WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal reactors assessment

  1. Thermal and epithermal data assessment for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, H.

    1991-01-01

    Sensitivity calculations indicated that the wrong computation of the reactivity temperature coefficient of a multiplying medium could be explained by a change of the neutron cross section shapes for the major actinides in the thermal energy range. Consequently, new measurements of these shapes were recently performed in several laboratories. Nu-bar, the fission and total cross sections, the eta parameter and some resonance widths were measured again. The isotopes of interest are uranium 238, uranium 235, plutonium 239 and plutonium 240. Now the results of these new measurements are almost all available. The purpose of the present paper is the review of the new results and a proposal, if it is necessary, of a modification of some cross sections shapes which were previously used in the evaluated files. The new cross section values are validated against a wide set of integral experiments which includes buckling and temperature coefficient of reactivity measurements. It seems that we observe a satisfactory agreement between the new microcospic data and the values which are deduced from the integral experiments

  2. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-01-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean/US/laboratory/university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program

  3. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  4. Thermal Reactor Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  5. Thermal Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods

  6. Assessing thermal conductivity of composting reactor with attention on varying thermal resistance between compost and the inner surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongjiang; Niu, Wenjuan; Ai, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic estimation of heat transfer through composting reactor wall was crucial for insulating design and maintaining a sanitary temperature. A model, incorporating conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer mechanisms, was developed in this paper to provide thermal resistance calculations for composting reactor wall. The mechanism of thermal transfer from compost to inner surface of structural layer, as a first step of heat loss, was important for improving insulation performance, which was divided into conduction and convection and discussed specifically in this study. It was found decreasing conductive resistance was responsible for the drop of insulation between compost and reactor wall. Increasing compost porosity or manufacturing a curved surface, decreasing the contact area of compost and the reactor wall, might improve the insulation performance. Upon modeling of heat transfers from compost to ambient environment, the study yielded a condensed and simplified model that could be used to conduct thermal resistance analysis for composting reactor. With theoretical derivations and a case application, the model was applicable for both dynamic estimation and typical composting scenario. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport

  8. Thermal reactor safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  9. Thorium utilisation in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, K.

    1997-01-01

    It is now more or less accepted that the best way to use thorium is in thermal reactors. This is due to the fact that U233 is a good material in the thermal spectrum. Studies of different thorium cycles in various reactor concepts had been carried out in the early days of nuclear power. After three decades of neglect, the world is once again looking at thorium with some interest. We in India have been studying thorium cycles in most of the existing thermal reactor concepts, with greater emphasis on heavy water reactors. In this paper, we report some of the work done in India on different thorium cycles in the Indian pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR), and also give a description of the design of the advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR). (author). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  10. The probabilistic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Feng; Wang, Rongshan; Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Donghui [State Nuclear Power Plant Service Company, 200237 Shanghai (China); Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, 215004 Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The methodology and the case study of the FAVOR software were shown. • The over-conservative parameters in the DFM were shown. • The differences between the PFM and the DFM were discussed. • The limits in the current FAVOR were studied. - Abstract: The pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event poses a potentially significant challenge to the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the long time operation (LTO). In the USA, the “screening criteria” for maximum allowable embrittlement of RPV material, which forms part of the USA regulations, is based on the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). The FAVOR software developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is used to establish the regulation. As the technical basis of FAVOR is not the most widely-used and codified methodologies, such as the ASME and RCC-M codes, in most countries (with exception of the USA), proving RPV integrity under the PTS load is still based on the deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM). As the maximum nil-ductility-transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}) of the beltline material for the 54 French RPVs after 40 years operation is higher than the critical values in the IAEA-TECDOC-1627 and European NEA/CSNI/R(99)3 reports (while still obviously lower than the “screening criteria” of the USA), it may conclude that the RPV will not be able to run in the LTO based on the DFM. In the FAVOR, the newest developments of fracture mechanics are applied, such as the warm pre-stress (WPS) effect, more accurate estimation of the flaw information and less conservation of the toughness (such as the three-parameter Weibull distribution of the fracture toughness). In this paper, the FAVOR software is first applied to show both the methodology and the results of the PFM, and then the limits in the current FAVOR software (Version 6.1, which represents the baseline for re-assessing the regulation of 10 CFR 50.61), lack of the impact of the constraint effect

  11. International thermal reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    The worldwide development of nuclear power plants is reviewed. Charts are presented which show the commitment to light-water reactor capacity construction with breakdown by region and country. Additional charts show the major nuclear research centers which have substantial scope in light water reactor development and extensive international activities

  12. Prospects for the establishment of plutonium recycle in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries. Status and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.; Melches, C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the technical status of plutonium recycle in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries and assesses the prospect for it becoming established in the future with the implicit assumptions that uranium oxide reprocessing capacity will be installed commensurate with the projected programmes for thermal reactor installation and that there will be no insuperable environmental, security or safeguards obstacles to the use of plutonium as a fuel. It is argued that the feasibility of using plutonium as an alternative to 235 U as the fuel for thermal reactors, particularly LWRs, has been extensively demonstrated by a number of Foratom countries and the main problem areas are fuel fabrication and fuel reprocessing. Mixed-oxide fuel fabrication has been well established on the prototype plant scale using low-irradiation plutonium, but it is recognized that the future design of production-scale plants will need to cater for the significantly higher radiation levels from high burnup plutonium and meet stricter environmental requirements on operator dosage and waste arisings. The main constraint on the establishment of recycle up to now has been the lack of available plutonium owing to the absence of significant uranium-oxide fuel reprocessing capacity. An assessment of the plutonium arisings in Europe, based on the projected uranium-oxide reprocessing capacity, shows that by 1990 plutonium, surplus to FBR requirements, should be accumulating by about 10t/a, sufficient to fuel about 8000MW(e) of LWRs. A further constraint would then be the availability and technical problems of mixed-oxide reprocessing, which is one of the areas identified for international collaboration. It is concluded that whilst there is unlikely to be substantial recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries before the early 1990s, an incentive could possibly arise about that time. The strength of this incentive will depend on a number of factors including the status of

  13. What can Recycling in Thermal Reactors Accomplish?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson

    2007-09-01

    Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives.

  14. What can recycling in thermal reactors accomplish?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal recycle provides several potential benefits when used as stop-gap, mixed, or backup recycling to recycling in fast reactors. These three roles involve a mixture of thermal and fast recycling; fast reactors are required to some degree at some time. Stop-gap uses thermal reactors only until fast reactors are adequately deployed and until any thermal-recycle-only facilities have met their economic lifetime. Mixed uses thermal and fast reactors symbiotically for an extended period of time. Backup uses thermal reactors only if problems later develop in the fast reactor portion of a recycling system. Thermal recycle can also provide benefits when used as pure thermal recycling, with no intention to use fast reactors. However, long term, the pure thermal recycling approach is inadequate to meet several objectives. (authors)

  15. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  16. Assessment of Extent and Degree of Thermal Damage to Polymeric Materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N. J.

    1984-02-01

    Thermal damage to susceptible materials in accessible regions of the TMI-2 reactor building shows damage-distribution patterns that indicate non-uniform intensity of exposure. No clear explanation for non-uniformity is found in existing evidence; e.g., in some regions a lack of thermally susceptible materials frustrates analysis. Elsewhere, burned materials are present next to materials that seem similar but appear unscathed-leading to conjecture that the latter materials preferentially absorb water vapor during periods of high local steam concentration. Most of the polar crane pendant shows heavy burns on one half of its circumferential surface. This evidence suggests that the polar crane pendant side that experienced heaviest burn damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Tests and simple heat-transfer calculations based on pressure and temperature records from the accident show that the atmosphere inside the reactor building was probably 8% hydrogen in air, a value not inconsistent with the extent of burn damage. Burn-pattern geography indicates uniform thermal exposure in the dome volume to the 406-ft level (about 6 ft below the polar crane girder), partial thermal exposure in the volume between the 406- and 347-ft levels as indicated by the polar crane cable, and lack of damage to most thermally susceptible materials in the west quadrant of the reactor building; some evidence of thermal exposure Is seen in the free volume between the 305- and 347-ft levels. (author)

  17. Advanced Computational Thermal Studies and their Assessment for Supercritical-Pressure Reactors (SCRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. McEligot; J. Y. Yoo; J. S. Lee; S. T. Ro; E. Lurien; S. O. Park; R. H. Pletcher; B. L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J. M. Wallace

    2009-04-01

    The goal of this laboratory / university collaboration of coupled computational and experimental studies is the improvement of predictive methods for supercritical-pressure reactors. The general objective is to develop supporting knowledge needed of advanced computational techniques for the technology development of the concepts and their safety systems.

  18. A preliminary assessment of thorium as a fuel for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duret, M.F.; Halsall, M.J.

    1965-08-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey of the contributing factors to total fuel cost, for a variety of potentially economic fuel cycles. U 238 and Th 232 are considered as fertile materials with enrichments of U 235 , U 233 and plutonium. The total fuel cost comprises: (a) a fuel supply cost which is derived from a manufacturing cost and the fuel burnup, (b) as spent fuel credit, and (c) inventory charges. The interrelation of these three factors and their dependence on reactor flux, fuel burnup, the heat rating of the fuel and the interest rate are considered for each combination of fertile and fissile material. Results show inventory charges, spent fuel credit (hence processing costs) and fabrication costs have an important effect on the fuelling cost. In addition, using highly rated thorium-based fuels will affect reactor capital costs. Further, more detailed studies of reactor design, fuel design and fuel management schemes are now required to verify the attraction of using thorium as a reactor fuel. (author)

  19. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, the authors assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  20. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1985-06-01

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  1. Heat Conductor Model and Assessment Results of the Nuclear Reactor Component Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code CUPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Ik Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2008-09-15

    A thermal-hydraulic analysis module, CUPID has been developed for a design and safety analysis of a nuclear reactor component. In the CUPID code, a two-fluid three-field model is adopted and the governing equations are solved on an unstructured grid to make CUPID advantageous for a flow analysis in complicated geometries. As for the numerical solution scheme, the semi-implicit method was adopted, which has proved to be stable and accurate for most applications of a nuclear reactor transient. A thermal analysis of a heat structure in a nuclear reactor component is very important for the safety analysis of a nuclear reactor as well as that of a fluid. Moreover, a conjugate heat transfer analysis between a fluid and a heat structure is indispensable in many transient situations of a nuclear reactor. For this reason, a heat conductor model was implemented into the CUPID module in this study. This report presents the governing equation, numerical method and verification results of the heat conductor model.

  2. Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

    2008-03-01

    Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

  3. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  4. Gel-sphere-pac fuel for thermal reactors: assessment of fabrication technology and irradiation performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, R.L. Norman, R.E.; Notz, K.J. (comps.)

    1979-11-01

    Recent interest in proliferation-resistant fuel cycles for light-water reactors has focused attention on spiked plutonium and /sup 233/U-Th fuels, requiring remote refabrication. The gel-sphere-pac process for fabricating metal-clad fuel elements has drawn special attention because it involves fewer steps. Gel-sphere-pac fabrication technology involves two major areas: the preparation of fuel spheres of high density and loading these spheres into rods in an efficiently packed geometry. Gel sphere preparation involves three major steps: preparation of a sol or of a special solution (broth), gelation of droplets of sol or broth to give semirigid spheres of controlled size, and drying and sintering these spheres to a high density. Gelation may be accomplished by water extraction (suitable only for sols) or ammonia gelation (suitable for both sols and broths but used almost exclusively with broths). Ammonia gelation can be accomplished either externally, via ammonia gas and ammonium hydroxide, or internally via an added ammonia generator such as hexamethylenetetramine. Sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication involves controlled blending and metering of three sizes of spheres into the rod and packing by low- to medium-energy vibration to achieve about 88% smear density; these sizes have diametral ratios of about 40:10:1 and are blended in size fraction amounts of about 60% coarse, 18% medium, and 22% fine. Irradiation test results indicate that sphere-pac fuel performs at least as well as pellet fuel, and may in fact offer an advantage in significantly reducing mechanical and chemical interaction between the fuel and cladding. The normal feed for gel sphere preparation, heavy metal nitrate solution, is the usual product of fuel reprocessing, so that fabrication of gel spheres performs all the functions performed by both conversion and pellet fabrication in the case of pellet technology.

  5. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  6. Assessment of thermal damage to polymeric materials by hydrogen deflagration in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.

    1985-05-01

    Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations duplicate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building. These data support estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen concentration predictions based on various hydrogen production mechanisms

  7. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  8. Procedures, methods and computer codes for the probabilistic assessment of reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Guian; Niffenegger, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV), as one of the most important safety barriers of light water reactors, is exposed to neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures, which results in embrittlement of the RPV steel. One potential challenge to the structural integrity of the RPV in a pressurized water reactor is posed by pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Therefore, the safety of the RPV with regard to neutron embrittlement has to be analyzed. In this paper, the procedure and method for the structural integrity analysis of RPV subjected to PTS are presented. FAVOR and PASCAL, two computer codes widely used for the probabilistic analysis of RPV subjected to PTS, are briefly reviewed and compared. By using FAVOR, a benchmark example is presented to show the procedure and method for the integrity analysis. The influence of warm prestressing (WPS), fracture toughness and constraint effect on the integrity analysis of RPV is discussed. The Master Curve method is more realistic than the ASME model to consider the analysis of fracture toughness and thus is recommended. In order to transfer the fracture toughness data from test specimen to the RPV, local approach provides a probabilistic method

  9. Thermal hydraulic reactor safety analyses and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, H.; Eerikaeinen, L.; Kervinen, T.; Kilpi, K.; Mattila, L.; Miettinen, J.; Yrjoelae, V.

    1989-04-01

    The report introduces the results of the thermal hydraulic reactor safety research performed in the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) during the years 1972-1987. Also practical applications i.e. analyses for the safety authorities and power companies are presented. The emphasis is on description of the state-of-the-art know how. The report describes VTT's most important computer codes, both those of foreign origin and those developed at VTT, and their assessment work, VTT's own experimental research, as well as international experimental projects and other forms of cooperation VTT has participated in. Appendix 8 contains a comprehensive list of the most important publications and technical reports produced. They present the content and results of the research in detail.(orig.)

  10. EL-2 reactor: Thermal neutron flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, A.; Genthon, J.P.

    1958-01-01

    The flux distribution of thermal neutrons in EL-2 reactor is studied. The reactor core and lattices are described as well as the experimental reactor facilities, in particular, the experimental channels and special facilities. The measurement shows that the thermal neutron flux increases in the central channel when enriched uranium is used in place of natural uranium. However the thermal neutron flux is not perturbed in the other reactor channels by the fuel modification. The macroscopic flux distribution is measured according the radial positioning of fuel rods. The longitudinal neutron flux distribution in a fuel rod is also measured and shows no difference between enriched and natural uranium fuel rods. In addition, measurements of the flux distribution have been effectuated for rods containing other material as steel or aluminium. The neutron flux distribution is also studied in all the experimental channels as well as in the thermal column. The determination of the distribution of the thermal neutron flux in all experimental facilities, the thermal column and the fuel channels has been made with a heavy water level of 1825 mm and is given for an operating power of 1000 kW. (M.P.)

  11. Development and assessment of the code for reactor outages thermal hydraulic and safety analysis. Midloop operation with loss of RHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Kuo-Shing; Ko Fu-Kuang [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan, TW (China)

    1997-12-31

    Although only a few percent of residual power is remained during plant outages, the associated risk to experience core uncovery and correspondent fuel overheating has been identified to be relatively high, particularly during the midloop operation (MLO) in PWR. However, the current available tools to analyze the system behavior, such as RELAP5, RETRAN, etc., can not easily perform the right job. A medium-sized program aiming at the reactor outages simulation and evaluation, such as MLO with loss of PHR, has been developed. All important thermal hydraulic processes involved during MLO with loss of RHR will be properly simulated by this newly developed ROSE code. Instead of using classical nodal momentum approach, two-region approach with modified two-fluid and piston models will be the theoretical basis of the new program to analyze the NSSS during plant outages. To verify the analytical model in the first step, posttest calculation against the integral midloop experiments with loss of RHR were performed. The paper also demonstrates the excellent simulation capacity of the ROSE code against IIST test data. (author)

  12. Assessment for the Applicability of Effective Thermal Conductivity Models on the Prismatic Fuel Assembly of Very High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong-ho; Cho, Hyoung-kyu; Tak, Nam-il; Park, Goon-cherl

    2014-01-01

    A prismatic gas-cooled reactor is promising reactor type in the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) project which was launched at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). One of the most favorable characteristics of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor is its inherent and passive safety. As one of its inherent safety features, the heat flows through the prismatic core radially during the High Pressure Conduction Cooling (HPCC) or Low Pressure Conduction Cooling (LPCC) event and the radial heat transfer cools down the reactor core passively under such conditions. To verify the inherent safety of its design, the GAMMA+ code that is used to analyze VHTR thermo-fluid transients has been developed by KAERI. The code adopts effective thermal conductivity (ETC) model to analyze radial heat transfer in the core as a lumped parameter model. It is because the fuel block has complex geometry with large number of coolant holes and fuel compacts and the detail heat transfer calculations on that geometry needs excessive computation resources. GAMMA+ is adopting the Maxwell-based ETC model, however, there are several ETC models that could be applied to the GAMMA+ code. In this study, several ETC models will be introduced. They will be compared to CFD calculations which have similar condition with the fuel block. And then the most appropriate ETC model will be suggested for calculating the ETC of the fuel block. For the CFD calculation, unit cell tests with simple geometries were conducted. With unit cell test, the applicability of the ETC models were investigated. And proper ETC models were used to calculate the ETC of the fuel block and the results were compared to that of CFD calculation on the fuel block. In this study, the ETC models are introduced and the applicability of the ETC models to VHTR fuel block was investigated. The results of the ETC models were compared to those of CFD calculation. The CFD calculations were conducted for square graphite block

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Zohuri, Bahman

    2015-01-01

    This text covers the fundamentals of thermodynamics required to understand electrical power generation systems and the application of these principles to nuclear reactor power plant systems. It is not a traditional general thermodynamics text, per se, but a practical thermodynamics volume intended to explain the fundamentals and apply them to the challenges facing actual nuclear power plants systems, where thermal hydraulics comes to play.  Written in a lucid, straight-forward style while retaining scientific rigor, the content is accessible to upper division undergraduate students and aimed at practicing engineers in nuclear power facilities and engineering scientists and technicians in industry, academic research groups, and national laboratories. The book is also a valuable resource for students and faculty in various engineering programs concerned with nuclear reactors. This book also: Provides extensive coverage of thermal hydraulics with thermodynamics in nuclear reactors, beginning with fundamental ...

  14. Thermal baffle for fast-breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rylatt, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor includes a bridge structure for separating hot outlet coolant from relatively cool inlet coolant consisting of an annular stainless steel baffle plate extending between the core barrel surrounding the core and the thermal liner associated with the reactor vessel and resting on ledges thereon, there being inner and outer circumferential webs on the lower surface of the baffle plate and radial webs extending between the circumferential webs, a stainless steel insulating plate completely covering the upper surface of the baffle plate and flex seals between the baffle plate and the ledges on which the baffle plate rests to prevent coolant from washing through the gaps therebetween. The baffle plate is keyed to the core barrel for movement therewith and floating with respect to the thermal liner and reactor vessel. 3 claims, 2 figures

  15. Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, G.; Katz, R.

    1984-01-01

    This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors

  16. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma- and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of (14)C by LSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoníček, B; Kučera, J; Světlík, I; Viererbl, L; Lahodová, Z; Tomášková, L; Cabalka, M

    2014-11-01

    Gamma- and neutron doses in an experimental reactor were measured using alanine/electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. The absorbed dose in alanine was decomposed into contributions caused by gamma and neutron radiation using neutron kerma factors. To overcome a low sensitivity of the alanine/ESR response to thermal neutrons, a novel method has been proposed for the assessment of a thermal neutron flux using the (14)N(n,p) (14)C reaction on nitrogen present in alanine and subsequent measurement of (14)C by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics of the combined operation of thermal and fast power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litkin, V.B.; Kagramanyahn, V.S.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal reactors have several deficiencies, in particular, their low efficiency in the use of national uranium resources. The advantages of joint use of thermal and fast reactors in a nuclear power system are indicated. Current fast reactors assessments however, show higher specific capital costs than for thermal reactors. To determine the combination of both types for which the economic effect is a maximum, optimization calculations are necessary including optimization of reactor characteristics. Some of the problems involved are examined. Analysis of the results shows that in the period of mass introduction of fast reactors, thermal reactors of high plutonium production are required in the early stages and that the significance of expenditure on the initial fuel inventory in the cycle increases sharply in comparison with that for established fast reactors. (U.K.)

  18. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor

  19. Test reactor risk assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, R.H.; Rawlins, J.K.; Stewart, M.E.

    1976-04-01

    A methodology has been developed for the identification of accident initiating events and the fault modeling of systems, including common mode identification, as these methods are applied in overall test reactor risk assessment. The methods are exemplified by a determination of risks to a loss of primary coolant flow in the Engineering Test Reactor.

  20. Assessment of Smart Reactor Utilization for Barelang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahala-M-Lumbanraja; Yuliastuti

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of SMART reactor utilization in BARELANG region. BARELANG region is an industrial area located in Riau Islands Province. The need of electricity and fresh water, whether for industry growth or people, are the main problem of this region. Until now, the National Electricity Company (PLN) has not able to supply the electricity needed by industrial sector. The use of oil as a main electricity generation resource of the entire power plant has caused a tremendous generation cost. On dry seasons, the fresh water supplied by PDAM is reducing drastically. This situation occurs because water source of PDAM extremely depends on the water storage during rainy seasons. SMART reactor is a modular light reactor developed by KAERI for dual purposes, producing electricity and fresh water at the same time. The total thermal power generated by this type of reactor is about 330 M Wth with 33 % efficiency, as 90 M We connected to the electricity grid and rest is used in producing potable water with capacity 40,000 m 3 /day. Compare to the conventional reactor, SMART reactor is based on simple operation and maintenance principles, enhanced safety, easy to inspect, a relatively short construction time, small investment cost, competitive generation cost, and a flexible design to fit with the existing infrastructure. The main characteristic of SMART reactor is an integral design concept where the entire main cooling system components are located in the pressurize vessel. (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Experience has shown that reactors can be operated safely. Accidents have occurred, but the probability of physical health detriment to members of the public has been negligible. Methods for the quantitative evaluation of the probabilities of serious accidents are described, and some results are quoted which show that the estimated frequency of harmful effects is small when compared with other risks already accepted by society. Attempts have been made to justify the acceptance of nuclear reactor risks by relating them to the benefits which are derived from reactor operation and comparing them quantitatively with the risks from alternative methods of deriving the same benefits. This approach takes no account of the perceptions which people have of risk

  2. Proceedings of the 8. Brazilian Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Some papers about pressurized light water reactors, fast reactors, accident analysis, transients, research reactors, nuclear data collection, thermal hydraulics, reactor monitoring, neutronics are presented. (E.G.)

  3. Thermally-insulating layer for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The thermally-insulating layer has been designed both for insulating surfaces within the core of a nuclear reactor and transmitting loads such as the core-weight. Said layer comprises a layer of bricks and a layer of tiles with smaller clearance between the tiles than between the bricks, the latter having a reduced cross-section against the tiles so as to be surrounded by relatively large interconnected ducts forming a continuous chamber behind the tile-layer in order to induce a substantial decreases in the transverse flow of the reactor-core coolant. The core preferably comprises hexagonal columns supported by rhomb-shaped plates, with channels distributed so as to mix the coolant of twelve columns. The plates are separated from support-tiles by means of pillars [fr

  4. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  5. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  6. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors

  7. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of reactivity accidents in MTR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater Hany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a dynamic model for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of MTR research reactors during a reactivity insertion accident. The model is formulated for coupling reactor kinetics with feedback reactivity and reactor core thermal-hydraulics. To represent the reactor core, two types of channels are considered, average and hot channels. The developed computer program is compiled and executed on a personal computer, using the FORTRAN language. The model is validated by safety-related benchmark calculations for MTR-TYPE reactors of IAEA 10 MW generic reactor for both slow and fast reactivity insertion transients. A good agreement is shown between the present model and the benchmark calculations. Then, the model is used for simulating the uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod of an ETRR-2 reactor in transient with over power scram trip. The model results for ETRR-2 are analyzed and discussed.

  8. Transient thermal analysis of a space reactor power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, M.J.; Best, F.R.

    1993-01-01

    Space nuclear power systems utilize materials and processes that are completely different from terrestrial reactor systems. Therefore, the tools used to analyze ground-based systems are inappropriate for space reactor design and analysis. The purpose of this study was to develop a space reactor transient analysis tool and to apply this tool to scenarios of interest. The scope of the simulation includes the thermal and neutronic behavior of a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor, the electrical and thermal performance of the thermoelectric generators, the thermal dynamics of heat pipe radiators, and the thermal behavior of the coolant piping between major components. The thermal model of the system is explicitly coupled to a momentum model of the primary and secondary coolant loops. A one-dimensional conduction model is employed in all solid component models. The reactor model includes an expression for energy generation due to fission and decay heat. The thermoelectric heat exchanger model accounts for thermal energy conversion to useful electrical output. The two-node radiator heat pipe model includes normal operation as well as limited heat pipe operation under sonic limit conditions. The reactor, thermoelectric heat exchanger, and heat pipe models are coupled explicitly by the coolant piping thermal model. The computer program is used to simulate a variety of transients including reactor power changer, degradation of the radiator, and a temporary open circuit condition on the thermoelectrics

  9. Thermal performances of an insulating structure for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranovitch, E.; Crutzen, S.; Le Det, M.; Denis, R.

    1974-12-01

    This report describes the thermal and technological tests performed on a multilayer thermal insulation system for high temperature gas reactors. It includes the description of test facilities, global tests, interpretation of data, and technological tests. Results obtained make it possible to predetermine with a satisfactory precision thermal performances under various nominal conditions

  10. Thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obmelukhin, J.A.; Obukhov, P.I.; Rinejskij, A.A.; Sobolev, V.A.; Sherbakov, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    The signs of thermal stratification of sodium in the BN 600 reactor upper plenum revealed by the analysis of standard temperature sensors' readings are defined. The initial conditions for existence of different temperature sodium layers are given. Two approaches for realizing on a computer of equations describing sodium motion in the upper plenum of the reactor are presented. (author)

  11. The Choice of thermal reactor systems. A report by the National Nuclear Corporation Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report to the Secretary of State in Great Britain by the National Nuclear Corporation following their assessment of the three thermal reactor systems, the AGR, PWR and SGHWR type reactors, which was performed in order to assist in the decision on the choice of thermal reactors for the U.K., is in three parts. Part I is an assessment of the three systems. It comprises: a description of the general method of assessment; a commentary in which are summarised discussions on the most important issues influencing reactor choice, i.e. safety, component failure, operational characteristics, development programme, construction programme; implications for the U.K. industry; costs; and reference design of each system. Part II consists of related questions and answers accompanied by commentaries on public acceptability and views from industry. Part III contains some conclusions including an analysis on the implications of the choices open and a summary of the main features of the assessment. (U.K.)

  12. Modeling solid thermal explosion containment on reactor HNIW and HMX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Ping; Chang, Chang-Ping; Chou, Yu-Chuan; Chu, Yung-Chuan; Shu, Chi-Min

    2010-04-15

    2,4,6,8,10,12-Hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaaza-isowurtzitane (HNIW), also known as CL-20 and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), are highly energetic materials which have been popular in national defense industries for years. This study established the models of thermal decomposition and thermal explosion hazard for HNIW and HMX. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data were used for parameters determination of the thermokinetic models, and then these models were employed for simulation of thermal explosion in a 437L barrel reactor and a 24 kg cubic box package. Experimental results indicating the best storage conditions to avoid any violent runaway reaction of HNIW and HMX were also discovered. This study also developed an efficient procedure regarding creation of thermokinetics and assessment of thermal hazards of HNIW and HMX that could be applied to ensure safe storage conditions. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessment of the high performance light water reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE, (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    From 2006-2010, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) was investigated within a European Funded project called HPLWR Phase 2. Operated at 25MPa with a heat-up rate in the core from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C, this reactor concept provides a technological challenge in the fields of design, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer, materials, and safety. The assessment of the concept with respect to the goals of the technology roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors of the Generation IV International Forum shows that the HPLWR has a potential to fulfil the goals of economics, safety and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In terms of sustainability, the HPLWR with a thermal neutron spectrum investigated within this project, does not differ from existing Light Water Reactors in terms of usage of fuel and waste production. (author)

  14. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a previous publication the author presented a method for undertaking statistical steady state thermal analyses of reactor cores. The present paper extends the technique to an assessment of confidence limits for the resulting probability functions which define the probability that a given thermal response value will be exceeded in a reactor core. Establishing such confidence limits is considered an integral part of any statistical thermal analysis and essential if such analysis are to be considered in any regulatory process. In certain applications the use of a best estimate probability function may be justifiable but it is recognised that a demonstrably conservative probability function is required for any regulatory considerations. (orig.)

  15. Device for monitoring thermal operation margin in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To extend the freedom of operation relative to the thermal limit for the fuel rods without imparing the reactor safety. Constitution: The monitoring system comprises a computing device for the plant operation conditions that computes the plant conditions based on the data signals obtained from each of various types of detectors for detecting the position of control rods inserted into the reactor core, neutron fluxes in the reactor core and the process amounts in the inner and the outer sides of the reactor cores, a thermal limit computing device that computes the thermal limit value in the operation based on the data outputted from the plant operation condition computer device, a transient condition thermal limit computing device that computes the thermal limit value in the transient changes of the conditions based on the data outputted from the plant operation condition computing device, and a thermal comparison device that compares the outputs of the thermal limit computing device and the transient thermal limit computing device. (Ikeda, J.)

  16. Thermal neutron flux distribution in ET-RR-2 reactor thermal column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Mahmoud M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal column in the ET-RR-2 reactor is intended to promote a thermal neutron field of high intensity and purity to be used for following tasks: (a to provide a thermal neutron flux in the neutron transmutation silicon doping, (b to provide a thermal flux in the neutron activation analysis position, and (c to provide a thermal neutron flux of high intensity to the head of one of the beam tubes leading to the room specified for boron thermal neutron capture therapy. It was, therefore, necessary to determine the thermal neutron flux at above mentioned positions. In the present work, the neutron flux in the ET-RR-2 reactor system was calculated by applying the three dimensional diffusion depletion code TRITON. According to these calculations, the reactor system is composed of the core, surrounding external irradiation grid, beryllium block, thermal column and the water reflector in the reactor tank next to the tank wall. As a result of these calculations, the thermal neutron fluxes within the thermal column and at irradiation positions within the thermal column were obtained. Apart from this, the burn up results for the start up core calculated according to the TRITION code were compared with those given by the reactor designer.

  17. Parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Fujii, Sadao.

    1988-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs) from the thermal-hydraulic viewpoint, parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of HCLWR has been carried out by using a unit cell model. It is assumed that a HCLWR core is contained in a current 1000 MWe PWR plant. At the present study, reactor core parameters such as fuel pin diameter, pitch, core height and linear heat rate are widely and parametrically changed to survey the relation between these parameters and the basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics, i.e. maximum fuel temperature, minimum DNBR, reduction of reactor thermal output and so on. The validity of the unit cell model used has been ensured by comparison with the result of a subchannel analysis carried out for a whole core. (author)

  18. Plant with nuclear reactor, in particular a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reactor core of the plant has tubular and vertically movable control rods moved by a flow of coolant under pressure. Each control rod surrounds a similarly tubular guide rod, stationary relative to the reactor core, leaving an annular slot-like space therebetween. The inside of each guide rod forms a first pressure chamber supplied with the coolant under pressure. The upper end of each control rod is closed and has a vertical shaft that extends into the inside of the guide rod and forms therewith a second annular slot-like space. At least one first restriction is provided in the first annular slot-like space and at least one second restriction is provided in the second annular slot-like space. A second pressure chamber is formed between both restrictions. The coolant supplied to the guide rod thus returns to the pressure vessel surrounding the reactor core through the second annular slot-like space, the second pressure chamber and the first annular slot-like space. Controlling means are provided, with which pressure thrusts can be generated if necessary in the coolant within the first pressure chamber. (author) 5 refs., 10 figs

  19. Estimation technique on thermal properties data of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hidetaka; Baba, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi; Kishimoto, Isao; Taketoshi, Naoyuki; Arai, Teruo

    1998-01-01

    This study aims at rapid measurement of thermal properties (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and emissivity) with the highest precision and till ultra high temperature in the world under identifying high temperature materials expected at reactor engineering in future such as plasma facing materials of nuclear fusion reactor. It was conducted by setting some sub-theme such as highly precise measurement and characterization of thermal properties, estimation technique of their data. Thus, precise measurement on specific heat capacity of meso-phase graphite was conducted. Between those at 1000degC and 3000degC a difference of about 5% was observed. As a result, it was found that it was required for highly precise estimation of thermal property data to consider value of the specific heat capacity. (G.K.)

  20. Thermal hydraulic simulation of the CANDU nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Athos M.S.S. de; Ramos, Mario C.; Costa, Antonella L.; Fernandes, Gustavo H.N., E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) is a Canadian-designed power reactor of PHWR type (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) that uses heavy water (deuterium oxide) for moderator and coolant, and natural uranium for fuel. There are about 47 reactors of this type in operation around the world generating more than 23 GWe, highlighting the importance of this kind of device. In this way, the main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic model for a CANDU reactor to aggregate knowledge in this line of research. In this way, a core modeling was performed using RELAP5-3D code. Results were compared with reference data to verify the model behavior in steady state operation. Thermal hydraulic parameters as temperature, pressure and mass flow rate were verified and the results are in good agreement with reference data, as it is being presented in this work. (author)

  1. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  2. Thorium utilization: conversion ratio and fuel needs in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1975-01-01

    As a preparatory study for thorium utilization in thermal reactors a study has been made of the fuel comsumption in existing reactor types. A quantitative description is given of the influence of enrichment, burnup, amount of structural material, choise of coolant and control requirements on the convertion ratio. The enrichment is an important factor and a low fuel comsumption can be achieved by increasing the enrichment

  3. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  4. Coupled fast-thermal system at the 'RB' nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1987-04-01

    The results of the analyses of the possibility of the coupled fast-thermal system (CFTS) design at the 'RB' nuclear reactor are shown. As the proof of the theoretical analyses the first stage CFTS-1 has been designed, realized, and tested. The excellent agreement between the results of the CFTS-1 studies and the theoretical predictions opens a straight way to the second, the final stage - realization of the designed CFST at the 'RB' nuclear reactor. (author)

  5. Assessment of the thorium fuel cycle in power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Homan, F.J.; Allen, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the role of thorium fuel cycles in power reactors. Three thermal reactor systems were considered: Light Water Reactors (LWRs); High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs); and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) of the Canadian Deuterium Uranium Reactor (CANDU) type; most of the effort was on these systems. A summary comparing thorium and uranium fuel cycles in Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) was also compiled.

  6. An overview of the potential of the CANDU reactor as a thermal breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.B.

    1977-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the use of thorium as a fuel in the existing CANDU concept. The neutron balance of the reactor core is analyzed and an assessment is made of the potential for development of a thermal 'breeder' reactor system. It is concluded that while the SSET cycle (i.e. self-sufficient equilibrium thorium cycle) appears feasible, there is little potential for developing a significant 'breeding' fuel cycle if current reactor operating capability and capital costs are to be maintained. (author)

  7. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Painter, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R 0 = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B 0 = 4.8-7.5 T, B max (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions

  8. Thermal calculations for water cooled research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrega, S.

    1979-01-01

    The formulae and the more important numerical data necessary for thermic calculations on the core of a research reactor, cooled with low pressure water, are presented. Most of the problems met by the designer and the operator are dealt with (calculations margins, cooling after shut-down). Particular cases are considered (gas release, rough walls, asymmetric cooling slabs etc.), which are not generally envisaged in works on general thermics

  9. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken

  10. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  11. Hanford B Reactor Building Hazard Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P. W.

    1999-01-01

    The 105-B Reactor (hereinafter referred to as B Reactor) is located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The B Reactor is one of nine plutonium production reactors that were constructed in the 1940s during the Cold War Era. Construction of the B Reactor began June 7, 1943, and operation began on September 26, 1944. The Environmental Restoration Contractor was requested by RL to provide an assessment/characterization of the B Reactor building to determine and document the hazards that are present and could pose a threat to the environment and/or to individuals touring the building. This report documents the potential hazards, determines the feasibility of mitigating the hazards, and makes recommendations regarding areas where public tour access should not be permitted

  12. 11. international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics (NURETH-11)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemonnier, H. (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The main topics covered by the NURETH 11 meeting are the thermal-hydraulics of existing and future nuclear power plants as foreseen by the Generation IV worldwide initiative. Normal operation and accidental situations are also relevant topics of the Conference. The topics cover modeling, experiments, instrumentation and numerical simulations related to flow and heat transfer in nuclear reactors with a special emphasis on the advances of multiphase CFD methods. The first part of this Book of Abstracts enumerates the Organizing Scientific Societies, the Sponsors of the Conference, the Conference Chairs, and the members of the Steering Committee and of the Technical Program Committee. The second part of this Book of Abstracts contains the list of the titles of the contributed papers. Each item includes the log number of the paper, the abstract of which can therefore be easily located in the next section of this book. The titles of the papers have been sorted out by topics to provide a synthetic view of the contributions in a selected domain. The last section of this Book includes an index of authors and co-authors with a reference to the log number(s) of their contributed paper(s). Finally, the CD-Rom of the Conference Proceedings containing the full-length papers is inserted at the inside back cover. Sessions content: A - two-phase flow and heat transfer fundamentals: computational and mathematical techniques (numerical schemes, LBM, BEM, mesh-less, etc.); contact angle and wettability phenomena; experiments and data bases for the assessment and the verification of 3D models; flow regime identification and modelling; heat transfer near critical pressure and supercritical water reactors; interfacial area (data base, modeling, measurement techniques); instrumentation techniques; micro-scale basic phenomena, fluid flow and heat transfer; scaling methods; counter current flow; B - code developments: containment analysis; core thermal-hydraulics and subchannel analysis

  13. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  14. Ductile fracture estimation of reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Sakai, Shinsuke; Okamura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new scheme for the estimation of unstable ductile fracture of a reactor pressure vessel under thermal shock conditions. First, it is shown that the bending moment applied to the cracked section can be evaluated by considering the plastic deformation of the cracked section and the thermal deformation of the shell. As the contribution of the local thermal stress to the J-value is negligible, the J-value under thermal shock can be easily evaluated by using fully plastic solutions for the cracked part. Next, the phenomena of ductile fracture under thermal shock are expressed on the load-versus-displacement diagram which enables us to grasp the transient phenomena visually. In addition, several parametrical surveys are performed on the above diagram concerning the variation of (1) thermal shock conditions, (2) initial crack length, and (3) J-resistance curve (i.e. embrittlement by neutron irradiation). (author)

  15. A survey of thorium utilization in thermal power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosterkamp, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    The present status of thorium utilization in thermal reactors HTGR's, HWR's and LWR's has been reviewed. Physics considerations are made to obtain the optimum use of thorium. Existing information on reprocessing and refabrication is given together with the properties of thorium metal and thoria

  16. Thermal-hydraulic methods in fast reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, D.P.; Briggs, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the solution of thermal-hydraulic problems in liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) arising primarily from transient accident analysis are reviewed. Principal emphasis is given to the important phenomenological issues of sodium boiling and fuel motion. Descriptions of representative phenomenological and mathematical models, computational algorithms, advantages and limitations of the approaches, and current research needs and directions are provided

  17. Thermal analysis of biological shield of fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sarda, V.

    1976-01-01

    A design optimisation of the biological shield of fast breeder test reactor was carried out using computer code HEATING. The effect of different heat sources, variation of coolant tube pitch circle radius, coolant temperature, angular pitch of coolant tubes and thermal conductivity of concrete on the temperature distribution within the shield has been studied. (author)

  18. THERMAL FISSION REACTOR COMPOSITIONS AND METHOD OF FABRICATING SAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blainey, A.

    1959-10-01

    A body is presented for use in a thermal fission reactor comprising a sintered compressed mass of a substance of the group consisting of uranium, thorium, and oxides and carbides of uranium and thorium, enclosed in an envelope of a sintered, compacted, heat-conductive material of the group consisting of beryllium, zirconium, and oxides and carbides of beryllium and zirconium.

  19. Validation of thermal hydraulic codes for fusion reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardain, P.; Gulden, W.; Massaut, V.; Takase, K.; Merill, B.; Caruso, G.

    2006-01-01

    A significant effort has been done worldwide on the validation of thermal hydraulic codes, which can be used for the safety assessment of fusion reactors. This work is an item of an implementing agreement under the umbrella of the International Energy Agency. The European part is supported by EFDA. Several programmes related to transient analysis in water-cooled fusion reactors were run in order to assess the capabilities of the codes to treat the main physical phenomena governing the accidental sequences related to water/steam discharge into the vacuum vessel or the cryostat. The typical phenomena are namely the pressurization of a volume at low initial pressure, the critical flow, the flashing, the relief into an expansion volume, the condensation of vapor in a pressure suppression system, the formation of ice on a cryogenic structure, the heat transfer between walls and fluid in various thermodynamic conditions. · A benchmark exercise has been done involving different types of codes, from homogeneous equilibrium to six equations non-equilibrium models. Several cases were defined, each one focusing on a particular phenomenon. · The ICE (Ingress of Coolant Event) facility has been operated in Japan. It has simulated an in-vessel LOCA and the discharge of steam into a pressure suppression system. · The EVITA (European Vacuum Impingement Test Apparatus) facility has been operated in France. It has simulated ingress of coolant into the cryostat, i.e. into a volume at low initial pressure containing surfaces at cryogenic temperature. This paper gives the main lessons gained from these programs, in particular the possibilities for the improvement of the computer codes, extending their capabilities. For example, the water properties have been extended below the triple point. Ice formation models have been implemented. Work has also been done on condensation models. The remaining needs for R-and-D are also highlighted. (author)

  20. Extended use of alanine irradiated in experimental reactor for combined gamma-and neutron-dose assessment by ESR spectroscopy and thermal neutron fluence assessment by measurement of C-14 by LSC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoníček, B.; Kučera, Jan; Světlík, Ivo; Viererbl, L.; Lahodová, Z.; Tomášková, Lenka; Cabalka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, NOV (2014), s. 52-56 ISSN 0969-8043 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010218 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : reactor rediation * alanine/ESR dosimeter * C-14 * LSC simultaneous gamma * neutron dose * assessment Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics Impact factor: 1.231, year: 2014

  1. A solid reactor core thermal model for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods, and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions

  2. Thermal insulation of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornille, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Operating conditions of HTR thermal insulation are given and heat insulators currently developed are described (fibers kept in position by metallic structures). For future applications and higher temperatures, research is directed towards solutions using ceramics or associating fibers and ceramics [fr

  3. Reactor thermal-hydraulic FY 1986 status report for the multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1986-10-01

    PNL's 1986 activities can be divided into three basic areas: code assessment, correlation assessment and experimental activities. The ultimate goal of all these activities is developing computer codes and verifying their use to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and design of the reactor core and plenum of the various proposed concepts. To perform this task as assessment is made of existing computer codes, models, correlations, and microgravity experimental data

  4. Design of tandem mirror reactors with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    End-plug technologies for tandem mirror reactors include high-field superconducting magnets, neutral beam injectors, and gyrotrons for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). In addition to their normal use for sustenance of the end-plug plasmas, neutral beam injectors are used for ''pumping'' trapped ions from the thermal barrier regions by charge exchange. An extra function of the axially directed pump beams is the removal of thermalized alpha particles from the reactor. The principles of tandem mirror operation with thermal barriers will be demonstrated in the upgrade of the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX-U) in 1981 and the tandem configuration of the Mirror fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) in 1984

  5. The role of heater thermal response in reactor thermal limits during oscillartory two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Brown, N.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vasil`ev, A.D. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Wendel, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analytical and numerical investigations of critical heat flux (CHF) and reactor thermal limits are conducted for oscillatory two-phase flows often associated with natural circulation conditions. It is shown that the CHF and associated thermal limits depend on the amplitude of the flow oscillations, the period of the flow oscillations, and the thermal properties and dimensions of the heater. The value of the thermal limit can be much lower in unsteady flow situations than would be expected using time average flow conditions. It is also shown that the properties of the heater strongly influence the thermal limit value in unsteady flow situations, which is very important to the design of experiments to evaluate thermal limits for reactor fuel systems.

  6. Determination of reactor thermal power using a more accurate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papuga, J.; Madron, F.; Pliska, J.

    2005-01-01

    Reactor thermal power is an important operational parameter in many respects such as nuclear safety, reactor physics or evaluation of turbine thermal performance. Thermal power of a pressurized water reactor is determined on the basis of the steam generator thermal balance. The balance can be made in several variants differing from one another by the selection of different measuring circuits whose data are used in the balancing. In principle, no one such variant gives the true value of the thermal power. Among the variant values, the one nearest to the unknown true value of reactor thermal power is probably the value calculated with the lowest uncertainty. The determination of such uncertainty is not easy and its value can make even several percent, which has significant economic consequences. This paper presents the method of data reconciliation and its application to the data of the third of Dukovany NPP. The data reconciliation method allows to exploit all the information which process data contain. It is based on the statistical adjustment of the redundant data in such a way that the adjusted data obey generally valid laws of nature (e.g. conservation laws). Mass and energy balances based on the data not yet reconciled do not obey those laws because of measurement errors. For data reconciliation in Dukovany, a detailed model of mass and energy flows describing the 3rd unit from steam generators to alternator and condenser was set up. Laws of mass and energy conservation and phase equilibrium in water-steam systems are thus fulfilled. Moreover, the user can model momentum balances in pipelines and create other equations, which are respected during calculation. The data reconciliation is done regularly for hourly averages (Authors)

  7. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  8. Report of the experts' mission to review thermal hydraulic and structural analyses for PTS assessment of Kozloduy NPP units 1-4 reactor pressure vessels, Sofia, Bulgaria 3-7 April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Based upon a request of the Government of Bulgaria and in order to assist its Regulatory Body, an experts' mission was carried out to Sofia and Kozloduy, 21-25 November 1994 within the framework of the IAEA TC Project BUL/9/013-05 and of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of the WWER NPPs. The mission also specified the technical content of further assistance by the IAEA. With respect to the findings and recommendations made in November 1994, WWER-SC-109, a follow-up expert's mission was carried out to Sofia, Bulgaria, April 3-7, 1995. The objective of the mission was to review the selection of transients, thermal hydraulic, stress and fracture mechanics analyses for reactor pressure vessel integrity assessment of Kozloduy unit 1-4. In addition, an update on the activities completed, underway and planned related to unit 1 reactor pressure vessel embrittlement was presented and discussed. The review was carried out by 4 international experts from Finland, France, Russia and IAEA in co-operation with the Bulgarian regulatory body, plant, Energoproject Sofia and Institute of Metals staff. The mission was conducted out within the frame of the IAEA TC Project BUL/9/013-05 and of the IAEA Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of the WWER NPPs. 18 refs

  9. NOx Pollution Analysis for a Sulfur Recovery Unit Thermal Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chun-Lang

    2017-12-01

    A sulfur recovery unit (SRU) thermal reactor is the most important equipment in a sulfur plant. It is negatively affected by high temperature operations. In this paper, NOx emissions from the SRU thermal reactors are simulated. Both the prototype thermal reactor and its modifications, including changing fuel mass fraction, changing inlet air quantity, changing inlet oxygen mole fraction, and changing burner geometry, are analyzed to investigate their influences on NOx emissions. In respect of the fuel mass fraction, the simulation results show that the highest NO emission occurs at a zone 1 fuel mass fraction of 0.375, around which the reactor maximum temperature and the zone 1 average temperature reach maximum values. Concerning the inlet air quantity, the highest NO emission occurs when the inlet air quantity is 2.4 times the designed inlet air quantity. This is very close to the inlet air quantity at which the maximum average temperature occurs. Regarding the inlet oxygen mole fraction, the NO emission increases as the inlet oxygen mole fraction increases. With regard to the burner geometry, the NO emission increases as the clearance of the burner acid gas tip increases. In addition, the NO emission increases as the swirling strength increases.

