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Sample records for thermal neutral temperature

  1. The response of human thermal sensation and its prediction to temperature step-change (cool-neutral-cool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuyuan Du

    Full Text Available This paper reports on studies of the effect of temperature step-change (between a cool and a neutral environment on human thermal sensation and skin temperature. Experiments with three temperature conditions were carried out in a climate chamber during the period in winter. Twelve subjects participated in the experiments simulating moving inside and outside of rooms or cabins with air conditioning. Skin temperatures and thermal sensation were recorded. Results showed overshoot and asymmetry of TSV due to the step-change. Skin temperature changed immediately when subjects entered a new environment. When moving into a neutral environment from cool, dynamic thermal sensation was in the thermal comfort zone and overshoot was not obvious. Air-conditioning in a transitional area should be considered to limit temperature difference to not more than 5°C to decrease the unacceptability of temperature step-change. The linear relationship between thermal sensation and skin temperature or gradient of skin temperature does not apply in a step-change environment. There is a significant linear correlation between TSV and Qloss in the transient environment. Heat loss from the human skin surface can be used to predict dynamic thermal sensation instead of the heat transfer of the whole human body.

  2. The Response of Human Thermal Sensation and Its Prediction to Temperature Step-Change (Cool-Neutral-Cool)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiuyuan; Li, Baizhan; Liu, Hong; Yang, Dong; Yu, Wei; Liao, Jianke; Huang, Zhichao; Xia, Kechao

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on studies of the effect of temperature step-change (between a cool and a neutral environment) on human thermal sensation and skin temperature. Experiments with three temperature conditions were carried out in a climate chamber during the period in winter. Twelve subjects participated in the experiments simulating moving inside and outside of rooms or cabins with air conditioning. Skin temperatures and thermal sensation were recorded. Results showed overshoot and asymmetry of TSV due to the step-change. Skin temperature changed immediately when subjects entered a new environment. When moving into a neutral environment from cool, dynamic thermal sensation was in the thermal comfort zone and overshoot was not obvious. Air-conditioning in a transitional area should be considered to limit temperature difference to not more than 5°C to decrease the unacceptability of temperature step-change. The linear relationship between thermal sensation and skin temperature or gradient of skin temperature does not apply in a step-change environment. There is a significant linear correlation between TSV and Qloss in the transient environment. Heat loss from the human skin surface can be used to predict dynamic thermal sensation instead of the heat transfer of the whole human body. PMID:25136808

  3. Thermal Conductivity of the Multicomponent Neutral Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    Approximate expressions for the thermal conductivity coefficient of the multicomponent neutral atmosphere consisting of N2, O2, O, He, and H are analyzed and evaluated for the atmospheric conditions by comparing them with that given by the rigorous hydrodynamic theory. The new approximations of the thermal conductivity coefficients of simple gases N2, O2, O, He, and H are derived and used. It is proved that the modified Mason and Saxena approximation of the atmospheric thermal conductivity coefficient is more accurate in reproducing the atmospheric values of the rigorous hydrodynamic thermal conductivity coefficient in comparison with those that are generally accepted in atmospheric studies. This approximation of the thermal conductivity coefficient is recommended to use in calculations of the neutral temperature of the atmosphere.

  4. Estimation of thermal sensation during varied air temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuura, T; Tabuchi, R; Iwanaga, K; Harada, H; Kikuchi, Y

    1998-03-01

    Seven male students were exposed to four varied air temperature environments: hot (37 degrees C) to neutral (27 degrees C) (HN), neutral to hot (NH), cool (17 degrees C) to neutral (CN), and neutral to cool (NC). The air temperature was maintained at the first condition for 20 min, then was changed to the second condition after 15 min and was held there for 20 min. Each subject wore a T-shirt, briefs, trunks, and socks. Each sat on a chair and was continuously evaluated for thermal sensation, thermal comfort, and air velocity sensation. Some physiological and thermal parameters were also measured every 5 s during the experiment. The correlation between thermal sensation and skin temperature at 15 sites was found to be poor. The subjects felt much warmer during the rising phase of the air temperature (CN, NH) than during the descending phase (HN, NC) at a given mean skin temperature. However, thermal sensation at the same heat flux or at the same value of the difference between skin and air temperature (delta(Tsk - Ta)) was not so different among the four experimental conditions, and the correlation between thermal sensation and heat flux or delta(Tsk - Ta) was fairly good. The multiple regression equation of the thermal sensation (TS) on 15 sites of skin temperature (Tsk; degrees C) was calculated and the coefficient of determination (R*2) was found to be 0.656. Higher coefficients of determination were found in the equations of thermal sensation for the heat flux (H; kcal.m-2.h-1) at the right and left thighs of the subjects and on delta(Tsk - Ta) (degrees C) at 4 sites. They were as follows: TS = 2.04 - 0.016 Hright - 0.036 Hleft; R*2 = 0.717, TS = 1.649 + 0.013 delta(Tsk - Ta)UpperArm - 0.036 delta(Tsk - Ta)Chest - 0.223 delta(Tsk - Ta)Thigh-0.083 delta(Tsk - Ta)LowerLeg; R*2 = 0.752, respectively.

  5. Precise measurements of neutral gas temperature using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor in Argon capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daoman; Liu, Zigeng; Liu, Yongxin; Peng, Wei; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    Neutral gas temperature was measured using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor (FBGs) in capacitively coupled argon plasmas. Thermometry is based on the thermal equilibrium between the sensor and neutral gases, which is found to become faster with increasing pressure. It is also observed that the neutral gas temperature is higher than the room temperature by 10 120 °depending on the experiental conditions, and gas temperature shows significant non-uniformity in space. In addition, radial profiles of neutral temperature at different pressures, resemble these of ion density, obtained by a floating double probe. Specifically, at low pressure, neutral gas temperature and ion density peak at the center of the reactor, while the peak appears at the edge of the electrode at higher pressure. The neutral gas heating is mainly caused by the elastic collisions of Ar + with neutral gas atoms in the sheath region after Ar + gaining a certain energy. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Grants No. 11335004, 11405018, and 61137005).

  6. Perceived air quality, thermal comfort, and SBS symptoms at low air temperature and increased radiant temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftum, Jørn; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Foldbjerg, P.

    2002-01-01

    source present at the low temperature. To maintain overall thermal neutrality, the low air temperature was partly compensated for by individually controlled radiant heating, and partly by allowing subjects to modify clothing insulation. A reduction of the air temperature from 23 deg.C to 18 deg.......C suggested an improvement of the perceived air quality, while no systematic effect on symptom intensity was observed. The overall indoor environment was evaluated equally acceptable at both temperatures due to local thermal discomfort at the low air temperature....

  7. Thermal comfort, physiological responses and performance during exposure to a moderate temperature drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; de Wit, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effects of a moderate temperature drift on human thermal comfort, physiological responses, productivity and performance. A dynamic thermophysiological model was used to examine the possibility of simulating human thermal responses and thermal comfort...... temperature corresponding with a neutral thermal sensation (control situation). During the experiments both physiological responses and thermal sensation were measured. Productivity and performance were assessed with a ‘Remote Performance Measurement’ (RPM) method. Physiological and thermal sensation data...

  8. Active ion temperature measurement with heating neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yukitoshi; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Shin

    1987-03-01

    When the heating neutral-beam (hydrogen beam) is injected into a deuterium plasma, the density of neutral particles is increased locally. By using this increased neutral particles, the local ion temperature is measured by the active charge-exchange method. The analyzer is the E//B type mass-separated neutral particle energy analyzer and the measured position is about one third outside of the plasma radius. The deuterium energy spectrum is Maxwellian, and the temperature is increased from 350 eV to 900 eV during heating. Since the local hydrogen to deuterium density concentration and the density of the heating neutral-beam as well as the ion temperature can be obtained good S/N ratio, the usefulness of this method during neutral-beam heating is confirmed by this experiment. (author)

  9. Differences between young adults and elderly in thermal comfort, productivity and thermal physiology in response to a moderate temperature drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; Lichtenbelt, Wouter van Marken; Loomans, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    thermal condition differ between young adults and elderly. There is a lack of studies that describe the effect of aging on thermal comfort and productivity during a moderate temperature drift. In this study, the effect of a moderate temperature drift on physiological responses, thermal comfort......Results from naturally ventilated buildings show that allowing the indoor temperature to drift does not necessarily result in thermal discomfort and may allow for a reduction in energy use. However, for stationary conditions, several studies indicate that the thermal neutral temperature and optimum......, temperature drift: first 4 h: +2 K/h, last 4 h: –2 K/h. The results indicate that thermal sensation of the elderly was, in general, 0.5 scale units lower in comparison with their younger counterparts. Furthermore, the elderly showed more distal vasoconstriction during both conditions. Nevertheless, TS...

  10. Ion temperature measurement by neutral energy analyzer in high-field tokamak TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-02-01

    The measurement of the ion temperature of the TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma is carried out by using a seven-channel neutral energy analyzer. The temporal and spatial variations of the ion temperature have been obtained with the spatial resolution of +-4.3 mm and the temporal resolution of 100 ..mu..sec. The energy range of the analyzed neutral particles is from 0.2 to 8 keV. The energy spectrum in the TRIAM-1 plasma without the strong gas puffing usually consists of two-component Maxwellian; the one represents the thermal part which is a superposition of the contribution from a hot region (T sub(i) = 100 - 300 eV) and that from an edge region (T sub(i) asymptotically equals 50 eV), and the other represents the superthermal part (T sub(i) asymptotically equals 1 keV). The neutral particle energy spectra at several vertical positions are obtained by scanning the analyzer in the vertical direction. From those spectra, the radial profile of the ion temperature is derived by means of the nonlinear optimization method.

  11. Evolution of a neutral-ion 2 fluid system using thermal lattice Boltzmann model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.; Carter, J.; Pavlo, P.

    2000-01-01

    The 2D evolution of a 2-species system is examined using the thermal lattice Boltzmann model (TLBM). The effects of velocity shear layers on sharp heat fronts are considered for a neutral-ion system in the case where both species are turbulent. The rate at which the species velocities and temperatures equilibrate no longer follow the Morse estimate. (author)

  12. Differences between young adults and elderly in thermal comfort, productivity, and thermal physiology in response to a moderate temperature drift and a steady-state condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellen, L.; Marken Lichtenbelt, van W.D.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Toftum, J.; Wit, de M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Results from naturally ventilated buildings show that allowing the indoor temperature to drift does not necessarily result in thermal discomfort and may allow for a reduction in energy use. However, for stationary conditions, several studies indicate that the thermal neutral temperature and optimum

  13. Thermospheric neutral temperatures derived from charge-exchange produced N{sub 2}{sup +} Meinel (1,0) rotational distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutiso, C.K.; Zettergren, M.D.; Hughes, J.M.; Sivjee, G.G. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Space Physics Research Lab.

    2013-06-01

    Thermalized rotational distributions of neutral and ionized N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} have long been used to determine neutral temperatures (T{sub n}) during auroral conditions. In both bright E-region (or similar 130 km) species provide an exception to this situation. In particular, the charge-exchange reaction O{sup +}({sup 2}D)+N{sub 2}(X) {yields}N{sub 2}{sup +} (A{sup 2}{Pi}{sub u}, {nu}' = 1) + O({sup 3}P) yields thermalized N{sub 2}{sup +} Meinel (1,0) emissions, which, albeit weak, can be used to derive neutral temperatures at altitudes of {proportional_to} 130 km and higher. In this work, we present N{sub 2}{sup +} Meinel (1,0) rotational temperatures and brightnesses obtained at Svalbard, Norway, during various auroral conditions. We calculate T{sub n} at thermospheric altitudes of 130-180 km from thermalized rotational populations of N{sub 2}{sup +} Meinel (1,0); these emissions are excited by soft electron (neutral atmosphere, although certain limiting conditions are necessary. These include precipitation of low-energy electrons, and a non-sunlit emitting layer. (orig.)

  14. Occupant Time Period of Thermal Adaption to Change of Outdoor Air Temperature in Naturally Ventilated Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Wargocki, Pawel; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The present work proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption of occupants in naturally ventilated building, based on the relationship between their neutral temperatures and running mean outdoor air temperature. Based on the data of the field investigation, the subjects’ time...

  15. Transition from positive to neutral in mutation fixation along with continuing rising fitness in thermal adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Toshihiko; Iijima, Leo; Tatsumi, Makoto; Ono, Naoaki; Oyake, Ayana; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Matsuo, Moe; Okubo, Masato; Suzuki, Shingo; Mori, Kotaro; Kashiwagi, Akiko; Furusawa, Chikara; Ying, Bei-Wen; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2010-10-21

    It remains to be determined experimentally whether increasing fitness is related to positive selection, while stationary fitness is related to neutral evolution. Long-term laboratory evolution in Escherichia coli was performed under conditions of thermal stress under defined laboratory conditions. The complete cell growth data showed common continuous fitness recovery to every 2°C or 4°C stepwise temperature upshift, finally resulting in an evolved E. coli strain with an improved upper temperature limit as high as 45.9°C after 523 days of serial transfer, equivalent to 7,560 generations, in minimal medium. Two-phase fitness dynamics, a rapid growth recovery phase followed by a gradual increasing growth phase, was clearly observed at diverse temperatures throughout the entire evolutionary process. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed the transition from positive to neutral in mutation fixation, accompanied with a considerable escalation of spontaneous substitution rate in the late fitness recovery phase. It suggested that continually increasing fitness not always resulted in the reduction of genetic diversity due to the sequential takeovers by fit mutants, but caused the accumulation of a considerable number of mutations that facilitated the neutral evolution.

  16. Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhibin; Li, Nianping; Cui, Haijiao; Peng, Jinqing; Chen, Haowen; Liu, Penglong

    2017-09-21

    Existing thermal comfort field studies are mainly focused on the relationship between the indoor physical environment and the thermal comfort. In numerous chamber experiments, physiological parameters were adopted to assess thermal comfort, but the experiments' conclusions may not represent a realistic thermal environment due to the highly controlled thermal environment and few occupants. This paper focuses on determining the relationships between upper extremity skin temperatures (i.e., finger, wrist, hand and forearm) and the indoor thermal comfort. Also, the applicability of predicting thermal comfort by using upper extremity skin temperatures was explored. Field studies were performed in office buildings equipped with split air-conditioning (SAC) located in the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW) climate zone of China during the summer of 2016. Psychological responses of occupants were recorded and physical and physiological factors were measured simultaneously. Standard effective temperature (SET*) was used to incorporate the effect of humidity and air velocity on thermal comfort. The results indicate that upper extremity skin temperatures are good indicators for predicting thermal sensation, and could be used to assess the thermal comfort in terms of physiological mechanism. In addition, the neutral temperature was 24.7 °C and the upper limit for 80% acceptability was 28.2 °C in SET*.

  17. Using Upper Extremity Skin Temperatures to Assess Thermal Comfort in Office Buildings in Changsha, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Existing thermal comfort field studies are mainly focused on the relationship between the indoor physical environment and the thermal comfort. In numerous chamber experiments, physiological parameters were adopted to assess thermal comfort, but the experiments’ conclusions may not represent a realistic thermal environment due to the highly controlled thermal environment and few occupants. This paper focuses on determining the relationships between upper extremity skin temperatures (i.e., finger, wrist, hand and forearm and the indoor thermal comfort. Also, the applicability of predicting thermal comfort by using upper extremity skin temperatures was explored. Field studies were performed in office buildings equipped with split air-conditioning (SAC located in the hot summer and cold winter (HSCW climate zone of China during the summer of 2016. Psychological responses of occupants were recorded and physical and physiological factors were measured simultaneously. Standard effective temperature (SET* was used to incorporate the effect of humidity and air velocity on thermal comfort. The results indicate that upper extremity skin temperatures are good indicators for predicting thermal sensation, and could be used to assess the thermal comfort in terms of physiological mechanism. In addition, the neutral temperature was 24.7 °C and the upper limit for 80% acceptability was 28.2 °C in SET*.

  18. Ultimate temperature for laser cooling of two-level neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnato, V.S.; Zilio, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    We present a simple pedagogical method to evaluate the minimum attainable temperature for laser cooling of two-level neutral atoms. Results are given as a function of the laser detuning and intensity. We also discuss the use of this approach to predict the minimum temperature of neutral atoms confined in magnetic traps. (author) [pt

  19. Do people like to feel 'neutral'? Exploring the variation of the desired thermal sensation on the ASHRAE scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, Michael A; Hancock, Mary [Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development, Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, Gipsy Lane, Oxford OX3 0BP (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-15

    This analysis explores the pattern of variation of the desired thermal sensation on the ASHRAE scale, applying the method of direct enquiry. Data are from studies of thermal comfort at university lectures and in selected dwellings. Respondents reported both their thermal sensation and the sensation they would have desired at that time. The data contain 868 comparisons of the actual and the desired sensation. On 57% of occasions the desired sensation was other than 'neutral'. The respondents did not always desire the same sensation, and the mean desired sensation differed systematically among the respondents. The mean desired sensation depended to some extent on the actual sensation, there being a positive correlation in the region from 'neutral' and 'warm' and a negative correlation outside this region. Sensations on the ASHRAE scale are shown to have more than one meaning. Adjusting the ASHRAE scale to allow for the desired sensation yields different distributions of thermal comfort and different group-optimum temperatures. The adjustment should therefore be applied whenever the ASHRAE scale is used. The implications for thermal simulation and for energy use in buildings are considered. (author)

  20. Low-temperature thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter discusses the thermal expansion of insulators and metals. Harmonicity and anharmonicity in thermal expansion are examined. The electronic, magnetic, an other contributions to low temperature thermal expansion are analyzed. The thermodynamics of the Debye isotropic continuum, the lattice-dynamical approach, and the thermal expansion of metals are discussed. Relative linear expansion at low temperatures is reviewed and further calculations of the electronic thermal expansion coefficient are given. Thermal expansions are given for Cu, Al and Ti. Phenomenologic thermodynamic relationships are also discussed

  1. Loss and thermal redistributed modulation methods for three-level neutral-point-clamped wind power inverter undergoing Low Voltage Ride Through

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    The three-level neutral-point-clamped (3L-NPC) converter is a promising multilevel topology in the application of mega-watts wind power generation system. However, the growing requirements by grid codes may impose high stress and even give reliability problem to this converter topology. This paper...... modulation methods, the thermal distribution in the 3L-NPC wind power inverter undergoing LVRT becomes more equal, and the junction temperature of the most stressed devices can be also relieved. Also the control ability of DC-bus neutral point potential, which is one of the crucial considerations for the 3L...

  2. Effect of mode of operation on hydrogen production from glycerol at thermal neutral conditions: Thermodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pairojpiriyakul, Thirasak; Soottitantawat, Apinan; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University (Thailand); Wiyaratn, Wisitsree [Department of Production Technology Education, Faculty of Industrial Education and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Laosiripojana, Navadol [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Croiset, Eric [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production from glycerol under thermal neutral conditions is studied in this work. Heat requirement from the process can be achieved from the exothermic reaction of glycerol with oxygen in air fed to the system. Two modes of operation for air feeding are considered including (i) Single-feed mode in which air is fed in combination with water and glycerol to the reformer, and (ii) Split-feed mode in which air and part of glycerol is fed to a combustor in order to generate heat. The thermal neutral conditions are considered for two levels including Reformer and System levels. It was found that the H{sub 2} yield from both modes is not significantly different at the Reformer level. In contrast, the difference becomes more pronounced at the System level. Single-feed and Split-feed modes offer high H{sub 2} yield in low (600-900 K) and high (900-1200 K) temperature ranges, respectively. The maximum H{sub 2} yields are 5.67 (water to glycerol ratio, WGR = 12, oxygen to glycerol ratio, OGR = 0.37, T = 900 K, Split-feed mode), and 3.28 (WGR = 3, OGR = 1.40, T = 900 K, Single-feed mode), for the Reformer and System levels, respectively. The difference between H{sub 2} yields in both levels mainly arises from the huge heat demand for preheating feeds in the System level, and therefore, a higher amount of air is needed to achieve the thermal neutral condition. Split-feed mode is a favorable choice in term of H{sub 2} purity because the gas product is not diluted with N{sub 2} from the air. The use of pure O{sub 2} and afterburner products (ABP) stream were also considered at the System level. The maximum H{sub 2} yield becomes 3.75 (WGR = 5.21, OGR = 1.28, T = 900 K, Split-feed mode) at thermal neutral condition when utilizing heat from the ABP stream. Finally comparisons between the different modes and levels are addressed in terms of yield of by-products, and carbon formation. (author)

  3. Measurement of a neutral particle flux by a thermal method using the junction temperature effect; Mesure d'un flux de particules neutres par une methode thermique mettant a contribution l'effet de temperature des jonctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, Anthime [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Services Scientifiques

    1966-07-01

    Among all the methods suitable for measuring neutral particle fluxes obtained by proton charge exchange in an organic gas, the thermal method has been chosen. The energy imparted by the neutral particles to the target in the form of heat leads to the latter temperature increasing; this temperature is usually followed with a thermocouple. In order to increase the sensitivity and the elegance of the apparatus the thermocouple has been replaced by a junction whose characteristics are known to vary with temperature. A calibration is carried out using a beam of charged particles. The response obtained is linear. Measurements have been made with a power of up to 1 mW; the accuracy increases with the energy provided; for 4 joules an accuracy of 10 per cent is obtained. The apparatus may be improved in particular by extending the measurement range towards low power values, and by increasing the accuracy. (author) [French] Parmi toutes les methodes utilisees pour la mesure d'un flux de particules neutres, obtenues par echange de charge de protons dans un gaz organique, nous avons choisi la methode thermique. L'energie cedee par les particules neutres a la cible sous forme de chaleur provoque une elevation de temperature de celle-ci; cette temperature est habituellement reperee par thermocouple. Pour accroitre la sensibilite et la finesse de l'appareillage, nous avons substitue au thermocouple une jonction dont on sait que les caracteristiques varient avec la temperature. Un etalonnage est realise par un faisceau de particules chargees. La reponse obtenue est lineaire. Des puissances de l'ordre du mW ont ete mesurees; la precision croit avec l'energie apportee; elle est de 10 pour cent quand celle-ci est de 4 joules. L'appareillage peut etre notablement perfectionne, pour reculer la gamme des mesures vers les basses puissances et accroitre la precision. (auteur)

  4. The thermal pressure distribution of a simulated cold neutral medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazol, Adriana, E-mail: a.gazol@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A. P. 3-72, c.p. 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    We numerically study the thermal pressure distribution in a gas with thermal properties similar to those of the cold neutral interstellar gas by analyzing three-dimensional hydrodynamic models in boxes with sides of 100 pc with turbulent compressible forcing at 50 pc and different Mach numbers. We find that at high pressures and for large Mach numbers, both the volume-weighted and the density-weighted distributions can be appropriately described by a log-normal distribution, whereas for small Mach numbers they are better described by a power law. Thermal pressure distributions resulting from similar simulations but with self-gravity differ only for low Mach numbers; in this case, they develop a high pressure tail.

  5. Selected contribution: ambient temperature for experiments in rats: a new method for determining the zone of thermal neutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A; Ivanov, Andrei I; Shimansky, Yury P

    2002-06-01

    There is a misbelief that the same animal has the same thermoneutral zone (TNZ) in different experimental setups. In reality, TNZ strongly depends on the physical environment and varies widely across setups. Current methods for determining TNZ require elaborate equipment and can be applied only to a limited set of experimental conditions. A new, broadly applicable approach that rapidly determines whether given conditions are neutral for a given animal is needed. Consistent with the definition of TNZ [the range of ambient temperature (T(a)) at which body core temperature (T(c)) regulation is achieved only by control of sensible heat loss], we propose three criteria of thermoneutrality: 1) the presence of high-magnitude fluctuations in skin temperature (T(sk)) of body parts serving as specialized heat exchangers with the environment (e.g., rat tail), 2) the closeness of T(sk) to the median of its operational range, and 3) a strong negative correlation between T(sk) and T(c). Thermocouple thermometry and liquid crystal thermography were performed in five rat strains at 13 T(a). Under the conditions tested (no bedding or filter tops, no group thermoregulation), the T(a) range of 29.5-30.5 degrees C satisfied all three TNZ criteria in Wistar, BDIX, Long-Evans, and Zucker lean rats; Zucker fatty rats had a slightly lower TNZ (28.0-29.0 degrees C). Skin thermometry or thermography is a definition-based, simple, and inexpensive technique to determine whether experimental or housing conditions are neutral, subneutral, or supraneutral for a given animal.

  6. Simultaneous temperature measurement of ionospheric plasma and neutral atmosphere with K-10-11 rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murasato, Yukio; Kaneko, Osamu; Sasaki, Susumu; Kawashima, Nobuki; Kibune, Tadashi.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperature and neutral atmospheric temperature in lower ionospheric layer were measured by the ''Shadow Method'', which has been developed and improved by the authors. The principle of the method, which utilizes the fact that the shadow due to the reduction of density of medium behind on obstacle depends upon the flow velocity and the temperature of the medium, is briefly explained together with the apparatus used for the measurement. A pair of the Langmuir probes with the interval of 44 mm was used for the measurement of ion temperature. For the measurement of the neutral atmospheric temperature, its density was measured with the ionization gauge. The measuring system was mounted on the K-10-11 rocket, and launched from KSC at 2 p.m., September 24, 1975. Although the rocket itself reached its highest altitude of 196 km, the temperature measurement was performed between the altitude of 80 km and 140 km. The measured temperatures of ions, neutral atmosphere, and electrons are presented as the functions of altitude. It is confirmed that the temperatures of ions and neutral atmosphere are lower than that of electrons in that range of altitude. (Aoki, K.)

  7. Thermal analysis of annular fins with temperature-dependent thermal properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I. G. AKSOY

    2013-01-01

    The thermal analysis of the annular rectangular profile fins with variable thermal properties is investigated by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM). The thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient are assumed to vary with a linear and power-law function of temperature, respectively. The effects of the thermal-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter variations on the temperature distribution and fin efficiency are investigated for different heat transfer modes. Results from the HAM are compared with numerical results of the finite difference method (FDM). It can be seen that the variation of dimensionless parameters has a significant effect on the temperature distribution and fin efficiency.

  8. Energizing and depletion of neutrals by a collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchtman, A

    2008-01-01

    Neutral depletion can significantly affect the steady state of low temperature plasmas. Recent theoretical analyses predicted previously unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless regimes. In this paper we address the effect of the energy deposited in the neutral gas by a collisional plasma. The fraction of power deposited in the neutrals is shown to be independent of the amount of power. The first case we address is of a thermalized neutral gas. It is shown that a low heat conductivity of the neutral gas is followed by a high neutral temperature that results in a high neutral depletion even if the plasma pressure is small. In the second case neutrals are accelerated through charge exchange with ions leading to what we call neutral pumping, which is equivalent to ion pumping in a collisionless plasma. Neutral depletion is found in the second case for both a closed system (no net mass flow) and an open system (a finite mass flow). A thruster that employs a collisional plasma and pumped neutrals is compared with the thruster analyzed before that employs collisionless plasma.

  9. Active neutral particle diagnostics for high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobita, Kenji

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies related to active neutral particle diagnostics in the JT-60 tokamak. Detection efficiencies of a micro-channel plate (MCP), which has widely used in plasma diagnostics, were determined for ions and neutrals. Multi-step processes for a neutral beam is predicted to enhance the beam stopping cross section in a plasma. In order to confirm the predictions, shine-through for a hydrogen and for a helium beam was measured in the JT-60 ohmic plasmas. The measurements for a hydrogen beam resulted in the cross sectional enhancement in the beam stopping. The same experiment using a helium beam indicated that the cross sectional enhancement for helium was much smaller than that for hydrogen at almost same plasma parameters. Ion temperature diagnostic using active beam scattering was developed in data processing technique, in consideration of the device function of a neutral particle analyzer and in estimation of the effect of beam ion component. Fundamental experiments for detecting helium ions in a plasma were performed using two-electron transfer reaction between a helium atomic beam and helium ions, and the energy distribution and the density of the helium ions were determined. These experiments demonstrated promise of the two-electron transfer reaction as an alpha ash detection in a burning plasma. A parasitic neutral efflux accompanied by active beam injection was investigated. (J.P.N.)

  10. Effect of ambient temperature on human pain and temperature perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigo, I A; Carli, F; Bushnell, M C

    2000-03-01

    Animal studies show reduced nociceptive responses to noxious heat stimuli and increases in endogenous beta-endorphin levels in cold environments, suggesting that human pain perception may be dependent on ambient temperature. However, studies of changes in local skin temperature on human pain perception have yielded variable results. This study examines the effect of both warm and cool ambient temperature on the perception of noxious and innocuous mechanical and thermal stimuli. Ten subjects (7 men and 3 women, aged 20-23 yr) used visual analog scales to rate the stimulus intensity, pain intensity, and unpleasantness of thermal (0-50 degrees C) and mechanical (1.2-28.9 g) stimuli applied on the volar forearm with a 1-cm2 contact thermode and von Frey filaments, respectively. Mean skin temperatures were measured throughout the experiment by infrared pyrometer. Each subject was tested in ambient temperatures of 15 degrees C (cool), 25 degrees C (neutral), and 35 degrees C (warm) on separate days, after a 30-min acclimation to the environment. Studies began in the morning after an 8-h fast. Mean skin temperature was altered by ambient temperature (cool room: 30.1 degrees C; neutral room: 33.4 degrees C; warm room: 34.5 degrees C; P cool than in the neutral environment (P cool room and that noxious heat stimuli were more unpleasant in a warm environment. Environmental temperature did not alter ratings of warm (37 and 40 degrees C) or mechanical stimuli. These results indicate that, in humans, a decrease in skin temperature following exposure to cool environments reduces thermal pain. Suppression of Adelta primary afferent cold fiber activity has been shown to increase cold pain produced by skin cooling. Our current findings may represent the reverse phenomenon, i.e., a reduction in thermal nociceptive transmission by the activation of Adelta cutaneous cold fibers.

