYS environment using 8-node 3D element Solid278. Mathematical modeling of transformation of austenite to ferrite-carbide implemented using the C++ programming language theory isokinetic reactions, which is based on the additivity rule for the transition from isothermal kinetics of austenite to non-isothermal conditions. To describe the isothermal transformation kinetics of austenite to ferrite-carbide used the equation of Avrami. The results of mathematical modeling as applied to bulk quenching in oil rail type R65, made of steel 85. It is established that the cooling of the rail to oil temperature 40 ° C occurs in approximately 10 minutes. Through mathematical modeling shows that after quenching the structure near the end at the edge of the base of the rail contains up to 89 % of martensite. The maximum share of ferrite-carbide in inner areas is about 50 %. Developed software tools necessary for

  7. A novel solar trigeneration system based on concentrating photovoltaic/thermal collectors. Part 1: Design and simulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonomano, Annamaria; Calise, Francesco; Dentice d'Accadia, Massimo; Vanoli, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thermodynamic performance of high-temperature PhotoVoltaic/Thermal (PVT) solar collectors. The collector is based on a combination of a parabolic dish concentrating solar thermal collector and a high efficiency solar photovoltaic collector. The PVT system under investigation allows one to produce simultaneously electrical energy and high-temperature thermal energy by solar irradiation. The main aim of this study is the design and the analysis of a concentrating PVT which is able to operate at reasonable electric and thermal efficiency up to 180 °C. In fact, the PVT is designed to be integrated in a Solar Heating and Cooling system and it must drive a two-effect absorption chiller. This capability is quite new since conventional PVT collectors usually operate below 45 °C. Among the possible high-temperature PVT systems, this paper is focused on a system consisting in a dish concentrator and in a triple-junction PV layer. In particular, the prototype consists in a parabolic dish concentrator and a planar receiver. The system is equipped with a double axis tracking system. The bottom surface of the receiver is equipped with triple-junction silicon cells whereas the top surface is insulated. In order to analyze the performance of the Concentrating PVT (CPVT) collector a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances on the control volumes of the system. The simulation model allows one to calculate in detail the temperatures of the main components of the system (PV layer, concentrator, fluid inlet and outlet and metallic substrate) and the main energy flows (electrical energy, useful thermal energy, radiative losses, convective losses). The input parameters of the model include all the weather conditions (temperature, insolation, wind velocity, etc.) and the geometrical/material parameters of the systems (lengths, thermal resistances, thicknesses, etc.). Results showed that both electrical

  8. Analysis of human factors on urban heat island and simulation of urban thermal environment in Lanzhou city, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinghu

    2015-01-01

    Urban heat island (UHI) effect is a global phenomenon caused by urbanization. Because of the number and complexity of factors contributing to the urban thermal environment, traditional statistical methods are insufficient for acquiring data and analyzing the impact of human activities on the thermal environment, especially for identifying which factors are dominant. The UHI elements were extracted using thermal infrared remote sensing data to retrieve the land surface temperatures of Lanzhou city, and then adopting an object-oriented fractal net evolution approach to create an image segmentation of the land surface temperature (LST). The effects of urban expansion on the urban thermal environment were quantitatively analyzed. A comprehensive evaluation system of the urban thermal environment was constructed, the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou was assessed, and principal influencing factors were identified using spatial principal component analysis (SPCA) and multisource spatial data. We found that in the last 20 years, the UHI effect in Lanzhou city has been strengthened, as the UHI ratio index has increased from 0.385 in 1993 to 0.579 in 2001 and to 0.653 in 2011. The UHI expansion had a spatiotemporal consistency with the urban expansion. The four major factors that affect the spatial pattern of the urban thermal environment in Lanzhou can be ranked in the following order: landscape configuration, anthropogenic heat release, urban construction, and gradient from man-made to natural land cover. These four together accounted for 91.27% of the variance. A linear model was thus successfully constructed, implying that SPCA is helpful in identifying major contributors to UHI. Regression analysis indicated that the instantaneous LST and the simulated thermal environment have a good linear relationship, the correlation coefficient between the two reached 0.8011, highly significant at a confidence level of 0.001.

  9. Numerical Simulation for Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics Considering the Effects of Initial Stress Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking the hafnium diboride ceramic as an example, the effects of heating rate, cooling rate, thermal shock initial temperature, and external constraint on the thermal shock resistance (TSR of ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs were studied through numerical simulation in this paper. The results show that the external constraint has an approximately linear influence on the critical rupture temperature difference of UHTCs. The external constraint prepares a compressive stress field in the structure because of the predefined temperature field, and this compressive stress field relieves the tension stress in the structure when it is cooled down and then it improves the TSR of UHTCs. As the thermal shock initial temperature, a danger heating rate (or cooling rate exists where the critical temperature difference is the lowest.

  10. Evaluation on numerical simulation accuracy of the commercial CFD program for FBR thermal-hydraulic conditions and applications. Single phase multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic evaluation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi

    2003-03-01

    Commercial computational fluid dynamic program is taken up to be employed for nuclear thermal-hydraulic applications due to the advantages in high-speed solution and easy-to-use operation. The principal objective of this report is evaluating the numerical simulation accuracy of the Fluent, on single-phase multi-dimensional thermal hydraulic problems. The evaluation problems are: 1) Laminar flow over a backward-facing step, 2) Turbulent flow over a backward-facing step, 3) Temperature of a inner rectangular rotating flow, 4) Thermal-driven natural convection flow in a square cavity, and 5) Turbulent flow in a cubic cavity, those were selected in supposing nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic conditions by the technical committee of the Japan atomic energy society. The features on numerical method and accuracy of the Fluent being identified are: 1) Spatial differential schemes for convection term: 1st upwind, power-law, 2nd upwind, and Quick, upgrade the numerical accuracy in this order. Each scheme has the same accuracy as of the existing referenced numerical results. Quick scheme employs numerical stability oriented filtering so that no over- or under-shoots are observed. Yet, 2nd central differential scheme -used in large eddy simulation (LES)- leads numerical instability (i.e. temporal oscillation in pressure, and spatial wavering in velocity) typically when we deal with in low-resolution domains. 2) Turbulent models: (Standard, RNG, Realizable) k-ε, (Standard, SST) k-ω, and, (Standard, Quadratic) RST, necessitate to involve non-equilibrium wall function to take numerical accuracy and stability. The Fluent evaluations on re-attaching points and velocity distributions show nearly the same as -and on several counts more accurate than- those of the existing reference results. The LES turbulent model can be used only for 3-D simulations. 3) The evaluations of thermal-driven natural convection flow, which is one of the heat transfer and fluidics coupling problem, show

  11. A new closed-form analytical thermal model for simulating Stirling engines based on polytropic-finite speed thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinzade, Hadi; Sayyaadi, Hoseyn; Babaelahi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A closed-form thermal model was presented for Stirling engines. • The new model was used to simulate the GPU-3 Stirling engine. • Results were compared with experimental data as well as other models. • The new model was more accurate and simple in calculation than other models. • Effects of the engines’ parameters on operation of engine were evaluated. - Abstract: Thermal models for the simulation of Stirling engines need to have greater accuracy along with simple and low-cost calculation. In this regard, a new closed-form thermal model was presented for the thermal simulation of Stirling engines. The new model called PFST (polytropic-finite speed thermodynamics) was developed based on the combination of polytropic analysis of expansion/compression processes and the concept of finite speed thermodynamics (FST). Therefore, compression/expansion works of compression/expansion processes and transferred heat into the heater of Stirling engines were determined based on polytropic analysis, instead of isothermal processes of the ideal Stirling cycle. The calculated work of polytropic processes was corrected to include the effects of internal irreversibilities including pressure throttling in heat exchangers, mechanical friction, and finite motion of the pistons. Output power and thermal efficiency of Stirling engines were calculated as functions of various engine parameters. The developed PFST model was implemented on a prototype Stirling engine, called GPU-3 engine, and the obtained results were compared with those of other closed-form and numerical models as well as experimental data. It was found that the new closed-form model, in addition to its simple and low-cost calculation, had the same order of accuracy as recently developed numerical models

  12. Germination of rye brome (Bromus secalinus L. seeds under simulated drought and different thermal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Haliniarz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the germination of rye brome (Bromus secalinus L. seeds and the initial growth of seedlings under simulated drought and different thermal conditions. The study included two experiments carried out under laboratory conditions in the spring of 2012. The first experiment involved an evaluation of the speed of germination as well as of the biometric characters and weight of seedlings in polyethylene glycol solutions (PEG 8000 in which the water potential was: -0.2; -0.4; -0.65; -0.9 MPa, and in distilled water as the control treatment. The experiment was conducted at the following temperatures: 25/22oC and 18/14oC day/night, at a relative air humidity of 90%. The other experiment, in which lessive soil was used as a germination substrate, was carried out in a plant growth chamber at two levels of air humidity (55–65% and 85–95% and temperature (22/10oC and 16/5oC. The soil moisture content was determined by the gravimetric method and the water potential corresponding to it was as follows: -0.02, -0.07, -0.16, -0.49, -1.55 MPa. The germination capacity and emergence of Bromus secalinus as well as the weight of sprouts produced were significantly dependent on the water potential of the polyethylene glycol solution and on the soil water potential. The emergence of Bromus secalinus was completely inhibited by reducing the soil water potential below -0.16 MPa (the point of strong growth inhibition. The emergence and biometric characters of rye bro- me seedlings were significantly dependent on temperature and air humidity.

  13. Thermally Induced Vibrations of the Hubble Space Telescope's Solar Array 3 in a Test Simulated Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early, Derrick A.; Haile, William B.; Turczyn, Mark T.; Griffin, Thomas J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the European Space Agency (ESA) conducted a disturbance verification test on a flight Solar Array 3 (SA3) for the Hubble Space Telescope using the ESA Large Space Simulator (LSS) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. The LSS cyclically illuminated the SA3 to simulate orbital temperature changes in a vacuum environment. Data acquisition systems measured signals from force transducers and accelerometers resulting from thermally induced vibrations of the SAI The LSS with its seismic mass boundary provided an excellent background environment for this test. This paper discusses the analysis performed on the measured transient SA3 responses and provides a summary of the results.

  14. Numerical simulation of long-period fluid temperature fluctuation at a mixing tee for the thermal fatigue problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utanohara, Yoichi, E-mail: utanohara@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Nakamura, Akira, E-mail: a-naka@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koji@inss.co.jp [Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., 64 Sata, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui 919-1205 (Japan); Kasahara, Naoto, E-mail: kasahara@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • A large eddy simulation of a mixing tee was carried out. • Fluid temperature fluctuation could be predicted qualitatively. • Grid convergence was almost attained and the simulation continued until 100 s. • A longer-period temperature fluctuation than the well-known St = 0.2 appeared. • Prediction of long-period temperature fluctuations improves the thermal fatigue assessment. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue cracks may be initiated at mixing tees where high and low temperature fluids flow in and mix. According to a previous study, damage by thermal fatigue depends on the frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuation near the wall surface. Structures have the time constant of structural response that depends on physical properties of the structure and the gain of the frequency response tends to become maximum at the frequency lower than the typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation. Hence the effect of the lower frequency, that is, long-period temperature fluctuation is important for the thermal fatigue assessment. The typical frequency of fluid temperature fluctuation is about St = 0.2 (nearly 6 Hz), where St is Strouhal number and means non-dimensional frequency. In the experimental study by Miyoshi et al. (2014), a longer-period fluctuation than St = 0.2 was also observed. Results of a fluid–structure coupled analysis by Kamaya et al. (2011) showed this long-period temperature fluctuation causes severer damage to piping. In the present study, a large eddy simulation was carried out to investigate the predictive performance of the long-period fluid temperature fluctuation more quantitatively. Numerical simulation was conducted for the WATLON experiment which was the water experiment of a mixing tee performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Four computational grids were used to confirm grid convergence. In the short time (9 s) simulations, tendencies of time-averaged and fluctuated velocities could be followed. Time

  15. Numerical simulations on the temperature gradient and thermal stress of a thermoelectric power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yongjia; Ming, Tingzhen; Li, Xiaohua; Pan, Tao; Peng, Keyuan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An appropriate ceramic plate thickness is effective in alleviating the thermal stress. • A smaller distance between thermo-pins can help prolong lifecycle of the TE module. • Either a thicker or a thinner copper conducting strip effectively reduces thermal stress. • A suitable tin soldering thickness will alleviate thermal stress intensity and increase thermal efficiency. - Abstract: Thermoelectric generator is a device taking advantage of the temperature difference in thermoelectric material to generate electric power, where the higher the temperature difference of the hot-cold ends, the higher the efficiency will be. However, higher temperature or higher heat flux upon the hot end will cause strong thermal stress which will negatively influence the lifecycle of the thermoelectric module. This phenomenon is very common in industrial applications but seldom has research work been reported. In this paper, numerical analysis on the thermodynamics and thermal stress performance of the thermoelectric module has been performed, considering the variation on the thickness of materials; the influence of high heat flux on thermal efficiency, power output, and thermal stress has been examined. It is found that under high heat flux imposing upon the hot end, the thermal stress is so strong that it has a decisive effect on the life expectation of the device. To improve the module’s working condition, different geometrical configurations are tested and the optimum sizes are achieved. Besides, the side effects on the efficiency, power output, and open circuit voltage output of the thermoelectric module are taken into consideration

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Liu, H.J., E-mail: phlhj@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Cheng, L.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, P.H.; Liang, J.H.; Fan, D.D.; Shi, J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-10

    Highlights: • A simple but effective Morse potential is constructed to accurately describe the interatomic interactions of CuInTe{sub 2}. • The lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} predicted by MD agrees well with those measured experimentally, as well as those calculated from phonon BTE. • Introducing Cd impurity or Cu vacancy can effectively reduce the lattice thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} and thus further enhance its thermoelectric performance. - Abstract: The lattice thermal conductivity of thermoelectric material CuInTe{sub 2} is predicted using classical molecular dynamics simulations, where a simple but effective Morse-type interatomic potential is constructed by fitting first-principles total energy calculations. In a broad temperature range from 300 to 900 K, our simulated results agree well with those measured experimentally, as well as those obtained from phonon Boltzmann transport equation. By introducing the Cd impurity or Cu vacancy, the thermal conductivity of CuInTe{sub 2} can be effectively reduced to further enhance the thermoelectric performance of this chalcopyrite compound.

  17. The diffusional pulsed cooling of the thermal neutron flux in small two-region systems. Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiacek, U.