  10. Small Modular Reactors: Institutional Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Perkowski, Ph.D.

    2012-06-01

    ? Objectives include, among others, a description of the basic development status of “small modular reactors” (SMRs) focused primarily on domestic activity; investigation of the domestic market appeal of modular reactors from the viewpoints of both key energy sector customers and also key stakeholders in the financial community; and consideration of how to proceed further with a pro-active "core group" of stakeholders substantially interested in modular nuclear deployment in order to provide the basis to expedite design/construction activity and regulatory approval. ? Information gathering was via available resources, both published and personal communications with key individual stakeholders; published information is limited to that already in public domain (no confidentiality); viewpoints from interviews are incorporated within. Discussions at both government-hosted and private-hosted SMR meetings are reflected herein. INL itself maintains a neutral view on all issues described. Note: as per prior discussion between INL and CAP, individual and highly knowledgeable senior-level stakeholders provided the bulk of insights herein, and the results of those interviews are the main source of the observations of this report. ? Attachment A is the list of individual stakeholders consulted to date, including some who provided significant earlier assessments of SMR institutional feasibility. ? Attachments B, C, and D are included to provide substantial context on the international status of SMR development; they are not intended to be comprehensive and are individualized due to the separate nature of the source materials. Attachment E is a summary of the DOE requirements for winning teams regarding the current SMR solicitation. Attachment F deserves separate consideration due to the relative maturity of the SMART SMR program underway in Korea. Attachment G provides illustrative SMR design features and is intended for background. Attachment H is included for overview

  11. Model predictive control of a solar-thermal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade Saade, Maria Elizabeth

    Solar-thermal reactors represent a promising alternative to fossil fuels because they can harvest solar energy and transform it into storable and transportable fuels. The operation of solar-thermal reactors is restricted by the available sunlight and its inherently transient behavior, which affects the performance of the reactors and limits their efficiency. Before solar-thermal reactors can become commercially viable, they need to be able to maintain a continuous high-performance operation, even in the presence of passing clouds. A well-designed control system can preserve product quality and maintain stable product compositions, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective operation, which can ultimately lead to scale-up and commercialization of solar thermochemical technologies. In this work, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) system for a solar-thermal reactor for the steam-gasification of biomass. The proposed controller aims at rejecting the disturbances in solar irradiation caused by the presence of clouds. A first-principles dynamic model of the process was developed. The model was used to study the dynamic responses of the process variables and to identify a linear time-invariant model used in the MPC algorithm. To provide an estimation of the disturbances for the control algorithm, a one-minute-ahead direct normal irradiance (DNI) predictor was developed. The proposed predictor utilizes information obtained through the analysis of sky images, in combination with current atmospheric measurements, to produce the DNI forecast. In the end, a robust controller was designed capable of rejecting disturbances within the operating region. Extensive simulation experiments showed that the controller outperforms a finely-tuned multi-loop feedback control strategy. The results obtained suggest that our controller is suitable for practical implementation.

  12. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Study for Thermal Molten Salt Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaud, Adrien; Ivanona, Tatiana; Mastrangelo, Victor; Kodeli, Ivo

    2006-04-01

    The Thermal Molten Salt Reactor (TMSR) using the thorium cycle can achieve the GEN IV objectives of economy, safety, non-proliferation and durability. Its low production of higher actinides, coupled with its breeding capabilities - even with a thermal spectrum - are very valuable characteristics for an innovative reactor. Furthermore, the thorium cycle is more flexible than the uranium cycle since only a small fissile inventory (Molten Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR). The MSBR concept was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1970's based on the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE). The main goals of our current studies are to achieve a reactor concept that enables breeding, improved safety and having chemical reprocessing needs reduced and simplified as much as reasonably possible. The neutronic properties of the new TMSR concept are presented in this paper. As the temperature coefficient is close to zero, we will see that the moderation ratio cannot be chosen to simultaneously achieve a high breeding ratio, long graphite lifetime and low uranium inventory. It is clear that any safety margin taken due to uncertainty in the nuclear data will significantly reduce the capability of this concept, thus a sensitivity analysis is vital to propose measurements which would allow to reduce at present high uncertainties in the design parameters of this reactor. Two methodologies, one based on OECD/NEA deterministic codes and one on IPPE (Obninsk) stochastic code, are compared for keff sensitivity analysis. The uncertainty analysis of keff using covariance matrices available in evaluated files has been performed. Furthermore, a comparison of temperature coefficient sensitivity profiles is presented for the most important reactions. These results are used to review the nuclear data needs for the TMSR thorium fuelled reactor.

  13. Transmutation of LWR waste actinides in thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    Recycle of actinides to a reactor for transmutation to fission products is being considered as a possible means of waste disposal. Actinide transmutation calculations were made for two irradiation options in a thermal (LWR) reactor. The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies, and transuranic actinides recycled in separate mixed oxide (MOX) assemblies. When all actinides were recycled in a uranium lattice, a reduction of 62% in the transuranic inventory was achieved after 10 recycles, compared to the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from 2 regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after 5 recycles

  14. Microscopic simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Aoki, Takayuki; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    On three-dimensional behavior, multi-phase and multi-component thermal-hydraulics co-existing complex phase change and chemical reaction seen at severe accident, and so on under complex systems such as liquid film and drop behavior in a fuel assembly, inside of reactor pressure vessel, and so on, on aiming at further precise analysis on thermal-hydraulics phenomena in a reactor, researches on simulation focusing at microscopic mechanism of the phenomena have been carried out. And, simulations on microscopic thermal-hydraulics phenomena using numerical analysis such as super fine mesh method based on continuous body dynamic procedure, particle method, lattice Boltzmann method, Automaton method, Monte Carlo method at a view point of molecular dynamics, and so on have also become to be found out. This report was summary of previous survey actions under the research special committee on the 'microscopic simulation on reactor thermal-hydraulics' of the Japanese Society of Atomic Energy started in 1996. Here were elucidated a relationship between previous applicable technologies such as macroscopic simulation focusing a motion at local mean field and microscopic simulation one as well as survey and systematization of present condition of microscopic understanding on various physical phenomena, to scope directivity and subject on future research. (G.K.)

  15. Assessment of fusion reactor development. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Tazima, T.

    1994-04-01

    Symposium on assessment of fusion reactor development was held to make clear critical issues, which should be resolved for the commercial fusion reactor as a major energy source in the next century. Discussing items were as follows. (1) The motive force of fusion power development from viewpoints of future energy demand, energy resources and earth environment for 'Sustainable Development'. (2) Comparison of characteristics with other alternative energy sources, i.e. fission power and solar cell power. (3) Future planning of fusion research and advanced fuel fusion (D 3 He). (4) Critical issues of fusion reactor development such as Li extraction from the sea water, structural material and safety. (author)

  16. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun

    1999-02-01

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10 10 neutrons/cm 2 . sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV

  17. Probabilistic safety assessment for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    Increasing interest in using Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methods for research reactor safety is being observed in many countries throughout the world. This is mainly because of the great ability of this approach in achieving safe and reliable operation of research reactors. There is also a need to assist developing countries to apply Probabilistic Safety Assessment to existing nuclear facilities which are simpler and therefore less complicated to analyse than a large Nuclear Power Plant. It may be important, therefore, to develop PSA for research reactors. This might also help to better understand the safety characteristics of the reactor and to base any backfitting on a cost-benefit analysis which would ensure that only necessary changes are made. This document touches on all the key aspects of PSA but placed greater emphasis on so-called systems analysis aspects rather than the in-plant or ex-plant consequences

  18. Requirements for thermal insulation on prestressed concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neylan, A.J.; Wistrom, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    During the past decade, extensive design, construction, and operating experience on concrete pressure vessels for gas-cooled reactor applications has accumulated. Excellent experience has been obtained to date on the structural components (concrete, prestressing systems, liners, penetrations, and closures) and the thermal insulation. Three fundamentally different types of insulation systems have been employed to ensure the satisfactory performance of this component, which is critical to the overall success of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Although general design criteria have been published, the requirements for design, materials, and construction are not rigorously addressed in any national or international code. With the more onerous design conditions being imposed by advanced reactor systems, much greater attention has been directed to advance the state of the art of insulation systems for PCRVs. This paper addresses some of the more recent developments in this field being performed by General Atomic Company and others. (author)

  19. Thermal-structural response of EBR-II major components under reactor operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the LMFBR safety research has been focused primarily on severe but highly unlikely accident, such as hypothetical-core-disruptive accidents (HCDA's), and not enough attention has been given to accident prevention, which is less severe but more likely sequence. The objective of the EBR-II operational reliability testing (ORT) is to demonstrate that the reactor can be designed and operated to prevent accident. A series of mild duty cycles and overpower transients were designed for accident prevention tests. An assessment of the EBR-II major plant components has been performed to assure structural integrity of the reactor plant for the ORT program. In this paper, the thermal-structural response and structural evaluation of the reactor vessel, the reactor-vessel cover, the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the superheater are presented

  20. Thermal-hydraulic tests for reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Se Young; Chung, Moon Ki; Baek, Won Pil

    2002-05-01

    Tests for the safety depressurization system, Sparger adopted for the Korean next generation reactor, APR1400 are carried out for several geometries with the B and C (Blowdown and Condensation) facility in the condition of high temperature and pressure and with a small test facility in the condition of atmospheric temperature and pressure. Tests for the critical heat flux are performed with the RCS(Reactor Coolant System) facility as well as with the Freon CHF Loop in the condition of high temperature and pressure. The atmospheric temperature and pressure facility is utilized for development of the high standard thermal hydraulic measurement technology. The optical method is developed to measure the local thermal-hydraulic behavior for the single and two-phase boiling phenomena

  1. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of porous bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum design of nuclear reactor core requires an iterative approach between the thermal-hydraulic, neutronic and operational analysis. This paper concentrates on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a hydrogen cooled, small particle bed reactor (PBR). The PBR core, modeled here, consists of a hexagonal array of fuel elements embedded in a moderator matrix. The fuel elements are annular packed beds of fuel particles held between two porous cylindrical frits. These particles, 500 to 600 μm in diameter, have a uranium carbide core, which is coated by two layers of graphite and an outer coating of zirconium carbide. Coolant flow, radially inward, from the cold frit through the packed bed and hot frit and axially out the channel, formed by the hot frit, to a common plenum. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  2. Thermal reactor. [liquid silicon production from silane gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Ford, L. B. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A thermal reactor apparatus and method of pyrolyticaly decomposing silane gas into liquid silicon product and hydrogen by-product gas is disclosed. The thermal reactor has a reaction chamber which is heated well above the decomposition temperature of silane. An injector probe introduces the silane gas tangentially into the reaction chamber to form a first, outer, forwardly moving vortex containing the liquid silicon product and a second, inner, rewardly moving vortex containing the by-product hydrogen gas. The liquid silicon in the first outer vortex deposits onto the interior walls of the reaction chamber to form an equilibrium skull layer which flows to the forward or bottom end of the reaction chamber where it is removed. The by-product hydrogen gas in the second inner vortex is removed from the top or rear of the reaction chamber by a vortex finder. The injector probe which introduces the silane gas into the reaction chamber is continually cooled by a cooling jacket.

  3. Review of PSI studies on reactor physics and thermal fluid dynamics of pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland is member of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The related work takes entirely place at PSI in the working groups of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors and Very High Temperature Reactors. In the past, PSI has performed experimental and theoretical studies on criticality issues of pebble beds at the PROTEUS reactor, as well as a preliminary risk assessment of a prototypal HTR as an input for a comparison of energy supply options. PROTEUS was a critical assembly with an annular driver zone. The central region was filled by arrangements of fuel spheres. The reactivity effect of a water ingress was investigated by simulating the water by polyethylene rods of different diameter inserted into the gaps of a regular package. For sub-criticality measurements in pebble beds, a built-in pulsed neutron source was used. The experimental results were used to validate diffusion and higher order neutron transport models. Concerning thermal hydraulics of gas flows, the vast experience of PSI is focused on hydrogen transport, accumulation, and dispersion in containments of light water reactors. The phenomena are comparable in many aspects to the fluid dynamic issues relevant to HTR. Experiments on hydrogen flows are performed for numerous scenarios in the large-scale containment test facility PANDA. Hydrogen is substituted by helium as a model fluid. An important generic aspect is turbulent mixing in the presence of strong stratification, which is relevant for HTR as well. In a parallel project, generic small-scale mixing experiments with a high density ratio of 1:7 are carried out in a horizontal rectangular channel, where helium and nitrogen flows are brought into contact downstream of the rear edge of a splitter plate. Due to the high density ratio, turbulent mixing is affected by strong non-Boussinesq effects. The measurements taken by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Induced Fluorescence techniques are compared to RANS and LES simulations. Similar large

  4. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  6. Revision of construction plan for advanced thermal demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Federation of Electric Power Companies demanded the revision of the construction plan for the advanced thermal demonstration reactor, which is included in the 'Long term plan on the research, development and utilization of atomic energy' decided by the Atomic Energy Commission in 1994, for economical reason. The Atomic Energy Commission carried out the deliberation on this demand. It was found that the cost of construction increases to 580 billion yen, and the cost of electric power generation increases three times as high as that of LWRs. The role as the reactor that utilizes MOX fuel can be substituted by LWRs. The relation of trust with the local town must be considered. In view of these circumstances, it is judged that the stoppage of the construction plan is appropriate. It is necessary to investigate the substitute plan for the stoppage, and the viewpoints of investigating the substitute plan, the examination of the advanced BWR with all MOX fuel core and the method of advancing its construction are considered. On the research and development related to advanced thermal reactors, the research and development contributing to the advance of nuclear fuel recycling are advanced, and the prototype reactor 'Fugen' is utilized. (K.I.)

  7. Numerical Modelling of Wood Gasification in Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirka, Ivan; Živný, Oldřich; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 947-965 ISSN 0272-4324 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma modelling * CFD * Thermal plasma reactor * Biomass * Gasification * Syngas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9812-z

  8. FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THERMAL-FISSION NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, O.

    1961-01-10

    Fuel elements for thermal-fission nuclear reactors are described. The fuel element is comprised of a core of alumina, a film of a metal of the class consisting of copper, silver, and nickel on the outer face of the core, and a coating of an oxide of a metal isotope of the class consisting of Un/sup 235/, U/ sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/ on the metal f ilm.

  9. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Pickering, J.L.; Black, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described having a thermal barrier for supporting a fuel column of a nuclear reactor core within a reactor vessel having a fixed rigid metal liner. The fuel column has a refractory post extending downward. The thermal barrier comprises, in combination, a metallic core support having an interior chamber secured to the metal liner; fibrous thermal insulation material covering the metal liner and surrounding the metallic core support; means associated with the metallic core support and resting on the top for locating and supporting the full column post; and a column of ceramic material located within the interior chamber of the metallic core support, the height of the column is less than the height of the metallic core support so that the ceramic column will engage the means for locating and supporting the fuel column post only upon plastic deformation of the metallic core support; the core support comprises a metallic cylinder and the ceramic column comprises coaxially aligned ceramic pads. Each pad has a hole located within the metallic cylinder by means of a ceramic post passing through the holes in the pads

  10. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  11. Space nuclear reactor SP-100 thermal-hydraulic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Camillo, Giannino P.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2009-01-01

    Since 1983 it has been under development in the USA the project SP-100 of space nuclear reactors for electric generation in a range of 100 to 1000 KWe. In this project the heat is generated at the core of a fast compact liquid lithium refrigerated reactor. Thermoelectric converters produce direct current electric energy and the primary and secondary loops flow is controlled by electromagnetic thermoelectric pumps (EMTE). In this work it is studied a system with a fast nuclear reactor, with similar characteristics to the SP-100, aiming at generating high electric power in space for a future application on the TERRA (Advanced Fast Reactor Technology) Project of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies). It will be presented the working principles, basic structure and operation characteristics of an electromagnetic thermoelectric pump (EMTE) for a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor refrigeration loops flow control. In order to determine the operating point of the reactor, it is indispensable the simulation of the EMTE pump along with the other components of the system, once all the working parameters are connected. So, it has been developed a computer system, named BEMTE-3 (a FORTRAN micro-computer code), which simulates the primary and secondary refrigeration components of liquid metal cooled fast space reactor. This computer code also simulates the thermoelectric conversion, with the flow being controlled by the EMTE pump with thermoelectric converters, determining the system operation point for a given nominal operating power. The BEMTE-3 is used for the study of the SP-100 primary and secondary loops thermal-hydraulic simulation and for the calculation of the operating point of the system based on data from available projects. (author)

  12. Nodal equivalence theory for hexagonal geometry, thermal reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zika, M.; Downar, T.

    1992-01-01

    An important aspect of advanced nodal methods is the determination of equivalent few-group parameters for the relatively large homogenized regions used in the nodal flux solution. The theoretical foundation for light water reactor (LWR) assembly homogenization methods has been clearly established, and during the last several years, its successes have secured its position in the stable of dependable LWR analysis methods. Groupwise discontinuity factors that correct for assembly homogenization errors are routinely generated along with the group constants during lattice physics analysis. During the last several years, there has been interest in applying equivalence theory to other reactor types and other geometries. A notable effort has been the work at Argonne National Laboratory to incorporate nodal equivalence theory (NET) for hexagonal lattices into the nodal diffusion option of the DIF3D code. This work was originally intended to improve the neutronics methods used for the analysis of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), and Ref. 4 discusses the success of that application. More recently, however, attempts were made to apply NET to advanced, thermal reactor designs such as the modular high-temperature gas reactor (MHTGR) and the new production heavy water reactor (NPR/HWR). The same methods that were successful for EBR-II have encountered problems for these reactors. Our preliminary analysis indicates that the sharp global flux gradients in these cores requires large discontinuity factors (greater than 4 or 5) to reproduce the reference solution. This disrupts the convergence of the iterative methods used to solve for the node-wise flux moments and partial currents. Several attempts to remedy the problem have been made over the last few years, including bounding the discontinuity factors and providing improved initial guesses for the flux solution, but nothing has been satisfactory

  13. Influence of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha buildup on tokamak reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tolliver, J.S.; Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fast alpha diffusion and thermal alpha accumulation on the confinement capability of a candidate Engineering Test Reactor plasma (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) in achieving ignition and steady-state driven operation has been assessed using both global and 1-1/2-dimensional transport models. Estimates are made of the threshold for radial diffusion of fast alphas and thermal alpha buildup. It is shown that a relatively low level of radial transport, when combined with large gradients in the fast alpha density, leads to a significant radial flow with a deleterious effect on plasma performance. Similarly, modest levels of thermal alpha concentration significantly influence the ignition and steady-state burn capability

  14. Independent assessment for new nuclear reactor safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Auria Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous framework for safety assessment is established in all countries where nuclear technology is used for the production of electricity. On the one side, industry, i.e. reactor designers, vendors and utilities perform safety analysis and demonstrate consistency between results of safety analyses and requirements. On the other side, regulatory authorities perform independent assessment of safety and confirm the acceptability of safety of individual reactor units. The process of comparing results from analyses by reactor utilities and regulators is very complex. The process is also highly dependent upon mandatory approaches pursued for the analysis and from very many details which required the knowledge of sensitive proprietary data (e.g. spacer designs. Furthermore, all data available for the design, construction and operation of reactors produced by the nuclear industry are available to regulators. Two areas for improving the process of safety assessment for individual Nuclear Power Plant Units are identified: New details introduced by industry are not always and systematically requested by regulators for the independent assessment; New analytical techniques and capabilities are not necessarily used in the analyses by regulators (and by the industry. The established concept of independent assessment constitutes the way for improving the process of safety assessment. This is possible, or is largely facilitated, by the recent availability of the so-called Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty approach.

  15. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  16. Positron annihilation studies on reactor irradiated and thermal annealed ferrocene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques Netto, A.; Carvalho, R.S.; Magalhaes, W.F.; Sinisterra, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Retention and thermal annealing following (n, γ) reaction in solid ferrocene, Fe(C 5 H 5 ) 2 , were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PAL). Positronium (Ps) formation was observed in the non-irradiated compound with a probability or intensity (I 3 ) of 30%. Upon irradiation of the compound with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, I 3 decreases with increasing irradiation time. Thermal treatment again increases I 3 values from 16% to 25%, revealing an important proportion of molecular reformation without variation of the ortho-positronium lifetime (τ 3 ). These results point out the major influence of the electronic structure as determining the Ps yields in the pure complex. In the irradiated and non irradiated complexes the results are satisfactorily explained on the basis of the spur model. (orig.)

  17. Methods and tools to detect thermal noise in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, M.; Giovannini, R.

    1985-07-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Methods and Tools to Detect Thermal Noise in Fast Reactors'' was held in Bologna on 8-10 October 1984. The meeting was hosted by the ENEA and was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. 17 participants attended the meeting from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, Joint Research Centre of CEC and from IAEA. The meeting was presided over by Prof. Mario Motta of Italy. The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss methods and tools for temperature noise detection and related analysis as a potential means for detecting local blockages in fuel and blanket subassemblies and other faults in LMFBR. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions as follows: 1. National review presentations on application purposes and research activities for thermal noise detection. (5 papers); 2. Detection instruments and electronic equipment for temperature measurements in fast reactors. (5 papers); 3. Physical models. (2 papers); 4. Signal processing techniques. (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  18. Comparison of Several Thermal Conductivity Constants for Thermal Hydraulic Calculation of Pebble Bed Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, Dwi; Setiadipura, Topan; Pramutadi, Asril

    2017-07-01

    There are two type of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR), prismatic and pebble bed. Pebble Bed type has unique configuration because the fuels are randomly distributed inside the reactor core. In term of safety features, Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is one of the most promising reactor type in avoiding severe nuclear accidents. In order to analyze heat transfer and safety of this reactor type, a computer code is now under development. As a first step, calculation method proposed by Stroh [1] is adopted. An approach has been made to treat randomly distributed pebble balls contains fissile material inside the reactor core as a porous medium. Helium gas act as coolant on the reactor system are carrying heat flowing in the area between the pebble balls. Several parameters and constants are taken into account in the new developed code. Progress of the development of the code especially comparison of several thermal conductivity constants for a certain PBR-case are reported in the present study.

  19. Strategic need for a multi-purpose thermal hydraulic loop for support of advanced reactor technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su -Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation

  20. Proceedings of the 10. Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Bastos, W. dos

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings presents all the Meeting papers emphasizing specific aspects on reactor physics method, criticality, fuel management, nuclear data, safety analysis, simulation and shielding, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, reactor operation and computational methods

  1. Thermal storage for solar cooling using paired ammoniated salt reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    The feasibility of using various solid and liquid ammoniates in heat pump-thermal storage systems for space heating and cooling was conducted. Corrosion testing of selected metallic and non-metallic specimens in the ammoniates was investigated. Results of the corrosion testing showed that problems exist with manganese and magnesium chloride ammoniates, except with the teflon which displayed excellent resistance in all environments. Also, all liquid ammoniates are unsuitable for use with uncoated carbon steel. Cycling of the manganese chloride between the high and low ammoniates does not affect its properties. However, the density change between the high and low ammoniates could cause packing problems in a reactor which constrains the salt volume. Subscale tests with solid ammoniates indicated that the heat transfer coefficient in a fixed bed reactor is low (approx. 1 Btu/h-ft(2)-OF). Therefore solid ammoniates are not practical because of the high heat exchanger cost requirement.

  2. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic considerations for particle bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, R.; Araj, K. J.; Horn, F.

    In the design of particle bed reactor (PBR) cores, consideration must be given to the gas coolant channels and their configuration. Neutronics analysis provides the relative volume fractions of the component materials, but these must be arranged in such a manner as to allow proper cooling of all components by the gas flow at relatively low pressure drops. The thermal hydraulic aspects of this problem are addressed. A description of the computer model used in the analysis of the steady state condition is also included. Blowdown tests on hot particle bed fuel elements were carried out and are described.

  4. Thermal reactor benchmark testing of 69 group library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng; Wang Yaoqing; Liu Ping; Zhang Baocheng

    1994-01-01

    Using a code system NSLINK, AMPX master library in WIMS 69 groups structure are made from nuclides relating to 4 newest evaluated nuclear data libraries. Some integrals of 10 thermal reactor benchmark assemblies recommended by the U.S. CSEWG are calculated using rectified PASC-1 code system and compared with foreign results, the authors results are in good agreement with others. 69 group libraries of evaluated data bases in TPFAP interface file are generated with NJOY code system. The k ∞ values of 6 cell lattice assemblies are calculated by the code CBM. The calculated results are analysed and compared

  5. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor using a RELAP5 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Antonella L.; Reis, Patricia Amelia L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Soares, Humberto V.

    2010-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is widely used for thermal hydraulic studies of commercial nuclear power plants. Current investigations and code adaptations have demonstrated that the RELAP5 code can be also applied for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research reactors with good predictions. Therefore, as a contribution to the assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.3 for research reactors analysis, this work presents steady-state and transient calculation results performed using a RELAP5 model to simulate the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at 50 kilowatts (kW) of power operation. The reactor is located in the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), Brazil. It is a 250 kW, light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open pool type research reactor. The development and the assessment of a RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA are presented. Experimental data were considered in the process of the RELAP5 model validation. The RELAP5 results were also compared with calculated data from the STHIRP-1 (Research Reactors Thermal Hydraulic Simulation) code. The results obtained have shown that the RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA reproduces the actual steady-state reactor behavior in good agreement with the available data.

  6. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Aksan, N.; Andersen, J.; Yan, J.; Simoneau, J.P.; Leung, L.; Bertrand, F.; Aoto, K.; Kamide, H.

    2013-01-01

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs

  7. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of porous bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum design of nuclear reactor cores requires an iterative approach between the thermal-hydraulic, neutronic, and operational analysis. This paper will concentrate on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a hydrogen-cooled small particle bed reactor (PBR). The PBR core modeled here consists of a hexagonal array of fuel elements embedded in a moderator matrix. The fuel elements are annular packed beds of fuel particles held between two porous cylindrical frits. These particles, 500 to 600 μm in diameter, have a uranium carbide core, which is coated by two layers of graphite and an outer coating of zirconium carbide. Coolant flows, radially inward, from the cold frit through the packed bed and hot frit and axially out the channel, formed by the hot frit to a common plenum. A fast running one-dimensional lumped-parameter steady-state code (FTHP) was developed to evaluate the effects of design changes in fuel assembly and power distribution. Another objective for the code was to investigate various methods of coolant control to minimize hot channel effects and maximize outlet temperatures

  8. Reactor physics analysis of the pin-cell Doppler effect in a thermal nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de

    1995-01-01

    This report has also been published as a PhD thesis. It deals with the Doppler effect in thermal nuclear reactors. Especially the behaviour of the reactor in transient conditions is an important issue. During such a transient the radial temperature profile in a fuel pin changes. In this PhD research effective fuel temperatures have been calculated for arbitrary temperature profiles in the fuel pin with the improved slowing-down code ROLAIDS-CPM. A general expression for the effective fuel temperature in a specific fuel pin is found by defining this effective fuel temperature as a weighted sum of the temperatures in different radial fuel zones. Also, the radial power profile in a fuel pin has been calculated by performing detailed burnup calculations, which agree very well with experimental data. (orig.).

  9. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, F.; Galassi, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  10. Scaling in nuclear reactor system thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Auria, F., E-mail: dauria@ing.unipi.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Galassi, G.M. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, University of Pisa, Via Diotisalvi 2, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Scaling is a reference 'key-word' in engineering and in physics. The relevance of scaling in the water cooled nuclear reactor technology constitutes the motivation for the present paper. The origin of the scaling-issue, i.e. the impossibility to get access to measured data in case of accident in nuclear reactors, is discussed at first. The so-called 'scaling-controversy' constitutes an outcome. Then, a critical survey (or 'scaling state-of-art';) is given of the attempts and of the approaches to provide a solution to the scaling-issue in the area of Nuclear Reactor System Thermal-Hydraulics (NRSTH): dimensionless design factors for Integral Test Facilities (ITF) are distinguished from scaling factors. The last part of the paper has a two-fold nature: (a) classifying the information about achievements in the area of thermal-hydraulics which are relevant to scaling: the concepts of 'scaling-pyramid' and the related 'scaling bridges' are introduced; (b) establishing a logical path across the scaling achievements (represented as a 'scaling puzzle'). In this context, the 'roadmap for scaling' is proposed: the objective is addressing the scaling issue when demonstrating the applicability of system codes in the licensing process of nuclear power plants. The code itself is referred hereafter as the 'key-to-scaling'. The database from the operation of properly scaled ITF and the availability of qualified system codes are identified as main achievements in NRSTH connected with scaling. The 'roadmap to scaling' constitutes a unified approach to scaling which aims at solving the 'scaling puzzle' created by researches performed during a half-a-century period.

  11. Assessment of the HPLWR thermal core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Maraczy, C. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI, Budapest (Hungary); Bernnat, W.; Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The core design concept of the High Performance Light Water Reactor features a thermal neutron spectrum, provided by additional moderator water in water boxes and in gaps between assembly boxes, and a heat-up of the coolant in three steps from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C. Intermediate coolant mixing has been foreseen by mixing chambers underneath and above the core to overcome the hot channel issue of a core design with a large enthalpy rise. The paper summarizes the various analyses performed within the project HPLWR-Phase 2 with respect to this core design and assesses how far the initial design target has been met. (author)

  12. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  13. Containment concepts assessment for the SEAFP reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Pace, L.; Natalizio, A.

    2000-01-01

    A simple methodology has been developed for making relative comparisons of potential containment designs for future fusion reactors. The assessment methodology requires only conceptual design information. The application of this methodology, at the early stages of a fusion reactor design, provides designers useful information regarding the suitability of various containment designs and design features. Because the radiation hazard from the operation of future fusion power reactors is expected to be low, the containment design, in addition to public safety, needs to take into account worker safety considerations, as well as factors important to the reliable and economical operation of the power plant. Several containment concepts have been assessed with a methodology that takes into account public safety, worker safety, operability and maintainability as well as cost. This paper describes this methodology and presents the results of the assessment. The paper concludes that, to obtain a containment design that is optimised with respect to safety, operational and cost factors, designers should focus on a containment that is conceptually simple-that is, one utilising a single, large containment building without relying on special features such as expansion volumes, pressure suppression pools or spray systems

  14. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  15. Prestressed concrete reactor vessel thermal cylinder model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, J.P.; Canonico, D.A.; Richardson, M.; Corum, J.M.; Dodge, W.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal cylinder experiment was designed both to provide information for evaluating the capability of analytical methods to predict the time-dependent stress-strain behavior of a 1 / 6 -scale model of the barrel section of a single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel and to demonstrate the structural behavior under design and off-design thermal conditions. The model was a thick-walled cylinder having a height of 1.22 m, a thickness of 0.46 m, and an outer diameter of 2.06 m. It was prestressed both axially and circumferentially and subjected to 4.83 MPa internal pressure together with a thermal crossfall imposed by heating the inner surface to 338.8 K and cooling the outer surface to 297.1 K. The initial 460 days of testing were divided into time periods that simulated prestressing, heatup, reactor operation, and shutdown. At the conclusion of the simulated operating period, the model was repressurized and subjected to localized heating at 505.4 K for 84 days to produce an off-design hot-spot condition. Comparisons of experimental data with calculated values obtained using the SAFE-CRACK finite-element computer program showed that the program was capable of predicting time-dependent behavior in a vessel subjected to normal operating conditions, but that it was unable to accurately predict the behavior during off-design hot-spot heating. Readings made using a neutron and gamma-ray backscattering moisture probe showed little, if any, migration of moisture in the concrete cross section. Destructive examination indicated that the model maintained its basic structural integrity during localized hot-spot heating

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chung, M. K.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of advanced nuclear reactor system for evaluating key thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant to new safety concepts. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. The Followings are main research topics: - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation-induced Thermal Mixing in a Pool - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Construction of T-H Data Base

  17. VISTA : thermal-hydraulic integral test facility for SMART reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K. Y.; Park, H. S.; Cho, S.; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.

    2003-01-01

    Preliminary performance tests were carried out using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility, VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents), which has been constructed to simulate the SMART-P. The VISTA facility is an integral test facility including the primary and secondary systems as well as safety-related Passive Residual Heat Removal (PRHR) systems. Its scaled ratio with respect to the SMART-P is 1/1 in height and 1/96 in volume and heater power. Several steady states and power changing tests have been carried out to verify the overall thermal hydraulic primary and secondary characteristics in the range of 10% to 100% power operation. As for the preliminary results, the steady state conditions were found to coincide with the expected design values of the SMART-P. But the major thermal hydraulic parameters are greatly affected by the initial water level and the nitrogen pressure in the reactor's upper annular cavity. The power step/ramp changing tests are successfully carried out and the system responses are observed. The primary natural circulation operation is achieved, but advanced control logics need to be developed to reach the natural circulation mode without pressure excursion. In the PRHR transient tests, the natural circulation flow rate through the PRHR system was found to be about 10 percent in the early phases of PRHR operation

  18. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  19. A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle for advanced gas cooled fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyoshi, Kato; Takeshi, NItawaki; Yoshio, Yoshizawa

    2001-01-01

    A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle concept has been proposed for gas cooled fast and thermal reactors. The fast reactor with the concept are evaluated to be a potential alternative option to liquid metal cooled fast reactors, providing comparable cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature, eliminating the safety problems, simplifying the heat transport system and making easier plant maintenance. The thermal reactor with the concept is expected to be an alternative solution to current high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas turbines, allowing comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate temperature of 650 C instead of 800 C in HTGRs. (author)

  20. Assessment of Sensor Technologies for Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, Kofi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vlim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Britton, Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wootan, D. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anheier, Jr, N. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Diaz, A. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hirt, E. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, H. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sheen, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gopalsami, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heifetz, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tam, S. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Park, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Upadhyaya, B. R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stanford, A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Sensors and measurement technologies provide information on processes, support operations and provide indications of component health. They are therefore crucial to plant operations and to commercialization of advanced reactors (AdvRx). This report, developed by a three-laboratory team consisting of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), provides an assessment of sensor technologies and a determination of measurement needs for AdvRx. It provides the technical basis for identifying and prioritizing research targets within the instrumentation and control (I&C) Technology Area under the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program and contributes to the design and implementation of AdvRx concepts.

  1. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  2. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  3. Open thermal-hydraulic research issues in western nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicken, E.F.

    2004-01-01

    It is common practice to access the system or component behavior of Nuclear Power Reactors on the basis of code calculations, operating experience and common engineering practice. It is, therefore, necessary to base the design and the approval by Licensing Bodies on a confidence in thermal-hydraulic and neutronic knowledge. It has be assessed if relevant phenomena may exist which have not yet been identified. This question is assessed by studying if the three basic safety requirements - the control of the reactivity - the cooling of the core - the confinement of fission products are met; if these requirements are met, the plant is 'safe'. Because these basic safety requirements are generally met - with the possible exception of containment integrity when exposed to loads from Severe Accidents - there are no additional needs for research to validate the safety level of existing reactors. However, research for new designs with a higher safety level or new phenomena might be mandatory. Also some additional research will be necessary to keep the level of safety (e.g. due to aging) or might be beneficial to reduce operating costs. Besides keeping a high safety level industry is aiming for lifetime extension, power increase, higher burn-ups and higher availability. Therefore, it is understandable that industry decreased its support for thermal-hydraulics for operating reactors. With regard to operation and the safety of existing reactors the author does not know of any request by licensing authorities for major R and D in thermal-hydraulics. Only in the area of Severe Accidents with core melt sequences some validation is requested. There is one area of common interest for utilities as well as for licensing bodies, namely the full scope, real-time simulators. Industry, licensing bodies and the European Union are responsible to keep the competence in nuclear safety - consequently also in thermal-hydraulics. Because advanced computer codes require much more information than

  4. Integral test of JENDL-3.3 for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Mori, Takamasa

    2003-01-01

    Criticality benchmark testing was carried out for 59 experiments in various thermal reactors using a continues-energy Monte Carlo code MVP and its different libraries generated from JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VI (R8). From the benchmark results, we can say JENDL-3.3 generally gives better k eff values compared with other nuclear data libraries. However, further modification of JENDL-3.3 is expected to solve the following problems: 1) systematic underestimation of k eff depending on 235 U enrichment for the cores with low (less than 3wt.%) enriched uranium fueled cores, 2) dependence of C/E value of k eff on neutron spectrum and plutonium composition for MOX fueled cores. These are common problems for all of the nuclear data libraries used in this study. (author)

  5. Thermal hydraulic stability in a pressure tube nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villani, A.; Ravetta, R.; Mansani, L.

    1986-01-01

    The CIRENE plant which will undergo preoperational tests in the near future is equipped with a 40 MW(e) Heavy Water moderated Boiling Light Water cooled Reactor (HWBLWR); at the start-up and up to about 30 % of nominal power, the necessary low coolant density is obtained injecting into the core a mixture of liquid and steam. To verify the thermal-hydraulic stability of the plant in this situation, tests have been carried out in a facility simulating two full scale power channels; the system stability has been confirmed in the reference conditions, and is not reduced by even a significant reduction of the liquid flowrate, where a decrease in liquid temperature has some negative effect and steam flowrate has a small influence. (author)

  6. Assessment of core protection and monitoring systems for an advanced reactor SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang Kee; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Yoo, Yeon Jong; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2002-01-01

    Analogue and digital core protection/monitoring systems were assessed for the implementation in an advanced reactor. The core thermal margins to nuclear fuel design limits (departure from nucleate boiling and fuel centerline melting) were estimated using the design data for a commercial pressurized water reactor and an advanced reactor. The digital protection system resulted in a greater power margin to the fuel centerline melting by at least 30% of rated power for both commercial and advanced reactors. The DNB margin with the digital system is also higher than that for the analogue system by 8 and 12.1% of rated power for commercial and advanced reactors, respectively. The margin gain with the digital system is largely due to the on-line calculations of DNB ratio and peak local power density from the live sensor signals. The digital core protection and monitoring systems are, therefore, believed to be more appropriate for the advanced reactor

  7. The Storage of Thermal Reactor Safety Analysis data (STRESA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanarro Colodron, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Storage of Thermal Reactor Safety Analysis data (STRESA) is an online information system that contains three technical databases: 1) European Nuclear Research Facilities, open to all online visitors; 2) Nuclear Experiments, available only to registered users; 3) Results Data, being the core content of the information system, its availability depends on the role and organisation of each user. Its main purpose is to facilitate the exchange of experimental data produced by large Euratom funded scientific projects addressing severe accidents, providing at the same time a secure repository for this information. Due to its purpose and architecture, it has become an important asset for networks of excellence as SARNET or NUGENIA. The Severe Accident ResearchNetwork of Excellence (SARNET)was set up in 2004 under the aegis of the research Euratom Framework Programmes to study severe accidents in watercooled nuclear power plants. Coordinated by the IRSN, SARNET unites 43 organizations involved in research on nuclear reactor safety in 18 European countries plus the USA, Canada, South Korea and India. In 2013, SARNET became fully integrated in the Technical Area N2(TA2), named “Severe accidents” of NUGENIA association, devoted to R&D on fission technology of Generation II and III. (author

  8. Nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics safety analysis and thoughts on FUKUSHIMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this article is to show my thoughts on the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. It is cited from a summary of my lecture talk in Indonesia, in the beginning of the last December, 2011. This talk was based on my previous lecture and seminar talks including those delivered at MIT, June 16, at the ANS Annual Meeting in Hollywood, Florida, June 28 at NURETH-13 in Toronto, September 27, and others. The content is based on the open and latest information available to date in Japan. It may contain some erroneous or uncertain information. I tried to minimize it to my best capability. Also I tried to eliminate any critical issues or opinions that may jeopardize some people who were involved in. The latter half of this article will be excerpts of my recent R and D activities related to the safety-by-design for sodium cooled fast reactors and light water reactors, thermal hydraulics analysis focusing on the simulation-based technology, in particular subchannel analysis and computational fluid dynamics. (J.P.N.)

  9. Thermal comfort assessment of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    A number of metrics for assessing human thermal response to climatic conditions have been proposed in scientific literature over the last decades. They aim at describing human thermal perception of the thermal environment to which an individual or a group of people is exposed. More recently, a new type of “discomfort index” has been proposed for describing, in a synthetic way, long-term phenomena. Starting from a systematic review of a number of long-term global discomfort indices, they are then contrasted and compared on a reference case study in order to identify their similarities and differences and strengths and weaknesses. Based on this analysis, a new short-term local discomfort index is proposed for the American Adaptive comfort model. Finally, a new and reliable long-term general discomfort index is presented. It is delivered in three versions and each of them is suitable to be respectively coupled with the Fanger, the European Adaptive and the American Adaptive comfort models.

  10. Testing ENDF/B-V data for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.S.

    1984-06-01

    Lattice parameters have been calculated for some thermal reactor benchmark lattices using ENDF/B-V data. These lattices were TRX-1,-2; BAPL-UO 2 -1,-2,-3; BNL-ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 -H 2 O-1,-2,-3; MIT-4,-5,-6; and PNL-31,-33,-35 (infinite lattices). In addition, parameters were calculated for 3 ZEEP lattices, 3 High-Conversion UO 2 -H 2 O lattices, and 7 BNL-ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 -D 2 O lattices. These calculations were made using the integral transport cell code RAHAB with the resonance reaction rates obtained using the OZMA code operating in the discrete ordinate mode. This code calculates the resonance rates allowing for the interaction of all resonances. In Revision 1 many of the calculated values have been changed because of the use of revised data for Th-232, and for the thermal scattering matrices for H 2 O and D 2 O. In addition the OZMA calculations for D 2 O-moderated lattices were improved. Four more lattices have been added. The first, LTRIIA, is reported in Addendum 1. It is a D 2 O-moderated lattice of uranium fuel tubes arranged on a tight pitch. The other three, R1/1OOH, R2/100H and R3/100H, are reported in Addendum 2

  11. Lifetime evaluation for thermal fatigue: application at the first wall of a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merola, M.; Biggio, M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal fatigue seems to be the most lifetime limiting phenomenon for the first wall of the next generation Tokamak fusion reactors. This work deals with the problem of the thermal fatigue in relation to the lifetime prediction of the fusion reactor first wall. The aim is to compare different lifetime methodologies among them and with experimental results. To fulfil this purpose, it has been necessary to develop a new numerical methodology, called reduced-3D, especially suitable for thermal fatigue problems

  12. Thermal durability of modified Synroc material as reactor fuel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira; Kanazawa, Hiroyuki; Togashi, Yoshihiro; Matumoto, Seiichiro; Nishino, Yasuharu; Ohwada, Isao; Nakata, Masahito; Amano, Hidetoshi; Mitamura, Hisayoshi

    1994-08-01

    A Synroc, a polyphase titanate ceramics composed of three mineral phases (perovskite, hollandite and zirconolite), has an excellent performance of immobilization of high level nuclear waste. A working group in the Department of Hot Laboratories paid special attention to this merit and started a development study on a LWR fuel named 'Waste Disposal Possible (WDP) Fuel', which has the two functions of a reactor fuel and a waste form. The present paper mainly describes thermal durability of a modified Synroc material, which is essentially important for applying the material to a fuel matrix. The two kinds of Synroc specimens, designated 'SM' as modified and 'SB' as a reference, were prepared by hot-pressing and annealed at 1200degC to 1500degC for 30 min in air. Unexpected and peculiar spherical voids were observed in the specimen SM at 1400degC and 1500degC, which caused the specimen swelling. The formation of the voids depends significantly on the existence of spherical precipitates seen in the as-fabricated specimen including latent micropores with high pressure. On the other hand, the heat treatment at 1500degC formed additional new phases, designated 'Phase A' for the specimen SB and 'Phase X' for SM. Phase A is a decomposition product of hollandite and Phase X a reaction product of Phase A and perovskite in the spherical voids. Furthermore, additional information and thermal properties examined are presented in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2, respectively. It was recognized that the modified Synroc specimen SM had excellent thermal properties. (author)

  13. Effects of low upper shelf fracture toughness on reactor vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamford, W.H.; Heinecke, C.C.; Balkey, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    For the past decade, significant attention has been focused on the subject of nuclear rector vessel integrity during pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events. The issue of low upper shelf fracture toughness at operating temperatures has been a consideration for some reactor vessel materials since the early 1970's. Deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity studies have been completed to evaluate the interaction between the PTS and lower upper shelf toughness issues that result from neutron embrittlement of the critical beltline region materials. This paper presents the results of these studies to show the interdependency of these fracture considerations in certain instances and to identify parameters that need to be carefully treated in reactor vessel integrity evaluations for these subjects. This issue is of great importance to those vessels which have low upper shelf toughness, both for demonstrating safety during the original design life and in life extension assessments

  14. HTGR reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion uncertainty analysis: a proposed IAEA coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Reitsma, Frederik; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2011-01-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis and uncertainty analysis methods. In order to benefit from recent advances in modeling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors recommended that the proposed IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling be implemented. In the paper the current status and plan are presented. The CRP will also benefit from interactions with the currently ongoing OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) UAM benchmark activity by taking into consideration the peculiarities of HTGR designs and simulation requirements. (author)

  15. VISA-2, Reactor Vessel Failure Probability Under Thermal Shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, F.; Johnson, K.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: VISA2 (Vessel Integrity Simulation Analysis) was developed to estimate the failure probability of nuclear reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock conditions. The deterministic portion of the code performs heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations for a vessel subjected to a user-specified temperature and pressure transient. The probabilistic analysis performs a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the probability of vessel failure. Parameters such as initial crack size and position, copper and nickel content, fluence, and the fracture toughness values for crack initiation and arrest are treated as random variables. Linear elastic fracture mechanics methods are used to model crack initiation and growth. This includes cladding effects in the heat transfer, stress, and fracture mechanics calculations. The simulation procedure treats an entire vessel and recognizes that more than one flaw can exist in a given vessel. The flaw model allows random positioning of the flaw within the vessel wall thickness, and the user can specify either flaw length or length-to-depth aspect ratio for crack initiation and arrest predictions. The flaw size distribution can be adjust on the basis of different inservice inspection techniques and inspection conditions. The toughness simulation model includes a menu of alternative equations for predicting the shift in the reference temperature of the nil-ductility transition. 2 - Method of solution: The solution method uses closed form equations for temperatures, stresses, and stress intensity factors. A polynomial fitting procedure approximates the specified pressure and temperature transient. Failure probabilities are calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of 30 welds. VISA2 models only the belt-line (cylindrical) region of a reactor vessel. The stresses are a function of the radial (through-wall) coordinate only

  16. Deposition reactors for solar grade silicon: A comparative thermal analysis of a Siemens reactor and a fluidized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Filtvedt, W. O.; Lindholm, D.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Rodríguez, A.; del Cañizo, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polysilicon production costs contribute approximately to 25-33% of the overall cost of the solar panels and a similar fraction of the total energy invested in their fabrication. Understanding the energy losses and the behaviour of process temperature is an essential requirement as one moves forward to design and build large scale polysilicon manufacturing plants. In this paper we present thermal models for two processes for poly production, viz., the Siemens process using trichlorosilane (TCS) as precursor and the fluid bed process using silane (monosilane, MS). We validate the models with some experimental measurements on prototype laboratory reactors relating the temperature profiles to product quality. A model sensitivity analysis is also performed, and the effects of some key parameters such as reactor wall emissivity and gas distributor temperature, on temperature distribution and product quality are examined. The information presented in this paper is useful for further understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of both deposition technologies, and will help in optimal temperature profiling of these systems aiming at lowering production costs without compromising the solar cell quality.