  11. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.; Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Arias, Paul G.; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Im, Hong G.; Chen, Jyh Yuan

    2016-01-01

    neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported

  12. Outdoor thermal comfort in public space in warm-humid Guayaquil, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Erik; Yahia, Moohammed Wasim; Arroyo, Ivette; Bengs, Christer

    2018-03-01

    The thermal environment outdoors affects human comfort and health. Mental and physical performance is reduced at high levels of air temperature being a problem especially in tropical climates. This paper deals with human comfort in the warm-humid city of Guayaquil, Ecuador. The main aim was to examine the influence of urban micrometeorological conditions on people's subjective thermal perception and to compare it with two thermal comfort indices: the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the standard effective temperature (SET*). The outdoor thermal comfort was assessed through micrometeorological measurements of air temperature, humidity, mean radiant temperature and wind speed together with a questionnaire survey consisting of 544 interviews conducted in five public places of the city during both the dry and rainy seasons. The neutral and preferred values as well as the upper comfort limits of PET and SET* were determined. For both indices, the neutral values and upper thermal comfort limits were lower during the rainy season, whereas the preferred values were higher during the rainy season. Regardless of season, the neutral values of PET and SET* are above the theoretical neutral value of each index. The results show that local people accept thermal conditions which are above acceptable comfort limits in temperate climates and that the subjective thermal perception varies within a wide range. It is clear, however, that the majority of the people in Guayaquil experience the outdoor thermal environment during daytime as too warm, and therefore, it is important to promote an urban design which creates shade and ventilation.

  13. Kinetic theory of neutrals in a bounded plasma slab with inhomogeneous temperature and density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.B.; Agren, O.

    1982-01-01

    The transport of neutral hydrogen atoms in a hydrogen plasma slab is considered. The influence of the inhomogeneous ion temperature profile on the neutral density and distribution is discussed as well as the influence of the neutral edge energy, charge exchange, and ionization rates. The analytical solutions for the neutral density and distribution function are obtained and compared with the numerical results. The effects due to the inhomogeneous temperature profile are discussed. The recommen-dations from the viewpoint of the effects mentioned previously for the purposes of the cold-gas mantle system have been given

  14. Low temperature thermal conductivities of glassy carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of glassy carbon in the temperature range 0.1 to 100 0 K appears to depend only on the temperature at which the material was pyrolyzed. The thermal conductivity can be related to the microscopic structure of glassy carbon. The reticulated structure is especially useful for thermal isolation at cryogenic temperatures

  15. Thermal sensations and comfort investigations in transient conditions in tropical office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlan, Nur Dalilah; Gital, Yakubu Yau

    2016-05-01

    The study was done to identify affective and sensory responses observed as a result of hysteresis effects in transient thermal conditions consisting of warm-neutral and neutral - warm performed in a quasi-experiment setting. Air-conditioned building interiors in hot-humid areas have resulted in thermal discomfort and health risks for people moving into and out of buildings. Reports have shown that the instantaneous change in air temperature can cause abrupt thermoregulation responses. Thermal sensation vote (TSV) and thermal comfort vote (TCV) assessments as a consequence of moving through spaces with distinct thermal conditions were conducted in an existing single-story office in a hot-humid microclimate, maintained at an air temperature 24 °C (± 0.5), relative humidity 51% (± 7), air velocity 0.5 m/s (± 0.5), and mean radiant temperature (MRT) 26.6 °C (± 1.2). The measured office is connected to a veranda that showed the following semi-outdoor temperatures: air temperature 35 °C (± 2.1), relative humidity 43% (± 7), air velocity 0.4 m/s (± 0.4), and MRT 36.4 °C (± 2.9). Subjective assessments from 36 college-aged participants consisting of thermal sensations, preferences and comfort votes were correlated against a steady state predicted mean vote (PMV) model. Local skin temperatures on the forehead and dorsal left hand were included to observe physiological responses due to thermal transition. TSV for veranda-office transition showed that no significant means difference with TSV office-veranda transition were found. However, TCV collected from warm-neutral (-0.24, ± 1.2) and neutral-warm (-0.72, ± 1.3) conditions revealed statistically significant mean differences (p thermal transition after travel from warm-neutral-warm conditions did not replicate the hysteresis effects of brief, slightly cool, thermal sensations found in previous laboratory experiments. These findings also indicate that PMV is an acceptable alternative to predict thermal

  16. Partial local thermal equilibrium in a low-temperature hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, J.D.; Chu, C.C.; Rash, J.P.S.

    1999-01-01

    If the degree of ionisation is sufficient, competition between de-excitation by electron collisions and radiative decay determines the smallest principal quantum number (the so-called 'thermal limit') above which partial local thermodynamic equilibrium (PLTE) holds under the particular conditions of electron density and temperature. The LTE (PLTE) criteria of Wilson (JQSRT 1962;2:477-90), Griem (Phys Rev 1963;131:1170-6; Plasma Spectroscopy. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1964), Drawin (Z Physik 1969;228: 99-119), Hey (JQSRT 1976;16:69-75), and Fujimoto and McWhirter (Phys Rev A 1990;42:6588-601) are examined as regards their applicability to neutral atoms. For these purposes, we consider for simplicity an idealised, steady-state, homogeneous and primarily optically thin plasma, with some additional comments and numerical estimates on the roles of opacity and of atom-atom collisions. Particularly for atomic states of lower principal quantum number, the first two of the above criteria should be modified quite appreciably before application to neutral radiators in plasmas of low temperature, because of the profoundly different nature of the near-threshold collisional cross-sections for atoms and ions, while the most recent criterion should be applied with caution to PLTE of atoms in cold plasmas in ionisation balance. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Two-photon LIF on the HIT-SI3 experiment: Absolute density and temperature measurements of deuterium neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Drew, E-mail: dbelliott@mix.wvu.edu; Siddiqui, Umair; Scime, Earl [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26056 (United States); Sutherland, Derek; Everson, Chris; Morgan, Kyle; Hossack, Aaron; Nelson, Brian; Jarboe, Tom [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98105 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed on the helicity injected torus (HIT-SI3) device to determine the density and temperature of the background neutral deuterium population. Measurements were taken in 2 ms long pulsed plasmas after the inductive helicity injectors were turned off. Attempts to measure neutrals during the main phase of the plasma were unsuccessful, likely due to the density of neutrals being below the detection threshold of the diagnostic. An unexpectedly low density of atomic deuterium was measured in the afterglow; roughly 100 times lower than the theoretical prediction of 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}. The neutral temperatures measured were on the order of 1 eV. Temporally and spatially resolved neutral density and temperature data are presented.

  18. Modulation Methods for Neutral-Point-Clamped Wind Power Converter Achieving Loss and Thermal Redistribution Under Low-Voltage Ride-Through

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    The three-level neutral-point (NP)-clamped (3L-NPC) converter is a promising multilevel topology in the application of megawatt wind power generation systems. However, the growing requirements by grid codes may impose high stress and even give reliability problem to this converter topology......, with the proposed modulation methods, the thermal distribution in the 3L-NPC wind power inverter undergoing LVRT becomes more equal, and the junction temperature of the most stressed devices can be also relieved. Also, the control ability of the dc-bus NP potential, which is one of the crucial considerations...

  19. Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio-Agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...of Cincinnati Project Title: Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation...fire ball, where they will not effectively interact with any viable bio -aerosol. 1.1.4. Conclusions Cryo-milling is necessary to achieve a

  20. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  1. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  2. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the measured energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The measured ion temperature obtained from the only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The actual ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. The reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the calculated ion temperature profile should be the best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines He II 4686 A and H-alpha at the relevant radial positions.

  3. Thermal conductivity at very low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locatelli, M [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Service des Basses Temperatures

    1976-06-01

    The interest of low and very low temperatures in solid physics and especially that of thermal measurements is briefly mentioned. Some notes on the thermal conductivity of dielectrics, the method and apparatus used to measure this property at very low temperatures (T<1.5K) and some recent results of fundamental and applied research are then presented.

  4. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(α) at the relevant radial positions. (author)

  5. Derivation of the radial profile of ion temperature from the 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Hiraki, N; Toi, K; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1980-07-01

    In the TRIAM-1 tokamak the energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed by scanning the neutral energy analyzer vertically. The ''measured'' ion temperature obtained from only energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by the neoclassical transport theory because of reflection (backscattering) of neutrals at the wall. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived from all observed energy spectra by using the numerical code in which a wall-reflection effect of neutrals and an impermeability of plasma are taken into account. In this numerical analysis, the reflection coefficient is adjusted so that the above calculated ion temperature profile should be best fit for the ion temperatures measured by the Doppler broadening of the visible lines HeII 4686 A and H sub(..cap alpha..) at the relevant radial positions.

  6. Local temperature in quantum thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Saez, Artur; Ferraro, Alessandro; Acin, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We consider blocks of quantum spins in a chain at thermal equilibrium, focusing on their properties from a thermodynamical perspective. In a classical system the temperature behaves as an intensive magnitude, above a certain block size, regardless of the actual value of the temperature itself. However, a deviation from this behavior is expected in quantum systems. In particular, we see that under some conditions the description of the blocks as thermal states with the same global temperature as the whole chain fails. We analyze this issue by employing the quantum fidelity as a figure of merit, singling out in detail the departure from the classical behavior. As it may be expected, we see that quantum features are more prominent at low temperatures and are affected by the presence of zero-temperature quantum phase transitions. Interestingly, we show that the blocks can be considered indeed as thermal states with a high fidelity, provided an effective local temperature is properly identified. Such a result may originate from typical properties of reduced subsystems of energy-constrained Hilbert spaces. Finally, the relation between local and global temperatures is analyzed as a function of the size of the blocks and the system parameters.

  7. The measurement of neutral beam thermal profiles on 'V'-shaped calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Lagin, L.J.; Silber, K.

    1995-01-01

    It is customary in high power neutral beam systems to use a V-shaped calorimeter to stop and measure the beam. With proper instrumentation, it is possible to determine both the neutral beam power and divergence. By utilizing a near-grazing angle of incidence, the area over which the beam is in contact with the surface is increased, thereby decreasing the power density over the case of normal incidence. Thermocouples on the back of the calorimeter, in conjunction with real time fitting algorithms, are used to deduce the divergence from the thermal profile. This measurement implicitly assumes that the measured profile corresponds to that of the incident beam. It is shown that such is not the case. Energetic particle reflection at near-grazing angle causes the thermal profile on the calorimeter to be more peaked than the incident distribution. The implications of this on the non-linear multiple regression technique of determining the divergence are discussed. With the aid of a reflection model, developed and applied to the beam from a typical TFTR ion source, it is shown that a peaked power density can be modelled. Neural networks are being studied as a means of supplanting the older regression technique of measuring divergence. Y-direction divergences have been successfully derived using a one-dimensional neural network

  8. Comparison of experimentally-inferred ion thermal diffusivities with neoclassical theory for neutral beam-heated discharges in the Doublet III tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groebner, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    The study of ion transport in neutral beam-heated discharges in tokamaks is necessary to determine if neoclassical theory can reliably be used to predict the performance of future machines. Previous studies of ion tranport have generally been difficult due to the lack of information regarding the ion temperature profile. The standard procedure used to study ion transport has been to model the T/sub i/ profile with the assumption that the ion thermal diffusivity profile chi/sub i/(r) was equal to a multiplier times chi/sub i//sup neo/(r), the ion thermal diffusivity calculated from neoclassical theory. The multiplier was varied until the calculated T/sub i/ profile agreed with the available ion temperature data, usually T/sub i/(0) or the measured neutron rate. Values of the multiplier in the range of 1 to 10 have generally been obtained with few estimates of the uncertainties in these values. Furthermore, there have been few, if any, attempts to calculate chi/sub i/ by modeling the ion temperature profiles in other ways. As a result, the issue as to whether or not the ion transport in tokamaks is in agreement with neoclassical theory has not been definitively answered

  9. DETERMINATION OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION FOR ANNULAR FINS WITH TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BY HPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Domairry Ganji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, homotopy perturbation method has been used to evaluate the temperature distribution of annular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and to determine the temperature distribution within the fin. This method is useful and practical for solving the nonlinear heat transfer equation, which is associated with variable thermal conductivity condition. The homotopy perturbation method provides an approximate analytical solution in the form of an infinite power series. The annular fin heat transfer rate with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity has been obtained as a function of thermo-geometric fin parameter and the thermal conductivity parameter describing the variation of the thermal conductivity.

  10. Numerical calculation of 'actual' radial profile of ion temperature from 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-10-01

    The energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak by vertical scanning of the neutral energy analyzer. The ''apparent'' ion temperature obtained directly from the energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived numerically from the energy spectra observed at various positions taking into account the wall-reflection effect of neutrals and the impermeability of the plasma. As a result, the ''actual'' ion temperature profile is found to agree well with that predicted by neoclassical transport theory.

  11. Numerical calculation of 'actual' radial profile of ion temperature from 'measured' energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Toi, Kazuo; Itoh, Satoshi

    1984-01-01

    The energy spectra of charge-exchanged neutrals are observed in the TRIAM-1 tokamak by vertical scanning of the neutral energy analyzer. The ''apparent'' ion temperature obtained directly from the energy spectrum observed in the peripheral region is much higher than that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. The ''actual'' ion temperature profile is derived numerically from the energy spectra observed at various positions taking into account the wall-reflection effect of neutrals and the impermeability of the plasma. As a result, the ''actual'' ion temperature profile is found to agree well with that predicted by neoclassical transport theory. (author)

  12. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE THERMAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal conductivity values, in the temperature range 300 – 1200 K, have been measured in air and at atmospheric pressure for a Kenyan kaolinite refractory with 0% - 50% grog proportions. The experimental thermal conductivity values were then compared with those calculated using the Zumbrunnen et al [1] and the ...

  13. Ceramic/Metal Composites with Positive Temperature Dependence of Thermal Conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianhui; Yu Qi; Sun Wei; Zhang Rui; Wang Ke; Li Jingfeng; Ichigozaki, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    Most materials show decreasing thermal conductivity with increasing temperature, but an opposite temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is required for some industrial applications. The present work was conducted with a motivation to develop composite materials with a positive temperature dependence of thermal conductivity. ZrO 2 / stainless steel powders (304L) composite, with 3% stearic acid, was prepared by normal sintering under the protecting of Ar after mixing by mechanical ball milling technique. With the 304L content increasing from 10% to 20%, the thermal conductivity values increased. For all samples, the thermal conductivity in the temperature range of room temperature to 700 °C decreased with temperature below 300 °C, and then began to increase. The increasing thermal conductivity of the composites (within the high temperature range was attributed to the difference of the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient between ZrO 2 ceramic and 304L stainless steel powders. Two simple models were also used to estimate the thermal conductivity of the composites, which were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  14. Temperature distribution and thermal stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thermal effects of a double-end-pumped cubic Nd:YVO4 laser crystal are investigated in this paper. A detailed analysis of temperature distribution and thermal stress in cubic crystal with circular shape pumping is discussed. It has been shown that by considering the total input powers as constant, the ...

  15. Thermal diffusivity of felsic to mafic granulites at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Labani; Förster, H.-J.; Schilling, F. R.; Förster, A.

    2006-11-01

    The thermal diffusivity of felsic and intermediate granulites (charnockites, enderbites), mafic granulites, and amphibolite-facies gneisses has been measured up to temperatures of 550 °C using a transient technique. The rock samples are from the Archean and Pan-African terranes of the Southern Indian Granulite Province. Thermal diffusivity at room temperature ( DRT) for different rock types ranges between 1.2 and 2.2 mm 2 s - 1 . For most of the rocks, the effect of radiative heat transfer is observed at temperatures above 450 °C. However, for few enderbites and mafic granulites, radiative heat transfer is negligible up to 550 °C. In the temperature range of conductive heat transfer, i.e., between 20 ° and 450 °C, thermal diffusivity decreases between 35% and 45% with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the thermal diffusivity is directly correlated with the thermal diffusivity at room temperature, i.e., the higher the thermal diffusivity at room temperature, DRT, the greater is its temperature dependence. In this temperature range i.e., between 20 and 450 °C, thermal diffusivity can be expressed as D = 0.7 mm 2 s -1 + 144 K ( DRT - 0.7 mm 2 s -1 ) / ( T - 150 K), where T is the absolute temperature in Kelvin. At higher temperatures, an additional radiative contribution is observed according to CT3, where C varies from 10 - 9 to 10 - 10 depending on intrinsic rock properties (opacity, absorption behavior, grain size, grain boundary, etc). An equation is presented that describes the temperature and pressure dependence thermal diffusivity of rocks based only on the room-temperature thermal diffusivity. Room-temperature thermal diffusivity and its temperature dependence are mainly dependent on the major mineralogy of the rock. Because granulites are important components of the middle and lower continental crust, the results of this study provide important constraints in quantifying more accurately the thermal state of the deeper continental

  16. The perceived temperature - a versatile index for the assessment of the human thermal environment. Part A: scientific basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Henning; Laschewski, Gudrun; Grätz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The Perceived Temperature (PT) is an equivalent temperature based on a complete heat budget model of the human body. It has proved its suitability for numerous applications across a wide variety of scales from micro to global and is successfully used both in daily forecasts and climatological studies. PT is designed for staying outdoors and is defined as the air temperature of a reference environment in which the thermal perception would be the same as in the actual environment. The calculation is performed for a reference subject with an internal heat production of 135 W m-2 (who is walking at 4 km h-1 on flat ground). In the reference environment, the mean radiant temperature equals the air temperature and wind velocity is reduced to a slight draught. The water vapour pressure remains unchanged. Under warm/humid conditions, however, it is implicitly related to a relative humidity of 50%. Clothing is adapted in order to achieve thermal comfort. If this is impossible, cold or heat stress will occur, respectively. The assessment of thermal perception by means of PT is based on Fanger's Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) together with additional model extensions taking account of stronger deviations from thermal neutrality. This is performed using a parameterisation based on a two-node model. In the cold, it allows the mean skin temperature to drop below the comfort value. In the heat, it assesses additionally the enthalpy of sweat-moistened skin and of wet clothes. PT has the advantages of being self-explanatory due to its deviation from air temperature and being—via PMV—directly linked to a thermo-physiologically-based scale of thermal perception that is widely used and has stood the test of time. This paper explains in detail the basic equations of the human heat budget and the coefficients of the parameterisations.

  17. Thermal analysis of EAST neutral beam injectors for long-pulse beam operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundong, HU; Yongjian, XU; Yuanlai, XIE; Yahong, XIE; Lizhen, LIANG; Caichao, JIANG; Sheng, LIU; Jianglong, WEI; Peng, SHENG; Zhimin, LIU; Ling, TAO; the NBI Team

    2018-04-01

    Two sets of neutral beam injectors (NBI-1 and NBI-2) have been mounted on the EAST tokamak since 2014. NBI-1 and NBI-2 are co-direction and counter-direction, respectively. As with in-depth physics and engineering study of EAST, the ability of long pulse beam injection should be required in the NBI system. For NBIs, the most important and difficult thing that should be overcome is heat removal capacity of heat loaded components for long-pulse beam extraction. In this article, the thermal state of the components of EAST NBI is investigated using water flow calorimetry and thermocouple temperatures. Results show that (1) operation parameters have an obvious influence on the heat deposited on the inner components of the beamline, (2) a suitable operation parameter can decrease the heat loading effectively and obtain longer beam pulse length, and (3) under the cooling water pressure of 0.25 MPa, the predicted maximum beam pulse length will be up to 260 s with 50 keV beam energy by a duty factor of 0.5. The results present that, in this regard, the EAST NBI-1 system has the ability of long-pulse beam injection.

  18. Linear thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and melting temperature of Am-MOX and Np-MOX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, D.; Belin, R.C.; Manara, D.; Staicu, D.; Richaud, J.-C.; Vigier, J.-F.; Scheinost, A.C.; Somers, J.; Martin, P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions were investigated. • Np- and Am-MOX solid solutions exhibit the same linear thermal expansion. • The thermal conductivity of Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. • The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX are 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively. - Abstract: The thermal properties of Np- and Am-MOX solid solution materials were investigated. Their linear thermal expansion, determined using high temperature X-ray diffraction from room temperature to 1973 K showed no significant difference between the Np and the Am doped MOX. The thermal conductivity of the Am-MOX is about 10% higher than that of Np-MOX. The melting temperatures of Np-MOX and Am-MOX, measured using a laser heating self crucible arrangement were 3020 ± 30 K and 3005 ± 30 K, respectively

  19. Temperature dependence of thermal pressure for NaCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandra K.; Pande, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Anjani K.

    2018-05-01

    Engineering applications of the materials can be explored upto the desired limit of accuracy with the better knowledge of its mechanical and thermal properties such as ductility, brittleness and Thermal Pressure. For the resistance to fracture (K) and plastic deformation (G) the ratio K/G is treated as an indication of ductile or brittle character of solids. In the present work we have tested the condition of ductility and brittleness with the calculated values of K/G for the NaCl. It is concluded that the nature of NaCl can be predicted upto high temperature simply with the knowledge of its elastic stiffness constant only. Thermoelastic properties of materials at high temperature is directly related to thermal pressure and volume expansion of the materials. An expression for the temperature dependence of thermal pressure is formulated using basic thermodynamic identities. It is observed that thermal pressure ΔPth calculated for NaCl by using Kushwah formulation is in good agreement with the experimental values also the thermal pressure increases with the increase in temperature.

  20. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of terbium-gallium garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inyushkin, A. V.; Taldenkov, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of paramagnetic Tb 3 Ga 5 O 12 (TbGG) terbium-gallium garnet single crystals is investigated at temperatures from 0.4 to 300 K in magnetic fields up to 3.25 T. A minimum is observed in the temperature dependence κ(T) of thermal conductivity at T min = 0.52 K. This and other singularities on the κ(T) dependence are associated with scattering of phonons from terbium ions. The thermal conductivity at T = 5.1 K strongly depends on the magnetic field direction relative to the crystallographic axes of the crystal. Experimental data are considered using the Debye theory of thermal conductivity taking into account resonance scattering of phonons from Tb 3+ ions. Analysis of the temperature and field dependences of the thermal conductivity indicates the existence of a strong spin-phonon interaction in TbGG. The low-temperature behavior of the thermal conductivity (field and angular dependences) is mainly determined by resonance scattering of phonons at the first quasi-doublet of the electron spectrum of Tb 3+ ion.

  1. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  2. Microscale solid-state thermal diodes enabling ambient temperature thermal circuits for energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Song; Cottrill, Anton L.; Kunai, Yuichiro; Toland, Aubrey R.; Liu, Pingwei; Wang, Wen-Jun; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    rectifications range from 1.18 to 1.34. We show that such devices perform reliably enough to operate in thermal diode bridges, dynamic thermal circuits capable of transforming oscillating temperature inputs into single polarity temperature differences – analogous

  3. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  4. Microscale solid-state thermal diodes enabling ambient temperature thermal circuits for energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Song

    2017-05-10

    Thermal diodes, or devices that transport thermal energy asymmetrically, analogous to electrical diodes, hold promise for thermal energy harvesting and conservation, as well as for phononics or information processing. The junction of a phase change material and phase invariant material can form a thermal diode; however, there are limited constituent materials available for a given target temperature, particularly near ambient. In this work, we demonstrate that a micro and nanoporous polystyrene foam can house a paraffin-based phase change material, fused to PMMA, to produce mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of ambient operation with Young\\'s moduli larger than 11.5 MPa and 55.2 MPa above and below the melting transition point, respectively. Moreover, the composites show significant changes in thermal conductivity above and below the melting point of the constituent paraffin and rectification that is well-described by our previous theory and the Maxwell–Eucken model. Maximum thermal rectifications range from 1.18 to 1.34. We show that such devices perform reliably enough to operate in thermal diode bridges, dynamic thermal circuits capable of transforming oscillating temperature inputs into single polarity temperature differences – analogous to an electrical diode bridge with widespread implications for transient thermal energy harvesting and conservation. Overall, our approach yields mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of engineering design from a mathematical model of phase change and thermal transport, with implications for energy harvesting.

  5. Temperature Modulated Nanomechanical Thermal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Gustavo Marcati A.; Bose-Goswami, Sanjukta; Mansano, Ronaldo D.

    2018-01-01

    The response of microcantilever deflection to complex heating profiles was used to study thermal events like glass transition and enthalpy relaxation on nanograms of the biopolymer Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The use of two heating rates enables the separation of effects on the deflection...... response that depends on previous thermal history (non-reversing signal) and effects that depends only on the heating rate variation (reversing signal). As these effects may appear superposed in the total response, temperature modulation can increase the measurement sensitivity to some thermal events when...

  6. A self-adaptive thermal switch array for rapid temperature stabilization under various thermal power inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Xiaobao; Patel, Pragnesh; Narain, Amitabh; Meng, Dennis Desheng

    2011-01-01

    A self-adaptive thermal switch array (TSA) based on actuation by low-melting-point alloy droplets is reported to stabilize the temperature of a heat-generating microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device at a predetermined range (i.e. the optimal working temperature of the device) with neither a control circuit nor electrical power consumption. When the temperature is below this range, the TSA stays off and works as a thermal insulator. Therefore, the MEMS device can quickly heat itself up to its optimal working temperature during startup. Once this temperature is reached, TSA is automatically turned on to increase the thermal conductance, working as an effective thermal spreader. As a result, the MEMS device tends to stay at its optimal working temperature without complex thermal management components and the associated parasitic power loss. A prototype TSA was fabricated and characterized to prove the concept. The stabilization temperatures under various power inputs have been studied both experimentally and theoretically. Under the increment of power input from 3.8 to 5.8 W, the temperature of the device increased only by 2.5 °C due to the stabilization effect of TSA

  7. Coordinated observations of postmidnight irregularities and thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tam; Otsuka, Yuichi; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nishioka, Michi; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Buhari, Suhaila M.; Abdullah, Mardina; Husin, Asnawi

    2017-07-01

    We investigated a postmidnight field-aligned irregularity (FAI) event observed with the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar at Kototabang (0.2°S, 100.3°E, dip latitude 10.4°S) in Indonesia on the night of 9 July 2010 using a comprehensive data set of both neutral and plasma parameters. We examined the rate of total electron content change index (ROTI) obtained from GPS receivers in Southeast Asia, airglow images detected by an all-sky imager, and thermospheric neutral winds and temperatures obtained by a Fabry-Perot interferometer at Kototabang. Altitudes of the F layer (h'F) observed by ionosondes at Kototabang, Chiang Mai, and Chumphon were also surveyed. We found that the postmidnight FAIs occurred within plasma bubbles and coincided with kilometer-scale plasma density irregularities. We also observed an enhancement of the magnetically equatorward thermospheric neutral wind at the same time as the increase of h'F at low-latitude stations, but h'F at a station near the magnetic equator remained invariant. Simultaneously, a magnetically equatorward gradient of thermospheric temperature was identified at Kototabang. The convergence of equatorward neutral winds from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres could be associated with a midnight temperature maximum occurring around the magnetic equator. Equatorward neutral winds can uplift the F layer at low latitudes and increase the growth rate of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, causing more rapid extension of plasma bubbles. The equatorward winds in both hemispheres also intensify the eastward Pedersen current, so a large polarization electric field generated in the plasma bubble might play an important role in the generation of postmidnight FAIs.

  8. Measuring Thermal Conductivity at LH2 Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) produced reference materials for materials testing. One such reference material was intended for use with a guarded hot plate apparatus designed to meet the requirements of ASTM C177-97, "Standard Test Method for Steady-State Heat Flux Measurements and Thermal Transmission Properties by Means of the Guarded-Hot-Plate Apparatus." This apparatus can be used to test materials in various gaseous environments from atmospheric pressure to a vacuum. It allows the thermal transmission properties of insulating materials to be measured from just above ambient temperature down to temperatures below liquid hydrogen. However, NIST did not generate data below 77 K temperature for the reference material in question. This paper describes a test method used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to optimize thermal conductivity measurements during the development of thermal protection systems. The test method extends the usability range of this reference material by generating data at temperatures lower than 77 K. Information provided by this test is discussed, as are the capabilities of the MSFC Hydrogen Test Facility, where advanced methods for materials testing are routinely developed and optimized in support of aerospace applications.

  9. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  10. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A theoretical investigation has been undertaken to study operating temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses in the valves of a modern diesel engine with and without air-cavity. Temperatures, heat fluxes and radial thermal stresses were measured theoretically for both cases under all four thermal loading ...