    2006-06-01

    The thermal neutron transport in small unhomogeneous system and namely in two- layers where the first one -outer moderator is of hydride type (polyethylene or plexiglas) and the second one - inner is made with other materials is investigated. The diffusional cooling of neutrons has been calculated by means of monte Carlo simulations using MCPN code. Because of un consistency of calculated and measured data the MCPN code library has been modified for polyethylene and plexiglas

  18. Coupled optical and thermal detailed simulations for the accurate evaluation and performance improvement of molten salts solar towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barberena, Javier; Mutuberria, Amaia; Palacin, Luis G.; Sanz, Javier L.; Pereira, Daniel; Bernardos, Ana; Sanchez, Marcelino; Rocha, Alberto R.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain, CENER, and the Technology & Innovation area of ACS Cobra, as a result of their long term expertise in the CSP field, have developed a high-quality and high level of detail optical and thermal simulation software for the accurate evaluation of Molten Salts Solar Towers. The main purpose of this software is to make a step forward in the state-of-the-art of the Solar Towers simulation programs. Generally, these programs deal with the most critical systems of such plants, i.e. the solar field and the receiver, on an independent basis. Therefore, these programs typically neglect relevant aspects in the operation of the plant as heliostat aiming strategies, solar flux shapes onto the receiver, material physical and operational limitations, transient processes as preheating and secure cloud passing operating modes, and more. The modelling approach implemented in the developed program consists on effectively coupling detailed optical simulations of the heliostat field with also detailed and full-transient thermal simulations of the molten salts tube-based external receiver. The optical model is based on an accurate Monte Carlo ray-tracing method which solves the complete solar field by simulating each of the heliostats at once according to their specific layout in the field. In the thermal side, the tube-based cylindrical external receiver of a Molten Salts Solar Tower is modelled assuming one representative tube per panel, and implementing the specific connection layout of the panels as well as the internal receiver pipes. Each tube is longitudinally discretized and the transient energy and mass balances in the temperature dependent molten salts and steel tube models are solved. For this, a one dimensional radial heat transfer model based is used. The thermal model is completed with a detailed control and operation strategy module, able to represent the appropriate operation of the plant. An integration framework has been

  19. Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, and ammonia in contact with tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-02-01

    Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. Described in this report are the results of tests to evaluate the rates of thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving flammable gases in the presence of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste. Flammable gases generated by the radiolysis of water and by the thermal and radiolytic decomposition of organic waste constituents may themselves participate in further reactions. Examples include the decomposition of nitrous oxide to yield nitrogen and oxygen, the reaction of nitrous oxide and hydrogen to produce nitrogen and water, and the reaction of nitrogen and hydrogen to produce ammonia. The composition of the gases trapped in bubbles in the wastes might therefore change continuously as a function of the time that the gas bubbles are retained

  20. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m -2 deg C -1 for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m -2 deg C -1 for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min -1 . The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra

  1. A non-equilibrium simulation of thermal constriction in a cascaded arc hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerenboom, K. S. C.; van Dijk, J.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-01-01

    The cascaded arc hydrogen plasma of Pilot-PSI is studied in a non-LTE model. We demonstrate that the effect of vibrationally excited molecules on the heavy-particle-assisted dissociation is crucial for obtaining thermal constriction. To the best of our knowledge, thermal constriction has not been

  2. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under shear deformation: A molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Cui-Xia; Wei, Ning; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-01

    Tensile strain and compress strain can greatly affect the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, the effect of GNRs under shear strain, which is also one of the main strain effect, has not been studied systematically yet. In this work, we employ reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to the systematical study of the thermal conductivity of GNRs (with model size of 4 nm × 15 nm) under the shear strain. Our studies show that the thermal conductivity of GNRs is not sensitive to the shear strain, and the thermal conductivity decreases only 12–16% before the pristine structure is broken. Furthermore, the phonon frequency and the change of the micro-structure of GNRs, such as band angel and bond length, are analyzed to explore the tendency of thermal conductivity. The results show that the main influence of shear strain is on the in-plane phonon density of states (PDOS), whose G band (higher frequency peaks) moved to the low frequency, thus the thermal conductivity is decreased. The unique thermal properties of GNRs under shear strains suggest their great potentials for graphene nanodevices and great potentials in the thermal managements and thermoelectric applications. PMID:28120921

  3. Thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons under shear deformation: A molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hao, Xiao-Li; Wang, Cui-Xia; Wei, Ning; Rabczuk, Timon

    2017-01-25

    Tensile strain and compress strain can greatly affect the thermal conductivity of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, the effect of GNRs under shear strain, which is also one of the main strain effect, has not been studied systematically yet. In this work, we employ reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) to the systematical study of the thermal conductivity of GNRs (with model size of 4 nm × 15 nm) under the shear strain. Our studies show that the thermal conductivity of GNRs is not sensitive to the shear strain, and the thermal conductivity decreases only 12-16% before the pristine structure is broken. Furthermore, the phonon frequency and the change of the micro-structure of GNRs, such as band angel and bond length, are analyzed to explore the tendency of thermal conductivity. The results show that the main influence of shear strain is on the in-plane phonon density of states (PDOS), whose G band (higher frequency peaks) moved to the low frequency, thus the thermal conductivity is decreased. The unique thermal properties of GNRs under shear strains suggest their great potentials for graphene nanodevices and great potentials in the thermal managements and thermoelectric applications.

  4. Numerical simulation of high-temperature thermal contact resistance and its reduction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    High-temperature thermal contact resistance (TCR) plays an important role in heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structures due to the existence of contact interface between the embedded heat pipe and the heat resistive structure, and the reduction mechanism of thermal contact resistance is of special interests in the design of such structures. The present paper proposed a finite element model of the high-temperature thermal contact resistance based on the multi-point contact model with the consideration of temperature-dependent material properties, heat radiation through the cavities at the interface and the effect of thermal interface material (TIM), and the geometry parameters of the finite element model are determined by simple surface roughness test and experimental data fitting. The experimental results of high-temperature thermal contact resistance between superalloy GH600 and C/C composite material are employed to validate the present finite element model. The effect of the crucial parameters on the thermal contact resistance with and without TIM are also investigated with the proposed finite element model. PMID:29547651

  5. Simulating the Thermal Conductivity of Lower Mantle Bridgmanite as a Function of Temperature, Pressure, and Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, B.; Stackhouse, S.; Walker, A.; Mound, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conductivity is a key parameter for Earth models involving heat flow across the core-mantle boundary. It is not currently possible to experimentally measure the thermal conductivity of minerals at lower mantle temperatures, meaning that lower temperature values must be extrapolated, introducing considerable uncertainty. Furthermore, the effect of impurities, such as Fe, is poorly constrained. In view of this, we use theoretical methods to determine the lattice thermal conductivity of (Fe,Mg)SiO3 bridgmanite, with varying concentration of Fe impurities. We utilise the "direct method" (non-equilibrium molecular dynamics), which allows thermal conductivity to be calculated via Fourier's law from the ratio of an imposed heat-flux and induced thermal gradient. We find the thermal conductivity follows the expected trends, decreasing then saturating with increasing temperature and a linear increase with pressure. We find composition dependence varies with temperature, and at high temperatures (4000 K) saturates quickly with respect to iron content. These results will be used to create a model of lower mantle thermal conductivity at all relevant conditions, with the goal of determining the heat flux from the Earth's core to mantle.

  6. Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Tarwidi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, thermal performance of various phase change materials (PCMs used as thermal energy storage in a solar cooker has been investigated numerically. Heat conduction equations in cylindrical domain are used to model heat transfer of the PCMs. Mathematical model of phase change problem in the PCM storage encompasses heat conduction equations in solid and liquid region separated by moving solid-liquid interface. The phase change problem is solved by reformulating heat conduction equations with emergence of moving boundary into an enthalpy equation. Numerical solution of the enthalpy equation is obtained by implementing Godunov method and verified by analytical solution of one-dimensional case. Stability condition of the numerical scheme is also discussed. Thermal performance of various PCMs is evaluated via the stored energy and temperature history. The simulation results show that phase change material with the best thermal performance during the first 2.5 hours of energy extraction is shown by erythritol. Moreover, magnesium chloride hexahydrate can maintain temperature of the PCM storage in the range of 110-116.7°C for more than 4 hours while magnesium nitrate hexahydrate is effective only for one hour with the PCM storage temperature around 121-128°C. Among the PCMs that have been tested, it is only erythritol that can cook 10 kg of the loaded water until it reaches 100°C for about 3.5 hours. Article History: Received June 22nd 2016; Received in revised form August 26th 2016; Accepted Sept 1st 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Tarwidi, D., Murdiansyah, D.T, Ginanja, N. (2016 Performance Evaluation of Various Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage of A Solar Cooker via Numerical Simulation. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(3, 199-210. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.3.199-210

  7. Electrode Materials, Thermal Annealing Sequences, and Lateral/Vertical Phase Separation of Polymer Solar Cells from Multiscale Molecular Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang

    2014-12-10

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. The nanomorphologies of the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer of polymer solar cells are extremely sensitive to the electrode materials and thermal annealing conditions. In this work, the correlations of electrode materials, thermal annealing sequences, and resultant BHJ nanomorphological details of P3HT:PCBM BHJ polymer solar cell are studied by a series of large-scale, coarse-grained (CG) molecular simulations of system comprised of PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al layers. Simulations are performed for various configurations of electrode materials as well as processing temperature. The complex CG molecular data are characterized using a novel extension of our graph-based framework to quantify morphology and establish a link between morphology and processing conditions. Our analysis indicates that vertical phase segregation of P3HT:PCBM blend strongly depends on the electrode material and thermal annealing schedule. A thin P3HT-rich film is formed on the top, regardless of bottom electrode material, when the BHJ layer is exposed to the free surface during thermal annealing. In addition, preferential segregation of P3HT chains and PCBM molecules toward PEDOT:PSS and Al electrodes, respectively, is observed. Detailed morphology analysis indicated that, surprisingly, vertical phase segregation does not affect the connectivity of donor/acceptor domains with respective electrodes. However, the formation of P3HT/PCBM depletion zones next to the P3HT/PCBM-rich zones can be a potential bottleneck for electron/hole transport due to increase in transport pathway length. Analysis in terms of fraction of intra- and interchain charge transports revealed that processing schedule affects the average vertical orientation of polymer chains, which may be crucial for enhanced charge transport, nongeminate recombination, and charge collection. The present study establishes a more detailed link between processing and morphology by combining multiscale molecular

  8. Finger temperature as a predictor of thermal comfort for sedentary passengers in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Wyon, David Peter; Zukowska, Daria

    2009-01-01

    that were made included finger temperature. The purpose of the present paper is to show that mean finger temperature is a good predictor of mean thermal vote (MTV) on the seven-point scale of thermal sensation. The results indicate that women and younger subjects have slightly colder fingers........1°C. A total of 68 subjects were exposed to each of the three conditions. The subjects completed questionnaires to provide subjective assessments of air quality, cabin environment, intensity of symptoms commonly experienced during flight, and thermal comfort. Objective physiological measurements...

  9. Analysis of rail cooling strategies through numerical simulation with instant calculation of thermal expansion coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernía-Espinoza, A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a new methodology to simulate the cooling process for an asymmetrical Ri60 grooved rail, designed for city tramways, in a more realistic manner than that conducted previously by other authors for long steel sections. The approach considers the phase transformation of the steel and the forced convection cooling. The process is modelled as an uncoupled thermo-mechanical problem. First, the rail’s temperature history is obtained from a computer fluid dynamic model and subsequently introduced in the finite element model, in order to model the stresses and displacements. This second stage involves the calculation of the thermal expansion coefficient, for each element and at each iteration. The calculation is made according to the continuous cooling transformation diagram. These results lead to the extremely reliable determination of residual stresses as proved by the comparison with experimental data obtained in the industrial plant. The methodology allows for an accurate study of two types of cooling strategies for the Ri60 and the selection of the more suitable one.

    En este artículo se describe una nueva metodología para simular el proceso de enfriamiento de un rail asimétrico Ri60, diseñado para tranvías, de una forma mucho más realista que lo realizado hasta ahora para perfiles largos de acero. La propuesta considera los efectos de la transformación de fases del acero y el enfriamiento por convección forzada. El proceso es simulado como un proceso termo-mecánico desacoplado. Primero, las curvas de enfriamiento del rail son obtenidas a partir de un modelo basado en dinámica de fluidos computacional y posteriormente introducidas en el modelo de elementos finitos para calcular las tensiones y desplazamientos. En esta segunda fase se calcula, para cada elemento finito y en cada iteración, el coeficiente de dilatación térmica lineal según el diagrama de curvas de enfriamiento continuo. Estos resultados

  10. CFD Simulation of a Concrete Cubicle to Analyze the Thermal Effect of Phase Change Materials in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Míguez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a CFD-based model is proposed to analyse the effect of phase change materials (PCMs on the thermal behaviour of the walls of a cubicle exposed to the environment and on the resistance of the walls to climate changes. The effect of several days of exposure to the environment was simulated using the proposed method. The results of the simulation are compared with experimental data to contrast the models. The effects of exposure on the same days were simulated for several walls of a cubicle made of a mixture of concrete and PCM. The results show that the PCM stabilizes temperatures within the cubicle and decreases energy consumption of refrigeration systems.

  11. Simulation of energy use, human thermal comfort and office work performance in buildings with moderately drifting operative temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarik, Jakub; Toftum, Jørn; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2011-01-01

    Annual primary energy use in a central module of an office building consisting of two offices separated with a corridor was estimated by means of dynamic computer simulations. The simulations were conducted for conventional all-air VAV ventilation system and thermo active building system (TABS......) supplemented with CAV ventilation. Simulations comprised moderate, hot–dry and hot–humid climate. Heavy and light wall construction and two orientations of the building (east–west and north–south) were considered. Besides the energy use, also capability of examined systems to keep a certain level of thermal...... comfort was examined. The results showed that with the moderate climate, the TABS decreased the primary energy use by about 16% as compared with the VAV. With hot–humid climate, the portion of the primary energy saved by TABS was ca. 50% even with the supply air dehumidification taken into account...

  12. Optimisation of a thermal storage installation in Wollerau; Optimisation par simulation calee de l'installation de stockage Wollerau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahud, D.

    2003-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy describes a dynamic simulation tool developed at the University of Applied Science of Southern Switzerland that was used for the simulation of a heating and cooling system which includes 32 borehole heat exchangers under an industrial building in Wollerau, Switzerland. The tool was calibrated using the measured heat balance of the building. The electrical energy of the circulation pumps was also taken into account and thus the global efficiency of the system was estimated. The simulation tool is documented. The thermal performance of the system is analysed and problems related to system sizing are discussed. The influence of the main system parameters are quantified and recommendations for system integration and sizing are made. Rules of thumb for the design of systems providing cooling are formulated.

  13. Survey of ion-acoustic-instability particle simulations and relevance to laser-fusion thermal-transport inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    Ion acoustic turbulence is examined as one mechanism which could contribute to the inhibition of electron thermal transport which has been inferred from many laser-plasma experiments. The behavior of the ion acoustic instability is discussed from the viewpoint of the literature of 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Simulation techniques, limitations, and reported saturation mechanisms and levels are discussed. A scaling law for the effective collision frequency ν* can be fit to several workers' results to within an order-of-magnitude. The inferred ν* is shown to be 1-2 orders-of-magnitude too small to account for the transport inhibition seen in Nd-laser-produced plasmas. Several differences between the simulation conditions and laser-produced plasma conditions are noted

  14. Simulated juvenile salmon growth and phenology respond to altered thermal regimes and stream network shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context. Thermally diverse habitats may afford fish protection from climate change by providing opportunities to behaviorally optimize growing conditions. However, it is unclear what role the spatial properties of river networks will play in determining risk. Objectives. We hypot...