  17. Safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    One of the first tasks of the NFPQT Committee was to determine which DOE reactors would be assessed. The Committee determined that in view of the limited time available to conduct the assessment, 13 DOE reactors were of such size (physical, power or fission product inventory) to warrant review. This determination was approved by the Under Secretary. A decision was also made in the cases of three weapons material production reactors, C, K and P, to concentrate on the K reactor only, since all three are of the same basic design, have the same operating features, are all at the same site, and are all operated by the same contractor. The assessment was accomplished in the following ways: reviewing the results of assessments conducted by the DOE organizations with reactor safety responsibilities, which were undertaken in compliance with the request of the various program directors; reviewing selected documents that were requested by the Committee and assembled at DOE Headquarters; interviewing DOE Headquarters and Field Office personnel; and conducting on-site reviews of four reactors located at four different sites. The four reactors for on-site reviews were: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); K Production Reactor; High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR); and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Specific findings and recommendations from the assessment are presented

  18. Nuclear reactor having thermally compensated support structure for a fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borst, R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensation system for nuclear reactor fuel assemblies is disclosed which utilizes materials with different rates of thermal expansion in appropriate components so to: retain alignment of the assembly; reduce or eliminate thermal bow; and reduce or eliminate jump movement of fuel assemblies. (orig.)

  19. CFD Prediction of Thermal-Hydraulic Characteristics Inside a Containment of a CANDU-6 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Woong; Choi, Yong Seog; Kim, Hyun Koon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Nho, Hyun Suk [Advanced Technology Engineering Service, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    During the course of accident in a CANDU reactor, large amounts of flow mass, enthalpy and hydrogen could be generated and released into the containment. The integrity of the containment could be challenged by certain hydrogen and hydraulic dynamic load. Therefore, a detailed knowledge of containment thermal-hydraulics is necessary to predict the local distribution of hydrogen, steam and air inside the containment. Considerable international efforts have been undertaken to better understand the associated phenomena by conducting a large number of experiments such as ISP 23, ISP29, ISP 35, etc. and then subjecting the test results to extensive analytical assessment. Moreover, the recent progress in CFD methods has provided opportunities to predict the pressure, temperature and hydrogen distribution under accident conditions reflecting the actual geometry. This capability will lead to a significant improvement of the reliability of accident containment models for full-plant analysis. In this study, the CFD prediction of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics inside a containment of a CANDU-6 reactor is carried out. A MSLB (Main Steam Line Break) scenario was selected to analyze the thermal-hydraulic behavior. The source of vaporized water mass flow rate and enthalpy released for the FLUENT CFD analysis is obtained from a RELAP/CANDU calculation. A comparison between FLUENT CFD and PRESCON results is also performed.

  20. RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic analyses of two pressurized thermal shock sequences for the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolander, M.A.

    1985-10-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analyses of two pressurized thermal shock sequences for the Oconee-1 pressurized water reactor were performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory using the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. This report presents the results of these calculations

  1. Exploratory development of a glass ceramic automobile thermal reactor. [anti-pollution devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, R. E.; Petticrew, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the design, fabrication and test results obtained for glass-ceramic (CER-VIT) automotive thermal reactors. Several reactor designs were evaluated using both engine-dynamometer and vehicle road tests. A maximum reactor life of about 330 hours was achieved in engine-dynamometer tests with peak gas temperatures of about 1065 C (1950 F). Reactor failures were mechanically induced. No evidence of chemical degradation was observed. It was concluded that to be useful for longer times, the CER-VIT parts would require a mounting system that was an improvement over those tested in this program. A reactor employing such a system was designed and fabricated.

  2. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  3. In-core instrumentation and reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Information on the conditions in the reactor core is essential for the safe and economic operation of nuclear reactors. This book reviews the important aspects of measurement and interpretation of reactor core parameters. Contributions of industry and research laboratories on the state of the art cover measurement methods, core performance evaluation, and operating experience

  4. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants operate most economically at a constant power level, providing base load electric power. In an energy grid containing a high fraction of renewable power sources, nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling a nuclear reactor to a large thermal energy storage block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this paper, a Prismatic core Advanced High Temperature Reactor supplies constant power to a lithium chloride molten salt thermal energy storage block that provides thermal power as needed to a closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system. During normal operation, the thermal energy storage block stores thermal energy during the night for use in the times of peak demand during the day. In this case, the nuclear reactor stays at a constant thermal power level. After a loss of forced circulation, the reactor reaches a shut down state in less than half an hour and the average fuel, graphite and coolant temperatures remain well within the design limits over the duration of the transient, demonstrating the inherent safety of the coupled system. (author)

  5. Pseudo-harmonics method: an application to thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C. da; Rotenberg, S.; Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1985-10-01

    Several applications of the Pseudo-Harmonics method are presented, aiming to calculate the neutron flux and the perturbed eigenvalue of a nuclear reactor, like PWR, with three enrichment regions as Angra-1 reactor. In the reference reactor, perturbations of several types as global as local were simulated. The results were compared with those from the direct calculation. (E.G.) [pt

  6. Temperature variation of criticality of thermal reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velner, S.; Rothenstein, W.

    1975-01-01

    Departures from the asymptotic mode in the experimental setup have been examined in detail for two assemblies, one exponential, the other critical. It was found that the flux shape differed noticeably from the asymptotic mode in the core region especially for the exponential assemblies. On the other hand the departure from the fundamental mode has very little effect on the change of material buckling with temperature. Results of the calculations and their comparison with experiment are presented. The variation of material buckling with temperature is the same for ENDF/B-II and for ENDF/B-IV data, both for asymptotic reactor theory and for the buckling values derived from the flux calculated with the SN code. The results obtained with ENDF/B-IV data for both lattices are shown. In the small exponential assembly the results derived from S-4 calculations are compared with experiment. In the critical assembly the ratio of U-238 to U-235 fissions delta 28 and the relative conversion ratio - the ratio of U-238 captures to U-235 fissions in the lattice compared with the same quantity in a thermal column - are also shown. In both cases the experimental change of buckling with temperature is smaller than the calculated change. (B.G.)

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a thermal hygienization reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Borski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For reasons of limiting the spread of serious transmissible diseases, with regard to the requirement for reducing landfill of biodegradable waste (which may or contains animal by-products and thus presents a potential risk to human and animal health and with a focus on supporting its separate collection, there has been created a legal framework for processing and hygienization of materials containing animal by-products. For the above reasons new technologies are being developed and implemented. These technologies are able to ensure the processing of biological waste containing animal by-products. As a practical result of the effort to ensure the hygienization of biowaste, a hygienization unit of own design, which uses the thermal way of hygienization, is presented in this work. The general part of the work defines a legislative framework for the assignment and gives technical parameters and minimum requirements for conversion that hygienization unit should be able to perform, including the limits for digestion residues and compost.In the experimental section there are described operational tests which document the technological process of hygienization depending on the aeration of the contents of the reactor. Experiment III outlines the validation process which uses contamination by indicator organisms, including subsequent checking of their occurrence as well as processing of the results of experiments and evaluation of the process of hygienization.

  8. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses ''generic'' magnetic fusion reactors. The author comments on DT burning magnetic fusion reactor models being possibly operational in the 21st century. Representative parameters from D-T reactor studies are given, as well as a shematic diagram of a generic fusion reactor. Values are given for winding pack current density for existing and future superconducting coils. Topics included are the variation of the cost of electricity (COE), the dependence of the COE on the net electric power of the reactor, and COE formula definitions

  9. Burning plasma simulation and environmental assessment of tokamak, spherical tokamak and helical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Uemura, S.; Oishi, T.; Arimoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Garcia, J.

    2009-01-01

    Reference 1-GWe DT reactors (tokamak TR-1, spherical tokamak ST-1 and helical HR-1 reactors) are designed using physics, engineering and cost (PEC) code, and their plasma behaviours with internal transport barrier operations are analysed using toroidal transport analysis linkage (TOTAL) code, which clarifies the requirement of deep penetration of pellet fuelling to realize steady-state advanced burning operation. In addition, economical and environmental assessments were performed using extended PEC code, which shows the advantage of high beta tokamak reactors in the cost of electricity (COE) and the advantage of compact spherical tokamak in life-cycle CO 2 emission reduction. Comparing with other electric power generation systems, the COE of the fusion reactor is higher than that of the fission reactor, but on the same level as the oil thermal power system. CO 2 reduction can be achieved in fusion reactors the same as in the fission reactor. The energy payback ratio of the high-beta tokamak reactor TR-1 could be higher than that of other systems including the fission reactor.

  10. Gas reactor international cooperative program. HTR-synfuel application assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This study assesses the technical, environmental and economic factors affecting the application of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor (HTR) to: synthetic fuel production; and displacement of fossil fuels in other industrial and chemical processes. Synthetic fuel application considered include coal gasification, direct coal liquefaction, oil shale processing, and the upgrading of syncrude to motor fuel. A wide range of other industrial heat applications was also considered, with emphasis on the use of the closed-loop thermochemical energy pipeline to supply heat to dispersed industrial users. In this application syngas (H 2 +CO 2 ) is produced at the central station HTR by steam reforming and the gas is piped to individual methanators where typically 1000 0 F steam is generated at the industrial user sites. The products of methanation (CH 4 + H 2 O) are piped back to the reformer at the central station HTR

  11. Gas reactor international cooperative program. HTR-synfuel application assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This study assesses the technical, environmental and economic factors affecting the application of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor (HTR) to: synthetic fuel production; and displacement of fossil fuels in other industrial and chemical processes. Synthetic fuel application considered include coal gasification, direct coal liquefaction, oil shale processing, and the upgrading of syncrude to motor fuel. A wide range of other industrial heat applications was also considered, with emphasis on the use of the closed-loop thermochemical energy pipeline to supply heat to dispersed industrial users. In this application syngas (H/sub 2/ +CO/sub 2/) is produced at the central station HTR by steam reforming and the gas is piped to individual methanators where typically 1000/sup 0/F steam is generated at the industrial user sites. The products of methanation (CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O) are piped back to the reformer at the central station HTR.

  12. Thermal hydraulic analysis of flow inversion in a research reactor with downward core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Dae Seong; Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Research reactors with forced downward core cooling experience flow inversion if the primary cooling pump (PCP) is failed. If PCP failure occurs, the downward flow decreases into zero flow and eventually turn into upward flow by natural circulation. During flow inversion phenomenon, reactor cores may undergo the most unfavorable thermal hydraulic condition, which results in the highest coolant and fuel temperatures and lowest thermal margins. The transient thermal hydraulic analyses of loss of flow accidents (LOFA) in IAEA 10MW benchmark MTR research reactor have been widely investigated by many institutes. In this study, a transient thermal hydraulic model of flow inversion is developed and applied to IAEA 10MW benchmark MTR research reactor. The results are compared against other analyses

  13. Probabilistic safety assessment of the PLUTO Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.F.; Coates, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The preliminary finding of a probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) carried out in support of a licensing submission are presented. The research reactor, a 25 MW highly enriched thermal reactor moderated and cooled by D 2 O, is housed in a steel containment building equipped with an active extract system to mitigate any possible release. A full PSA (to level 3) was performed based on the current operational plant making as much use of the plant operational records as possible. A medium sized event tree-fault tree approach was used to allow realistic modelling of operator actions. For reasons of practicality only plant damage states of core melt, fuel damage, and tritium release were defined, all release accident sequences being assigned to one of these states. Prior to discharge to the environment the releases were further sub-divided dependent upon the success of the active extract system. The individual and societal risks were calculated taking account of meterological and demographic conditions. The provisional results indicate that the core melt frequency is in the region of 1 x 10 -4 /yr, the dominant contributor being an unisolatable gross leakage beyond the capabilities of the recovery systems. The core melt frequency is comparable with those of power reactors of a similar age; however, the core inventory and hence release is much smaller; therefore the consequences are much reduced. The risk to an individual at any fixed location 100 m from the plant is assessed as 1 x 10 -6 ; the societal risk is estimated as 6 x 10 -4 . The main contributor to the dose received is from the released iodine. Additional benefit is being obtained from the PSA in several ways: the insights obtained into the function and operation are being incorporated into the operational safety document, whilst the source term results are being used to assist in the refurbishment/improvement of the active extract system

  14. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  15. Thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the JEN-1 Reactor; Caracteristicas hidraulicas y termicas del Reactor JEN-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otra Otra, F.; Leira Rey, G.

    1971-07-01

    In this report an analysis is made of the thermal and hydraulic performances of the JEN-1 reactor operating steadily at 3 Mw of thermal power. The analysis is made separately for the core, main heat exchanger and cooling tower. A portion of the report is devoted to predict the performances of these three main components when and if the reactor was going to operate at a power higher than the maximum 3 Mw attainable today. Finally an study is made of the unsteady operation of the reactor, focusing the attention towards the pumping characteristics and the temperatures obtained in the fuel elements. Reference is made to several digital calculation programmes that nave been developed for such purpose. (Author) 21 refs.

  16. System assessment of helical reactors in comparison with tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Imagawa, S.; Muroga, T.; Sagara, A.; Okamura, S.

    2002-01-01

    A comparative assessment of tokamak and helical reactors has been performed using equivalent physics/engineering model and common costing model. Higher-temperature plasma operation is required in tokamak reactors to increase bootstrap current fraction and to reduce current-drive (CD) power. In helical systems, lower-temperature operation is feasible and desirable to reduce helical ripple transport. The capital cost of helical reactor is rather high, however, the cost of electricity (COE) is almost same as that of tokamak reactor because of smaller re-circulation power (no CD power) and less-frequent blanket replacement (lower neutron wall loading). The standard LHD-type helical reactor with 5% beta value is economically equivalent to the standard tokamak with 3% beta. The COE of lower-aspect ratio helical reactor is on the same level of high-β N tokamak reactors. (author)

  17. Benchmark tests for fast and thermal reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Yuji

    1984-01-01

    Integral tests of JENDL-2 library for fast and thermal reactor applications are reviewed including relevant analyses of JUPITER experiments. Criticality and core center characteristics were tested with one-dimensional models for a total of 27 fast critical assemblies. More sofisticated problems such as reaction rate distributions, control rod worths and sodium void reactivities were tested using two-dimensional models for MOZART and ZPPR-3 assemblies. Main observations from the fast core benchmark tests are as follows. 1) The criticality is well predicted; the average C/E value is 0.999+-0.008 for uranium cores and 0.997+-0.005 for plutonium cores. 2) The calculation underpredicts the reaction rate ratio 239 Pusub(fis)/ 235 Usub(fis) by 3% and overpredicts 238 Usub(cap)/ 239 Pusub(fis) by 6%. The results are consistent with those of JUPITER analyses. 3) The reaction rate distributions in the cores of prototype size are well predicted within +-3%. In larger JUPITER cores, however, the C/E value increases with the radial distance from the core center up to 6% at the outer core edge. 4) The prediction of control rod worths is satisfactory; C/E values are within the range from 0.92 to 0.97 with no apparent dependence on 10 B enrichment and the number of control rods inserted. Spatial dependence of C/E is also observed in the JUPITER cores. 5) The sodium void reactivity is overpredicted by 30% to 50% to the positive side. 1) The criticality is well predicted, as is the same in the fast core tests; the average C/E is 0.997+-0.003. 2) The calculation overpredicts 238 Usub(fis)/ 235 Usub(fis) by 3% to 6%, which shows the same tendency as in the small and medium size fast assemblies. The 238 Usub(cap)/ 235 Usub(fis) ratio is well predicted in the thermal cores. The calculated reaction rate ratios of 232 Th deviate from the measurements by 10% to 15%. (author)

  18. Assessing the economics of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to examine the economics of fast reactors but, before doing so, it describes briefly some of their characteristics and states their main attraction, namely to utilize to the maximum the available low-cost uranium resources. This particularly makes fast reactors desirable for nations without large indigenous uranium reserves. Turning to economics, the components that go to make up the cost in a fast reactor, such as capital, fuel fabrication, reprocessing, etc. are considered first. The chapter then deals with the costs of generating electricity from stations taken in isolation (i.e. single station generating costs) and identifies those factors which can help to reduce them to a minimum. Finally, the expenditure of a whole system of thermal and fast reactors is considered over an extended period, where it will be shown that an optimum fast reactor design, based on system costs may differ from one based on single station generating costs. (author)

  19. Thermal-hydraulic development a small, simplified, proliferation-resistant reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M. T.; Hill, D. J.; Sienicki, J. J.; Spencer, B. W.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses thermal-hydraulics related criteria and preliminary concepts for a small (300 MWt), proliferation-resistant, liquid-metal-cooled reactor system. A main objective is to assess what extent of simplification is achievable in the concepts with the primary purpose of regaining economic competitiveness. The approach investigated features lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and a low power density core for ultra-long core lifetime (goal 15 years) with cartridge core replacement at end of life. This potentially introduces extensive simplifications resulting in capital cost and operating cost savings including: (1) compact, modular, pool-type configuration for factory fabrication, (2) 100+% natural circulation heat transport with the possibility of eliminating the main coolant pumps, (3) steam generator modules immersed directly in the primary coolant pool for elimination of the intermediate heat transport system, and (4) elimination of on-site fuel handling and storage provisions including rotating plug. Stage 1 natural circulation model and results are presented. Results suggest that 100+% natural circulation heat transport is readily achievable using LBE coolant and the long-life cartridge core approach; moreover, it is achievable in a compact pool configuration considerably smaller than PRISM A (for overland transportability) and with peak cladding temperature within the existing database range for ferritic steel with oxide layer surface passivation. Stage 2 analysis follows iteration with core designers. Other thermal hydraulic investigations are underway addressing passive, auxiliary heat removal by air cooling of the reactor vessel and the effects of steam generator tube rupture

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of research reactor core with different LEU fuel types using RELAP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sahlamy, Neama M. [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-11-15

    In the current work, comparisons between the core performances when using different LEU fuels are done. The fuels tested are UA1{sub X}-A1, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuels with 19.7 % enrichment. Calculations are done using RELAP5 code to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the IAEA benchmark 10 MW reactor. First, a reassessment of the slow reactivity insertion transient with UA1{sub X}-A1 LEU fuel to compare the results with those reported in the IAEA TECDOC [1]. Then, comparisons between the thermal-hydraulic core performances when using the three LEU fuels are done. The assessment is performed at initial power of 1.0 W. The reactor power is calculated using the RELAP5 point kinetic model. The reactivity feedback, from changes in water density and fuel temperature, is considered for all cases. From the results it is noticed that U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al fuel gives the best fuel performance since it has the minimum value of peak fuel temperature and the minimum peak clad surface temperature, as operating parameters. Also, it gives the maximum value of the Critical Heat Flux Ratio and the lowest tendency to flow instability occurrence.

  1. Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, N.; Moriya, S.; Wada, A.

    1984-01-01

    The most important problem in the thermal-hydraulic designs of the pool-type fast breeder reactor is to estimate the thermal conditions affecting the vessel and/or internal structures during both steady and transient operations. The severity of these conditions in the Japanese pool-type reactor, which will be reinforced and equipped with special devices for seismic demands, is apt to be much greater than for other countries. Water tests and thermal-hydraulic analyses have been performed to study such conditions. The effects of the elevations of upper internal structure discharge and intermediate heat exchanger intakes on flow patterns, free surface disturbance, and thermal stratification in the hot plenum have been estimated. From the results of the experiments, suitable elevations could be recommended by comparing some thermal-hydraulic characteristics. The calculations agreed well with the experimental results for the steady-state flow patterns and thermal transients, with the exception of thermal stratification

  2. Econometric modelling of certain nuclear power systems based on thermal and fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Pioaru, C.; Ursu, I.

    1988-01-01

    Certain known economic analysis models for a LMFBR fast breeder and CANDU thermal solitary reactors are presented, based on the concepts of discounting and levelization. These models are subsequently utilized as a basis for establishing an original model for the econometric analysis of certain thermal reactor systems or/and fast breeder reactors. Case studies are subsequently conducted with the systems: 1-CANDU, 2-LMFBR, 3-CANDU + LMFBR which enables us to draw certain interesting conclusions for a long range nuclear power policy. (author)

  3. Afterheat assessment for conceptual tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goddard, A.J.H.; Jayatissa, S.

    1987-01-01

    Afterheat represents an important consideration in design of conceptual fusion power reactors, particularly during normal or unplanned shutdown. Afterheat calculations have been undertaken for various generic designs, but with special reference to the Culham DEMO reactor. These calculations have included the redistribution of heating by gamma ray transport. Selected temperature response calculations have been undertaken. (author)

  4. Utilization of heavy elements such as lead or busmuth in thermal and epithermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radowsky, Alvin; Chien, J.-P.; Yang, C.-Y.; Hsieh, H.M.

    1980-01-01

    Reactivity in thermal and epithermal reactors may be increased by inserting into these reactors at least one rod of a heavy element having high inelastic cross-section for high energy neutrons with energys above 1 MeV and low caputre cross-sections. The heavy element may be lead, bismuth, or compounds and mixtures of lead and bismuth. Such incrases may be used, for example, to reduce heavy water needs in the case of heavy water moderated reactors and enrichment needs in the case of light water reactors. (auth)

  5. Risk-assessment techniques and the reactor licensing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400), concentrating on the engineering aspects of the contribution to reactor accident risks is followed by some comments on how we have applied the insights and techniques developed in this study to prepare a program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. Some new work we are just beginning on the application of risk-assessment techniques to stablize the reactor licensing process is also discussed

  6. Three dimensional thermal hydraulic characteristic analysis of reactor core based on porous media method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ronghua; Tian, Maolin; Chen, Sen; Tian, Wenxi; Su, G.H.; Qiu, Suizheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This study constructed a full CFD model for the RPV of a PWR. • The reactor core was simplified using the porous model in CFX. • The CFX simulation result was in good agreement with the scaled test and design values. • The analysis of the SGTR accident was performed. - Abstract: Thermal-hydraulic performance in the reactor core was an essential factor in the nuclear power plant design. In this study, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3-D) thermal-hydraulic characteristic of reactor core based on porous media method. Firstly, a 3-D rector pressure vessel (RPV) model was built, including the inlet leg nozzle, downcomer, lower plenum, reactor core, upper plenum and outlet leg nozzle. Porous media model was used to simplify the reactor core and upper plenum. The commercial CFD code ANSYS CFX was employed to solve the governing equations and provide the 3-D local velocity, temperature and pressure field. After appropriate parameters and turbulent model being carefully selected, the simulation was validated against the 1:5 scaled steady-state hydraulic test. The predicted hydraulic parameters (normalized flowrate distribution and pressure drop) were in good agreement with the test results. And the predicted thermal parameters agreed well with the designed values. The validation indicated that this method was practicable in analyzing the 3-D thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the RPV. Finally, the thermal-hydraulic features in reactor core were analyzed under the condition of the Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident. The simulation results showed that the coolant temperature increased gradually from the center to the periphery in the reactor core in the accident. But the temperature decreased to safety level rapidly after the reactor shutdown and safety injection operation. The reactor core could keep in a safe state if appropriate safety operations were performed after accidents.

  7. Test and application of thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Jun; Zhao Xiang Feng; Wang Dao Hua

    2002-01-01

    A thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an Pulsed Reactor is described as well as its characteristics and application. The experiment results show the inherent unsharpness of BAS ND is 0.15 mm. The efficient thermal neutron n/gamma ratio is lower in not only steady state configuration but also pulsing state configuration and it is improved using Pb filter

  8. Environmental impact assessment around TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Lee, Hyun Duk; Lee, Young Bok; Cheong, Kyu Hoi; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kim, Kug Chan; You, Byung Sun; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Sang Bok; Han Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Population distribution, atmospheric change, X/Q, characteristics of terrestrial ecosystem around Seoul site were surveyed. Environmental radiation and radioactivities such as grossα, grossβ, Cs-137, Sr-90 and H-3 of various environmental samples were analyzed. The values of environmental radiation dose tended to increase gradually in the light of the recent five years' results of environmental radiation monitoring around the nuclear power plants from 1980 to 1984, however, the changes were not significant. In addition, continuous assessment of environmental radiation monitoring on the roofs of main building and life science building at KAERI showed that the environmental radiation dose tended to increase a little during the night time. Judging from the above results, it is concluded that environmental contamination level by radioactive materials could be ignored in the case of radioisotope production or experiment using radioisotopes except the release of gaseous radioactive materials such as Ar-41 of short half life by the operation of nuclear reactor. (Author)

  9. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  10. Thermal Hydraulic Characteristics of Fuel Defects in Plate Type Nuclear Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent flow coupled with heat transfer is investigated for a High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel plate. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Models are used for fluid dynamics and the transfer of heat from a thermal nuclear fuel plate using the Multi-physics code COMSOL. Simulation outcomes are compared with experimental data from the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop. The computational results for the High Flux Isotope Reactor core system provide a more physically accurate simulation of this system by modeling the turbulent flow field in conjunction with the diffusion of thermal energy within the solid and fluid phases of the model domain. Recommendations are made regarding Nusselt number correlations and material properties for future thermal hydraulic modeling efforts

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of an innovative decay heat removal system for lead-cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Fabio; Vitale Di Maio, Damiano; Naviglio, Antonio; Caruso, Gianfranco, E-mail: gianfranco.caruso@uniroma1.it

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • LOOP thermal-hydraulic transient analysis for lead-cooled fast reactors. • Passive decay heat removal system concept to avoid lead freezing. • Solution developed for the diversification of the decay heat removal functions. • RELAP5 vs. RELAP5-3D comparison for lead applications. - Abstract: Improvement of safety requirements in GEN IV reactors needs more reliable safety systems, among which the decay heat removal system (DHR) is one of the most important. Complying with the diversification criteria and based on pure passive and very reliable components, an additional DHR for the ALFRED reactor (Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) has been proposed and its thermal-hydraulic performances are analyzed. It consists in a coupling of two innovative subsystems: the radiative-based direct heat exchanger (DHX), and the pool heat exchanger (PHX). Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses, by using RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© computer programs, have been carried out showing that the whole system can safely operate, in natural circulation, for a long term. Sensitivity analyses for: the emissivity of the DHX surfaces, the PHX water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and the lead HTC have been carried out. In addition, the effects of the density variation uncertainty on the results has been analyzed and compared. It allowed to assess the feasibility of the system and to evaluate the acceptable range of the studied parameters. A comparison of the results obtained with RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© has been carried out and the analysis of the differences of the two codes for lead is presented. The features of the innovative DHR allow to match the decay heat removal performance with the trend of the reactor decay heat power after shutdown, minimizing at the same time the risk of lead freezing. This system, proposed for the diversification of the DHR in the LFRs, could be applicable in the other pool-type liquid metal fast reactors.

  12. Passive compact molten salt reactor (PCMSR), modular thermal breeder reactor with totally passive safety system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harto, Andang Widi

    2012-06-01

    Design Study Passive Compact Molten Salt Reactor (PCMSR) with totally passive safety system has been performed. The term of Compact in the PCMSR name means that the reactor system is designed to have relatively small volume per unit power output by using modular and integral concept. In term of modular, the reactor system consists of three modules, i.e. reactor module, turbine module and fuel management module. The reactor module is an integral design that consists of reactor, primary and intermediate heat exchangers and passive post shutdown cooling system. The turbine module is an integral design of a multi heating, multi cooling, regenerative gas turbine. The fuel management module consists of all equipments related to fuel preparation, fuel reprocessing and radioactive handling. The preliminary calculations show that the PCMSR has negative temperature and void reactivity coefficient, passive shutdown characteristic related to fuel pump failure and possibility of using natural circulation for post shutdown cooling system.

  13. Reactor power setback: A procedure to reduce thermal shock on FBR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Automatic procedure for implementation of reactor power setback in a fast reactor. ► Plant dynamic modeling of a sodium cooled fast breeder reactor. ► Selection of optimum value for the reduced power level and set of plant parameters for triggering power setback. - Abstract: Reactor power setback is a procedure to avoid reactor SCRAM for events originating from balance of plant, which do not affect the operation of boiler feed pumps that supply coolant to steam generators. This procedure is envisaged to avoid reactor components from being subjected to thermal shock due to SCRAM for some of the events which do not affect nuclear safety. In this procedure, all control rods of the reactor are driven down simultaneously to achieve a pre-determined lower power level. Appropriate plant parameters have been identified for the automatic triggering of power setback procedure on the occurrence of those events which are envisaged to be managed through this procedure. Knowledge of the transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during various events is essential to formulate the operating procedure. Plant dynamics code DYANA-P developed for PFBR has been utilized for this purpose. This paper discusses (i) events for which this procedure can be adopted, (ii) detailed implantation scheme of power setback, (iii) transient thermal hydraulic behavior of the whole plant during this procedure and (iv) benefits of this procedure

  14. Gas-cooled reactor thermal-hydraulics using CAST3M and CRONOS2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Coulon, N.; Stietel, A.; Damian, F.; Golfier, H.; Raepsaet, X.

    2003-01-01

    The CEA R and D program on advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) relies on different concepts: modular High Temperature Reactor (HTR), its evolution dedicated to hydrogen production (Very High Temperature Reactor) and Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GCFR). Some key safety questions are related to decay heat removal during potential accident. This is strongly connected to passive natural convection (including gas injection of Helium, CO 2 , Nitrogen or Argon) or forced convection using active safety systems (gas blowers, heat exchangers). To support this effort, thermal-hydraulics computer codes will be necessary tools to design, enhance the performance and ensure a high safety level of the different reactors. Accurate and efficient modeling of heat transfer by conduction, convection or thermal radiation as well as energy storage are necessary requirements to obtain a high level of confidence in the thermal-hydraulic simulations. To achieve that goal a thorough validation process has to ve conducted. CEA's CAST3M code dedicated to GCR thermal-hydraulics has been validated against different test cases: academic interaction between natural convection and thermal radiation, small scale in-house THERCE experiments and large scale High Temperature Test Reactor benchmarks such as HTTR-VC benchmark. Coupling with neutronics is also an important modeling aspect for the determination of neutronic parameters such as neutronic coefficient (Doppler, moderator,...), critical position of control rods...CEA's CAST3M and CRONOS2 computer codes allow this coupling and a first example of coupled thermal-hydraulics/neutronics calculations has been performed. Comparison with experimental data will be the next step with High Temperature Test Reactor experimental results at nominal power

  15. Assessment of properties of Swedish reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, R.; Aittola, J.P.; Broden, K.; Andersson, K.; Wingefors, S.

    1984-01-01

    Low- and intermediate-level reactor waste has been produced in Sweden for many years, but only recently have plans for its final disposal been presented. According to these plans the waste will be transported from the nuclear power stations and research facilities to a final repository in hard rock under the Baltic Sea. It is anticipated that a series of waste handling and disposal operations will be commenced within the next ten years. For realization of these operations the waste forms must fulfil certain, as yet not clearly defined, quality requirements. A programme is outlined for the identification and quantification of those properties which are of importance for the safe handling, transportation and intermediate storage of the waste. The programme includes the following steps: (1) Collection of data concerning existing plant inventories (waste), raw material, solidification processes, waste composition, etc.; (2) Categorization of the waste; within each category the properties should be similar and expected to fall within certain intervals; (3) Identification of those properties which are of interest for each category with respect to both normal and abnormal handling situations; (4) Development and evaluation of methods for sampling and testing important properties; (5) Survey of existing R and D and test data, together with supplementary investigations and measurements; (6) Assessment of the properties of relevance for each waste category. This work was initiated by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate in 1981 and is being performed in close cooperation with the nuclear power industry. The results will be used by the concerned parties as a basis for the definition and stipulation of quality requirements for the various categories of waste, and the confirmation and introduction of quality control and quality assurance procedures. (author)

  16. Assessment of a RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Soares, Humberto V.

    2010-01-01

    RELAP5 code was developed at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory and it is widely used for thermal hydraulic studies of commercial nuclear power plants and, currently, it has been also applied for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research systems with good predictions. This work is a contribution to the assessment of RELAP5/3.3 code for research reactors analysis. It presents steady-state and transient calculation results performed using a RELAP5 model to simulate the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor conditions operating at 50 and 100 kW. The reactor is located at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN), Brazil. The development and the assessment of a RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA are presented. Experimental data were considered in the process of code-to-data validation. The RELAP5 results were also compared with calculation performed using the STHIRP-1 (Research Reactors Thermal Hydraulic Simulation) code. The use of a cross flow model has been essential to improve results in the transient condition respect to preceding investigations.

  17. Three-dimension thermal hydraulic studies for the pool-type fast reactor of CEFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yijun; Liu Yizhe; Xue Xiuli; Feng Yuheng; Qiao Xuedong; Hou Zhifeng; Yu Hong; Yang Hongyi; Yang Fuchang

    2009-01-01

    With the development of the computer software and hardware, 3-dimension numerical analysis technology has become an important part of the reactor core and plenums design and research of the fast reactor, sometimes even plays an un-replacable role in the design. In this paper, the typical thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the pool-type fast reactor are analysed by using 3-dimension numerical analysis codes and programs. It can be said that it will play an important role in the thermal hydraulic design and research by using these tools. And at the same time, it will also set good examples and speed up the application of these technologies by summing up these experiences and methods in order that it can be used in the future design and analyses for the large-scaled pool-type fast reactor. (authors)

  18. The seismic assessment of fast reactor cores in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthie, J.C.; Dostal, M.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) has evolved over a number of years. The design has to meet two seismic requirements: (i) the reactor must cause no hazard to the public during or after the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE); (ii) there must be no sudden reduction in safety for an earthquake exceeding the SSE. The core is a complicated component in the whole reactor. It is usually represented in a very simplified manner in the seismic assessment of the whole reactor station. From this calculation, a time history or response spectrum can be generated for the diagrid, which supports the core, and for the above core structure, which supports the main absorber rods. These data may then be used to perform a detailed assessment of the reactor core. A new simplified model of the core response may then be made and used in a further calculation of the whole reactor. The calculation of the core response only, is considered in the remainder of this paper. One important feature of the fast reactor core, compared with other reactors, is that the components are relatively thin and flexible to promote neutron economy and heat transfer. A further important feature is that there are very small gaps between the wrapper tubes. This leads to very strong fluid-coupling effects. These effects are likely to be beneficial, but adequate techniques to calculate them are only just being developed. 9 refs, figs

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of a Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucukboyaci, V.N.; Oriani, L.

    2004-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor

  20. Thermal effects, creep and nonlinear responde of concrete reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazant, Z.P.

    1978-01-01

    A new mathematical model for prediction of pore pressure and moisture transfer in concrete heated well beyond 100 0 C is outlined. The salient features of the model are:(1) the hypothesis taht the pore space available to capillary water grows with increasing temperature as well as increasing pressure in excess of saturation pressure, and (2) the hypothesis that moisture permeability increases by two orders of magnitude when passing 100 0 C. Permaability below 100 0 C is controlled by migration of adsorbed water through gel-pore sized necks on passages through the material; these necks are lost above 100 0 C and viscosity then governs. The driving force of moisture transfer may be considered as the gradient of pore pressure, which is defined as pressure of vapor rather than liquid water if concrete is not saturated. Thermodynamic properties of water may be used to determine sorption isotherms in saturated concrete. The theory is the necessary first step in rationally predicting thermal stresses and deformations, and assessing the danger of explosive spalling. However, analysis of creep and nonlinear triaxial behavior is also needed for this purpose. A brief review of recent achievements in these subjects is also given. (Author)

  1. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  2. Optimization of a thermal power reactor by means of a non-linear programming model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavelescu, M.; Dumitrescu, H.; Ghilea, S.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of optimizing a power reactor of the HWGCR type is dealt with. The reactor will be operated with a Roumanian vitroceramic fuel, essentially a mixture of UO 2 and SiO 2 , that has to meet a great number of irradiation behaviour and reliability requirements. The purpose of optimization is to find the optimum reactor structure for which fuel burnup during the first campaign is maximum with some restrictions on the reactor integral parameters, such as thermal power, fuel mass, and cell power density, as well as some lattice and cell parameters, e.g. the reactor radius and the fuel cell pitch. Due to the problem structure corresponding to a non-linear programming model the SUMT method has been used for solving it by means of the ORPN computing programme. (author)

  3. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  4. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic design analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L. Jr.; Dixon, J.R.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Felde, D.K.; Giles, G.E.; Harrington, R.M.; Morris, D.G.; Nelson, W.R.; Ruggles, A.E.; Siman-Tov, M.; Stovall, T.K.

    1994-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This reactor will be a user facility with the major objective of providing the highest continuous neutron beam intensities of any reactor in the world. Additional objectives for the facility include providing materials irradiation facilities and isotope production facilities as good as, or better than, those in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. To achieve these objectives, the reactor design uses highly subcooled heavy water as both coolant and moderator. Two separate core halves of 67.6-L total volume operate at an average power density of 4.5 MW(t)/L, and the coolant flows upward through the core at 25 m/s. Operating pressure is 3.1 MPa at the core inlet with a 1.4-MPa pressure drop through the core region. Finally, in order to make the resources available for experimentation, the fuel is designed to provide a 17-d fuel cycle with an additional 4 d planned in each cycle for the refueling process. This report examines the codes and models used to develop the thermal-hydraulic design for ANS, as well as the correlations and physical data; evaluates thermal-hydraulic uncertainties; reports on thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis; describes experimentation in support of the ANS reactor design and safety analysis; and provides an overview of the experimental plan

  5. Evaluation of system requirements and standards development for thermal annealing of reactor pressure vessels. Progress report, March-September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.

    1983-03-01

    The material property data on thermal annealing of reactor-pressure-vessel steels have been reviewed. The most-critical materials are high copper welds; the data indicate that close to full recovery of Charpy V-notch properties can be realized by annealing at 850 0 F for 1 week (168 hours). However, the variability and sparcity of annealing recovery data dictate appropriate surveillance and experimental test programs. Of particular concern are the actual fracture-toughness changes and the differences between test- and power-reactor conditions. A survey of pressurized-water-reactor vendors, architect engineers, and consultants has been performed to assess the feasibility of performing a thermal-annealing cycle to restore the beltline material properties to their original state. This survey also addressed the issue of whether or not an actual annealing demonstration should be performed. It is the consensus view of the industry that in-situ reactor-vessel annealing can be done, but several areas still need to be studied and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code guidelines need to be defined

  6. Swedish reactor safety. Barsebaeck risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    probabilistic safety analysis of the Barsebaeck reactor, a Swedish-designed Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), was done using design and reliability information from Barsebaeck and similar Swedish reactors. The methodology of the Reactor Safety (WASH-1400) was employed to the extent possible to determine the probability of major accidents at Barsebaeck. It is concluded that an accident at the Barsebaeck nuclear plant could potentially affect a large segment of the population of Sweden and of neighbouring countries. The risk consists not only of potential harm to the current population, but of possible harm to future population due to the very long lives of the radioactive materials involved. However the complexity of nuclear systems, the relatively scant data base on which to make long-term predictions of equipment reliability, and little experience in accident consequences make the uncertainty bounds of this typype of studies very broad. Thus, in the end, the decision on the question of continuation of the Swedish nuclear power program must be made outside of, but with the assistance of, the technical community. The acceptance of nuclear power as an energy source in a country becomes a decision of social acceptability and, of necessity, must be made by the social structure's appointed representatives. (E.R.)

  7. L-Reactor operation, Savannah River Plant: environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to assess the significance of the effects on the human environment of the proposed resumption of L-reactor operation at the Savannah River Plant, scheduled for October 1983. The discussion is presented under the following section headings: need for resumption of L-Reactor operations and purpose of this environmental assessment; proposed action and alternative; affected environment (including, site location and description, land use, historic and archeological resources, socioeconomic and community characteristics, geology and seismology, hydrology, meteorology and climatology, ecology, and radiation environment); environmental consequences; summary of projected L-Reactor releases and impacts; and Federal and State permits and approval. The three appendices are entitled: radiation dose calculation methods and assumptions; floodplain/wetlands assessment - L-Reactor operations; and, conversion table. A list of references is included at the end of each chapter

  8. A contribution to the method of fast reactor thermal output calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harant, M.

    1978-01-01

    The method of stating the heat sources is discussed as being one of the factors influencing the accuracy of the thermal output calculation of fast reactors. The distribution of heat sources in the core and in other inner parts of the fast reactor is described using the least square fit method. Relations are derived of outputs of both individual components of fuel elements and of whole inner parts of the reactor. A comparison is made of various methods used for obtaining source integrals. The optimum integration method was found. (author)

  9. Contribution to the thermal study of a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubus, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aims to study the thermal behaviour of a laboratory Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. An experimental study was first realized to measure temperatures at different points of the reactor by using optic fibers. These measurements were performed in transient and steady states. To examine the influence of heat losses, not insulated and insulated reactors were considered. The influence of the nature and the form of the applied voltage was else considered. Experiments were conducted with a sinusoidal voltage and a pulsed power supply. (author) [fr

  10. Significance assessment of small-medium sized reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Minoru [Japan Atomic Power Co., Research and Development Dept., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Preliminary assessment for deployment of small-medium sized reactor (S and M reactor) as a future option has been conducted at the JAPCO (Japan Atomic Power Company) under the cooperation with the CRIERI (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry). Significance of the S and M reactor introduction is listed as follows; lower investment cost, possible siting near demand side, enlarged freedom of siting, shorter transmission line, good compatibility with slow increase of demand and plain explanation of safety using simpler system such as integral type vessel without piping, natural convection core cooling and passive safety system. The deployment of simpler plant system, modular shop fabrication, ship-shell structured building and longer operation period can assure economics comparable with that of a large sized reactor, coping with scale-demerit. Also the S and M reactor is preferable in size for the nuclear heat utilization such as hydrogen production. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Recent advances in nuclear fuels technology for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutharshan, Balendra

    2011-01-01

    In today's competitive electrical generation, many nuclear power generators are lowering operating and fuel cycle costs by extending burnups, utilizing longer cycles, reducing outage duration, increasing peaking factors for more efficient fuel management; and by up rating to maximize energy output from the reactors. To better equip nuclear operators to meet these competitive challenges, Westinghouse has strategically aligned its goals to ensure that customer needs are met and that fuel supplied operates flawlessly. Westinghouse's fuel performance program implements design features and manufacturing processes to maximize margins to failure, specify bounds of reactor operation, and monitor critical operating parameters using BEACON software as well as specify and implement a robust Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) to obtain early feedback on fuel performance. Westinghouse's unwavering commitment to achieve flawless fuel performance and to innovate resulted in exceptional pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), and VVER fuel performance worldwide. This paper covers decades of continuous innovation in fuel design and manufacturing process which supports our outstanding fuel performance in all LWR fuel types. This paper also includes information about Westinghouse's state-of-the-art tools and methodologies utilized to improve fuel performance as well as recent developments in fuel cladding material. (author)

  12. First-alpha diffusion and thermalization in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Energy relaxation and spatial diffusion of fast alpha particles are incorporated into a multi-energy group model which is coupled to a fluid transport code for the thermal-plasma species. The multi-energy group equations evolve the temporal- and spatial-dependent alpha-particle distribution function and thus determine alpha-particle heating and loss rates for arbitrary thermalization and diffusion models. The effects of deviations from classical, local thermalization on plasma performance are discussed. It is shown that spatial diffusion can lead to inversion of the fast - ion distribution function even if thermalization remains classical. This inversion may drive instabilities and lead to anomalous thermalization. Ripple-induced spatial diffusion of fast alphas is used to illustrate the importance of extending the analysis to include pitch-angle dependence

  13. Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors. A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, K.; Porsch, D.; Rimpault, G.; Taiwo, T.; Worrall, A.

    2013-01-01

    them to be considered candidates for transmutation. Fast reactors are needed to transmute TRUs because fast neutron cross sections are generally more effective in the fissioning of TRUs. However, studies have demonstrated that TRU transmutation rates can also be achieved in thermal reactors, although with serious limitations due to their accumulation through recycling and their impact on the safety of the plants. The transmutation of TRUs could potentially be carried out in many thermal reactors operating today, while waiting for a similar programme in fast reactors to allow commercial-scale operations in 20 to 30 years or more. Investment in fuel cycle plants could lead to even more efficient transmutation in fast reactors towards the end of the century. In the interim, the potential contribution of thermal reactors should not be overlooked. A considerable amount of research has already been conducted on minor actinide transmutation in thermal reactors, and the purpose of this report is to summarise the findings of this research. The report concentrates on general conclusions related to thermal reactors and foregoes a lengthy examination of the more technical details. While a commercial-scale implementation programme for a specific reactor type will need to address a multitude of very specific questions, the objective of this report is to provide the broad understanding necessary to inform high-level strategy and decision making. Chapter 1 of the report provides an introduction to minor actinide nuclear properties and discusses some of the arguments in favour of minor actinide recycling. The introduction is not specific to thermal reactors but could apply to any nuclear system in general. Chapter 2 discusses the potential role of thermal reactors in minor actinide recycling; Chapter 3 looks at the various technical issues and challenges presented by minor actinide recycling; Chapter 4 examines fuel cycle issues; Chapter 5 presents implications for thermal reactor

  14. Design and analysis of a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket reactor engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Three NTR reactors are optimized for the single stage launch of 1–15 MT payloads. • The proposed rocket engines have specific impulses in excess of 700 s. • Reactivity and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each reactor. - Abstract: Recent advances in the development of high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This paper describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 800 s. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. The 40 cm long reactor meets the submersion criticality requirements (a shutdown margin of at least $1 subcritical in all submersion scenarios) with no further modifications. The 80 and 120 cm long reactors include small amounts of gadolinium nitride as a spectral shift absorber to keep them subcritical upon submersion in seawater or wet sand following a launch abort.