  11. Kinetic Properties of the Neutral Solar Wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Charge-exchange collisions between the solar wind protons and interstellar hydrogen produce a distinctive population of neutral hydrogen streaming radially at nearly the solar-wind speed. This tenuous population, known as the neutral solar wind (NSW) is thought to play a key role in the appearance of the Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer ribbon, a bright circular band in the sky that is the source of neutral hydrogen with energies near 1 keV. According to the leading model of the ribbon, the velocity distribution of NSW hydrogen is imparted on the pickup ions (PUIs) generated via charge exchange with the interstellar protons beyond the heliopause, and in this way controls the stability of the resulting ring distribution of PUIs against hydromagnetic wave generation. In this paper, we examine the velocity distributions of the NSW atoms in the heliosphere and the outer heliosheath regions by following the phase-space trajectories of the Boltzmann equation. It is demonstrated that these distributions are highly anisotropic, with the parallel (radial) temperature greatly exceeding the perpendicular temperature. Ions picked up near 90° from the anisotropic NSW would form a stable ring distribution capable of generating the ribbon flux. We also discuss a second population of neutrals born in charge transfer collisions with interstellar PUIs, the so-called neutralized pickup ion (NPI) component. Their high thermal velocities translate into large parallel velocity spread of the daughter ribbon PUIs, which would adversely affect plasma stability in local interstellar space.

  12. Kinetic Properties of the Neutral Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2017-03-01

    Charge-exchange collisions between the solar wind protons and interstellar hydrogen produce a distinctive population of neutral hydrogen streaming radially at nearly the solar-wind speed. This tenuous population, known as the neutral solar wind (NSW) is thought to play a key role in the appearance of the Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer ribbon, a bright circular band in the sky that is the source of neutral hydrogen with energies near 1 keV. According to the leading model of the ribbon, the velocity distribution of NSW hydrogen is imparted on the pickup ions (PUIs) generated via charge exchange with the interstellar protons beyond the heliopause, and in this way controls the stability of the resulting ring distribution of PUIs against hydromagnetic wave generation. In this paper, we examine the velocity distributions of the NSW atoms in the heliosphere and the outer heliosheath regions by following the phase-space trajectories of the Boltzmann equation. It is demonstrated that these distributions are highly anisotropic, with the parallel (radial) temperature greatly exceeding the perpendicular temperature. Ions picked up near 90° from the anisotropic NSW would form a stable ring distribution capable of generating the ribbon flux. We also discuss a second population of neutrals born in charge transfer collisions with interstellar PUIs, the so-called neutralized pickup ion (NPI) component. Their high thermal velocities translate into large parallel velocity spread of the daughter ribbon PUIs, which would adversely affect plasma stability in local interstellar space.

  13. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage.

  14. The effects of thermal motion of neutrals on the non-potential instabilities in a weakly sodium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigman, V.J.; Milic, B.S.

    1982-01-01

    The results of recent experimental measurements of the differential cross-section for elastic scattering of electrons on sodium atoms are used to evaluate the electron steady-state distribution function in a weakly ionized, uniform and non-magnetized sodium plasma placed in a d.c. electric field. The field is assumed to be of moderate intensity, so that the thermal motion of the neutrals has to be taken into account in the evaluation of the distribution function. The resulting 'modified Druyvesteinian function' is applied to study the non-potential instabilities arising from the presence of the field in this particular plasma. Threshold drifts for both very slow and slow modes are obtained and the conditions for the onset of instabilities are discussed. It is shown that the thermal motion of the neutrals affects both critical drifts and the angles of propagation. (author)

  15. Nonmonotonic Thermal Casimir Force from Geometry-Temperature Interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Alexej; Gies, Holger

    2010-01-01

    The geometry dependence of Casimir forces is significantly more pronounced in the presence of thermal fluctuations due to a generic geometry-temperature interplay. We show that the thermal force for standard sphere-plate or cylinder-plate geometries develops a nonmonotonic behavior already in the simple case of a fluctuating Dirichlet scalar. In particular, the attractive thermal force can increase for increasing distances below a critical temperature. This anomalous behavior is triggered by a reweighting of relevant fluctuations on the scale of the thermal wavelength. The essence of the phenomenon becomes transparent within the worldline picture of the Casimir effect.

  16. Non-uniform temperature gradients and thermal stresses produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thermally-induced stress distributions in a hollow steel sphere heated by a moving uniform ... models to evaluate temperatures according to the frictional heat generation, ... of these thermal effects include thermal stress, strain and deformation.

  17. Extreme temperature stability of thermally insulating graphene-mesoporous-silicon nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Rahim Boucherif, Abderrahim; Dupuy, Arthur; Fréchette, Luc G.; Arès, Richard; Ruediger, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate the thermal stability and thermal insulation of graphene-mesoporous-silicon nanocomposites (GPSNC). By comparing the morphology of GPSNC carbonized at 650 °C as-formed to that after annealing, we show that this nanocomposite remains stable at temperatures as high as 1050 °C due to the presence of a few monolayers of graphene coating on the pore walls. This does not only make this material compatible with most thermal processes but also suggests applications in harsh high temperature environments. The thermal conductivity of GPSNCs carbonized at temperatures in the 500 °C-800 °C range is determined through Raman spectroscopy measurements. They indicate that the thermal conductivity of the composite is lower than that of silicon, with a value of 13 ± 1 W mK-1 at room temperature, and not affected by the thin graphene layer, suggesting a role of the high concentration of carbon related-defects as indicated by the high intensity of the D-band compared to G-band of the Raman spectra. This morphological stability at high temperature combined with a high thermal insulation make GPSNC a promising candidate for a broad range of applications including microelectromechanical systems and thermal effect microsystems such as flow sensors or IR detectors. Finally, at 120 °C, the thermal conductivity remains equal to that at room temperature, attesting to the potential of using our nanocomposite in devices that operate at high temperatures such as microreactors for distributed chemical conversion, solid oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric devices or thermal micromotors.

  18. Hepatitis C virus epitope exposure and neutralization by antibodies is affected by time and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Ray, Stuart C

    2012-01-01

    A recent study with flaviviruses suggested that structural dynamics of the virion impact antibody neutralization via exposure of ostensibly cryptic epitopes. To determine whether this holds true for the distantly related hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose neutralizing epitopes may be obscured...... by a glycan shield, apolipoprotein interactions, and the hypervariable region on the E2 envelope protein, we assessed how time and temperature of pre-incubation altered monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of HCV. Notably, several MAbs showed increased inhibitory activity when pre-binding was performed...

  19. High-Temperature Thermal Diffusivity Measurements of Silicate Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertermann, M.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Whittington, A. G.; Spera, F. J.; Zayac, J.

    2005-12-01

    Transport of heat in geologically relevant materials is of great interest because of its key role in heat transport, magmatism and volcanic activity on Earth. To better understand the thermal properties of magmatic materials at high temperatures, we measured the thermal diffusivity of four synthetic end-member silicate glasses with the following compositions: albite (NaAlSi3O8), orthoclase (KAlSi3O8), anorthite (CaAl2Si2O8), and diopside (CaMgSi2O6). Thermal diffusivity measurements were conducted with the laser-flash technique and data were acquired from room temperature to a maximum temperature near 1100°C, depending on the glass transition temperature. The presence of sub-mm sized bubbles in one of the orthoclase samples had no discernable effect on measured diffusivities. At room temperature, the three feldspar-type glasses have thermal diffusivity (D) values of 0.58-0.61 mm2/s, whereas the diopside glass has 0.52 mm2/s. With increasing temperature, D decreases by 5-10% (relative) for all samples and becomes virtually constant at intermediate temperatures. At higher temperatures, the anorthite and diopside glasses exhibit significant drops in thermal diffusivity over a 50-100°C interval, correlating with previously published heat capacity changes near the glass transition for these compositions. For anorthite, D (in mm2/s) decreases from 0.48 at 750-860°C to 0.36 at 975-1075°C; for diopside, D changes from 0.42 at 630-750°C to 0.30 at 850-910°C, corresponding to relative drops of 24 and 29%, respectively. Albite and orthoclase glasses do not exhibit this change and also lack significant changes in heat capacity near the glass transition. Instead, D is constant at 400-800°C for albite, and for orthoclase values go through a minimum at 500-600°C before increasing slightly towards 1100°C but it never exceeds the room temperature D. Our data on thermal diffusivity correlate closely with other thermophysical properties. Thus, at least in case of simple

  20. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  1. Ground-based thermal imaging of stream surface temperatures: Technique and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Petre, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a ground-based handheld thermal imaging system for measuring water temperatures using data from eight southwestern USA streams and rivers. We found handheld thermal imagers could provide considerably more spatial information on water temperature (for our unit one image = 19,600 individual temperature measurements) than traditional methods could supply without a prohibitive amount of effort. Furthermore, they could provide measurements of stream surface temperature almost instantaneously compared with most traditional handheld thermometers (e.g., >20 s/reading). Spatial temperature analysis is important for measurement of subtle temperature differences across waterways, and identification of warm and cold groundwater inputs. Handheld thermal imaging is less expensive and equipment intensive than airborne thermal imaging methods and is useful under riparian canopies. Disadvantages of handheld thermal imagers include their current higher expense than thermometers, their susceptibility to interference when used incorrectly, and their slightly lower accuracy than traditional temperature measurement methods. Thermal imagers can only measure surface temperature, but this usually corresponds to subsurface temperatures in well-mixed streams and rivers. Using thermal imaging in select applications, such as where spatial investigations of water temperature are needed, or in conjunction with stationary temperature data loggers or handheld electronic or liquid-in-glass thermometers to characterize stream temperatures by both time and space, could provide valuable information on stream temperature dynamics. These tools will become increasingly important to fisheries biologists as costs continue to decline.

  2. Thermal operator representation of finite temperature graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Frenkel, J.; Das, Ashok; Espinosa, Olivier; Perez, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    Using the mixed space representation (t,p→) in the context of scalar field theories, we prove in a simple manner that the Feynman graphs at finite temperature are related to the corresponding zero temperature diagrams through a simple thermal operator, both in the imaginary time as well as in the real time formalisms. This result is generalized to the case when there is a nontrivial chemical potential present. Several interesting properties of the thermal operator are also discussed

  3. Use of a thermal imager for snow pit temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Weak snow of interest to avalanche forecasting often forms and changes as thin layers. Thermometers, the current field technology for measuring the temperature gradients across such layers – and for thus estimating the expected vapour flux and future type of crystal metamorphism – are difficult to use at distances shorter than 1 cm. In contrast, a thermal imager can provide thousands of simultaneous temperature measurements across small distances with better accuracy. However, a thermal imager only senses the exposed surface, complicating its methods for access and accuracy of buried temperatures. This paper presents methods for exposing buried layers on pit walls and using a thermal imager to measure temperatures on these walls, correct for lens effects with snow, adjust temperature gradients, adjust time exposed, and calculate temperature gradients over millimetre distances. We find lens error on temperature gradients to be on the order of 0.03 °C between image centre and corners. We find temperature gradient change over time to usually decrease – as expected with atmospheric equalization as a strong effect. Case studies including thermal images and visual macro photographs of crystals, collected during the 2010–2011 winter, demonstrate large temperature differences over millimetre-scale distances that are consistent with observed kinetic metamorphism. Further study is needed to use absolute temperatures independently of supporting gradient data.

  4. Improved Thermal-Insulation Systems for Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D.

    2003-01-01

    Improved thermal-insulation materials and structures and the techniques for manufacturing them are undergoing development for use in low-temperature applications. Examples of low-temperature equipment for which these thermal insulation systems could provide improved energy efficiency include storage tanks for cryogens, superconducting electric-power-transmission equipment, containers for transport of food and other perishable commodities, and cold boxes for low-temperature industrial processes. These systems could also be used to insulate piping used to transfer cryogens and other fluids, such as liquefied natural gas, refrigerants, chilled water, crude oil, or low-pressure steam. The present thermal-insulation systems are layer composites based partly on the older class of thermal-insulation systems denoted generally as multilayer insulation (MLI). A typical MLI structure includes an evacuated jacket, within which many layers of radiation shields are stacked or wrapped close together. Low-thermal-conductivity spacers are typically placed between the reflection layers to keep them from touching. MLI can work very well when a high vacuum level (less than 10(exp-4) torr) is maintained and utmost care is taken during installation, but its thermal performance deteriorates sharply as the pressure in the evacuated space rises into the soft vacuum range [pressures greater than 0.1 torr (greater than 13 Pa)]. In addition, the thermal performance of MLI is extremely sensitive to mechanical compression and edge effects and can easily decrease from one to two orders of magnitude from its ideal value even when the MLI is kept under high vacuum condition. The present thermal-insulation systems are designed to perform well under soft vacuum level, in particular the range of 1 to 10 torr. They are also designed with larger interlayer spacings to reduce vulnerability to compression (and consequent heat leak) caused by installation and use. The superiority of these systems is the

  5. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceresoli, M; Palermo, M; Ferrarese Lupi, F; Seguini, G; Perego, M; Zuccheri, G; Phadatare, S D; Antonioli, D; Gianotti, V; Sparnacci, K; Laus, M

    2015-01-01

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ∼ 16000 g mol"−"1) were grafted on SiO_2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t < 600 s) thermal treatments. The resulting brush layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO_2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO_2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO_2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO_2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition. (paper)

  6. Perception of foot temperature in young women with cold constitution: analysis of skin temperature and warm and cold sensation thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakata, Mieko; Yamada, Yoshiaki

    2007-06-01

    To examine the disease state of cold constitution, physiological measurements of the foot were conducted by investigating thermal sensations under an environmental condition of 25 degrees C-26 degrees C (neutral temperature) in 29 young women with and without cold constitution. The subjects were classified into 3 groups according to their experiences with cold constitution: cold constitution, intermediate, and normal groups. Foot skin temperature was measured by thermography. Thermal sensations were measured on the dorsum of the left foot using a thermal stimulator. Cold and warm spots on the dorsum of the right foot were ascertained. Thermal stimulation was delivered by a copper probe. No significant differences in foot skin temperature among these 3 groups were identified as measured in a laboratory under neutral temperature conditions. However, the mean warm sensation threshold was +6.3+/-1.09 degrees C (mean+/-SEM) for the cold constitution group (n=14), +3.4+/-2.10 degrees C (mean+/-SEM) for the intermediate group (n=7), and -0.25+/-1.96 degrees C (mean+/-SEM) for the normal group (n=6). The difference was significant between the cold constitution and normal groups. No significant differences among the 3 groups were found in the cold sensation threshold. This may be attributable to the distribution of thermal receptors and to chronically reduced blood flow in subcutaneous tissues, where the skin temperature receptors responsible for temperature sensation are located.

  7. Regional differences in temperature sensation and thermal comfort in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoda, Tamae; Crawshaw, Larry I; Yasuhara, Saki; Saito, Yasuyo; Kasuga, Momoko; Nagashima, Kei; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-01

    Sensations evoked by thermal stimulation (temperature-related sensations) can be divided into two categories, "temperature sensation" and "thermal comfort." Although several studies have investigated regional differences in temperature sensation, less is known about the sensitivity differences in thermal comfort for the various body regions. In the present study, we examined regional differences in temperature-related sensations with special attention to thermal comfort. Healthy male subjects sitting in an environment of mild heat or cold were locally cooled or warmed with water-perfused stimulators. Areas stimulated were the face, chest, abdomen, and thigh. Temperature sensation and thermal comfort of the stimulated areas were reported by the subjects, as was whole body thermal comfort. During mild heat exposure, facial cooling was most comfortable and facial warming was most uncomfortable. On the other hand, during mild cold exposure, neither warming nor cooling of the face had a major effect. The chest and abdomen had characteristics opposite to those of the face. Local warming of the chest and abdomen did produce a strong comfort sensation during whole body cold exposure. The thermal comfort seen in this study suggests that if given the chance, humans would preferentially cool the head in the heat, and they would maintain the warmth of the trunk areas in the cold. The qualitative differences seen in thermal comfort for the various areas cannot be explained solely by the density or properties of the peripheral thermal receptors and thus must reflect processing mechanisms in the central nervous system.

  8. Determination of the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizi, M.; Ahmed, M. B.; Jain, A.

    2017-12-01

    Safety and performance of Li-ion cells is severely affected by thermal runaway where exothermic processes within the cell cause uncontrolled temperature rise, eventually leading to catastrophic failure. Most past experimental papers on thermal runaway only report surface temperature measurement, while the core temperature of the cell remains largely unknown. This paper presents an experimentally validated method based on thermal conduction analysis to determine the core temperature of a Li-ion cell during thermal runaway using surface temperature and chemical kinetics data. Experiments conducted on a thermal test cell show that core temperature computed using this method is in good agreement with independent thermocouple-based measurements in a wide range of experimental conditions. The validated method is used to predict core temperature as a function of time for several previously reported thermal runaway tests. In each case, the predicted peak core temperature is found to be several hundreds of degrees Celsius higher than the measured surface temperature. This shows that surface temperature alone is not sufficient for thermally characterizing the cell during thermal runaway. Besides providing key insights into the fundamental nature of thermal runaway, the ability to determine the core temperature shown here may lead to practical tools for characterizing and mitigating thermal runaway.

  9. Passivation mechanism of thermal atomic layer-deposited Al2O3 films on silicon at different annealing temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Chunlan; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Peng; Dou, Yanan; Wang, Wenjing; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Tang, Yehua; Zhou, Su

    2013-03-02

    Thermal atomic layer-deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) acquires high negative fixed charge density (Qf) and sufficiently low interface trap density after annealing, which enables excellent surface passivation for crystalline silicon. Qf can be controlled by varying the annealing temperatures. In this study, the effect of the annealing temperature of thermal ALD Al2O3 films on p-type Czochralski silicon wafers was investigated. Corona charging measurements revealed that the Qf obtained at 300°C did not significantly affect passivation. The interface-trapping density markedly increased at high annealing temperature (>600°C) and degraded the surface passivation even at a high Qf. Negatively charged or neutral vacancies were found in the samples annealed at 300°C, 500°C, and 750°C using positron annihilation techniques. The Al defect density in the bulk film and the vacancy density near the SiOx/Si interface region decreased with increased temperature. Measurement results of Qf proved that the Al vacancy of the bulk film may not be related to Qf. The defect density in the SiOx region affected the chemical passivation, but other factors may dominantly influence chemical passivation at 750°C.

  10. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Fahr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016, it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  11. Neutralized solar wind ahead of the Earth's magnetopause as contribution to non-thermal exospheric hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans J.; Nass, Uwe; Dutta-Roy, Robindro; Zoennchen, Jochen H.

    2018-03-01

    In a most recent paper by Qin and Waldrop (2016), it had been found that the scale height of hydrogen in the upper exosphere of the Earth, especially during solar minimum conditions, appears to be surprisingly large. This indicates that during minimum conditions when exobasic temperatures should be small, large exospheric H-scale heights predominate. They thus seem to indicate the presence of a non-thermal hydrogen component in the upper exosphere. In the following parts of the paper we shall investigate what fraction of such expected hot hydrogen atoms could have their origin from protons of the shocked solar wind ahead of the magnetopause converted into energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) via charge-exchange processes with normal atmospheric, i.e., exospheric hydrogen atoms that in the first step evaporate from the exobase into the magnetosheath plasma region. We shall show that, dependent on the sunward location of the magnetopause, the density of these types of non-thermal hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) becomes progressively comparable with the density of exobasic hydrogen with increasing altitude. At low exobasic heights, however, their contribution is negligible. At the end of this paper, we finally study the question of whether the H-ENA population could even be understood as a self-consistency phenomenon of the H-ENA population, especially during solar activity minimum conditions, i.e., H-ENAs leaving the exosphere being replaced by H-ENAs injected into the exosphere.

  12. Thermal preference of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea in relation to thermal acclimation and optimal growth temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Schram

    Full Text Available Dover sole (Solea solea is an obligate ectotherm with a natural thermal habitat ranging from approximately 5 to 27°C. Thermal optima for growth lie in the range of 20 to 25°C. More precise information on thermal optima for growth is needed for cost-effective Dover sole aquaculture. The main objective of this study was to determine the optimal growth temperature of juvenile Dover sole (Solea solea and in addition to test the hypothesis that the final preferendum equals the optimal growth temperature. Temperature preference was measured in a circular preference chamber for Dover sole acclimated to 18, 22 and 28°C. Optimal growth temperature was measured by rearing Dover sole at 19, 22, 25 and 28°C. The optimal growth temperature resulting from this growth experiment was 22.7°C for Dover sole with a size between 30 to 50 g. The temperature preferred by juvenile Dover sole increases with acclimation temperature and exceeds the optimal temperature for growth. A final preferendum could not be detected. Although a confounding effect of behavioural fever on temperature preference could not be entirely excluded, thermal preference and thermal optima for physiological processes seem to be unrelated in Dover sole.

  13. Compton scattering at finite temperature: thermal field dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juraev, F.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Compton scattering is a classical problem of quantum electrodynamics and has been studied in its early beginnings. Perturbation theory and Feynman diagram technique enables comprehensive analysis of this problem on the basis of which famous Klein-Nishina formula is obtained [1, 2]. In this work this problem is extended to the case of finite temperature. Finite-temperature effects in Compton scattering is of practical importance for various processes in relativistic thermal plasmas in astrophysics. Recently Compton effect have been explored using closed-time path formalism with temperature corrections estimated [3]. It was found that the thermal cross section can be larger than that for zero-temperature by several orders of magnitude for the high temperature realistic in astrophysics [3]. In our work we use a main tool to account finite-temperature effects, a real-time finite-temperature quantum field theory, so-called thermofield dynamics [4, 5]. Thermofield dynamics is a canonical formalism to explore field-theoretical processes at finite temperature. It consists of two steps, doubling of Fock space and Bogolyubov transformations. Doubling leads to appearing additional degrees of freedom, called tilded operators which together with usual field operators create so-called thermal doublet. Bogolyubov transformations make field operators temperature-dependent. Using this formalism we treat Compton scattering at finite temperature via replacing in transition amplitude zero-temperature propagators by finite-temperature ones. As a result finite-temperature extension of the Klein-Nishina formula is obtained in which differential cross section is represented as a sum of zero-temperature cross section and finite-temperature correction. The obtained result could be useful in quantum electrodynamics of lasers and for relativistic thermal plasma processes in astrophysics where correct account of finite-temperature effects is important. (author)

  14. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Bentonite Foundry Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewski P.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of measuring thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bentonite foundry sand in temperature range ambient - 900­­°C. During the experiments a technical purity Cu plate was cast into the green-sand moulds. Basing on measurements of the mould temperature field during the solidification of the casting, the temperature relationships of the measured properties were evaluated. It was confirmed that water vaporization strongly influences thermal conductivity of the moulding sand in the first period of the mould heating by the poured casting.

  15. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  16. Temperature and Thermal Stress Analysis of Refractory Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyang Shi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Firstly current status of temperature and thermal stress research of refractory product at home and aboard are analyzed. Finite element model of two classical refractory products is building by using APDL language. Distribution law of temperature and thermal stress of two typical refractory products-ladles and tundish are analyzed and their structures are optimized. Stress of optimal structure is dropped obviously, and operation life is increased effectively.

  17. Preterm infant thermal care: differing thermal environments produced by air versus skin servo-control incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K A; Burr, R

    1999-06-01

    Incubator thermal environments produced by skin versus air servo-control were compared. Infant abdominal skin and incubator air temperatures were recorded from 18 infants in skin servo-control and 14 infants in air servo-control (26- to 29-week gestational age, 14 +/- 2 days postnatal age) for 24 hours. Differences in incubator and infant temperature, neutral thermal environment (NTE) maintenance, and infant and incubator circadian rhythm were examined using analysis of variance and scatterplots. Skin servo-control resulted in more variable air temperature, yet more stable infant temperature, and more time within the NTE. Circadian rhythm of both infant and incubator temperature differed by control mode and the relationship between incubator and infant temperature rhythms was a function of control mode. The differences between incubator control modes extend beyond temperature stability and maintenance of NTE. Circadian rhythm of incubator and infant temperatures is influenced by incubator control.

  18. The influence of outdoor thermal environment on young Japanese females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Ishii, Jin; Kondo, Emi; Fukagawa, Kenta; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Sakoi, Tomonori; Tsuchikawa, Tadahiro; Matsubara, Naoki; Horikoshi, Tetsumi

    2014-07-01

    The influence of short wave solar radiation appears to be strong outdoors in summer, and the influence of airflow appears to be strong outdoors in winter. The purpose of this paper was to clarify the influence of the outdoor environment on young Japanese females. This research shows the relationship between the physiological and psychological responses of humans and the enhanced conduction-corrected modified effective temperature (ETFe). Subjective experiments were conducted in an outdoor environment. Subjects were exposed to the thermal environment in a standing posture. Air temperature, humidity, air velocity, short wave solar radiation, long wave radiation, ground surface temperature, sky factor, and the green solid angle were measured. The temperatures of skin exposed to the atmosphere and in contact with the ground were measured. Thermal sensation and thermal comfort were measured by means of rating the whole-body thermal sensation (cold-hot) and the whole body thermal comfort (comfortable-uncomfortable) on a linear scale. Linear rating scales are given for the hot (100) and cold (0), and comfortable (100) and uncomfortable (0) directions only. Arbitrary values of 0 and 100 were assigned to each endpoint, the reported values read in, and the entire length converted into a numerical value with an arbitrary scale of 100 to give a linear rating scale. The ETFe considered to report a neither hot nor cold, thermally neutral sensation of 50 was 35.9 °C, with 32.3 °C and 42.9 °C, respectively, corresponding to the low and high temperature ends of the ETFe considered to report a neither comfortable nor uncomfortable comfort value of 50. The mean skin temperature considered to report a neither hot nor cold, thermally neutral sensation of 50 was 33.3 °C, with 31.0 °C and 34.3 °C, respectively, corresponding to the low and high temperature ends of the mean skin temperature considered to report a neither comfortable nor uncomfortable comfort value of 50. The

  19. Thermal aging effects of VVER-1000 weld metal under operation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Kuleshova, E.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Erak, D.Y.; Zabusov, O.O.; Maltsev, D.A.; Zhurko, D.A.; Papina, V.B.; Skundin, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The VVER-1000 thermal aging surveillance specimen sets are located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under real operation conditions. Thermal aging surveillance specimens data are the most reliable source of the information about changing of VVER-1000 RPV materials properties because of long-term (hundred thousand hours) exposure at operation temperature. A revision of database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging surveillance specimens has been done. The reassessment of transition temperature (T t ) for all tested groups of specimens has been performed. The duration of thermal exposure and phosphorus contents have been defined more precisely. The analysis of thermal aging effects has been done. The yield strength data, study of carbides evolution show absence of hardening effects due to thermal aging under 310-320 C degrees. Measurements of phosphorus content in grain boundaries segregation in different states have been performed. The correlation between intergranular fracture mode in Charpy specimens and transition temperature shift under thermal aging at temperature 310-320 C degrees has been revealed. All these data allow developing the model of thermal aging. (authors)

  20. Thermal expansion of diamond at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V

    2010-02-26

    Temperature variation of a lattice parameter of a synthetic diamond crystal (type IIa) was measured using high-energy-resolution x-ray Bragg diffraction in backscattering. A 2 order of magnitude improvement in the measurement accuracy allowed us to directly probe the linear thermal expansion coefficient at temperatures below 100 K. The lowest value measured was 2x10{-9} K-1. It was found that the coefficient deviates from the expected Debye law (T3) while no negative thermal expansion was observed. The anomalous behavior might be attributed to tunneling states due to low concentration impurities.

  1. Temperature measurement by thermal strain imaging with diagnostic power ultrasound, with potential for thermal index determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai-Dong; Zhou, Li-Xia; Wells, Peter N T; Halliwell, Michael

    2009-05-01

    Over the years, there has been a substantial increase in acoustic exposure in diagnostic ultrasound as new imaging modalities with higher intensities and frame rates have been introduced; and more electronic components have been packed into the probe head, so that there is a tendency for it to become hotter. With respect to potential thermal effects, including those which may be hazardous occurring during ultrasound scanning, there is a correspondingly growing need for in vivo techniques to guide the operator as to the actual temperature rise occurring in the examined tissues. Therefore, an in vivo temperature estimator would be of considerable practical value. The commonly-used method of tissue thermal index (TI) measurement with a hydrophone in water could underestimate the actual value of TI (in one report by as much as 2.9 times). To obtain meaningful results, it is necessary to map the temperature elevation in 2-D (or 3-D) space. We present methodology, results and validation of a 2-D spatial and temporal thermal strain ultrasound temperature estimation technique in phantoms, and its apparently novel application in tracking the evolution of heat deposition at diagnostic exposure levels. The same ultrasound probe is used for both transmission and reception. The displacement and thermal strain estimation methods are similar to those used in high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal monitoring. The use of radiofrequency signals permits the application of cross correlation as a similarity measurement for tracking feature displacement. The displacement is used to calculate the thermal strain directly related to the temperature rise. Good agreement was observed between the temperature rise and the ultrasound power and scan duration. Thermal strain up to 1.4% was observed during 4000-s scan. Based on the results obtained for the temperature range studied in this work, the technique demonstrates potential for applicability in phantom (and possibly in vivo tissue

  2. Thermal conduction down steep temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Evans, R.G.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-08-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation has been solved numerically in one spatial and two velocity dimensions in order to study thermal conduction in large temperature gradients. An initially cold plasma is heated at one end of the spatial grid producing temperature gradients with scale lengths of a few times the electron mean free path. The heat flow is an order of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory which is valid in the limit of small temperature gradients. (author)

  3. Performance Limits and Opportunities for Low Temperature Thermal Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Kishor Govind; Swaminathan, Jaichander; Warsinger, David Elan Martin; Lienhard, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional low temperature thermal desalination (LTTD) uses ocean thermal temperature gradients to drive a single stage flash distillation process to produce pure water from seawater. While the temperature difference in the ocean drives distillation and provides cooling in LTTD, external electrical energy is required to pump the water streams from the ocean and to maintain a near vacuum in the flash chamber. In this work, an LTTD process from the literature is compared against, the thermody...