  15. Load sharing with a local thermal network fed by a microcogenerator: Thermo-economic optimization by means of dynamic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angrisani, Giovanni; Canelli, Michele; Rosato, Antonio; Roselli, Carlo; Sasso, Maurizio; Sibilio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The cogeneration is the combined production of electric and/or mechanical and thermal energy starting by a single energy source; in particular in this paper the analysis will be focused on a cogeneration system with electric power lower than 15 kW (micro-cogeneration). The paper analyzes a system consisting of a natural gas-fired micro-cogeneration unit (MCHP), a heat storage and a peak boiler. The system provides thermal and electric energy to two end-users, the former is a tertiary building (office), where the generation system is located, and the latter is a residential building connected to the former through a district heating micro-grid. In order to analyze the influence of climatic conditions, two different geographical locations in Italy (Benevento and Milano) are considered, that are also characterized by different natural gas and electricity tariffs. Particular attention is paid to the choice of the users, in order to obtain more stable and continuous electric and thermal loads (load sharing approach) and to increase the operating hours per year of the MCHP unit. The operation of the MCHP is governed by a control system, aimed to optimize a thermo-economic objective function. The models representing the components, the thermo-economic objective function and the buildings have been implemented in a widely used commercial software for building simulations. The models are calibrated and validated through data obtained from experimental tests carried out in the laboratory of the University of Sannio (Benevento). The results of the simulations highlight the potential benefits of the thermal load sharing approach. In particular, this study shows that an MCHP unit connected by means of a thermal micro-grid to different users in “load sharing mode” can obtain a high number of operating hours as well as significant energy (Primary Energy Saving) and environmental (avoided CO 2 equivalent emissions) benefits with respect to an appropriate reference system

  16. Numerical simulation of near surface rail cracks subject to thermal contact stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fletcher, D.I.

    2014-01-01

    Boundary element modelling was conducted to investigate rail cracks subject to combined thermal and contact loading such as occurs in 'stud' or 'squat type' defects in which white etching layer lies above shallow cracks formed without evidence of plastic flow. An embedded crack at 0.5. mm below the rail surface was modelled, revealing a thermal mechanism of crack opening. Stress intensity values for a range of contact temperatures were calculated. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Integration of a Multizone Airflow Model into a Thermal simulation Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Sørensen, Karl Grau; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    An existing computer model for dynamic hygrothermal analysis of buildings has been extended with a multizone airflow model based on loop equations to account for the coupled thermal and airflow in natural and hybrid ventilated buildings.......An existing computer model for dynamic hygrothermal analysis of buildings has been extended with a multizone airflow model based on loop equations to account for the coupled thermal and airflow in natural and hybrid ventilated buildings....

  18. A 2-D FEM thermal model to simulate water flow in a porous media: Campi Flegrei caldera case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Romano

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic and geothermal aspects both exist in many geologically young areas. In these areas the heat transfer process is of fundamental importance, so that the thermal and fluid-dynamic processes characterizing a viscous fluid in a porous medium are very important to understand the complex dynamics of the these areas. The Campi Flegrei caldera, located west of the city of Naples, within the central-southern sector of the large graben of Campanian plain, is a region where both volcanic and geothermal phenomena are present. The upper part of the geothermal system can be considered roughly as a succession of volcanic porous material (tuff saturated by a mixture formed mainly by water and carbon dioxide. We have implemented a finite elements approach in transient conditions to simulate water flow in a 2-D porous medium to model the changes of temperature in the geothermal system due to magmatic fluid inflow, accounting for a transient phase, not considered in the analytical solutions and fluid compressibility. The thermal model is described by means of conductive/convective equations, in which we propose a thermal source represented by a parabolic shape function to better simulate an increase of temperature in the central part (magma chamber of a box, simulating the Campi Flegrei caldera and using more recent evaluations, from literature, for the medium's parameters (specific heat capacity, density, thermal conductivity, permeability. A best-fit velocity for the permeant is evaluated by comparing the simulated temperatures with those measured in wells drilled by Agip (Italian Oil Agency in the 1980s in the framework of geothermal exploration. A few tens of days are enough to reach the thermal steady state, showing the quick response of the system to heat injection. The increase in the pressure due to the heat transport is then used to compute ground deformation, in particular the vertical displacements characteristics of the Campi Flegrei caldera

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of electron thermalization in scintillator materials: Implications for scintillator nonproportionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Micah P.; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2017-12-01

    The lack of reliable quantitative estimates of the length and time scales associated with hot electron thermalization after a gamma-ray induced energy cascade obscures the interplay of various microscopic processes controlling scintillator performance and hampers the search for improved detector materials. We apply a detailed microscopic kinetic Monte Carlo model of the creation and subsequent thermalization of hot electrons produced by gamma irradiation of six important scintillating crystals to determine the spatial extent of the cloud of excitations produced by gamma rays and the time required for the cloud to thermalize with the host lattice. The main ingredients of the model are ensembles of microscopic track structures produced upon gamma excitation (including the energy distribution of the excited carriers), numerical estimates of electron-phonon scattering rates, and a calculated particle dispersion to relate the speed and energy of excited carriers. All these ingredients are based on first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon band structures of the materials. The details of the Monte Carlo model are presented along with the results for thermalization time and distance distributions. These results are discussed in light of previous work. It is found that among the studied materials, calculated thermalization distances are positively correlated with measured nonproportionality. In the important class of halide scintillators, the particle dispersion is found to be more influential than the largest phonon energy in determining the thermalization distance.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of electron thermalization in scintillator materials: Implications for scintillator nonproportionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prange, Micah P. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Xie, YuLong [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Campbell, Luke W. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Gao, Fei [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; Kerisit, Sebastien [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA

    2017-12-21

    The lack of reliable quantitative estimates of the length and time scales associated with hot electron thermalization after a gamma-ray induced energy cascade obscures the interplay of various microscopic processes controlling scintillator performance and hampers the search for improved detector materials. We apply a detailed microscopic kinetic Monte Carlo model of the creation and subsequent thermalization of hot electrons produced by gamma irradiation of six important scintillating crystals to determine the spatial extent of the cloud of excitations produced by gamma rays and the time required for the cloud to thermalize with the host lattice. The main ingredients of the model are ensembles of microscopic track structures produced upon gamma excitation (including the energy distribution of the excited carriers), numerical estimates of electron-phonon scattering rates, and a calculated particle dispersion to relate the speed and energy of excited carriers. All these ingredients are based on first-principles density functional theory calculations of the electronic and phonon band structures of the materials. Details of the Monte Carlo model are presented along with results for thermalization time and distance distributions. These results are discussed in light of previous work. It is found that among the studied materials, calculated thermalization distances are positively correlated with measured nonproportionality. In the important class of halide scintillators, the particle dispersion is found to be more influential than the largest phonon energy in determining the thermalization distance.

  1. Construction of a rapid simulation design tool for thermal responses to laser-induced feature patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2017-11-01

    There are many emerging manufacturing processes whereby surface structures are processed by spatially laser patterning of an entire feature at a time, as opposed to rastering a small beam. It is important to ascertain and ideally control the induced thermal fields underneath the pattern. This paper develops a computational framework to rapidly evaluate the induced thermal fields due to application of a laser on the surface. The aggregate thermal fields are efficiently computed by superposing individual "beamlet" heat-kernel solutions, based on Green's functions, to form complex surface patterns. The utility of the approach is that laser-process designers can efficiently compute the results of selecting various system parameters, such as spatially-variable laser intensity within a pattern. This allows one to rapidly compute system parameter studies needed in the manufacturing of new products. Included are: A computational framework to compute the time-transient thermal response from a spatio-temporally non-uniform laser beam in an arbitrary spatial pattern and An analysis of how the results can be used to track the evolution of the thermal gradients and their correlation to thermal stresses. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the technique. The utility of the approach is that an analyst can efficiently ascertain a large number of laser-input scenarios without resorting to computationally-intensive numerical procedures, such the Finite Element Method.

  2. The modeling and simulation of thermal based modified solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC for grid-connected systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayetül Gelen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a thermal based modified dynamic model of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC for grid-connected systems. The proposed fuel cell model involves ohmic, activation and concentration voltage losses, thermal dynamics, methanol reformer, fuel utilization factor and power limiting module. A power conditioning unit (PCU, which consists of a DC-DC boost converter and a DC-AC voltage-source inverter (VSI, their controller, transformer and filter, is designed for grid-connected systems. The voltage-source inverter with six Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT switches inverts the DC voltage that comes from the converter into a sinusoidal voltage synchronized with the grid. The simulations and modeling of the system are developed on Matlab/Simulink environment. The performance of SOFC with converter is examined under step and random load conditions. The simulation results show that the designed boost converter for the proposed thermal based modified SOFC model has fairly followed different DC load variations. Finally, the AC bus of 400 Volt and 50 Hz is connected to a single-machine infinite bus (SMIB through a transmission line. The real and reactive power managements of the inverter are analyzed by an infinite bus system. Thus, the desired nominal values are properly obtained by means of the inverter controller.

  3. Investigating the Plasma-Assisted and Thermal Catalytic Dry Methane Reforming for Syngas Production: Process Design, Simulation and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Delikonstantis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing surplus of green electricity generated by renewable energy technologies has fueled research towards chemical industry electrification. By adapting power-to-chemical concepts, such as plasma-assisted processes, cheap resources could be converted into fuels and base chemicals. However, the feasibility of those electrified processes at large scale has not been investigated yet. Thus, the current work strives to compare, for first time in the literature, plasma-assisted production of syngas, from CH4 and CO2 (dry methane reforming, with thermal catalytic dry methane reforming. Specifically, both processes are conceptually designed to deliver syngas suitable for methanol synthesis (H2/CO ≥ 2 in mole. The processes are simulated in the Aspen Plus process simulator where different process steps are investigated. Heat integration and equipment cost estimation are performed for the most promising process flow diagrams. Collectively, plasma-assisted dry methane reforming integrated with combined steam/CO2 methane reforming is an effective way to deliver syngas for methanol production. It is more sustainable than combined thermal catalytic dry methane reforming with steam methane reforming, which has also been proposed for syngas production of H2/CO ≥ 2; in the former process, 40% more CO2 is captured, while 38% less H2O is consumed per mol of syngas. Furthermore, the plasma-assisted process is less complex than the thermal catalytic one; it requires higher amount of utilities, but comparable capital investment.

  4. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S. [B& W Nuclear Technologies, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  5. Evaluating the performance of coupled snow-soil models in SURFEXv8 to simulate the permafrost thermal regime at a high Arctic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrere, Mathieu; Domine, Florent; Decharme, Bertrand; Morin, Samuel; Vionnet, Vincent; Lafaysse, Matthieu

    2017-09-01

    Climate change projections still suffer from a limited representation of the permafrost-carbon feedback. Predicting the response of permafrost temperature to climate change requires accurate simulations of Arctic snow and soil properties. This study assesses the capacity of the coupled land surface and snow models ISBA-Crocus and ISBA-ES to simulate snow and soil properties at Bylot Island, a high Arctic site. Field measurements complemented with ERA-Interim reanalyses were used to drive the models and to evaluate simulation outputs. Snow height, density, temperature, thermal conductivity and thermal insulance are examined to determine the critical variables involved in the soil and snow thermal regime. Simulated soil properties are compared to measurements of thermal conductivity, temperature and water content. The simulated snow density profiles are unrealistic, which is most likely caused by the lack of representation in snow models of the upward water vapor fluxes generated by the strong temperature gradients within the snowpack. The resulting vertical profiles of thermal conductivity are inverted compared to observations, with high simulated values at the bottom of the snowpack. Still, ISBA-Crocus manages to successfully simulate the soil temperature in winter. Results are satisfactory in summer, but the temperature of the top soil could be better reproduced by adequately representing surface organic layers, i.e., mosses and litter, and in particular their water retention capacity. Transition periods (soil freezing and thawing) are the least well reproduced because the high basal snow thermal conductivity induces an excessively rapid heat transfer between the soil and the snow in simulations. Hence, global climate models should carefully consider Arctic snow thermal properties, and especially the thermal conductivity of the basal snow layer, to perform accurate predictions of the permafrost evolution under climate change.

  6. Thermal energy creation and transport and X-ray/EUV emission in a thermodynamic MHD CME simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K.; Mikic, Z.; Torok, T.; Linker, J.; Murphy, N. A.

    2017-12-01

    We model a CME using the PSI 3D numerical MHD code that includes coronal heating, thermal conduction and radiative cooling in the energy equation. The magnetic flux distribution at 1 Rs is produced by a localized subsurface dipole superimposed on a global dipole field, mimicking the presence of an active region within the global corona. We introduce transverse electric fields near the neutral line in the active region to form a flux rope, then a converging flow is imposed that causes the eruption. We follow the formation and evolution of the current sheet and find that instabilities set in soon after the reconnection commences. We simulate XRT and AIA EUV emission and find that the instabilities manifest as bright features emanating from the reconnection region. We examine the quantities responsible for plasma heating and cooling during the eruption, including thermal conduction, radiation, adiabatic compression and expansion, coronal heating and ohmic heating due to dissipation of currents. We find that the adiabatic compression plays an important role in heating the plasma around the current sheet, especially in the later stages of the eruption when the instabilities are present. Thermal conduction also plays an important role in the transport of thermal energy away from the current sheet region throughout the reconnection process.

  7. Simulation of thermal hydraulics accidental transients. Evaluation of MAAP5.02 versus CATHAREv2.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittan, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP) is a deterministic code developed by EPRI that can simulate the response of light water moderated nuclear power plants during accidental transients for Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) applications. It can as well simulate severe accident sequences, including actions taken as part of the Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs). EPRI indicates that the latest version of the code - MAAP5.02 - benefits from major enhancements, in particular concerning the thermal hydraulics in the primary side. This code revision takes into account momentum equations allowing, to model thermal hydraulics transient with a good accuracy. EDF is interested in using MAAP5.02 as an incidental/accidental transient’s simulation tool for the management of crises on its 58 PWRs. In particular, it could evaluate the time before core uncovers, core melting and fission product releases. In order to assess MAAP5.02 ability to simulate accidental transients prior to core uncovery, EDF has compared MAAP5.02 results to the code used as a reference to simulate thermal hydraulics transients in France: CATHARE (that stands for Code for Analysis of Thermal hydraulics during an Accident of Reactor and safety Evaluation). CATHARE is a system code for PWR safety analysis, accident management, definition of plant operating procedures and for research and development. It is also used to quantify conservative analysis margins and for licensing. It is based on a 2-fluid 6-equation model. The version of CATHARE used for the comparison is CATHAREv2.5 – 2 (one of the latest CATHARE versions). Several transient analyses on LOCA and non LOCA transients have been performed by EDF. Transients at full power conditions as well as in shutdown states have been considered. Here are some of EDF analyzed transients: LOCA (small break on cold leg), LOOP (Loss Of Offsite Power), SGTR (Steam Generator Tube Rupture). The comparisons performed tend to prove that the

  8. CATHARE2 V1.4 capability to simulate the performance of isolation condenser systems with thermal valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meloni, P.