  15. Deleterious Thermal Effects Due To Randomized Flow Paths in Pebble Bed, and Particle Bed Style Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    A review of literature associated with Pebble Bed and Particle Bed reactor core research has revealed a systemic problem inherent to reactor core concepts which utilize randomized rather than structured coolant channel flow paths. For both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor designs; case studies reveal that for indeterminate reasons, regions within the core would suffer from excessive heating leading to thermal runaway and localized fuel melting. A thermal Computational Fluid Dynamics model was utilized to verify that In both the Pebble Bed and Particle Bed Reactor concepts randomized coolant channel pathways combined with localized high temperature regions would work together to resist the flow of coolant diverting it away from where it is needed the most to cooler less resistive pathways where it is needed the least. In other words given the choice via randomized coolant pathways the reactor coolant will take the path of least resistance, and hot zones offer the highest resistance. Having identified the relationship between randomized coolant channel pathways and localized fuel melting it is now safe to assume that other reactor concepts that utilize randomized coolant pathways such as the foam core reactor are also susceptible to this phenomenon.

  16. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented

  17. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented.

  18. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  19. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic coupling for 3D reactor core modeling combining MCB and fluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Królikowski Igor P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional simulations of neutronics and thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors are a tool used to design nuclear reactors. The coupling of MCB and FLUENT is presented, MCB allows to simulate neutronics, whereas FLUENT is computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The main purpose of the coupling is to exchange data such as temperature and power profile between both codes. Temperature required as an input parameter for neutronics is significant since cross sections of nuclear reactions depend on temperature. Temperature may be calculated in thermal hydraulics, but this analysis needs as an input the power profile, which is a result from neutronic simulations. Exchange of data between both analyses is required to solve this problem. The coupling is a better solution compared to the assumption of estimated values of the temperatures or the power profiles; therefore the coupled analysis was created. This analysis includes single transient neutronic simulation and several steady-state thermal simulations. The power profile is generated in defined points in time during the neutronic simulation for the thermal analysis to calculate temperature. The coupled simulation gives information about thermal behavior of the reactor, nuclear reactions in the core, and the fuel evolution in time. Results show that there is strong influence of neutronics on thermal hydraulics. This impact is stronger than the impact of thermal hydraulics on neutronics. Influence of the coupling on temperature and neutron multiplication factor is presented. The analysis has been performed for the ELECTRA reactor, which is lead-cooled fast reactor concept, where the coolant fl ow is generated only by natural convection

  20. Portfolio Assessment on Chemical Reactor Analysis and Process Design Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alha, Katariina

    2004-01-01

    Assessment determines what students regard as important: if a teacher wants to change students' learning, he/she should change the methods of assessment. This article describes the use of portfolio assessment on five courses dealing with chemical reactor and process design during the years 1999-2001. Although the use of portfolio was a new…

  1. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THERMAL STRATIFICATION IN THE UPPER PLENUM OF THE MONJU FAST REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEOK-KI CHOI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical analysis of thermal stratification in the upper plenum of the MONJU fast breeder reactor was performed. Calculations were performed for a 1/6 simplified model of the MONJU reactor using the commercial code, CFX-13. To better resolve the geometrically complex upper core structure of the MONJU reactor, the porous media approach was adopted for the simulation. First, a steady state solution was obtained and the transient solutions were then obtained for the turbine trip test conducted in December 1995. The time dependent inlet conditions for the mass flow rate and temperature were provided by JAEA. Good agreement with the experimental data was observed for steady state solution. The numerical solution of the transient analysis shows the formation of thermal stratification within the upper plenum of the reactor vessel during the turbine trip test. The temporal variations of temperature were predicted accurately by the present method in the initial rapid coastdown period (∼300 seconds. However, transient numerical solutions show a faster thermal mixing than that observed in the experiment after the initial coastdown period. A nearly homogenization of the temperature field in the upper plenum is predicted after about 900 seconds, which is a much shorter-term thermal stratification than the experimental data indicates. This discrepancy may be due to the shortcoming of the turbulence models available in the CFX-13 code for a natural convection flow with thermal stratification.

  2. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The rotary reactor differs from most alternative chemical looping combustion (CLC) reactor designs because it maintains near-thermal equilibrium between the two stages of the redox process by thermally coupling channels undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends this analysis to alternative CLC cycles with the objective of identifying optimal configurations and design tradeoffs. Results show that the increased efficiency from reactor thermal coupling applies only to cycles that are capable of exploiting the increased availability in the reduction reactor exhaust. Thus, in addition to the regenerative cycle, the combined CLC cycle and the combined-regenerative CLC cycle are suitable for integration with the rotary reactor. Parametric studies are used to compare the sensitivity of the different cycle efficiencies to parameters like pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, carrier-gas fraction and purge steam generation. One of the key conclusions from this analysis is that while the optimal efficiency for regenerative CLC cycle was the highest of the three (56% at 3. bars, 1200. °C), the combined-regenerative cycle offers a trade-off that combines a reasonably high efficiency (about 54% at 12. bars, 1200. °C) with much lower gas volumetric flow rate and consequently, smaller reactor size. Unlike the other two cycles, the optimal compressor pressure ratio for the regenerative cycle is weakly dependent on the design turbine inlet temperature. For the regenerative and combined regenerative cycles, steam production in the regenerator below 2× fuel flow rate improves exhaust recovery and consequently, the overall system efficiency. Also, given that the fuel side regenerator flow is unbalanced, it is more efficient to generate steam from the

  3. Application of RELAP5-3D code for thermal analysis of the ADS reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Gustavo Henrique Nazareno

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear power is essential to supply global energy demand. Therefore, in order to use nuclear fuel more efficiently, more efficient nuclear reactors technologies researches have been intensified, such as hybrid systems, composed of particle accelerators coupled into nuclear reactors. In order to add knowledge to such studies, an innovative reactor design was considered where the RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic analysis code was used to perform a thermal analysis of the core, either in stationary operation or in situations transitory. The addition of new kind of coolants, such as, liquid salts, among them Flibe, lead, lead-bismuth, sodium, lithium-bismuth and lithium-lead was an important advance in this version of the code, making possible to do the thermal simulation of reactors that use these types of coolants. The reactor, object of study in this work, is an innovative reactor, due to its ability to operate in association with an Accelerator Driven System (ADS), considered a predecessor system of the next generation of nuclear reactors (GEN IV). The reactor selected was the MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High tech Applications) due to the availability of data to perform the simulation. In the modeling of the reactor with the code RELAP5-3D, the core was simulated using nodules with 1, 7, 15 and 51 thermohydraulic channels and eutectic lead-bismuth (LBE) as coolant. The parameters, such as, pressure, mass flow and coolant and heat structure temperature were analyzed. In addition, the thermal behavior of the core was evaluated by varying the type of coolant (sodium) in substitution for the LBE of the original design using the model with 7 thermohydraulic channels. The results of the steady-state calculations were compared with data from the literature and the proposed models were verified certifying the ability of the RELAP5-3D code to simulate this innovative reactor. After this step, it was analysed cases of transients with loss of coolant flow

  4. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  5. Preliminary Options Assessment of Versatile Irradiation Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the work undertaken at INL from April 2016 to January 2017 and aimed at analyzing some options for designing and building a versatile test reactor; the scope of work was agreed upon with DOE-NE. Section 2 presents some results related to KNK II and PRISM Mod A. Section 3 presents some alternatives to the VCTR presented in [ ] as well as a neutronic parametric study to assess the minimum power requirement needed for a 235U metal fueled fast test reactor capable to generate a fast (>100 keV) flux of 4.0 x 1015 n /cm2-s at the test location. Section 4 presents some results regarding a fundamental characteristic of test reactors, namely displacement per atom (dpa) in test samples. Section 5 presents the INL assessment of the ANL fast test reactor design FASTER. Section 6 presents a summary.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic simulation and analysis of Research Reactor Cooling Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL Khatib, H.H.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to formulate a model to simulate the thermal hydraulic behavior of integrated cooling system in a typical material testing reactor (MTR) under loss of ultimate heat sink, the model involves three interactively coupled sub-models for reactor core, heat exchanger and cooling tower. The developed model predicts the temperature profiles in addition it predicts inlet and outlet temperatures of the hot and cold stream as well as the heat exchangers and cooling tower. The model is validated against PARET code for steady-state operation and also verified by the reactor operational records, and then the model is used to simulate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor under a loss of ultimate heat sink. The simulation is performed for two operational regimes named regime I of (11 MW) thermal power and three operated cooling tower cells and regime II of (22 MW) thermal power and six operated cooling tower cells. In regime I, the simulation is performed for 1, 2 and 3 cooling tower failed cells while in regime II, it is performed for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 cooling tower failed cells. The safety action is conducted by the reactor protection system (RPS) named power reduction safety action, it is triggered to decrease the reactor power by amount of 20% of the present power when the water inlet temperature to the core reaches 43 degree C and a scram (emergency shutdown) is triggered in case of the inlet temperature reaches 44 degree C. The model results are analyzed and discussed. The temperature profiles of fuel, clad and coolant are predicted during transient where its maximum values are far from thermal hydraulic limits.

  7. Thermal response of fusion reactor containment to lithium fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dube, D.A.; Kazimi, M.S.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    The lithium pool combustion model LITFIRE was used to study the consequences of lithium fire within fusion reactor containments. Calculations based on the UWMAK-III design show that without any special fire protection measures, the containment may reach over-pressures of up to 2.2 atm when one coolant loop is spilled inside the reactor building. Temperatures as high as 1100 0 C would also be experienced by some of the containment structures. These consequences were found to diminish greatly by the incorporation of a number of design strategies including initially subatmospheric containment pressures, initially low oxygen concentrations, and active post-accident cooling of the containment gas. Compartmentalization of the containment, as in the EBTR design, was found to limit the consequences of lithium fire and hence offers a potential safety advantage

  8. Economic evaluation of reprocessing and thermal reactor recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    This paper provides a summing up of the discussions on economic aspects in WG4. These discussions also took account of the strategic, ecological and public acceptance factors intimately involved. Tentative conclusions are put forward as a basis for discussion. Reprocessing may take place for reasons other than just strictly economic ones. The decisions facing various countries are rationalized by considering their reactions to the range of possible uranium prices and fast reactor costs in the future

  9. Thermal analysis of IRT-T reactor fuel elements

    OpenAIRE

    Naymushin, Artem Georgievich; Chertkov, Yuri Borisovich; Lebedev, Ivan Igorevich; Anikin, Mikhail Nikolaevich

    2015-01-01

    The article describes the method and results of thermo-physical calculations of IRT-T reactor core. Heat fluxes, temperatures of cladding, fuel meat and coolant were calculated for height of core, azimuth directions of FA and each fuel elements in FA. Average calculated values of uniformity factor of energy release distribution for height of fuel assemblies were shown in this research. Onset nucleate boiling temperature and ONB-ratio were calculated. Shows that temperature regimes of fuel ele...

  10. Parallel linear solvers for simulations of reactor thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.; Antal, S.P.; Edge, B.; Keyes, D.E.; Shaver, D.; Bolotnov, I.A.; Podowski, M.Z.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art multiphase fluid dynamics code, NPHASE-CMFD, performs multiphase flow simulations in complex domains using implicit nonlinear treatment of the governing equations and in parallel, which is a very challenging environment for the linear solver. The present work illustrates how the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) and scalable Algebraic Multigrid (AMG) preconditioner from Hypre can be utilized to construct robust and scalable linear solvers for the Newton correction equation obtained from the discretized system of governing conservation equations in NPHASE-CMFD. The overall long-tem objective of this work is to extend the NPHASE-CMFD code into a fully-scalable solver of multiphase flow and heat transfer problems, applicable to both steady-state and stiff time-dependent phenomena in complete fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors and, eventually, the entire reactor core (such as the Virtual Reactor concept envisioned by CASL). This campaign appropriately begins with the linear algebraic equation solver, which is traditionally a bottleneck to scalability in PDE-based codes. The computational complexity of the solver is usually superlinear in problem size, whereas the rest of the code, the “physics” portion, usually has its complexity linear in the problem size. (author)

  11. A three-dimensional steady-state thermal analysis of the reactor closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsugu; Sosa, Yutaka; Otsubo, Toru.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the thermal shield design and the three-dimensional thermal analysis on the upper reactor structures of FBR Monju. The analysis was performed by using NASTRAN taking account of both convective and radiative heat flow. Especially, local heat flow by circumferential natural convection in the annulus gaps was calculated by VANAC (Vertical Annulus Natural Convection Analysis Program) which was confirmed by the scale model experiments. (author)

  12. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  13. Fuel Design for Particle-Bed Reactors for Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husser, Dewayne L.; Evans, Robert S.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    The design of particle bed reactor (PBR) fuels is an iterative process involving close coordination of design and manufacturing operations. The process starts with the generation of an initial particle design, based on a knowledge of the system requirements and interfaces (such as, fissile loading requirements, coolant type, exit gas temperatures, operation time, number of cycles, contacting materials, etc.). The designer must consider materials property data, heat-transfer and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the particle and particle bed, and available (or anticipated) manufacturing technology. The design process also uses parametric studies to identify the influences of composition, size, and coating thickness on fuel performance. This resulting design is then used to provide a target manufacturing specification against which initial manufacturing development can be assessed and which provides the framework for manufacturing and testing derived feedback that can be incorporated into the subsequent particle design modifications. In this paper, an example of this design process for a hypothetical particle using a (U,Zr)C kernel and a NbC outer coating designed for a thermal propulsion application is given.

  14. Role of radiation embrittlement in reactor vessel integrity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Chexal, V.K.; Wyckoff, M.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor vessel integrity calculations are complex. The effect of radiation embrittlement on vessel material properties is a very important aspect of any vessel integrity evaluation. The importance of realistic (based on surveillance capsule results) rather than conservative estimates of the material properties (based on regulatory curves) cannot be overestimated. It is also important to make realistic thermal hydraulic and system operations assumptions. In addition, use of actual flaw sizes from in-service inspections (versus hypothetical flaw size selection) will promote realism. Important research results exist that need to be incorporated into the regulatory process. The authors believe results from current research and development efforts will demonstrate that, with reasonable assumptions and best estimate calculations, the safety of even the older reactor vessels with high copper content welds can be assured over their design lifetimes without the need for major fixes. The utilities, through EPRI and the vendors, have dedicated a significant effort to solving the pressurized thermal shock problem

  15. Analytical Estimation of the Central Reflector Impact on Thermal Neutron Flux Density in Research Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdyakov Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research was shown an analytical assessment of the impact of the central reflector as an example of spherical reactor in one-group approximation. From the external reflector introduced an effective border that simplifies the mathematical problem of critical task. The validation of the research is done just for one of the IRT-T reactor conditions.

  16. Thermal power evaluation of the TRIGA nuclear reactor at CDTN in operations of long duration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Rezende, Hugo Cesar, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b, E-mail: avf@cdtn.b, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The standard operations of nuclear research reactor IPR-R1 TRIGA located at CDTN (Belo Horizonte) usually have duration of not more than 8h. However in 2009 two operations for samples irradiations lasted about 12 hours each at a power of 100 kW. These long lasting operations started in the evening and most of them were carried out at night, when there are only small fluctuations in atmosphere temperature. Therefore the conditions were ideal for evaluating the thermal balance of the power dissipated by the reactor core through the forced cooling system. Heat balance is the standard methodology for power calibration of the IPR-R1 reactor. As in any reactor operation, the main operating parameters were monitored and stored by the Data Acquisition System developed for the reactor. These data have been used for the analysis and calculation of the evolution of several neutronic and thermalhydraulic parameters involved in the reactor operation. This paper analyzes the two long lasting operations of the IPR-R1 TRIGA and compares the recorded results for the power dissipated through the primary cooling loop with the results of the power calibration conducted in March 2009. The results corresponded to those of the thermal power calibration within the uncertainty of this methodology, indicating system stability over a period of six months. (author)

  17. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation

  18. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeg Veternikova, J., E-mail: jana.veternikova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Degmova, J. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pekarcikova, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Simko, F. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Petriska, M. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Skarba, M. [Slovak University of Technology, Vazovova 5, 812 43 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pupala, M. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Thermal resistance of advanced stainless steels were observed at 1000 °C. • GEN IV candidate steels were confronted to classic AISI steels. • ODS AISI 316 has weaker thermal resistance than classic AISI steel. • Ferritic ODS steels and NF 709 has better thermal resistance than AISI steels. - Abstract: Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. Preparation of processed nuclear data libraries for thermal, fast and fusion research and power reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, S.

    1994-03-01

    A Consultants Meeting on ''Preparation of Processed Nuclear Data Libraries for Thermal, Fast and Fusion Research and Power Reactor Applications'' was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency and held during December 13-16, 1993 December 8-10, 1993 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. The detailed agenda, the complete list of participants and the recommendations are presented in this report. (author)

  20. Measurements of thermal and fast neutron fluxes at the TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerdin, F.; Grabovsek, Z.; Klinc, T.; Solinc, H.

    1966-01-01

    Gold foils were placed at different positions in the TRIGA reactor core and in the experimental devices. Absolute values of the thermal neutron flux at these positions were obtained by coincidence method. Preliminary fast neutron spectrum was measured by threshold detector and by 'Li 6 sandwich' detector. A short description of the applied method and obtained measurements results are included [sl

  1. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The decomposition of mixture of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been studied in a catalytic non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The VOCs mixture consisting n-hexane, cyclo-hexane and -xylene was chosen for the present study. The decomposition characteristics of mixture of VOCs ...

  2. 10 CFR 50.66 - Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Requirements for thermal annealing of the reactor pressure vessel. (a) For those light water nuclear power... operating plan must include: (i) A detailed description of the pressure vessel and all structures and... For those cases where materials are removed from the beltline of the pressure vessel, the stress...

  3. Advances in thermal hydraulic and neutronic simulation for reactor analysis and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tentner, A.M.; Blomquist, R.N.; Canfield, T.R.; Ewing, T.F.; Garner, P.L.; Gelbard, E.M.; Gross, K.C.; Minkoff, M.; Valentin, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes several large-scale computational models developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the simulation and analysis of thermal-hydraulic and neutronic events in nuclear reactors and nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced parallel computing technologies on these computational models is emphasized

  4. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bostelmann, F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The predictive capability of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations for reactor design and safety analysis can be assessed with sensitivity analysis (SA) and uncertainty analysis (UA) methods. Uncertainty originates from errors in physical data, manufacturing uncertainties, modelling and computational algorithms. (The interested reader is referred to the large body of published SA and UA literature for a more complete overview of the various types of uncertainties, methodologies and results obtained). SA is helpful for ranking the various sources of uncertainty and error in the results of core analyses. SA and UA are required to address cost, safety, and licensing needs and should be applied to all aspects of reactor multi-physics simulation. SA and UA can guide experimental, modelling, and algorithm research and development. Current SA and UA rely either on derivative-based methods such as stochastic sampling methods or on generalized perturbation theory to obtain sensitivity coefficients. Neither approach addresses all needs. In order to benefit from recent advances in modelling and simulation and the availability of new covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) extensive sensitivity and uncertainty studies are needed for quantification of the impact of different sources of uncertainties on the design and safety parameters of HTGRs. Only a parallel effort in advanced simulation and in nuclear data improvement will be able to provide designers with more robust and well validated calculation tools to meet design target accuracies. In February 2009, the Technical Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors (TWG-GCR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recommended that the proposed Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on

  5. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment

  6. Statistical treatment of the thermal behaviour of fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, S.; Truffert, J.; Martella, T.; Marbach, G.

    1981-08-01

    In a sodium cooled fast reactor, fuel temperature is an important parameter acting on main characteristics of the project on fuel element and core behaviour. This parameter is important to define boundary conditions of fuel element utilisation. A method of statistical evaluation of temperature and of temperature increase higher than a given value is presented. This evaluation is obtained in the FIEVRE code by a combination of incertainties by means of a Monte Carlo optimized method. An application of FIEVRE code is presented in the case of Rapsodie-Fortissimo fuel at the beginning of refueling at nominal conditions without transient [fr

  7. Neutronics - thermal-hydraulics coupling: application to the helium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiana, F.

    2009-11-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of interactions between neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics. Neutron-kinetics allow to calculate the power in a nuclear reactor and the temperature evolution of materials where this power is deposited is known thanks to thermal-hydraulics. Moreover, when the temperatures evolve, the densities and cross sections change. These two disciplines are thus coupled. The first part of this work corresponds to the study and development of a method which allows to simulate transients in nuclear reactors and especially with a Monte-Carlo code for neutron-kinetics. An algorithm for the resolution of the neutron transport equation has been established and validated with a benchmark. In thermal-hydraulics, a porous media approach, based on another thesis, is considered. This gives the opportunity to solve the equations on the whole core without unconscionable computation time. Finally, a theoretical study has been performed on the statistical uncertainties which result from the use of a Monte-Carlo code and which spread from the reactivity to the power and from the power to the temperatures. The second part deals with the study of a misplaced control rod withdrawing in a GFR (helium-cooled fast reactor), a fourth generation reactor. Some models allowing to calculate neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics in the core (which contains assemblies built up with fuel plates) were defined. In thermal-hydraulics, a model for the core based on the porous media approach and a fuel plate homogenization model have been set up. A similar homogenization model has been studied for neutron-kinetics. Finally, the control rod withdrawing transient where we can observe the power raising and the stabilisation by thermal feedback has been performed with the Monte-Carlo code Tripoli for neutron-kinetics and the code Trio-U for thermal-hydraulics. (author)

  8. SRAC: JAERI thermal reactor standard code system for reactor design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Takano, Hideki; Horikami, Kunihiko; Ishiguro, Yukio; Kaneko, Kunio; Hara, Toshiharu.

    1983-01-01

    The SRAC (Standard Reactor Analysis Code) is a code system for nuclear reactor analysis and design. It is composed of neutron cross section libraries and auxiliary processing codes, neutron spectrum routines, a variety of transport, 1-, 2- and 3-D diffusion routines, dynamic parameters and cell burn-up routines. By making the best use of the individual code function in the SRAC system, the user can select either the exact method for an accurate estimate of reactor characteristics or the economical method aiming at a shorter computer time, depending on the purpose of study. The user can select cell or core calculation; fixed source or eigenvalue problem; transport (collision probability or Sn) theory or diffusion theory. Moreover, smearing and collapsing of macroscopic cross sections are separately done by the user's selection. And a special attention is paid for double heterogeneity. Various techniques are employed to access the data storage and to optimize the internal data transfer. Benchmark calculations using the SRAC system have been made extensively for the Keff values of various types of critical assemblies (light water, heavy water and graphite moderated systems, and fast reactor systems). The calculated results show good prediction for the experimental Keff values. (author)

  9. Reactivity changes in hybrid thermal-fast reactor systems during fast core flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1994-09-01

    A new space-dependent kinetic model in adiabatic approximation with local feedback reactivity parameters for reactivity determination in the coupled systems is proposed in this thesis. It is applied in the accident calculation of the 'HERBE' fast-thermal reactor system and compared to usual point kinetics model with core-averaged parameters. Advantages of the new model - more realistic picture of the reactor kinetics and dynamics during local large reactivity perturbation, under the same heat transfer conditions, are underlined. Calculated reactivity parameters of the new model are verified in the experiments performed at the 'HERBE' coupled core. The model has shown that the 'HERBE' safety system can shutdown reactor safely and fast even in the case of highly set power trip and even under conditions of big partial failure of the reactor safety system (author)

  10. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease.

  11. Thermal Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel due to Aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Park, Duck Gun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Thermal SS sets are located above the nuclear core where a fast neutron flux is negligible and temperature is 320 .deg. C (as opposed to 290 .deg. C in locations of high-irradiated SS). These SS allow monitoring of continuous operation temperature exposure effect on mechanical characteristics of the steels. Although transgranular cleavage is the predominant mode of brittle fracture in RPV steels, solute (e.g. phosphorus) segregation to grain boundaries can result in another type of brittle fracture known as intergranular (grain boundary) fracture. Figures 1 a) and b) show examples of transgranular and intergranular (IG) fracture, respectively, as viewed in a scanning electron microscope. The investigators have interpreted the intergranular cracking occurs as a result of segregation of sulfur and/or phosphorus at grain boundary. The IG cracking is a kind of symptom of embrittlement. It is reported that the IG cracking occurs in inert (Ar) environment under slow strain rate test. 1. The lath grain size in SA508 RPV steel increases slightly due to thermal aging at 350, 420, and 420 .deg. C for 2,250H. 2. The decrease in toughness appeared 4-25% and the lattice contraction appeared to be +0.004% - -0.022% due to thermal aging at 350, 420, and 420 .deg. C for 2,250H. 3. The amount of decrease in Charpy impact energy due to thermal aging is correlated well with the magnitude of lattice contraction.

  12. Laser driven thermal reactor for hazardous waste stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarian, A. [SAIC, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Increasing attention is being paid to treatment of hazardous waste through stabilization and possible solidification. Among the preferred technologies are thermal processes that detoxify and reduce the volume of hazardous wastes by exposing them to appropriate thermal regimes. However, as with any technology, there are potential problems which may detract from the application of the technology. Environmental pollution from particulate matter and off-gases can occur. Therefore, it is important to develop the technology of hazardous waste stabilization on a strong research base and to determine parameters and conditions of appropriate thermal processes. The purpose of the present work was to determine phenomenological parameters that characterize the processes of hazardous waste stabilization during thermal treatment. These methods can be used for any kind of liquid, solid and multiphase (liquid/solid and gas/solid) hazardous wastes. The method presented herein has been used to find corresponding parameters and conditions in the following applications: decomposition of ozone and nitrocompounds absorbed by activated carbon; sulphur compounds in heavy fuel oil; and appraisals of the explosion hazards involved in coal mining.

  13. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  14. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  15. Interim Report on Fluid-Fuel Thermal Breeder Reactors (Revised)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H. G.; Alexander, L. G.; Carter, W. L.; Chapman, R. H.; Kinyon, B. W.; Miller, J. W.

    1960-01-01

    The merits of aqueous-homogeneous ), graphite-moderated molten salt (MSBR) , and graphite-moderated liquid-bismuth (LBBR) breeder reactors operated at nearly comparable fuel-cycle costs (~1.5 mills/kwhr) were evaluated. The net electrical plant capability was assumed to be 1000 MwE, and the fuel and fertile streams were processed continuously on-site. The specific powers based on fuel were 1.2, 1.2, and 0.5 MwE/kg respectively, and 5.9, 3.7, and 5.3 MwE/tonne based on thorium. Net breeding ratios were 1.10, 1.07, and 1.07, giving doubling times of 5-1/2, 11, and 25 full power years . The fuel-cycle costs at the design points selected were 1.4, 1.3, and 1.6 mills/kwhr . The AHBR has an advantage in breeding ratio and doubling time because D 2 O is superior to graphite as a moderator in breeder reactors. MSBR has an advantage in fuel-cycle costs and in inventory of uranium in the fertile stream as a result of using a solution blanket.

  16. Application of fuzzy synthetic assessment to assess human factors design level on reactor control panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Xuecheng

    1999-01-01

    Reactor control panel design level on human factors must be considered by designer. The author evaluated the human factor design level of arrangement and combinations including the switch buttons, meter dials and indication lamps on Minjiang Reactor and High-Flux Engineer Test Reactor (HFETR) critical device by application of fuzzy synthetic assessment method in mathematics. From the assessment results, the advantages and shortcomings are fount, and some modification suggestions have also been proposed

  17. Experimental research in neutron physic and thermal-hydraulic at the CDTN Triga reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Souza, Rose Mary G.P.; Ferreira, Andrea V.; Pinto, Antonio J.; Costa, Antonio C.L.; Rezende, Hugo C., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b, E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.b, E-mail: avf@cdtn.b, E-mail: ajp@cdtn.b, E-mail: aclc@cdtn.b, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes production, General Atomics) at Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) is a pool type reactor cooled by natural circulation of light water and an open surface. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world and characterized by inherent safety. The IPR-R1 is the only Brazilian nuclear research reactor available and able to perform experiments in which interaction between neutronic and thermal-hydraulic areas occurs. The IPR-R1 has started up on November 11th, 1960. At that time the maximum thermal power was 30 kW. The present forced cooling system was built in the 70th and the power was upgraded to 100 kW. Recently the core configuration and instrumentation was upgraded again to 250 kW at steady state, and is awaiting the license of CNEN to operate definitely at this new power. This paper describes the experimental research project carried out in the IPR-R1 reactor that has as objective evaluate the behaviour of the reactor operational parameters, and mainly to investigate the influence of temperature on the neutronic variables. The research was supported by Research Support Foundation of the State of Minas Gerais (FAPEMIG) and Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). The research project meets the recommendations of the IAEA, for safety, modernization and development of strategic plan for research reactors utilization. This work is in line with the strategic objectives of Brazil, which aims to design and construct the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (RMB). (author)

  18. Determination and Analysis of Ar-41 Dose Rate Characteristic at Thermal Column of Kartini Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widarto; Sardjono, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Determination and Analysis of Ar-41 activity dose rate at the thermal column after shutdown of Kartini reactor has been done. Based on evaluation and analysis concluded that external dose rate is D = 1.606x10 -6 Sv/second and internal dose rate is 3.429x10 -1 1 Sv/second. It means that if employee work at the column thermal area for 15 minutes a day, 5 days a week, in a year will be 0.376 Sv still under dose rate limit i.e. 0.5 Sv, so that the column thermal facility is safely area. (author)

  19. Preliminary Assessment of Two Alternative Core Design Concepts for the Special Purpose Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Werner, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hummel, Andrew J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kennedy, John C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, Robert C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dion, Axel M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Richard N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ananth, Krishnan P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Special Purpose Reactor (SPR) is a small 5 MWt, heat pipe-cooled, fast reactor based on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Mega-Power concept. The LANL concept features a stainless steel monolithic core structure with drilled channels for UO2 pellet stacks and evaporator sections of the heat pipes. Two alternative active core designs are presented here that replace the monolithic core structure with simpler and easier to manufacture fuel elements. The two new core designs are simply referred to as Design A and Design B. In addition to ease of manufacturability, the fuel elements for both Design A and Design B can be individually fabricated, assembled, inspected, tested, and qualified prior to their installation into the reactor core leading to greater reactor system reliability and safety. Design A fuel elements will require the development of a new hexagonally-shaped UO2 fuel pellet. The Design A configuration will consist of an array of hexagonally-shaped fuel elements with each fuel element having a central heat pipe. This hexagonal fuel element configuration results in four radial gaps or thermal resistances per element. Neither the fuel element development, nor the radial gap issue are deemed to be serious and should not impact an aggressive reactor deployment schedule. Design B uses embedded arrays of heat pipes and fuel pins in a double-wall tank filled with liquid metal sodium. Sodium is used to thermally bond the heat pipes to the fuel pins, but its usage may create reactor transportation and regulatory challenges. An independent panel of U.S. manufacturing experts has preliminarily assessed the three SPR core designs and views Design A as simplest to manufacture. Herein are the results of a preliminary neutronic, thermal, mechanical, material, and manufacturing assessment of both Design A and Design B along with comparisons to the LANL concept (monolithic core structure). Despite the active core differences, all three reactor concepts behave

  20. FONESYS: The FOrum and NEtwork of SYStem Thermal-Hydraulic Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, S.H.; Aksan, N.; Austregesilo, H.; Bestion, D.; Chung, B.D.; D’Auria, F.; Emonot, P.; Gandrille, J.L.; Hanninen, M.; Horvatović, I.; Kim, K.D.; Kovtonyuk, A.; Petruzzi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We briefly presented the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS). • We presented FONESYS participants and their codes. • We explained FONESYS projects motivation, its main targets and working modalities. • We presented FONESYS position about projects topics and subtopics. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present briefly the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS), its participants, the motivation for the project, its main targets and working modalities. System Thermal-Hydraulics (SYS-TH) codes, also as part of the Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) approaches, are expected to achieve a more-and-more relevant role in nuclear reactor technology, safety and design. Namely, the number of code-users can easily be predicted to increase in the countries where nuclear technology is exploited. Thus, the idea of establishing a forum and a network among the code developers and with possible extension to code users has started to have major importance and value. In this framework the FONESYS initiative has been created. The main targets of FONESYS are: • To promote the use of SYS-TH Codes and the application of the BEPU approaches. • To establish acceptable and recognized procedures and thresholds for Verification and Validation (V and V). • To create a common ground for discussing envisaged improvements in various areas, including user-interface, and the connection with other numerical tools, including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes

  1. FONESYS: The FOrum and NEtwork of SYStem Thermal-Hydraulic Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S.H., E-mail: k175ash@kins.re.kr [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) (Korea, Republic of); Aksan, N., E-mail: nusr.aksan@gmail.com [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Austregesilo, H., E-mail: henrique.austregesilo@grs.de [Gesellschaft für Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) (Germany); Bestion, D., E-mail: dominique.bestion@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) (France); Chung, B.D., E-mail: bdchung@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) (Korea, Republic of); D’Auria, F., E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Emonot, P., E-mail: philippe.emonot@cea.fr [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) (France); Gandrille, J.L., E-mail: jeanluc.gandrille@areva.com [AREVA NP (France); Hanninen, M., E-mail: markku.hanninen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) (Finland); Horvatović, I., E-mail: i.horvatovic@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Kim, K.D., E-mail: kdkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) (Korea, Republic of); Kovtonyuk, A., E-mail: a.kovtonyuk@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy); Petruzzi, A., E-mail: a.petruzzi@ing.unipi.it [University of Pisa San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG) (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We briefly presented the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS). • We presented FONESYS participants and their codes. • We explained FONESYS projects motivation, its main targets and working modalities. • We presented FONESYS position about projects topics and subtopics. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to present briefly the project called Forum and Network of System Thermal-Hydraulics Codes in Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (FONESYS), its participants, the motivation for the project, its main targets and working modalities. System Thermal-Hydraulics (SYS-TH) codes, also as part of the Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) approaches, are expected to achieve a more-and-more relevant role in nuclear reactor technology, safety and design. Namely, the number of code-users can easily be predicted to increase in the countries where nuclear technology is exploited. Thus, the idea of establishing a forum and a network among the code developers and with possible extension to code users has started to have major importance and value. In this framework the FONESYS initiative has been created. The main targets of FONESYS are: • To promote the use of SYS-TH Codes and the application of the BEPU approaches. • To establish acceptable and recognized procedures and thresholds for Verification and Validation (V and V). • To create a common ground for discussing envisaged improvements in various areas, including user-interface, and the connection with other numerical tools, including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Codes.

  2. Lumped thermal capacitance analysis of transient heat conduction and induced stresses in Ghana Research Reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annor-Nyarko, M.; Ayensu Gyeabour, I.; Akaho, E. H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Lumped thermal capacitance analysis has been undertaken to investigate the transient temperature variations, associated induced thermal stress distributions, and the structural integrity of Ghana Research Reactor-I (GHAR R-I) vessel after 15 years of operation. The beltline configuration of the cylindrical vessel of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) was based on thin-shell and axi-symmetric assumptions with small temperature gradient and low Biot number. The thermal energy transferred by unsteady flow of the coolant to the vessel was determined as internal energy change. Numerical algorithms for Matlab Code were implemented to generate data for transient analysis and simulation. The simulations indicated that the temperature variations and the thermal stresses were below the limits imposed by the vessel material (Aluminium alloy LT 21) specifications of 933 K melting point and allowable yield stress of 480 MPa. The low level of induced thermal stresses indicated that the structural integrity of the reactor vessel has been maintained to forestall any incidence of crack propagation and fatigue failure over the operation period. (au)

  3. Comparative study of Thermal Hydraulic Analysis Codes for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Hoon; Jang, Mi Suk; Han, Kee Soo [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Various codes are used for the thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactors. The use of some codes among these is limited by user and some codes are not even open to general person. Thus, the use of alternative code is considered for some analysis. In this study, simple thermal hydraulic behaviors are analyzed using three codes to show that alternative codes are possible for the analysis of nuclear reactors. We established three models of the simple u-tube manometer using three different codes. RELAP5 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program), SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis CodE for nuclear power Plants), GOTHIC (Generation of Thermal Hydraulic Information for Containments) are selected for this analysis. RELAP5 is widely used codes for the analysis of system behavior of PWRs. SPACE has been developed based on RELAP5 for the analysis of system behavior of PWRs and licensing of the code is in progress. And GOTHIC code also has been widely used for the analysis of thermal hydraulic behavior in the containment system. The internal behavior of u-tube manometer was analyzed by RELAP5, SPACE and GOTHIC codes. The general transient behavior was similar among 3 codes. However, the stabilized status of the transient period analyzed by REPAP5 was different from the other codes. It would be resulted from the different physical models used in the other codes, which is specialized for the multi-phase thermal hydraulic behavior analysis.

  4. Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman

    2014-01-01

    This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermalization is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

  5. PEBBLE: a two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1981-09-01

    This report documents the local implementation of the PEBBLE code to treat the two-dimensional steady-state pebble bed reactor thermal hydraulics problem. This code is implemented as a module of a computation system used for reactor core history calculations. Given power density data, the geometric description in (RZ), and basic heat removal conditions and thermal properties, the coolant properties, flow conditions, and temperature distributions in the pebble fuel elements are predicted. The calculation is oriented to the continuous fueling, steady state condition with consideration of the effect of the high energy neutron flux exposure and temperature history on the thermal conductivity. The coolant flow conditions are calculated for the same geometry as used in the neutronics calculation, power density and fluence data being used directly, and temperature results are made available for subsequent use.

  6. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.S.

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10 6 MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials

  7. Assessment of materials needs for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G.S. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This report has the goal of presenting for the CTR designer and material supplier potentially significant problem areas in materials manufacturing and in structural material resources projected for potential application in fusion power reactor construction. The projected material requirements are based on presently available bills-of-materials for conceptual CTR designs used for constructing a hypothetical fusion power generating capacity of 10/sup 6/ MW(e) maturing exponentially over a 20-year period. The projected elemental requirements, the ratio of these requirements to the projected total U.S. demand, and the salient problems currently identified with the CTR use of these elements are summarized. The projected requirements are based upon a ''model'' industry, which is described, and the estimated potential use of molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, and tantalum as blanket structural materials.

  8. Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, 17 - 21 July 1967. The meeting was attended by 143 participants from 24 Member States and one international organization. Contents: (Vol.I) Theory of neutron thermalization (15 papers); Scattering law (20 papers); Angular, space, temperature and time dependence of neutron spectra (9 papers). (Vol.II) Measurement of thermal neutron spectra and spectral indices, and comparison with theory (17 papers); Time-dependent problems in neutron thermalization (12 papers). Each paper is in its original language (61 English, 1 French and 11 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  9. Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra. Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Neutron Thermalization and Reactor Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held at Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, 17 - 21 July 1967. The meeting was attended by 143 participants from 24 Member States and one international organization. Contents: (Vol.I) Theory of neutron thermalization (15 papers); Scattering law (20 papers); Angular, space, temperature and time dependence of neutron spectra (9 papers). (Vol.II) Measurement of thermal neutron spectra and spectral indices, and comparison with theory (17 papers); Time-dependent problems in neutron thermalization (12 papers). Each paper is in its original language (61 English, 1 French and 11 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English.

  10. Actinides reduction by recycling in a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Martinez C, E.; Balboa L, H.

    2014-10-01

    This work is directed towards the evaluation of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle in which radioactive actinides could be recycled to remove most of the radioactive material; firstly a production reference of actinides in standard nuclear fuel of uranium at the end of its burning in a BWR reactor is established, after a fuel containing plutonium is modeled to also calculate the actinides production in MOX fuel type. Also it proposes a design of fuel rod containing 6% of actinides in a matrix of uranium from the tails of enrichment, then four standard uranium fuel rods are replaced by actinides rods to evaluate the production and transmutation thereof, the same procedure was performed in the fuel type MOX and the end actinide reduction in the fuel was evaluated. (Author)

  11. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified

  12. Space-reactor electric systems: subsystem technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.V.; Bost, D.; Determan, W.R.

    1983-03-29

    This report documents the subsystem technology assessment. For the purpose of this report, five subsystems were defined for a space reactor electric system, and the report is organized around these subsystems: reactor; shielding; primary heat transport; power conversion and processing; and heat rejection. The purpose of the assessment was to determine the current technology status and the technology potentials for different types of the five subsystems. The cost and schedule needed to develop these potentials were estimated, and sets of development-compatible subsystems were identified.

  13. Investigation of Correlations for the Thermal-hydraulic Analysis of Liquid Metal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Won Pyo; Jeong, Hae Yong; Lee, Yong Bum

    2007-08-15

    The present investigation is aimed at reducing favorable constitutive correlations from those developed for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR), for reliable safety analyses of KALIMER. It is achieved by analyzing them in a point of their accuracies. The study is particularly important because its outcomes can provide an essential knowledge on their relative errors including their conservatisms to be analyzed in the future KALIMER licensing stage. The predictions of the correlations have been compared with available experimental data on both friction factors for the wired-wrapped rod bundles in the core and the heat transfer coefficients in the system. As a result, the heat transfer coefficient inside pipe currently featured in SSC-K has been found acceptable. It, however, has shown a discrepancy of about 60 % and thus an alternative one has been proposed for improvement. Meanwhile, the friction factor model in the current SSC-K has not shown a prominent discrepancy in prediction trend but it has not backed an enough theoretical basis so that another model has been proposed. A systematic assessment for effects of those factors to the conservatism must be fully understood for the future licensing stage, and systematic calculations must be followed by designing an assessment matrix. Besides, it is essential to conduct experiments under similar conditions for constitutive parts of geometries which represent the KALIMER design.

  14. Risk-assessment methodology for fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.

    1976-04-01

    The methods applied or proposed for risk assessment of nuclear reactors are reviewed, particularly with respect to their applicability for risk assessment of future commercial fast breeder reactors. All methods are based on the calculation of accident consequences for relatively few accident scenarios. The role and general impact of uncertainties in fast-reactor accident analysis are discussed. The discussion shows the need for improvement of the methodology. A generalized and improved risk-assessment methodology is outlined and proposed (accident-spectra-progression approach). The generalization consists primarily of an explicit treatment of uncertainties throughout the accident progression. The results of this method are obtained in form of consequence distributions. The width and shape of the distributions depend in part on the superposition of the uncertainties. The first moment of the consequence distribution gives an improved prediction of the ''average'' consequence. The higher-consequence moments can be used for consideration of risk aversion. The assessment of the risk of one or a certain number of nuclear reactors can only provide an ''isolated'' risk assessment. The general problem of safety risk assessment and its relation to public acceptance of certain modes of power production is a much broader problem area, which is also discussed

  15. Research Reactor MZFR, Karlsruhe, Germany Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and of the Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (authors)

  16. Thorium fueled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current development in thorium fueled reactors shows that they can be designed to operate in the fast or thermal spectrum. The thorium/uranium fuel cycle converts fertile thorium-232 into fissile uranium-233, which fissions and releases energy. This paper analyses the characteristics of thorium fueled reactors and discusses the thermal reactor option. It is found that thorium fuel can be utilized in molten salt reactors through many configurations and designs. A balanced assessment on the feasibility of adopting one reactor technology versus another could lead to optimized benefits of having thorium resource.

  17. Assessment of TRIGA pulsing reactor safety without loss of coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Kaall, L.

    1979-11-01

    The fuel temperature, fuel can pressure and cladding stresses in the TRIGA fuel elements at various transient states has in part been measured and semiempirically estimated in cases where no experiments could be carried out. To the end of obtaining more reliable and up-to-date data and reactor parameters, reactor power and fuel temperatures were measured both at steady and transient states, including pulsing up to 280 MW. A novel and more realistic model for the fuel temperature at pulsing was also presented and used in the assessments. Based on the present assessment with the water coolant present and a maximum excess reactivity of (Δksub(max)/β = ) 4 $, no reactivity induced transients can bring about any undue hazards to the reactor or to the surroundings. (author)

  18. Experimental and computational studies of thermal mixing in next generation nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landfried, Douglas Tyler

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a proposed next generation nuclear power plant. The VHTR utilizes helium as a coolant in the primary loop of the reactor. Helium traveling through the reactor mixes below the reactor in a region known as the lower plenum. In this region there exists large temperature and velocity gradients due to non-uniform heat generation in the reactor core. Due to these large gradients, concern should be given to reducing thermal striping in the lower plenum. Thermal striping is the phenomena by which temperature fluctuations in the fluid and transferred to and attenuated by surrounding structures. Thermal striping is a known cause of long term material failure. To better understand and predict thermal striping in the lower plenum two separate bodies of work have been conducted. First, an experimental facility capable of predictably recreating some aspects of flow in the lower plenum is designed according to scaling analysis of the VHTR. Namely the facility reproduces jets issuing into a crossflow past a tube bundle. Secondly, extensive studies investigate the mixing of a non-isothermal parallel round triple-jet at two jet-to-jet spacings was conducted. Experimental results were validation with an open source computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAMRTM. Additional care is given to understanding the implementation of the realizable k-a and Launder Gibson RSM turbulence Models in OpenFOAMRTM. In order to measure velocity and temperature in the triple-jet experiment a detailed investigation of temperature compensated hotwire anemometry is carried out with special concern being given to quantify the error with the measurements. Finally qualitative comparisons of trends in the experimental results and the computational results is conducted. A new and unexpected physical behavior was observed in the center jet as it appeared to spread unexpectedly for close spacings (S/Djet = 1.41).

  19. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic studies of aqueous homogeneous reactor for medical isotopes production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Daniel Milian; Lorenzo, Daniel E. Milian; Lira, Carlos A. Brayner de Oliveira; Garcia, Lorena P. Rodríguez, E-mail: milianperez89@gmail.com, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu, E-mail: lorenapilar1109@gmail.com, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences (InSTEC), Havana (Cuba); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    The use of Aqueous Homogenous Reactors (AHR) is one of the most promissory alternatives to produce medical isotopes, mainly {sup 99}Mo. Compare to multipurpose research reactors, an AHR dedicated for {sup 99}Mo production has advantages because of their low cost, small critical mass, inherent passive safety, and simplified fuel handling, processing, and purification characteristics. This article presents the current state of research in our working group on this topic. Are presented and discussed the group validation efforts with benchmarking exercises that include neutronic and thermal-hydraulic results of two solution reactors, the SUPO and ARGUS reactors. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic results of 75 kWth AHR based on the ARGUS reactor LEU configuration are presented. The neutronic studies included the determination of parameters such as reflector thickness, critical height, medical isotopes production and others. Thermal-hydraulics studies were focused on demonstrating that sufficient cooling capacity exists to prevent fuel overheating. In addition, the effects of some calculation parameters on the computational modeling of temperature, velocity and gas volume fraction during steady-state operation of an AHR are discussed. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulics studies have been performed with the MCNPX version 2.6e computational code and the version 14 of ANSYS CFX respectively. Our group studies and the results obtained contribute to demonstrate the feasibility of using AHR for the production of medical isotopes, however additional studies are still necessary to confirm these results and contribute to development and demonstration of their technical, safety, and economic viability. (author)

  20. Mechanical and thermal design of the Cascade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We present an improved Cascade fusion reaction chamber that is optimized with respect to chamber radius, wall thickness, and pebble blanket outlet temperature. We show results of a parameter study where we varied chamber radius from 3 to 6 m, wall thickness from 15 to 80 mm, and blanket outlet temperature from 900 to 1400 K. Based on these studies, we achieved an optimized chamber with 50% the volume of the original design and 60% of its blanket. Chamber radius is only 4.4 m and its half length is only 5.9 m, decreased from the original 5-m radius and 8-m half-length. In our optimization method, we calculate both thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from x-ray, fusion-pellet-debris, and neutron-generated momentum, pressure from ablated material, centrifugal action, vacuum inside the chamber, and gravity. We add the mechanical stresses to thermal stresses and keep the total less than the yield stress. Further, we require that fluctuations in these stresses be less than that which would produce creep-fatigue failure within the chamber 30-year lifetime

  1. First report on non-thermal plasma reactor scaling criteria and optimization models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.