  4. Simulation of global warming effect on outdoor thermal comfort conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roshan, G.R.; Ranjbar, F. [Univ. of Tehran (IR). Dept. of Physical Geography; Orosa, J.A. [Univ. of A Coruna (Spain). Dept. of Energy

    2010-07-01

    In the coming decades, global warming and increase in temperature, in different regions of the world, may change indoor and outdoor thermal comfort conditions and human health. The aim of this research was to study the effects of global warming on thermal comfort conditions in indoor ambiences in Iran. To study the increase in temperature, model for assessment of greenhouse-gas induced climate change scenario generator compound model has been used together with four scenarios and to estimate thermal comfort conditions, adaptive model of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has been used. In this study, Iran was divided into 30 zones, outdoor conditions were obtained using meteorological data of 80 climatological stations and changes in neutral comfort conditions in 2025, 2050, 2075 and 2100 were predicted. In accordance with each scenario, findings from this study showed that temperature in the 30 zones will increase by 2100 to between 3.4 C and 5.6 C. In the coming decades and in the 30 studied zones, neutral comfort temperature will increase and be higher and more intense in the central and desert zones of Iran. The low increase in this temperature will be connected to the coastal areas of the Caspian and Oman Sea in southeast Iran. This increase in temperature will be followed by a change in thermal comfort and indoor energy consumption from 8.6 % to 13.1 % in air conditioning systems. As a result, passive methods as thermal inertia are proposed as a possible solution.

  5. Thermal ratchetting in pipes subjected to intermittent thermal downshocks at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corum, J.M.; Young, H.C.; Grindell, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    The results of two thermal ratchetting tests on straight sections of pipe are presented. The pipes, each of which was machined from a well-characterized heat of type 304 stainless steel, were subjected to a series of thermal downshocks on their inner surface, followed by sustained periods under an internal pressure loading at a temperature of 1100 0 F. Testing was carried out in a special sodium test facility built for the purpose, and the outer surface strain histories were measured using high-temperature capacitive strain gages. The circumferential strain responses, which typify the inelastic behaviors, are presented. 7 references. (U.S.)

  6. High-temperature thermal conductivity of uranium chromite and uranium niobate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoseev, D.V.; Varshavskaya, I.G.; Lavrent'ev, A.V.; Oziraner, S.N.; Kuznetsova, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of determining thermal conductivity coefficient of uranium niobate and uranium chromite on heating with laser radiation is described. Determined is the coefficient of free-convective heat transfer (with provision for a conduction component) by means of a standard specimen. The thermal conductivity coefficients of uranium chromite and niobate were measured in the 1300-1700 K temperature range. The results are presented in a diagram form. It has been calculated, that the thermal conductivity coefficient for uranium niobate specimens is greater in comparison with uranium chromite specimens. The thermal conductivity coefficients of the materials mentioned depend on temperature very slightly. Thermal conductivity of the materials considerably depends on their porosity. The specimens under investigation were fabricated by the pressing method and had the following porosity: uranium chromite - 30 %, uranium niobate - 10 %. Calculation results show, that thermal conductivity of dense uranium chromite is higher than thermal conductivity of dense uranium niobate. The experimental error equals approximately 20 %, that is mainly due to the error of measuring the temperature equal to +-25 deg, with a micropyrometer

  7. Wall temperature measurements using a thermal imaging camera with temperature-dependent emissivity corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaid, Chloe; Zhang, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is presented whereby the relationship between temperature and emissivity for fused quartz has been used to correct the temperature values of a quartz impingement plate detected by an SC3000 thermal imaging camera. The methodology uses an iterative method using the initial temperature (obtained by assuming a constant emissivity) to find the emissivity values which are then put into the thermal imaging software and used to find the subsequent temperatures, which are used to find the emissivities, and so on until converged. This method is used for a quartz impingement plate that has been heated under various flame conditions, and the results are compared. Radiation losses from the plate are also calculated, and it is shown that even a slight change in temperature greatly affects the radiation loss. It is a general methodology that can be used for any wall material whose emissivity is a function of temperature

  8. The dissolution rate constant of magnetite in water at different temperatures and neutral or ammoniated chemistry conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajery, K.; Lister, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the dissolution rate constants of magnetite were measured at various water chemistry conditions and different temperatures, corresponding to several feedwater conditions of water-cooled reactors. Sintered magnetite pellets were used as the dissolving material and these were mounted in a jet-impingement apparatus in a recirculating water loop. Exposures were carried out at temperatures of 25, 55 and 140 o C and pHs of neutral and 9.2 in which many FAC (Flow Accelerated Corrosion) studies have been conducted. Average dissolution rate constants were estimated by measuring the volume of lost material with a profilometry technique. The excellent correspondent between the calculated value of dissolution rate constant of 2.20 mm/s for the synthesized magnetite and 2.05 mm/s for the single crystal of magnetite at neutral condition shows that the particle removal from the synthesized pellets is not an obstruction in this technique. Also, good agreement between the values calculated in duplicated runs at neutral condition at room temperature supports the accuracy of the method. (author)

  9. Molecular evolution and thermal adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiqiu

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we address problems in molecular evolution, thermal adaptation, and the kinetics of adaptation of bacteria and viruses to elevated environmental temperatures. We use a nearly neutral fitness model where the replication speed of an organism is proportional to the copy number of folded proteins. Our model reproduces the distribution of stabilities of natural proteins in excellent agreement with experiment. We find that species with high mutation rates tend to have less stable proteins compared to species with low mutation rate. We found that a broad distribution of protein stabilities observed in the model and in experiment is the key determinant of thermal response for viruses and bacteria. Our results explain most of the earlier experimental observations: striking asymmetry of thermal response curves, the absence of evolutionary trade-off which was expected but not found in experiments, correlation between denaturation temperature for several protein families and the Optimal Growth Temperature (OGT) of their carrier organisms, and proximity of bacterial or viral OGTs to their evolutionary temperatures. Our theory quantitatively and with high accuracy described thermal response curves for 35 bacterial species. The model also addresses the key to adaptation is in weak-link genes (WLG), which encode least thermodynamically stable essential proteins in the proteome. We observe, as in experiment, a two-stage adaptation process. The first stage is a Luria-Delbruck type of selection, whereby rare WLG alleles, whose proteins are more stable than WLG proteins of the majority of the population (either due to standing genetic variation or due to an early acquired mutation), rapidly rise to fixation. The second stage constitutes subsequent slow accumulation of mutations in an adapted population. As adaptation progresses, selection regime changes from positive to neutral: Selection coefficient of beneficial mutations scales as a negative power of number of

  10. Thermal characterization of European ant communities along thermal gradients and its implications for community resilience to temperature variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eArnan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecologists are increasingly concerned about how climate change will affect biodiversity yet have mostly addressed the issue at the species level. Here, we present a novel framework that accounts for the full range and complementarity of thermal responses present in a community; it may help reveal how biological communities will respond to climatic (i.e., thermal variability. First, we characterized the thermal niches of 147 ant species from 342 communities found along broad temperature gradients in western Europe. Within each community, species’ mean thermal breadth and the difference among species’ thermal optima (thermal complementarity were considered to define community thermal niche breadth—our proxy for community thermal resilience. The greater the range of thermal responses and their complementarity within a community, the greater the likelihood that the community could cope with novel conditions. Second, we used simulations to calculate how robust community thermal resilience was to random species extinctions. Community resilience was considered to be robust when random species extinctions largely failed to constrict initial community thermal breadth. Our results indicate that community thermal resilience was negatively and positively correlated with mean temperature and temperature seasonality, respectively. The pattern was reversed for robustness. While species richness did not directly affect community resilience to thermal variability, it did have a strong indirect effect because it determined community resilience robustness. Consequently, communities in warm, aseasonal regions are the most vulnerable to temperature variability, despite their greater number of species and resultant greater resilience robustness.

  11. Evaluation of thermal network correction program using test temperature data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, T.; Fink, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation process to determine the accuracy of a computer program for thermal network correction is discussed. The evaluation is required since factors such as inaccuracies of temperatures, insufficient number of temperature points over a specified time period, lack of one-to-one correlation between temperature sensor and nodal locations, and incomplete temperature measurements are not present in the computer-generated information. The mathematical models used in the evaluation are those that describe a physical system composed of both a conventional and a heat pipe platform. A description of the models used, the results of the evaluation of the thermal network correction, and input instructions for the thermal network correction program are presented.

  12. 3D thermography for improving temperature measurements in thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, D. W.; Simpson, R.; Parian, J. A.; Cozzani, A.; Casarosa, G.; Sablerolle, S.; Ertel, H.

    2017-09-01

    The application of thermography to thermal vacuum (TV) testing of spacecrafts is becoming a vital additional tool in the mapping of structures during thermal cycles and thermal balance (TB) testing. Many of the customers at the European Space Agency (ESA) test centre, European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), The Netherlands, now make use of a thermal camera during TB-TV campaigns. This complements the use of embedded thermocouples on the structure, providing the prospect of monitoring temperatures at high resolution and high frequency. For simple flat structures with a well-defined emissivity, it is possible to determine the surface temperatures with reasonable confidence. However, for most real spacecraft and sub-systems, the complexity of the structure's shape and its test environment creates inter-reflections from external structures. This and the additional complication of angular and spectral variations of the spacecraft surface emissivity make the interpretation of the radiation detected by a thermal camera more difficult in terms of determining a validated temperature with high confidence and well-defined uncertainty. One solution to this problem is: to map the geometry of the test specimen and thermal test environment; to model the surface temperatures and emissivity variations of the structures and materials; and to use this model to correct the apparent temperatures recorded by the thermal camera. This approach has been used by a team from NPL (National Physical Laboratory), Psi-tran, and PhotoCore, working with ESA, to develop a 3D thermography system to provide a means to validate thermal camera temperatures, based on a combination of thermal imaging photogrammetry and ray-tracing scene modeling. The system has been tested at ESTEC in ambient conditions with a dummy spacecraft structure containing a representative set of surface temperatures, shapes, and spacecraft materials, and with hot external sources and a high power lamp as a sun

  13. Working gas temperature and pressure changes for microscale thermal creep-driven flow caused by discontinuous wall temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yen-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Microscale temperature gradient-driven (thermal creep/transpiration) gas flows have attracted significant interest during the past decade. For free molecular and transitional conditions, applying temperature gradients to a flow channel's walls induces the thermal creep effect. This results in a working gas flowing through the channel from cold to hot, which is generally accompanied by a rising pressure from cold to hot in the channel. Working gas temperature and pressure distributions can vary significantly, depending on a flow channel's configuration and wall temperature distribution. Understanding working gas temperature excursions, both increases and decreases, is essential to ensure the effective use of thermal creep flows in microscale applications. In this study, the characterizations of working gas temperature variations, due to both temperature discontinuities and more gradual changes, on a variety of flow channel walls, were systematically investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. A micro/meso-scale pump, the Knudsen compressor, was chosen to illustrate the importance of controlling working gas temperature in thermal creep-driven flows. Gas pressure and temperature variations, through several Knudsen compressor stage configurations, were studied to determine the most advantageous flow phenomena for the efficient operation of Knudsen compressors.

  14. Impact of shade on outdoor thermal comfort—a seasonal field study in Tempe, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middel, Ariane; Selover, Nancy; Hagen, Björn; Chhetri, Nalini

    2016-12-01

    Shade plays an important role in designing pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces in hot desert cities. This study investigates the impact of photovoltaic canopy shade and tree shade on thermal comfort through meteorological observations and field surveys at a pedestrian mall on Arizona State University's Tempe campus. During the course of 1 year, on selected clear calm days representative of each season, we conducted hourly meteorological transects from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and surveyed 1284 people about their thermal perception, comfort, and preferences. Shade lowered thermal sensation votes by approximately 1 point on a semantic differential 9-point scale, increasing thermal comfort in all seasons except winter. Shade type (tree or solar canopy) did not significantly impact perceived comfort, suggesting that artificial and natural shades are equally efficient in hot dry climates. Globe temperature explained 51 % of the variance in thermal sensation votes and was the only statistically significant meteorological predictor. Important non-meteorological factors included adaptation, thermal comfort vote, thermal preference, gender, season, and time of day. A regression of subjective thermal sensation on physiological equivalent temperature yielded a neutral temperature of 28.6 °C. The acceptable comfort range was 19.1 °C-38.1 °C with a preferred temperature of 20.8 °C. Respondents exposed to above neutral temperature felt more comfortable if they had been in air-conditioning 5 min prior to the survey, indicating a lagged response to outdoor conditions. Our study highlights the importance of active solar access management in hot urban areas to reduce thermal stress.

  15. Thermal conductivities and conduction mechanisms of Sb-Te Alloys at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro; Kuwahara, Masashi

    2011-01-01

    Sb-Te alloys have drawn much attention due to its application in phase change memory as well as the unique properties as chalcogenide. In this work, the thermal conductivities of Sb-x mol%Te alloys (x = 14, 25, 44, 60, 70, and 90) have been measured by the hot strip method from room temperature up to temperature just below the respective melting points. For the intermetallic compound Sb 2 Te 3 (x = 60), the thermal conductivity decreases up to approximately 600 K and then increases. For other Sb-x mol%Te alloys where x > 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys decrease with increasing temperature. In contrast, for x < 60, the thermal conductivities of the alloys keep roughly constant up to approximately 600 K and then increase with increasing temperature. It is proposed that free electron dominates the heat transport below 600 K, and ambipolar diffusion also contributes to the increase in the thermal conductivity at higher temperatures. The prediction equation from temperature and chemical composition has been proposed for thermal conductivities of Sb-Te alloys.

  16. Predication of skin temperature and thermal comfort under two-way transient environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Xiong, Jing; Lian, Zhiwei

    2017-12-01

    In this study, three transient environmental conditions consisting of one high-temperature phase within two low-temperature phases were developed, thus creating a temperature rise followed by a temperature fall. Twenty-four subjects (including 12 males and 12 females) were recruited and they underwent all three test scenarios. Skin temperature on seven body parts were measured during the whole period of the experiment. Besides, thermal sensation was investigated at specific moments by questionnaires. Thermal sensation models including PMV model, Fiala model and the Chinese model were applied to predict subjects' thermal sensation with comparisons carried out among them. Results show that most predicated thermal sensation by Chinese model lies within the range of 0.5 scale of the observed sensation vote, and it agrees best with the observed thermal sensation in transient thermal environment than PMV and Fiala model. Further studies should be carried out to improve performance of Chinese model for temperature alterations between "very hot" to "hot" environment, for prediction error in the temperature-fall situation of C5 (37-32°C) was over 0.5 scale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuss, Daniel Simon

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the first investigation of thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses in the range between 6mK and 300K. Measuring the thermal conductivity provides the possibility to probe the fundamental interactions governing the heat flow in solids. At ultralow temperatures a novel contactless measuring technique was used, which is based on optical heating and paramagnetic temperature sensors that are read out by a SQUID magnetometer. Below the critical temperature T c the results can be described by resonant scattering of phonons by tunneling systems. Above T c the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity can be described successfully within a model considering not only electrons and phonons but also localized modes as scattering centres. To expand the accessible temperature range for experiments an adiabatic nuclear demagnetization refrigerator was set up. For measuring the base temperature a novel noise thermometer was developed which enables continuous measuring of the temperature in this temperature range for the first time. Therefore the magnetic Johnson noise of a massive copper cylinder is simultaneously monitored by two SQUID magnetometers. A subsequent cross-correlation suppresses the amplifier noise by more than one order of magnitude. The thermometer was characterized between 42μK and 0.8K showing no deviation from the expected linear behaviour between the power spectral density of the thermal noise and the temperature.

  18. Conceptual thermal-mechanical design of the TFTR first wall armor against neutral beam impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, J.W.H.; Flaherty, R.

    1976-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is designed to operate in a pulsed mode with relatively low duty cycles. Each pulse consists of a short plasma heat-up period, a reaction period, followed by a relatively long cooldown period. Plasma heating is accomplished by ohmic heating by a current induced change in the magnetically linked ohmic heating coils, followed by neutral beam injection for further preheat and the initiation of fusion reactions. During normal operation, the bulk of the neutral beam energy will be absorbed by the plasma, while the remainder will impinge on the vacuum vessel wall. The amount of thermal energy deposited on an unprotected wall is expected to be excessive, limiting the frequency of pulses and requiring frequent wall replacement. A faulted condition would cause penetration of an unprotected wall. As a consequence, a wall armoring (or liner) concept was developed to protect the vacuum vessel wall and to permit ease of liner replacement

  19. Seasonal differences in the subjective assessment of outdoor thermal conditions and the impact of analysis techniques on the obtained results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kántor, Noémi; Kovács, Attila; Takács, Ágnes

    2016-11-01

    Wide research attention has been paid in the last two decades to the thermal comfort conditions of different outdoor and semi-outdoor urban spaces. Field studies were conducted in a wide range of geographical regions in order to investigate the relationship between the thermal sensation of people and thermal comfort indices. Researchers found that the original threshold values of these indices did not describe precisely the actual thermal sensation patterns of subjects, and they reported neutral temperatures that vary among nations and with time of the year. For that reason, thresholds of some objective indices were rescaled and new thermal comfort categories were defined. This research investigates the outdoor thermal perception patterns of Hungarians regarding the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature ( PET) index, based on more than 5800 questionnaires. The surveys were conducted in the city of Szeged on 78 days in spring, summer, and autumn. Various, frequently applied analysis approaches (simple descriptive technique, regression analysis, and probit models) were adopted to reveal seasonal differences in the thermal assessment of people. Thermal sensitivity and neutral temperatures were found to be significantly different, especially between summer and the two transient seasons. Challenges of international comparison are also emphasized, since the results prove that neutral temperatures obtained through different analysis techniques may be considerably different. The outcomes of this study underline the importance of the development of standard measurement and analysis methodologies in order to make future studies comprehensible, hereby facilitating the broadening of the common scientific knowledge about outdoor thermal comfort.

  20. Field study of thermal comfort in non-air-conditioned buildings in a tropical island climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shilei; Pang, Bo; Qi, Yunfang; Fang, Kun

    2018-01-01

    The unique geographical location of Hainan makes its climate characteristics different from inland areas in China. The thermal comfort of Hainan also owes its uniqueness to its tropical island climate. In the past decades, there have been very few studies on thermal comfort of the residents in tropical island areas in China. A thermal environment test for different types of buildings in Hainan and a thermal comfort field investigation of 1944 subjects were conducted over a period of about two months. The results of the survey data show that a high humidity environment did not have a significant impact on human comfort. The neutral temperature for the residents in tropical island areas was 26.1 °C, and the acceptable temperature range of thermal comfort was from 23.1 °C to 29.1 °C. Residents living in tropical island areas showed higher heat resistance capacity, but lower cold tolerance than predicted. The neutral temperature for females (26.3 °C) was higher than for males (25.8 °C). Additionally, females were more sensitive to air temperature than males. The research conclusions can play a guiding role in the thermal environment design of green buildings in Hainan Province. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Charge exchange as a recombination mechanism in high-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.

    1980-03-01

    Charge exchange with neutral hydrogen is examined as a recombination mechanism for multi-charged impurity ions present in high-temperature fusion plasmas. At sufficiently low electron densities, fluxes of atomic hydrogen produced by either the injection of neutral heating beams or the background of thermal neutrals can yield an important or even dominant recombination process for such ions. Equilibrium results are given for selected impurity elements showing the altered ionization balance and radiative cooling rate produced by the presence of various neutral populations. A notable result is that the stripping of impurities to relatively non-radiative ionization states with increasing electron temperature can be postponed or entirely prevented by the application of intense neutral beam heating power. A time dependent calculation modelling the behavior of iron in recent PLT tokamak high power neutral beam heating experiments is also presented

  2. Temperature dependency of the thermal conductivity of porous heat storage media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Henok; Wuttke, Frank

    2018-04-01

    Analyzing the variation of thermal conductivity with temperature is vital in the design and assessment of the efficiency of sensible heat storage systems. In this study, the temperature variation of the thermal conductivity of a commercial cement-based porous heat storage material named - Füllbinder L is analyzed in saturated condition in the temperature range between 20 to 70°C (water based storage) with a steady state thermal conductivity and diffusivity meter. A considerable decrease in the thermal conductivity of the saturated sensible heat storage material upon increase in temperature is obtained, resulting in a significant loss of system efficiency and slower loading/un-loading rates, which when unaccounted for can lead to the under-designing of such systems. Furthermore, a new empirical prediction model for the estimation of thermal conductivity of cement-based porous sensible heat storage materials and naturally occurring crystalline rock formations as a function of temperature is proposed. The results of the model prediction are compared with the experimental results with satisfactory results.

  3. Effect of heat treatment temperature on binder thermal conductivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1975-12-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the thermal conductivities of a pitch and a polyfurfuryl alcohol binder residue was investigated. Graphites specially prepared with these two binders were used for the experiments. Measured thermal conductivities were treated in terms of a two-component system, and the binder thermal conductivities were calculated. Both binder residues showed increased thermal conductivity with increased heat treatment temperature

  4. Effects of pressure and temperature on thermal contact resistance between different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore whether pressure and temperature can affect thermal contact resistance, we have proposed a new experimental approach for measurement of the thermal contact resistance. Taking the thermal contact resistance between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites, cuprum, and aluminum as the examples, the influence of the thermal contact resistance between specimens under pressure is tested by experiment. Two groups of experiments are performed and then an analysis on influencing factors of the thermal contact resistance is presented in this paper. The experimental results reveal that the thermal contact resistance depends not only on the thermal conductivity coefficient of materials, but on the interfacial temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the thermal contact resistance between cuprum and aluminum is more sensitive to pressure and temperature than that between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites.

  5. Muon nuclear fusion and low temperature nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    1990-01-01

    Low temperature (or normal temperature) nuclear fusion is one of the phenomena causing nuclear fusion without requiring high temperature. In thermal nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is overcome with the help of thermal energy, but in the low temperature nuclear fusion, the Coulomb barrier is neutralized by the introduction of the particles having larger mass than electrons and negative charges, at this time, if two nuclei can approach to the distance of 10 -13 cm in the neutral state, the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction is expected. As the mass of the particles is heavier, the neutral region is smaller, and nuclear fusion is easy to occur. The particles to meet this purpose are the electrons within substances and muons. The research on muon nuclear fusion became suddenly active in the latter half of 1970s, the cause of which was the discovery of the fact that the formation of muons occurs resonantly rapidly in D-T and D-D systems. Muons are the unstable elementary particles having the life of 2.2 μs, and they can have positive and negative charges. In the muon catalyzed fusion, the muons with negative charge take part. The principle of the muon catalyzed fusion, its present status and future perspective, and the present status of low temperature nuclear fusion are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Improved Temperature Diagnostic for Non-Neutral Plasmas with Single-Electron Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanman, Sabrina; Evans, Lenny; Fajans, Joel; Hunter, Eric; Nelson, Cheyenne; Sierra, Carlos; Wurtele, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Plasma temperature diagnostics in a Penning-Malmberg trap are essential for reliably obtaining cold, non-neutral plasmas. We have developed a setup for detecting the initial electrons that escape from a trapped pure electron plasma as the confining electrode potential is slowly reduced. The setup minimizes external noise by using a silicon photomultiplier to capture light emitted from an MCP-amplified phosphor screen. To take advantage of this enhanced resolution, we have developed a new plasma temperature diagnostic analysis procedure which takes discrete electron arrival times as input. We have run extensive simulations comparing this new discrete algorithm to our existing exponential fitting algorithm. These simulations are used to explore the behavior of these two temperature diagnostic procedures at low N and at high electronic noise. This work was supported by the DOE DE-FG02-06ER54904, and the NSF 1500538-PHY.

  7. Thermal insulation of high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornille, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Operating conditions of HTR thermal insulation are given and heat insulators currently developed are described (fibers kept in position by metallic structures). For future applications and higher temperatures, research is directed towards solutions using ceramics or associating fibers and ceramics [fr

  8. Thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures at LASA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broggi, F.; Pedrini, D.; Rossi, L.

    1995-08-01

    Here the improvement realised to have better control of the reference junction temperature and measurements carried out on Nb 3 Sn cut out from 2 different coils (named LASA3 and LASA5), showing the difference between the longitudinal and the transverse thermal conductivity, is described. Two different methods of data analysis are presented, the DAM (derivative approximated method) and the TCI (thermal conductivity integral. The data analysis for the tungsten and the LASA5 coil has been done according to the two methods showing that the TCI method with polynomial functions is not adequate to describe the thermal conductivity. Only a polynomial fit based on the TCI method but limited at a lower order than the nominal, when the data are well distributed along the range of measurements, can describe reasonably the thermal conductivity dependence with the temperature. Finally the measurements on a rod of BSCCO 2212 high T c superconductor are presented

  9. Thermal conductivity of beryllium under low temperature high dose neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Latypov, R.N.; Suslov, D.N.; Kupriyanov, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of compact beryllium of several Russian grades such as TE-400, TE-56, TE-30, TIP and DIP differing in the production technology, grain size and impurity content has been investigated. The thermal diffusivity of beryllium was measured on the disks in the initial and irradiated conditions using the pulse method in the range from room temperature to 200degC. The thermal conductivity was calculated using the table values for the beryllium thermal capacity. The specimens and beryllium neutron source fragments were irradiation in the SM reactor at 70degC and 200degC to a neutron fluence of (0.5-11.4)·10 22 cm -2 (E>0.1 MeV) and in the BOR-60 reactor at 400degC to 16·10 22 cm -2 (E>0.1MeV), respectively. The low-temperature irradiation leads to the drop decrease of the beryllium thermal conductivity and the effect depends on the irradiation parameters. The paper analyses the effect of irradiation parameters (temperature, neutron fluence), measurement temperature and structural factors on beryllium conductivity. The experiments have revealed that the short time post-irradiation annealing at high temperature results in partial reduction of the thermal conductivity of irradiated beryllium. (author)

  10. Simulations of an ultracold, neutral plasma with equal mass for every charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robicheaux, F; Bender, B J; Phillips, M A

    2014-01-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of an ultracold, neutral plasma composed only of equal mass positive and negative charges are reported. In our simulations, the plasma is created by the fast dissociation of a neutral particle; each dissociation leads to one positive ion and one negative ion with the same mass as the positive ion. The temperature of the plasma is controlled by the relative energy of the dissociation. We studied the early time evolution of this system where the initial energy was tuned so that the plasma is formed in the strongly coupled regime. In particular, we present results on the temperature evolution and three body recombination. In the weakly coupled regime, we studied how an expanding plasma thermalizes and how the scattering between ions affects the expansion. Because the expansion causes the density to drop, the velocity distribution only evolves for a finite time with the final distribution depending on the number of particles and initial temperature of the plasma. (paper)

  11. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  12. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (42-46°C, treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  13. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  14. Experimental study on physiological responses and thermal comfort under various ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ye; Lian, Zhiwei; Liu, Weiwei; Shen, Qi

    2008-01-28

    This study mainly explored the thermal comfort from the perspective of physiology. Three physiological parameters, including skin temperature (local and mean), electrocardiograph (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG), were investigated to see how they responded to the ambient temperature and how they were related to the thermal comfort sensation. A total of four ambient temperatures (21 degrees C, 24 degrees C, 26 degrees C and 29 degrees C) were created, while the other thermal conditions including the air velocity (about 0.05+/-0.01 m/s) and the air humidity (about 60+/-5 m/s) were kept as stable as possible throughout the experiments. Twenty healthy students were tested with questionnaire investigation under those thermal environments. The statistical analysis shows that the skin temperature (local and mean), the ratio of LF(norm) to HF(norm) of ECG and the global relative power of the different EEG frequency bands will be sensitive to the ambient temperatures and the thermal sensations of the subjects. It is suggested that the three physiological parameters should be considered all together in the future study of thermal comfort.

  15. Evaluating local and overall thermal comfort in buildings using thermal manikins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, E.