    2001-01-01

    ENEA (Italy) in co-operation with CEA (France) has carried out an R and D activity aimed at increasing the reliability of Decay Heat Removal (DHR) passive systems that implement in-pool heat exchangers. The main outcome reached was the definition of a device, called Thermal Valve (TV), able to avoid the installation of mechanical valve on the primary circuit, thus reducing thermalmechanical constrains and thermal-hydraulic instabilities. This paper presents a preliminary assessment performed with CATHARE of this innovative device. In the first part the code capability to simulate in-pool heat exchangers is verified against experimental data of the PANDA facility, that are available within the frame of the ISP 42. In the second part a CATHARE calculation showing the performances of the PANDA passive condenser with TV (start-up and shutdown) is described.(author)

  9. Use cases for integrated electrical and thermal energy systems operation and control with a view on simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehrke, Oliver; Richert, Thibaut Pierre

    2017-01-01

    There is a general lack of knowledge regarding energy systems coupling (also known as multi-energy systems (MES), multi-domain or integrated energy systems) and few well-defined use cases (UCs) that properly describe their operation. Energy systems coupling increases complexity due to additional...... operational, physical, temporal and spatial constraints making it challenging for analysis and simulation but also for designing operational strategies (e.g. control). In this paper, we present UCs based on a holistic validation and testing methodology in the context of integrated electro-thermal systems...... integrated electro-thermal systems with a focus on their capabilities and limitations with respect to the analysis of system/network operation and control impact aspects. Control strategies of domains-linking components such as a heat pump can be various and challenging since actions taken in one domain...

  10. Computer simulation of thermal and fluid systems for MIUS integration and subsystems test /MIST/ laboratory. [Modular Integrated Utility System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Liu, D. K.; Nunnery, W. J., Jr.; Brandli, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the SINDA (systems improved numerical differencing analyzer) computer program to simulate the operation of the NASA/JSC MIUS integration and subsystems test (MIST) laboratory. The MIST laboratory is designed to test the integration capability of the following subsystems of a modular integrated utility system (MIUS): (1) electric power generation, (2) space heating and cooling, (3) solid waste disposal, (4) potable water supply, and (5) waste water treatment. The SINDA/MIST computer model is designed to simulate the response of these subsystems to externally impressed loads. The computer model determines the amount of recovered waste heat from the prime mover exhaust, water jacket and oil/aftercooler and from the incinerator. This recovered waste heat is used in the model to heat potable water, for space heating, absorption air conditioning, waste water sterilization, and to provide for thermal storage. The details of the thermal and fluid simulation of MIST including the system configuration, modes of operation modeled, SINDA model characteristics and the results of several analyses are described.

  11. CFD simulations of thermal comfort in naturally ventilated primary school classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Žana Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of Thermal Comfort is to specify the combinations of indoor space environment and personal factors that will produce thermal environment conditions acceptable to 80% or more of the occupants within a space. Naturally ventilated indoors has a very complex air movement, which depends on numerous variables such as: outdoor interaction, intensity of infiltration, the number of openings, the thermal inertia of walls, occupant behaviors, etc. The most important mechanism for naturally ventilated indoors is the intensity of infiltration and thermal buoyancy mechanism. In this study the objective was to determine indicators of thermal comfort for children, by the CFD model based on experimental measurements with modification on turbulent and radiant heat transfer mathematical model. The case study was selected on school children aged 8 and 9 years in primary school „France Prešern“, Belgrade. The purpose was to evaluate the relationships between the indoor environment and the subjective responses. Also there was analysis of infiltration and stack effect based on meterological data on site. The main parameters that were investigated are: operative temperature, radiant temperature, concentration of CO2 and air velocity. The new correction of turbulence and radiative heat transfer models has been validated by comparison with experimental data using additional statistical indicators. It was found that both turbulence model correct and the new radiative model of nontransparent media have a significant influence on CFD data set accuracy.

  12. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  13. Mapping Evapotranspiration in the Sacramento San Joaquin Delta using simulated ECOSTRESS Thermal Data: Validation and Inter-comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A.; Jin, Y.; He, R.; Hulley, G.; Fisher, J.; Lee, C. M.; Rivera, G.; Hook, S. J.; Medellin-Azuara, J.; Kent, E. R.; Paw U, K. T.; Gao, F.; Lund, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    Irrigation accounts for 80% of human freshwater consumption, and most of it return to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration (ET). In California, where our water resources are limited and heavily utilized, the need for a cost-effective, timely, and consistent spatial estimate of crop ET, from the farm to watershed level, is becoming increasingly important. The ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS), to be launched in mid-2018, will provide the most detailed and accurate temperature measurements ever acquired from space and thus unique opportunities for estimating ET at the farm scale. We simulated the ECOSTRESS thermal data at a 70 m resolution using VIIRS thermal observations and ASTER emissivity data in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta region for the 2016 water year. Three remote sensing based ET methods were then applied to estimate ET using simulated ECOSTRESS data and optical data from Landsat and VIIRS, including Priestley-Taylor approaches developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) and by UC Davis (PT-UCD), and the Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model. We compared these three sets of ET estimates with field measurements at sixteen sites over five crop types (Alfalfa, Corn, Pasture, Tomato, and Beardless Wheat). Good agreement was found between satellite-based estimates and field measurements. Our results demonstrate that thermal data from the upcoming ECOSTRESS mission will reduce the uncertainty in ET estimates. A continuous monitoring of the dynamics and spatial heterogeneity of consumptive water use at a field scale will help prepare and inform to adaptively manage water, canopy, and planting density to maximize yield with least amount of water.

  14. Implementation of mathematical model of thermal behavior of electronic components for lifetime estimation based on multi-level simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frivaldsky Michal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the paper is the proposal of multi-level simulation, suited for the evaluation of the lifetime of critical electronic devices (electrolytic capacitors. The aim of this issue is to imagine about the expected operation of complex and expensive power electronic systems, when the failure of the most critical component occurs. For that reason, various operational conditions and various physical influences must be considered (e.g. mechanical, humidity, electrical, heat stress, where nonlinearities are naturally introduced. Verification of the proposal is given, whereby the life-time estimation of an electrolytic capacitor operated in a DC-DC converter during various operational conditions is shown. At this point electrical and heat stress is considered for lifetime influence. First, the current state in the field of mathematical modeling of the lifetime for electrolytic capacitors, considering main phenomena is introduced. Next, individual sub-models for multi-level simulation purposes are developed, including a thermal simulation model and electrical simulation model. Several complexities of individual models are mutually compared in order to evaluate their accuracy and suitability for further use. Proper simulation tools have been mutually linked and data transfer was secured, in order to have the possibility of investigation of a lifetime depend on the changes of various variables.

  15. Thermal simulations of the STIX instrument for ESA Solar Orbiter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Agata; Severyn, Karol; Grassmann, Kamil; Orleańskii, Piotr; Skup, Konrad R.; Arnold, Nicolas; Gröbelbauer, Hans-Peter; Hurford, Gordon J.; Krucker, Samuel; Bauer, Svend-Marian; Mann, Gottfied; Önel, Hakan; Bernet, Adeline; Blecha, Luc; Grimm, Oliver; Limousin, Olivier; Martignac, Jerome; Meuris, Aline

    2013-07-01

    The ESA Solar Orbiter mission, planned to be launched in 2017, is going to study the Sun with ten different instruments including the Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays - STIX. The thermal environment on the elliptical orbit around the Sun - 0.28 AU at perihelion and 0.952 AU at aphelion - is extreme, where at one point of the orbit is very hot, while on another very cold. That makes the requirements for the heat fluxes exchanged between each instrument and the spacecraft, as well as between the instrument - subsystems, very restrictive. Here the authors discuss the thermal design with respect to the defined requirements and present the results of the thermal analyses performed with ESATAN TMS software.

  16. First principles calculations of thermal conductivity with out of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    The prediction of the thermal properties of solids and liquids is central to numerous problems in condensed matter physics and materials science, including the study of thermal management of opto-electronic and energy conversion devices. We present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at non equilibrium conditions. Our formulation is based on a generalization of the approach to equilibrium technique, using sinusoidal temperature gradients, and it only requires calculations of first principles trajectories and atomic forces. We discuss results and computational requirements for a representative, simple oxide, MgO, and compare with experiments and data obtained with classical potentials. This work was supported by MICCoM as part of the Computational Materials Science Program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science , Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division under Grant DOE/BES 5J-30.

  17. Geant4 and MCNPX simulations of thermal neutron detection with planar silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardiola, C; Fleta, C; Quirion, D; Lozano, M [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, (IMB-CNM), CSIC, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Amgarou, K [Departamento de FIsica, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); GarcIa, F, E-mail: Consuelo.Guardiola@imb-cnm.csic.es [Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-09-15

    We used Geant4 and MCNPX codes to evaluate the detection efficiency of planar silicon detectors coupled to different Boron-based converters with varied compositions and thicknesses that detect thermal neutrons via the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction. Few studies about the thermal neutron transport in Geant4 have been reported so far and it is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore its discrepancies with MCNPX in this neutron energy range. In the thermal energy range, Geant4 shows high discrepancies with MCNPX giving a maximum efficiency of about 3.3% in the {sup 10}B case whereas that obtained with MCNPX was 5%. Disagreements obtained between both codes in this energy range are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Thermal magnetic resonance: physics considerations and electromagnetic field simulations up to 23.5 Tesla (1GHz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Lukas; Oezerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; van de Lindt, Tessa; Periquito, Joao; Ji, Yiyi; Ghadjar, Pirus; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-09-22

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common and most aggressive malign brain tumor. The 5-year survival rate after tumor resection and adjuvant chemoradiation is only 10 %, with almost all recurrences occurring in the initially treated site. Attempts to improve local control using a higher radiation dose were not successful so that alternative additive treatments are urgently needed. Given the strong rationale for hyperthermia as part of a multimodal treatment for patients with glioblastoma, non-invasive radio frequency (RF) hyperthermia might significantly improve treatment results. A non-invasive applicator was constructed utilizing the magnetic resonance (MR) spin excitation frequency for controlled RF hyperthermia and MR imaging in an integrated system, which we refer to as thermal MR. Applicator designs at RF frequencies 300 MHz, 500 MHz and 1GHz were investigated and examined for absolute applicable thermal dose and temperature hotspot size. Electromagnetic field (EMF) and temperature simulations were performed in human voxel models. RF heating experiments were conducted at 300 MHz and 500 MHz to characterize the applicator performance and validate the simulations. The feasibility of thermal MR was demonstrated at 7.0 T. The temperature could be increased by ~11 °C in 3 min in the center of a head sized phantom. Modification of the RF phases allowed steering of a temperature hotspot to a deliberately selected location. RF heating was monitored using the integrated system for MR thermometry and high spatial resolution MRI. EMF and thermal simulations demonstrated that local RF hyperthermia using the integrated system is feasible to reach a maximum temperature in the center of the human brain of 46.8 °C after 3 min of RF heating while surface temperatures stayed below 41 °C. Using higher RF frequencies reduces the size of the temperature hotspot significantly. The opportunities and capabilities of thermal magnetic resonance for RF hyperthermia

  19. Basic study of thermal and mechanical properties of high burnup MOX fuel with simulated burnup fuel. 3. Co-operative new technology research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Uno, Masayoshi; Kurosaki, Ken; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Namekawa, Takashi

    2001-03-01

    For the purpose of establishment of evaluation method of thermal and mechanical properties of high burnup uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel of fast reactor, basic study on both simulated burnup fuel technique and computer simulation was carried out. The following results were obtained in this study. Simulated burnup MOX fuel, that is urania fuel added ceria simulating plutonia and niobium oxide or zirconia simulating soluble fission products (FP), was synthesized. It is suggested that thermal conductivity of high burnup MOX fuel can be derived from the thermal conductivity of fuel matrix and the concentration of the soluble FP. It is also suggested that elastic constants and Vickers hardness decreases with the increase of the concentration of soluble FP. As the gray oxide phase with perovskite type structure, which is major FP precipitation, BaUO 3 , BaZrO 3 , and BaCeO 3 were chosen and the correlations between thermal and mechanical properties were investigated. It is shown that the thermal conductivity and the correlations of the mechanical properties of BaUO 3 are resemble to those of quartz glass. The molecular dynamics calculations show the capability of simulation of heat capacity and thermal conductivity of MOX fuel, using basic properties, such as lattice parameters, thermal expansion coefficients and compressibilities, of UO 2 and PuO 2 . Obtained results in this study suggests that the molecular dynamics simulation technique is usefulness and applicable to estimate the physico-chemical properties of MOX fuel. Evaluation of thermal conductivity degradation effect of FP precipitation in high burnup MOX fuel with finite element method, exhibited that the effect of FP precipitation was about a figure lower than that of soluble FP. (author)

  20. High-precision numerical simulation with autoadaptative grid technique in nonlinear thermal diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambarel, A.; Pumborios, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that many engineering problems concern the determination of a steady state solution in the case with strong thermal gradients, and results obtained using the finite-element technique are sometimes inaccurate, particularly for nonlinear problems with unadapted meshes. Building on previous results in linear problems, we propose an autoadaptive technique for nonlinear cases that uses quasi-Newtonian iterations to reevaluate an interpolation error estimation. The authors perfected an automatic refinement technique to solve the nonlinear thermal problem of temperature calculus in a cast-iron cylinder head of a diesel engine

  1. Engineering Performance Simulations in Architectural Design Conception : Atrium in Shenyang: a case study on thermal mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turrin, M.; Chatzikonstantinou, I.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Sariyildiz, I.S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper tackles the integration of engineering performance simulations in the conceptual phase of architectural design, with specific focus on parametric design processes. A general framework is exemplified, in which the use of performance simulations and the learning process of the designer are

  2. Performance and Thermal Stability of a Polyaromatic Hydrocarbon in a Simulated Concentrating Solar Power Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna McFarlane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because polyaromatic hydrocarbons show high thermal stability, an example of these compounds, phenylnaphthalene, was tested for solar thermal-power applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 ℃ indicated that the fluid isomerized and degraded at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. This would indicate that the internal channels of cooler components of trough solar electric generating systems, such as the waste heat rejection exchanger, may become coated or clogged affecting loop performance. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene, without addition of stabilizers, does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades to be used in a loop at temperatures significantly greater than the current 400 ℃ maximum for organic fluids. Similar degradation pathways may occur with other organic materials. The performance of a concentrating solar loop using high temperature fluids was modeled based on the National Renewable Laboratory Solar Advisory Model. It was determined that a solar-to-electricity efficiency of up to 30% and a capacity factor of 60% could be achieved using a high efficiency collector and 12 h thermal energy storage when run at a field outlet temperature of 550 ℃.

  3. Indoor simulation and testing of photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) air collectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solanki, S.C.; Dubey, Swapnil; Tiwari, A.

    2009-01-01

    An indoor standard test procedure has been developed for thermal and electrical testing of PV/T collectors connected in series. For this, a PV/T solar air heater has been designed, fabricated and its performance over different operating parameters were studied. Based on the energy balance equations,

  4. Thermal Conditions in a Simulated Office Environment with Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conditions in a two person office room were measured with four air conditioning systems: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...

  5. Three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled simulation of MSR in transient state condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Zhang, Daling; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Wu, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled transient analysis code for MSR. • Investigated the neutron distribution and thermal-hydraulic characters of the core under transient condition. • Analyzed three different transient conditions of inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. - Abstract: MSR (molten salt reactor) use liquid molten salt as coolant and fuel solvent, which was the only one liquid reactor of six Generation IV reactor types. As a liquid reactor the physical property of reactor was significantly influenced by fuel salt flow and the conventional analysis methods applied in solid fuel reactors are not applicable for this type of reactors. The present work developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled code investigated the neutronics and thermo-hydraulics characteristics of the core in transient condition based on neutron diffusion theory and numerical heat transfer. The code consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes and six group balance equations for delayed neutron precursors. The code was separately validated by neutron benchmark and flow and heat transfer benchmark. Three different transient conditions was analyzed with inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. The results provide some valuable information in design and research this kind of reactor

  6. Simulation of Thermal, Neutronic and Radiation Characteristics in Spent Nuclear Fuel and Radwaste Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Bartkus, G.