    1998-01-13

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Example NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel engine powered electrical generators. Example VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint stripping, and parts cleaning. To design and build NTP reactors that are optimized for particular DoD applications, one must understand the basic decomposition chemistry of the target compound(s) and how the decomposition of a particular chemical species depends on the air emissions stream parameters and the reactor operating parameters. This report is intended to serve as an overview of the subject of reactor scaling and optimization and will discuss the basic decomposition chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) and two representative VOCs, trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride, and the connection between the basic plasma chemistry, the target species properties, and the reactor operating parameters (in particular, the operating plasma energy density). System architecture, that is how NTP reactors can be combined or ganged to achieve higher capacity, will also be briefly discussed.

  2. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet-bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion is a hydrogen-cooled, BeO-reflected, fast reactor, consisting of an annular core region filled with randomly packed, spherical fuel pellets. The fuel pellets in the PBR are self-supported, eliminating the need for internal core structure, which simplifies the core design and reduces the size and mass of the reactor. Each spherical fuel pellet is composed of hundreds of fuel microspheres embedded in a zirconium carbide (ZrC) matrix. Each fuel microsphere is composed of a UC-NbC fuel kernel surrounded by two consecutive layers of the NbC and ZrC. Gaseous hydrogen serves both as core coolant and as the propellant for the PBR rocket engine. The cold hydrogen flows axially down the inlet channel situated between the core and the external BeO reflector and radially through the orifices in the cold frit, the core, and the orifices in the hot frit. Finally, the hot hydrogen flows axially out the central channel and exits through converging-diverging nozzle. A thermal-hydraulic analysis of the PBR core was performed with an emphasis on optimizing the size and axial distribution of the orifices in the hot and cold frits to ensure that hot spots would not develop in the core during full-power operation. Also investigated was the validity of the assumptions of neglecting the axial conduction and axial cross flow in the core

  3. Thermal-hydraulics design comparisons for the tandem mirror hybrid reactor blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Yang, Y.S.; Schultz, K.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor (TMHR) is a cylindrical reactor, and the fertile materials and tritium breeding fuel elements can be arranged with radial or axial orientation in the blanket module. Thermal-hydraulics performance comparisons were made between plate, axial rod and radial rod fuel geometrices. The three configurations result in different coolant/void fractions and different clad/structure fractions. The higher void fraction in the two rod designs means that these blankets will have to be thicker than the plate design blanket in order to achieve the same level of nuclear interactions. Their higher structural fractions will degrade the uranium breeding ratio and energy multiplication factor of the design. One difficulty in the thermal-hydraulics analysis of the plate design was caused by the varying energy multiplication of the blanket during the lifetime of the plate which forced the use of designs that operated in the transition flow regime at some point during life. To account for this, an approach was adopted from Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) experience for the pressure drop calculation and the corresponding heat transfer coefficient that was used for the film drop thermal calculation. Because of the superior nuclear performance, the acceptable thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the mechanical design feasibility, the plate geometry concept was chosen for the reference gas-cooled TMHR blanket design

  4. Transient thermal-hydraulic/neutronic analysis in a VVER-1000 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyed khalil Mousavian; Mohammad Mohsen Ertejaei; Majid Shahabfar

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nowadays, coupled thermal-hydraulic and three-dimensional neutronic codes in order to consider different feedback effects is state of the art subject in nuclear engineering researches. In this study, RELAP5/COBRA and WIMS/CITATION codes are implemented to investigate the VVER-1000 reactor core parameters during Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LB-LOCA). In a LB-LOCA, the primary side pressure, coolant density and fuel temperature strongly decrease but the cladding temperature experiences a strong peak. For this purpose, the RELAP5 Best Estimate (BE) system code is used to simulate the LB-LOCA analysis in VVER-1000 nuclear thermal-hydraulic loops. Also, the modified COBRA-IIIc software as a sub-channel analysis code is applied for modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core. Moreover, WIMS and CITATION as a cross section and 3-D neutron flux codes are coupled with thermal-hydraulic codes with the aim of consider the spatial effects through the reactor core. For this reason, suitable software is developed to link and speed up the coupled thermalhydraulic and three-dimensional neutronic calculations. This software utilizes of external coupling concept in order to integrate thermal-hydraulic and neutronic calculations. (authors)

  5. Thermal simulations and tests in the development of a helmet transport spent fuel elements Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba, R.; Quintana, F.; Márquez Turiello, R.; Furnari, J.C.; Pimenta Mourão, R.

    2013-01-01

    A packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel from research reactors was designed by a group of researchers to improve the capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the reactors operated in the region. Two half-scale models for MTR fuel were constructed and tested so far and a third one for both MTR and TRIGA fuels will be constructed and tested next. Four test campaigns have been carried out, covering both normal and hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. The thermal test is part of the requirements for the qualification of transportation packages for nuclear reactors spent fuel elements. In this paper both the numerical modelling and experimental thermal tests performed are presented and discussed. The cask is briefly described as well as the finite element model developed and the main adopted hypotheses for the thermal phenomena. The results of both numerical runs and experimental tests are discussed as a tool to validate the thermal modelling. The impact limiters, attached to the cask for protection, were not modelled. (author) [es

  6. Thermal spectra of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macias B, L.R.; Palacios G, J.

    1998-01-01

    The diffraction phenomenon is gave in observance of the well known Bragg law in crystalline materials and this can be performance by mean of X-rays, electrons and neutrons among others, which allows to do inside the field of each one of these techniques the obtaining of measurements focussed at each one of them. For the present work, it will be mentioned only the referring to X-ray and neutron techniques. The X-ray diffraction due to its properties just it does measurements which are known in general as superficial measurements of the sample material but for the properties of the neutrons, this diffraction it explores in volumetric form the sample material. Since the neutron diffraction process depends lots of its intensity, then it is important to know the neutron source spectra that in this case is supplied by the TRIGA Mark III reactor. Within of diffraction techniques a great number of them can be found, however some of the traditional will be mentioned such as the identification of crystalline samples, phases identification and the textures measurement. At present this last technique is founded on the dot of a minimum error and the technique of phases identification performs but not compete with that which is obtained by mean of X-rays due to this last one has a major resolution. (Author)

  7. Thermal convection of liquid metal in the titanium reduction reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimurazov, A.; Frick, P.; Stefani, F.

    2017-06-01

    The structure of the convective flow of molten magnesium in a metallothermic titanium reduction reactor has been studied numerically in a three-dimensional non-stationary formulation with conjugated heat transfer between liquid magnesium and solids (steel walls of the cavity and titanium block). A nonuniform computational mesh with a total of 3.7 million grid points was used. The Large Eddy Simulation technique was applied to take into account the turbulence in the liquid phase. The instantaneous and average characteristics of the process and the velocity and temperature pulsation fields are analyzed. The simulations have been performed for three specific heating regimes: with furnace heaters operating at full power, with furnace heaters switched on at the bottom of the vessel only, and with switched-off furnace heaters. It is shown that the localization of the cooling zone can completely reorganize the structure of the large-scale flow. Therefore, by changing heating regimes, it is possible to influence the flow structure for the purpose of creating the most favorable conditions for the reaction. It is also shown that the presence of the titanium block strongly affects the flow structure.

  8. ASSESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF THERMAL REFUGE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon populations require river networks that provide water temperature regimes sufficient to support a diversity of salmonid life histories across space and time. The importance of cold water refuges for migrating adult salmon and steelhead may seem intuitive, and refuges are clearly used by fish during warm water episodes. But quantifying the value of both small and large scale thermal features to salmon populations has been challenging due to the difficulty of mapping thermal regimes at sufficient spatial and temporal resolutions, and integrating thermal regimes into population models. We attempt to address these challenges by using newly-available datasets and modeling approaches to link thermal regimes to salmon populations across scales. We discuss the challenges and opportunities to simulating fish behaviors and linking exposures to migratory and reproductive fitness. In this talk and companion poster, we describe an individual-based modeling approach for assessing sufficiency of thermal refuges for migrating salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River. Many rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are currently listed as impaired under the Clean Water Act as a result of high summer water temperatures. Adverse effects of warm waters include impacts to salmon and steelhead populations that may already be stressed by habitat alteration, disease, predation, and fishing pressures. Much effort is being expended to improve conditions for salmon and steelhea

  9. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Disclosed is a neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch. 1 claim, 16 figures

  10. Probabilistic Safety Assessment Of It TRIGA Mark-II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergun, E; Kadiroglu, O.S.

    1999-01-01

    The probabilistic safety assessment for Istanbul Technical University (ITU) TRIGA Mark-II reactor is performed. Qualitative analysis, which includes fault and event trees and quantitative analysis which includes the collection of data for basic events, determination of minimal cut sets, calculation of quantitative values of top events, sensitivity analysis and importance measures, uncertainty analysis and radiation release from fuel elements are considered

  11. Thermal denitrification of evaporators concentrates in reactor with fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugnot, C.

    1993-11-01

    As part of the treatments of liquid wastes coming from the Marcoule reprocessing plant, the study of a thermal denitrification process for evaporator concentrates has been chosen by the CEA/CEN Cadarache: the fluidized-bed calcination. This work presents the study of a calcination pilot-plant for wastes with a very high sodium nitrate content. After a reactional analysis carried out in a thermobalance on samples which are representative of the fluidized-bed compounds, the perfecting of many of the plant parameters - such as the solution injection system - was carried out on a scale-model at first. Then, it was verified on the pilot-plant, and some experiments have been carried out. A mathematical model for the particle growth inside the fluidized-bed is proposed. (author). 179 refs., 65 figs., 23 tabs

  12. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a heavy-water reactor moderator tank using the CUPID Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Su Ryong; Jeong, Jae Jun [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Han Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a preliminary analysis is performed for the CANDU moderator tank. The calculation results using the basic case input showed a unrealistic, thermal stratification in the upper region, which was caused by the lack of the momentum of the cooling water from the inlet nozzle. To increase the flow momentum from the inlet nozzle, the cross-section area of each inlet nozzle was reduced by half and, then, the calculation showed very realistic results. It is clear that the modeling of the inlet nozzle affects the calculation result significantly. Further studies are needed for a realistic and efficient simulation of the flow in the Calandria tank. When the core cooling system fails to remove the decay heat from the fuel channels during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the pressure tube (PT) could strain to contact its surrounding Calandria tube (CT), which leads to sustained CTs dry out, finally resulting in damages to nuclear fuel. This situation can occur when the degree of the subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is insufficient. In this regard, to estimate the local subcooling of the moderator inside the Calandria vessel is very important. However, the local temperature is measured at the inlet and outlet of the vessel only. Therefore, we need to accurately predict the local temperature inside the Calandria vessel.In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the real-scale heavy-water reactor moderator is carried out using the CUPID code. The applicability of the CUPID code to the analysis of the flow in the Calandria vessel has been assessed in the previous studies.

  13. Site Suitability and Hazard Assessment Guide for Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne Moe

    2013-10-01

    Commercial nuclear reactor projects in the U.S. have traditionally employed large light water reactors (LWR) to generate regional supplies of electricity. Although large LWRs have consistently dominated commercial nuclear markets both domestically and abroad, the concept of small modular reactors (SMRs) capable of producing between 30 MW(t) and 900 MW(t) to generating steam for electricity is not new. Nor is the idea of locating small nuclear reactors in close proximity to and in physical connection with industrial processes to provide a long-term source of thermal energy. Growing problems associated continued use of fossil fuels and enhancements in efficiency and safety because of recent advancements in reactor technology suggest that the likelihood of near-term SMR technology(s) deployment at multiple locations within the United States is growing. Many different types of SMR technology are viable for siting in the domestic commercial energy market. However, the potential application of a particular proprietary SMR design will vary according to the target heat end-use application and the site upon which it is proposed to be located. Reactor heat applications most commonly referenced in connection with the SMR market include electric power production, district heating, desalinization, and the supply of thermal energy to various processes that require high temperature over long time periods, or a combination thereof. Indeed, the modular construction, reliability and long operational life purported to be associated with some SMR concepts now being discussed may offer flexibility and benefits no other technology can offer. Effective siting is one of the many early challenges that face a proposed SMR installation project. Site-specific factors dealing with support to facility construction and operation, risks to the plant and the surrounding area, and the consequences subsequent to those risks must be fully identified, analyzed, and possibly mitigated before a license

  14. The influence of reactor material and heterogeneous factor on radiation-thermal conversion of petroleum fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliyeva, N.G.; Safikhanov, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The influence of reaction vessel material and heterogeneous factor (relation of internal surface to the volume of reactor - S/V) at the process rate of radiation-thermal conversion of petroleum fraction Δt 162 - 400 o C were studied. As a main indexes of process the yield of gases and high molecular olefin hydrocarbons were used. At the radiation-thermal process the reaction vessels from several materials (titan, nickel, stainless steels Stal-3, 1X18H9T, X23H18) were examined. Among the materials studied there are the most active stainless steel- IX18H9T with heterogeneous factor S/V=1. While using such reactor at 400-500 o C in comparison the rate of radiation-thermal process with thermal one it is α = W RT /W T ≥2. Rate's increasing of petroleum fraction conversion possibility becomes more two times due to the choice of reaction vessel and heterogeneous factor. During the radiation-thermal conversion of petroleum fraction with Δt =162 - 400 o C in the reactor made from stainless steel IX18H9T with S/V=1 under the influence of the accelerated electrons and optimal condition (adsorbed doze- in the interval D = (0.6-1.5·10 19 eV/sm 3 ), doze rate - J = (4-5·10 15 ) eV/sm 3 sec, temperature-400-500 o C ) the yield of olefin is 53%. The production of the olefins from petroleum fraction by using of radiation-thermal method gives opportunity to their yields to be 20% approximately, in comparison with thermo-catalytic process being applied in the presence of catalysts and water vapour at 500 o C

  15. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases

  16. Thermal-hydraulic analysis techniques for axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor cores. [PEBBLE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroh, K.R.

    1979-03-01

    The pebble bed reactor's cylindrical core volume contains a random bed of small, spherical fuel-moderator elements. These graphite spheres, containing a central region of dispersed coated-particle fissile and fertile material, are cooled by high pressure helium flowing through the connected interstitial voids. A mathematical model and numerical solution technique have been developed which allow calculation of macroscopic values of thermal-hydraulic variables in an axisymmetric pebble bed nuclear reactor core. The computer program PEBBLE is based on a mathematical model which treats the bed macroscopically as a generating, conducting porous medium. The steady-state model uses a nonlinear Forchheimer-type relation between the coolant pressure gradient and mass flux, with newly derived coefficients for the linear and quadratic resistance terms. The remaining equations in the model make use of mass continuity, and thermal energy balances for the solid and fluid phases.

  17. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally different but edaphically similar reactor cooling reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilde, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure and the physicochemical characteristics of three reactor cooling reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type were studied during 1978. The three reservoirs differed in thermal alteration resulting from reactor cooling water as follows: (1) considerable heating with lake-wide temperatures >30 0 C, even in winter; (2) a maximal 5 0 C increase occurring in only one of three major arms of the reservoir; and (3) no thermal effluent received during the study period. Considerable spatial and temporal differences in water quality and phytoplankton community structure were observed; however, water temperature independent of other environmental factors (e.g., light and nutrients) was found to be a relatively unimportant variable for explaining phytoplankton periodicity

  18. Phytoplankton distribution in three thermally different but edaphically similar reactor cooling reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E W

    1982-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure and the physicochemical characteristics of three reactor cooling reservoirs in close proximity and of similar age and bottom type were studied during 1978. The three reservoirs differed in thermal alteration resulting from reactor cooling water as follows: (1) considerable heating with lake-wide temperatures >30/sup 0/C, even in winter; (2) a maximal 5/sup 0/C increase occurring in only one of three major arms of the reservoir; and (3) no thermal effluent received during the study period. Considerable spatial and temporal differences in water quality and phytoplankton community structure were observed; however, water temperature independent of other environmental factors (e.g., light and nutrients) was found to be a relatively unimportant variable for explaining phytoplankton periodicity.

  19. Commercial tandem mirror reactor design with thermal barriers: WITAMIR-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Emmert, G.A.; Maynard, C.W.

    1980-10-01

    A conceptual design of a near term commercial tandem mirror power reactor is presented. The basic configuration utilizes yin-yang minimum-B plugs with inboard thermal barriers. The maximum magnetic fields are 6.1 T, 8.1 T, and 15 T in the central cell, yin-yang, and thermal barrier magnets, respectively. The blanket utilizes Pb 83 Li 17 as the coolant and HT-9 as the structural material. This yields a high energy multiplication (1.37), a sufficient tritium breeding ratio (1.07) and has a major advantage with respect to maintenance. The plasma Q is 28 at a fusion power level of 3000 MW(t); the net electrical output is 1530 MW(e); and the overall efficiency is 39%. Cost estimates indicate that WITAMIR-I is competitive with recent tokamak power reactor designs

  20. Exploratory screening tests of several alloys and coatings for automobile thermal reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A total of 23 materials (including uncoated ferritic and austenitic iron-base alloys, uncoated nickel and cobalt-base superalloys, and several different coatings on AISI 304 stainless steel) were screened as test coupons on a rack in an automobile thermal reactor. Test exposures were generally 51 hours including 142 thermal cycles of 10 minutes at 1010 + or - 30 C test coupon temperature and 7-minutes cool-down to about 510 C. Materials that exhibited corrosion resistance better than that of Hastelloy X include: a ferritic iron alloy with 6 weight percent aluminum; three nickel-base superalloys; two diffused-aluminum coatings on AISI 304; and a Ni-Cr slurry-sprayed coating on AISI 304. Preliminary comparison is made on the performance of the directly impinged coupons and a reactor core of the same material.

  1. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  2. NUMERICAL MULTIGROUP TRANSIENT ANALYSIS OF SLAB NUCLEAR REACTOR WITH THERMAL FEEDBACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Osuský

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new numerical code for multigroup transient analyses with thermal feedback. The code is developed at Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering. It is necessary to carefully investigate transient states of fast neutron reactors, due to recriticality issues after accident scenarios. The code solves numerical diffusion equation for 1D problem with possible neutron source incorporation. Crank-Nicholson numerical method is used for the transient states. The investigated cases are describing behavior of PWR fuel assembly inside of spent fuel pool and with the incorporated neutron source for better illustration of thermal feedback.

  3. Measuring thermal neutron spectra of RIEN-1 reactor with a chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus Vilar, G. de.

    1977-03-01

    The setting up of a time-of-flight spectrometer (Fermi Chopper) and its use in measurements of thermal neutron spectra in the irradiation channels of the Argonaut Reactor(Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Brazil), is described. These distributions are obtained using a multichannel analyser with the necessary corrections being made for counting losses in the analyser, dectector efficiency experimental resolution and chopper transmission function. The results obtained show that the thermal neutron flux emerging from the canal J-9 can be approximately described by a Maxwellian distribution with and associated characteristic temperature fo 430+-30 0 K [pt

  4. Design of a Resistively Heated Thermal Hydraulic Simulator for Nuclear Rocket Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Foote, John P.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Wang, Ten-See; Anghaie, Samim

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary design study is presented for a non-nuclear test facility which uses ohmic heating to replicate the thermal hydraulic characteristics of solid core nuclear reactor fuel element passages. The basis for this testing capability is a recently commissioned nuclear thermal rocket environments simulator, which uses a high-power, multi-gas, wall-stabilized constricted arc-heater to produce high-temperature pressurized hydrogen flows representative of reactor core environments, excepting radiation effects. Initially, the baseline test fixture for this non-nuclear environments simulator was configured for long duration hot hydrogen exposure of small cylindrical material specimens as a low cost means of evaluating material compatibility. It became evident, however, that additional functionality enhancements were needed to permit a critical examination of thermal hydraulic effects in fuel element passages. Thus, a design configuration was conceived whereby a short tubular material specimen, representing a fuel element passage segment, is surrounded by a backside resistive tungsten heater element and mounted within a self-contained module that inserts directly into the baseline test fixture assembly. With this configuration, it becomes possible to create an inward directed radial thermal gradient within the tubular material specimen such that the wall-to-gas heat flux characteristics of a typical fuel element passage are effectively simulated. The results of a preliminary engineering study for this innovative concept are fully summarized, including high-fidelity multi-physics thermal hydraulic simulations and detailed design features.

  5. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a method for performing a statistical steady state thermal analysis of a reactor core. The technique is only outlined here since detailed thermal equations are dependent on the core geometry. The method has been applied to a pressurised water reactor core and the results are presented for illustration purposes. Random hypothetical cores are generated using the Monte-Carlo method. The technique shows that by splitting the parameters into two types, denoted core-wise and in-core, the Monte Carlo method may be used inexpensively. The idea of using extremal statistics to characterise the low probability events (i.e. the tails of a distribution) is introduced together with a method of forming the final probability distribution. After establishing an acceptable probability of exceeding a thermal design criterion, the final probability distribution may be used to determine the corresponding thermal response value. If statistical and deterministic (i.e. conservative) thermal response values are compared, information on the degree of pessimism in the deterministic method of analysis may be inferred and the restrictive performance limitations imposed by this method relieved. (orig.)

  6. CFD model development and data comparison for thermal-hydraulic analysis of HTO pilot scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochan, R.J.; Oh, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The DOE Hydrothermal Oxidation (HTO) program is validating computational methods for use in scaling up small HTO systems to production scale. As part of that effort, the computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT is being used to calculate the integrated fluid dynamics and chemical reactions in an HTO vessel reactor designed by MODAR, Inc. Previous validation of the code used data from a benchscale reactor. This reports presents the validation of the code using pilotscale (10 times greater throughput than benchscale) data. The model for the pilotscale reactor has been improved based upon the benchscale data by including better fluid thermal properties, a better solution algorithm, addition of external heat transfer, investigation of the effects of turbulent flow, and, although not built into the computer model, a technique for using the calculated adiabatic oxidation temperatures for selecting initial conditions. Thermal results from this model show very good agreement with the limited test data from MODAR Run 920. In addition to the reactor temperatures, flowfield details, including chemical reaction distribution, and simulated salt particle transport were obtained. This model will be very beneficial in designing and evaluating larger commercial scale units. The results of these calculations indicate that for model validation, more accurate boundary conditions need to be measured in future test runs

  7. Intelligent information database of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics for a future marine water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    2000-01-01

    At the Ship Research Institute, a series of the experimental studies on the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of an integrated type marine water reactor has been conducted. This current study aims at developing an intelligent information database program with the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a future marine water reactor on the basis of the valuably experimental knowledge, which was obtained from the above-mentioned studies. In this paper, the experimental knowledge with the flow boiling of a once-through steam generator and the natural circulation of primary water under a ship rolling motion was converted into an intelligent information database program. The program was created as a Windows application using the Visual Basic. Main functions of the program are as follows: (1) steady state flow boiling analysis and determination of stability for any helical-coil type once-through steam generator design, (2) reference and graphic display of the experimental data, (3) reference of the information such as analysis method and experimental apparatus. The program will be useful for the design of not only the future integrated type marine water reactor but also the small sized reactor with helical-coil type steam generator. (author)

  8. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  9. Power transients of Ghana research reactor-1 using PARET/ANL thermal hydraulic code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampomah-Amoaka, E.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Anim-Sampong, S.; Nyarko, B.J.B.

    2010-01-01

    PARET/ANL(Version 7.3 of 2007) thermal-hydraulic code was used to perform transient analysis of the Ghana Research Reactor-1.The reactivities inserted were 2.1mk and 4mk.The peak power of 5.81kW was obtained for 2.1 mk insertion whereas the peak power for 4mk insertion of reactivity was 92.32kW.These results compare closely with experiments and theoretical studies conducted previously.

  10. Non-iterative method to calculate the periodical distribution of temperature in reactors with thermal regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez de Alsina, O.L.; Scaricabarozzi, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    A matrix non-iterative method to calculate the periodical distribution in reactors with thermal regeneration is presented. In case of exothermic reaction, a source term will be included. A computer code was developed to calculate the final temperature distribution in solids and in the outlet temperatures of the gases. The results obtained from ethane oxidation calculation in air, using the Dietrich kinetic data are presented. This method is more advantageous than iterative methods. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine based on particle bed reactor using light water steam as a propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James R.; Ludewig, Hans; Maise, George

    1993-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of configuring a water cooled Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket, based on a Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is investigated. This rocket will be used to operate on water obtained from near earth objects. The conclusions reached in this paper indicate that it is possible to configure a PBR based NTP rocket to operate on water and meet the mission requirements envisioned for it. No insurmountable technology issues have been identified.

  12. Contribution to the study of thermal-hydraulic problems in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cognet, G.

    1998-01-01

    In nuclear reactors, whatever the type considered, Pressurized Water Water Reactors (PWRs), Fast Breeder reactors (FBRs)..., thermal-hydraulics, the science of fluid mechanics and thermal behaviour, plays an essential role, both in nominal operating and accidental conditions. Fluid can either be the primary fluid (liquid or gas) or a very specific fluid called corium, which, in case of severe accident, could result from core and environning structure melting. The work reported here represents a 20-year contribution to thermal-hydraulic issues which could occur in FBRs and PWRs. Working on these two types of reactors, both in nominal and severe accident situations, has allowed me to compare the problems and to realize the importance of communication between research teams. The evolution in the complexity of studied problems, unavoidable in order to reduce costs and significantly improve safety, has led me from numerical modelling of single-phase flow turbulence to high temperature real melt experiments. The difficulties encountered in understanding the observed phenomena and in increasing experimental databases for computer code qualification have often entailed my participation in specific measurement device developments or adaptations, in particular non-intrusive devices generally based on optical techniques. Being concerned about the end-use of this research work, I actively participated in 'in-situ' thermalhydraulic experiments in the FBRs: Phenix and Super-Phenix, of which I appreciated their undeniable scientific contribution. In my opinion, the thermal-hydraulic questions related to severe accidents are the most complex as they are at the cross-roads of several scientific specialities. Consequently, they require a multi-disciplinary approach and a continuous see-saw motion between experimentalists and modelling teams. After a brief description of the various problems encountered, the main ones are reported. Finally, the importance for research teams to

  13. Thermal neutron spectra measurements in IEAR-1 Reactor, by using a crystal spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulfaro, R.; Figueiredo Neto, A.M.; Stasiulevicius, E.; Vinhas, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal neutron spectrum of the IEN Argonauta reactor has been measured in the wavelength from 0.7 to 1.9A, using a neutron crystal spectrometer. An aluminium single crystal, in transmission, was used as monochromator. The aluminium crystal reflectivity employed in the analysis of the data was calculated for the first five permitted orders. An effective absorption coefficient of the crystal was used to perform the calculations instead of the macroscopic cross section of the element

  14. International benchmark study of advanced thermal hydraulic safety analysis codes against measurements on IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hainoun, A., E-mail: pscientific2@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Doval, A. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Av. Cmdt. Luis Piedrabuena 4950, C.P. 8400 S.C de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Umbehaun, P. [Centro de Engenharia Nuclear – CEN, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242-Cidade Universitaria, CEP-05508-000 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chatzidakis, S. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Ghazi, N. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Park, S. [Research Reactor Design and Engineering Division, Basic Science Project Operation Dept., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Street No. 1, P.O. Box 78, 115400 Mioveni, Arges (Romania); Shokr, A. [Division of Nuclear Installation Safety, Research Reactor Safety Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A set of advanced system thermal hydraulic codes are benchmarked against IFA of IEA-R1. • Comparative safety analysis of IEA-R1 reactor during LOFA by 7 working teams. • This work covers both experimental and calculation effort and presents new out findings on TH of RR that have not been reported before. • LOFA results discrepancies from 7% to 20% for coolant and peak clad temperatures are predicted conservatively. - Abstract: In the framework of the IAEA Coordination Research Project on “Innovative methods in research reactor analysis: Benchmark against experimental data on neutronics and thermal hydraulic computational methods and tools for operation and safety analysis of research reactors” the Brazilian research reactor IEA-R1 has been selected as reference facility to perform benchmark calculations for a set of thermal hydraulic codes being widely used by international teams in the field of research reactor (RR) deterministic safety analysis. The goal of the conducted benchmark is to demonstrate the application of innovative reactor analysis tools in the research reactor community, validation of the applied codes and application of the validated codes to perform comprehensive safety analysis of RR. The IEA-R1 is equipped with an Instrumented Fuel Assembly (IFA) which provided measurements for normal operation and loss of flow transient. The measurements comprised coolant and cladding temperatures, reactor power and flow rate. Temperatures are measured at three different radial and axial positions of IFA summing up to 12 measuring points in addition to the coolant inlet and outlet temperatures. The considered benchmark deals with the loss of reactor flow and the subsequent flow reversal from downward forced to upward natural circulation and presents therefore relevant phenomena for the RR safety analysis. The benchmark calculations were performed independently by the participating teams using different thermal hydraulic and safety

  15. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  16. Comparative Studies of Core Thermal Hydraulic Design Methods for the Prototype Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Lim, Jae Yong; Kim, Sang Ji

    2013-01-01

    In this work, various core thermal-hydraulic design methods, which have arisen during the development of a prototype SFR, are compared to establish a proper design procedure. Comparative studies have been performed to determine the appropriate design method for the prototype SFR. The results show that the minimization method show a lower cladding midwall temperature than the fixed outlet temperature methods and superior thermal safety margin with the same coolant flow. The Korea Atomic energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed a conceptual SFR design with the final goal of constructing a prototype plant by 2028. The main objective of the SFR prototype plant is to verify the TRU metal fuel performance, reactor operation, and transmutation ability of high-level wastes. The core thermal-hydraulic design is used to ensure the safe fuel performance during the whole plant operation. Compared to the critical heat flux in typical light water reactors, nuclear fuel damages in SFR subassemblies are arisen from a creep induced failure. The creep limit is evaluated based on both the maximum cladding temperature and the uncertainties of the design parameters. Therefore, the core thermalhydraulic design method, which eventually determines the cladding temperature, is highly important to assure a safe and reliable operation of the reactor systems

  17. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  18. A quantitative methodology for reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerson, D.S.; Balkey, K.R.; Meyer, T.A.; Ofstun, R.P.; Rupprecht, S.D.; Sharp, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The recent operating experience of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Industry has focused increasing attention on the issue of reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Previous reactor vessel integrity concerns have led to changes in vessel and plant system design and to operating procedures, and increased attention to the PTS issue is causing consideration of further modifications. Events such as excess feedwater, loss of normal feedwater, and steam generator tube rupture have led to significant primary system cooldowns. Each of these cooldown transients occurred concurrently with a relatively high primary system pressure. Considerations of these and other postulated cooldown events has drawn attention to the impact of operator action and control system effects on reactor vessel PTS. A methodology, which couples event sequence analysis with probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses, was developed to identify those events that are of primary concern for reactor vessel integrity. Operating experience is utilized to aid in defining the appropriate event sequences and event frequencies of occurrence for the evaluation. (orig./RW)

  19. Primary Damage Characteristics in Metals Under Irradiation in the Cores of Thermal and Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechenkin, V.A.

    2012-01-01

    For an analysis and forecasting of radiation-induced phenomena in structural materials of WWERs, PWRs and BN reactors the fast neutron fluence is usually used (for structural materials of the reactor cores and internals the fluence of neutrons with energy > 0.1 MeV, for WWER and PWRs vessel steels the fluence of neutrons with energy > 0.5 MeV in Russia and East Europe, and with energy > 1.0 MeV in USA and France). Displacements per atom (dpa) seem to be a more appropriate correlation parameter, because it allows comparing the results of materials irradiation in different neutron energy spectra or with different types of particles (neutrons, ions, fast electrons). Energy spectra of primary knocked atoms (PKA) and 'effective' dpa, which are introduced to take into account the point defect recombination during the relaxation stage of a displacement cascade, can be still better representation of the effect of irradiation on material properties. In this work the results of calculating dose rates (dpa/s, NRT-model), PKA energy spectra and PKA mean energies in metals under irradiation in the cores of Russian reactors WWER-440, WWER-1000 (both power thermal reactors) and BN-600 (power fast reactor) and BR-10 (test fast reactor) are presented. In all the reactors Fe and Zr are considered, with addition of Ti and W in BN-600. 'Effective' dose rates in these metals are calculated. Limitations and uncertainties in the standard dpa formulation (the NRT-dpa) are discussed. IPPE activities in the fields related to the TM subject are considered

  20. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  1. Structural assessments of plate type support system for APR1400 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Anh Tung; Namgung, Ihn, E-mail: inamgung@kings.ac.kr

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • This paper investigates plate-type support structure for the reactor vessel of the APR 1400. • The tall column supports of APR1400 reactor challenges in seismic and severe accident events. • A plate-type support of reactor vessel was proposed and evaluated based on ASME code. • The plate-type support was assessed to show its higher rigidity than column-type. - Abstract: This paper investigates an alternative form of support structure for the reactor vessel of the APR 1400. The current reactor vessel adopts a four-column support arrangement locating on the cold legs of the vessel. Although having been successfully designed, the tall column structure challenges in seismic events. In addition, for the mitigation of severe accident consequences, the columns inhibit ex-vessel coolant flow, hence the elimination of the support columns proposes extra safety advantages. A plate-type support was proposed and evaluated for the adequacy of meeting the structural stiffness by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) approach. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code was used to verify the design. The results, which cover thermal and static structural analysis, show stresses are within allowable limits in accordance with the design code. Even the heat conduction area is increased for the plate-type of support system, the results showed that the thermal stresses are within allowable limits. A comparison of natural frequencies and mode shapes for column support and plate-type support were presented as well which showed higher fundamental frequencies for the plate-type support system resulting in greater rigidity of the support system. From the outcome of this research, the plate-type support is proven to be an alternative to current APR column type support design.

  2. A comparative evaluation of fuel utilisation by different thermal reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, M.R.

    1992-10-01

    A comparative assessment of fuel utilization efficiency of pressurised water reactors, pressure tube type pressurised heavy water reactors, pressure vessel type pressurised heavy water reactors and high temperature gas cooled graphite reactors operating on a number of different fuel cycles has been carried out. The fuel utilization efficiency has been defined as the amount of natural uranium consumed for the generation of one unit of electricity averaged over the period covered in the analysis. The comparative evaluation has been done with different projected growth of installed nuclear capacity for a period of 50 years. One of the models used to predict the installed nuclear capacity growth is the Fisher-Pry model. (author). refs., figs., tabs

  3. Gas cooled reactor assessment. Volume II. Final report, February 9, 1976--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report was prepared to document the estimated power plant capital and operating costs, and the safety and environmental assessments used in support of the Gas Cooled Reactor Assessment performed by Arthur D. Little, Inc. (ADL), for the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The gas-cooled reactor technologies investigated include: the High Temperature Gas Reactor Steam Cycle (HTGR-SC), the HTGR Direct Cycle (HTGR-DC), the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). Reference technologies used for comparison include: Light Water Reactors (LWR), the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), conventional coal-fired steam plants, and coal combustion for process heat

  4. Thermal spectra of the TRIGA Mark III reactor; El espectro termico del reactor TRIGA Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R.; Palacios G, J. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    The diffraction phenomenon is gave in observance of the well known Bragg law in crystalline materials and this can be performance by mean of X-rays, electrons and neutrons among others, which allows to do inside the field of each one of these techniques the obtaining of measurements focussed at each one of them. For the present work, it will be mentioned only the referring to X-ray and neutron techniques. The X-ray diffraction due to its properties just it does measurements which are known in general as superficial measurements of the sample material but for the properties of the neutrons, this diffraction it explores in volumetric form the sample material. Since the neutron diffraction process depends lots of its intensity, then it is important to know the neutron source spectra that in this case is supplied by the TRIGA Mark III reactor. Within of diffraction techniques a great number of them can be found, however some of the traditional will be mentioned such as the identification of crystalline samples, phases identification and the textures measurement. At present this last technique is founded on the dot of a minimum error and the technique of phases identification performs but not compete with that which is obtained by mean of X-rays due to this last one has a major resolution. (Author)

  5. Assessment of RANS CFD modelling for pressurised thermal shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander M Willemsen; Ed MJ Komen; Sander Willemsen

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The most severe Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) scenario is a cold water Emergency Core Coolant (ECC) injection into the cold leg during a LOCA. The injected ECC water mixes with the hot fluid present in the cold leg and flows towards the downcomer where further mixing takes place. When the cold mixture comes into contact with the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall, it may lead to large temperature gradients and consequently to high stresses in the RPV wall. Knowledge of these thermal loads is important for RPV remnant life assessments. The existing thermal-hydraulic system codes currently applied for this purpose are based on one-dimensional approximations and can, therefore, not predict the complex three-dimensional flows occurring during ECC injection. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) can be applied to predict these phenomena, with the ultimate benefit of improved remnant RPV life assessment. The present paper presents an assessment of various Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) CFD approaches for modeling the complex mixing phenomena occurring during ECC injection. This assessment has been performed by comparing the numerical results obtained using advanced turbulence models available in the CFX 5.6 CFD code in combination with a hybrid meshing strategy with experimental results of the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). The UPTF was a full-scale 'simulation' of the primary system of the four loop 1300 MWe Siemens/KWU Pressurised Water Reactor at Grafenrheinfeld. The test vessel upper plenum internals, downcomer and primary coolant piping were replicas of the reference plant, while other components, such as core, coolant pump and steam generators were replaced by simulators. From the extensive test programme, a single-phase fluid-fluid mixing experiment in the cold leg and downcomer was selected. Prediction of the mixing and stratification is assessed by comparison with the measured temperature profiles at several locations

  6. Thermal tests of a multi-tubular reactor for hydrogen production by using mixed ferrites thermochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pardo, Aurelio; Denk, Thorsten; Vidal, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    The SolH2 project is an INNPACTO initiative of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, with the main goal to demonstrate the technological feasibility of solar thermochemical water splitting cycles as one of the most promising options to produce H2 from renewable sources in an emission-free way. A multi-tubular solar reactor was designed and build to evaluate a ferrite thermochemical cycle. At the end of this project, the ownership of this plant was transferred to CIEMAT. This paper reviews some additional tests with this pilot plant performed in the Plataforma Solar de Almería with the main goal to assess the thermal behavior of the reactor, evaluating the evolution of the temperatures inside the cavity and the relation between supplied power and reached temperatures. Previous experience with alumina tubes showed that they are very sensitive to temperature and flux gradients, what leads to elaborate an aiming strategy for the heliostat field to achieve a uniform distribution of the radiation inside the cavity. Additionally, the passing of clouds is a phenomenon that importantly affects all the CSP facilities by reducing their efficiency. The behavior of the reactor under these conditions has been studied.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic analyses of the High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor for loss of forced cooling at 30% reactor power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A LOFC test involves the loss of both reactor-reactivity control and core cooling. • The HTTR demonstrated the LOFC test at 30% reactor power (9 MW). • The analyses could show the three-dimensional thermal-phenomena qualitatively. • The downstream of forced convection pushes down the upstream by natural convection. • The forced convection has little influence on the core thermal-hydraulics. - Abstract: In a safety demonstration test involving the loss of both reactor-reactivity control and core cooling, the High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) demonstrated spontaneous stabilization of the reactor power. A test where all three gas circulators were tripped at 30% reactor power (9 MW) without a reactor scram, called a loss-of-forced-cooling (LOFC) test, was analyzed, and the analytical results from a reactor kinetics code was reported. After that, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) acquired a large supercomputer and the STAR-CCM+ software developed by CD-adapco, which can be used to create a three-dimensional model of the HTTR to analyze steady-state and transient conditions. In this paper, a model of the three-dimensional thermal-hydraulics inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) during the LOFC test at 30% reactor power (9 MW) is described and detailed analyses are performed using STAR-CCM+. With this tool, the effects of natural and forced convection on thermal-phenomena in the HTTR can be understood quantitatively. The finding is as follows: the downstream of forced convection caused by the helium purification system (HPS) pushes down the upstream by natural convection in the fuel assemblies; however, the forced convection due to the HPS has little influence on the core thermal-hydraulics without the reactor outlet coolant temperature. And the effect can be neglected because the difference of the maximum velocity of the helium between the cases where the HPS is active and inactive, is very little over the course of LOFC test

  8. Assessment of the Dry Processed Oxide Fuel in Liquid Metal Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    2005-09-01

    The neutronic feasibility of the dry process oxide fuel was assessed for the sodium-cooled and lead-cooled fast reactors (SFR and LFR, respectively), which were recommended as Generation-IV (Gen-IV) reactor systems by the Gen-IV international forum. The reactor analysis was performed for the equilibrium fuel cycle of two core configurations: Hybrid BN-600 benchmark core with an enlarged lattice pitch and a modified BN-600 core. The dry process technology assumed in this study is the molten-salt process, which was developed by Russian scientists for recycling oxide fuels. The core calculation was performed by the REBUS-3 code and the reactor characteristics such as the transuranic (TRU) enrichment, breeding ratio, peak linear power, burnup reactivity swing, etc. were calculated for the equilibrium core under a fixed fuel management scheme. The results showed that a fissile self-sustainable breakeven core was achievable without blanket fuels when the fuel volume fraction was ∼50% and most of the fission products were removed. If the design criteria used in this study is proved to be acceptable through a detailed physics design and thermal hydraulic analysis in the future, it is practically possible to construct an equilibrium fuel cycle of the SFR and LFR systems based on the oxide fuel by utilizing the dry process technology

  9. Neutron measurement at the thermal column of the Malaysian Triga Mark II reactor using gold foil activation method and TLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalbi, Safwan; Salleh, Wan Norhayati Wan; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Aliff Ashraff Rosdi, Muhammad; Syahir Sarkawi, Muhammad; Liyana Jamsari, Nur; Nasir, Nur Aishah Mohd

    2018-01-01

    In order to design facilities for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), the neutron measurement must be considered to obtain the optimal design of BNCT facility such as collimator and shielding. The previous feasibility study showed that the thermal column could generate higher thermal neutrons yield for BNCT application at the TRIGA MARK II reactor. Currently, the facility for BNCT are planned to be developed at thermal column. Thus, the main objective was focused on the thermal neutron and epithermal neutron flux measurement at the thermal column. In this measurement, pure gold and cadmium were used as a filter to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes from inside and outside of the thermal column door of the 200kW reactor power using a gold foil activation method. The results were compared with neutron fluxes using TLD 600 and TLD 700. The outcome of this work will become the benchmark for the design of BNCT collimator and the shielding

  10. Status of measured neutron cross sections of transactinium isotopes for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Experimentally determined neutron cross sections, resonance parameters, and the average number of neutrons per fission for neutron-induced fission of actinide nuclides in the production chains associated with thermal and near-thermal reactors are summarized and compared with user requests for experimental data. The primary fertile and fissile isotopes 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu are excluded from this survey. Integral data, i.e., spectrum-averaged thermal cross sections and resonance integrals, are included, but the emphasis is placed on energy-dependent differential cross sections because of their general utility with any specified neutron energy spectrum. Included with the data summaries are an extensive survey of the literature through August 1975, brief descriptions of measurements known to be in progress or firmly planned for the immediate future, and recommendations for needed measurements. (author)

  11. Status of measured neutron cross sections of transactinium isotopes for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    Experimentally determined neutron cross sections, resonance parameters, and the average number of neutrons per fission for neutron-induced fission of actinide nuclides in the production chains associated with thermal and near-thermal reactors are summarized and compared with user requests for experimental data. The primary fertile and fissile isotopes 232 Th, 233 U, 235 U, 238 U, and 239 Pu are excluded from this survey. Integral data, i.e., spectrum-averaged thermal cross sections and resonance integrals, are included, but the emphasis is placed on energy-dependent differential cross sections because of their general utility with any specified neutron energy spectrum. Included with the data summaries are an extensive survey of the literature through August 1975, brief descriptions of measurements known to be in progress or firmly planned for the immediate future, and recommendations for needed measurements. (3 figures, 5 tables)

  12. Dosimetric characteristics of the thermal neutron beam facility for neutron capture therapy at Hanaro reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Han; Suh, Soheigh; Ji, Young Hoon

    2006-01-01

    The thermal neutron beam facility utilizing a typical tangential beam port for Neutron Capture Therapy was installed at the Hanaro, 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor. In order to determine the different dose components in phantoms irradiated with a mixed thermal neutron beam and gamma-ray for clinical applications, various techniques were applied including the use of activation foils, TLDs and ionization chambers. The water phantom was utilized in the measurement. The results of the measurement were compared with MCNP4B calculations. The thermal neutron fluxes were 1.02E9 and 6.07E8/cm 2 ·s at 10 and 20 mm depth in water, respectively. The gamma-ray dose rate was 5.10 Gy/hr at 20 mm depth in water. The result of this study can be used as basic data for subsequent BNCT clinical application. (author)

  13. Development of MCATHAS system of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics in supercritical water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, P.; Yao, D. [Science and Tech. on Reactor System Design Tech. Laboratory, Chengdu (China)

    2011-07-01

    The MCATHAS system of coupled neutronics/Thermal-hydraulics in supercritical water reactor is described, which considers the mutual influence between the obvious axial and radial evolution of material temperature, water density and the relative power distribution. This system can obtain the main neutronics and thermal parameters along with burn-up. MCATHAS system is parallel processing coupling. The MCNP code is used for neutronics analysis with the continuous cross section library at any temperature calculated by interpolation algorithm; The sub-channel code ATHAS is for thermal-hydraulics analysis and the ORIGEN Code for burn-up calculation. We validate the code with the assembly of HPLWR and analyze the assembly SCLWR- H. (author)

  14. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, F.J.; Heger, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  15. A model to estimate volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion in solution reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, F.J. [NIS-6: Advanced Nuclear Technology, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Heger, A.S. [ESA-EA: Engineering Sciences and Application, Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2001-07-01

    To investigate the effects of radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion on the steady-state operation of solution reactors at the power level required for the production of medical isotopes, a calculational model has been developed. To validate this model, including its principal hypotheses, specific experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory SHEBA uranyl fluoride solution reactor were conducted. The following sections describe radiolytic gas generation in solution reactors, the equations to estimate the fuel solution volume change due to radiolytic gas bubbles and thermal expansion, the experiments conducted at SHEBA, and the comparison of experimental results and model calculations. (author)

  16. Experimental thermal hydraulic facility for simulating LOCA behaviour of pressurised heavy water power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, M.K.; John, P.K.; Jayaraj, N.; Chatterjee, P.B.; Das, Sandeep; John, Benny; Sharma, A.K.; Prasad, N.; Singhal, M.; Malhotra, P.K.; Haldar, S.C.; Bhambra, H.S.; Chadda, S.K.; Chandra, Umesh

    2006-01-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic facility being set up adjacent to R and D Centre at Tarapur is a 13 MW full-elevation scaled down facility having the key components of PHT System of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). The objective of the facility is to study thermal hydraulic behaviour of PHT System of PHWR by simulating various transients and accidental scenarios, to conduct safety related and operational transient studies and validation of various thermal hydraulic computer codes developed for analysis. The design of thermal hydraulic facility is based on the process parameters of a large PHWR with respect to fluid mass flux, transit time, flow velocity, pressure, temperature and enthalpy in PHT System. Experiments would be conducted in the facility to gain an improved understanding of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of large size PHWR during loss of coolant accident scenarios with forced and natural thermo-siphoning circulation modes etc. The data collected from the experiments would be used in validating computer codes developed for safety analysis. The facility is extensively instrumented to measure parameters such as temperature, pressure, flow, level, void-fraction at key locations. This paper gives the design philosophy used for scaling, design of major components of primary and secondary circuit of Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Facility and details of simulated experiments to be carried out. (author)

  17. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  18. Modeling and temperature regulation of a thermally coupled reactor system via internal model control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Coronella, C.J.; Bhadkamkar, A.S.; Seader, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1993-12-01

    A two-stage, thermally coupled fluidized-bed reactor system has been developed for energy-efficient conversion of tar-sand bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Modeling and temperature control of a system are addressed in this study. A process model and transfer function are determined by a transient response technique and the reactor temperature are controlled by PI controllers with tuning settings determined by an internal model control (IMC) strategy. Using the IMC tuning method, sufficiently good control performance was experimentally observed without lengthy on-line tuning. It is shown that IMC strategy provides a means to directly use process knowledge to make a control decision. Although this control method allows for fine tuning by adjusting a single tuning parameter, it is not easy to determine the optimal value of this tuning parameter, which must be specified by the user. A novel method is presented to evaluate that parameter, which must be specified by the user. A novel method is presented to evaluate that parameter in this study. It was selected based on the magnitude of elements on the off-diagonal of the relative gain array to account for the effect of thermal coupling on control performance. It is shown that this method provides stable and fast control of reactor temperatures. By successfully decoupling the system, a simple method of extending the IMC tuning technique to multiinput/multioutput systems is obtained.