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation methods of human thermal comfort that are based on whole-body heat balance with its surroundings may not be adequate for evaluations in non-uniform thermal conditions. Under these conditions, the human body's segments may experience a wide range of room physical parameters and the evaluation of the local (segmental) thermal comfort becomes necessary. In this work, subjective measurements of skin temperature were carried out to investigate the human body's local responses due to a step change in the room temperature; and the variability in the body's local temperatures under different indoor conditions and exposures as well as the physiological steady state local temperatures. Then, a multi-segmental model of human thermoregulation was developed based on these findings to predict the local skin temperatures of individuals' body segments with a good accuracy. The model predictability of skin temperature was verified for steady state and dynamic conditions using measured data at uniform neutral, cold and warm as well as different asymmetric thermal conditions. The model showed very good predictability with average absolute deviation ranged from 0.3-0.8 K. The model was then implemented onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'THERMINATOR' to adjust the segmental skin temperature set-points based on the indoor conditions. This new control for the manikin was experimentally validated for the prediction of local and overall thermal comfort using the equivalent temperature measure. THERMINATOR with the new control mode was then employed in the evaluation of localized floor-heating system variants towards maximum energy efficiency. This aimed at illustrating a design strategy using the thermal manikin to find the optimum geometry and surface area of a floor-heater for a single seated person. Furthermore, a psychological comfort model that is based on local skin temperature was adapted for the use with the model of human

  16. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywaters, Kathryn F.; Fritsen, Christian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems – in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011, 2012). Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass, and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 39.0 to 344.1 mg C L−1 day−1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production) ranged from 0 to 38.74 mg free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerols (TAG) L−1 day−1; the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio) decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment. All results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels. PMID:25763368

  17. Biomass and Neutral Lipid Production in Geothermal Microalgal Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Faye Bywaters

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, technologies have been developed that offer the possibility of using algal biomass as feedstocks to energy producing systems- in addition to oil-derived fuels (Bird et al., 2011;Bird et al., 2012. Growing native mixed microalgal consortia for biomass in association with geothermal resources has the potential to mitigate negative impacts of seasonally low temperatures on biomass production systems as well as mitigate some of the challenges associated with growing unialgal strains. We assessed community composition, growth rates, biomass and neutral lipid production of microalgal consortia obtained from geothermal hot springs in the Great Basin/Nevada area that were cultured under different thermal and light conditions. Biomass production rates ranged from 368 to 3246 mg C L-1 d-1. The neutral lipid production in these consortia with and without shifts to lower temperatures and additions of bicarbonate (both environmental parameters that have been shown to enhance neutral lipid production ranged from zero to 38.74 mg free fatty acids and triacylglycerols L-1 d-1, the upper value was approximately 6% of the biomass produced. The higher lipid values were most likely due to the presence of Achnanthidium sp. Palmitic and stearic acids were the dominant free fatty acids. The S/U ratio (the saturated to unsaturated FA ratio decreased for cultures shifted from their original temperature to 15°C. Biomass production was within the upper limits of those reported for individual strains, and production of neutral lipids was increased with secondary treatment – all results demonstrate a potential of culturing and manipulating resultant microalgal consortia for biomass-based energy production and perhaps even for biofuels.

  18. Study of elevated temperature design standard against thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Naoto; Asayama, Tai; Morishita, Masaki

    2001-01-01

    Elevated temperature components must be designed against both pressure and thermal loads. In the case of sodium circuits of fast breeder reactors, a restriction from the pressure load becomes small because of the high boiling point of sodium. Design approaches for thermal loads (displacement-controlled) are compared with those against pressure loads (load-controlled). Considering differences between those two approaches, a concept of the elevated temperature design standard that takes the nature of thermal loads fully into account is proposed. This concept is a basis of load evaluation techniques and an inelastic analysis guide, that are being developed. Finally, problems and plans to realize the above concept are discussed. (author)

  19. Fused silica thermal conductivity dispersion at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchut, P.; Decruppe, D.; Delrive, L.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous CO 2 laser is focused to locally anneal small fused silica spots. A noncontact radiometry diagnostic enables us to follow surface temperature variation that occurs from site to site. A 'steady state' dispersion of surface temperature is observed across our sample. We show that nonhomogeneous silica thermal conductivity, above 1000 K is responsible for this temperature dispersion

  20. Divertor, thermonuclear device and method of neutralizing high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Hideo.

    1995-01-01

    The thermonuclear device comprises a thermonuclear reactor for taking place fusion reactions to emit fusion plasmas, and a divertor made of a hydrogen occluding material, and the divertor is disposed at a position being in contact with the fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction. The divertor is heated by fusion plasmas after nuclear fusion reaction, and hydrogen is released from the hydrogen occluding material as a constituent material. A gas blanket is formed by the released hydrogen to cool and neutralize the supplied high temperature nuclear fusion plasmas. This prevents the high temperature plasmas from hitting against the divertor, elimination of the divertor by melting and evaporation, and solve a problem of processing a divertor activated by neutrons. In addition, it is possible to utilize hydrogen isotopes of fuels effectively and remove unnecessary helium. Inflow of impurities from out of the system can also be prevented. (N.H.)

  1. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  2. Mineralogical control on thermal damage and the presence of a thermal Kaiser effect during temperature-cycling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Daoud, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems are in part controlled by the mechanical and thermal stresses acting on them and so it is important to understand the response of volcanic rocks to thermo-mechanical loading. One such response is the well-known `Kaiser stress-memory' effect observed under cyclic mechanical loading. By contrast, the presence of an analogous `Kaiser temperature-memory effect' during cyclic thermal loading has received little attention. We have therefore explored the possibility of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect using three igneous rocks of different composition, grain size and origin; Slaufrudalur Granophyre (SGP), Nea Kameni Andesite (NKA) and Seljadalur Basalt (SB). We present results from a series of thermal stressing experiments in which acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded contemporaneously with changing temperature. Samples of each rock were subjected to both a single heating and cooling cycle to a maximum temperature of 900 °C and multiple heating/cooling cycles to peak temperatures of 350°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900 °C (all at a constant rate of 1°C/min on heating and a natural cooling rate of memory effect in SGP, but not in either NKA and SB. We further find that the vast majority of thermal crack damage is generated upon cooling in the finer grained materials (NKA and SB), but that substantial thermal crack damage is generated during heating in the coarser grained SGP. The total amount of crack damage generated due to heating or cooling is dependent on the mineral composition and, most importantly, the grain size and arrangement, as well as the maximum temperature to which the rock is exposed. Knowledge of thermal stress history and the presence of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect is potentially important in understanding magma chamber dynamics, where the cyclic nature of mechanical and thermal inflation and deflation can lead to sequential accumulation of damage, potentially leading to critical rupture.

  3. Development of temperature related thermal neutron scattering database for MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Jiang Dazhen; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei

    2013-01-01

    Based on ENDF/B-Ⅶ neutron library, the thermal neutron scattering library S(α, β) for molten salt reactor moderators was developed. The temperatures of this library were chose as the characteristic temperature of the molten salt reactor. The cross section of the thermal neutron scattering of ACE format was investigated, and this library was also validated by the benchmarks of ICSBEP. The uncertainties shown in the validation were in reasonable range when compared with the thermal neutron scattering library tmccs which included in the MCNP data library. It was proved that the thermal neutron scattering library processed in this study could be used in the molten salt reactor design. (authors)

  4. Effect of thermal phonons on the superconducting transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavens, C.R.; Talbot, E.

    1983-01-01

    There is no consensus in the literature on whether or not thermal phonons depress the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/. In this paper it is shown by accurate numerical solution of the real-frequency Eliashberg equations for the pairing self-energy phi and renormalization function Z that thermal phonons in the kernel for phi raise T/sub c/ but those in Z lower it by a larger amount so that the net effect is to depress T/sub c/. (A previous calculation which ignored the effect of thermal phonons in phi overestimated the suppression of T/sub c/ by at least a factor of 3.) It is shown how to switch off the thermal phonons in the imaginary-frequency Eliashberg equations, exactly for Z and approximately for phi. The real-frequency and approximate imaginary-frequency results for the depression of T/sub c/ by thermal phonons are in very satisfactory agreement. Thermal phonons are found to depress the transition temperature of Nb 3 Sn by only 2%. It is estimated that the suppression of T/sub c/ by thermal phonons saturates at about 50% in the limit of very strong electron-phonon coupling

  5. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and Te fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-01-01

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  6. Thermal comfort assessment in civil aircraft cabins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Liping

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft passengers are more and demanding in terms of thermal comfort. But it is not yet easy for aircraft crew to control the environment control system (ECS that satisfies the thermal comfort for most passengers due to a number of causes. This paper adopts a corrected predicted mean vote (PMV model and an adaptive model to assess the thermal comfort conditions for 31 investigated flights and draws the conclusion that there does exist an uncomfortable thermal phenomenon in civil aircraft cabins, especially in some short-haul continental flights. It is necessary to develop an easy way to predict the thermal sensation of passengers and to direct the crew to control ECS. Due to the assessment consistency of the corrected PMV model and the adaptive model, the adaptive model of thermal neutrality temperature can be used as a method to predict the cabin optimal operative temperature. Because only the mean outdoor effective temperature ET∗ of a departure city is an input variable for the adaptive model, this method can be easily understood and implemented by the crew and can satisfy 80–90% of the thermal acceptability levels of passengers.

  7. Impact of shade on outdoor thermal comfort-a seasonal field study in Tempe, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middel, Ariane; Selover, Nancy; Hagen, Björn; Chhetri, Nalini

    2016-12-01

    Shade plays an important role in designing pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces in hot desert cities. This study investigates the impact of photovoltaic canopy shade and tree shade on thermal comfort through meteorological observations and field surveys at a pedestrian mall on Arizona State University's Tempe campus. During the course of 1 year, on selected clear calm days representative of each season, we conducted hourly meteorological transects from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and surveyed 1284 people about their thermal perception, comfort, and preferences. Shade lowered thermal sensation votes by approximately 1 point on a semantic differential 9-point scale, increasing thermal comfort in all seasons except winter. Shade type (tree or solar canopy) did not significantly impact perceived comfort, suggesting that artificial and natural shades are equally efficient in hot dry climates. Globe temperature explained 51 % of the variance in thermal sensation votes and was the only statistically significant meteorological predictor. Important non-meteorological factors included adaptation, thermal comfort vote, thermal preference, gender, season, and time of day. A regression of subjective thermal sensation on physiological equivalent temperature yielded a neutral temperature of 28.6 °C. The acceptable comfort range was 19.1 °C-38.1 °C with a preferred temperature of 20.8 °C. Respondents exposed to above neutral temperature felt more comfortable if they had been in air-conditioning 5 min prior to the survey, indicating a lagged response to outdoor conditions. Our study highlights the importance of active solar access management in hot urban areas to reduce thermal stress.

  8. Reconstructing bottom water temperatures from measurements of temperature and thermal diffusivity in marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesner, F.; Lechleiter, A.; Müller, C.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous monitoring of oceanic bottom water temperatures is a complicated task, even in relatively easy-to-access basins like the North or Baltic seas. Here, a method to determine annual bottom water temperature variations from inverse modeling of instantaneous measurements of temperatures and sediment thermal properties is presented. This concept is similar to climate reconstructions over several thousand years from deep borehole data. However, in contrast, the presented method aims at reconstructing the recent temperature history of the last year from sediment thermal properties and temperatures from only a few meters depth. For solving the heat equation, a commonly used forward model is introduced and analyzed: knowing the bottom water temperature variations for the preceding years and the thermal properties of the sediments, the forward model determines the sediment temperature field. The bottom water temperature variation is modeled as an annual cosine defined by the mean temperature, the amplitude and a phase shift. As the forward model operator is non-linear but low-dimensional, common inversion schemes such as the Newton algorithm can be utilized. The algorithms are tested for artificial data with different noise levels and for two measured data sets: from the North Sea and from the Davis Strait. Both algorithms used show stable and satisfying results with reconstruction errors in the same magnitude as the initial data error. In particular, the artificial data sets are reproduced with accuracy within the bounds of the artificial noise level. Furthermore, the results for the measured North Sea data show small variances and resemble the bottom water temperature variations recorded from a nearby monitoring site with relative errors smaller than 1 % in all parameters.

  9. Thermal characteristics of high-temperature R718 heat pumps with turbo compressor thermal vapor recompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šarevski, Milan N.; Šarevski, Vasko N.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High pressure ratio, high speed, transonic R718 centrifugal compressors. • High efficient industrial evaporators/concentrators with turbo thermal vapor recompression. • Utilization of waste heat from industrial thermal and processing systems. • R718 is an ideal refrigerant for the novel high-temperature industrial heat pumps. • Application of single-stage R718 centrifugal compressors. - Abstract: Characteristics of R718 centrifugal compressors are analyzed and range of their applications in industrial high-temperature heat pumps, district heating systems and geothermal green house heating systems are estimated. Implementation of turbo compressor thermal vapor recompression in industrial evaporating/concentrating plants for waste heat utilization results in a high energy efficiency and in other technical, economical and environmental benefits. A novel concept of turbo compression R718 heat pumps is proposed and an assessment of their thermal characteristics is presented for utilization of waste heat from industrial thermal plants and systems (boilers, furnaces, various technological and metallurgical cooling processes, etc.), and for applications in district heating and geothermal green house heating systems. R718 is an ideal refrigerant for the novel high-temperature turbo compression industrial heat pumps. Direct evaporation and condensation are advantages of the proposed system which lead to higher COP, and to simplification of the plant and lower cost.

  10. Neutral beam deployment on DEMO and its influence on design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surrey, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.surrey@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); King, Damian; Lister, Jonathan; Porton, Michael; Timmis, William; Ward, David [EURATOM/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The demands on the neutral beam heating and current drive system of a DEMO device exceed those of existing fusion experiments by several orders of magnitude. By predicting possible power waveforms it is possible to analyse the technological advances necessary to achieve a system relevant to deployment on a power plant. Achieving the necessary efficiency will require simultaneous improvements in beam current density, neutralization efficiency and beam transmission. Considering the deployment on the tokamak vessel shows no major disruption to the tritium breeder blanket and no requirement to reach a high packing density of injectors. The thermal management of components subjected to low heat flux for many hours is considered and it is shown that radiation cooling can be exploited to control the temperature of such items.

  11. Human transient response under local thermal stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lijuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human body can operate physiological thermoregulation system when it is exposed to cold or hot environment. Whether it can do the same work when a local part of body is stimulated by different temperatures? The objective of this paper is to prove it. Twelve subjects are recruited to participate in this experiment. After stabilizing in a comfort environment, their palms are stimulated by a pouch of 39, 36, 33, 30, and 27°C. Subject’s skin temperature, heart rate, heat flux of skin, and thermal sensation are recorded. The results indicate that when local part is suffering from harsh temperature, the whole body is doing physiological thermoregulation. Besides, when the local part is stimulated by high temperature and its thermal sensation is warm, the thermal sensation of whole body can be neutral. What is more, human body is more sensitive to cool stimulation than to warm one. The conclusions are significant to reveal and make full use of physiological thermoregulation.

  12. Identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Weizhen; Yi, Fajun; Zhu, Yanwei; Meng, Songhe

    2016-01-01

    A modified Levenberg–Marquardt method (LMM) for the identification of temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is proposed; the experiment and structure of the specimen for identification are also designed. The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of copper C10200 and brass C28000 are identified to verify the effectiveness of the proposed identification method. The comparison between identified results and the measured data of laser flash diffusivity apparatus indicates the fine consistency and potential usage of the proposed method. (paper)

  13. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  14. Neutralization study of boron and some metallic impurities (gold, titanium, manganese, chromium) by hydrogen implantation in monocrystal silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zundel, T.

    1987-02-01

    Boron doped silicon implanted with hydrogen at low energy in the temperature range 80-140 0 C shows a large decrease of the electrically active dopant concentration up to a depth which increases with the temperature, the implantation duration and the starting material resistivity. This effect is assigned to the formation of an electrically inactive BH complex. The hydrogen incorporation process shows a weakly temperature dependent enhanced diffusion step followed by a normal diffusion phase which may be described by a thermally activated diffusion coefficient. Heating at 80 0 C produces a complete dissociation of the BH complexes in the space charge region of reverse biased Schottky diodes. Consequently the released hydrogen drifts under the electric field and the neutralization becomes more pronounced in the bulk. Hydrogen neutralizes the gold, chromium, manganese related deep levels but has no effect on titanium related defect levels. Thermal annealing at 495 0 C of hydrogenated chromium or manganese doped samples produces four majority carriers levels which disappear at 700 0 C [fr

  15. Heat experiment design to estimate temperature dependent thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovski, M

    2008-01-01

    Experimental conditions are studied to optimize transient experiments for estimating temperature dependent thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. A mathematical model of a specimen is the one-dimensional heat equation with boundary conditions of the second kind. Thermal properties are assumed to vary nonlinearly with temperature. Experimental conditions refer to the thermal loading scheme, sampling times and sensor location. A numerical model of experimental configurations is studied to elicit the optimal conditions. The numerical solution of the design problem is formulated on a regularization scheme with a stabilizer minimization without a regularization parameter. An explicit design criterion is used to reveal the optimal sensor location, heating duration and flux magnitude. Results obtained indicate that even the strongly nonlinear experimental design problem admits the aggregation of its solution and has a strictly defined optimal measurement scheme. Additional region of temperature measurements with allowable identification error is revealed.

  16. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iezzi, F; Todisco, M T

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  17. Influence of moisture content and temperature on thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of rice flours

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of four types of rice flours and one type of rice protein were determine at temperatures ranging from 4.8 to 36.8 C, bulk densities 535 to 875.8 kg/m3, and moisture contents 2.6 to 16.7 percent (w.b.), using a KD2 Thermal Properties Analyzer. It was ...

  18. Thermal conductivity of yttrium iron garnet at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Y.P.; Sing, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the low-temperature thermal conductivity of yttrium iron garnet is presented giving consideration to the fact that in a conventional conductivity experiment the magnon temperature gradient inside a magnetic insulator need not be necessarily equal to the phonon temperature gradient. Consequently the effective conductivity can be less than the algebraic sum of the phonon and magnon intrinsic conductivities, depending on the magnon-phonon thermal relaxation rate. This relaxation rate has been distinguished from the individual phonon and magnon relaxation rates and an expression is derived for it. Theoretical calculations of the effective conductivity are found to be in good agreement with experimental results. The contribution of magnons to the effective conductivity is observed to be small at all temperatures below the conductivity maximum. (author)

  19. New WC-Cu thermal barriers for fusion applications: High temperature mechanical behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejado, E.; Dias, M.; Correia, J. B.; Palacios, T.; Carvalho, P. A.; Alves, E.; Pastor, J. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The combination of tungsten carbide and copper as a thermal barrier could effectively reduce the thermal mismatch between tungsten and copper alloy, which are proposed as base armour and heat sink, respectively, in the divertor of future fusion reactors. Furthermore, since the optimum operating temperature windows for these divertor materials do not overlap, a compatible thermal barrier interlayer between them is required to guarantee a smooth thermal transition, which in addition may mitigate radiation damage. The aim of this work is to study the thermo-mechanical properties of WC-Cu cermets fabricated by hot pressing. Focus is placed on the temperature effect and composition dependence, as the volume fraction of copper varies from 25 to 50 and 75 vol%. To explore this behaviour, fracture experiments are performed within a temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C under vacuum. In addition, elastic modulus and thermal expansion coefficient are estimated from these tests. Results reveal a strong dependence of the performance on temperature and on the volume fraction of copper and, surprisingly, a slight percent of Cu (25 vol%) can effectively reduce the large difference in thermal expansion between tungsten and copper alloy, which is a critical point for in service applications. The thermal performance of these materials, together with their mechanical properties could indeed reduce the heat transfer from the PFM to the underlying element while supporting the high thermal stresses of the joint. Thus, the presence of these cermets could allow the reactor to operate above the ductile to brittle transition temperature of tungsten, without compromising the underlying materials.

  20. Automatic Thermal Control System with Temperature Difference or Derivation Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darina Matiskova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic thermal control systems seem to be non-linear systems with thermal inertias and time delay. A controller is also non-linear because its information and power signals are limited. The application of methods that are available to on-linear systems together with computer simulation and mathematical modelling creates a possibility to acquire important information about the researched system. This paper provides a new look at the heated system model and also designs the structure of the thermal system with temperature derivation feedback. The designed system was simulated by using a special software in Turbo Pascal. Time responses of this system are compared to responses of a conventional thermal system. The thermal system with temperature derivation feedback provides better transients, better quality of regulation and better dynamical properties.

  1. Thermal contraction effects in epoxy resin composites at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.; Morgan, J.T.

    1979-10-01

    Because of their electrical and thermal insulation characteristics, high strength fibreglass/epoxy composites are widely used in the construction of bubble chamber and other cryogenic equipment. Thermal contraction effects on cooling to operating temperature present problems which need to be taken into account at the design stage. This paper gives results of thermal contraction tests carried out on fibreglass/epoxy composites including the somewhat anomalous results obtained with rings and tubes. Also considered are some of the problems associated with the use of these materials at temperatures in the region of 20K. (author)

  2. Preferred temperature and thermal breadth of birds wintering in peninsular Spain: the limited effect of temperature on species distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Carrascal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The availability of environmental energy, as measured by temperature, is expected to limit the abundance and distribution of endotherms wintering at temperate latitudes. A prediction of this hypothesis is that birds should attain their highest abundances in warmer areas. However, there may be a spatial mismatch between species preferred habitats and species preferred temperatures, so some species might end-up wintering in sub-optimal thermal environments. Methods. We model the influence of minimum winter temperature on the relative abundance of 106 terrestrial bird species wintering in peninsular Spain, at 10 ×10 km2 resolution, using 95%-quantile regressions. We analyze general trends across species on the shape of the response curves, the environmental preferred temperature (at which the species abundance is maximized, the mean temperature in the area of distribution and the thermal breadth (area under the abundance-temperature curve. Results. Temperature explains a low proportion of variation in abundance. The most significant effect is on limiting the maximum potential abundance of species. Considering this upper-limit response, there is a large interspecific variability on the thermal preferences and specialization of species. Overall, there is a preponderance of positive relationships between species abundance and temperature; on average, species attain their maximum abundances in areas 1.9 °C warmer than the average temperature available in peninsular Spain. The mean temperature in the area of distribution is lower than the thermal preferences of the species. Discussion. Many species prefer the warmest areas to overwinter, which suggests that temperature imposes important restrictions to birds wintering in the Iberian Peninsula. However, one third of species overwinter in locations colder than their thermal preferences, probably reflecting the interaction between habitat and thermal requirements. There is a high inter

  3. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal ...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....

  4. Direct Photon and Neutral Mesons Measurements with the ALICE Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Matyja, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at LHC is dedicated to studies of the Quark– Gluon Plasma (QGP) state, which is going to be created in heavy-ion collisions. Both photons and neutral mesons are excellent probes for QGP formation. Photons are produced during the different stages of the expan- sion of the initial hot matter fireball. They do not interact strongly with the medium and passing through it, they carry information on their emis- sion point. The prompt photons which are formed at the early stage of the collision enable us to test perturbative QCD constraining parton distri- butions and fragmentation functions. Looking into the regime of thermal photons, one can extract the temperature of the medium. The medium- induced energy loss of particles can be investigated via the measurement of neutral meson spectra for different centrality classes as well as via neutral meson–hadron correlations. A decrease of the nuclear modification factor ( R AA ) with centrality of the collision is observed. The suppression of th...

  5. Using the Pairs of Lines Broadened by Collisions with Neutral and Charged Particles for Gas Temperature Determination of Argon Non-Thermal Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Yubero

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic method for gas temperature determination in argon non-thermal plasmas sustained at atmospheric pressure proposed recently by Spectrochimica Acta Part B 129 14 (2017—based on collisional broadening measurements of selected pairs of argon atomic lines, has been applied to other pairs of argon atomic lines, and the discrepancies found in some of these results have been analyzed. For validation purposes, the values of the gas temperature obtained using the different pairs of lines have been compared with the rotational temperatures derived from the OH ro-vibrational bands, using the Boltzmann-plot technique.

  6. Effect of moisture content and temperature on thermal behaviour of sesame seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Hassan Miraei ASHTIANI

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The specific heat, thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of two varieties (white and brown of sesame seeds were evaluated as a function of moisture content and temperature. The experiments were conducted in the temperature range of 25-70˚C and the moisture content range of 3.86-19.83% (dry basis for white and 3.07-18.99% (dry basis for brown varieties. The specific heat of white and brown sesame seeds ranged 1062-3058 and 906-2958 J/(kg·˚C, respectively. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity values also increased with increasing either moisture content or temperature. Thermal diffusivity varied between 4.66×10-8 and 8.59×10-8 m2/s for white and 4.36×10-8-8.08×10-8 m2/s for brown varieties. Thermal conductivity ranged 0.031-0.149 and 0.023-0.135 W/(m·˚C for white and brown varieties, respectively. Results showed that the moisture content and temperature had significant effects (p≤0.01 on the studied properties.

  7. Sheet Fluorescence and Annular Analysis of Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, J.; Gao, H.; Killian, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    Annular analysis of fluorescence imaging measurements on Ultracold Neutral Plasmas (UNPs) is demonstrated. Spatially-resolved fluorescence imaging of the strontium ions produces a spectrum that is Doppler-broadened due to the thermal ion velocity and shifted due to the ion expansion velocity. The fluorescence excitation beam is spatially narrowed into a sheet, allowing for localized analysis of ion temperatures within a volume of the plasma with small density variation. Annular analysis of fluorescence images permits an enhanced signal-to-noise ratio compared to previous fluorescence measurements done in strontium UNPs. Using this technique and analysis, plasma ion temperatures are measured and shown to display characteristics of plasmas with strong coupling such as disorder induced heating and kinetic energy oscillations.

  8. Low temperature thermal annealing in fast neutron-irradiated potassium permanganate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, C W; Lecington, W C [New Hampshire Univ., Durham (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-01-01

    The effect of thermal annealing on the retention of recoil /sup 54/Mn as permanganate in crystalline KMnO/sub 4/ irradiated with fast neutrons at liquid nitrogen temperature has been studied. The retention after 4 hrs of annealing increases from about 8% at -196/sup 0/ to a maximum of 61% at 180/sup 0/, then decreases at higher temperatures. A single activation energy (approximately 0.01 eV) applies to the thermal annealing process between -196/sup 0/ and -40/sup 0/. Extrapolation of the data suggests that below -229/sup 0/ no thermal annealing would occur.

  9. The elevated temperature and thermal shock fracture toughnesses of nuclear pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Hideo; Nakazawa, Hajime; Nara, Atsushi.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal shock experiments were conducted on nuclear pressure vessel steel A533 Grade B Class 1. Elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests were carried out within the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment and the relation between stretched zone width, SZW and J-integral was clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value. J sub(tsc) was evaluated from a critical value of stretched zone width, SZW sub(tsc) at the initiation of thermal shock fracture by using the relation between SZW and J. The J sub(tsc) value was compared with elastic-plastic fracture toughness values, J sub( ic), and the difference between the J sub(tsc) and J sub( ic) values was discussed. The results obtained are summarized as follows; (1) The relation between SZW and J before the initiation of stable crack growth in fracture toughness test at a high temperature can be expressed by the following equation regardless of test temperature, SZW = 95(J/E), where E is Young's modulus. (2) Elevated temperature fracture toughness values ranging from room temperature to 400 0 C are nearly constant regardless of test temperature. It is confirmed that upper shelf fracture toughness exists. (3) Thermal shock fracture toughness is smaller than elevated temperature fracture toughness within the same high temperature range of thermal shock experiment. (author)

  10. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Cong Gan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  11. Thermal geometry from CFT at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Wen-Cong, E-mail: ganwencong@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Shu, Fu-Wen, E-mail: shufuwen@ncu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wu, Meng-He, E-mail: menghewu.physik@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Center for Relativistic Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-09-10

    We present how the thermal geometry emerges from CFT at finite temperature by using the truncated entanglement renormalization network, the cMERA. For the case of 2d CFT, the reduced geometry is the BTZ black hole or the thermal AdS as expectation. In order to determine which spacetimes prefer to form, we propose a cMERA description of the Hawking–Page phase transition. Our proposal is in agreement with the picture of the recent proposed surface/state correspondence.

  12. Simultaneous reconstruction of thermal degradation properties for anisotropic scattering fibrous insulation after high temperature thermal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Shuyuan; Zhang, Wenjiao; He, Xiaodong; Li, Jianjun; Yao, Yongtao; Lin, Xiu

    2015-01-01

    To probe thermal degradation behavior of fibrous insulation for long-term service, an inverse analysis model was developed to simultaneously reconstruct thermal degradation properties of fibers after thermal exposures from the experimental thermal response data, by using the measured infrared spectral transmittance and X-ray phase analysis data as direct inputs. To take into account the possible influence of fibers degradation after thermal exposure on the conduction heat transfer, we introduced a new parameter in the thermal conductivity model. The effect of microstructures on the thermal degradation parameters was evaluated. It was found that after high temperature thermal exposure the decay rate of the radiation intensity passing through the material was weakened, and the probability of being scattered decreased during the photons traveling in the medium. The fibrous medium scattered more radiation into the forward directions. The shortened heat transfer path due to possible mechanical degradation, along with the enhancement of mean free path of phonon scattering as devitrification after severe heat treatment, made the coupled solid/gas thermal conductivities increase with the rise of heat treatment temperature. - Highlights: • A new model is developed to probe conductive and radiative properties degradation of fibers. • To characterize mechanical degradation, a new parameter is introduced in the model. • Thermal degradation properties are reconstructed from experiments by L–M algorithm. • The effect of microstructures on the thermal degradation parameters is evaluated. • The analysis provides a powerful tool to quantify thermal degradation of fiber medium

  13. Thermal Skin Damage During Reirradiation and Hyperthermia Is Time-Temperature Dependent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, Akke, E-mail: akke.bakker@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kolff, M. Willemijn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Holman, Rebecca [Clinical Research Unit, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Caspar M. van; Korshuize-van Straten, Linda; Kroon-Oldenhof, Rianne de; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Crezee, Hans [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center (AMC), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship of thermal skin damage (TSD) to time–temperature isoeffect levels for patients with breast cancer recurrence treated with reirradiation plus hyperthermia (reRT + HT), and to investigate whether the treatment history of previous treatments (scar tissue) is a risk factor for TSD. Methods and Materials: In this observational study, temperature characteristics of hyperthermia sessions were analyzed in 262 patients with recurrent breast cancer treated in the AMC between 2010 and 2014 with reirradiation and weekly hyperthermia for 1 hour. Skin temperature was measured using a median of 42 (range, 29-82) measurement points per hyperthermia session. Results: Sixty-eight patients (26%) developed 79 sites of TSD, after the first (n=26), second (n=17), third (n=27), and fourth (n=9) hyperthermia session. Seventy percent of TSD occurred on or near scar tissue. Scar tissue reached higher temperatures than other skin tissue (0.4°C, P<.001). A total of 102 measurement points corresponded to actual TSD sites in 35 of 79 sessions in which TSD developed. Thermal skin damage sites had much higher maximum temperatures than non-TSD sites (2.8°C, P<.001). Generalized linear mixed models showed that the probability of TSD is related to temperature and thermal dose values (P<.001) and that scar tissue is more at risk (odds ratio 0.4, P<.001). Limiting the maximum temperature of a measurement point to 43.7°C would mean that the probability of observing TSD was at most 5%. Conclusion: Thermal skin damage during reRT + HT for recurrent breast cancer was related to higher local temperatures and time–temperature isoeffect levels. Scar tissue reached higher temperatures than other skin tissue, and TSD occurred at lower temperatures and thermal dose values in scar tissue compared with other skin tissue. Indeed, TSD developed often on and around scar tissue from previous surgical procedures.