    1999-01-01

    The overview of the activities in the Division of Thermo hydro-mechanics related with the assessment of thermal, neutronic and radiation characteristics in spent nuclear fuel and radwaste facilities are performed. Also some new data about radiation characteristics of the RBMK-1500 spent nuclear fuel are presented. (author)

  7. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  8. Thermal decomposition of solder flux activators under simulated wave soldering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2017-01-01

    -base titration method as a function of temperature, time of exposure and the substrate material used. Findings: The study shows that there is a possibility of anhydride-like species formation during the thermal treatment of fluxes containing weak organic acids (WOAs) as activators (succinic and DL...

  9. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, R.; Quintana, F.; Márquez Turiello, R.; Furnari, J.C.; Pimenta Mourão, R.

    2013-01-01

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author) [es

  10. Thermoregulation and heat exchange in a nonuniform thermal environment during simulated extended EVA. Extravehicular activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscheyev, V. S.; Leon, G. R.; Hubel, A.; Nelson, E. D.; Tranchida, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonuniform heating and cooling of the body, a possibility during extended duration extravehicular activities (EVA), was studied by means of a specially designed water circulating garment that independently heated or cooled the right and left sides of the body. The purpose was to assess whether there was a generalized reaction on the finger in extreme contradictory temperatures on the body surface, as a potential heat status controller. METHOD: Eight subjects, six men and two women, were studied while wearing a sagittally divided experimental garment with hands exposed in the following conditions: Stage 1 baseline--total body garment inlet water temperature at 33 degrees C; Stage 2--left side inlet water temperature heated to 45 degrees C; right side cooled to 8 degrees C; Stage 3--left side inlet water temperature cooled to 8 degrees C, right side heated to 45 degrees C. RESULTS: Temperatures on each side of the body surface as well as ear canal temperature (Tec) showed statistically significant Stage x Side interactions, demonstrating responsiveness to the thermal manipulations. Right and left finger temperatures (Tfing) were not significantly different across stages; their dynamic across time was similar. Rectal temperature (Tre) was not reactive to prevailing cold on the body surface, and therefore not informative. Subjective perception of heat and cold on the left and right sides of the body was consistent with actual temperature manipulations. CONCLUSIONS: Tec and Tre estimates of internal temperature do not provide accurate data for evaluating overall thermal status in nonuniform thermal conditions on the body surface. The use of Tfing has significant potential in providing more accurate information on thermal status and as a feedback method for more precise thermal regulation of the astronaut within the EVA space suit.

  11. Simulation and Experimental Study on Thermal Conductivity of [EMIM][DEP] + H_2 O + SWCNTs Nanofluids as a New Working Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang; Zhao, Zongchang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Tianyu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were dispersed into ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethylphosphate ([EMIM][DEP]), and its aqueous solution [EMIM][DEP](1) + H2O(2) to enhance the thermal conductivity of base liquids, which will be the promising working pairs for absorption heat pumps and refrigerators. The enhancement effects on thermal conductivity were studied by experiment and molecular dynamic simulation (MD) methods. The thermal conductivities of [EMIM][DEP] + SWCNTs (INF) and [EMIM][DEP](1) + H2O(2) + SWCNT(SNF) both with SWCNT mass fraction of 0.5, 1, and 2 (wt%) were measured by transient hot-wire method. The results indicate that the enhancement ratio of thermal conductivity of INF, and SNF can approach 1.30 when SWCNT is 2 (wt%). Moreover, SWCNTs has a higher enhancement ratio than multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Density and thermal conductivity of [EMIM][DEP], [EMIM][DEP](1) + H2O(2), INF and SNF systems, together with self-diffusion coefficients of [EMIM]+, [DEP]-, [EMIM][DEP] and water in solution [EMIM][DEP](1) + H2O(2), were investigated by MD simulations. The results indicate that the maximum relative error between the simulated and experimental densities is about 2 %, and the simulated self-diffusion coefficient of [EMIM][DEP] is in the order of magnitude of 10^{-11} m2\\cdot s^{-1}. The average relative deviation for the simulated thermal conductivity of [EMIM][DEP](1) + H2O(2), INF and SNF from experimental ones are 23.57 %, 5 %, and 5 %, respectively. In addition, the contributions of kinetic energy, potential energy, and virial and partial enthalpy terms to thermal conductivity were also calculated. The results indicate that virial term's contribution to thermal conductivity is the maximum, which accounts for 75 % to 80 % of total thermal conductivity.

  12. Development of a Reduced-Order Three-Dimensional Flow Model for Thermal Mixing and Stratification Simulation during Reactor Transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Rui

    2017-09-03

    Mixing, thermal-stratification, and mass transport phenomena in large pools or enclosures play major roles for the safety of reactor systems. Depending on the fidelity requirement and computational resources, various modeling methods, from the 0-D perfect mixing model to 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models, are available. Each is associated with its own advantages and shortcomings. It is very desirable to develop an advanced and efficient thermal mixing and stratification modeling capability embedded in a modern system analysis code to improve the accuracy of reactor safety analyses and to reduce modeling uncertainties. An advanced system analysis tool, SAM, is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory for advanced non-LWR reactor safety analysis. While SAM is being developed as a system-level modeling and simulation tool, a reduced-order three-dimensional module is under development to model the multi-dimensional flow and thermal mixing and stratification in large enclosures of reactor systems. This paper provides an overview of the three-dimensional finite element flow model in SAM, including the governing equations, stabilization scheme, and solution methods. Additionally, several verification and validation tests are presented, including lid-driven cavity flow, natural convection inside a cavity, laminar flow in a channel of parallel plates. Based on the comparisons with the analytical solutions and experimental results, it is demonstrated that the developed 3-D fluid model can perform very well for a wide range of flow problems.

  13. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Influence Factors Analysis of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Based on Coupled Electrical-Thermal Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J. J.; Chang, F.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Sun, J. R.; Xiao, Y.

    2017-10-01

    According to the mathematical analysis model constructed on the basis of energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, and accompany with the simplified calculation strategy of composite resin pyrolysis degree dependent electrical conductivity, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, to elucidate the effects of lighting current waveform parameters and thermal/electrical properties of composite laminate on the extent of ablation damage. Simulated predictions agree well with the composite lightning strike directed effect experimental data, illustrating the potential accuracy of the constructed model. The analytical results revealed that extent of composite lightning strike ablation damage can be characterized by action integral validly, there exist remarkable power function relationships between action integral and visual damage area, projected damage area, maximum damage depth and damage volume of ablation damage, and enhancing the electrical conductivity and specific heat of composite, ablation damage will be descended obviously, power function relationships also exist between electrical conductivity, specific heat and ablation damage, however, the impact of thermal conductivity on the extent of ablation damage is not notable. The conclusions obtained provide some guidance for composite anti-lightning strike structure-function integration design.

  14. Simulation of a process for the two-stage thermal conversion of biomass into the synthesis gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosov, V. F.; Lavrenov, V. A.; Zaichenko, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents results of simulation of a process for the two-stage thermal conversion of wood biomass into the synthesis gas. The first stage of process is pyrolysis of raw materials, the second stage is cracking of volatile pyrolysis products which blown through the char at a temperature of about 1000° C. Char is a porous biomass residue with carbon content about 90%. The simulation based on the results of experimental investigations of a pilot plant with capacity up to 50 kg of raw material per hour. The main result of simulation is estimation of an energy conversion efficiency of wood biomass into synthesis gas for three different operation modes. The first mode is conversion of biomass into fuel gas and char, and the char is not further used. The second mode is the same, but char used as fuel for producing heat for own demand of the process. The third mode includes gasification of char by means of water steam, aimed to obtaining an additional yield of synthesis gas. The simulation shown, that total efficiency of power plant was 17.1% in the first mode, 22.4% in the second mode and 22.6% in the third mode.

  15. G-189A analytical simulation of the integrated waste management-water system using radioisotopes for thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggi, J. V.; Loscutoff, A. V.; Barker, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical simulation of the RITE-Integrated Waste Management and Water Recovery System using radioisotopes for thermal energy was prepared for the NASA-Manned Space Flight Center (MSFC). The RITE system is the most advanced concept water-waste management system currently under development and has undergone extended duration testing. It has the capability of disposing of nearly all spacecraft wastes including feces and trash and of recovering water from usual waste water sources: urine, condensate, wash water, etc. All of the process heat normally used in the system is produced from low penalty radioisotope heat sources. The analytical simulation was developed with the G189A computer program. The objective of the simulation was to obtain an analytical simulation which can be used to (1) evaluate the current RITE system steady state and transient performance during normal operating conditions, and also during off normal operating conditions including failure modes; and (2) evaluate the effects of variations in component design parameters and vehicle interface parameters on system performance.

  16. The effects of pen partitions and thermal pig simulators on airflow in a livestock test room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, B.; Svidt, Kjeld; Zhang, G.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of pen partitions and heated simulated pigs on airflow in a slot ventilated test room and to evaluate computer fluid dynamics (CFD) as a tool to predict airflow in livestock rooms. To obtain two-dimensional flow in the occupied zone, four...... guiding plates were mounted beneath the ceiling in the test room. Experiments were carried out in three arrangements: (a) the room with guiding plates; (b) the room with guiding plates and eight heated pig simulators; and (c) the room with guiding plates, eight heated pig simulators and 0.8 m high...... partitions which divided the room into four equal-sized pens. The guiding plates beneath the ceiling were efficient in creating two-dimensional how in the occupied zone, but they increased the differences between measured and simulated air velocity close to the ceiling and close to the floor. Both...

  17. Multiphysics simulation of thermal phenomena in direct laser metal powder deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available presents on two dimensional multi-physics models to describe the physical mechanism of heat transfer, melting and solidification that take place during and post laser-powder interaction. The simulated transient temperature profile, the geometrical features...

  18. Simulation of Solar Assisted Absorption Cooling and Electricity Generation along with Thermal Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Faezeh Mosallat; Eric L. Bibeau; Tarek El Mekkawy

    2015-01-01

    Parabolic solar trough systems have seen limited deployments in cold northern climates as they are more suitable for electricity production in southern latitudes. A numerical dynamic model is developed to simulate troughs installed in cold climates and validated using a parabolic solar trough facility in Winnipeg. The model is developed in Simulink and will be utilized to simulate a trigeneration system for heating, cooling and electricity generation in remote northern co...

  19. Simulation of thermal behavior of nuclear fuel rod by electrically heated pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carajilescov, P.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of electrically heated rods for the simulation of nuclear fuel rods represents an universally adopted method by the nuclear industry to study thermalhydraulic problems. The present work represents the development of a method to obtain the time variation of the electric linear power necessary to simulate a given nuclear power transient in order to yield the same temperature and heat flux conditions in the surface of the electrical heater that would be obtained by the nuclear fuel rod. (Author) [pt

  20. A novel solar-assisted heat pump driven by photovoltaic/thermal collectors: Dynamic simulation and thermoeconomic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calise, Francesco; Dentice d'Accadia, Massimo; Figaj, Rafal Damian; Vanoli, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic simulation model and a thermo-economic analysis of a novel polygeneration system based on a solar-assisted heat pump and an adsorption chiller, both driven by PVT (photovoltaic/thermal) collectors. The aim of this work is to design and dynamically simulate a novel ultra-high efficient solar heating and cooling system. The overall plant layout is designed to supply electricity, space heating and cooling and domestic hot water for a small residential building. The system combines solar cooling, solar-assisted heat pump and photovoltaic/thermal collector technologies in a novel solar polygeneration system. In fact, the polygeneration system is based on a PVT solar field, coupled with a water-to-water electric heat pump or to an adsorption chiller. PVT collectors simultaneously produce electricity and thermal energy. During the winter, hot water produced by PVT collectors primarily supplies the evaporator of the heat pump, whereas in summer, solar energy supplies an adsorption chiller providing the required space cooling. All year long, solar thermal energy in excess is converted into DHW (domestic hot water). The system model was developed in TRNSYS environment. 1-year dynamic simulations are performed for different case studies in various weather conditions. The results are analysed on different time bases presenting energetic, environmental and economic performance data. Finally, a sensitivity analysis and a thermoeconomic optimization were performed, in order to determine the set of system design/control parameters that minimize the simple pay-back period. The results showed a total energy efficiency of the PVT of 49%, a heat pump yearly coefficient of performance for heating mode above 4 and a coefficient of performance of the adsorption chiller of 0.55. Finally, it is also concluded that system performance is highly sensitive to the PVT field area. The system is profitable when a capital investment subsidy of 50% is considered

  1. Thermal hydraulic and neutron kinetic simulation of the Angra 2 reactor using a RELAP5/PARCS coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Hamers, Adolfo R.; Pereira, Claubia; Rodrigues, Thiago D.A.; Mantecon, Javier G.; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: adolforomerohamers@hotmail.com, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: thiagodanielbh@gmail.com, E-mail: mantecon1987@gmail.com, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq), Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The computational advances observed in the last two decades have been provided direct impact on the researches related to nuclear simulations, which use several types of computer codes, including coupled between them, allowing representing with very accuracy the behavior of nuclear plants. Studies of complex scenarios in nuclear reactors have been improved by the use of thermal-hydraulic (TH) and neutron kinetics (NK) coupled codes. This technique consists in incorporating three-dimensional (3D) neutron modeling of the reactor core into codes, mainly to simulate transients that involve asymmetric core spatial power distributions and strong feedback effects between neutronics and reactor thermal-hydraulics. Therefore, this work presents preliminary results of TH RELAP5 and the NK PARCS calculations applied to model of the Angra 2 reactor. The WIMSD-5B code has been used to generate the macroscopic cross sections used in the NK code. The results obtained are satisfactory and represent important part of the development of this methodology. The next step is to couple the codes. (author)

  2. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining

  3. Improvements in Thermal Performance of Mango Hot-water Treatment Equipments: Data Analysis, Mathematical Modelling and Numerical-computational Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder M. Mendoza Orbegoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mango is one of the most popular and best paid tropical fruits in worldwide markets, its exportation is regulated within a phytosanitary quality control for killing the “fruit fly”. Thus, mangoes must be subject to hot-water treatment process that involves their immersion in hot water over a period of time. In this work, field measurements, analytical and simulation studies are developed on available hot-water treatment equipment called “Original” that only complies with United States phytosanitary protocols. These approaches are made to characterize the fluid-dynamic and thermal behaviours that occur during the mangoes’ hot-water treatment process. Then, analytical model and Computational fluid dynamics simulations are developed for designing new hot-water treatment equipment called “Hybrid” that simultaneously meets with both United States and Japan phytosanitary certifications. Comparisons of analytical results with data field measurements demonstrate that “Hybrid” equipment offers a better fluid-dynamic and thermal performance than “Original” ones.