  19. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  20. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling in reactor dynamics codes TRAB-3D and HEXTRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Raety, H.

    1999-01-01

    The reactor dynamics codes for transient and accident analyses inherently include the coupling of neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling. In Finland a number of codes with 1D and 3D neutronic models have been developed, which include models also for the cooling circuits. They have been used mainly for the needs of Finnish power plants, but some of the codes have also been utilized elsewhere. The continuous validation, simultaneous development, and experiences obtained in commercial applications have considerably improved the performance and range of application of the codes. The fast operation of the codes has enabled realistic analysis of 3D core combined to a full model of the cooling circuit even in such long reactivity scenarios as ATWS. The reactor dynamics methods are developed further and new more detailed models are created for tasks related to increased safety requirements. For thermal hydraulics calculations, an accurate general flow model based on a new solution method has been developed. Although mainly intended for analysis purposes, the reactor dynamics codes also provide reference solutions for simulator applications. As computer capability increases, these more sophisticated methods can be taken into use also in simulator environments. (author)

  1. Review of turbulence modelling for numerical simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Haapalehto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The report deals with the modelling of turbulent flows in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic applications. The goal is to give tools and knowledge about turbulent flows and their modelling in practical applications for engineers, and especially nuclear engineers. The emphasize is on the theory of turbulence, the existing different turbulence models, the state-of-art of turbulence in research centres, the available models in the commercial code CFD-FLOW3D, and the latest applications of turbulence modelling in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. It turns out that it is difficult to elaborate an universal turbulence model and each model has its advantages and drawbacks in each application. However, the increasing power of computers can permit the emergence of new methods of turbulence modelling such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which open new horizons in this field. These latter methods are beginning to be available in commercial codes and are used in different nuclear applications such as 3-D modelling of the nuclear reactor cores and the steam generators. (orig.) (22 refs.)

  2. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of flow inversion in a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazeminejad, H.

    2008-01-01

    The course of loss of flow accident and flow inversion in a pool type research reactor, with scram enabled under natural circulation condition is numerically investigated. The analyses were performed by a lumped parameters approach for the coupled kinetic-thermal-hydraulics, with continuous feedback due to coolant and fuel temperature effects. A modified Runge-Kutta method was adopted for a better solution to the set of stiff differential equations. Transient thermal-hydraulics during the process of flow inversion and establishment of natural circulation were considered for a 10-MW IAEA research reactor. Some important parameters such as the peak temperatures for the hot channel were obtained for both high-enriched and low enriched fuel. The model prediction is also verified through comparison with other computer code results reported in the literature for detailed simulations of loss of flow accidents (LOFA) and the agreement between the results for the peak clad temperatures and key parameters has been satisfactory. It was found that the flow inversion and subsequent establishment of natural circulation keep the peak cladding surface temperature below the saturation temperature to avoid the escalation of clad temperature to the level of onset of nucleate boiling and sub-cooled void formation to ensure the safe operation of the reactor

  3. Methods and Models for the Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis of the CROCUS Reactor at EFPL

    OpenAIRE

    Rais, A.; Siefman, D.; Girardin, G.; Hursin, M.; Pautz, A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of the CROCUS reactor, several methods and models need to be developed in the areas of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, and multiphysics coupling. The long-term objectives of this project are to work towards the development of a modern method for the safety analysis of research reactors and to update the Final Safety Analysis Report of the CROCUS reactor. A first part of the paper deals with generation of a core simulator nuclear...

  4. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, October 1, 1982-March 3, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report provides descriptions and results of the technical effort during the first half of FY 83 on the Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. The work on Integration and Management (WBS 01) includes the preparation of the Advanced Systems Concept Evaluation Plan and the Advanced Systems Technology Development Plan in addition to the program management activities. The Market Definition (WBS 03) efforts considered the application of the Modular Reactor System with reforming (MRS-R) to the production of methanol and ammonia and the refining of petroleum. Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task there were activities to develop anlytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. In addition to the work on the advanced HTGR for process heat users, new activities were initiated in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead plant Protect (WBS 30 and 31). The Plant Simulation task (WBS 31) was initiated to develop a computer code for simulation of plant operation and for plant transient systems analysis. The efforts on the advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Systems task (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of a Passive Residual Heat Removal System for an Integral Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli Gou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical investigation on the thermal hydraulic characteristics of a new type of passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS, which is connected to the reactor coolant system via the secondary side of the steam generator, for an integral pressurized water reactor is presented in this paper. Three-interknited natural circulation loops are adopted by this PRHRS to remove the residual heat of the reactor core after a reactor trip. Based on the one-dimensional model and a simulation code (SCPRHRS, the transient behaviors of the PRHRS as well as the effects of the height difference between the steam generator and the heat exchanger and the heat transfer area of the heat exchanger are studied in detail. Through the calculation analysis, it is found that the calculated parameter variation trends are reasonable. The higher height difference between the steam generator and the residual heat exchanger and the larger heat transfer area of the residual heat exchanger are favorable to the passive residual heat removal system.

  6. Numerical modeling of disperse material evaporation in axisymmetric thermal plasma reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Predrag Lj.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical 3D Euler-Lagrangian stochastic-deterministic (LSD model of two-phase flow laden with solid particles was developed. The model includes the relevant physical effects, namely phase interaction, panicle dispersion by turbulence, lift forces, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, heat and mass transfer between phases, melting and evaporation of particles, vapour diffusion in the gas flow. It was applied to simulate the processes in thermal plasma reactors, designed for the production of the ceramic powders. Paper presents results of extensive numerical simulation provided (a to determine critical mechanism of interphase heat and mass transfer in plasma flows, (b to show relative influence of some plasma reactor parameters on solid precursor evaporation efficiency: 1 - inlet plasma temperature, 2 - inlet plasma velocity, 3 - particle initial diameter, 4 - particle injection angle a, and 5 - reactor wall temperature, (c to analyze the possibilities for high evaporation efficiency of different starting solid precursors (Si, Al, Ti, and B2O3 powder, and (d to compare different plasma reactor configurations in conjunction with disperse material evaporation efficiency.

  7. Performance Assessment of Turbulence Models for the Prediction of the Reactor Internal Flow in the Scale-down APR+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gonghee; Bang, Youngseok; Woo, Swengwoong; Kim, Dohyeong; Kang, Minku

    2013-01-01

    The types of errors in CFD simulation can be divided into the two main categories: numerical errors and model errors. Turbulence model is one of the important sources for model errors. In this study, in order to assess the prediction performance of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)-based two equations turbulence models for the analysis of flow distribution inside a 1/5 scale-down APR+, the simulation was conducted with the commercial CFD software, ANSYS CFX V. 14. In this study, in order to assess the prediction performance of turbulence models for the analysis of flow distribution inside a 1/5 scale-down APR+, the simulation was conducted with the commercial CFD software, ANSYS CFX V. 14. Both standard k-ε model and SST model predicted the similar flow pattern inside reactor. Therefore it was concluded that the prediction performance of both turbulence models was nearly same. Complex thermal-hydraulic characteristics exist inside reactor because the reactor internals consist of fuel assembly, control rod assembly, and the internal structures. Either flow distribution test for the scale-down reactor model or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation have been conducted to understand these complex thermal-hydraulic features inside reactor

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column and beam tube of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.com [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Karimzadeh, S.; Stummer, T.; Boeck, H. [Atominstitute (ATI), Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), Stadion allee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Neutronics parameters of the reactor shielding. > Biological shielding of the TRIGA reactor. > Thermal flux measurement in the thermal column and BT-A. > MCNP model validation. - Abstract: The Monet Carlo simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor core has been performed employing the radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The model has been confirmed experimentally in the PhD research work at the Atominstitute (ATI) of the Vienna University of Technology. The MCNP model has been extended to complete biological shielding of the reactor including the thermal column, radiographic collimator and four beam tubes. This paper presents the MCNP simulated results in the thermal column and one of the beam tubes (beam tube A) of the reactor. To validate these theoretical results, thermal neutron flux density measurements using the gold foil activation method have been performed in the thermal column and beam tube A (BT-A). In the thermal column, the theoretical and experimental results are in fairly good agreement i.e. maximum thermal flux density in the centre decreases in radial direction. Further, it is also agreed that thermal flux densities in the lower part is greater than the upper part of the thermal column. In the BT-A experiment, the thermal flux density distribution is measured using gold foil. The experimental and theoretical diffusion lengths have been determined as 10.77 cm and 9.36 cm respectively with only 13% difference, reflecting good agreement between the experimental and simulated results. To save the computational cost and to incorporate the accurate and complete information of each individual Monte Carlo MC particle tracks, the surface source writing capability of MCNP has been utilized to the TRIGA shielding model. The variance reduction techniques have been applied to improve the statistics of the problem and to save computational efforts.

  9. Enhancing VHTR Passive Safety and Economy with Thermal Radiation Based Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Ling Zou; Xiaodong Sun

    2012-06-01

    One of the most important requirements for Gen. IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is passive safety. Currently all the gas cooled version of VHTR designs use Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) for passive decay heat removal. The decay heat first is transferred to the core barrel by conduction and radiation, and then to the reactor vessel by thermal radiation and convection; finally the decay heat is transferred to natural circulated air or water systems. RVACS can be characterized as a surface based decay heat removal system. The RVACS is especially suitable for smaller power reactors since small systems have relatively larger surface area to volume ratio. However, RVACS limits the maximum achievable power level for modular VHTRs due to the mismatch between the reactor power (proportional to volume) and decay heat removal capability (proportional to surface area). When the relative decay heat removal capability decreases, the peak fuel temperature increases, even close to the design limit. Annular core designs with inner graphite reflector can mitigate this effect; therefore can further increase the reactor power. Another way to increase the reactor power is to increase power density. However, the reactor power is also limited by the decay heat removal capability. Besides the safety considerations, VHTRs also need to be economical in order to compete with other reactor concepts and other types of energy sources. The limit of decay heat removal capability set by using RVACS has affected the economy of VHTRs. A potential alternative solution is to use a volume-based passive decay heat removal system, called Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling Systems (DRACS), to remove or mitigate the limitation on decay heat removal capability. DRACS composes of natural circulation loops with two sets of heat exchangers, one on the reactor side and another on the environment side. For the reactor side, cooling pipes will be inserted into holes made in the outer or

  10. Status and Trends of Thermal-Hydraulic System Codes for Nuclear Power Plants With Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhitao; Wang Binghua; Qin Benke; Xie Heng

    2009-01-01

    Research and development of thermal-hydraulic system codes for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors were analyzed on their history, status and application ranges. The important roles of best-estimate methodology, codes coupling and codes qualification were pointed out. The development models of thermal-hydraulic system codes around the world provide references to China's self-innovation. (authors)

  11. Small scale thermal-hydraulic experiment for stable operation of a pius-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, K.; Tamaki, M.; Imai, S.; Irianto, I.D.; Tsuji, Y.; Kukita, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic experiments using a small-scale atmospheric pressure test loop have been performed for the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS)-type reactor to develop the new pump speed feedback control system. Three feedback control systems based on the measurement of flow rate, differential pressure, and fluid temperature distribution in the lower density lock have been proposed and confirmed by a series of experiments. Each of the feedback control systems had been verified in the simulation experiment such as a start-up simulation test. The automatic pump speed control based on the fluid temperature at the lower density lock was quite effective to maintain the stratified interface between primary water and borated pool water for stable operation of the reactor. (author)

  12. Review of pressurized thermal shock studies of large scale reactor pressure vessels in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Fekete

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Hungary, four nuclear power units were constructed more than 30 years ago; they are operating to this day. In every unit, VVER-440 V213-type light-water cooled, light-water moderated, ressurized water reactors are in operation. Since the mid-1980s, numerous researches in the field of Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS analyses of Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPVs have been conducted in Hungary; in all of them, the concept of structural integrity was the basis of research and development. During this time, four large PTS studies with industrial relevance have been completed in Hungary. Each used different objectives and guides, and the analysis methodology was also changing. This paper gives a comparative review of the methodologies used in these large PTS Structural Integrity Analysis projects, presenting the latest results as well

  13. Thermal performance of fresh mixed-oxide fuel in a fast flux LMR [liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethridge, J.L.; Baker, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    A test was designed and irradiated to provide power-to-melt (heat generation rate necessary to initiate centerline fuel melting) data for fresh mixed-oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 fuel irradiated in a fast neutron flux under prototypic liquid metal reactor (LMR) conditions. The fuel pin parameters were selected to envelope allowable fabrication ranges and address mass production of LMR fuel using sintered-to-size techniques. The test included fuel pins with variations in fabrication technique, pellet density, fuel-to-cladding gap, Pu concentration, and fuel oxygen-to-metal ratios. The resulting data base has reestablished the expected power-to-melt in mixed-oxide fuels during initial reactor startup when the fuel temperatures are expected to be the highest. Calibration of heat transfer models of fuel pin performance codes with these data are providing more accurate capability for predicting steady-state thermal behavior of current and future mixed-oxide LMR fuels

  14. Population radiation risk assessment for research reactor site evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudeir, I.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of radiological assessment is to predict the transport, bio-accumulation and uptake by man of radio-nuclides release to the environment be it air, surface water or ground water. It is one of the important studies in site selection and evaluation for a nuclear facility: (Research/Power reactors, Fuel reprocessing plants, waste burial site). Several methods could be applied depending on the availability of pop/meteo data. The results of this assessment must satisfy National or International regulations

  15. Design of small-animal thermal neutron irradiation facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.B.

    1996-01-01

    The broad beam facility (BBF) at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) can provide a thermal neutron beam with flux intensity and quality comparable to the beam currently used for research on neutron capture therapy using cell-culture and small-animal irradiations. Monte Carlo computations were made, first, to compare with the dosimetric measurements at the existing BBF and, second, to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes and doses expected at the proposed BBF. Multiple cell cultures or small animals could be irradiated simultaneously at the so-modified BBF under conditions similar to or better than those individual animals irradiated at the existing thermal neutron irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the BMRR. The flux intensity of the collimated thermal neutron beam at the proposed BBF would be 1.7 x 10 10 n/cm 2 ·s at 3-MW reactor power, the same as at the TNIF. However, the proposed collimated beam would have much lower gamma (0.89 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) and fast neutron (0.58 x 10 -11 cGy·cm 2 /n th ) contaminations, 64 and 19% of those at the TNIF, respectively. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed

  16. Environmental assessment for the deactivation of the N Reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This environmental assessment (EA) provides information for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to decide whether the Proposed Action for the N Reactor facilities warrants a Finding of No Significant Impact or requires the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS). The EA describes current conditions at the N Reactor facilities, the need to take action at the facilities, the elements of the Proposed Action and alternatives, and the potential environmental impacts. As required by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), this EA complies with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), parts 1500--1508, ''Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA. '' It also implements the ''National Environmental Policy Act; Implementing Procedures and Guidelines'' (10 CFR 1021)

  17. Reactor safeguards system assessment and design. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Daniel, S.L.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.

    1978-06-01

    This report describes the development and application of a methodology for evaluating the effectiveness of nuclear power reactor safeguards systems. Analytic techniques are used to identify the sabotage acts which could lead to release of radioactive material from a nuclear power plant, to determine the areas of a plant which must be protected to assure that significant release does not occur, to model the physical plant layout, and to evaluate the effectiveness of various safeguards systems. The methodology was used to identify those aspects of reactor safeguards systems which have the greatest effect on overall system performance and which, therefore, should be emphasized in the licensing process. With further refinements, the methodology can be used by the licensing reviewer to aid in assessing proposed or existing safeguards systems

  18. Assessment of very high-temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Gambill, W.R.; Fox, E.C.

    1976-11-01

    An overview is presented of the technical and economic feasibility for the development of a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) and associated processes. A critical evaluation of VHTR technology for process temperatures of 1400 and 2000 0 F is made. Additionally, an assessment of potential market impact is made to determine the commercial viability of the reactor system. It is concluded that VHTR process heat in the range of 1400 to 1500 0 F is attainable with near-term technology. However, process heat in excess of 1600 0 F would require considerably more materials development. The potential for the VHTR could include a major contribution to synthetic fuel, hydrogen, steel, and fertilizer production and to systems for transport and storage of high-temperature heat. A recommended development program including projected costs is presented

  19. Reactor safeguards system assessment and design. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Daniel, S.L.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.

    1978-06-01

    This report describes the development and application of a methodology for evaluating the effectiveness of nuclear power reactor safeguards systems. Analytic techniques are used to identify the sabotage acts which could lead to release of radioactive material from a nuclear power plant, to determine the areas of a plant which must be protected to assure that significant release does not occur, to model the physical plant layout, and to evaluate the effectiveness of various safeguards systems. The methodology was used to identify those aspects of reactor safeguards systems which have the greatest effect on overall system performance and which, therefore, should be emphasized in the licensing process. With further refinements, the methodology can be used by the licensing reviewer to aid in assessing proposed or existing safeguards systems.

  20. Titer plate formatted continuous flow thermal reactors for high throughput applications: fabrication and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Daniel Sang-Won; Chen, Pin-Chuan; You, Byoung Hee; Kim, Namwon; Park, Taehyun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Soper, Steven A; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E; Murphy, Michael C; Datta, Proyag; Desta, Yohannes

    2010-01-01

    A high throughput, multi-well (96) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform, based on a continuous flow (CF) mode of operation, was developed. Each CFPCR device was confined to a footprint of 8 × 8 mm 2 , matching the footprint of a well on a standard micro-titer plate. While several CFPCR devices have been demonstrated, this is the first example of a high-throughput multi-well continuous flow thermal reactor configuration. Verification of the feasibility of the multi-well CFPCR device was carried out at each stage of development from manufacturing to demonstrating sample amplification. The multi-well CFPCR devices were fabricated by micro-replication in polymers, polycarbonate to accommodate the peak temperatures during thermal cycling in this case, using double-sided hot embossing. One side of the substrate contained the thermal reactors and the opposite side was patterned with structures to enhance thermal isolation of the closely packed constant temperature zones. A 99 bp target from a λ-DNA template was successfully amplified in a prototype multi-well CFPCR device with a total reaction time as low as ∼5 min at a flow velocity of 3 mm s −1 (15.3 s cycle −1 ) and a relatively low amplification efficiency compared to a bench-top thermal cycler for a 20-cycle device; reducing the flow velocity to 1 mm s −1 (46.2 s cycle −1 ) gave a seven-fold improvement in amplification efficiency. Amplification efficiencies increased at all flow velocities for 25-cycle devices with the same configuration.

  1. Development of system analysis code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of integral reactor, Rex-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. G.; Kim, J. W.; Yoon, S. J.; Park, G. C.

    2010-10-01

    Rex-10 is an environment-friendly and economical small-scale nuclear reactor to provide the energy for district heating as well as the electric power in micro-grid. This integral reactor comprises several innovative concepts supported by advanced primary circuit components, low coolant parameters and natural circulation cooling. To evaluate the system performance and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor, a system analysis code is being developed so that the new designs and technologies adopted in Rex-10 can be reflected. The research efforts are absorbed in programming the simple and fast-running thermal-hydraulic analysis software. The details of hydrodynamic governing equations component models and numerical solution scheme used in this code are presented in this paper. On the basis of one-dimensional momentum integral model, the models of point reactor neutron kinetics for thorium-fueled core, physical processes in the steam-gas pressurizer, and heat transfers in helically coiled steam generator are implemented to the system code. Implicit numerical scheme is employed to momentum and energy equations to assure the numerical stability. The accuracy of simulation is validated by applying the solution method to the Rex-10 test facility. Calculated natural circulation flow rate and coolant temperature at steady-state are compared to the experimental data. The validation is also carried out for the transients in which the sudden reduction in the core power or the feedwater flow takes place. The code's capability to predict the steady-state flow by natural convection and the qualitative behaviour of the primary system in the transients is confirmed. (Author)

  2. Development of system analysis code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of integral reactor, Rex-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    Rex-10 is an environment-friendly and economical small-scale nuclear reactor to provide the energy for district heating as well as the electric power in micro-grid. This integral reactor comprises several innovative concepts supported by advanced primary circuit components, low coolant parameters and natural circulation cooling. To evaluate the system performance and thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor, a system analysis code is being developed so that the new designs and technologies adopted in Rex-10 can be reflected. The research efforts are absorbed in programming the simple and fast-running thermal-hydraulic analysis software. The details of hydrodynamic governing equations component models and numerical solution scheme used in this code are presented in this paper. On the basis of one-dimensional momentum integral model, the models of point reactor neutron kinetics for thorium-fueled core, physical processes in the steam-gas pressurizer, and heat transfers in helically coiled steam generator are implemented to the system code. Implicit numerical scheme is employed to momentum and energy equations to assure the numerical stability. The accuracy of simulation is validated by applying the solution method to the Rex-10 test facility. Calculated natural circulation flow rate and coolant temperature at steady-state are compared to the experimental data. The validation is also carried out for the transients in which the sudden reduction in the core power or the feedwater flow takes place. The code's capability to predict the steady-state flow by natural convection and the qualitative behaviour of the primary system in the transients is confirmed. (Author)

  3. Small Reactor Designs Suitable for Direct Nuclear Thermal Propulsion: Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Schnitzler

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests requires high performance propulsion systems to support missions beyond low Earth orbit. A robust space exploration program will include robotic outer planet and crewed missions to a variety of destinations including the moon, near Earth objects, and eventually Mars. Past studies, in particular those in support of both the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) and the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), have shown nuclear thermal propulsion systems provide superior performance for high mass high propulsive delta-V missions. In NASA's recent Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) was again selected over chemical propulsion as the preferred in-space transportation system option for the human exploration of Mars because of its high thrust and high specific impulse ({approx}900 s) capability, increased tolerance to payload mass growth and architecture changes, and lower total initial mass in low Earth orbit. The recently announced national space policy2 supports the development and use of space nuclear power systems where such systems safely enable or significantly enhance space exploration or operational capabilities. An extensive nuclear thermal rocket technology development effort was conducted under the Rover/NERVA, GE-710 and ANL nuclear rocket programs (1955-1973). Both graphite and refractory metal alloy fuel types were pursued. The primary and significantly larger Rover/NERVA program focused on graphite type fuels. Research, development, and testing of high temperature graphite fuels was conducted. Reactors and engines employing these fuels were designed, built, and ground tested. The GE-710 and ANL programs focused on an alternative ceramic-metallic 'cermet' fuel type consisting of UO2 (or UN) fuel embedded in a refractory metal matrix such as tungsten. The General Electric program examined closed loop concepts for space or terrestrial

  4. Temperature-dependent ordinary and thermal diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through thermonuclear reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1976-09-01

    To permit more accurate calculations of tritium permeation for design purposes, theoretical expressions for quasiunidirectional ordinary diffusion of hydrogen isotopes through nonisothermal plane, cylindrical shell, and spherical shell barriers are presented. Arrhenium-type dependence of mass diffusivity on temperature and steady-state constant-thermal-conductivity temperature gradients through the barriers are considered. Analyses that consider thermal diffusion with both constant and temperature-dependent heat of transport are also presented. Other topics discussed are amounts of dissolved hydrogen, variable-thermal-conductivity temperature profiles, hydrogen isotope trapping by chemical impurities, crystal lattice imperfections, and grain boundaries, and mixing rules for dilute dissolution of hydrogen isotope mixtures in metals. Numerical results are given which reveal that neglect of thermal diffusion can lead to errors of up to several hundred percent in calculations of hydrogen isotope transfer through reactor components having large temperature gradients through them. Calculations of combined ordinary and thermal diffusion that rigorously treat the temperature dependences of thermophysical properties typically yield results that differ by only a few percent from results based on physical property evaluations at the arithmetic average of barrier face temperatures.

  5. A design study on hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field for neutron capture therapy at Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Y.; Kobayashi, T.

    2000-01-01

    A study about the installation of a hyper-thermal neutron converter to a clinical collimator was performed, as a series of the design study on a hyper-thermal neutron irradiation field at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Reactor. From the parametric-surveys by Monte Carlo calculation, it was confirmed that the practical irradiation field of hyper-thermal neutrons would be feasible by the modifications of the clinical collimator and the bismuth-layer structure. (author)

  6. Self Assessment for the Safety of Research Reactor in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melani, Ai; Chang, Soon Heung

    2008-01-01

    At the present Indonesia has no nuclear power plant in operation yet, although it is expected that the first nuclear power plant will be operated and commercially available in around the year of 2016 to 2017 in Muria Peninsula. National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) has three research reactor; which are: Reactor Triga Mark II at Bandung, Reactor Kartini at Yogyakarta and Reactor Serbaguna (Multi Purpose Reactor) at Serpong. The Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors establishes 'best practice' guidelines for the licensing, construction and operation of research reactors. In this paper the author use the requirement in code of conduct to review the safety of research reactor in Indonesia

  7. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    An assessment of the HTGR opportunities from the year 2000 through 2045 was the principal activity on the Market Definition Task (WBS 03). Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task, there were activities to develop analytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. The activities in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Plant (WBS 30 and 31) were the participation in the Lead Plant System Engineering (LPSE) effort and the plant simulation task. The efforts on the Advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Reactor Systems (MRS) (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors

  8. Gas-Cooled Thermal Reactor Program. Semiannual technical progress report, April 1, 1983-September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    An assessment of the HTGR opportunities from the year 2000 through 2045 was the principal activity on the Market Definition Task (WBS 03). Within the Plant Technology (WBS 13) task, there were activities to develop analytical methods for investigation of Coolant Transport Behavior and to define methods and criteria for High Temperature Structural Engineering design. The activities in support of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Plant (WBS 30 and 31) were the participation in the Lead Plant System Engineering (LPSE) effort and the plant simulation task. The efforts on the Advanced HTGR systems was performed under the Modular Reactor Systems (MRS) (WBS 41) to study the potential for multiple small reactors to provide lower costs, improved safety, and higher availability than the large monolithic core reactors.

  9. Thermal hydraulics characterization of the core and the reactor vessel type BWR; Caracterizacion termohidraulica del nucleo y de la vasija de un reactor tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata Y, M.; Lopez H, L.E. [CFE, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km. 42.5, Municipio Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: marxlenin.zapata@cfe.gob.mx

    2008-07-01

    The thermal hydraulics design of a reactor type BWR 5 as the employees in the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde involves the coupling of at least six control volumes: Pumps jet region, Stratification region, Core region, Vapor dryer region, Humidity separator region and Reactor region. Except by the regions of the core and reactor, these control volumes only are used for design considerations and their importance as operative data source is limited. It is for that is fundamental to complement the thermal hydraulics relations to obtain major data that allow to determine the efficiency of internal components, such as pumps jet, humidity separator and vapor dryer. Like example of the previous thing, calculations are realized on the humidity of the principal vapor during starting, comparing it with the values at the moment incorporated in the data banks of the computers of process of both units. (Author)

  10. Properties of gallium arsenide alloyed with Ge and Se by irradiation in nuclear reactor thermal column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolin, N.G.; Osvenskij, V.B.; Tokarevskij, V.V.; Kharchenko, V.A.; Ievlev, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Dependences of electrophysical properties as well as lattice unit spacing and density of nuclear-alloyed gallium arsenide on the fluence of reactor neutrons and heat treatment are investigated. Neutron radiation of gallium arsenide with different energy spectra is shown to differently affect material properties. Fast neutrons make the main contribution to defect formation. Concentration of compensating acceptor defects formed under GaAs radiation in a thermal column practically equals concentration of introduced donor impurities. Radiation defects of acceptor type are not annealed in the material completely even at 900-1000 deg C

  11. Effect of Thermal Degradation on High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer Performance in Small Modular Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgunde, Prathamesh N.; Bond, Leonard J.

    Prototype ultrasonic NDT transducers for use in immersion in coolants for small modular reactors have shown low signal to noise ratio. The reasons for the limitations in performance at high temperature are under investigation, and include changes in component properties. This current work seeks to quantify the issue of thermal expansion and degradation of the piezoelectric material in a transducer using a finite element method. The computational model represents an experimental set up for an ultrasonic transducer in a pulse-echo mode immersed in a liquid sodium coolant. Effect on transmitted and received ultrasonic signal due to elevated temperature (∼200oC) has been analysed.

  12. Multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition for light water reactor thermalization calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, B.; Ozgener, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    A multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition is developed for thermalization calculations of light water moderated reactors. Hydrogen scatterings are treated by Nelkin's kernel while scatterings from other nuclei are assumed to obey the free-gas scattering kernel. The isotropic return (white) boundary condition is applied directly by using the appropriate collision probabilities. Comparisons with alternate numerical methods show the validity of the present formulation. Comparisons with some experimental results indicate that the present formulation is capable of calculating disadvantage factors which are closer to the experimental results than alternative methods

  13. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  14. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible

  15. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enables faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk represented by deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible. (author)

  16. History of the 185-/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory and its effects on reactor operations at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 185-D deaeration building and the 189-D refrigeration building were constructed at Hanford during 1943 and 1944. Both buildings were constructed as part of the influent water cooling system for D reactor. The CMS studies eliminated the need for 185-D function. Early gains in knowledge ended the original function of the 189-D building mission. In 1951, 185-D and 189-D were converted to a thermal-hydraulic laboratory. The experiments held in the thermal-hydraulic lab lead to historic changes in Hanford reactor operations. In late 1951, the exponential physics experiments were moved to the 189-D building. In 1958, new production reactor experiments were begun in 185/189-D. In 1959, Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor experiments were added to the 185/189-D facility. By 1960, the 185/189-D thermal hydraulics laboratory was one of the few full service facilities of its type in the nation. During the years 1961--1963 tests continued in the facility in support of existing reactors, new production reactors, and the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor. In 1969, Fast Flux Test Facility developmental testings began in the facility. Simulations in 185/189-D building aided in the N Reactor repairs in the 1980's. In 1994 the facility was nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, because of its pioneering role over many years in thermal hydraulics, flow studies, heat transfer, and other reactor coolant support work. During 1994 and 1995 it was demolished in the largest decontamination and decommissioning project thus far in Hanford Site history

  17. Adapting a reactor safety assessment system for specific plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, T.L.; Cordes, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the University of Maryland (UofM) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for use in the NRC Operations center. RSAS is designed to help the Reactor Safety Team monitor and project core status during an emergency at a licensed nuclear power plant. Analysis uses a hierarchical plant model based on equipment availability and automatically input parametric plant information. There are 3 families of designs of pressurized water reactors and 75 plants using modified versions of the basic design. In order to make an RSAS model for each power plant, a generic model for a given plant type is used with differences being specified by plant specific files. Graphical displays of this knowledge are flexible enough to handle any plant configuration. A variety of tools have been implemented to make it easy to modify a design to fit a given plant while minimizing chance for error. 3 refs., 4 figs

  18. Assessment of very high temperature reactors in process applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.E. Jr.; Spiewak, I.; Gambill, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    In April 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) authorized General Atomic Company, General Electric Company, and Westinghouse Astronuclear Laboratory to assess the available technology for producing process heat utilizing a very high temperature nuclear reactor (VHTR). The VHTR is defined as a gas-cooled graphite-moderated reactor. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been given a lead role in evaluating the VHTR reactor studies and potential applications of the VHTR. Process temperatures up to the 760 to 871 0 C range appear to be achievable with near-term technology. The major development considerations are high temperature materials, the safety questions (especially regarding the need for an intermediate heat exchanger) and the process heat exchanger. The potential advantages of the VHTR over competing fossil energy sources are conservation of fossil fuels and reduced atmospheric impacts. Costs are developed for nuclear process heat supplied from a 3000-MW(th) VHTR. The range of cost in process applications is competitive with current fossil fuel alternatives

  19. Application of probabilistic safety assessment to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This document has been prepared to assist in the performance of a research reactor probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). It offers examples of experience gained by a number of Member States in carrying out PSA for research reactors. These examples are illustrative of the types of approach adopted, the problems that arise and the judgements entered into when conducting a PSA. The illustrative examples of experiences gained are discussed in a series of thirteen chapters which address some of the issues that arise in a PSA. The examples are not exhaustive and offer evidence of how other analyses have approached the task of preparing a PSA, for their particular plant. The principles should be capable of being utilised and the various issues which are discussed should be translated into the needs of the analyst. Each PSA will make its own demands on the analyst depending on the reactor and so the illustrations must only be used as guidance and not adopted as published, without critical appreciation. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Proliferation resistance assessment of thermal recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper examines the major proliferation aspects of thermal recycle systems and the extent to which technical or institutional measures could increase the difficulty or detectability of misuse of the system by would-be proliferators. It does this by examining the various activities necessary to acquire weapons-usable material using a series of assessment factors; resources required, time required, detectability. It is concluded that resistance to proliferation could be improved substantially by collecting reprocessing, conversion and fuel fabrication plants under multi national control and instituting new measures to protect fresh MOX fuel. Resistance to theft at sub-national level could be improved by co-location of sensitive facilities high levels of physical protection at plants and during transportation and possibly by adding a radiation barrier to MOX prior to shipment

  1. Thermal ecological risk assessment - methodology for modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markandeya, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Discharge of hot effluents into natural water bodies is a potential risk to the aquatic life. The stipulations imposed by the MoEF, Government of India for protecting the environment are in place. However, due to lack of quality scientific information, these stipulations are generally conservative in nature and hence questionable. A Coordinated Research Project on Thermal Ecological Studies, successfully completed recently came out with a suggestion of implementing multi-factorially estimated mixing zone concept. In the present paper, risk based assessment methodology is proposed as an alternate approach. The methodology is presented only conceptually and briefly over which further refining may be necessary. The methodology would enable to account for variations in the plant operational conditions, climatic conditions and the geographical and hydraulic characteristic conditions of the water body in a suitable manner. (author)

  2. Cold source moderator vessel development for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: Thermal-hydraulic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.; Wendel, M.W.

    1998-07-01

    A project is underway at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to design, test, and install a cold neutron source facility in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This new cold source employs supercritical hydrogen at cryogenic temperatures both as the medium for neutron moderation and as the working fluid for removal of internally-generated nuclear heating. The competing design goals of minimizing moderator vessel mass and providing adequate structural integrity for the vessel motivated the requirement of detailed multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses of the moderator vessel as a critical design subtask. This paper provides a summary review of the HFIR cold source moderator vessel design and a description of the thermal-hydraulic studies that were carried out to support the vessel development.

  3. Analysis of Reactor Pressurized Thermal Shock Conditions Considering Upgrading of Systems Important to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurok, A.S; Vyshemirskyij, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyzes conditions of pressurized thermal shock on the reactor pressure vessel taking into account upgrading of the emergency core cooling system and primary overpressure protection system. For representative accident scenarios, calculation and comparative analysis was carried out. These scenarios include a small leak from the hot leg and PRZ SV stuck opening with re closure after 3600 sec and 3 SG heat transfer tube rupture. The efficiency of mass flow control by valves on the pump head (emergency core cooling systems) and cold overpressure protection (primary overpressure protection system) was analyzed. The thermal hydraulic model for RELAP5/Mod3.2 code with detailed downcomer (DC) model and changes in accordance with upgrades was used for calculations. Detailed (realistic) modeling of piping and equipment was performed. The upgrades prevent excessive primary cooling and, consequently, help to preserve the RPV integrity and to avoid the formation of a through crack, which can lead to a severe accident

  4. Proceedings of the International ENS/ANS Conference on thermal reactor safety. Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings of the international ENS/ANS conference on thermal reactor safety, volume 6, are divided into 15 sessions bearing on: - source term and fission product follow up in accident progression (4 conferences) - containment threats in severe accident conditions (3 conferences) - thermal hydraulics in DBA (3 conferences) - PRA for plant operation (1 conference) - Reactivity accidents (1 conference) - overall views on severe accidents (1 conference) - operational safety experience (1 conference) - structural integrity and material aging (2 conferences) - phenomenology in severe accidents (1 conference) - thermalhydraulics in DBA 2 (1 conference) - fires (1 conference) - steam generators-human factors - thermalhydraulics (5 conferences) - severe accidents (4 conferences) - PRA operating experience DBA (3 conferences) - Containment control and simulation (7 conferences)

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Thermal fluid dynamics study of nuclear advanced reactors of high temperature using RELAP5-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scari, Maria Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    -isotropic) particles. They also use graphite as moderator. The results of the thermal analysis obtained in this work demonstrated the ability of the RELAP5-3D code to reproduce the behavior of the simulated core reactors. Thus, this study adds knowledge to the several researches that have been carried out on the thermal hydraulic analysis of these new systems, searching for models capable of reproducing their thermal behavior, especially in cases of transient situations or accident. This thesis present new studies, especially detailed investigation on the heat transfer across the fuel. (author)

  7. Fuel-element simulator for investigating thermal-hydraulic accidents in water-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, S.M.; Kumskoi, V.V.; Pavlov, A.M.; Ulanovskii, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    A fuel-element simulator should provide the necessary environmental parameters (thermal flux, and temperature at the cladding surface) and satisfy the requirements of reliability and modeling an actual fuel element, according to a formulated research problem. A universal simulator design, which could be used in a wide range of research, does not exist up to now and it is hardly useful in general. In developing fuel-element simulators to study loss-of-coolant accidents in water-water reactors, the most important condition from the modeling point of view is that the overall heat capacity of the simulator should correspond to that of the fuel element. The overall heat capacity and the temperature distribution over the reactor cross section determine the reserve of accumulated energy, which cannot be modeled by simply increasing the supplied electrical power. Experiments showed the magnesium oxide, as compared to other materials, is the best model of uranium oxide due to the closeness of the heat transfer coefficient and the thermal conductivity of these materials. Moreover, MgO has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, close to that of stainless steel. The construction of fuel-element simulators often uses boron nitride powder, which is densified by one means or another. Boron nitride has the highest thermal conductivity (besides beryllium oxide), but it has a lower electrical conductivity than magnesium oxide. These materials simultaneously fulfill the function of electrically insulating the heating element from the cladding. The basic disadvantage of this design is that the simulator has no gas gap; however, this is compensated by its simplicity, reliability, and long lifetime. This article presents several test designs for analysis and solving problems characteristic of loss-of-coolant accidents. Test results from VVER-440 fuel rod simulators using 19-rod assemblies an presented

  8. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. Conceptual Thermal Hydraulic Design of a 20MW Multipurpose Research Reactor (KAERI/VAEC joint study on a new research reactor for Vietnam)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Seo, Chul Gyo; Park, Jong Hark; Park, Cheol; Vinh, Le Vinh; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Dang, Vo Doan Hai

    2007-08-01

    The conceptual thermal hydraulics design analyses for the 20 MW reference AHR core have been jointly performed by the KAERI and DNRI(VAEC). The preliminary core thermal hydraulic characteristics and safety margins for the AHR core were studied for various core flow rates, fuel assembly powers and core inlet temperatures. Statistical method was applied to the thermal hydraulic design of the reactor core. The MATRA h subchannel code has been applied to evaluate the thermal hydraulic performances of the AHR and the resulting thermal margins of the core under the forced convection cooling mode during a nominal power operation and the natural circulation mode during a reactor shutdown condition. In addition, typical accident analyses were carried out for a loss of flow accident by a primary pump seizure and a reactivity induced accident by a CAR rod withdrawal during a normal full power operation. The normal full power operation of the AHR was ensured with a sufficient safety margin for the onset of nucleate boiling phenomena. The AHR also had a sufficient natural circulation cooling capability to cool the core without the onset of nucleate boiling in the channel after a normal reactor shutdown and the anticipated transients. It was confirmed by the typical accident analyses that the AHR core was sufficiently protected from the loss of flow by the primary cooling pump seizure and the overpower transients by the CAR withdrawal from the MCHFR and fuel temperature points of view

  10. Conceptual Thermal Hydraulic Design of a 20MW Multipurpose Research Reactor (KAERI/VAEC joint study on a new research reactor for Vietnam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Seo, Chul Gyo; Park, Jong Hark; Park, Cheol [Kaeri, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Vinh, Le Vinh; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Dang, Vo Doan Hai [Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2007-08-15

    The conceptual thermal hydraulics design analyses for the 20 MW reference AHR core have been jointly performed by the KAERI and DNRI(VAEC). The preliminary core thermal hydraulic characteristics and safety margins for the AHR core were studied for various core flow rates, fuel assembly powers and core inlet temperatures. Statistical method was applied to the thermal hydraulic design of the reactor core. The MATRA{sub h} subchannel code has been applied to evaluate the thermal hydraulic performances of the AHR and the resulting thermal margins of the core under the forced convection cooling mode during a nominal power operation and the natural circulation mode during a reactor shutdown condition. In addition, typical accident analyses were carried out for a loss of flow accident by a primary pump seizure and a reactivity induced accident by a CAR rod withdrawal during a normal full power operation. The normal full power operation of the AHR was ensured with a sufficient safety margin for the onset of nucleate boiling phenomena. The AHR also had a sufficient natural circulation cooling capability to cool the core without the onset of nucleate boiling in the channel after a normal reactor shutdown and the anticipated transients. It was confirmed by the typical accident analyses that the AHR core was sufficiently protected from the loss of flow by the primary cooling pump seizure and the overpower transients by the CAR withdrawal from the MCHFR and fuel temperature points of view.

  11. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment To Test The Stable Operation Of A PIUS Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irianto, Djoko; Kanji, T.; Kukita, Y.

    1996-01-01

    An advanced type of reaktor concept as the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor was based on intrinsically passive safety considerations. The stable operation of a PIUS type reactor is based on the automation of circulation pump speed. An automatic circulation pump speed control system by using a measurement of the temperature distribution in the lower density lock is proposed the PIUS-type reactor. In principle this control system maintains the fluid temperature at the axial center of the lower density lock at average of the fluid temperatures below and above the lower density lock. This control system will prevent the poison water from penetrating into the core during normal operation. The effectiveness of this control system was successfully confirmed by a series of experiments using atmospheric pressure thermal-hydraulic test loop which simulated the PIUS principle. The experiments such as: start-up and power ramping tests for normal operation simulation and loss of feedwater test for an accident condition simulation, carried out in JAERI

  12. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic instabilities in pressure tube graphite - moderated boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiklauri, G.; Schmitt, B.

    1995-09-01

    Thermally induced two-phase instabilities in non-uniformly heated boiling channels in RBMK-1000 reactor have been analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3 code. The RELAP5 model of a RBMK-1000 reactor was developed to investigate low flow in a distribution group header (DGH) supplying 44 fuel pressure tubes. The model was evaluated against experimental data. The results of the calculations indicate that the period of oscillation for the high power tube varied from 3.1s to 2.6s, over the power range of 2.0 MW to 3.0 MW, respectively. The amplitude of the flow oscillation for the high powered tube varied from +100% to -150% of the tube average flow. Reverse flow did not occur in the lower power tubes. The amplitude of oscillation in the subcooled region at the inlet to the fuel region is higher than in the saturated region at the outlet. In the upper fuel region and outlet connectors the flow oscillations are dissipated. The threshold of flow instability for the high powered tubes of a RBMK reactor is compared to Japanese data and appears to be in good agreement.

  14. Optimal initial fuel distribution in a thermal reactor for maximum energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran-Lopez, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Using the fuel burnup as objective function, it is desired to determine the initial distribution of the fuel in a reactor in order to obtain the maximum energy possible, for which, without changing a fixed initial fuel mass, the results for different initial fuel and control poison configurations are analyzed and the corresponding running times compared. One-dimensional, two energy-group theory is applied to a reflected cylindrical reactor using U-235 as fuel and light water as moderator and reflector. Fissions in both fast and thermal groups are considered. The reactor is divided into several annular regions, and the constant flux approximation in each depletion step is then used to solve the fuel and fission-product poisons differential equations in each region. The computer code OPTIME was developed to determine the time variation of core properties during the fuel cycle. At each depletion step, OPTIME calls ODMUG, [12] a criticality search program, from which the spatially-averaged neutron fluxes and control poison cross sections are obtained

  15. Development of a thermally-intensive reactor and process for upgrading heavy crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauptmann, E.G. [Refinery Science Corp., El Paso, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed a pilot study conducted to test the performance of a 15 bpd high thermal flux short vapor residence time reactor. The technology was comprised of a flowing, free-surface channel of molten metal salts. Heavy crude droplets were placed on the flowing surface and mixed with catalysts. A free vapor space was used to remove and condense the clean, particulate-free cracked hydrocarbon vapors. An additional process was used to remove and separate the coke, catalysts and heavy metals for further processing and recovery. Placing the heavy crude onto a hot surface caused the drops to float or sputter on the surface. As the temperature increased, the film became thinner and broke down at the Leidenfrost point. A peak heat transfer coefficient then occurred during the intense nucleate boiling at the drop surface. The heavy crude was cracked through the combined effects of rapid heating and the presence of the catalyst. The clean, cracked hydrocarbon vapors were then removed from the drops and away from the heating source. Heavy metals were removed from the liquid product and discharged from the reactor with the coke and the catalyst. It was concluded that tests conducted to evaluate the performance of the technology demonstrated that the reactor required no external fuel for continuous operation after start-up, and all process water was fully recyclable. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  17. Detailed channel thermal-hydraulic calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Sorokin, A.P.; Ushakov, P.A.; Yur'ev, Yu.S.