  14. Glass transition temperatures of liquid prepolymers obtained by thermal penetrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, J. E., Jr.; Ashcraft, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Thermal penetrometry is experimental technique for detecting temperature at which frozen prepolymer becomes soft enough to be pierced by weighted penetrometer needle; temperature at which this occurs is called penetration temperature. Apparatus used to obtain penetration temperatures can be set up largely from standard parts.

  15. Solar Thermal | Climate Neutral Research Campuses | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    building can still be designed and constructed to be solar ready with roof exposures and slopes that accept Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Solar thermal applications can be simple, cost effective, and diverse for research campuses. The following links go to sections that describe when and where solar thermal

  16. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  17. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid–solid phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruiting; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jianjian; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce a general strategy to achieve large contrasts in electrical and thermal conductivities using first-order phase transitions in percolated composite materials. Internal stress generated during a phase transition modulates the electrical and thermal contact resistances, leading to large contrasts in the electrical and thermal conductivities at the phase transition temperature. With graphite/hexadecane suspensions, the electrical conductivity changes 2 orders of magnitude and the thermal conductivity varies up to 3.2 times near 18 °C. The generality of the approach is also demonstrated in other materials such as graphite/water and carbon nanotube/hexadecane suspensions. PMID:21505445

  18. Reversible temperature regulation of electrical and thermal conductivity using liquid-solid phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruiting; Gao, Jinwei; Wang, Jianjian; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Reversible temperature tuning of electrical and thermal conductivities of materials is of interest for many applications, including seasonal regulation of building temperature, thermal storage and sensors. Here we introduce a general strategy to achieve large contrasts in electrical and thermal conductivities using first-order phase transitions in percolated composite materials. Internal stress generated during a phase transition modulates the electrical and thermal contact resistances, leading to large contrasts in the electrical and thermal conductivities at the phase transition temperature. With graphite/hexadecane suspensions, the electrical conductivity changes 2 orders of magnitude and the thermal conductivity varies up to 3.2 times near 18 °C. The generality of the approach is also demonstrated in other materials such as graphite/water and carbon nanotube/hexadecane suspensions.

  19. Relationship between thermal expansion coefficient and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, H.; Chen, H.-S.; Inoue, A.

    2008-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients of 13 metallic glasses were measured using a thermo-mechanical analyser. A unique correlation was found between the linear thermal expansion coefficient and the glass transition temperature-their product is nearly constant ∼8.24 x 10 -3 . If one assumes the Debye expression for thermal activation, the total linear thermal expansion up to glass transition temperature (T g ) is reduced to 6 x 10 -3 , nearly 25% of that at the fusion of pure metals

  20. Optimal bus temperature for thermal comfort during a cool day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velt, K B; Daanen, H A M

    2017-07-01

    A challenge for electric buses is to minimize heating and cooling power to maximally extend the driving range, but still provide sufficient thermal comfort for the driver and passengers. Therefore, we investigated the thermal sensation (TS) and thermal comfort (TC) of passengers in buses during a cool day (temperature 13.4 ± 0.5 °C, relative humidity (RH) 60 ± 5.8%) typical for the Dutch temperate maritime climate. 28 Males and 72 females rated TS and TC and gave information on age, stature, body weight and worn garments. The temperature in the bus of 22.5 ± 1.1 °C and RH of 59.9 ± 5.8% corresponded to a slightly warm feeling (TS = 0.85 ± 1.06) and TC of 0.39 ± 0.65. TS related significantly to bus temperature, clothing insulation and age. Linear regression based on these parameters showed that the temperature in the bus corresponding to TC = 0 and TS = 0 would have been 20.9 ± 0.6 °C. In conclusion, a 1.6 °C lower bus temperature during the investigated cool day probably would have led to less thermal discomfort and energy savings of electrical busses. The methodology to relate climatic measurements to subjective assessments is currently employed in a wider climatic range and may prove to be useful to find a better balance between thermal comfort and energy savings of the bus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-temperature thermal expansion of metastable intermetallic Fe-Cr phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunoff, A.; Levin, A.A.; Meyer, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) of metastable disordered intermetallic Fe-Cr phases formed in thin Fe-Cr alloy films prepared by an extremely non-equilibrium method of the pulsed laser deposition are studied. The lattice parameters of the alloys calculated from the low-temperature wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD) patterns show linear temperature dependencies in the temperature range 143-293 K and a deviation from the linearity at lower temperatures. The linear thermal expansion coefficients determined from the slopes of the linear portions of the temperature-lattice parameter dependencies differ significantly from phase to phase and from the values expected for the body-centered cubic (b.c.c.) Fe 1-x Cr x solid solutions. Strain-crystallite size analysis of the samples is performed. Predictions about the Debye temperature and the mechanical properties of the alloys are made.

  2. Suppressing gravitino thermal production with a temperature-dependent messenger coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badziak, Marcin; Dalianis, Ioannis; Lalak, Zygmunt

    2016-01-01

    We show that the constraints on GMSB theories from the gravitino cosmology can be significantly relaxed if the messenger-spurion coupling is temperature dependent. We demonstrate this novel mechanism in a scenario in which this coupling depends on the VEV of an extra singlet field S that interacts with the thermalized plasma which can result in a significantly suppressed gravitino production rate. In such a scenario the relic gravitino abundance is determined by the thermal dynamics of the S field and it is easy to fit the observed dark matter abundance evading the stringent constraints on the reheating temperature, thus making gravitino dark matter consistent with thermal leptogenesis.

  3. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: spatial characterization of thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Menezes de Souza, Zigomar

    2018-05-01

    The use of enhanced technologies of temperature control can improve the thermal conditions in environments of livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the thermal environment variables in a pig nursery with a heating system with two temperature control technologies based on the geostatistical analysis. The following systems were evaluated: overhead electrical resistance with Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) controller and overhead electrical resistance with a thermostat. We evaluated the climatic variables: dry bulb temperature (Tbs), air relative humidity (RH), temperature and humidity index (THI), and enthalpy in the winter, at 7:00, 12:00, and 18:00 h. The spatial distribution of these variables was mapped by kriging. The results showed that the resistance heating system with PID controllers improved the thermal comfort conditions in the pig nursery in the coldest hours, maintaining the spatial distribution of the air temperature more homogeneous in the pen. During the hottest weather, neither system provided comfort.

  4. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: spatial characterization of thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Menezes de Souza, Zigomar

    2017-11-01

    The use of enhanced technologies of temperature control can improve the thermal conditions in environments of livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the thermal environment variables in a pig nursery with a heating system with two temperature control technologies based on the geostatistical analysis. The following systems were evaluated: overhead electrical resistance with Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) controller and overhead electrical resistance with a thermostat. We evaluated the climatic variables: dry bulb temperature (Tbs), air relative humidity (RH), temperature and humidity index (THI), and enthalpy in the winter, at 7:00, 12:00, and 18:00 h. The spatial distribution of these variables was mapped by kriging. The results showed that the resistance heating system with PID controllers improved the thermal comfort conditions in the pig nursery in the coldest hours, maintaining the spatial distribution of the air temperature more homogeneous in the pen. During the hottest weather, neither system provided comfort.

  5. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: spatial characterization of thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Menezes de Souza, Zigomar

    2017-11-28

    The use of enhanced technologies of temperature control can improve the thermal conditions in environments of livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the thermal environment variables in a pig nursery with a heating system with two temperature control technologies based on the geostatistical analysis. The following systems were evaluated: overhead electrical resistance with Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) controller and overhead electrical resistance with a thermostat. We evaluated the climatic variables: dry bulb temperature (Tbs), air relative humidity (RH), temperature and humidity index (THI), and enthalpy in the winter, at 7:00, 12:00, and 18:00 h. The spatial distribution of these variables was mapped by kriging. The results showed that the resistance heating system with PID controllers improved the thermal comfort conditions in the pig nursery in the coldest hours, maintaining the spatial distribution of the air temperature more homogeneous in the pen. During the hottest weather, neither system provided comfort.

  6. Thermal analysis of high temperature phase transformations of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gryc

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The series of thermal analysis measurements of high temperature phase transformations of real grain oriented electrical steel grade under conditions of two analytical devices (Netzsch STA 449 F3 Jupiter; Setaram SETSYS 18TM were carried out. Two thermo analytical methods were used (DTA and Direct thermal analysis. The different weight of samples was used (200 mg, 23 g. The stability/reproducibility of results obtained by used methodologies was verified. The liquidus and solidus temperatures for close to equilibrium conditions and during cooling (20 °C/min; 80 °C/min were determined. It has been shown that the higher cooling rate lead to lower temperatures for start and end of solidification process of studied steel grade.

  7. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (radiofrequency helicon discharge using spectroscopic techniques. The atomic and molecular species were not found to be in thermal equilibrium with the atomic temperature being mostly larger then the molecular temperature. In low power operation (measurements near a graphite target demonstrated localised cooling near the sample surface. The temporal evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1 ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  8. Thermal stability of the tokamak plasma edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The general linear, fluid, thermal instability theory for the plasma edge has been extended. An analysis of a two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma edge has identified the importance of many previously unappreciated phenomena associated with parallel and gyroviscous forces in the presence of large radial gradients, with large radial or parallel flows, with the temperature dependence of transport coefficients, and with the coupling of temperature, flow and density perturbations. The radiative condensation effect is generalized to include a further destabilizing condensation effect associated with radial heat conduction. Representative plasma edge neutral and impurity densities are found to be capable of driving thermal instabilities in the edge transport barrier and radiative mantle, respectively. (author)

  9. Thermal buffering performance of composite phase change materials applied in low-temperature protective garments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Jiao, Mingli; Yu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xueying; Liu, Rangtong; Cao, Jian

    2017-07-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is increasingly being applied in the manufacturing of functional thermo-regulated textiles and garments. This paper investigated the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCMs which are suitable for the application in functional low-temperature protective garments. First, according to the criteria selecting PCM for functional textiles/garments, three kinds of pure PCM were selected as samples, which were n-hexadecane, n-octadecane and n-eicosane. To get the adjustable phase change temperature range and higher phase change enthalpy, three kinds of composite PCM were prepared using the above pure PCM. To evaluate the thermal buffering performance of different composite PCM samples, the simulated low-temperature experiments were performed in the climate chamber, and the skin temperature variation curves in three different low temperature conditions were obtained. Finally composite PCM samples’ thermal buffering time, thermal buffering capacity and thermal buffering efficiency were calculated. Results show that the comprehensive thermal buffering performance of n-octadecane and n-eicosane composite PCM is the best.

  10. Thermal conductivity in high critical temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    A measuring procedure to obtain the electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power of samples of low conductivity has been developed. The setup was designed to allow the removal of the sample in clean fashion, so that further heat treatments could be performed, and therefore no adhesives were used in the mounting of the thermocouples or heat sinks, etc. The heat equation has been analyzed with time-dependent boundary conditions, with the purpose of developing a dynamic measuring method which avoids the long delays involved in reaching thermal equilibrium above 30K. Based on this analysis, the developed measuring method allows a precise and reliable measurements, in a continuous fashion, for temperatures above 25K. The same setup is used in a stationary mode at low temperatures, so the sample needs to be mounted only once. κ(T) has been measured in two ceramic samples of La 2 CuO 4 : the first semiconducting, the other superconducting (SC) as a consequence of an oxygen annealing. Both exhibit a strong thermal resistivity due to defects, though lower in the SC, where two maxima are observed and are attributed to an AF ordering: T N ' ≅ 40K and T N '' ≅ 240K. The low temperature dependence is T 1 .6 and T 2 .3 respectively. It was interpreted that the former sample presents a greater dispersion due to localized excitations, characteristic of amorphouus materials, 'tunneling two-level systems' (TS). A third syntherized sample of CuO exhibits a typical behaviour of an insulator, with T 2 .6 at low temperatures, a maximum at 40K and a decrease in T -1 at high temperatures. κ(T) in a SC sample of La 1 .85Sr 1 .15CuO 4 with T c =35.5K has also been measured, observing a small increase below T c because of the diminishing of the phonon dispersion due to the condensating electrons. κ(T) is lower than in the previous samples and thus a greater number of defects was inferred. At low temperatures, its dependence is T 1 .4 in agreement with the

  11. Enhancing Low-Grade Thermal Energy Recovery in a Thermally Regenerative Ammonia Battery Using Elevated Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2015-02-13

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. A thermally regenerative ammonia battery (TRAB) is a new approach for converting low-grade thermal energy into electricity by using an ammonia electrolyte and copper electrodes. TRAB operation at 72°C produced a power density of 236±8 Wm-2, with a linear decrease in power to 95±5 Wm-2 at 23°C. The improved power at higher temperatures was due to reduced electrode overpotentials and more favorable thermodynamics for the anode reaction (copper oxidation). The energy density varied with temperature and discharge rates, with a maximum of 650 Whm-3 at a discharge energy efficiency of 54% and a temperature of 37°C. The energy efficiency calculated with chemical process simulation software indicated a Carnot-based efficiency of up to 13% and an overall thermal energy recovery of 0.5%. It should be possible to substantially improve these energy recoveries through optimization of electrolyte concentrations and by using improved ion-selective membranes and energy recovery systems such as heat exchangers.

  12. Thermal insulation of the high-temperature helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamov, A.G.; Grebennik, V.N.

    1979-01-01

    Unlike the well-known thermal insulation methods, development of high-temperature helium reactors (HTGR) raises quite new problems. To understand these problems, it is necessary to consider behaviour of thermal insulation inside the helium circuit of HTGR and requirements imposed on it. Substantiation of these requirements is given in the presented paper

  13. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  14. Layout-Driven Post-Placement Techniques for Temperature Reduction and Thermal Gradient Minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Calimera, Andrea; Macii, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    With the continuing scaling of CMOS technology, on-chip temperature and thermal-induced variations have become a major design concern. To effectively limit the high temperature in a chip equipped with a cost-effective cooling system, thermal specific approaches, besides low power techniques, are ...

  15. Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairi, Ahmad; Hung, Shih-Chang; Paramesh, Jeyanandh; Fedder, Gary; Rabin, Yoed

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

  16. Thermal expansion studies on Inconel-600[reg] by high temperature X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, S.; Sivasubramanian, K.; Divakar, R.; Panneerselvam, G.; Banerjee, A.; Mohandas, E.; Antony, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    The lattice thermal expansion characteristics of Inconel-600[reg] have been studied by high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD) technique in the temperature range 298-1200 K. Altogether four experimental runs were conducted on thin foils of about 75-100 μm thickness. The diffraction profiles have been accurately calibrated to offset the shift in 2θ values introduced by sample buckling at elevated temperatures. The corrected lattice parameter data have been used to estimate the instantaneous and mean linear thermal expansion coefficients as a function of temperature. The thermal expansion values estimated in the present study show a fair degree of agreement with other existing dilatometer based bulk thermal expansion estimates. The lattice parameter for this alloy at 300 K is found to be 0.3549(1) nm. The mean linear thermal expansivity is found to be 11.4 x 10 -6 K -1

  17. Female upper body and breast skin temperature and thermal comfort following exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, B; White, J; Hedger, W; Scurr, J

    2013-01-01

    Breast support reduces breast pain and movement during exercise, however, an extra layer of clothing may affect thermoregulation. This preliminary study investigated female upper body and breast skin temperature and thermal comfort following short-duration exercise. Eight female participants with C-cup breasts had thermal images (infra-red camera, FLIR systems) of the bare breasts, the breasts in two sports bras (composite and polyester) and the abdomen, taken before and after 20 min of exercise at 28(o)C. Following exercise, bare-breast, bra and abdomen temperatures reduced by 0.61(o)C, 0.92(o)C and 2.06(o)C, respectively. The polyester sports bra demonstrated greater thermal comfort and enabled a greater change in skin temperature than the composite sports bra. It is concluded that following short-duration exercise, sports bras reduced the cooling ability of the breast. Material properties of the bras affect thermal comfort and post-exercise skin temperature; this should be an important consideration for sports bra manufacturers. This study investigates the effect of sports bras on thermal regulation of the breast following exercise. Sports bras negatively affected the cooling ability of the skin on the breast, with the material properties of the bra affecting thermal comfort following exercise. These results present important considerations for sports bra manufacturers.

  18. Active Wireless Temperature Sensors for Aerospace Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active wireless sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor sub-surface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuitry to enable acquisition and non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 2.54-cm square integrated circuit.

  19. The influence of heated or cooled seats on the acceptable ambient temperature range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Y.F.; Wyon, David Peter; Fang, Lei

    2007-01-01

    series, subjects were preconditioned to be too hot, while in other series they were preconditioned to be thermally neutral. They reported their thermal sensations, overall thermal acceptability and comfort on visual analogue scales at regular intervals. Instantaneous heat flow to the seat was measured...... continuously. At each ambient room temperature, the percentage dissatisfied was found to be a second-order polynomial function of local heat flow. Zero heat flow was preferred at an air temperature of 22 degrees C and the heat flow that minimized the percentage dissatisfied was found to be a single linear...

  20. Thermal Expansion and Magnetostriction Measurements at Cryogenic Temperature Using the Strain Gauge Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Huiming; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Huang, Chuangjun; Guo, Shibin; Shan, Yi; Li, Laifeng

    2018-01-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction, the strain responses of a material to temperature and a magnetic field, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely useful to study electronic and phononic properties, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and other interesting phenomena in cryogenic engineering and materials science. However, traditional dilatometers cannot provide magnetic field and ultra-low temperature (thermal expansion and magnetostriction at cryogenic temperature using the strain gauge method based on a Physical Properties Measurements System (PPMS). The interfacing software and automation were developed using LabVIEW. The sample temperature range can be tuned continuously between 1.8 and 400 K. With this PPMS-aided measuring system, we can observe temperature and magnetic field dependence of the linear thermal expansion of different solid materials easily and accurately.

  1. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John; Glisic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc.) and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc.) to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature-deformation-displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i) the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii) the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  2. Ion temperature anisotropy in high power helium neutral beam fuelling experiments in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maas, A C; Core, W G.F.; Gerstel, U C; Von Hellermann, M G; Koenig, R W.T.; Marcus, F B [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    During helium beam fuelling experiments in JET, distinctive anisotropic features have been observed in the velocity distribution function describing both fast and thermal alpha particle populations. During the initial fuelling phase the central helium ion temperature observed perpendicular to the magnetic field is higher than the central electron temperature, while the central helium ion temperature observed parallel to the magnetic field is lower than or equal to the central electron temperature. In order to verify temperature measurements of both perpendicular and parallel lines of sight, other independent methods of deducing the ion temperature are investigated: deuterium ion temperature, deuterium density, comparison with neutron rates and profiles (influence of a possible metastable population of helium). 6 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Performance of the PDX neutral beam wall armor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Williams, M.D.

    1985-02-01

    The PDX wall armor was designed to function as an inner wall thermal armor, a neutral beam diagnostic, and a large area inner toroidal plasma limiter. In this paper we discuss its thermal performance as wall armor during two years of PDX neutral beam heating experiments. During this period it provided sufficient inner wall protection to permit perpendicular heating injections into normal and disruptive plasmas as well as injections in the absence of plasma involving special experiments, calibrations, and tests important for the optimization and development of the PDX neutral beam injection system. Many of the design constraints and performance issues encountered in this work are relevant to the design of larger fusion devices

  4. DOUBLE code simulations of emissivities of fast neutrals for different plasma observation view-lines of neutral particle analyzers on the COMPASS tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitosinkova, K.; Tomes, M.; Stockel, J.; Varju, J.; Stano, M.

    2018-03-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) measure line-integrated energy spectra of fast neutral atoms escaping the tokamak plasma, which are a product of charge-exchange (CX) collisions of plasma ions with background neutrals. They can observe variations in the ion temperature T i of non-thermal fast ions created by additional plasma heating. However, the plasma column which a fast atom has to pass through must be sufficiently short in comparison with the fast atom’s mean-free-path. Tokamak COMPASS is currently equipped with one NPA installed at a tangential mid-plane port. This orientation is optimal for observing non-thermal fast ions. However, in this configuration the signal at energies useful for T i derivation is lost in noise due to the too long fast atoms’ trajectories. Thus, a second NPA is planned to be connected for the purpose of measuring T i. We analyzed different possible view-lines (perpendicular mid-plane, tangential mid-plane, and top view) for the second NPA using the DOUBLE Monte-Carlo code and compared the results with the performance of the present NPA with tangential orientation. The DOUBLE code provides fast-atoms’ emissivity functions along the NPA view-line. The position of the median of these emissivity functions is related to the location from where the measured signal originates. Further, we compared the difference between the real central T i used as a DOUBLE code input and the T iCX derived from the exponential decay of simulated energy spectra. The advantages and disadvantages of each NPA location are discussed.

  5. Experimental study of the influence of anticipated control on human thermal sensation and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y; Feng, C; Zhang, X

    2014-04-01

    To investigate whether occupants' anticipated control of their thermal environment can influence their thermal comfort and to explain why the acceptable temperature range in naturally ventilated environments is greater than that in air-conditioned environments, a series of experiments were conducted in a climate chamber in which the thermal environment remained the same but the psychological environment varied. The results of the experiments show that the ability to control the environment can improve occupants' thermal sensation and thermal comfort. Specifically, occupants' anticipated control decreased their thermal sensation vote (TSV) by 0.4-0.5 and improved their thermal comfort vote (TCV) by 0.3-0.4 in neutral-warm environment. This improvement was due exclusively to psychological factors. In addition, having to pay the cost of cooling had no significant influence on the occupants' thermal sensation and thermal comfort in this experiment. Thus, having the ability to control the thermal environment can improve occupants' comfort even if there is a monetary cost involved. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. High-temperature thermal storage systems for advanced solar receivers materials selections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D. F.; Devan, J. H.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced space power systems that use solar energy and Brayton or Stirling heat engines require thermal energy storage (TES) systems to operate continuously through periods of shade. The receiver storage units, key elements in both Brayton and Stirling systems, are designed to use the latent heat of fusion of phase-change materials (PCMs). The power systems under current consideration for near-future National Aeronautics and Space Administration space missions require working fluid temperatures in the 1100 to 1400 K range. The PCMs under current investigation that gave liquid temperatures within this range are the fluoride family of salts. However, these salts have low thermal conductivity, which causes large temperature gradients in the storage systems. Improvements can be obtained, however, with the use of thermal conductivity enhancements or metallic PCMs. In fact, if suitable containment materials can be found, the use of metallic PCMs would virtually eliminate the orbit associated temperature variations in TES systems. The high thermal conductivity and generally low volume change on melting of germanium and alloys based on silicon make them attractive for storage of thermal energy in space power systems. An approach to solving the containment problem, involving both chemical and physical compatibility, preparation of NiSi/NiSi2, and initial results for containment of germanium and NiSi/NiSi2, are presented.

  7. High Temperature Fiberoptic Thermal Imaging System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will fabricate and demonstrate a small diameter single fiber endoscope that can perform high temperature thermal imaging in a jet engine...

  8. Thermal Stability of Hexamethyldisiloxane (MM for High-Temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Preißinger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC units for the usage of industrial waste heat at high temperatures requires direct contact evaporators without intermediate thermal oil circuits. Therefore, the thermal stability of high-temperature working fluids gains importance. In this study, the thermal degradation of hexamethyldisiloxane (MM is investigated in an electrically heated tube. Qualitative results concerning remarks on degradation products as well as quantitative results like the annual degradation rate are presented. It is shown that MM is stable up to a temperature of 300 °C with annual degradation rates of less than 3.5%. Furthermore, the break of a silicon–carbon bond can be a main chemical reaction that influences the thermal degradation. Finally, it is discussed how the results may impact the future design of ORC units.

  9. Experimental research on thermal comfort in the university classroom of regular semesters in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gun Joo; Oh, Geun Sug; Im, Young Bin; Song, Sung Ki; Ahn, Young Chull

    2011-01-01

    This research has investigated physical variables affecting indoor thermal comfort and subjective responses of thermal comfort of students in a university in Korea in which the weather is oceanic temperate climate, and has been performed to contribute to the research fields of Sustainable Thermal Standard and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC). This research is based on the ISO 7730-2005 standard and the ATC theories and 4 main variables of PMV such as dry bulb temperature (Ta), relative humidity (RH), black bulb temperature (Tg), and air velocity (Va) are measured once a week during two regular semesters. A clothing insulation, a thermal sensation vote (TSV), an acceptability of thermal environment, and a preference for cooling and heating are investigated at the same time using a questionnaire. This study was carried out for 26 weeks during the spring season, from March to June 2009, and the autumn season, from September to December 2009. The main achievements of this study are as follows. Monthly Mean Outdoor Temperature (MMOT) and Operative Temperature (OT) in the classroom during research periods are 7.4∼23.3 .deg. C and 17.5∼29.0 .deg. C, respectively. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment shows over 80% when the range of OT in the classroom is 17∼25 .deg. C, and the range can be applicable to operative index of heating and cooling of classroom. The mean TSV of respondents is almost 'neutral (0)' when the PMV in the classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' and 'slightly cool (-1)', and the TSV is almost '+1.5' when the PMV moves to 'slightly warm (+1)'. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment is slightly different from ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. So it is necessary to more investigate standard range of acceptability of thermal environment in oceanic temperate climate region using much more databases

  10. Ambient Temperature Based Thermal Aware Energy Efficient ROM Design on FPGA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saini, Rishita; Bansal, Neha; Bansal, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal aware design is currently gaining importance in VLSI research domain. In this work, we are going to design thermal aware energy efficient ROM on Virtex-5 FPGA. Ambient Temperature, airflow, and heat sink profile play a significant role in thermal aware hardware design life cycle. Ambient...

  11. Thermal Protective Coating for High Temperature Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Andrew R.

    1999-01-01

    The central theme of this research is the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticles as precursors to thermally protective coatings for high temperature polymer composites. In addition, we will investigate the application of carboxylate-alumoxane nanoparticle as a component to polymer composites. The objective of this research was the high temperature protection of polymer composites via novel chemistry. The significance of this research is the development of a low cost and highly flexible synthetic methodology, with a compatible processing technique, for the fabrication of high temperature polymer composites. We proposed to accomplish this broad goal through the use of a class of ceramic precursor material, alumoxanes. Alumoxanes are nano-particles with a boehmite-like structure and an organic periphery. The technical goals of this program are to prepare and evaluate water soluble carboxylate-alumoxane for the preparation of ceramic coatings on polymer substrates. Our proposed approach is attractive since proof of concept has been demonstrated under the NRA 96-LeRC-1 Technology for Advanced High Temperature Gas Turbine Engines, HITEMP Program. For example, carbon and Kevlar(tm) fibers and matting have been successfully coated with ceramic thermally protective layers.

  12. Conservatism of lizard thermal tolerances and body temperatures across evolutionary history and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Joseph W; Buckley, Lauren B

    2013-04-23

    Species may exhibit similar thermal tolerances via either common ancestry or environmental filtering and local adaptation, if the species inhabit similar environments. We ask whether upper and lower thermal limits (critical thermal maxima and minima) and body temperatures are more strongly conserved across evolutionary history or geography for lizard populations distributed globally. We find that critical thermal maxima are highly conserved with location accounting for a higher proportion of the variation than phylogeny. Notably, thermal tolerance breadth is conserved across the phylogeny despite critical thermal minima showing little niche conservatism. Body temperatures observed during activity in the field show the greatest degree of conservatism, with phylogeny accounting for most of the variation. This suggests that propensities for thermoregulatory behaviour, which can buffer body temperatures from environmental variation, are similar within lineages. Phylogeny and geography constrain thermal tolerances similarly within continents, but variably within clades. Conservatism of thermal tolerances across lineages suggests that the potential for local adaptation to alleviate the impacts of climate change on lizards may be limited.