  4. CNA web server: rigidity theory-based thermal unfolding simulations of proteins for linking structure, (thermo-)stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Dennis M; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Pfleger, Christopher; Gohlke, Holger

    2013-07-01

    The Constraint Network Analysis (CNA) web server provides a user-friendly interface to the CNA approach developed in our laboratory for linking results from rigidity analyses to biologically relevant characteristics of a biomolecular structure. The CNA web server provides a refined modeling of thermal unfolding simulations that considers the temperature dependence of hydrophobic tethers and computes a set of global and local indices for quantifying biomacromolecular stability. From the global indices, phase transition points are identified where the structure switches from a rigid to a floppy state; these phase transition points can be related to a protein's (thermo-)stability. Structural weak spots (unfolding nuclei) are automatically identified, too; this knowledge can be exploited in data-driven protein engineering. The local indices are useful in linking flexibility and function and to understand the impact of ligand binding on protein flexibility. The CNA web server robustly handles small-molecule ligands in general. To overcome issues of sensitivity with respect to the input structure, the CNA web server allows performing two ensemble-based variants of thermal unfolding simulations. The web server output is provided as raw data, plots and/or Jmol representations. The CNA web server, accessible at http://cpclab.uni-duesseldorf.de/cna or http://www.cnanalysis.de, is free and open to all users with no login requirement.

  5. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture of MOE, School of Mechanical EngineeringShandong University, Jinan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining.

  6. Factitious Dermatitis Due to Thermal Burn With Histologic Features Simulating Fixed Drug Eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Leah; Salim, Sadia; Motaparthi, Kiran

    2017-08-01

    Factitious dermatitis (FD) (dermatitis artefacta) is rare and often difficult to diagnose because of conflicting history and nonspecific clinical and histologic findings. It can present with varied clinical features including geometric ulcers, erosions, and less commonly bullae secondary to external trauma from chemicals, electric burns, heat, and suction. Herein, we describe a case of bullous FD due to thermal burn with histologic features demonstrating overlap with fixed drug eruption. Histopathology demonstrated a subepidermal blister with epidermal necrosis along with pigment incontinence and dermal eosinophils and neutrophils. Although these features, and the clinician's impression, were suggestive of fixed drug eruption, several morphologic findings allowed accurate diagnosis of FD: sharp demarcation of necrotic keratinocytes from adjacent uninvolved epidermis, elongated keratinocytes reminiscent of thermal or electrical artifact, and multinucleated keratinocytes. Although FD is often considered a diagnosis of exclusion, these clues may help dermatopathologists distinguish this entity from inflammatory dermatoses.

  7. Novel solid-state solar thermal simulator supplying 30,000 suns by a fibre optical probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Kueh, Kimberley C Y; Nathan, Gus J; Cannon, Scott

    2016-10-31

    An efficient 3.168 kW solid-state solar thermal simulator (SSSTS), capable of supplying ~30,000 suns at a focal plane via a fibre optical delivery, has been developed. The source consists of 41 diode lasers, each operated at a wavelength and power of ~915 nm and ~80 watt, respectively. The SSSTS provides a semi-top hat radiation profile and can be focused to a diameter of ~10.5 mm. The electro-optical power efficiency of the SSSTS was evaluated to be 55%, where the maximum value of the uniform radiation flux exceeds 36.6MW/m2. As such, the present technology is relevant to solar thermal applications that are not wavelength-sensitive or where narrow line-width is desirable. Additionally, the fibre optical delivery feature enables ease of direction onto a suitable target, without the need of large ellipsoidal reflectors usually employed for the conventional arc solar simulators. To demonstrate the new SSSTS, ZnO:Zn particles were introduced into the path of the radiation to investigate the change in their own temperature by using the laser induced phosphorescence technique (LIP). The temperature of the averaged particles was measured at a different radiation flux over a ~87 mm2 cross sectional area. A change in the average particle temperature of up to 225°C was detected within the measurement volume when the SSSTS was operated at a flux of ~30,000 suns. The unique characteristics of the SSSTS, namely, the uniformity, high power flux, efficiency, ease of delivery, and precise control of the radiation flux responds to the current demands of solar thermal research.

  8. Simulation modeling and analysis of a complex system of a thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorabh Gupta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the opportunities for the modeling of flue gas and air system of a thermal power plant by making the performance evaluation using probabilistic approach. The present system of thermal plant under study consists of four subsystems with three possible states: full working, reduced capacity working and failed. Failure and repair rates for all the subsystems are assumed to be constant. Formulation of the problem is carried out using Markov Birth-Death process using probabilistic approach and a transition diagram represents the operational behavior of the system. Interrelationship among the full working and reduced working has been developed. A probabilistic model has been developed, considering some assumptions. Data in feasible range are selected from a survey of thermal plant and the effect of each subsystem on the system availability is tabulated in the form of availability matrices, which provides various performance/availability levels for different combinations of failure and repair rates of all subsystems. Based upon various availability values obtained in availability matrices and graphs of failure/repair rates of different subsystems, performance and optimum values of failure/repair rates for maximum availability, of each subsystem is analyzed and then maintenance priorities are decided for all subsystems.

  9. Comparative simulation analyses on dynamic performances of photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors with different configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Feng; Tang, Fang; Cao, Lei; Fang, Guiyin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent developments of the PV/T systems were summarized. • The dynamic model of the PV/T system with different configurations was developed. • The performance parameters were derived to conduct comparative analyses. • The performances of the PV/T system were evaluated and analyzed. • The PV/T configurations have influences on the performances of the PV/T system. - Abstract: The electrical efficiency of photovoltaic (PV) module can be increased by reducing the operating temperature of PV module. The hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar system consists of conventional PV module and attached heat transfer pipe with internal working fluid flowing to extract heat energy from PV module. This article presents a brief review on the latest researches and applications of the PV/T systems. Afterwards, based on energy-balance equations, mathematical models for several PV/T systems with different configurations are developed. Analytical expressions for both the electrical and thermal performance parameters are derived as functions of climatic and design parameters to conduct comparative analyses. The calculation results indicate that the changes in the PV/T configurations have influences on electrical and thermal performances of the PV/T system. Further suggestions on configurations optimization for practical applications are propounded

  10. Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi: Simulations vs. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell; Benafan, Othmane; Noebe, Ronald; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A recent microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal-based plasticity, the B2 MB190 phase transformation and anisotropic elasticity at the grain scale is calibrated to recent data for polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at.% Ni). Inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, texture and differential scanning calorimetry data, as well as a subset of recent isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. The model is assessed against additional experimental data. Several experimental trends are captured - in particular, the transformation strain during thermal cycling monotonically increases and reaches a peak with increasing bias stress. This is achieved, in part, by modifying the martensite hardening matrix proposed by Patoor et al. [Patoor E, Eberhardt A, Berveiller M. J Phys IV 1996;6:277]. Some experimental trends are underestimated - in particular, the ratcheting of macrostrain during thermal cycling. This may reflect a model limitation that transformation-plasticity coupling is captured on a coarse (grain) scale but not on a fine (martensitic plate) scale.

  11. Thermal dynamic behavior during selective laser melting of K418 superalloy: numerical simulation and experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhen; Xiang, Yu; Wei, Zhengying; Wei, Pei; Lu, Bingheng; Zhang, Lijuan; Du, Jun

    2018-04-01

    During selective laser melting (SLM) of K418 powder, the influence of the process parameters, such as laser power P and scanning speed v, on the dynamic thermal behavior and morphology of the melted tracks was investigated numerically. A 3D finite difference method was established to predict the dynamic thermal behavior and flow mechanism of K418 powder irradiated by a Gaussian laser beam. A three-dimensional randomly packed powder bed composed of spherical particles was established by discrete element method. The powder particle information including particle size distribution and packing density were taken into account. The volume shrinkage and temperature-dependent thermophysical parameters such as thermal conductivity, specific heat, and other physical properties were also considered. The volume of fluid method was applied to reconstruct the free surface of the molten pool during SLM. The geometrical features, continuity boundaries, and irregularities of the molten pool were proved to be largely determined by the laser energy density. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experiments, which prove to be reasonable and effective. The results provide us some in-depth insight into the complex physical behavior during SLM and guide the optimization of process parameters.

  12. Simulating the swelling and deformation behaviour in soft tissues using a convective thermal analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog Walter

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally accepted that cartilage adaptation and degeneration are mechanically mediated. Investigating the swelling behaviour of cartilage is important because the stress and strain state of cartilage is associated with the swelling and deformation behaviour. It is well accepted that the swelling of soft tissues is associated with mechanical, chemical, and electrical events. Method The purpose of the present study was to implement the triphasic theory into a commercial finite element tool (ABAQUS to solve practical problems in cartilage mechanics. Because of the mathematical identity between thermal and mass diffusion processes, the triphasic model was transferred into a convective thermal diffusion process in the commercial finite element software. The problem was solved using an iterative procedure. Results The proposed approach was validated using the one-dimensional numerical solutions and the experimental results of confined compression of articular cartilage described in the literature. The time-history of the force response of a cartilage specimen in confined compression, which was subjected to swelling caused by a sudden change of saline concentration, was predicted using the proposed approach and compared with the published experimental data. Conclusion The advantage of the proposed thermal analogy technique over previous studies is that it accounts for the convective diffusion of ion concentrations and the Donnan osmotic pressure in the interstitial fluid.

  13. Simulating the swelling and deformation behaviour in soft tissues using a convective thermal analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z; Herzog, Walter

    2002-12-19

    It is generally accepted that cartilage adaptation and degeneration are mechanically mediated. Investigating the swelling behaviour of cartilage is important because the stress and strain state of cartilage is associated with the swelling and deformation behaviour. It is well accepted that the swelling of soft tissues is associated with mechanical, chemical, and electrical events. The purpose of the present study was to implement the triphasic theory into a commercial finite element tool (ABAQUS) to solve practical problems in cartilage mechanics. Because of the mathematical identity between thermal and mass diffusion processes, the triphasic model was transferred into a convective thermal diffusion process in the commercial finite element software. The problem was solved using an iterative procedure. The proposed approach was validated using the one-dimensional numerical solutions and the experimental results of confined compression of articular cartilage described in the literature. The time-history of the force response of a cartilage specimen in confined compression, which was subjected to swelling caused by a sudden change of saline concentration, was predicted using the proposed approach and compared with the published experimental data. The advantage of the proposed thermal analogy technique over previous studies is that it accounts for the convective diffusion of ion concentrations and the Donnan osmotic pressure in the interstitial fluid.

  14. Finite element simulation and experimental analysis of thermal distribution of optical transceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, ZHANG; Lei, NIE; Kai, JIANG Chuan

    2018-01-01

    In order to optimize the heat dissipation design, the finite element simulation and temperature measurement experiment were used to research the optical transceiver temperature distribution. The results indicated that the shield cage impaired the convective heat transfer efficiency of the photoelectric conversion chip in the optical transceiver. Thus the heat dissipation of the device was weakened. The optimization method was put forward to introduce the external ducts by improving the structure design of the shield cage. The simulation showed the effectiveness of this method which could improve the heat dissipation efficiency of optical transceiver products.

  15. Neutronic/Thermal-hydraulic Coupling Technigues for Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragusa, Jean; Siegel, Andrew; Ruggieri, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project was to test new coupling algorithms and enable efficient and scalable multi-physics simulations of advanced nuclear reactors, with considerations regarding the implementation of such algorithms in massively parallel environments. Numerical tests were carried out to verify the proposed approach and the examples included some reactor transients. The project was directly related to the Sodium Fast Reactor program element of the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and the Advanced Fuel cycle Initiative, and, supported the requirement of high-fidelity simulation as a mean of achieving the goals of the presidential Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) vision.

  16. Instantons in Quantum Annealing: Thermally Assisted Tunneling Vs Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V.; Neven, Hartmut; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical result (arXiv:1512.02206) from Google suggested that the D-Wave quantum annealer may have an asymptotic speed-up than simulated annealing, however, the asymptotic advantage disappears when it is compared to quantum Monte Carlo (a classical algorithm despite its name). We show analytically that the asymptotic scaling of quantum tunneling is exactly the same as the escape rate in quantum Monte Carlo for a class of problems. Thus, the Google result might be explained in our framework. We also found that the transition state in quantum Monte Carlo corresponds to the instanton solution in quantum tunneling problems, which is observed in numerical simulations.

  17. Modeling the thermal effect of the bipolar electrocautery for neurosurgery simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Sébastien; Cabral, Anne; Ayres, Fábio; Jiang, Di

    2011-01-01

    Real-time surgical simulation requires computationally-fast models describing the interaction between surgical instrument and tissues. In this study, a model for predicting the temperature distribution in brain tissue when using a bipolar electrocautery is proposed and validated against experimental in vitro animal data. Joule heat generation and heat conduction in the tissue are considered. The agreement between simulated temperature distributions and experimental data could be improved by modeling the output power as a function of electrical resistance between the electrodes, and by considering the heat exchange with surrounding air and bipolar tips.

  18. EXAMINATION OF THE SIMULATED THERMAL CONDITIONS IN A POPULAR PLAYGROUND RELATED TO THE HUMAN REACTIONS AND THE JUDGMENT OF THE AREA DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. ÉGERHÁZI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the field of urban bioclimatology an important and timely research direction today is to examine the thermal conditions of public places. In our study, human thermal comfort analysis was performed in a modern and well-attended children playground located in Szeged (Hungary. The aim of the paper is to reveal the changes in the thermal comfort conditions between two seasons and also the resulting subjective thermal reactions of visitors in this relatively small area. Thermal comfort conditions were quantified by the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET. For typical summer and autumn days of 2011 numerical simulations of thermal comfort conditions in the playground were carried out by means of the urban microclimate model ENVI-met. Spatial distribution of the simulated PET, i.e. thermal stress maps were created in two different times of the selected days in order to characterize the distinct microclimatological conditions appearing in the area. The relationship between the momentary spatial patterns of visitors and the thermal conditions was also under investigation. Additionally, onsite questionnaire survey was implemented which highlights the people’s subjective evaluation related to the design of the playground.

  19. Constraining Thermal Histories by Monte Carlo Simulation of Mg-Fe Isotopic Profiles in Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, C. K. I.; Dauphas, N.

    2016-12-01

    In thermochronology, random time-temperature (t-T) paths are generated and used as inputs to model fission track data. This random search method is used to identify a range of acceptable thermal histories that can describe the data. We have extended this modeling approach to magmatic systems. This approach utilizes both the chemical and stable isotope profiles measured in crystals as model constraints. Specifically, the isotopic profiles are used to determine the relative contribution of crystal growth vs. diffusion in generating chemical profiles, and to detect changes in melt composition. With this information, tighter constraints can be placed on the thermal evolution of magmatic bodies. We use an olivine phenocryst from the Kilauea Iki lava lake, HI, to demonstrate proof of concept. We treat this sample as one with little geologic context, then compare our modeling results to the known thermal history experienced by that sample. To complete forward modeling, we use MELTS to estimate the boundary condition, initial and quench temperatures. We also assume a simple relationship between crystal growth and cooling rate. Another important parameter is the isotopic effect for diffusion (i.e., the relative diffusivity of the light vs. heavy isotope of an element). The isotopic effects for Mg and Fe diffusion in olivine have been estimated based on natural samples; experiments to better constrain these parameters are underway. We find that 40% of the random t-T paths can be used to fit the Mg-Fe chemical profiles. However, only a few can be used to simultaneously fit the Mg-Fe isotopic profiles. These few t-T paths are close to the independently determined t-T history of the sample. This modeling approach can be further extended other igneous and metamorphic systems where data exist for diffusion rates, crystal growth rates, and isotopic effects for diffusion.