    1981-01-01

    The system of equations of mass balance, quantity of motion and energy used in calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies is obtained. The equation system is obtained on the base of integral equations of hydrodynamics interaction in assemblies of smooth fuel elements and fuel elements with wire packing. The calculation results of coolant heating distributions by the fast reactor assembly channels are presented. The analysis of the results obtained shows that interchannel exchange essentially uniforms the coolant heating distribution in the peripheral range of the assembly but it does not remove non-uniformity caused by power distribution non-uniformity in the cross section. Geometry of the peripheral assembly range plays an essential role in the heating distribution. Change of the calculation gap between the peripheral fuel elements and assembly shells can result either in superheating or in subcooling in the peripheral channels relatively to joint internal channels of the assembly. Heat supply to the coolant passing through interassembly gaps decreases temperature in the assembly periphery and results in the increase of temperature non-uniformity by the perimeter of peripheral fuel elements. It is concluded that the applied method of the channel-by-channel calculation is ef-- fective in thermal-physical calculation of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and it permits to solve a wide range of problems [ru

  18. Thermal modeling of the ceramic composite fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revankar, S.T.; Latta, R.; Solomon, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Composite fuel designs capable of providing improved thermal performance are of great interest in advanced reactor designs where high efficiency and long fuel cycles are desired. Thermal modeling of the composite fuel consisting of continuous second phase in a ceramic (uranium oxide) matrix has been carried out with detailed examination of the microstructure of the composite and the interface. Assuming that constituent phases are arranged as slabs, upper and lower bounds for the thermal conductivity of the composite are derived analytically. Bounding calculations on the thermal conductivity of the composite were performed for SiC dispersed in the UO 2 matrix. It is found that with 10% SiC, the thermal conductivity increases from 5.8 to 9.8 W/m.deg. K at 500 K, or an increase of 69% was observed in UO 2 matrix. The finite element analysis computer program ANSYS was used to create composite fuel geometries with set boundary conditions to produce accurate thermal conductivity predictions. A model developed also accounts for SiC-matrix interface resistance and the addition of coatings or interaction barriers. The first set of calculations using the code was to model simple series and parallel fuel slab geometries, and then advance to inter-connected parallel pathways. The analytical calculations were compared with the ANSYS results. The geometry of the model was set up as a 1 cm long by 400 micron wide rectangle. This rectangle was then divided into one hundred sections with the first ninety percent of a single section being UO 2 and the remaining ten percent consisting of SiC. The model was then meshed using triangular type elements. The boundary conditions were set with the sides of the rectangle being adiabatic and having an assigned temperature at the end of the rectangle. A heat flux was then applied to one end of the model producing a temperature gradient. The effective thermal conductivity was then calculated using the geometry

  19. Assessment of Power Quality Problems for TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fazli Zakaria; Ramachandaramurthy, V.K.

    2016-01-01

    The electrical power systems are exposed to different types of power quality disturbances. Investigation and monitoring of power quality is necessary to maintain accurate operation of sensitive equipment especially for nuclear installations. This paper will discuss the power quality problems observed at the electrical sources of PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP). Assessment of power quality requires the identification of any anomalous behavior on a power system, which adversely affects the normal operation of electrical or electronic equipment. A power quality assessment involves gathering data resources; analyzing the data (with reference to power quality standards) then, if problems exist, recommendation of mitigation techniques must be considered. Field power quality data is collected by power quality recorder and analyzed with reference to power quality standards. Normally the electrical power is supplied to the RTP via two sources in order to keep a good reliability where each of them is designed to carry the full load. The assessment of power quality during reactor operation was performed for both electrical sources. There were several disturbances such as voltage harmonics and flicker that exceeded the thresholds. (author)

  20. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW{sub th} and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW{sub th}, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  1. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hyun Nam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER, for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MWth and an electricity generation mode of 100 kWth, equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and

  2. Innovative concept for an ultra-small nuclear thermal rocket utilizing a new moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Although the harsh space environment imposes many severe challenges to space pioneers, space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival. One of the viable and promising options to overcome the harsh environment of space is nuclear propulsion. Particularly, the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term human missions to Mars and beyond due to its relatively high thrust and efficiency. Traditional NTR designs use typically high power reactors with fast or epithermal neutron spectrums to simplify core design and to maximize thrust. In parallel there are a series of new NTR designs with lower thrust and higher efficiency, designed to enhance mission versatility and safety through the use of redundant engines (when used in a clustered engine arrangement) for future commercialization. This paper proposes a new NTR design of the second design philosophy, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANUTER), for future space applications. The KANUTER consists of an Extremely High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor (EHTGR) utilizing hydrogen propellant, a propulsion system, and an optional electricity generation system to provide propulsion as well as electricity generation. The innovatively small engine has the characteristics of high efficiency, being compact and lightweight, and bimodal capability. The notable characteristics result from the moderated EHTGR design, uniquely utilizing the integrated fuel element with an ultra heat-resistant carbide fuel, an efficient metal hydride moderator, protectively cooling channels and an individual pressure tube in an all-in-one package. The EHTGR can be bimodally operated in a propulsion mode of 100 MW th and an electricity generation mode of 100 kW th , equipped with a dynamic energy conversion system. To investigate the design features of the new reactor and to estimate referential engine performance, a preliminary design study in terms of neutronics and thermohydraulics

  3. Development of an artificial neural network model for on-line thermal margin estimation of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Koon

    1992-02-01

    One of the key safety parameters related to thermal margin in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core, is Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR), which is to be assessed and continuously monitored during operation via either an analog or a digital monitoring system. The digital monitoring system, in general, allows more thermal margin than the analog system through the on-line computation of DNBR using the measured parameters as inputs to a simplified, fast running computer code. The purpose of this thesis is to develop an advanced method for on-line DNBR estimation by introducing an artifactual neural network model for best-estimation of DNBR at the given reactor operating conditions. the neural network model, consisting of three layers with five operating parameters in the input layer, provides real-time prediction accuracy of DNBR by training the network against the detailed simulation results for various operating conditions. The overall training procedure is developed to learn the characteristics of DNBR behaviour in the reactor core. First, a set of random combination of input variables is generated by Latin Hypercube Sampling technique performed on a wide range of input parameters. Second, the target values of DNBR to be referenced for training are calculated using a detailed simulation code, COBRA-IV. Third, the optimized training input data are selected. Then, training is performed using an Error Back Propagation algorithm. After completion of training, the network is tested on the examining data set in order to investigate the generalization capability of the network responses for the steady state operating condition as well as for the transient situations where DNB is of a primary concern. The test results show that the values of DNBR predicted by the neural network are maintained at a high level of accuracy for the steady state condition, and are in good agreements with the transient situation, although slightly conservative as compared to those

  4. Improvement of thermal conductivity of ceramic matrix composites for 4. generation nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrero, J.

    2009-11-01

    This study deals with thermal conductivity improvement of SiCf/SiC ceramic matrix composites materials to be used as cladding material in 4. generation nuclear reactor. The purpose of the study is to develop a composite for which both the temperature and irradiation effect is less pronounced on thermal conductivity of material than for SiC. This material will be used as matrix in CMC with SiC fibers. Some TiC-SiC composites with different SiC volume contents were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintering process enables to fabricate specimens very fast, with a very fine microstructure and without any sintering aids. Neutron irradiation has been simulated using heavy ions, at room temperature and at 500 C. Evolution of the thermal properties of irradiated materials is measured using modulated photothermal IR radiometry experiment and was related to structural evolution as function of dose and temperature. It appears that such approach is reliable to evaluate TiC potentiality as matrix in CMC. Finally, CMC with TiC matrix and SiC fibers were fabricated and both mechanical and thermal properties were measured and compare to SiCf/SiC CMC. (author)

  5. Thermal-hydraulically corrected neutron cross-sections for PWR reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Daniela M.N.; Alvim, Antonio C.M.; Silva, Fernando C., E-mail: dsantiago@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: alvim@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Reactor core simulation codes ought to have a thermal-hydraulics feedback module. This module calculates, among other effects, the fuel temperature thermal-hydraulics feedback, that corrects neutron cross sections. In the nodal code developed at PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, the fuel temperature is obtained through an empirical model. This work presents a physical model to calculate this temperature. A finite volume technique was used to discretize the equation for temperature distribution, while the moderator coefficient of heat transfer was calculated using ASME routines, appended to the developed code. This model allows calculation of an average radial temperature per node, since the thermal-hydraulic feedback must follow the conditions imposed by the nodal code. The results obtained were compared with the ones obtained by the empirical model. The results show that, for fuel elements near core periphery, the empirical model overestimates the temperature in the fuel, as compared to our model, which may indicate that the physical model is more appropriate to calculate the thermal-hydraulic feedback temperatures. (author)

  6. A linear stability analysis of supercritical water reactors, (1). Thermal-hydraulic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin Tin Yi; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes the analysis results of the thermal-hydraulic stability of a high-temperature reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical-pressure light water (SCLWR-H). A linear stability analysis code in the frequency domain was developed to study the thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR-H at constant supercritical pressure. The analysis method is based on linearization by perturbation of numerically-discretized one-dimensional single-channel single-phase conservation equations. The effect of water rods on stability is considered. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR-H for full-power and partial-power normal operations was investigated by frequency domain method. Our analysis reveals that though SCLWR-H has low coolant flow rate and large density change in the core, the thermal-hydraulic stability can be maintained both at normal operation and during power raising phase of constant pressure startup by applying an orifice pressure drop coefficient an the inlet of the fuel assemblies. A parametric study was also carried out to determine the parameters affecting the stability. (author)

  7. Experiments on one-phase thermally stratified flows in nuclear reactor pipe lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Navarro, Moyses Alberto; Jordao, Elizabete; Santos, Andre Augusto Campagnole dos

    2009-01-01

    The phenomenon of thermal stratified flows occurs when two different layers of the same liquid at different temperatures flow separately in horizontal pipes without appreciable mixing. This phenomenon was not considered in the design stage of most of the operating nuclear power plants, but in last two decades it has become apparent due to the temperature monitoring of piping systems. The occurrence of temperature differences of about 200 deg C have been found in a narrow band around the hot and cold water interface in components under stratified flows. Loadings due to thermal stratification affected the integrity of safety related piping systems. This paper presents the results of a range of experiments performed to simulate one phase thermally stratified flows in geometry and flow condition representing a nuclear reactor steam generator injection nozzle. They have the objective of studying the flow configurations and understanding the evolution of the thermal stratification process. The driving parameter considered to characterize flow under stratified regime due to difference in specific masses is the Froude number. Different Froude numbers, from 0.018 to 0.22, were obtained in different testes by setting injection cold water flow rates and hot water initial temperatures as planned in the test matrix. Results are presented showing the influence of Froude number on the hot and cold water interface position, temperature gradients and striping phenomenon. (author)

  8. ANCON, Space-Independent Reactor Kinetics with Linear or Nonlinear Thermal Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, John C.; Dugan, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ANCON solves the point-reactor kinetic equations including thermal feedback. Lump-type heat balance equations are used to represent the thermodynamics, and the heat capacity of each lump can vary with temperature. Thermal feedback can be either a linear or a non-linear function of lump temperature, and the impressed reactivity can be either a polynomial or sinusoidal function. 2 - Method of solution: In ANCON the system of coupled first-order differential equations is solved by a method based on continuous analytic continuation (references 2 and 3). The basic procedure consists of expanding all the dependent variables except reactivity in Taylor series, with a truncation error criterion, over successive intervals on the time axis. Variations of the basic procedure are used to increase the efficiency of the method in special situations. Automatic switching from the basic procedure to one of its variations (and vice-versa) may occur during the course of a transient. The method yields an analytic criterion for the magnitude of the time-step at any point in the transient. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is currently restricted to a maximum of six delayed neutron groups and a maximum of 56 lumps. Larger problems can be accommodated on a 65 K computer by increasing the dimensions of a few subscripted variables. Also, the code is currently restricted to a constant external transport delays, only the open-loop response of a reactor can be computed with ANCON

  9. Fundamental approaches for analysis thermal hydraulic parameter for Puspati Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Zaredah, E-mail: zaredah@nm.gov.my; Lanyau, Tonny Anak, E-mail: tonny@nm.gov.my; Farid, Mohamad Fairus Abdul; Kassim, Mohammad Suhaimi [Reactor Technology Centre, Technical Support Division, Malaysia Nuclear Agency, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, Bangi, 43000, Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Azhar, Noraishah Syahirah [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 80350, Johor Bahru, Johor Darul Takzim (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The 1-MW PUSPATI Research Reactor (RTP) is the one and only nuclear pool type research reactor developed by General Atomic (GA) in Malaysia. It was installed at Malaysian Nuclear Agency and has reached the first criticality on 8 June 1982. Based on the initial core which comprised of 80 standard TRIGA fuel elements, the very fundamental thermal hydraulic model was investigated during steady state operation using the PARET-code. The main objective of this paper is to determine the variation of temperature profiles and Departure of Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) of RTP at full power operation. The second objective is to confirm that the values obtained from PARET-code are in agreement with Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for RTP. The code was employed for the hot and average channels in the core in order to calculate of fuel’s center and surface, cladding, coolant temperatures as well as DNBR’s values. In this study, it was found that the results obtained from the PARET-code showed that the thermal hydraulic parameters related to safety for initial core which was cooled by natural convection was in agreement with the designed values and safety limit in SAR.

  10. Improved collision probability method for thermal-neutron-flux calculation in a cylindrical reactor cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosevski, T.

    1986-01-01

    An improved collision probability method for thermal-neutron-flux calculation in a cylindrical reactor cell has been developed. Expanding the neutron flux and source into a series of even powers of the radius, one' gets a convenient method for integration of the one-energy group integral transport equation. It is shown that it is possible to perform an analytical integration in the x-y plane in one variable and to use the effective Gaussian integration over another one. Choosing a convenient distribution of space points in fuel and moderator the transport matrix calculation and cell reaction rate integration were condensed. On the basis of the proposed method, the computer program DISKRET for the ZUSE-Z 23 K computer has been written. The suitability of the proposed method for the calculation of the thermal-neutron-flux distribution in a reactor cell can be seen from the test results obtained. Compared with the other collision probability methods, the proposed treatment excels with a mathematical simplicity and a faster convergence. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the future material testing reactor (JHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigitte Noel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The design of the future material testing reactor, named Jules Horowitz Reactor and dedicated to technological irradiations, will allow very high performances. The JHR will be cooled and moderated by light water. The preliminary core of JHR consists of 46 assemblies, arranged in a triangular lattice inside a rectangular aluminium matrix. It is boarded on two sides by a beryllium reflector. The other two sides are left free in order to introduce mobile irradiation devices. The JHR assembly would be composed of 3 x 6 cylindrical fuel plates maintained by 3 stiffeners. The external diameter of the assembly is close to 8 cm with a 600 mm heated length, coolant channels having a 1.8 mm gap width. The JHR core must be designed to accommodate high power densities using a high coolant mass flux and sub-cooling level at moderate pressure. The JHR core configuration with multi-channels is subject to a potential excursive instability, called flow redistribution, and is distinguished from a true critical heat flux which would occur at a fixed channel flow rate. At thermal-hydraulic conditions applicable to the JHR, the availability of experimental data for both flow redistribution and CHF is very limited. Consequently, a thermal-hydraulic test facility (SULTAN-RJH) was designed and built in CEA-Grenoble to simulate a full-length coolant sub-channel representative of the JHR core, allowing determination of both thermal limits under relevant thermal hydraulics conditions. The SULTAN-RJH test section simulates a single sub-channel in the JHR core with a cross section corresponding to a mean span (∼50 mm) that has a full reactor length (600 mm), the same flow channel gap (1.5 mm) and Inconel plates of 1 mm thickness. The tests with light water flowing vertically upward will investigate a heat flux range of 0-7 MW/m 2 , velocity range of 0.6-18 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.2-1.0 MPa and inlet temperature range of 25-180 deg. C. The test section

  12. Preliminary assessment of an S.G.H.W. type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicevskis, A.; Chapman, A.G.; Hesse, E.W.

    1970-08-01

    A preliminary design study has been made of a research reactor, based on the enriched S.G.H.W.R. concept, to be used for power reactor fuel irradiation, isotope production, basic research, and training in nuclear technology. A reactor physics assessment established a core size which would allow uninterrupted operation for the required irradiation period consistent with low capital and operating costs. A design was selected with 24 channels, a D 2 O calandria diameter of 2.7 m and an overall core height of 4.0 m. The capital cost was estimated as $750,000 for the fuel and $1,600,000 for the moderator, the refuelling cost being $340,000 per annum. A thermal design study showed that the fission heat of 65 MW could be transmitted to pressurised light water at 200 lb/in 2 abs. and rejected to sea water in two conventional U-tube heat exchangers. The basic design is flexible and can be adapted to meet many special requirements. (author)

  13. Thermal radiation modeling inside a degraded reactor core in presence of steam and water droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahlafi, Miloud

    2011-01-01

    This work aims at modelling thermal radiation in a nuclear reactor, in the course of a severe accident leading to its degradation. Because the reactor coolant is water, radiative heat transfer occurs in presence of steam and water droplets. The 3D geometry of a fuel bundle with 21 damaged rods has been characterized from γ-tomography images. The degradation of the rods has been simulated in the experimental small-scale facility PHEBUS. The homogenized radiative properties of the considered configurations with a transparent fluid phase have been completely characterized by both the extinction cumulated distribution function G ext and the scattering phase functions p. G ext strongly differs from the exponential function associated with the Beer law and p strongly depends on both the incidence and the scattering directions. By using the radiative transfer equation generalized for non Beerian porous media by Taine et al. the radiative conductivity tensor has been first determined with a transparent fluid phase, by a numerical perturbation method. Only the diagonal radial and axial components of this tensor are not equal to zero. They have been fitted by a simple law only depending on the porosity, the specific area and the wall absorptivity. In a second step, a radiative transfer equation based on three temperatures is established. This model takes into account a semi transparent fluid phase by coupling the radiative properties of fluid and solid phases. The radiative properties of water steam and droplets are calculated respectively with the CK approach and Mie theory, in typical thermal hydraulics conditions of reactor accidents. The radiative fluxes verify the Fourier law and are characterized by radiative coupled conductivity tensors associated with the temperatures of each phase. The radiative powers exchanged between phases per unit volume are also calculated from this model. (author)

  14. The approximate thermal-model-testing method for non-stationary temperature fields in central zones of fast reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhin, V.I.; Matukhin, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The approach to generalization of the non-stationary heat exchange data for the central zones of the nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and the approximate thermal-model-testing criteria are proposed. The fuel assemblies of fast and water-cooled reactors with different fuel compositions have been investigated. The reason of the non-stationary heat exchange is the fuel-energy-release time dependence. (author)

  15. Approaches to Assess Competitiveness of Small and Medium Sized Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Barkatullah, N.

    2011-01-01

    investment related factors affecting SMR competitiveness, as well as the tools available to assess these factors. In parallel with this, IAEA is conducting a series of case studies on SMR competitive deployment and application, making use of these tools and fostering their further development. The case studies that would highlight comparative benefits and disadvantages of SMRs versus larger reactors for different deployment strategies and application conditions, will be finalized in the end of 2009, and their final results are not yet available Therefore, the present paper summarizes the major outputs of the report titled 'Approaches to Assess Competitiveness of SMRs' and discusses approaches that need to be taken into account in the assessment rather than the results of their application. However, several illustrations of the application of such approaches are provided. (author)

  16. Thermal neutron flux measurements in the rotary specimen rack of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Rose Mary G. do Prado; Rodrigues, Rogério R.; Souza, Luiz Claudio A., E-mail: souzarm@cdtn.br, E-mail: rrr@cdtn.br, E-mail: lcas@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The thermal neutron flux in the rotary specimen rack of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor at the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been measured by the neutron activation method, using bare and cadmium covered gold foils. Those foils were irradiated in the rotary specimen rack with the reactor at 100 kW. The reactor core configuration has 63 fuel elements, composed of 59 original aluminum-clad elements and 4 stainless steel-clad fuel elements. The gamma activities of the foils were measured using Ge spectrometer. The perturbations of the thermal neutron flux caused by the introduction of an absorbing foil into the medium were considered in order to obtain accurate determination of the flux. The thermal neutron flux obtained was 7.4 x 10{sup 11} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel with an inner metal coating covered with a high temperature resistant thermal insulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The thermal insulator covering the metal coating of a reactor vessel is designed for resisting high temperatures. It comprises one or several porous layers of ceramic fibers or of stacked metal foils, covered with a layer of bricks or ceramic tiles. The latter are fixed in position by fasteners comprising pins fixed to the coating and passing through said porous layers and fasteners (nut or bolts) for individually fixing the bricks to said pins, whereas ceramic plugs mounted on said bricks or tiles provide for the thermal insulation of the pins and of the nuts or bolts; such a thermal insulation can be applied to high-temperature reactors or to fast reactors [fr

  18. Measure of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor using 197 Au wire activation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation has aimed at developing a neutron flux measurement technique by means of detectors activation analysis. The main task of this work was the implementation of this thermal neutron flux measurement technique, using gold wires as activation detectors in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core. The neutron thermal flux spatial distribution was obtained by gold wire activation technique, with wire diameters of 0.125 mm and 0.250 mm in seven selected reactor experimental channels. The values of thermal flux were about 10 9 neutrons/cm 2 .s. This experiment has been the first one conducted with gold wires in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, being this technique implemented for use by experiments in flux mapping of the core

  19. Soil slurry reactors for the assessment of contaminant biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, G.; Colarieti, M. L.; Greco, G.

    2012-04-01

    Slurry reactors are frequently used in the assessment of feasibility of biodegradation in natural soil systems. The rate of contaminant removal is usually quantified by zero- or first-order kinetics decay constants. The significance of such constants for the evaluation of removal rate in the field could be questioned because the slurry reactor is a water-saturated, well-stirred system without resemblance with an unsaturated fixed bed of soil. Nevertheless, a kinetic study with soil slurry reactors can still be useful by means of only slightly more sophisticated kinetic models than zero-/first-order decay. The use of kinetic models taking into account the role of degrading biomass, even in the absence of reliable experimental methods for its quantification, provides further insight into the effect of nutrient additions. A real acceleration of biodegradation processes is obtained only when the degrading biomass is in the growth condition. The apparent change in contaminant removal course can be useful to diagnose biomass growth without direct biomass measurement. Even though molecular biology techniques are effective to assess the presence of potentially degrading microorganism in a "viable-but-nonculturable" state, the attainment of conditions for growth is still important to the development of enhanced remediation techniques. The methodology is illustrated with reference to data gathered for two test sites, Oslo airport Gardermoen in Norway (continuous contamination by aircraft deicing fluids) and the Trecate site in Italy (aged contamination by crude oil spill). This research is part of SoilCAM project (Soil Contamination, Advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse Monitoring 2008-2012, EU-FP7).

  20. Thermal power calibrations of the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor by the calorimetric and the heat balance methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Rezende, Hugo Cesar; Souza, Rose Mary Gomes do Prado

    2009-01-01

    Since the first nuclear reactor was built, a number of methodological variations have been evolved for the calibration of the reactor thermal power. Power monitoring of reactors is done by means of neutronic instruments, but its calibration is always done by thermal procedures. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the thermal power calibration carried out on March 5th, 2009 in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor. It was used two procedures: the calorimetric and heat balance methods. The calorimetric procedure was done with the reactor operating at a constant power, with primary cooling system switched off. The rate of temperature rise of the water was recorded. The reactor power is calculate as a function of the temperature-rise rate and the system heat capacity constant. The heat balance procedure consists in the steady-state energy balance of the primary cooling loop of the reactor. For this balance, the inlet and outlet temperatures and the water flow in the primary cooling loop were measured. The heat transferred through the primary loop was added to the heat leakage from the reactor pool. The calorimetric method calibration presented a large uncertainty. The main source of error was the determination of the heat content of the system, due to a large uncertainty in the volume of the water in the system and a lack of homogenization of the water temperature. The heat balance calibration in the primary loop is the standard procedure for calibrating the power of the IPR-R1 TRIGA nuclear reactor. (author))

  1. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  2. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal in non-thermal plasma double dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Fu, Xindi; Liu, Yanjun; Abbas, Yawar; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Wenjing

    2018-04-05

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) an emerging technology to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in unhygienic point source air streams. In present study, double dielectric barrier discharge (DDBD) reactors were used for the first time to evaluate the removal efficiency of VOCs mixture of different nature at constant experimental conditions (input power 16-65.8 W, VOCs mixture feeding rate 1-6 L/min, 100-101 ppm inlet concentration of individual VOC). Reactor A and B with discharge gap at 6 mm and 3 mm respectively, were used in current study. When treated at an input power of 53.7 W with gas feeding rate of 1 L/min in DDBD reactor A, removal efficiency of the VOCs were: tetrachloroethylene (100%), toluene (100%), trichloroethylene (100%), benzene (100%), ethyl acetate (100%) and carbon disulfide (88.30%); whereas in reactor B, the removal efficiency of all VOCs were 100%. Plasma-catalyst (Pt-Sn/Al 2 O 3 , BaTiO 3 and HZSM-5) synergistic effect on VOCs removal efficiency was also investigated. Highest removal efficiency i.e 100% was observed for each compound with BaTiO 3 and HZSM-5 at an input power 65.8 W. However, integrating NTP with BaTiO 3 and HZSM-5 leads to enhanced removal performance of VOCs mixture with high activity, increase in energy efficiency and suppression of unwanted byproducts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Parameters of Ultra-High-Temperature Reactors for Closed-Cycle Nuclear MHD Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, P.V.

    1968-01-01

    Thermal parameters of ultra-high temperature reactors for closed-cycle MHD power plants are investigated. The 'pressure dilemma' (core and heat exchangers requiring highworking pressures for high performance; the MHD duct requiring low working pressures for strong non-equilibrium ionization and high power density) turns out to be less serious than is often assumed because: the core power density of present-day high temperature reactors is determined by nuclear considerations rather than thermal ones; higher plant efficiency reduces thermal power; larger temperature rise and higher efficiency lead to reduced mass flow rate; for the same ratio of pumping power to net output, core pressure loss ratio may be higher than in a conventional HTR; the cost of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel is considerably reduced at lower gas pressure. Dimensional and dimensionless equations are deduced that show the dependence of core dimensions and coolant flow data on thermodynamic parameters, and on thermal properties and state of the coolant. Helium, neon, and argon are compared, as are mixtures of them, showing advantages. Film and fuel temperature differences are small in comparison with gas temperature rise, particularly for the combined MHD/steam cycle. Maximum fuel element temperature - the crucial parameter - therefore occurs at the hot end of the channel. A worked example demonstrates that power densities only slightly lower than in conventional HTR's should be achievable with helium at a pressure of 5 to 10 bar and moderate pressure losses, even if the difference between maximum fuel temperature and mixed mean gas outlet temperature is only 150 to 250°C. There may be some penalty for fuel manufacturing and fuel inventory cost. Fuel cycle cost will, however, benefit from increased plant efficiency. Radial power and temperature flattening is of paramount importance; it requires a low age factor and thus a fuel management scheme with fuel reprocessing, relatively low

  4. Safety assessment of research reactors and preparation of the safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This Safety Guide presents guidelines, approved by international consensus, for the preparation, review and assessment of safety documentation for research reactors such as the Safety Analysis Report. While the Guide is most applicable to research reactors in the design and construction stage, it is also recommended for use during relicensing or reassessment of existing reactors

  5. Comparative assessment of thermophysical and thermohydraulic characteristics of lead, lead-bismuth and sodium coolants for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    All prototype, demonstration and commercial liquid metal cooled fast reactors (LMFRs) have used liquid sodium as a coolant. Sodium cooled systems, operating at low pressure, are characterised by very large thermal margins relative to the coolant boiling temperature and a very low structural material corrosion rate. In spite of the negligible thermal energy stored in the liquid sodium available for release in case of leakage, there is some safety concern because of its chemical reactivity with respect to air and water. Lead, lead-bismuth or other alloys of lead, appear to eliminate these concerns because the chemical reactivity of these coolants with respect to air and water is very low. Some experts believe that conceptually, these systems could be attractive if high corrosion activity inherent in lead, long term materials compatibility and other problems will be resolved. Extensive research and development work is required to meet this goal. Preliminary studies on lead-bismuth and lead cooled reactors and ADS (accelerator driven systems) have been initiated in France, Japan, the United States of America, Italy, and other countries. Considerable experience has been gained in the Russian Federation in the course of development and operation of reactors cooled with lead-bismuth eutectic, in particular, propulsion reactors. Studies on lead cooled fast reactors are also under way in this country. The need to exchange information on alternative fast reactor coolants was a major consideration in the recommendation by the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFRs) to collect, review and document the information on lead and lead-bismuth alloy coolants: technology, thermohydraulics, physical and chemical properties, as well as to make an assessment and comparison with respective sodium characteristics

  6. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  7. Assessment of benefits of research reactors in less developed countries. A case study of the Dalat reactor in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of data on nuclear research reactor (NRR) and socio-economic conditions across countries reveals highly significant relationships of reactor power with GDP and R and D expenditure. The trends revealed can be used as preliminary guides for feasibility assessment of investment in a NRR. Concerning reactor performance, i.e. the number of reactor operation days per year, the covariation with R and D expenditure is most significant, but moderate, implying that there are other controlling factors, e.g. the engagement of country in nuclear power development. Thus, the size of the R and D fund is a most significant indicator to look at in reactor planning. Unfortunately, the lack of adequate R and D funding is a common and chronic problem in less developed countries. As NRR is among the biggest R and D investment in less developed countries, adequate cost benefit assessment is rightfully required. In the case of Vietnam, during 15 years of operation of a 500 kW NRR 2300 Ci of radioisotopes were delivered and 45,000 samples were analysed for multielemental compositions. From a pure financial viewpoint these figures would still be insignificant to justify the investment. However, the impact of the reactor on the technological development seems not to be a matter of pro and cons. The status of reactor utilization and lessons learned are presented and discussed. (author)

  8. Guidelines for the review research reactor safety. Reference document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1992, the IAEA published new safety standards for research reactors as part of the set of publications considered by its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). This set also includes publications giving guidance for all safety aspects related to the lifetime of a research reactor. In addition, the IAEA has also revised the Safety Standards for radiation protection. Consequently, it was considered advisable to revise the Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) procedures to incorporate the new requirements and guidance as well as to extend the scope of the safety reviews to currently operating research reactors. The present report is the result of this revision. The purpose of this report is to give guidance on the preparation, execution, reporting and follow-up of safety review mission to research reactors as conducted by the IAEA under its INSARR missions safety service. However, it will also be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting: (a) ad hoc safety assessments of research reactors to address individual issues such as ageing or safety culture; and (b) other types of safety reviews such as internal and peer reviews and regulatory inspections

  9. Assessment of benefits of research reactors in less developed countries. A case study of the Dalat reactor in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hien, P.D. [Vietnam Atomic Energy Agency, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    1999-08-01

    The analysis of data on nuclear research reactor (NRR) and socio-economic conditions across countries reveals highly significant relationships of reactor power with GDP and R and D expenditure. The trends revealed can be used as preliminary guides for feasibility assessment of investment in a NRR. Concerning reactor performance, i.e. the number of reactor operation days per year, the covariation with R and D expenditure is most significant, but moderate, implying that there are other controlling factors, e.g. the engagement of country in nuclear power development. Thus, the size of the R and D fund is a most significant indicator to look at in reactor planning. Unfortunately, the lack of adequate R and D funding is a common and chronic problem in less developed countries. As NRR is among the biggest R and D investment in less developed countries, adequate cost benefit assessment is rightfully required. In the case of Vietnam, during 15 years of operation of a 500 kW NRR 2300 Ci of radioisotopes were delivered and 45,000 samples were analysed for multielemental compositions. From a pure financial viewpoint these figures would still be insignificant to justify the investment. However, the impact of the reactor on the technological development seems not to be a matter of pro and cons. The status of reactor utilization and lessons learned are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Design and Operation of an Optically-Accessible Modular Reactor for Diagnostics of Thermal Thin Film Deposition Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, W A; Sperling, B A; Maslars, J E

    2015-01-01

    The design and operation of a simple, optically-accessible modular reactor for probing thermal thin film deposition processes, such as atomic layer deposition processes (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is described. This reactor has a nominal footprint of 225 cm(2) and a mass of approximately 6.6 kg, making it small enough to conveniently function as a modular component of an optical train. The design is simple, making fabrication straightforward and relatively inexpensive. Reactor operation is characterized using two infrared absorption measurements to determine exhaust times for tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium and water, proto-typical ALD precursors, in a pressure and flow regime commonly used for ALD.

  11. Assessment of the world market for small and medium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The market for SMRs until 2015 was assessed by individual countries, taking into account energy demand and supply patterns, growth rates, energy resources, economic and financial resources, electric grids, industrial and technical development, infrastructure availability, environmental and nuclear safety concerns and other policy issues. The market assessment includes all applications of these reactors, that is electricity generation as well as the supply of process head and district heating. It is expected that SMRs will be deployed primarily in countries which have already started nuclear projects, in particular in countries which have developed SMR designs themselves. Thus, projects would be supplied predominantly by domestic sources in the years ahead; later, the export market is expected to attain more importance. It is further expected that over two thirds of the SMR units would be in the medium size range, i.e. from 300 to 700 MW(e), the rest would be smaller. About one third of the SMRs to be implemented are expected to supply heat and/or electricity to integrated seawater desalination plants. More than half of these reactors would be below 300 MW(e) or 1000 MW(th). The overall market is estimated at about 60 to 100 SMR units to be implemented up to the year 2015. It is recognized that forecasts, just like national development plans, tend to err on the optimistic side. Therefore, an overall market estimate of 70 to 80 units seems reasonable. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Sessions 17-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Technical papers accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics are included in the present Proceedings. Except for the invited papers in the plenary session, all other papers are contributed papers. The topics of the meeting encompass all major areas of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, including analytical and experimental works on the fundamental mechanisms of fluid flow and heat transfer, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Because of the complex nature of nuclear reactors and power plants, several papers deal with the combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. The participation in the conference by the authors from several countries and four continents makes the Proceedings a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the field of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics worldwide. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  13. Mathematical modeling of a multi-stage naphtha reforming process using novel thermally coupled recuperative reactors to enhance aromatic production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iranshahi, Davood; Bahmanpour, Ali Mohammad; Pourazadi, Ehsan; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, P.O. Box 71345, Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, a novel thermally coupled reactor containing the naphtha reforming process in the endothermic side and the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline in the exothermic side has been investigated. Considering the higher thermal efficiency as well as the smaller size of the reactor, utilizing the recuperative coupled reactor is given priority. In this novel configuration, the first and the second reactor of the conventional naphtha reforming process have been substituted by the recuperative coupled reactors which contain the naphtha reforming reactions in the shell side, and the hydrogenation reaction in the tube side. The achieved results of this simulation have been compared with the results of the conventional fixed-bed naphtha reforming reactors. Acceptable enhancement can be noticed in the performance of the reactors. The production rate of the high octane aromatics and the consumption rate of the paraffins have improved 17% and 72%, respectively. The conversion of the nitrobenzene is acceptable and the effect of the number of the tubes also has been taken into account. However, the performance of the new configuration needs to be tested experimentally over a range of parameters under practical operating conditions. (author)

  14. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Tajoura Nuclear Research Centre reactor (TNRC) with low enriched uranium core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghangir, F.; Elwaer, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of the reactor of the Tajoura Nuclear Research Centre (TNRC) with LOW Enriched Uranium (LEU) core. A MATLAB program has been constructed to calculate the important related safety parameters at the steady-state operation of the core. The calculations have been performed at the hottest cell of the core and at the operating power of 10 MW with coolant inlet temperature equals to 45 °. The benefit of the symmetry of the shape of the core cells has been used to divide the hottest cell to four regions. Each quarter of the hottest cell has been further divided to a plate part and a corner part. Therefore, the calculations have been applied to the quarter of the hottest cell at both plate and corner parts. The assessment of the operating power according to the maximum allowable clad surface temperature is used to identify the maximum operating power of TNRC's reactor. The outcome of this investigation is that the reactor of the TNRC must not operate at power equals to 10 MW and the maximum allowable operating power is 9.7 MW where the value of the maximum clad surface temperature is 101.7 ° (maximum allowable clad surface temperature = 102 °). The results have been compared witha previous studies [1] where a Nusselt number is calculated using a different correlation equation from this study. [2] where an onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and the maximum allowable power are tested and with the results of a team at Argonne National Lab, ANL, [3] Which present a good agreement.(author)

  15. Determination of nitrogen in wheat flour through Activation analysis using Fast neutron flux of a Thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, T.

    1976-01-01

    In this work is done a technical study for determining Nitrogen (protein) and other elements in wheat flour Activation analysis, with Fast neutrons from a Thermal nuclear reactor. Initially it is given an introduction about the basic principles of the methods of analysis. Equipment used in Activation analysis and a brief description of the neutron source (Thermal nuclear reactor). The realized experiments for determining the flux form in the irradiation site, the half life of N-13 and the interferences due to the sample composition are included too. Finally, the obtained results by Activation and the Kjeldahl method are tabulated. (Author)

  16. Natural Circulation Capability Assessments for a Small-medium Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Do

    2010-02-01

    Small-medium reactors have been highly evaluated to have more safe characteristics than those of large reactors. In addition, it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as small-scale power production in mountainous of island area, seawater desalination, regional heating system. For a higher safety, studies about a way of using natural circulation have being conducted around world. CAREM(Argentina), AST- 500(Russia), and NHR-200(china) etc. According to this tendency, REX- 10(Regional Energy rX-10) is designed in Korea for regional heating and small-scale power production. To investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of REX-10, we designed Rex-10 Test Facility (RTF), simulating REX-10, by using the scaling law. The scaling ratios of length, volume and power were set with 1/1, 1/50 and 1/50, respectively. The diameter and total length of RTF are 40 cm and approximately 6 m, respectively. The facility is composed of various components, which are a core in the bottom part, a heat exchanger in the middle part, a pressurizer and hot legs in the upper part, and chillers outside the facility. The test instrumentation is also designed to measure temperatures, flow rates, pressures, and pressure drop. The experiment parameters were adopted based on the 1-dimensional approach. There are a variety of parameters which influence natural circulation behavior such as heater power, overall flow resistance parameter, the distance between the center of the heat exchanger and the core. As the experimental geometries are fixed, it is found that the most important parameter is the heater power under the experimental conditions. In addition, to evaluate the effect of heater power, some experiments were conducted at varying heater power condition (from 70 kW to 170 kW) under constant primary pressure (2.0 MPa) and secondary flow rate (4.5 liter per minute). As the results of the experiments, the temperature and flow rate increase with increasing heater power. The flow rate is

  17. Probabilistic assessment and design of overpower trips in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, C.M.; Laratta, F.A.R.

    1983-01-01

    The data used for the design and operation of the Neutron Overpower (NOP) trip systems in CANDU reactors are subject to errors and uncertainty in their values, for which a suitable allowance must be made. The final NOP setpoints thus depend on the size of this error allowance in relation to the magnitudes of the various types of errors expected. This report outlines a new probabilistic assessment procedure for determining the NOP error allowance needed to meet a specified level of confidence. The procedure is relatively simple and computationally inexpensive, yet provides a comprehensive and reasonably rigorous assessment of the statistical risk of the NOP errors. Margins of about 11 percent have been found sufficient to meet regulatory requirements with the new procedure, compared with 18 to 20 percent previously. A further extension of the procedure, to probabilistic optimization of the core reference power shape, is also outlined

  18. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.; Gilmore, W.E.; Galyean, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability and hardware component failure data. The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal computer. NUCLARR can furnish the end user with data inputs for both human and hardware reliability analysis in support of a variety of risk assessment activities. The NUCLARR system is documented is a five-volume series of reports. Volume V: Data Manual provides a hard-copy representation of all data and related information available within the NUCLARR system software. This document is organized in three sections. Part 1 is the summary description, which presents an overview of the NUCLARR system and data processing procedures. Part 2 contains all data and information relevant to the human error probability (HEP) data side of NUCLARR. Data and information for the hardware component failure data (HCFD) side are presented in Part 3. 7 refs

  19. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.; Gilmore, W.E.; Galyean, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability and hardware component failure data. The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal computer. NUCLARR can furnish the end user with data inputs for both human and hardware reliability analysis in support of a variety of risk assessment activities. The NUCLARR system is documented in a five-volume series of reports. Volume 5: Data Manual provides a hard-copy representation of all data and related information available within the NUCLARR system software. This document is organized in three sections. Part 1 is the summary description, which presents an overview of the NUCLARR system and data processing procedures. Part 2 contains all data and information relevant to the human error probability (HEP) data side of NUCLARR. Data and information for the hardware component failure data (HCFD) side are presented in Part 3. 7 refs

  20. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, B.G.; Reece, W.J.; Gertman, D.I.; Gilmore, W.E.; Galyean, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability and hardware component failure data. The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal computer. NUCLARR can furnish the end user with data inputs for both human and hardware reliability analysis in support of a variety of risk assessment activities. The NUCLARR system is documented in a five-volume series of reports. Volume V: Data Manual provides a hard-copy representation of all data and related information available within the NUCLARR system software. This document is organized in three sections. Part 1 is the summary description, which presents an overview of the NUCLARR system and data processing procedures. Part 2 contains all data and information relevant to the human error probability (HEP) side of NUCLARR. Data and information for the hardware component failure data (HCFD) side are presented in Part 3. 7 refs., 1 fig

  1. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Summary description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertman, D.I.; Gilmore, W.E.; Galyean, W.J.; Groh, M.R.; Gentillon, C.D.; Gilbert, B.G.; Reece, W.J.

    1990-05-01

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automate data base management system for storing and processing human error probability and hardware component failure rate data. The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal microcomputer. NUCLARR can be accessed by the end user to furnish data suitable for input in human and/or hardware reliability analysis to support a variety of risk assessment activities. The NUCLARR system is documented in a five-volume series of reports. This document Volume 1, of this series is the Summary Description, which presents an overview of the data management system, including a description of data collection, data qualification, data structure, and taxonomies. Programming activities, procedures for processing data, a user's guide, and hard copy data manual are presented in Volumes 2 through 5, NUREG/CR-4639

  2. Investigation of V and V process for thermal fatigue issue in a sodium cooled fast reactor – Application of uncertainty quantification scheme in verification and validation with fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masaaki, E-mail: tanaka.masaaki@jaea.go.jp

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Outline of numerical simulation code MUGTHES for fluid-structure thermal interaction was described. • The grid convergence index (GCI) method was applied according to the ASME V and V-20 guide. • Uncertainty of MUGTHES can be successfully quantified for thermal-hydraulic problems and unsteady heat conduction problems in the structure. • Validation for fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in a T-junction piping system was well conducted. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue caused by thermal mixing phenomena is one of the most important issues in design and safety assessment of fast breeder reactors. A numerical simulation code MUGTHES consisting of two calculation modules for unsteady thermal-hydraulics analysis and unsteady heat conduction analysis in structure has been developed to predict thermal mixing phenomena and to estimate thermal response of structure under the thermal interaction between fluid and structure fields. Although verification and validation (V and V) of MUGTHES has been required, actual procedure for uncertainty quantification is not fixed yet. In order to specify an actual procedure of V and V, uncertainty quantifications with the grid convergence index (GCI) estimation according to the existing guidelines were conducted in fundamental laminar flow problems for the thermal-hydraulics analysis module, and also uncertainty for the structure heat conduction analysis module and conjugate heat transfer model was quantified in comparison with the theoretical solutions of unsteady heat conduction problems. After the verification, MUGTHES was validated for a practical fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in T-junction piping system compared with measured results of velocity and temperatures of fluid and structure. Through the numerical simulations in the verification and validation, uncertainty of the code was successfully estimated and applicability of the code to the thermal fatigue issue was confirmed.

  3. Investigation of V and V process for thermal fatigue issue in a sodium cooled fast reactor – Application of uncertainty quantification scheme in verification and validation with fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in T-junction piping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Outline of numerical simulation code MUGTHES for fluid-structure thermal interaction was described. • The grid convergence index (GCI) method was applied according to the ASME V and V-20 guide. • Uncertainty of MUGTHES can be successfully quantified for thermal-hydraulic problems and unsteady heat conduction problems in the structure. • Validation for fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in a T-junction piping system was well conducted. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue caused by thermal mixing phenomena is one of the most important issues in design and safety assessment of fast breeder reactors. A numerical simulation code MUGTHES consisting of two calculation modules for unsteady thermal-hydraulics analysis and unsteady heat conduction analysis in structure has been developed to predict thermal mixing phenomena and to estimate thermal response of structure under the thermal interaction between fluid and structure fields. Although verification and validation (V and V) of MUGTHES has been required, actual procedure for uncertainty quantification is not fixed yet. In order to specify an actual procedure of V and V, uncertainty quantifications with the grid convergence index (GCI) estimation according to the existing guidelines were conducted in fundamental laminar flow problems for the thermal-hydraulics analysis module, and also uncertainty for the structure heat conduction analysis module and conjugate heat transfer model was quantified in comparison with the theoretical solutions of unsteady heat conduction problems. After the verification, MUGTHES was validated for a practical fluid-structure thermal interaction problem in T-junction piping system compared with measured results of velocity and temperatures of fluid and structure. Through the numerical simulations in the verification and validation, uncertainty of the code was successfully estimated and applicability of the code to the thermal fatigue issue was confirmed

  4. Thermal instability observations during ramp tests in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roennberg, G.; Kjaer-Pedersen, N.

    1984-01-01

    A series of ramp tests on ENC-built BWR fuel from the Big Rock Point reactor was performed in September 1982 in the Studsvik R2 Reactor. The tests involved segmented rods with a burnup of 18 MWd/KgU, and constituted part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. Rods of different designs were tested. The reference design had solid, dished pellets and was unpressurized. The alternative designs were annular pellets and sphere-pac. Some of the rods with annular pellets were prepressurized, and some were not. During the ramp tests the rod power is controlled by a helium depressurization loop which causes a strictly linear power ramp versus time. The thermal output of the test rig is measured calorimetrically, the data immediately being recorded on a strip chart and later processed by a computer. Furthermore, elongation detectors permit the immediate recording of the rod length variation versus time. For some of the rods the thermal output went constant for a fraction of a minute after reaching a certain value, then continued to rise, while the helium depressurization continued to proceed linearly with time. For the duration of this plateau of the thermal output curve the slope of the elongation detector signal was significantly higher than before, but fell back to its original value after the plateau. This observation was made only for the reference rods. None of the annular rods, with or without prepressurization, nor the sphere-pac rods, showed the effect. When observed, the effect occurred at about 40 kw/m. The effect is attributed to fission gas release rapidly being enhanced by thermal feedback. The increase in stored energy associated with the temperature rise in the fuel causes the delay in thermal output. The larger available internal volume and/or the prepressurization of the annular rods, and the lack of a distinct fuel-clad gap for the sphere-pac rods prevented the effect from occurring in those other

  5. IRPhE/STEK, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietze, Klaus; Klippel, Henk Th.; Koning, Arjan; Jacqmin, Robert

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The STEK-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactors STEK (ECN Petten/ Netherlands) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in RCN-209, ECN-10 The 5 STEK configurations cover a broad energy range due to their increasing softness. The experiments are very valuable because of the extensive program of sample reactivity measurements with many fission product nuclides important in reactor burn-up calculations. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Petten. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and JENDL-3.2) are compared in JEF/DOC-861. It contains the following documents: 31 Reports, 2 publications, 5 JEF documents, 4 conferences. 2 - Related or auxiliary programs

  6. Studies of thermal hydraulics and heat transfer in cascade subcritical molten salt reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aysen, E.M.; Sedov, A.A.; Subbotin, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Cascade Subcritical Molten Salt Reactor (CSMSR) consists of three main parts: accelerator-driven proton-bombarded target, central and peripheral zones. External neutrons generated in the result of interaction of protons with the target nuclei are multiplied then in the central zone and leak farther into the peripheral reactor zone, where an efficient burning of Minor Actinides dissolved in a molten salt fluoride composition is produced. The bunch of target and two zones is designed so that preset subcriticality of reactor would not be less than 1% of k eff . A characteristic feature of the reactor is a high density of neutron flux (2.10 15 n/cm 2 s) in the central zone and target and very high volumetric power rate (2000 - 6000 W/cm 3 ) in all the parts of CSMSR. To provide a workability of the core structures under condition of so big level of power rate it is necessary to impose strict limitations on the temperatures and temperature gradients developed in the coolants and constructions. In this reason it has been arranged a calculational-designing study to reveal the problems of heat transfer in the coolant and core structures and to find more appropriate variant of the core and target design, which is a compromise of contradictory requirements: provision of high neutron flux and coolability of the core structures. In this paper the results of studies of thermal hydraulics and heat transfer in the core zones and proton-beam target are presented. Different variants of the target and central zone design as well as application of different kind of coolants in them are discussed and the main problems of heat removal in their structures are analyzed. Multidimensional fields of velocity and temperature got in thermal hydraulics calculations for free flow of fuelled molten salt in cylindrical-cave peripheral CSMSR zone without structures inside are demonstrated. The role of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat for free flow in the

  7. Bone assessment via thermal photoacoustic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photoacoustic (TPA) measurement, for nonionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photoacoustic PA methods which are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e. the temperature dependent Grueneisen parameter which is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique is less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 370 C to 440 C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis.