  13. Variation in thermal conductivity of porous media due to temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M.A.; Maqsood, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade, a great amount of attention has been paid to the study of the temperature dependence of the thermal transport properties of insulating materials. Thermal insulators constitute one of the major areas of the porous ceramic consumption. Measurements of thermal transport properties are important tools in this field. In the present work a set of synthetic porous insulating foams, used as insulating materials is studied. Advantageous Transient Plane Source (ATPS) method is used for the simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of these materials in air and then volumetric heat capacity is calculated. The study of thermal transport properties of three synthetic porous insulators that are foam, closed cell foam and fiberglass, under different conditions of temperature pressure and with corresponding densities was done. Due to this research it is possible to work out the material with optimum performance, lower thermal expansion and conductivity, high temperature use, low as well as high-pressure use, so that the insulation with high margin of safety and space with lower cost could be obtained. As a result the proper type of insulation can be recommended in accordance with the specific application. The change in the temperature and pressure causes different behavior on the samples, even then all these samples are suitable for insulation purposes in scientific and commercial fields. Foam is the best choice because of its lowest thermal conductivity values, fiberglass is a better choice because of its consistency, and closed cell foam is the third choice because of its plastic nature and high density. (author)

  14. Heat flux to the limiter during disruptions and neutral beam injection in Doublet-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; DeGrassie, J.; Taylor, T.S.; Hopkins, G.; Meyer, C.; Petrie, T.W.; Kahn, C.L.; Ejima, S.

    1984-01-01

    The heat flux to the Doublet-III primary limiter has been monitored during plasma disruptions and during neutral beam injection. The surface temperature of the movable TiC-coated graphite limiter was measured with an Inframetrics thermal imaging system and a suitably filtered silicon photodiode spot detector. In addition, the floating electric potential of the limiter with respect to the vacuum vessel was measured. The heat pulse duration to the limiter was measured by the spot detector with a time response of x approx.= 10 μs and these times were correlated with the plasma parameters. In limiter discharges, 20% of the plasma kinetic stored energy goes to the limiter during disruptions. The power balance during disruptions is also discussed. During neutral beam injection, the limiter is not heated uniformly; the ion drift side receives much more thermal flux than the electron drift side. The fraction of beam power going to the limiter is as high as approx.= 35% in normal limiter discharges. (orig.)

  15. The relationship between bioclimatic thermal stress and subjective thermal sensation in pedestrian spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlmutter, David; Jiao, Dixin; Garb, Yaakov

    2014-12-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort has important implications for urban planning and energy consumption in the built environment. To better understand the relation of subjective thermal experience to bioclimatic thermal stress in such contexts, this study compares micrometeorological and perceptual data from urban spaces in the hot-arid Negev region of Israel. Pedestrians reported on their thermal sensation in these spaces, whereas radiation and convection-related data were used to compute the Index of Thermal Stress (ITS) and physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). The former is a straightforward characterization of energy exchanges between the human body and its surroundings, without any conversion to an "equivalent temperature." Although the relation of ITS to subjective thermal sensation has been analyzed in the past under controlled indoor conditions, this paper offers the first analysis of this relation in an outdoor setting. ITS alone can account for nearly 60 % of the variance in pedestrians' thermal sensation under outdoor conditions, somewhat more than PET. A series of regressions with individual contextual variables and ITS identified those factors which accounted for additional variance in thermal sensation, whereas multivariate analyses indicated the considerable predictive power ( R-square = 0.74) of models including multiple contextual variables in addition to ITS. Our findings indicate that pedestrians experiencing variable outdoor conditions have a greater tolerance for incremental changes in thermal stress than has been shown previously under controlled indoor conditions, with a tapering of responses at high values of ITS. However, the thresholds of ITS corresponding to thermal "neutrality" and thermal "acceptability" are quite consistent regardless of context.

  16. Thermal energy storages analysis for high temperature in air solar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, Assunta; Buonomo, Bernardo; Manca, Oronzio; Tamburrino, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a high temperature thermal storage in a honeycomb solid matrix is numerically investigated and a parametric analysis is accomplished. In the formulation of the model it is assumed that the system geometry is cylindrical, the fluid and the solid thermo physical properties are temperature independent and radiative heat transfer is taken into account whereas the effect of gravity is neglected. Air is employed as working fluid and the solid material is cordierite. The evaluation of the fluid dynamic and thermal behaviors is accomplished assuming the honeycomb as a porous medium. The Brinkman–Forchheimer–extended Darcy model is used in the governing equations and the local thermal non equilibrium is assumed. The commercial CFD Fluent code is used to solve the governing equations in transient regime. Numerical simulations are carried out with storage medium for different mass flow rates of the working fluid and different porosity values. Results in terms of temperature profiles, temperatures fields and stored thermal energy as function of time are presented. The effects of storage medium, different porosity values and mass flow rate on stored thermal energy and storage time are shown. - Highlights: • HTTES in a honeycomb solid matrix is numerically investigated. • The numerical analysis is carried out assuming the honeycomb as a porous medium. • The Brinkman–Forchheimer–extended Darcy model is used in the governing equations. • Results are carried out for different mass flow rates and porosity values. • The main effect is due to the porosity which set the thermal energy storage value

  17. Near-Field Thermal Radiation for Solar Thermophotovoltaics and High Temperature Thermal Logic and Memory Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzouka, Mahmoud

    This dissertation investigates Near-Field Thermal Radiation (NFTR) applied to MEMS-based concentrated solar thermophotovoltaics (STPV) energy conversion and thermal memory and logics. NFTR is the exchange of thermal radiation energy at nano/microscale; when separation between the hot and cold objects is less than dominant radiation wavelength (˜1 mum). NFTR is particularly of interest to the above applications due to its high rate of energy transfer, exceeding the blackbody limit by orders of magnitude, and its strong dependence on separation gap size, surface nano/microstructure and material properties. Concentrated STPV system converts solar radiation to electricity using heat as an intermediary through a thermally coupled absorber/emitter, which causes STPV to have one of the highest solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency limits (85.4%). Modeling of a near-field concentrated STPV microsystem is carried out to investigate the use of STPV based solid-state energy conversion as high power density MEMS power generator. Numerical results for In 0.18Ga0.82Sb PV cell illuminated with tungsten emitter showed significant enhancement in energy transfer, resulting in output power densities as high as 60 W/cm2; 30 times higher than the equivalent far-field power density. On thermal computing, this dissertation demonstrates near-field heat transfer enabled high temperature NanoThermoMechanical memory and logics. Unlike electronics, NanoThermoMechanical memory and logic devices use heat instead of electricity to record and process data; hence they can operate in harsh environments where electronics typically fail. NanoThermoMechanical devices achieve memory and thermal rectification functions through the coupling of near-field thermal radiation and thermal expansion in microstructures, resulting in nonlinear heat transfer between two temperature terminals. Numerical modeling of a conceptual NanoThermoMechanical is carried out; results include the dynamic response under

  18. Temperature Distribution and Thermal Performance of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sayantan

    2017-04-01

    Energy conservation and storage has become very crucial to make use of excess energy during times of future demand. Excess thermal energy can be captured and stored in aquifers and this technique is termed as Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Storing seasonal thermal energy in water by injecting it into subsurface and extracting in time of demand is the principle of an ATES system. Using ATES systems leads to energy savings, reduces the dependency on fossil fuels and thus leads to reduction in greenhouse gas emission. This study numerically models an ATES system to store seasonal thermal energy and evaluates the performance of it. A 3D thermo-hydrogeological numerical model for a confined ATES system is presented in this study. The model includes heat transport processes of advection, conduction and heat loss to confining rock media. The model also takes into account regional groundwater flow in the aquifer, geothermal gradient and anisotropy in the aquifer. Results show that thermal injection into the aquifer results in the generation of a thermal-front which grows in size with time. Premature thermal-breakthrough causes thermal interference in the system when the thermal-front reaches the production well and consequences in the fall of system performance and hence should be avoided. This study models the transient temperature distribution in the aquifer for different flow and geological conditions. This may be effectively used in designing an efficient ATES project by ensuring safety from thermal-breakthrough while catering to the energy demand. Based on the model results a safe well spacing is proposed. The thermal energy discharged by the system is determined and strategy to avoid the premature thermal-breakthrough in critical cases is discussed. The present numerical model is applied to simulate an experimental field study which is found to approximate the field results quite well.

  19. Coupling analysis of the target temperature and thermal stress due to pulsed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jie; Liu Meng; Lin Jufang; An Li; Long Xinggui

    2013-01-01

    Background: Target temperature has an important effect on the target life for the sealed neutron generator without cooling system. Purpose: To carry out the thermal-mechanical coupling analysis of the film-substrate target bombarded by the pulsed ion beam. Methods: The indirect coupling Finite Element Method (FEM) with a 2-dimensional time-space Gaussian axisymmetric power density as heat source was used to simulate the target temperature and thermal stress fields. Results: The effects of the target temperature and thermal stress fields under difference pulse widths and beam sizes were analyzed in terms of the FEM results. Conclusions: Combining with the temperature requirement and the thermal stress inducing film thermal mechanical destruction effect of the sealed neutron generator film-substrate targets, an optimized pulsed ion beam work status was proposed. (authors)

  20. Air-ground temperature coupling: analysis by means of Thermal Orbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Vladimír; Bodri, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2016), s. 112-122 ISSN 2160-0414 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP210/11/0183; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13040 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Thermal Orbits * temperature monitoring * air temperature vs ground temperature Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  1. A thermal conductivity model for nanofluids including effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitprasert, Chatcharin; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Varangrat

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial layer of nanoparticles has been recently shown to have an effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. There is, however, still no thermal conductivity model that includes the effects of temperature and nanoparticle size variations on the thickness and consequently on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer. In the present work, the stationary model developed by Leong et al. (J Nanopart Res 8:245-254, 2006) is initially modified to include the thermal dispersion effect due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This model is called the 'Leong et al.'s dynamic model'. However, the Leong et al.'s dynamic model over-predicts the thermal conductivity of nanofluids in the case of the flowing fluid. This suggests that the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the flowing nanofluids due to the increase in temperature does not come from the thermal dispersion effect. It is more likely that the enhancement in heat transfer of the flowing nanofluids comes from the temperature-dependent interfacial layer effect. Therefore, the Leong et al.'s stationary model is again modified to include the effect of temperature variation on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer for different sizes of nanoparticles. This present model is then evaluated and compared with the other thermal conductivity models for the turbulent convective heat transfer in nanofluids along a uniformly heated tube. The results show that the present model is more general than the other models in the sense that it can predict both the temperature and the volume fraction dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids for both non-flowing and flowing fluids. Also, it is found to be more accurate than the other models due to the inclusion of the effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer. In conclusion, the present model can accurately predict the changes in thermal conductivity of nanofluids due to the changes in volume fraction and temperature for

  2. Low temperature desalination using solar collectors augmented by thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gude, Veera Gnaneswar; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany; Deng, Shuguang; Maganti, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new low temperature desalination process using solar collectors was investigated. ► A thermal energy storage tank (TES) was included for continuous process operation. ► Solar collector area and TES volumes were optimized by theoretical simulations. ► Economic analysis for the entire process was compared with and without TES tank. ► Energy and emission payback periods for the solar collector system were reported. -- Abstract: A low temperature desalination process capable of producing 100 L/d freshwater was designed to utilize solar energy harvested from flat plate solar collectors. Since solar insolation is intermittent, a thermal energy storage system was incorporated to run the desalination process round the clock. The requirements for solar collector area as well as thermal energy storage volume were estimated based on the variations in solar insolation. Results from this theoretical study confirm that thermal energy storage is a useful component of the system for conserving thermal energy to meet the energy demand when direct solar energy resource is not available. Thermodynamic advantages of the low temperature desalination using thermal energy storage, as well as energy and environmental emissions payback period of the system powered by flat plate solar collectors are presented. It has been determined that a solar collector area of 18 m 2 with a thermal energy storage volume of 3 m 3 is adequate to produce 100 L/d of freshwater round the clock considering fluctuations in the weather conditions. An economic analysis on the desalination system with thermal energy storage is also presented.

  3. Passivation behavior of SUS 304 stainless steel in neutral solutions at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanno, Kazuo; Kato, Koji; Ohnaka, Noriyuki; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Minato, Akira.

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic voltammograms of SUS 304 stainless steel in various neutral solutions such as Na 2 SO 4 at high temperature were measured, as a successive study to previous report in which effects of temperature and pH on polarization behavior of stainless steel were studied. In this measurement Ag/AgCl reference electrode and platinum counter electrode were used in a static autoclave lined with inconel. Passive films formed in various conditions were analysed by electron diffraction and Auger spectroscopy. Results obtained were compared with anodic behavior of iron, chromium and nickel and with thermodynamical stabilities of their compounds. The main results are summarized as follows. (1) Stainless steel shows such electrochemical behavior as active dissolution, passivation and transpassivation in a deaerated neutral solution at 250 0 C after fully reductive treatment of the specimen. In air-saturated solution, the peak of active dissolution is not observed. In the passive range there are intermediate oxidation and reduction peaks, and it is assumed that dissolved ionic species are oxidized to form oxide of spinel type and higher oxidized state successively at these peaks. (2) Electrochemical behavior of specimens in 0.1 M sulfate, -phosphate and -carbonate solutions are almost the same and rather thick films form in these solutions. On the other hand, specimens are easy to passivate in borate and -nitrate solution, and their passive films are thin. (author)

  4. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  5. Thermal Stress FE Analysis of Large-scale Gas Holder Under Sunshine Temperature Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyu; Yang, Ranxia; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The temperature field and thermal stress of Man type gas holder is simulated by using the theory of sunshine temperature field based on ASHRAE clear-sky model and the finite element method. The distribution of surface temperature and thermal stress of gas holder under the given sunshine condition is obtained. The results show that the thermal stress caused by sunshine can be identified as one of the important factors for the failure of local cracked oil leakage which happens on the sunny side before on the shady side. Therefore, it is of great importance to consider the sunshine thermal load in the stress analysis, design and operation of large-scale steel structures such as the gas holder.

  6. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The csub(p) of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation. (author)

  7. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-01-01

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation

  8. Energy and indoor temperature consequences of adative thermal comfort standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Centnerova, L.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The intent of the presented study was to quantify the implications for energy demand of indoor temperature requirements based on a proposed adaptive thermal comfort standard (7) relative to a more traditional thermal comfort approach. The study focuses on a typical office situation in a moderate

  9. Thermal Expansion and Magnetostriction Measurements at Cryogenic Temperature Using the Strain Gauge Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal expansion and magnetostriction, the strain responses of a material to temperature and a magnetic field, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely useful to study electronic and phononic properties, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and other interesting phenomena in cryogenic engineering and materials science. However, traditional dilatometers cannot provide magnetic field and ultra-low temperature (<77 K environment easily. This paper describes the design and test results of thermal expansion and magnetostriction at cryogenic temperature using the strain gauge method based on a Physical Properties Measurements System (PPMS. The interfacing software and automation were developed using LabVIEW. The sample temperature range can be tuned continuously between 1.8 and 400 K. With this PPMS-aided measuring system, we can observe temperature and magnetic field dependence of the linear thermal expansion of different solid materials easily and accurately.

  10. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements at cryogenic temperature using the strain gage method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Huiming; Huang, Rongjin; Zhao, Yuqiang; Huang, Chuangjun; Guo, Shibin; Shan, Yi; Li, Laifeng

    2018-03-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction, the strain responses of a material to temperature and a magnetic field, especially properties at low temperature, are extremely useful to study electronic and phononic properties, phase transitions, quantum criticality, and other interesting phenomena in cryogenic engineering and materials science. However, traditional dilatometers cannot provide magnetic field and ultra low temperature (<77 K) environment easily. This paper describes the design and test results of thermal expansion and magnetostriction at cryogenic temperature using the strain gage method based on a Physical Properties Measurements System (PPMS). The interfacing software and automation were developed using LabVIEW. The sample temperature range can be tuned continuously between 1.8 K and 400 K. With this PPMS-aided measuring system, we can observe temperature and magnetic field dependence of the linear thermal expansion of different solid materials easily and accurately.

  11. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reilly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc. and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc. to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature–deformation–displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  12. Anomalous electrodynamics of neutral pion matter in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, Tomáš [Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Stavanger,N-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Kadam, Saurabh V. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER),Pune 411008 (India)

    2017-03-03

    The ground state of quantum chromodynamics in sufficiently strong external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon chemical potential is a chiral soliton lattice (CSL) of neutral pions https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.05213. We investigate the interplay between the CSL structure and dynamical electromagnetic fields. Our main result is that in presence of the CSL background, the two physical photon polarizations and the neutral pion mix, giving rise to two gapped excitations and one gapless mode with a nonrelativistic dispersion relation. The nature of this mode depends on the direction of its propagation, interpolating between a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave https://www.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.93.085036 and a neutral pion surface wave, which in turn arises from the spontaneously broken translation invariance. Quite remarkably, there is a neutral-pion-like mode that remains gapped even in the chiral limit, in seeming contradiction to the Goldstone theorem. Finally, we have a first look at the effect of thermal fluctuations of the CSL, showing that even the soft nonrelativistic excitation does not lead to the Landau-Peierls instability. However, it leads to an anomalous contribution to pressure that scales with temperature and magnetic field as T{sup 5/2}(B/f{sub π}){sup 3/2}.

  13. [The physiological classification of human thermal states under high environmental temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A F; Kuznets, E I

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the physiological classification of human thermal states in a hot environment. A review of the basic systems of classifications of thermal states is given, their main drawbacks are discussed. On the basis of human functional state research in a broad range of environmental temperatures the system of evaluation and classification of human thermal states is proposed. New integral one-dimensional multi-parametric criteria for evaluation are used. For the development of these criteria methods of factor, cluster and canonical correlation analyses are applied. Stochastic nomograms capable of identification of human thermal state for different intensity of influence are given. In this case evaluation of intensity is estimated according to one-dimensional criteria taking into account environmental temperature, physical load and time of man's staying in overheating conditions.

  14. Rutherford scattering of neutral atoms: a technique for measuring plasma ion temperatures. An analysis of the applicability to the central cell plasma of TMX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granneman, E.H.A.

    1980-01-01

    Rutherford scattering of neutral particles by plasma ions is examined as a method for determining plasma ion in the central cell fo the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX). When a scattering configuration, consisting of a 20-keV-, 10-A-deuterium neutral beam and an energy analyzer with a 1% resolution, is arranged such that only neutral particles scattered by plasma ions over an angle of 10 0 are accepted, central-cell ion temperatures in the 30- to 1000-eV range can be measured. The count rate registered by the detector(s) is estimated to be 2000 counts/ms. Consequently, good statistical accuracy and time resolution are attainable simultaneously. The results of the calculation are presented such that the scaling of the count rates and the energy broadening with scattering angle, neutral-beam energy, ion temperature, and plasma density can easily be deduced. Neutral helium beams are also considered; they have some advantages over deuterium beams. The background signal, caused by neutral particles entering the detector after two successive charge-exchange collisions, is examined and ways to completely eliminate this background are indicated

  15. Thermal conductivity as influenced by the temperature and apparent viscosity of dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, B J; Pereira, C G; Lago, A M T; Gonçalves, C S; Giarola, T M O; Abreu, L R; Resende, J V

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the rheological behavior and thermal conductivity of dairy products, composed of the same chemical components but with different formulations, as a function of temperature. Subsequently, thermal conductivity was related to the apparent viscosity of yogurt, fermented dairy beverage, and fermented milk. Thermal conductivity measures and rheological tests were performed at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°C using linear probe heating and an oscillatory rheometer with concentric cylinder geometry, respectively. The results were compared with those calculated using the parallel, series, and Maxwell-Eucken models as a function of temperature, and the discrepancies in the results are discussed. Linear equations were fitted to evaluate the influence of temperature on the thermal conductivity of the dairy products. The rheological behavior, specifically apparent viscosity versus shear rate, was influenced by temperature. Herschel-Bulkley, power law, and Newton's law models were used to fit the experimental data. The Herschel-Bulkley model best described the adjustments for yogurt, the power law model did so for fermented dairy beverages, and Newton's law model did so for fermented milk and was then used to determine the rheological parameters. Fermented milk showed a Newtonian trend, whereas yogurt and fermented dairy beverage were shear thinning. Apparent viscosity was correlated with temperature by the Arrhenius equation. The formulation influenced the effective thermal conductivity. The relationship between the 2 properties was established by fixing the temperature and expressing conductivity as a function of apparent viscosity. Thermal conductivity increased with viscosity and decreased with increasing temperature. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. EXCITATION TEMPERATURE OF THE WARM NEUTRAL MEDIUM AS A NEW PROBE OF THE Lyα RADIATION FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Claire E.; Lindner, Robert R.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Pingel, Nickolas M.; Lawrence, Allen; Babler, Brian L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goss, W. M.; Jencson, Jacob [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Dickey, John [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Hennebelle, Patrick, E-mail: cmurray@astro.wisc.edu [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp—CNRS—Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to conduct a high-sensitivity survey of neutral hydrogen (H I) absorption in the Milky Way. In combination with corresponding H I emission spectra obtained mostly with the Arecibo Observatory, we detect a widespread warm neutral medium component with excitation temperature 〈T{sub s}〉=7200{sub −1200}{sup +1800} K (68% confidence). This temperature lies above theoretical predictions based on collisional excitation alone, implying that Lyα scattering, the most probable additional source of excitation, is more important in the interstellar medium (ISM) than previously assumed. Our results demonstrate that H I absorption can be used to constrain the Lyα radiation field, a critical quantity for studying the energy balance in the ISM and intergalactic medium yet notoriously difficult to model because of its complicated radiative transfer, in and around galaxies nearby and at high redshift.

  17. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...

  18. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  19. Low temperature thermal expansion of liquid Helium-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthold, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Results of a measurement of the thermal expansion of liquid He-4 are presented along the saturated vapor pressure curve at low temperatures (0.1 - 0.6 0 K). The thermal expansion is related to the low momentum region of the He-4 excitation spectrum, and the results of this measurement are analyzed to gain information concerning deviations from linearity in the phonon region of the spectrum. The data is also compared with theoretical predictions of Alrich and Bhatt and McMillan and with the thermal expansion measurement of Van Degrift. In addition a discussion of previous experimental evidence on the shape of the low momentum region of the dispersion relation is presented

  20. Identification of complex model thermal boundary conditions based on exterior temperature measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jianming; Ouyang Guangyao; Zhang Ping; Rong Bojun

    2012-01-01

    Combining the advantages of the finite element software in temperature field analyzing with the multivariate function optimization arithmetic, a feasibility method based on the exterior temperature was proposed to get the thermal boundary conditions, which was required in temperature field analyzing. The thermal boundary conditions can be obtained only by some temperature measurement values. Taking the identification of the convection heat transfer coefficient of a high power density diesel engine cylinder head as an example, the calculation result shows that when the temperature measurement error was less than 0.5℃, the maximum relative error was less than 2%. It is shown that the new method was feasible (authors)

  1. Fluid temperatures: Modeling the thermal regime of a river network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Ashley Steel

    2017-01-01

    Water temperature drives the complex food web of a river network. Aquatic organisms hatch, feed, and reproduce in thermal niches within the tributaries and mainstem that comprise the river network. Changes in water temperature can synchronize or asynchronize the timing of their life stages throughout the year. The water temperature fluctuates over time and place,...

  2. Measuring technique of super high temperature thermal properties of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Baba, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Hideo; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    In this study, thermal properties of reactor core materials used for water cooled reactors and FBR were tried to develop a technique to measure their melt states at less than 3,000degC in order to contribute more correct evaluation of the reactor core behavior at severe accident. Then, a thermal property measuring method of high temperature melt by using floating method was investigated and its fundamental design was begun to investigate under a base of optimum judgement on the air flow floating throw-down method. And, in order to measure emissivity of melt specimen surface essential for correct temperature measurement using the throw down method, a spectroscopic emissivity measuring unit using an ellipsometer was prepared and induced. On the thermal properties measurement using the holding method, a specimen container to measure thermal diffusiveness of the high temperature melts by using laser flashing method was tried to prepare. (G.K.)

  3. Estimated Viscosities and Thermal Conductivities of Gases at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, Roger A.

    1962-01-01

    Viscosities and thermal conductivities, suitable for heat-transfer calculations, were estimated for about 200 gases in the ground state from 100 to 5000 K and 1-atmosphere pressure. Free radicals were included, but excited states and ions were not. Calculations for the transport coefficients were based upon the Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential for all gases. This potential was selected because: (1) It is one of the most realistic models available and (2) intermolecular force constants can be estimated from physical properties or by other techniques when experimental data are not available; such methods for estimating force constants are not as readily available for other potentials. When experimental viscosity data were available, they were used to obtain the force constants; otherwise the constants were estimated. These constants were then used to calculate both the viscosities and thermal conductivities tabulated in this report. For thermal conductivities of polyatomic gases an Eucken-type correction was made to correct for exchange between internal and translational energies. Though this correction may be rather poor at low temperatures, it becomes more satisfactory with increasing temperature. It was not possible to obtain force constants from experimental thermal conductivity data except for the inert atoms, because most conductivity data are available at low temperatures only (200 to 400 K), the temperature range where the Eucken correction is probably most in error. However, if the same set of force constants is used for both viscosity and thermal conductivity, there is a large degree of cancellation of error when these properties are used in heat-transfer equations such as the Dittus-Boelter equation. It is therefore concluded that the properties tabulated in this report are suitable for heat-transfer calculations of gaseous systems.

  4. An experimental study of thermal comfort at different combinations of air and mean radiant temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2009-01-01

    It is often discussed if a person prefers a low air temperature (ta) and a high mean radiant temperature (tr), vice-versa or it does not matter as long as the operative temperature is acceptable. One of the hypotheses is that it does not matter for thermal comfort but for perceived air quality......, a lower air temperature is preferred. This paper presents an experimental study with 30 human subjects exposed to three different combinations of air- and mean radiant temperature with an operative temperature around 23 °C. The subjects gave subjective evaluations of thermal comfort and perceived air...... quality during the experiments. The PMV-index gave a good estimation of thermal sensation vote (TSV) when the air and mean radiant temperature were the same. In the environment with different air- and mean radiant temperatures, a thermal comfort evaluation shows an error up to 1 scale unit on the 7-point...

  5. Anomalous thermal property behaviour of uranium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandenaw, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low temperature heat capacity curves are presented for polycrystalline 235 U and 238 U metals in different microstructural states and of different purities. Thermal conductivity versus temperature curves are shown for low-purity, polycrystalline 238 U in the temperature range between approximately 80 and 373 0 K for metal having undergone varied fabrication procedures. Published information suggests that there will be no structural modification in very pure uranium below room temperature. The influence of impurities on low temperature transitions may be through their effects on dislocation formation. Thermal conductivity and heat capacity runs started at approximately 80 0 K, after holding specimens at the temperature of boiling liquid nitrogen, do not give results which match up with runs started below 36 to 43 0 K. Result of measurements started at approximately 80 0 K indicate that an ordering mechanism is predominating, with microstructure rather than purity being the important factor. This can be explained if ordering at approximately 80 0 K is through lattice imperfections remaining from prior specimen processing. The drop off in heat capacity appearing above 36 0 K in the C/sub p/ versus T curves of 235 U and 238 U suggest the possibility of: (1) heat evolution from a developing antiphase structure or (2) heat evolution similar to that noted with a quenched martensite. Physical property changes in 238 U at 250 to 270 0 K and at 325 to 350 0 K seem to be related to the heat evolution which starts at 36 0 K during adiabatic heat capacity measurements. The data from heat capacity and thermal conductivity measurements are analyzed to help explain the significance of the sometimes very slight physical property changes observed at 36 to 43, approximately 80, 250 to 270 and 325 to 350 0 K in uranium metal. (U.S.)

  6. Role of high-temperature creep stress in thermally grown oxide growth of thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K.; Nakao, Y.; Seo, D.; Miura, H.; Shoji, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Thermally grown oxide (TGO) grows at the top / bond coating interface of the thermal barrier coating (TBC) in service. It is supposed that the failures of the TBC occur due to thermal stress and the decrease of adhesive strength caused by the TGO growth. Recently, large local stress has been found to change both the diffusion constant of oxygen through an existing oxide and the rate of chemical reaction at the oxide / oxidized material interface. Since high thermal stress occurs in the TBC, the volume expansion of the newly grown oxide, and centrifugal force, the growth rate of the TGO may change depending on not only temperature but also the stress. The aim of this study is to make clear the influence of stress on the growth rate of the TGO quantitatively. As a result, the thickness of the TGO clearly increases with increase of the amplitude of the applied stress and temperature. The increase rate of the TGO thickness is approximately 23% when the applied stress is increased from 0 to 205 MPa at 900 C, and approximately 29% when the stress is increased from 0 to 150 MPa at 950 C. (orig.)

  7. Thermal investigations of a room temperature magnetic refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smaili, Arezki; Chiba, Younes [Ecole Nationale Polytechnique d' Alger (Algeria)], email: arezki.smaili@enp.edu.dz

    2011-07-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a concept based on the magnetocaloric effect that some materials exhibit when the external magnetic field changes. The aim of this paper is to assess the performance of a numerical model in predicting parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator. Numerical simulations were conducted to perform a thermal analysis on an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator operating near room temperature with and without applied cooling load. Curves of temperature span, cooling capacity and thermal efficiency as functions of the operating conditions were drawn and are presented in this paper. Results showed that at fixed frequency Ql versus mf has an optimum and COP was increased with cycle frequency values. This study demonstrated that the proposed numerical model could be used to predict parameters of an active magnetic regenerator refrigerator as it provides consistent results.