  20. The influence of competition effects on the initial rise method during thermal stimulation of luminescence: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitis, George; Pagonis, Vasilis; Tzamarias, Spyros E.

    2017-01-01

    The initial rise (IR) method is a widely used method to evaluate the activation energy of complex thermoluminescence (TL) glow-curves. It is generally accepted that competition effects take place among the various electrons traps responsible for the TL peaks of a glow curve. In the present study the potential influence of such competition effects on the IR method is studied. The simulation is divided in two parts. In the first part it is assumed that retrapping probabilities are lower than recombination probability. This simulation was carried out assuming either strong or weak competition from a thermally disconnected deep trap (TDDT). In the second part of the simulation the retrapping probabilities are assumed to be greater than the recombination probability. The simulation results showed that competition has serious effects on the resulting glow-curve shapes. Furthermore, the simulation showed that in most cases the IR method is able to reproduce accurately the input values of the activation energies of the three TL peaks. However, it was found that the IR method underestimated the activation energy of the last peak corresponding to the highest temperature by 8–20%, when the retrapping probabilities were higher than the recombination probability. - Highlights: • The IR method is very accurate in single peaks. • In complex TL glow curves the accuracy of IR depends on the competition between active traps. • In presence of strong deep trap competitors the competition between active traps is eliminated. • The IR method is very accurate in absence of competition among active traps. • The IR method underestimates E of an active trap which acts as competitor.

  1. Efficient Simulation and Abuse Modeling of Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Phenomena in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Laboratories; Abraham, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory; Dees, Dennis [Argonne National Laboratory; Yao, Pierre [Argonne National Laboratory

    2017-08-08

    NREL's Energy Storage team is exploring the effect of mechanical crush of lithium ion cells on their thermal and electrical safety. PHEV cells, fresh as well as ones aged over 8 months under different temperatures, voltage windows, and charging rates, were subjected to destructive physical analysis. Constitutive relationship and failure criteria were developed for the electrodes, separator as well as packaging material. The mechanical models capture well, the various modes of failure across different cell components. Cell level validation is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories.

  2. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  3. Volatilisation of ruthenium in vitrification. Isothermal calcination studies of 'Magnox' and thermal oxide simulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cains, P.W.; Hay, D.A.

    1982-12-01

    Ru volatilities have been measured for the static, isothermal calcination of ''Magnox'' and Thermal Oxide HAL's (Highly Active Liquors) at temperatures up to 600 0 C. Model solutions containing Ru, HNO 3 , and nitrates of important individual cations have also been investigated. Experimental design was primarily based on the requirements of rotary calcination process development. The results have been interpreted in terms of a reaction model involving competition between the simple degradation of Ru(NO) complexes to RuO 2 and oxidative decomposition to volatile species (e.g. RuO 4 ). (author)

  4. Degradation of pre-aged polymers exposed to simulated recycling: properties and thermal stabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Luzuriaga, S.; Kovářová, Jana; Fortelný, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 6 (2006), s. 1226-1232 ISSN 0141-3910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : accelerated weathering * simulated recycling * polyolefins Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.174, year: 2006

  5. Real-time simulation of thermal stresses and creep in plates subjected to transient heat input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Jacobsen, Torben Krogsdal; Hansen, P.N.

    1997-01-01

    -two-dimensional. Both plane stress and plane strain conditions are considered as extreme cases. It is shown that, by using the developed numerical technique, very fast real-time simulations can be performed. The method has proved its applicability in e.g. high-pressure die-casting, and applications to this industrial...

  6. Thermal Design and Simulation of a Heat Exchanger for a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simulation results showed an increase in all output parameters, except the tube side heat transfer coefficient, which remained constant due to the high viscosity and low Reynolds number of the flow. The cost of producing the exchanger was estimated at about $120,000, with an estimated payback period of about 6 months.

  7. Climate classification for the simulation of thermally activated building systems (TABS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Benjamin; Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2013-01-01

    alternative (sustainable) energy sources that would otherwise be insufficient. The design of TABS is however challenging and most often requires a complete simulation of the building. The standard ISO 11855-4 (2011) suggests a simplified sizing method for TABS. The results however omit condensation risk...... entirely. The proposed climate classification should fill this gap by providing the missing data in a simple manner....

  8. 1-Dimensional simulation of thermal annealing in a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel wall section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakos, J.T.; Rosinski, S.T.; Acton, R.U.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this work was to provide experimental heat transfer boundary condition and reactor pressure vessel (RPV) section thermal response data that can be used to benchmark computer codes that simulate thermal annealing of RPVS. This specific protect was designed to provide the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) with experimental data that could be used to support the development of a thermal annealing model. A secondary benefit is to provide additional experimental data (e.g., thermal response of concrete reactor cavity wall) that could be of use in an annealing demonstration project. The setup comprised a heater assembly, a 1.2 in {times} 1.2 m {times} 17.1 cm thick [4 ft {times} 4 ft {times} 6.75 in] section of an RPV (A533B ferritic steel with stainless steel cladding), a mockup of the {open_quotes}mirror{close_quotes} insulation between the RPV and the concrete reactor cavity wall, and a 25.4 cm [10 in] thick concrete wall, 2.1 in {times} 2.1 in [10 ft {times} 10 ft] square. Experiments were performed at temperature heat-up/cooldown rates of 7, 14, and 28{degrees}C/hr [12.5, 25, and 50{degrees}F/hr] as measured on the heated face. A peak temperature of 454{degrees}C [850{degrees}F] was maintained on the heated face until the concrete wall temperature reached equilibrium. Results are most representative of those RPV locations where the heat transfer would be 1-dimensional. Temperature was measured at multiple locations on the heated and unheated faces of the RPV section and the concrete wall. Incident heat flux was measured on the heated face, and absorbed heat flux estimates were generated from temperature measurements and an inverse heat conduction code. Through-wall temperature differences, concrete wall temperature response, heat flux absorbed into the RPV surface and incident on the surface are presented. All of these data are useful to modelers developing codes to simulate RPV annealing.

  9. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Desorption of Protonated Dialanine from a Perfluorinated Self-Assembled Monolayer Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohale, Swapnil C; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2018-04-05

    Classical chemical dynamics simulation results are presented for the thermal desorption kinetics and energetics of protonated dialanine ions (ala 2 -H + ) physisorbed on/in a perfluorinated self-assembled monolayer (F-SAM) surface. Previously developed analytic potentials were used for the F-SAM and the ala 2 -H + /F-SAM intermolecular interaction, and the AMBER valence force field was used for ala 2 -H + . The activation energy, E a = 13.2 kcal/mol, determined from the simulations is consistent with previous simulations of the ala 2 -H + /F-SAM binding energy. The A-factor, 7.8 × 10 11 s -1 , is about an order of magnitude lower than those representative of small molecule desorption from metal and semiconductor surfaces. This finding is consistent with the decreased entropies of ala 2 -H + and the F-SAM upon desorption. Using the Arrhenius parameters for ala 2 -H + desorption from the F-SAM, the lifetime of ala 2 -H + adsorbed on the F-SAM at 300 K is 5 × 10 -3 s. Larger peptide ions are expected to have longer adsorption lifetimes.

  10. Large eddy simulation on thermal mixing of fluids in a T-junction with conjugate heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de; Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • LES of fluid mixing in a T-junction at ΔT = 117 K and 123 K is performed. • Dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior downstream of T-junction. • Temperature fluctuations have maximum amplitudes of about 3.4–5.6% of ΔT. • High amplitude fluctuations occur near stratification layer in the mixing region. • Energy of temperature fluctuations mainly contained in the range 0.1–3 Hz. - Abstract: High cycle thermal fatigue failure in a nuclear power plant T-junction piping system may be caused by near-wall temperature fluctuations due to thermal mixing of hot and cold fluid streams. In the present study, thermal mixing at temperature differences (ΔT) of 117 K and 123 K between the mixing fluids is numerically investigated using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method with the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS CFX 14.0. LES results from the study are validated with experimental data obtained from Fluid–Structure Interaction (FSI) test facility at the Materials Testing Institute (MPA), University of Stuttgart. Mass flow rate ratios (main/branch) in both cases are 4 and 6, respectively. LES results in both cases show that there is incomplete mixing of fluids and within three diameters downstream of T-junction, the mixing results in a dynamical thermal stratification flow behavior, which is maintained throughout the computational domain. Mean temperature predictions by LES show good agreement with the experimental data, whereas the root mean square (RMS) temperature fluctuations are over or understated at a few positions. The temperature fluctuations have amplitudes ranging from 0.09 to 5.6% of ΔT between the mixing fluids. Incomplete mixing of fluids and relatively lower amplitude of temperature fluctuations are mainly due to lower Reynolds number of 3670 in the cold fluid coming from the branch pipe along with buoyancy effects in the flow due to higher inflow temperature in the main pipe.

  11. Thermal properties of adobe employed in Peruvian rural areas: Experimental results and numerical simulation of a traditional bio-composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginés A. Abanto

    2017-06-01

    Different adobes have been studied. Effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity were measured by means of a hot parallel-plate method. Density was estimated using a pycnometer and measuring physical dimensions and mass of each sample, which allowed the calculation of thermal effusivity and diffusivity. Some numerical simulation results displayed good agreement with experimental outcomes. The work presented here has implications for future studies of this traditional building material and might potentially help solving the problem of sustainable housing.

  12. Thermal Behavior of Mixtures of Perlite and Phase Change Materials in a Simulated Climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Petrie, T.W.

    1995-01-01

    Carefully controlled and well documented experiments have been done for two candidate configurations to control the heat load on a conditioned space. The 2:1 PCM/perlite mixture and the 6:1 PCM/perlite mixture, both on a weight basis, accomplished thermal control. The 2:1 system seemed to have enough PCM to be effective and involve a much larger fraction of its PCM in diurnal freezing and melting than the 6:1 system. It is a good starting point for engineering design of an optimum thermal control system. The results from the 2:1 system were reproduced with the computer program HEATING to prove that we know the relevant mechanisms and thermophysical properties of the PCM used in the system. Even without a model for the supersaturation and hysteresis that this material exhibited, HEATING reproduced the heat fluxes to the conditioned space in the experiments accurately enough to mirror the good thermal control performance of the system. The modified sensible heat capacity that was used in HEATING is a handy way to account for phase change effects and could be used in a subroutine to compute hourly phase change effects for whole building models like DOE-2. The experiments were done with PCM/perlite mixtures sealed in small methylmethacrylate boxes and covered top and bottom by XPS. The boxes allowed precise placement of the instrumentation used to follow the phase change effects. The XPS gave high R-value per unit thickness. A more practical prototype configuration such as PCM/perlite hermetically sealed in plastic pouches between layers of batts or blown-in insulation should be tested over a larger cross section. A good candidate is the whole attic cavity of the manufactured home test section used in the present work. Use of a PCM that does not exhibit supersaturation and hysteresis would make interpretation of the results easier. If the results of the larger scale test areas are as encouraging as the test cell results, a whole house model with a phase change

  13. The simulation of thermal characteristics of 980 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tianxiao; Cui, Bifeng; Hao, Shuai; Wang, Yang

    2018-02-01

    In order to design a single mode 980 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), a 2 μm output aperture is designed to guarantee the single mode output. The effects of different mesa sizes on the lattice temperature, the output power and the voltage are simulated under the condition of continuous working at room temperature, to obtain the optimum process parameters of mesa. It is obtained by results of the crosslight simulation software that the sizes of mesa radius are between 9.5 to 12.5 μm, which cannot only obtain the maximum output power, but also improve the heat dissipation of the device. Project supported by the Beijing Municipal Eduaction Commission (No. PXM2016_014204_500018) and the Construction of Scientific and Technological Innovation Service Ability in 2017 (No. PXM2017_014204_500034).

  14. Toward transient finite element simulation of thermal deformation of machine tools in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Andreas; Ruprecht, Daniel; Wensch, Joerg

    2018-01-01

    Finite element models without simplifying assumptions can accurately describe the spatial and temporal distribution of heat in machine tools as well as the resulting deformation. In principle, this allows to correct for displacements of the Tool Centre Point and enables high precision manufacturing. However, the computational cost of FE models and restriction to generic algorithms in commercial tools like ANSYS prevents their operational use since simulations have to run faster than real-time. For the case where heat diffusion is slow compared to machine movement, we introduce a tailored implicit-explicit multi-rate time stepping method of higher order based on spectral deferred corrections. Using the open-source FEM library DUNE, we show that fully coupled simulations of the temperature field are possible in real-time for a machine consisting of a stock sliding up and down on rails attached to a stand.

  15. Numerical simulation of circulation and thermal structure in the Yellow Sea using ROMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, C. S.; Lim, H. S.; Yoon, J. J.; Lee, S. H.

    2003-04-01

    The Yellow Sea is characterized by relatively shallow water depth, varying range of tidal action and very complex coastal geometry such as islands, bays, peninsulas, tidal flats, shoals etc. The dynamic system is controlled by tides, regional winds, river discharge, and interaction with the Kuroshio. Understanding the dynamic feature of the Yellow Sea is very important for environment and resource management therein. Numerical simulation using the ROMS model was conducted for seasonal circulation and thermohaline structure in the Yellow Sea. This study demonstrates the applicability of the terrain-following ROMS model to major processes in the Yellow Sea such as dilution of seawater due to fresh water discharge from major rivers, exchange between coastal waters and shelf waters across the tidal fronts etc. The model adopt curvilinear orthogonal grid with horizontal resolution of 3 5 km and several sigma levels in vertical coordinate confirming to a relatively realistic bottom topography. The models are initialized with the LEVITUS annual climatological data and forced by the monthly mean air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water derived from COADS. During the model spin-up steps, the models are integrated for several years from zero velocity and January climatological temperature and salinity fields with climatological monthly mean surface wind stress. The final states of the restoring run are taken as initial conditions for the second step (simulation run). During the simulation run after the initial run, the model was integrated again for another several more years with climatological monthly mean surface wind stress, net heat flux, and fresh-water flux from the COADS data and available regional environmental data. This study demonstrates that the simulated temperature, salinity, and velocity fields have been analyzed and compared for the major processes.

  16. Thermal Comfort in Simulated Office Environment with Four Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Mustakallio, Panu; Kolencíková, Sona

    2013-01-01

    load of 64 W/m2 was generated by simulated solar heat load, 2 laptops and 2 occupants, giving in total 1104 W. The supplied outdoor air temperature was kept at 16 oC. The supply air flow rate for CB, CBR and CCMV was set to 26 L/s (category II low-polluting building, EN 15251-2007). For MVRC supply...