  8. Thermal hydraulic behavior of sub-assembly local blockage in China experiment fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhimin

    2000-01-01

    The geometrical parameter ratio of pitch to diameter of China Experiment Fast Reactor (CEFR) subassembly is 1,167. To address the thermal hydraulic behavior of subassembly local blockage which may be caused by deformation of cladding due to severe swelling and thermal stresses and by space swirl loosening etc., the porous numerical model and SIMPLE-P code used to solve Navier-Stokes and energy equations in porous medium was developed, and the bundle experiment with 19 pins with 24 subchannels blocked in the sodium coolant was carried on in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The comparison of code predictions against experiments (including non-blockage and ten blockage conditions) seems well. The thermal hydraulic behavior of fuel subassembly with 61 fuel pins blockage of CEFR is calculated with SIMPLE-P code. The results indicate that the maximum temperature is 815 deg. C when the blockage area is about 37% (54 central subchannels are blocked). In this case the cladding won't be damaged and no sodium coolant boiling takes place. (author)

  9. FLICA-4 (version 1) a computer code for three dimensional thermal analysis of nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, P.; Allaire, G.; Boudsocq, G.

    1995-01-01

    FLICA-4 is a thermal-hydraulic computer code developed at the French Energy Atomic Commission (CEA) for three dimensional steady state or transient two phase flow for design and safety thermal analysis of nuclear reactor cores. The two phase flow model of FLICA-4 is based on four balance equations for the fluid which includes: three balance equations for the mixture and a mass balance equation for the less concentrated phase which permits the calculation of non-equilibrium flows as sub cooled boiling and superheated steam. A drift velocity model takes into account the velocity disequilibrium between phases. The thermal behaviour of fuel elements can be computed by a one dimensional heat conduction equation in plane, cylindrical or spherical geometries and coupled to the fluid flow calculation. Convection and diffusion of solution products which are transported either by the liquid or by the gas, can be evaluated by solving specific mass conservation equations. A one dimensional two phase flow model can also be used to compute 1-D flow in pipes, guide tubes, BWR assemblies or RBMK channels. The FLICA-4 computer code uses fast running time steam-water functions. Phasic and saturation physical properties are computed by using bi-cubic spline functions. Polynomial coefficients are tabulated from 0.1 to 22 MPa and 0 to 800 degrees C. Specific modules can be utilised in order to generate the spline coefficients for any other fluid properties

  10. Measurement and flow visualization research of thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR reactor Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, J. E.; Kim, S. O.; Choi, H. L.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, the thermal hydraulic and flow visualization experiment was described for the KALIMER-600 water-scaled model. In order to investigate a thermal hydraulic characteristics for the SFR KALIMER-600, which has been conceptually designed in the KAERI, a water-scaled 1/10 reactor vessel model was designed and prepared through the scaling analysis during three-years research. In this research, SFR Photos system, which has inherently very complicated the internal structures, was fabricated with a transparent vessel. It was shown that a serious of thermal hydraulic test was conducted within a short period if modeled with water than sodium. Natural circulation test was successfully performed with the modeled heater assembly and heat exchanger system coupled with cooling system. The water-scaled RSV experimental facility made in this research could be used to study the USA development for the future SFR system and utilized to analyze the flow characteristics before changing a main internal part of Photos system. It could also be used to test a pool-inspection study and a sensor selection study before large scale sodium experiment. The PCV system prepared in this research could be utilized to test other TSH experiment and temperature field measurement

  11. Reactor vessel assessment and the development of a reactor vessel life extension program for Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.; Hijeck, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to provide a general assessment of the life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two reactor pressure vessels. The purpose of the study is to assess the general life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs reactor pressure vessels based upon an extension and variation of the Surry pilot plant life extension study. This assessment provided a detailed reactor vessel surveillance program for plant life extension along with a hierarchy of specific tasks necessary for attaining maximum useful life. The assessment identified a number of critical issues which may impact life attainment and extension along with potential solutions to address these issues to ensure the life extension option is not precluded

  12. Methods and Models for the Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis of the CROCUS Reactor at EFPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of the CROCUS reactor, several methods and models need to be developed in the areas of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, and multiphysics coupling. The long-term objectives of this project are to work towards the development of a modern method for the safety analysis of research reactors and to update the Final Safety Analysis Report of the CROCUS reactor. A first part of the paper deals with generation of a core simulator nuclear data library for the CROCUS reactor using the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code and also with reactor core modeling using the PARCS code. PARCS eigenvalue, radial power distribution, and control rod reactivity worth results were benchmarked against Serpent 2 full-core model results. Using the Serpent 2 model as reference, PARCS eigenvalue predictions were within 240 pcm, radial power was within 3% in the central region of the core, and control rod reactivity worth was within 2%. A second part reviews the current methodology used for the safety analysis of the CROCUS reactor and presents the envisioned approach for the multiphysics modeling of the reactor.

  13. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak hybrid reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teofilo, V. L.; Leonard, B. R., Jr.; Aase, D. T.; Bickford, W. E.; McCormick, N. J.; McGrath, R. T.; Morrison, J. E.; Perry, R. T.; Schulte, S. C.; Willingham, C. E.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant was performed. The Tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb3Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited Tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs were made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis was made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered.

  14. Advanced neutron source reactor probabilistic flow blockage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Phase I Level I Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor identified core flow blockage as the most likely internal event leading to fuel damage. The flow blockage event frequency used in the original ANS PRA was based primarily on the flow blockage work done for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) PRA. This report examines potential flow blockage scenarios and calculates an estimate of the likelihood of debris-induced fuel damage. The bulk of the report is based specifically on the conceptual design of ANS with a 93%-enriched, two-element core; insights to the impact of the proposed three-element core are examined in Sect. 5. In addition to providing a probability (uncertainty) distribution for the likelihood of core flow blockage, this ongoing effort will serve to indicate potential areas of concern to be focused on in the preliminary design for elimination or mitigation. It will also serve as a loose-parts management tool

  15. Preconceptual design and assessment of a Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Leonard, B.R. Jr.; Aase, D.T.

    1980-09-01

    The preconceptual design of a commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (THR) power plant has been performed. The tokamak fusion driver for this hybrid is operated in the ignition mode. The D-T fusion plasma, which produces 1140 MW of power, has a major radius of 5.4 m and a minor radius of 1.0 m with an elongation of 2.0. Double null poloidal divertors are assumed for impurity control. The confining toroidal field is maintained by D-shaped Nb 3 Sn superconducting magnets with a maximum field of 12T at the coil. Three blankets with four associated fuel cycle alternatives have been combined with the ignited tokamak fusion driver. The engineering, material, and balance of plant design requirements for the THR are briefly described. Estimates of the capital, operating and maintenance, and fuel cycle costs have been made for the various driver/blanket combinations and an assessment of the market penetrability of hybrid systems is presented. An analysis has been made of the nonproliferation aspects of the hybrid and its associated fuel cycles relative to fission reactors. The current and required level of technology for both the fusion and fission components of the hybrid system has been reviewed. Licensing hybrid systems is also considered

  16. Assessment of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.D.; Saari, L.M.; White, A.S.; Geisendorfer, C.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.

    1986-02-01

    This report assesses the job-relatedness of specialized educational programs for licensed nuclear reactor operators. The approach used involved systematically comparing the curriculum of specialized educational programs for college credit, to academic knowledge identified as necessary for carrying out the jobs of licenses reactor operators. A sample of eight programs, including A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework programs were studied. Subject matter experts in the field of nuclear operations curriculum and training determined the extent to which individual program curricula covered the identified job-related academic knowledge. The major conclusions of the report are: There is a great deal of variation among individual programs, ranging from coverage of 15% to 65% of the job-related academic knowledge. Four schools cover at least half, and four schools cover less than one-third of this knowledge content; There is no systematic difference in the job-relatedness of the different types of specialized educational programs, A.S. degree, B.S. degree, and coursework; and Traditional B.S. degree programs in nuclear engineering cover as much job-related knowledge (about one-half of this knowledge content) as most of the specialized educational programs

  17. A Novel Thermal-Mechanical Detection System for Reactor Pressure Vessel Bottom Failure Monitoring in Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Daowei; Bu, Jiangtao; Xu, Dongling

    2013-06-01

    Following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in Japan, there is an increased need of enhanced capabilities for severe accident management (SAM) program. Among others, a reliable method for detecting reactor pressure vessel (RPV) bottom failure has been evaluated as imperative by many utility owners. Though radiation and/or temperature measurement are potential solutions by tradition, there are some limitations for them to function desirably in such severe accident as that in Japan. To provide reliable information for assessment of accident progress in SAM program, in this paper we propose a novel thermal-mechanical detection system (TMDS) for RPV bottom failure monitoring in severe accidents. The main components of TMDS include thermally sensitive element, metallic cables, tension controlled switch and main control room annunciation device. With TMDS installed, there shall be a reliable means of keeping SAM decision-makers informed whether the RPV bottom has indeed failed. Such assurance definitely guarantees enhancement of severe accident management performance and significantly improve nuclear safety and thus protect the society and people. (authors)

  18. Plutonium and minor actinides management in thermal high - temperature reactors - the EU FP6 project puma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    key elements, which are not covered by these other projects. Earlier projects indicate favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs will be investigated to optimise the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprises the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. It is also envisaged to optimise present Pu CP design and to explore feasibility for MA fuel. New CP designs will be explored that can withstand very high burn-ups and are well adapted for disposal after irradiation. The project benefits greatly from access to past knowledge from Belgonucleaire's Pu HTR fuel irradiation tests of the 1970-s, and also secures access to materials made at that time. (Very) High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Pu/MA transmuters are envisaged to operate in a global system of various reactor systems and fuel cycle facilities. Fuel cycle studies are envisaged to study the symbiosis to LWR, GCFR and ADS, and to quantify waste streams and radio toxic inventories. The technical, economic, environmental and socio-political impact will be assessed as well. The PUMA project runs from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and is being executed by a consortium of 15 European partner organisations and one from the USA. The paper presents an overview of planned activities and preliminary/expected results

  19. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuijper, J.C., E-mail: kuijper@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands); Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-15

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO{sub 2}-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR

  20. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.; Chauvet, V.; Cerullo, N.; Cetnar, J.; Abram, T.; Bakker, K.; Bomboni, E.; Bernnat, W.; Domanska, J.G.; Girardi, E.; De Haas, J.B.M.; Hesketh, K.; Hiernaut, J.P.; Hossain, K.; Jonnet, J.; Kim, Y.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Kopec, M.; Murgatroyd, J.; Millington, D.; Lecarpentier, D.; Lomonaco, G.; McEachern, D.; Meier, A.; Mignanelli, M.; Nabielek, H.; Oppe, J.; Petrov, B.Y.; Pohl, C.; Ruetten, H.J.; Schihab, S.; Toury, G.; Trakas, C.; Venneri, F.; Verfondern, K.; Werner, H.; Wiss, T.; Zakova, J.

    2010-11-01

    The PUMA project -the acronym stands for 'Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors'- was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the EURATOM 6th Framework Program (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO 2 -free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a

  1. An integrity evaluation method of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Masaaki; Okamura, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Present paper proposes a new algorithm of the integrity evaluation of the pressure vessel of nuclear reactors under pressurized thermal shock, PTS. This method enables us to do an effective evaluation by superimposing proposed ''PTS state-transient curves'' and ''toughness transient curves'', and is superior to a conventional one in the following points; (1) easy to get an overall view of the result of PTS event for the variations of several parameters, (2) possible to evaluate a safety margin for irradiation embrittlement, and (3) enable to construct an Expert-friendly evaluation system. In addition, the paper shows that we can execute a safety assurance test by using a flat plate model with the same thickness as that of real plant. (author)

  2. Application of an accurate thermal hydraulics solver in VTT's reactor dynamics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajamaeki, M.; Raety, H.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Eskola, M.

    1998-01-01

    VTT's reactor dynamics codes are developed further and new more detailed models are created for tasks related to increased safety requirements. For thermal hydraulics calculations an accurate general flow model based on a new solution method PLIM has been developed. It has been applied in VTT's one-dimensional TRAB and three-dimensional HEXTRAN codes. Results of a demanding international boron dilution benchmark defined by VTT are given and compared against results of other codes with original or improved boron tracking. The new PLIM method not only allows the accurate modelling of a propagating boron dilution front, but also the tracking of a temperature front, which is missed by the special boron tracking models. (orig.)

  3. Anti mutagenesis of chemical modulators against damage induced by reactor thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Garcia B, A.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.

    1999-01-01

    The mutations are changes in the genetic information whether for spontaneous form or induced by the exposure of the genetic material to certain agents, called mutagens: chemical or physical (diverse types of radiations). As well as exist a great variety of mutagens and pro mutagens (these last are agents which transform themselves in mutagens after the metabolic activation). Also several chemical compounds exist which are called antimutagens because they reduce the mutagens effect. The C vitamin or ascorbic acid (A A) presents antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic properties. On the other hand a sodium/copper salt derived from chlorophyll belonging to the porphyrin group (C L) contains a chelated metal ion in the center of molecule. It is also an antioxidant, antimutagenic and anti carcinogenic compound, it is called chlorophyllin. The objective of this work is to establish if the A A or the C L will reduce the damages induced by thermal and fast reactor neutrons. (Author)

  4. A unique nuclear thermal rocket engine using a particle bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Donald W.; Dahl, Wayne B.; McIlwain, Melvin C.

    1992-01-01

    Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) studied 75-klb thrust Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engines (NTRE) with particle bed reactors (PBR) for application to NASA's manned Mars mission and prepared a conceptual design description of a unique engine that best satisfied mission-defined propulsion requirements and customer criteria. This paper describes the selection of a sprint-type Mars transfer mission and its impact on propulsion system design and operation. It shows how our NTRE concept was developed from this information. The resulting, unusual engine design is short, lightweight, and capable of high specific impulse operation, all factors that decrease Earth to orbit launch costs. Many unusual features of the NTRE are discussed, including nozzle area ratio variation and nozzle closure for closed loop after cooling. Mission performance calculations reveal that other well known engine options do not support this mission.

  5. FLICA III. A digital computer program for thermal-hydraulic analysis of reactors and experimental loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plas, Roger.

    1975-05-01

    This computer program describes the flow and heat transfer in steady and transient state in two-phase flows. It is the present stage of the evolution about FLICA, FLICA II and FLICA II B codes which have been used and developed at CEA for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of reactors and experimental loops with heating rod bundles. In the mathematical model all the significant terms of the fundamental hydrodynamic equations are taken into account with the approximations of turbulent viscosity and conductivity. The two-phase flow is calculated by the homogeneous model with slip. In the flow direction an implicit resolution scheme is available, which make possible to study partial or total flow blockage, with upstream and downstream effects. A special model represents the helical wire effects in out-of pile experimental rod bundles [fr

  6. Non-destructive material investigation with thermal neutrons at the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastuerk, M.; Boeck, H.; Zamani, B.; Zawisky, M.; Rauch, H.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron tomography providing 3D information about interior of an object is a very efficient tool to visualize inner defects of the materials, non-destructively. In this study, some applications of neutron tomography in different fields such as geology, aerospace, civil engineering and archaeology were presented. Distribution of minerals in pumice and rock samples, visualization of inner defects within a new developed titan aluminum turbine blade, and distribution of silica gel as an important impregnating agent in construction and restoration of buildings were investigated. The measurements of tomography projections taken in the 0 to 180 o angle were performed with a thermal neutron flux of 10 5 at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Vienna, and the common filtered back projection method was used for the 3D image reconstruction. (author)

  7. Somatic mutation and recombination induced with reactor thermal neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambrano A, F.; Guzman R, J.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.

    1997-01-01

    The SMART test of Drosophila melanogaster was used to quantify the effect over the somatic mutation and recombination induced by thermal and fast neutrons at the TRIGA Mark III reactor of the ININ at the power of 300 k W for times of 30, 60 and 120 minutes with total equivalent doses respectively of 20.8, 41.6 and 83.2 Sv. A linear relation between the radiation equivalent dose and the frequency of the genetic effects such as mutation and recombination was observed. The obtained results allow to conclude that SMART is a sensitive system to the induced damage by neutrons, so this can be used for studying its biological effects. (Author)

  8. Physics parameter calculations for a Tandem Mirror Reactor with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghosian, B.M.; Lappa, D.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal barriers are localized reductions in potential between the plugs and the central cell, which effectively insulate trapped plug electrons from the central cell electrons. By then applying electron heating in the plug, it is possible to obtain trapped electron temperatures that are much greater than those of the central cell electrons. This, in turn, effects an increase in the plug potential and central cell confinement with a concomitant decrease in plug density and injection power. Ions trapped in the barrier by collisions are removed by the injection of neutral beams directed inside the barrier cell loss cone; these beam neutrals convert trapped barrier ions to neutrals by charge exchange permitting their escape. We describe a zero-dimensional physics model for this type of reactor, and present some preliminary results for Q

  9. Thermal hydrodynamic modeling and simulation of hot-gas duct for next-generation nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Injun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, Chansoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Bai, Cheolho; Hong, Sungyull [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jaesool, E-mail: jshim@ynu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydrodynamic nonlinear model is presented to examine a hot gas duct (HGD) used in a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor. • Experiments and simulation were compared to validate the nonlinear porous model. • Natural convection and radiation are considered to study the effect on the surface temperature of the HGD. • Local Nusselt number is obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD. - Abstract: A very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is a fourth-generation nuclear power reactor that requires an intermediate loop that consists of a hot-gas duct (HGD), an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), and a process heat exchanger for massive hydrogen production. In this study, a mathematical model and simulation were developed for the HGD in a small-scale nitrogen gas loop that was designed and manufactured by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. These were used to investigate the effect of various important factors on the surface of the HGD. In the modeling, a porous model was considered for a Kaowool insulator inside the HGD. The natural convection and radiation are included in the model. For validation, the modeled external surface temperatures are compared with experimental results obtained while changing the inlet temperatures of the nitrogen working fluid. The simulation results show very good agreement with the experiments. The external surface temperatures of the HGD are obtained with respect to the porosity of insulator, emissivity of radiation, and pressure of the working fluid. The local Nusselt number is also obtained for the optimum design of a possible next-generation HGD.

  10. Improving the understanding of thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer for super critical water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao y Leon, S.; Aksan, N.

    2010-01-01

    Ensuring the exchange of information and fostering the collaboration among Member States on the development of technology advances for future nuclear power plants are among the key roles of the IAEA. There is high interest internationally in both developing and industrialized countries in the design of innovative super-critical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs). This interest arises from the high thermal efficiencies (44-45%) and improved economic competitiveness promised by for this concept, utilizing and building on the recent developments of highly efficient fossil power plants. The SCWR is one of the six concepts included in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF). Following the advice of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Dept.'s Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), with the feedback from the Gen-IV SCWR Steering Committee, and in coordination with the OECD-NEA, IAEA is working on a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) in the areas of heat transfer behaviour and testing of thermo-hydraulic computer methods for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors. The second Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP was held at the IAEA Headquarters, in Vienna (Austria)) in August 2009. This paper summarizes the current status of the CRP, as well as the major achievements to date. (authors)

  11. CEDNBR: a computer code for transient thermal margin analysis of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shesler, A.T.; Lehmann, C.R.

    1976-09-01

    The report describes the CEDNBR computer code. This code was developed for the transient thermal analysis of a pressurized water reactor core or a critical heat flux test. Included are the code structure, conservation equations, and correlations utilized by CEDNBR. The methods of modelling a reactor core and hot channel and a CHF test are presented. Comparisons of CEDNBR calculations are made with both empirical pressure loss data and simulated loss of flow test data. The code solves the one-dimensional conservation of mass, energy, and momentum equations and the equation of state for the fluid for either steady-state or transient conditions. Tabular time dependent functions of inlet temperatures, pressure, mass velocity, axial heat flux distributions, normalized heat flux, radial peaking factors, and incremental mixing factors are required input to the code. Transient effects are included in the calculation of enthalpy rise and fluid properties. The Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) is calculated by applying a Critical Heat Flux (CHF) correlation to the computed local fluid properties. A code user's guide is provided for preparing input to the code. In addition, descriptions of the sub-routines used by CEDNBR are given

  12. Summary of particle bed reactor designs for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.

    1993-09-01

    A summary report of the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designs considered for the space nuclear thermal propulsion program has been prepared. The first chapters outline the methods of analysis, and their validation. Monte Carlo methods are used for the physics analysis, several new algorithms are used for the fluid dynamics heat transfer and engine system analysis, and commercially available codes are used for the stress analysis. A critical experiment, prototypic of the PBR was used for the physics validation, and blowdown experiments using fuel beds of prototypic dimensions were used to validate the power extraction capabilities from particle beds. In all four different PBR rocket reactor designs were studied to varying degrees of detail. They varied in power from 400 MW to 2000 MW. These designs were all characterized by a negative prompt coefficient, due to Doppler feedback, and the feedback due to moderator heat up varied from slightly negative to slightly positive. In all practical cases, the coolant worth was positive, although core configurations with negative coolant worth could be designed. In all practical cases the thrust/weight ratio was greater than 20.

  13. GEM, Fuel Cycle Cost and Economics for Thermal Reactor, Present Worth Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.A.; Hang, D.F.

    1974-01-01

    1- Description of problem or function: GEM is used to predict fuel cycle costs for any type nuclear system (i.e., BWR, HTGR, PWR, LMFBR, GCFR,... ). The current version is limited to thermal reactors. GEM is designed for production use by large utilities which have several reactor types on their system. GEM has been written so as to accommodate all major fuel management activities undertaken by a utility - (1) fuel bid analysis, (2) evaluation of actual day to day operation, and (3) system simulation and optimization studies. 2 - Method of solution: Costs are calculated using present-worth techniques and continuous compounding. The equations are based on an investor-owned utility capitalization structure which easily covers the range of industrial, private, and public (government) owned utilities. Three distinct types of analysis (cash flow, allocated costs, yearly cash flow) are performed, each yielding identical results. Using these as a basis many other analyses are undertaken. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Dimensions of all arrays are carried as variables throughout the analysis. The maximum size of each array is set by the user in program MAIN. Current values are set so that maxima are: 50 batches per case study, 20 year batch life, 30 year case study, 120 batch burn time-steps, 20 individual payments (sales) associated with each cost component

  14. Resonance region neutronics of unit cells in fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, A.A.; Driscoll, M.J.; Deutsch, O.L.

    1977-05-01

    A method has been developed for generating resonance-self-shielded cross sections based upon an improved equivalence theorem, which appears to allow extension of the self-shielding-factor (Bondarenko f-factor) method, now mainly applied to fast reactors, to thermal reactors as well. The method is based on the use of simple prescriptions for the ratio of coolant-to-fuel region-averaged fluxes, in the equations defining cell averaged cross sections. Linearization of the dependence of these functions on absorber optical thickness is found to be a necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of an equivalence theorem. Results are given for cylindrical, spherical and slab geometries. The functional form of the flux ratio relations is developed from theoretical considerations, but some of the parameters are adjusted to force-fit numerical results. Good agreement over the entire range of fuel and coolant optical thicknesses is demonstrated with numerical results calculated using the ANISN program in the S 8 P 1 option

  15. Experimental Development and Demonstration of Ultrasonic Measurement Diagnostics for Sodium Fast Reactor Thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuhiro, Akira; Jones, Byron

    2013-09-13

    This research project will address some of the principal technology issues related to sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR), primarily the development and demonstration of ultrasonic measurement diagnostics linked to effective thermal convective sensing under normatl and off-normal conditions. Sodium is well-suited as a heat transfer medium for the SFR. However, because it is chemically reactive and optically opaque, it presents engineering accessibility constraints relative to operations and maintenance (O&M) and in-service inspection (ISI) technologies that are currently used for light water reactors. Thus, there are limited sensing options for conducting thermohydraulic measurements under normal conditions and off-normal events (maintenance, unanticipated events). Acoustic methods, primarily ultrasonics, are a key measurement technology with applications in non-destructive testing, component imaging, thermometry, and velocimetry. THis project would have yielded a better quantitative and qualitative understanding of the thermohydraulic condition of solium under varied flow conditions. THe scope of work will evaluate and demonstrate ultrasonic technologies and define instrumentation options for the SFR.

  16. ATHENA [Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer] transient analysis of a fusion engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.

    1988-02-01

    Two potential undercooling transients are of concern in the design of TIBER-II (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor), namely loss of coolant and loss of flow accidents. The major area of concern for TIBER-II is the inboard shield, where, due to tungsten material, the decay heat is extremely high. The purpose of this study was to analyze these transients using the thermal-hydraulic code ATHENA (Advanced Thermal-Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer). The most comprehensive portion of this project involved creating a simple, yet complete, ATHENA model representative of TIBER-II. The completed model represents the case when the plasma is off and contains the inboard shield, the outboard shield, the divertor shields, and the primary loop. The primary loop contains the piping, pump, pressurizer, and heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is at the same elevation as the reactor, the least favorable to establishing natural circulation. The only transient analyzed so far, however, is a loss of flow accident. Results from the loss of flow analysis show that there is sufficient natural circulation in the inboard, outboard, and lower divertor shield to remove the decay heat, assuming that the secondary side flow is at full capacity. Although the upper divertor shield does not have sufficient natural circulation, cooling is provided due to vaporization and re-flood oscillations. However, one must recognize that there may be some local hot sport where the flow geometry inhibits cooling in a LOFA; the ATHENA model would not detect any localized problem. 9 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Aging assessment of PWR [Pressurized Water Reactor] Auxiliary Feedwater Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casada, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    In support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a review of Pressurized Water Reactor Auxiliary Feedwater Systems. Two of the objectives of the NPAR Program are to identify failure modes and causes and identify methods to detect and track degradation. In Phase I of the Auxiliary Feedwater System study, a detailed review of system design and operating and surveillance practices at a reference plant is being conducted to determine failure modes and to provide an indication of the ability of current monitoring methods to detect system degradation. The extent to which current practices are contributing to aging and service wear related degradation is also being assessed. This paper provides a description of the study approach, examples of results, and some interim observations and conclusions. 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Structural Integrity Assessment of Reactor Containment Subjected to Aircraft Crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Junyong; Chang, Yoonsuk

    2013-01-01

    When an accident occurs at the NPP, containment building which acts as the last barrier should be assessed and analyzed structural integrity by internal loading or external loading. On many occasions that can occur in the containment internal such as LOCA(Loss Of Coolant Accident) are already reflected to design. Likewise, there are several kinds of accidents that may occur from the outside of containment such as earthquakes, hurricanes and strong wind. However, aircraft crash that at outside of containment is not reflected yet in domestic because NPP sites have been selected based on the probabilistic method. After intentional aircraft crash such as World Trade Center and Pentagon accident in US, social awareness for safety of infrastructure like NPP was raised world widely and it is time for assessment of aircraft crash in domestic. The object of this paper is assessment of reactor containment subjected to aircraft crash by FEM(Finite Element Method). In this paper, assessment of structural integrity of containment building subjected to certain aircraft crash was carried out. Verification of structure integrity of containment by intentional severe accident. Maximum stress 61.21MPa of horizontal shell crash does not penetrate containment. Research for more realistic results needed by steel reinforced concrete model

  19. An analysis of the estimated capital cost of a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.

    1981-06-01

    The cost of building a fusion reactor similar to the Culham Conceptual Tokamak reactor Mark IIB is assessed and compared with other published capital costs of fusion and fission reactors. It is concluded that capital-investment and structure-renewal costs for a typical fusion reactor as presently conceived are likely to be higher than for thermal-fission reactors. (author)

  20. Experimental assessment of computer codes used for safety analysis of integral reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkov, A.A.; Kuul, V.S.; Samoilov, O.B. [OKB Mechanical Engineering, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-01

    Peculiarities of integral reactor thermohydraulics in accidents are associated with presence of noncondensable gas in built-in pressurizer, absence of pumped ECCS, use of guard vessel for LOCAs localisation and passive RHRS through in-reactor HX`s. These features defined the main trends in experimental investigations and verification efforts for computer codes applied. The paper reviews briefly the performed experimental investigation of thermohydraulics of AST-500, VPBER600-type integral reactors. The characteristic of UROVEN/MB-3 code for LOCAs analysis in integral reactors and results of its verification are given. The assessment of RELAP5/mod3 applicability for accident analysis in integral reactor is presented.

  1. Technical assessment: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, R.S.

    1981-02-01

    Inherent in the design of DOE reactors under review are many features which provide significant protection against the likelihood of TMI-type accidents. In addition, other features in the design or operating characteristics would tend to limit or reduce the consequences of the accident. Some of these features were discussed earlier in this report. However, some of the events included within the TMI accident sequence contain technical implications for the DOE reactors. These implications were reviewed by this Assessment Team, and the results of this review are reported in this and the following sections of this report. It is also important to reemphasize that as a result of this review, no major TMI-related safety issues have been identified that would indicate that these DOE reactors cannot be operated in a safe manner. Rather, the findings of this report, by nature, generally reemphasize and support ongoing DOE efforts and identify areas for additional improvements

  2. Thermal-performance study of liquid metal fast breeder reactor insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiu, K.K.

    1980-09-01

    Three types of metallic thermal insulation were investigated analytically and experimentally: multilayer reflective plates, multilayer honeycomb composite, and multilayer screens. Each type was subjected to evacuated and nonevacuated conditions, where thermal measurements were made to determine thermal-physical characteristics. A variation of the separation distance between adjacent reflective plates of multilayer reflective plates and multilayer screen insulation was also experimentally studied to reveal its significance. One configuration of the multilayer screen insulation was further selected to be examined in sodium and sodium oxide environments. The emissivity of Type 304 stainless steel used in comprising the insulation was measured by employing infrared technology. A comprehensive model was developed to describe the different proposed types of thermal insulation. Various modes of heat transfer inherent in each type of insulation were addressed and their relative importance compared. Provision was also made in the model to allow accurate simulation of possible sodium and sodium oxide contamination of the insulation. The thermal-radiation contribution to heat transfer in the temperature range of interest for LMFBR's was found to be moderate, and the suppression of natural convection within the insulation was vital in preserving its insulating properties. Experimental data were compared with the model and other published results. Moreover, the three proposed test samples were assessed and compared under various conditions as viable LMFBR thermal insulations

  3. Thermal-performance study of liquid metal fast breeder reactor insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiu, Kelvin K.

    1980-09-01

    Three types of metallic thermal insulation were investigated analytically and experimentally: multilayer reflective plates, multilayer honeycomb composite, and multilayer screens. Each type was subjected to evacuated and nonevacuated conditions, where thermal measurements were made to determine thermal-physical characteristics. A variation of the separation distance between adjacent reflective plates of multilayer reflective plates and multilayer screen insulation was also experimentally studied to reveal its significance. One configuration of the multilayer screen insulation was further selected to be examined in sodium and sodium oxide environments. The emissivity of Type 304 stainless steel used in comprising the insulation was measured by employing infrared technology. A comprehensive model was developed to describe the different proposed types of thermal insulation. Various modes of heat transfer inherent in each type of insulation were addressed and their relative importance compared. Provision was also made in the model to allow accurate simulation of possible sodium and sodium oxide contamination of the insulation. The thermal-radiation contribution to heat transfer in the temperature range of interest for LMFBR's was found to be moderate, and the suppression of natural convection within the insulation was vital in preserving its insulating properties. Experimental data were compared with the model and other published results. Moreover, the three proposed test samples were assessed and compared under various conditions as viable LMFBR thermal insulations.

  4. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications.

  5. Proceedings of the international meeting on thermal nuclear reactor safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current issues in nuclear power plant safety; national programs in nuclear power plant safety; radiological source terms; probabilistic risk assessment methods and techniques; non LOCA and small-break-LOCA transients; safety goals; pressurized thermal shocks; applications of reliability and risk methods to probabilistic risk assessment; human factors and man-machine interface; and data bases and special applications

  6. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Main research results in the field of nuclear power engineering of the Nuclear Reactors and Thermal Physics Institute in 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trufanov, A.A.; Orlov, Yu.I.; Sorokin, A.P.; Chernonog, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The main results of scientific and technological activities for last years of the Nuclear Reactors and Thermal Physics Institute FSUE SSC RF - IPPE in solving problems of nuclear power engineering are presented. The work have been carried out on the following problems: justification of research and development solutions and safety of NPPs with fast reactors of new generation with sodium (BN-1200, MBIR) and lead (BREST-OD-300) coolants, justification of safety of operating and advanced NPPs with WWER reactor facilities (WWER-1000, AEhS 2006, WWER-TOI), development and benchmarking of computational codes, research and development support of Beloyarsk-3 (BN-600) and Bilibino (BN-800) NPPs operation, decommissioning of AM and BR-10 research reactors, pilot scientific studies (WWER-SKD, ITER), international scientific and technical cooperation. Problems for further investigations are charted [ru

  8. IRPhE/RRR-SEG, Reactor Physics Experiments from Fast-Thermal Coupled Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Frank-Peter; Dietze, Klaus; Jacqmin, Robert; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description: The RRR-SEG-experiments have been performed to check neutron data of the most important reactor materials, especially of fission product nuclides, fuel isotopes and structural materials. The measured central reactivity worths (CRW) of small samples were compared with calculated values. These C/E-ratios have been used then for data corrections or in adjustment procedures. The reactor RRG-SEG (at RC Rossendorf / Germany) was a fast-thermal coupled facility of zero power. The annular thermal drivers were filled by fuel assemblies and moderated by water. The inner insertion lattices were loaded with pellets of fuel and other materials producing the fast neutron flux. The characteristics of the neutron and adjoint spectra were obtained by special arrangements of these pellets in unit cells. In this way, a hard or soft neutron spectrum or a special energy behavior of the adjoint function could be reached. The samples were moved by means of tubes to the central position (pile-oscillation technique). The original information about the facility and measurements is compiled in Note Technique SPRC/LEPh/93-230 (SEG) The SEG experiments are considered 'clean' integral experiments, simple and clear in geometry and well suited for calculation. In all SEG configurations only a few materials were used, most of these were standards. Due to the designed adjoint function (energy-independent or monotonously rising), the capture or scattering effect was dominant, convenient to check separately capture or scattering data. At first, analyses of the experiments have been performed in Rossendorf. Newer analyses were done later in Cadarache / CEA France using the European scheme for reactor calculation JEF-2.2 / ECCO / ERANOS (see Note Techniques and JEF/DOC-746). Furthermore, re-analyses were performed in O-arai / JNC Japan with the JNC standard route JENDL-3.2 / SLAROM / CITATION / PERKY. Results obtained with both code systems and different data evaluations (JEF-2.2 and

  9. Dragon project reference design assessment study for a 528 MW (E) thorium cycle high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosegood, S.B.

    1967-05-01

    The report presents an assessment of the feasibility, safety and cost of a large nuclear power station employing a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. A thermal output 1250 MW was chosen for the study, resulting in a net electrical output of 528.34 MW from a single reactor station, or 1056.7 MW from a twin reactor station. A reference design has been developed and is described. The reactor uses a U-235/Th-232/U-233 fuel cycle, on a feed and breed basis. It is believed that such a reactor could be built at an early date, requiring only a relatively modest development programme. Building costs are estimated to be Pound46.66/kW for a single unit station and Pound42.6/kW for a twin station, with power generation costs of 1.67p/kWh and 1.50p/kWh respectively. Optimisation studies have not been carried out and it should be possible to improve on the costs. The design has been made as flexible as possible to allow units of smaller or larger outputs to be designed with a minimum of change. (U.K.)

  10. Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Publishable Final Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Somers, J.; Van Den Durpel, L.

    2013-01-01

    The PUMA project - the acronym stands for “Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Thermal High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors” - was a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the Euratom 6th Framework (EU FP6). The PUMA project ran from September 1, 2006, until August 31, 2009, and was executed by a consortium of 14 European partner organisations and one from the USA. This report serves 2 purposes. It is both the 'Publishable Final Activity Report' and the 'Final (Summary) Report', describing, per Work Package, the specific objectives, research activities, main conclusions, recommendations and supporting documents. PUMA's main objective was to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO2-free energy generation. The PUMA project has assessed the impact of the introduction of Pu/MA-burning HTRs at three levels: fuel and fuel performance (modelling), reactor (transmutation performance and safety) and reactor/fuel cycle facility park. Earlier projects already indicated favourable characteristics of HTRs with respect to Pu burning. So, core physics of Pu/MA fuel cycles for HTRs has been investigated to study the CP fuel and reactor characteristics and to assure nuclear stability of a Pu/MA HTR core, under both normal and abnormal operating conditions. The starting point of this investigation comprised the two main contemporary HTR designs, viz. the pebble-bed type HTR, represented by the South-African PBMR, and hexagonal block type HTR, represented by the GT-MHR. The results (once again) demonstrate the flexibility of the contemporary (and near future) HTR designs and their ability to accept a variety

  11. A fundamental approach to specify thermal and pressure loadings on containment buildings of sodium cooled fast reactors during a core disruptive accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velusamy, K.; Chellapandi, P.; Satpathy, K.; Verma, Neeraj; Raviprasan, G.R.; Rajendrakumar, M.; Chetal, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An approach to quantify thermal and pressure loadings on RCB is presented. → Scaling laws to determine sodium release from water experiments are proposed. → Potential of in-vessel sodium fire after a CDA is assessed. → The proposed approach is applied to Indian Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. - Abstract: Reactor Containment Building (RCB) is the ultimate barrier to the environment against activity release in any nuclear power plant. It has to be designed to withstand both positive and negative pressures that are credible. Core Disruptive Accident (CDA) is an important event that specifies the design basis for RCB in sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper, a fundamental approach towards quantification of thermal and pressure loadings on RCB during a CDA, has been described. Mathematical models have been derived from fundamental conservation principles towards determination of sodium release during a CDA, subsequent sodium fire inside RCB, building up of positive and negative pressures inside RCB, potential of in-vessel sodium fire due to failed seals and temperature evolution in RCB walls during extended period of containment isolation. Various heating sources for RCB air and RCB wall and their potential have been identified. Scaling laws for conducting CDA experiments in small-scale water models by chemical explosives and the rule for extrapolation of water leak to quantify sodium leak in reactor are proposed. Validation of the proposed models and experimental simulation rules has been demonstrated by applying them to Indian prototype fast breeder reactor. Finally, it is demonstrated that in-vessel sodium fire potential is very weak and no special containment cooling system is essential.

  12. A Well-Posed Two Phase Flow Model and its Numerical Solutions for Reactor Thermal-Fluids Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A 7-equation two-phase flow model and its numerical implementation is presented for reactor thermal-fluids applications. The equation system is well-posed and treats both phases as compressible flows. The numerical discretization of the equation system is based on the finite element formalism. The numerical algorithm is implemented in the next generation RELAP-7 code (Idaho National Laboratory (INL)’s thermal-fluids code) built on top of an other INL’s product, the massively parallel multi-implicit multi-physics object oriented code environment (MOOSE). Some preliminary thermal-fluids computations are presented.

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  14. Computation of point reactor dynamics equations with thermal feedback via weighted residue method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo Changan; Liu Xiaoming

    1986-01-01

    Point reactor dynamics equations with six groups of delayed neutrons have been computed via weighted-residual method in which the delta function was taken as a weighting function, and the parabolic with or without exponential factor as a trial function respectively for an insertion of large or smaller reactivity. The reactivity inserted into core can be varied with time, including insertion in forms of step function, polynomials up to second power and sine function. A thermal feedback of single flow channel model was added in. The thermal equations concerned were treated by use of a backward difference technique. A WRK code has been worked out, including implementation of an automatic selection of time span based on an input of error requirement and of an automatic change between computation with large reactivity and that with smaller one. On the condition of power varied slowly and without feedback, the results are not sensitive to the selection of values of time span. At last, the comparison of relevant results has shown that the agreement is quite well

  15. Thermal-hydraulic and neutronic analysis of pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    A computational code, named CANAL2, was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of a Pressurized Water Reactor core. The conservation equations for the control volumes are obtained by area-averaging of the two-fluid model conservation equations and reducing them to the drift-flux model formulation. The resulting equations are aproximated by finite differences and solved by a marching-type numerical scheme. The model takes into account the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between adjacent subchannels of a fuel bundle. Turbulent mixing and diversion crossflow are considered. Correlations are provided for several heat trans and flow regimes and selected according to the local conditons. During transients core power can be evaluated by a point-Kinetics model. Fuel and coolant temperatures are feedback to the neutronics. The heat conduction equation is solved in the fuel using the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Temperature-dependent correlations are provided for the fuel and cladding thermal conductivities. Several runs were made with the code CANAL2 using the available experimental and calculated data in the open literature. Results indicate that CANAL2 is a good calculational tool for the thermal-hydraulics of PWR cores. A few refinements will make the code useful for design. (Author) [pt

  16. Thermal analysis to support decommissioning of the molten salt reactor experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulfredge, C.D.; Morris, D.G.; Park, J.E.; Williams, P.T.

    1996-06-01

    As part of the decommissioning process for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, several thermal-sciences issues were addressed. Apparently a mixture of UF{sub 6} and F{sub 2} had diffused into the upper portion of one charcoal column in the MSRE auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB), leading to radiative decay heating and possible chemical reaction sources. A proposed interim corrective action was planned to remove the water from the ACB cell to reduce criticality and reactivity concerns and then fill the ACB cell with an inert material. This report describes design of a thermocouple probe to obtain temperature measurements for mapping the uranium deposit, as well as development of steady-state and transient numerical models for the heat transfer inside the charcoal column. Additional numerical modeling was done to support filling of the ACB cell. Results from this work were used to develop procedures for meeting the goals of the MSRE Remediation Project without exceeding appropriate thermal limits.

  17. From a critical assembly heavy water - natural uranium to the fast - thermal research reactor in the Institute Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.; Pesic, M.

    1995-01-01

    A part of the Institute in Vinca this monograph refers to is the thermal nuclear zero power reactor RB, with a heavy water moderator and variously enriched uranium fuel, that is, its present day version, the coupled fast-thermal system HERBE. A group of research workers, technicians, operators and skilled workmen in the workshop have worked continuously on it. Some of them have spent their whole working age at the reactor, and some a part of it. There is about a hundred and fifty internationally published papers, twenty master's and fourteen doctor's theses left behind them for the past thirty five years. This book is devoted to them. The first part of the text refers to the pioneering efforts on the reactor and fundamental research in reactor physics. The experimental reactor RB was designed and constructed at the time to operate with natural uranium and heavy water. Measurements are presented and the first results of reaching critical state, measurements of migration length of thermal neutrons and neutron multiplication factor in an infinite medium; also measurements of neutron flux density distribution and reactor parameter, and in the domain of safety, measurement of safety rods reactivity. Those were also the times when the known serious accident occurred with the uncontrolled rise of reactivity, which was especially minutely described in a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency from Vienna. Later on, new fuel was acquired with 2 % enriched uranium. A series of experiments in reactor and neutron physics followed, with just the most interesting results of them presented here. In the period which followed, another type of fuel was available, with 80 % enriched uranium. New possibilities for work opened. Measurements with mixed lattices were performed, and the RA reactor lattices were simulated. After measurements mainly in the sphere of reactor and neutron physics, a need for investigations in the field of gamma and neutron radiation protection

  18. Use of Antineutrino Detectors for Nuclear Reactor Safeguards Effectiveness Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Lambert, H E; Elayat, H A; O' Connell, W J; Rexroth, P; Baldwin, G; Bowden, N; Huelskamp, R

    2006-06-05

    As described in an earlier article [1], important information regarding reactor power and the amount and type of fissile material in reactor cores can be determined by measuring the antineutrino rate and energy spectrum, using a cubic meter scale antineutrino detector at tens of meters standoff from the core. Current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards techniques do not provide such real-time quantitative information regarding core power levels and isotopic composition. The possible benefits of this approach are several and have been discussed in the earlier article. One key advantage is that the method gives the inspecting agency completely independent access to real-time information on the operational status and fissile content of the core. Furthermore, the unattended and non-intrusive nature of the technology may reduce the monitoring burden on the plant operator, even though more information is being provided than is available within the current IAEA safeguards regime. Here we present a detailed analytical framework for measuring the impact that such a detector might have on IAEA safeguards, if implemented. To perform the analysis, we will use initial data from our operating detector and a standard analysis technique for safeguards regimes, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Because characterization of the prototype detector is still underway, and because improvements in the prototype could have important impact on safeguards performance, the results presented here should be understood to be preliminary, and not reflective of the ultimate performance of the system. The structure of this paper is as follows. Reactor safeguards and the relevant properties of antineutrino detectors are briefly reviewed. A set of hypothetical diversion scenarios are then described, and one of these is analyzed using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Integrated Safeguards System Analysis Tool (LISSAT) The probability of successful

  19. Neutron flux measurement in the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA mark II reactor with MCNP verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Munem, E.; Shukri, A.; Tajuddin, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA Mark II reactor, forming part of a feasibility study for BNCT was proposed in 2001. In the current study, pure metals were used to measure the neutron flux at selected points in the thermal column and the neutron flux determined using SAND-II. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column was also carried out. The reactor core was homogenized and calculations of the neutron flux through the graphite stringers performed using MCNP5. The results show good agreement between the measured flux and the MCNP calculated flux. An obvious extension from this is that the MCNP neutron flux output can be utilized as an input spectrum for SAND-II for the flux iteration. (author)

  20. Thermal and hydrothermal stability of selected polymers in a nuclear reactor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho

    The focus of this study is the development and understanding of polymer based burnable poison rod assemblies (BPRAs) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This material substitution reduces the water displacement penalty at the end of cycle (EOC) currently found with the B4C/Al 2O3 BPRAs that displace moderator water in PWRs. This gives rise to a longer fuel cycle due to the extra moderation from hydrogen in polymer structures. Finding synthetic polymers that endure a severe nuclear reactor circumstance is a challenge. Aside from the p