  17. Thermal analysis of friction stir welding process and investigation into affective parameters using simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, Mahmoud [University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Behrouz [Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Keivani, Rasoul [Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Friction stir welding (FSW) as an efficient solid state joining process has numerous applications in industries. Temperature distribution analysis through simulation not only brings the possibility to characterize the microstructure of different zones, but also enables one to save cost and energy as optimum welding variables are obtained with less concern. In the present study, the temperature distribution during the friction stir welding (FSW) process of AA6061-T6 was evaluated using finite element method (FEM). Since experimental measurements cannot be readily made in the weld region, it is difficult to understand physics in the stir zone of the welds without simulation. Abaqus software was applied to model the parts and simulate the process of welding, while Johnson-Cook law utilized to evaluate the effect of strain rate and generated heat. FE-results were verified by experimental results. The comparisons revealed a good compatibility between the results. The effect of probe shape on temperature distribution was also studied. It was found that spherical pins result in the highest temperatures at workpieces with respect to cylindrical and tapered pins. Additionally, it was concluded that more heat is generated in workpieces as pin angle increases.

  18. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  19. Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Thermal Performance of a Miniature Flat Plate Heat Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Boukhanouf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a CFD analysis and experimental tests of two identical miniature flat plate heat pipes (FPHP using sintered and screen mesh wicks and a comparative analysis and measurement of two solid copper base plates 1 mm and 3 mm thick. It was shown that the design of the miniature FPHP with sintered wick would achieve the specific temperature gradients threshold for heat dissipation rates of up to 80 W. The experimental results also revealed that for localised heat sources of up to 40 W, a solid copper base plate 3 mm thick would have comparable heat transfer performances to that of the sintered wick FPHP. In addition, a marginal effect on the thermal performance of the sintered wick FPHP was recorded when its orientation was held at 0°, 90°, and 180° and for heat dissipation rates ranging from 0 to 100 W.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Entropy Generation with Thermal Radiation on MHD Carreau Nanofluid towards a Shrinking Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mubashir Bhatti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, entropy generation with radiation on non-Newtonian Carreau nanofluid towards a shrinking sheet is investigated numerically. The effects of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD are also taken into account. Firstly, the governing flow problem is simplified into ordinary differential equations from partial differential equations with the help of similarity variables. The solution of the resulting nonlinear differential equations is solved numerically with the help of the successive linearization method and Chebyshev spectral collocation method. The influence of all the emerging parameters is discussed with the help of graphs and tables. It is observed that the influence of magnetic field and fluid parameters oppose the flow. It is also analyzed that thermal radiation effects and the Prandtl number show opposite behavior on temperature profile. Furthermore, it is also observed that entropy profile increases for all the physical parameters.

  1. Evaluation of thermal behavior during laser metal deposition using optical pyrometry and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrov, Alexander V.; Zavalov, Yuri N.; Mirzade, Fikret K.; Dubrov, Vladimir D.

    2017-06-01

    3D mathematical model of non-stationary processes of heat and mass transfer was developed for additive manufacturing of materials by direct laser metal deposition. The model takes into account self-consistent dynamics of free surface, temperature fields, and melt flow speeds. Evolution of free surface is modelled using combined Volume of Fluid and Level-Set method. Article presents experimental results of the measurement of temperature distribution in the area of bead formation by direct laser metal deposition, using multi-channel pyrometer, that is based on two-color sensors line. A comparison of experimental data with the results of numerical modeling was carried out. Features of thermal dynamics on the surface of melt pool have been detected, which were caused by thermo-capillary convection.

  2. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  3. Laser treatment of port wine stains: three-dimensional simulation using biopsy-defined geometry in an optical-thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefer, T. Joshua; Barton, Jennifer K.; Smithies, Derek J.; Milner, Thomas E.; Nelson, J. Stuart; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1998-07-01

    The efficacy of laser treatment of port wine stains (PWS) has been shown to be highly dependent on the patient-specific structure of vascular lesions. To improve the accuracy of PWS numerical models, an optical-thermal model simulating an arbitrarily complex, three dimensional tissue geometry has been developed. In this model, the distribution of absorbed radiant energy -- determined using a modified Monte Carlo technique -- is used as the source term in a finite difference thermal model that predicts transient temperature rise. The Arrhenius rate process integral is then used to calculate thermal damage. Simulations based on a tomographic reconstruction of a PWS biopsy were performed for laser pulse durations of 0.5, 5.0 and 50.0 ms and a wavelength of 585 nm. Irradiances that produced maximum tissue temperatures of 120 degrees Celsius were used. The simulations indicated that energy deposition in blood is primarily a function of depth in skin. Thermal diffusion effects increased with longer pulse duration, leading to collateral damage observed at 5.0 and 50.0 ms. A pulse duration of 0.5 ms resulted in confinement of thermal damage to blood regions. Clusters of small vessels tended to behave similarly to larger vessels, reaching higher temperatures and creating more damage in the surrounding dermis than isolated vessels. The incorporation of realistic geometry into an optical-thermal model represents a significant advance in computer modeling of laser surgery.

  4. A new closed-form thermodynamic model for thermal simulation of spark ignition internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjaneh, Afshin; Sayyaadi, Hoseyn

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A new closed-form thermal model was developed for SI engines. • Various irreversibilities of real engines were integrated into the model. • The accuracy of the model was examined on two real SI engines. • The superiority of the model to previous closed-form models was shown. • Accuracy and losses were studied over the operating range of engines. - Abstract: A closed form model based on finite speed thermodynamics, FST, modified to consider various losses was developed on Otto cycle. In this regard, the governing equations of the finite speed thermodynamics were developed for expansion/compression processes while heat absorption/rejection of the Otto cycle was determined based on finite time thermodynamics, FTT. In addition, other irreversibility including power loss caused by heat transfer through the cylinder walls and irreversibility due to throttling process was integrated into the model. The developed model was verified by implementing on two different spark ignition internal combustion engines and the results of modeling were compared with experimental results as well as FTT model. It was found that the developed model was not only very simple in use like a closed form thermodynamic model, but also it models a real spark ignition engine with reasonable accuracy. The error in predicting the output power at rated operating range of the engine was 39%, while in the case of the FTT model, this figure was 167.5%. This comparison for predicting thermal efficiency was +7% error (as difference) for the developed model compared to +39.4% error of FTT model.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation methods in moment-based scale-bridging algorithms for thermal radiative-transfer problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, J.D.; Park, H.; Wollaber, A.B.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; Knoll, D.A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a moment-based acceleration algorithm applied to Monte Carlo simulation of thermal radiative-transfer problems. Our acceleration algorithm employs a continuum system of moments to accelerate convergence of stiff absorption–emission physics. The combination of energy-conserving tallies and the use of an asymptotic approximation in optically thick regions remedy the difficulties of local energy conservation and mitigation of statistical noise in such regions. We demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the developed method. We also compare directly to the standard linearization-based method of Fleck and Cummings [1]. A factor of 40 reduction in total computational time is achieved with the new algorithm for an equivalent (or more accurate) solution as compared with the Fleck–Cummings algorithm

  6. Simulation investigation of thermal phase transformation and residual stress in single pulse EDM of Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2018-04-01

    The thermal phase transformation and residual stress are ineluctable in the electrical discharge machining (EDM) process, and they will greatly affect the working performances of the machined surface. This paper presents a simulation study on the thermal phase transformation and residual stress in single-pulse EDM of Ti-6Al-4V, which is the most popular titanium alloy in fields such as aircraft engine and some other leading industries. A multi-physics model including thermal, hydraulic, metallography and structural mechanics was developed. Based on the proposed model, the thickness and metallographic structure of the recast layer and heat affected layer (HAZ) were investigated. The distribution and characteristics of residual stress around the discharge crater were obtained. The recast layer and HAZ at the center of crater are found to be the thinnest, and their thicknesses gradually increase approaching the periphery of the crater. The recast layer undergoes a complete α‧ (martensitic) transformation, while the HAZ is mainly composed by the α  +  β  +  α‧ three-phase microstructure. Along the depth direction of crater, the Von Mises stress increases first and then decreases, reaching its maximal value near the interface of recast layer and HAZ. In the recast layer, both compressive stress component and tensile stress component are observed. ANOVA results showed that the influence of discharge current on maximal tensile stress is more significant than that of pulse duration, while the pulse duration has more significant influence on average thickness of the recast layer and the depth location of the maximal tensile stress. The works conducted in this study will help to evaluate the quality and integrity of EDMed surface, especially when the non-destructive testing is difficult to achieve.

  7. Characterization of the Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy subjected to simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yanming, E-mail: heyanming@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Yang, Jianguo, E-mail: yangjg@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Qin, Chunjie [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chen, Shuangjian [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The constitution of Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was convincingly ascertained by TEM analysis. • The Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was thermally cycled with a peak temperature up to 1350 °C. • The lamellar-like phases in the alloy were firstly determined by TEM and HRTEM. • The formation mechanism for the lamellar-like phases was unveiled rigorously. • Effect of lamellar-like phases on the alloy’s performances was evaluated in depth. - Abstract: A representative Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy with basic composition of Ni–17Mo–7Cr (wt.%) was fabricated in the work and the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties while it went through simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycle treatment was investigated. The results reveal that the Ni–Mo–Cr alloy mainly consisted of Ni matrix and MoC carbides. The critical peak temperature that a lamellar-like structure occurred in the alloy was found to be 1300 °C. These products were firstly characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) analysis, and they were essentially Ni matrix and carbides (MoC and chromium carbides) generated through local melting. The equivalent mechanical properties of the alloy relative to that of un-treated alloy were received owing to its unique architecture even the peak temperature during thermal cycle was up to 1350 °C. The results obtained suggests these lamellar-like products dispersed near the fusion line in a Ni–Mo–Cr welded joint will not influence the joint’s mechanical strength and stability while the peak temperature in the HAZ was adjusted below 1350 °C, providing valuable guideline in designing and applying the Ni–Mo–Cr system superalloys.

  8. Simulations of thermal Rayleigh-Marangoni convection in a three-layer liquid-metal-battery model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, Thomas; Boeck, Thomas; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-11-01

    Operating a liquid-metal battery produces Ohmic losses in the electrolyte layer that separates both metal electrodes. As a consequence, temperature gradients establish which potentially cause thermal convection since density and interfacial tension depend on the local temperature. In our numerical investigations, we considered three plane, immiscible layers governed by the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations held at a constant temperature of 500°C at the bottom and top. A homogeneous current is applied that leads to a preferential heating of the mid electrolyte layer. We chose a typical material combination of Li separated by LiCl-KCl (a molten salt) from Pb-Bi for which we analyzed the linear stability of pure thermal conduction and performed three-dimensional direct-numerical simulations by a pseudospectral method probing different: electrolyte layer heights, overall heights, and current densities. Four instability mechanisms are identified, which are partly coupled to each other: buoyant convection in the upper electrode, buoyant convection in the molten salt layer, and Marangoni convection at both interfaces between molten salt and electrode. The global turbulent heat transfer follows scaling predictions for internally heated buoyant convection. Financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under Grant No. KO 5515/1-1 is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Response of beryllium to severe thermal shocks -simulation of disruption and vertical displacement events in future thermonuclear devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Roedig, M.; Schuster, A. [Association Euratom-Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Merola, M.; Qian, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium will play an important role for plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices such as ITER. In particular for the first wall beryllium will be used with an armor thickness of several millimeters. However, during plasma instabilities they will experience severe thermal shocks. Here plasma disruptions with deposited energy densities of several ten MJm{sup -2} are the most essential damaging mechanism. However, a signifant fraction of the incident energy will be absorbed by a dense cloud of ablation vapor, hence reducing the effective energy density at the beryllium surface to values in the order of 10 MJm{sup -2}. To investigate the material response to all these plasma instabilities thermal shock tests on small scale test coupons (disruption effects) and on actively cooled divertor modules (VDEs) have been performed in the electron beam test facility JUDITH at ITER relevant surface heat loads. These tests have been performed on different bulk beryllium grades and on plasma sprayed coatings; the influence of pulse duration, power density, and temperature effects has been investigated experimentally. Detailed in-situ diagnostics (for beam characterization, optical pyrometry etc.) and post mortem analyses (profilometry, metallography, optical and electron microscopy) have been applied to quantify the resulting material damage. 1D- and 2D models have developed to verify the experimental results obtained in the electron beam simulation experiments. (J.P.N.)

  10. Thermal Stability of Co-Pt and Co-Au Core-Shell Structured Nanoparticles: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2017-09-07

    Co-Pt and Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles were heated by molecular dynamics simulations to investigate their thermal stability. Two core structures, that is, hcp Co and fcc Co, have been addressed. The results demonstrate that the hcp-fcc phase transition happens in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Pt-shell nanoparticle, while it is absent in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one. The stacking faults appear in both Pt and Au shells despite different structures of the Co core. The Co core and Pt shell concurrently melt and present an identical melting point in both Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. However, typical two-stage melting occurs in both Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Au shell in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell nanoparticle exhibits a lower melting point than that in the fcc-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one, while the melting points are closely equal for both hcp and fcc Co cores. All of these observations suggest that their thermal stability strongly depends on the structure of the core and the element of the shell.

  11. Acid and thermal denaturation of barnase investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, A; Karplus, M

    1995-10-06

    The transition in barnase from the native state to a partially unfolded conformation has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules at 360 K and low pH(450 ps), and at 600 K and neutral pH (three simulations of 120, 250 and 200 ps each). The use of several simulations provides evidence that the results are not sensitive to initial conditions. To mimic low pH conditions, the acidic sidechains in barnase were neutralized and the two histidine residues were doubly protonated. Runs at 300 K showed that the solvated structures at low pH (300 ps) and neutral pH (310 ps) are very similar. The main structural differences involved the acidic residues, histidine residues, and the beta-turn connecting strands 4 and 5. When the temperature is raised to 360 K at low pH and to 600 K at neutral pH the barnase molecule begins to unfold. The molecule rapidly expands (Rg changes from 13.9 A to 15.3 A in 450 ps at 360 K and from 13.7 A to between 15.1 and 15.5 A in 120 ps at 600 K). However, the expansion is not uniform. In all the simulations, the chain termini, loops and the N-terminal parts of the main alpha-helix (helix 1) show a continuous and progressive unfolding. An essential step in the denaturation process is that the major alpha-helix (helix 1) separates from the beta-sheet; this is coupled to the exposure of the principal hydrophobic core, many of whose non-polar side chains become solvated by hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The barnase-water interaction energy improves during unfolding at the expense of the barnase self-energy. The deterioration of the intramolecular van der Waals energy suggests that the rupture of the tight packing during the initial unfolding phase contributes to the energy barrier of the denaturation process. The mutationally well-analyzed Asp8-Arg110-Asp12 double salt-bridge on the barnase surface is found to be marginally stable in the folded form in the simulations. A Poisson-Boltzmann calculation indicates that

  12. Numerical Simulations of the Natural Thermal Regime and Enhanced Geothermal Systems in the St. Lawrence Lowlands Basin, Quebec, Canad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, A.; Therrien, R.; Molson, J. W. H.; Gosselin, L.; Mathieu-Potvin, F.; Raymond, J.; Malo, M.; Comeau, F. A.; Bedard, K.

    2017-12-01

    An enhanced geothermal system (EGS) consists of injecting water into deep sedimentary or basement rocks, which have been hydraulically stimulated, and withdrawing this water for heat extraction. In this work, the geothermal potential of the St. Lawrence Lowlands Basin (SLLB), Quebec, Canada, is evaluated using numerical heat transport simulations. A 3D conceptual model was first developed based on a detailed geological model of the basin and using realistic ranges of hydrothermal properties of the geological formations. The basin thermal regime under natural conditions was simulated with the HydroGeoSphere model assuming non-isothermal single-phase flow, whi