  8. Modeling thermal spike driven reactions at low temperature and application to zirconium carbide radiation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2017-11-01

    The development of TEM-visible damage in materials under irradiation at cryogenic temperatures cannot be explained using classical rate theory modeling with thermally activated reactions since at low temperatures thermal reaction rates are too low. Although point defect mobility approaches zero at low temperature, the thermal spikes induced by displacement cascades enable some atom mobility as it cools. In this work a model is developed to calculate "athermal" reaction rates from the atomic mobility within the irradiation-induced thermal spikes, including both displacement cascades and electronic stopping. The athermal reaction rates are added to a simple rate theory cluster dynamics model to allow for the simulation of microstructure evolution during irradiation at cryogenic temperatures. The rate theory model is applied to in-situ irradiation of ZrC and compares well at cryogenic temperatures. The results show that the addition of the thermal spike model makes it possible to rationalize microstructure evolution in the low temperature regime.

  9. Passenger thermal perceptions, thermal comfort requirements, and adaptations in short- and long-haul vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Huang, Kuo-Tsang; Sun, Chen-Yi; Huang, Ying-Che

    2010-05-01

    While thermal comfort in mass transportation vehicles is relevant to service quality and energy consumption, benchmarks for such comfort that reflect the thermal adaptations of passengers are currently lacking. This study reports a field experiment involving simultaneous physical measurements and a questionnaire survey, collecting data from 2,129 respondents, that evaluated thermal comfort in short- and long-haul buses and trains. Experimental results indicate that high air temperature, strong solar radiation, and low air movement explain why passengers feel thermally uncomfortable. The overall insulation of clothing worn by passengers and thermal adaptive behaviour in vehicles differ from those in their living and working spaces. Passengers in short-haul vehicles habitually adjust the air outlets to increase thermal comfort, while passengers in long-haul vehicles prefer to draw the drapes to reduce discomfort from extended exposure to solar radiation. The neutral temperatures for short- and long-haul vehicles are 26.2 degrees C and 27.4 degrees C, while the comfort zones are 22.4-28.9 degrees C and 22.4-30.1 degrees C, respectively. The results of this study provide a valuable reference for practitioners involved in determining the adequate control and management of in-vehicle thermal environments, as well as facilitating design of buses and trains, ultimately contributing to efforts to achieve a balance between the thermal comfort satisfaction of passengers and energy conserving measures for air-conditioning in mass transportation vehicles.

  10. Influence of different temperatures on the thermal fatigue behavior and thermal stability of hot-work tool steel processed by a biomimetic couple laser technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chao; Zhou, Hong; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Ming; Tong, Xin; Cong, Dalong; Wang, Chuanwei; Chang, Fang; Ren, Luquan

    2014-04-01

    Three kinds of biomimetic non-smooth shapes (spot-shape, striation-shape and reticulation-shape) were fabricated on the surface of H13 hot-work tool steel by laser. We investigated the thermal fatigue behavior of biomimetic non-smooth samples with three kinds of shapes at different thermal cycle temperature. Moreover, the evolution of microstructure, as well as the variations of hardness of laser affected area and matrix were studied and compared. The results showed that biomimetic non-smooth samples had better thermal fatigue behavior compared to the untreated samples at different thermal cycle temperatures. For a given maximal temperature, the biomimetic non-smooth sample with reticulation-shape had the optimum thermal fatigue behavior, than with striation-shape which was better than that with the spot-shape. The microstructure observations indicated that at different thermal cycle temperatures the coarsening degrees of microstructures of laser affected area were different and the microstructures of laser affected area were still finer than that of the untreated samples. Although the resistance to thermal cycling softening of laser affected area was lower than that of the untreated sample, laser affected area had higher microhardness than the untreated sample at different thermal cycle temperature.

  11. Reliability of a novel thermal imaging system for temperature assessment of healthy feet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N L; Whittam, A; MacDonald, A; Ainarkar, S; Donaldson, A N; Bevans, J; Allen, J; Plassmann, P; Kluwe, B; Ring, F; Rogers, L; Simpson, R; Machin, G; Edmonds, M E

    2018-01-01

    Thermal imaging is a useful modality for identifying preulcerative lesions ("hot spots") in diabetic foot patients. Despite its recognised potential, at present, there is no readily available instrument for routine podiatric assessment of patients at risk. To address this need, a novel thermal imaging system was recently developed. This paper reports the reliability of this device for temperature assessment of healthy feet. Plantar skin foot temperatures were measured with the novel thermal imaging device (Diabetic Foot Ulcer Prevention System (DFUPS), constructed by Photometrix Imaging Ltd) and also with a hand-held infrared spot thermometer (Thermofocus® 01500A3, Tecnimed, Italy) after 20 min of barefoot resting with legs supported and extended in 105 subjects (52 males and 53 females; age range 18 to 69 years) as part of a multicentre clinical trial. The temperature differences between the right and left foot at five regions of interest (ROIs), including 1st and 4th toes, 1st, 3rd and 5th metatarsal heads were calculated. The intra-instrument agreement (three repeated measures) and the inter-instrument agreement (hand-held thermometer and thermal imaging device) were quantified using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the 95% confidence intervals (CI). Both devices showed almost perfect agreement in replication by instrument. The intra-instrument ICCs for the thermal imaging device at all five ROIs ranged from 0.95 to 0.97 and the intra-instrument ICCs for the hand-held-thermometer ranged from 0.94 to 0.97. There was substantial to perfect inter-instrument agreement between the hand-held thermometer and the thermal imaging device and the ICCs at all five ROIs ranged between 0.94 and 0.97. This study reports the performance of a novel thermal imaging device in the assessment of foot temperatures in healthy volunteers in comparison with a hand-held infrared thermometer. The newly developed thermal imaging device showed very good agreement in

  12. Thermal comfort index and infrared temperatures for lambs subjected to different environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago do Prado Paim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an abundance of thermal indices with different input parameters and applicabilities. Infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating the response of animals to the environment and differentiating between genetic groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate superficial body temperatures of lambs from three genetic groups under different environmental conditions, correlating these with thermal comfort indices. Forty lambs (18 males and 22 females from three genetic groups (Santa Inês, Ile de France × Santa Inês and Dorper × Santa Inês were exposed to three climatic conditions: open air, housed and artificial heating. Infrared thermal images were taken weekly at 6h, 12h and 21h at the neck, front flank, rear flank, rump, nose, skull, trunk and eye. Four thermal comfort indices were calculated using environmental measurements including black globe temperature, air humidity and wind speed. Artificial warming, provided by infrared lamps and wind protection, conserved and increased the superficial body temperature of the lambs, thus providing lower daily thermal ranges. Artificial warming did not influence daily weight gain or mortality. Skin temperatures increased along with increases in climatic indices. Again, infrared thermography is a promising technique for evaluating thermal stress conditions and differentiating environments. However, the use of thermal imaging for understanding animal responses to environmental conditions requires further study.

  13. A reduced low-temperature electro-thermal coupled model for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Ruan, Haijun; Sun, Bingxiang; Zhang, Weige; Gao, Wenzhong; Wang, Le Yi; Zhang, Linjing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A reduced low-temperature electro-thermal coupled model is proposed. • A novel frequency-dependent equation for polarization parameters is presented. • The model is validated under different frequency and low-temperature conditions. • The reduced model exhibits a high accuracy with a low computational effort. • The adaptability of the proposed methodology for model reduction is verified. - Abstract: A low-temperature electro-thermal coupled model, which is based on the electrochemical mechanism, is developed to accurately capture both electrical and thermal behaviors of batteries. Activation energies reveal that temperature dependence of resistances is greater than that of capacitances. The influence of frequency on polarization voltage and irreversible heat is discussed, and frequency dependence of polarization resistance and capacitance is obtained. Based on the frequency-dependent equation, a reduced low-temperature electro-thermal coupled model is proposed and experimentally validated under different temperature, frequency and amplitude conditions. Simulation results exhibit good agreement with experimental data, where the maximum relative voltage error and temperature error are below 2.65% and 1.79 °C, respectively. The reduced model is demonstrated to have almost the same accuracy as the original model and require a lower computational effort. The effectiveness and adaptability of the proposed methodology for model reduction is verified using batteries with three different cathode materials from different manufacturers. The reduced model, thanks to its high accuracy and simplicity, provides a promising candidate for development of rapid internal heating and optimal charging strategies at low temperature, and for evaluation of the state of battery health in on-board battery management system.

  14. Transient thermal stresses in multiple connected region exhibiting temperature dependence of material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Yoshihiro; Maekawa, Toshiya.

    1983-01-01

    The examples of the analysis of thermal stress in multiple connection regions such as heat exchangers, nuclear reactor cores, ingot cases and polygonal region with elliptic holes are not few, but the temperature dependence of material constants was neglected in these researches because of the difficulty of analysis though the industrial problems related to thermal stress are apt to occur in the condition of relatively large temperature gradient. Also, the analysis of heat conduction problems taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account was limited to one-dimensional problems for which Kirchhoff's transmission can be used. The purpose of this study is to derive the equation of condition which assures the one-value property of rotation and displacement, taking the temperature dependence of material constants into account, and to complete the formulation of the plane thermal stress problems in multiple connection regions by stress function method. Also the method of numerical analysis using difference method is shown to examine the effectiveness of various formulated equations and the effect of the temperature dependence of material constants on temperature and thermal stress. The example of numerical calculation on a thin rectangular plate with a rectangular hole is shown. (Kako, I.)

  15. Experimental study on thermal conductivity of He-Ar binary mixture at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results of the experimental and theoretical investigation of helium-argon mixture thermal conductivity for three concentrations of helium (25,50 and 75%) in the 90-273 K temperature range at 1 atm. pressure are presented. At the calculation of the thermal conductivity coefficients corrections for the heat removal from the heater ends, for radiation and temperature drop in the wall of a glass tube and a measuring cell have been considered. On the basis of the thermal conductivity coefficient values the empiric concentration dependences of the mixture thermal conductivity are obtained by the method of least squares at different temperatures. Experimental data have been compared with theoretical values of thermal conductivity, calculated according to the molecular-kinetic theory. The results of this investigation can be used for determining potential energy of interparticle interaction and studying heat exchange processes at the external flow over body

  16. Thermal diffusivity measurements of liquid materials at high temperature with the ''laser flash'' method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, Claude; Vandevelde, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Two solutions, one analytical and the other numerical are proposed to solve the thermokinetic problem encountered when measuring the thermal diffusivity of liquid materials at very high temperature (T>3123K). The liquid material is contained in a parallel faced vessel. This liquid is traversed by a short thermal pulse from a relaxed laser. The temperature response of the back face of the measurement cell is analysed. The first model proposed which does not take thermal losses into consideration, is a mathematical model derived from the ''two layer model'' (Larson and Koyama, 1968) extended to ''three layers''. In order to take the possibility of thermal losses to the external environment at high temperature into consideration, a Crank-Nicolson (1947) type numerical model utilizing finite differences is employed. These thermokinetic studies were performed in order to interpret temperature response curves obtained from the back face of a tungsten-liquid UO 2 -tungsten thermal wall, the purpose of the measurements made being to determine the thermal properties of liquid uranium oxide [fr

  17. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, J; Foest, R; Reuter, S; Kewitz, T; Šperka, J; Weltmann, K-D

    2012-10-01

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  18. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D. [INP Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Kewitz, T. [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany); Sperka, J. [Department of Physical Electronics, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable

  19. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error 10 sec.

  20. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites due to neutron irradiation at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    Several graphites and carbon/carbon composites (C/C's) have been irradiated with fission neutrons near 150 C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m K for a unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14% of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The significant recovery of thermal conductivity due to post-irradiation isochronal anneals is also presented. (orig.)

  1. Transient thermal-mechanical behavior of cracked glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Y.; Ueda, S.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the transient thermal-mechanical response of cracked G-10CR glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates with temperature-dependent properties. The glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates are suddenly cooled on the surfaces. A generalized plane strain finite element model is used to study the influence of warp angle and crack formation on the thermal shock behavior of two-layer woven laminates at low temperatures. Numerical calculations are carried out, and the transient temperature distribution and the thermal-mechanical stresses are shown graphically

  2. Nuclear-Thermal Analysis of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel via Two-Temperature Homogenized Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2013-01-01

    The FCM fuel is based on a proven safety philosophy that has been utilized operationally in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). However, the FCM fuel consists of TRISO particles randomly dispersed in SiC matrix. The high heterogeneity in composition leads to difficulty in explicit thermal calculation of such a fuel. Therefore, an appropriate homogenization model becomes essential. In this paper, we apply the two-temperature homogenized model to thermal analysis of an FCM fuel. The model was recently proposed in order to provide more realistic temperature profiles in the fuel element in VHTRs. We applied the two-temperature homogenized model to FCM fuel. The two-temperature homogenized model was obtained by particle transport Monte Carlo calculation applied to the pellet region consisting of many coated particles uniformly dispersed in SiC matrix. Since this model gives realistic temperature profiles in the pellet (providing fuel-kernel temperature and SiC matrix temperature distinctly), it can be used for more accurate neutronics evaluation such as Doppler temperature feedback. The transient thermal calculation may be performed also more realistically with temperature-dependent homogenized parameters in various scenarios

  3. Thermal Analysis of TRIO-CINEMA Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegun Yoo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis and control design are prerequisite essential to design the satellite. In the space environment, it makes satellite survive from extreme hot and cold conditions. In recent years CubeSat mission is developed for many kinds of purpose. Triplet Ionospheric Observatory (TRIO–CubeSat for Ion, Neutral, Electron, MAgnetic fields (CINEMA is required to weigh less than 3 kg and operate on minimal 3 W power. In this paper we describe the thermal analysis and control design for TRIO-CINEMA mission. For this thermal analysis, we made a thermal model of the CubeSat with finite element method and NX6.0 TMG software is used to simulate this analysis model. Based on this result, passive thermal control method has been applied to thermal design of CINEMA. In order to get the better conduction between solar panel and chassis, we choose aluminum 6061-T6 for the material property of standoff. We can increase the average temperature of top and bottom solar panels from -70°C to -40°C and decrease the average temperature of the magnetometer from +93°C to -4°C using black paint on the surface of the chassis, inside of top & bottom solar panels, and magnetometer.

  4. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  5. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moreno, Olga; Fernandez, Adolfo; Khainakov, Sergei; Torrecillas, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  6. Studies of Interactions of Positive Helium Ions with Small Neutrals at Temperatures Below 50K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Martin Michael

    1990-01-01

    Interactions of He^+ ions with small neutrals are important because of their fundamental nature and applicability to other areas of research. In the past, very little work has been done on such systems at very low temperatures (T Boehringer and Arnold (1986) and Johnsen, Chen, and Biondi (1980). A new method of detecting the ions in the trap was also developed and implemented. The Fourier Transform Ion Z-resonance (FTIZR) technique took advantage of an induced coherence in the oscillations of the ions in the trap. This method allowed for measurement of faster ion -neutral reactions. This method was demonstrated by studying the non -resonant charge transfer process ^3He ^+{+}^4He{toatop >=ts}^3He{+}^4He^+. These measurements confirmed that the forward reaction is endothermic by about 1.1 meV.

  7. Operation and thermal loading of three-level Neutral-Point-Clamped wind power converter under various grid faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede; Liserre, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In order to fulfill the continuous growing grid-side demands, the full-scale power converters are becoming more and more popular in the wind power application. Nevertheless, the more severe loading of the power semiconductor devices in the full-scale power converters, especially during Low Voltage...... Ride Through (LVRT) operation under grid faults, may compromise the reliability of the system and consequently further increase its cost. In this paper, the impact of various grid faults on a three-level Neutral-Point-Clamped (3L-NPC) grid-converter in terms of thermal loading of power semiconductor...

  8. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  9. Thermal effects in concrete members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, A.K.

    1977-01-01

    The proposed method of analysis for concrete members subjected to temperature changes is consistent with the requirements of ultimate strength design. This also facilitates the provision of the same safety margin as for other loads. Due to cracks and creep in concrete, thermal stresses are nonlinear; they are dependent on the effective member stiffness, which in turn vary with the magnitude of loading. Therefore it is inconsistent to have an ultimate strength design in conjunction with an analysis based on the linear elastic theory. It is proposed that when the requirements of serviceability are met, the neutral axis corresponding to the ultimate load capacity conditions be considered for temperature-induced loadings. This conforms with the fact that the thermal load, because of creep and formation of cracks in the member, can be self-relieving as the failure load condition or ultimate capacity is approached. The maximum thermal load that can develop in dependent on the effective cross section of the member. Recommendations are made for determining the average effective member stiffness, which lies between the stiffness corresponding to the cracked (at ultimate condition) and the uncracked sections. In the proposed method, thermal stresses are not considered completely self-relieving. The stresses are considered simultaneously with stresses resulting from other causes. A step-by-step approach is presented for analysis and design of concrete members subjected to temperature changes

  10. Differences in reported linguistic thermal sensation between Bangla and Japanese speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Aklima; Hasib, Md Abdul; Nagano, Hisaho; Taimura, Akihiro

    2017-06-05

    Thermal sensation is a fundamental variable used to determine thermal comfort and is most frequently evaluated through the use of subjective reports in the field of environmental physiology. However, there has been little study of the relationship between the semantics of the words used to describe thermal sensation and the climatic background. The present study investigates the linguistic differences in thermal reports from native speakers of Bangla and Japanese. A total of 1141 university students (932 in Bangladesh and 209 in Japan) responded to a questionnaire survey consisting of 20 questions. Group differences between Bangladeshi and Japanese respondents were then tested with a chi-square test in a crosstab analysis using SPSS (version 21). For the Bangla-speaking respondents, the closest feeling of thermal comfort was "neutral" (66.6%) followed by "slightly cool" (10.2%), "slightly cold" (6.0%), "slightly hot" (4.1%), and "cold" (3.8%). For the Japanese respondents, the closest feeling of thermal comfort was "cool" (38.3%) followed by "slightly cool" (20.4%), "neutral" (14.6%), "slightly warm" (13.1%), and "warm" (10.7%). Of the Bangladeshi respondents, 37.7% reported that they were sensitive to cold weather and 18.1% reported that they were sensitive to hot weather. Of the Japanese respondents, 20.6% reported that they were sensitive to cold weather and 29.2% reported that they were sensitive to hot weather. Of the Bangladeshi respondents, 51.4% chose "higher than 29 °C" as hot weather and 38.7% of the Japanese respondents chose "higher than 32 °C" as hot weather. In the case of cold weather, 43.1% of the Bangladeshi respondents selected "lower than 15 °C" as cold weather and 53.4% of the Japanese respondents selected "lower than 10 °C" as cold weather. Most of the Bangla-speaking respondents chose "neutral" as the most comfortable temperature, and most of the Japanese respondents chose "cool." Most of the Bangladeshi respondents reported that they

  11. Implications of Thermal Diffusity being Inversely Proportional to Temperature Times Thermal Expansivity on Lower Mantle Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    Many measurements and models of heat transport in lower mantle candidate phases contain systematic errors: (1) conventional methods of insulators involve thermal losses that are pressure (P) and temperature (T) dependent due to physical contact with metal thermocouples, (2) measurements frequently contain unwanted ballistic radiative transfer which hugely increases with T, (3) spectroscopic measurements of dense samples in diamond anvil cells involve strong refraction by which has not been accounted for in analyzing transmission data, (4) the role of grain boundary scattering in impeding heat and light transfer has largely been overlooked, and (5) essentially harmonic physical properties have been used to predict anharmonic behavior. Improving our understanding of the physics of heat transport requires accurate data, especially as a function of temperature, where anharmonicity is the key factor. My laboratory provides thermal diffusivity (D) at T from laser flash analysis, which lacks the above experimental errors. Measuring a plethora of chemical compositions in diverse dense structures (most recently, perovskites, B1, B2, and glasses) as a function of temperature provides a firm basis for understanding microscopic behavior. Given accurate measurements for all quantities: (1) D is inversely proportional to [T x alpha(T)] from ~0 K to melting, where alpha is thermal expansivity, and (2) the damped harmonic oscillator model matches measured D(T), using only two parameters (average infrared dielectric peak width and compressional velocity), both acquired at temperature. These discoveries pertain to the anharmonic aspects of heat transport. I have previously discussed the easily understood quasi-harmonic pressure dependence of D. Universal behavior makes application to the Earth straightforward: due to the stiffness and slow motions of the plates and interior, and present-day, slow planetary cooling rates, Earth can be approximated as being in quasi

  12. Thermal properties and modeling of aluminosilicate materials for low-temperature bulk applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, S.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis concerns itself with the thermal properties of aluminosilicate materials such as cements, blended cements and clays and their application to the problem of radioactive waste encapsulation. The objective of this thesis is to study the thermal properties (heat of hydration, thermal conductivity and diffusivity) of these materials and to determine their effect on the temperature in large monoliths and on the material itself. In this thesis the hydration temperatures for the extreme conditions (adiabatic) were experimentally measured and compared to those predicted under real conditions. Such a simulation can be made by measuring the thermal properties and studying the temperature distribution predicted by a finite differences computer model. Measurements of adiabatic temperature rise were made using a computer-controlled adiabatic calorimeter which was designed and developed for this thesis. Conditions very close to zero heat exchange with the environment were achieved. The existence of this method made it possible to actually observe the fact that cement hydration results in boiling off of the water in such conditions. A number of additives were tried to prevent this. It was observed that waste or by-product materials such as blast furnace slag and fly ash could be used to dramatically reduced the temperature in large bodies. These materials also reacted extensively with the highly alkaline radioactive waste solution to form hydrogarnet and zeolitic material which had useful cementing properties. The conclusion was reached that a selection of blends of aluminosilicate materials can be utilized for providing the proper thermal environment for long-term geological disposal of radioactive waste

  13. Numerical investigation of temperature distribution and thermal performance while charging-discharging thermal energy in aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Sayantan; Mohan Kumar, M.S.; Date, Abhijit; Akbarzadeh, Aliakbar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3D coupled thermo-hydrogeological numerical model of an ATES system is presented. • Importance of a few parameters involved in the study is determined. • Thermal energy discharge by the ATES system for two seasons is estimated. • A strategy and a safe well spacing are proposed to avoid thermal interference. • The proposed model is applied to simulate a real life ATES field study. - Abstract: A three-dimensional (3D) coupled thermo-hydrogeological numerical model for a confined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system underlain and overlain by rock media has been presented in this paper. The ATES system operates in cyclic mode. The model takes into account heat transport processes of advection, conduction and heat loss to confining rock media. The model also includes regional groundwater flow in the aquifer in the longitudinal and lateral directions, geothermal gradient and anisotropy in the aquifer. Results show that thermal injection into the aquifer results in the generation of a thermal-front which grows in size with time. The thermal interference caused by the premature thermal-breakthrough when the thermal-front reaches the production well results in the fall of system performance and hence should be avoided. This study models the transient temperature distribution in the aquifer for different flow and geological conditions which may be effectively used in designing an efficient ATES project by ensuring safety from thermal-breakthrough while catering to the energy demand. Parameter studies are also performed which reveals that permeability of the confining rocks; well spacing and injection temperature are important parameters which influence transient heat transport in the subsurface porous media. Based on the simulations here a safe well spacing is proposed. The thermal energy produced by the system in two seasons is estimated for four different cases and strategy to avoid the premature thermal-breakthrough in critical cases is

  14. Temperature corrected-calibration of GRACE's accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnacao, J.; Save, H.; Siemes, C.; Doornbos, E.; Tapley, B. D.

    2017-12-01

    Since April 2011, the thermal control of the accelerometers on board the GRACE satellites has been turned off. The time series of along-track bias clearly show a drastic change in the behaviour of this parameter, while the calibration model has remained unchanged throughout the entire mission lifetime. In an effort to improve the quality of the gravity field models produced at CSR in future mission-long re-processing of GRACE data, we quantify the added value of different calibration strategies. In one approach, the temperature effects that distort the raw accelerometer measurements collected without thermal control are corrected considering the housekeeping temperature readings. In this way, one single calibration strategy can be consistently applied during the whole mission lifetime, since it is valid to thermal the conditions before and after April 2011. Finally, we illustrate that the resulting calibrated accelerations are suitable for neutral thermospheric density studies.

  15. Effect of neutral atoms on tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueloep, T.; Catto, Peter J.; Helander, P.

    2001-01-01

    Neutral atoms can significantly influence the physics of tokamak edge plasmas, e.g., by affecting the radial electric field and plasma flow there, which may, in turn, be important for plasma confinement. Earlier work [Fueloep et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 3969 (1998)], assuming short mean-free path neutrals and Pfirsch-Schlueter ions, has shown that the ion-neutral coupling through charge-exchange affects the neoclassical flow velocity significantly. However, the mean-free path of the neutrals is not always small in comparison with the radial scale length of densities and temperatures in the edge pedestal. It is therefore desirable to determine what happens in the limit when the neutral mean-free path is comparable with the scale length. In the present work a self-similar solution for the neutral distribution function allowing for strong temperature and density variation is used, following the analysis of Helander and Krasheninnikov [Phys. Plasmas 3, 226 (1995)]. The self-similar solution is possible if the ratio of the mean-free path to the temperature and density scale length is constant throughout the edge plasma. The resulting neutral distribution function is used to investigate the neutral effects on the ion flow and electrostatic potential as this ratio varies from much less than one to order unity

  16. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The temperature field, heat transfer rate and thermal stresses were investigated with numerical simulation models using FORTRAN FE (finite element) software. ...... specific heats, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol.

  17. Experimental investigation of thermal de-stratification in rock bed TES systems for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okello, Denis; Nydal, Ole J.; Banda, Eldad J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High thermal stratifications exists rock bed TES when charge with high temperature heat. • Faster thermal degradation occurs in highly stratified bed irrespective of the bed length. • Average rate of heat loss as a function of storage time increases with increasing average bed temperature. - Abstract: Solar energy fluctuates so much that it cannot promote continuous use. Integration of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with solar energy collection devices has the potential of making solar energy available on demand. Thermal energy can be stored in a bed of rocks at temperatures suitable for applications like cooking, boiling space heating, etc. During charging, temperature stratification is observed in the bed. In a stratified system, if the heat is used immediately, then it is possible to extract heat at reasonably high temperature from the top. For cases where the system is to be used after sometime (later at night or the following morning), the high temperature heat at the top is observed to degrade as the system tries to establish thermal equilibrium irrespective of the bed height. The average rate of heat loss from the TES unit to the ambient is found to increase with increasing average bed temperatures

  18. Temperature dependence of thermal expansion of cadmium sulfide in the temperature range 20 - 820 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskotskij, V.S.; Kobyakov, I.B.; Solodukhin, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    The linear thermal expansion of cadmium sulfide is measured perpendicularly (α 1 ) and parallelly (α 2 ) to the hexagonal axis in the temperature range from 20 to 820 K. Anisotropy is low at up to 80 K; rises at higher temperatures; at 3OO K α 1 /α 3 ratio is 1.8; at 820 K, 2.4. Heat expansion is negative at temperatures lower than 104.5 K(α 1 ) and 126.0 K(α 2 ). It achieves the minimum at 43.6 K (α 1 ) and 52.5K (α 3 ). The theory of heat expansion is plotted in the Debue, approximation and cadmium sulfide is considered as an isotope crystal with average elastic constants. Two parameters of the theory are determined by the position and value of the minimum of volumetric thermal expansion of the model isotope crystal. The theoretic curve agrees well with the experimental one at temperatures up to 160 K, i.e in the range of applicability of the Debue approximation and the isotropic model

  19. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal...... sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation....... Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy...

  20. Predictive Simulations of ITER Including Neutral Beam Driven Toroidal Rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, Federico D.; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, G.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Budny, Robert V.; McCune, Douglas C.

    2008-01-01

    Predictive simulations of ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 2002] discharges are carried out for the 15 MA high confinement mode (H-mode) scenario using PTRANSP, the predictive version of the TRANSP code. The thermal and toroidal momentum transport equations are evolved using turbulent and neoclassical transport models. A predictive model is used to compute the temperature and width of the H-mode pedestal. The ITER simulations are carried out for neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas, for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) heated plasmas, and for plasmas heated with a mix of NBI and ICRF. It is shown that neutral beam injection drives toroidal rotation that improves the confinement and fusion power production in ITER. The scaling of fusion power with respect to the input power and to the pedestal temperature is studied. It is observed that, in simulations carried out using the momentum transport diffusivity computed using the GLF23 model [R.Waltz et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)], the fusion power increases with increasing injected beam power and central rotation frequency. It is found that the ITER target fusion power of 500 MW is produced with 20 MW of NBI power when the pedesta temperature is 3.5 keV. 2008 American Institute of Physics. [DOI: 10.1063/1.2931037

  1. Apple detection using infrared thermal image, 3: Real-time temperature measurement of apple tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.H.; Takahashi, T.; Fukuchi, H.; Sun, M.; Terao, H.

    1998-01-01

    In Part 1, we reported the thermal distribution characteristics and the identification methods of apples, leaves and branches by using the infrared thermal image at the specific time. This paper reports the temperature changing characteristics and the relationships among apples, leaves and air temperature based on the information measured by the infrared thermal image equipment in the real-time for 24 hours. As a result, it was confirmed that the average temperature of apples was 1 degree C or more higher than the one of the leaves, and the average temperature of the leaves was almost same as the air temperature within daytime and about 3 hours period after sunset. It was also clarified for a remarkable temperature difference not to exist for midnight and the early morning between the apples and the leaves, and both became almost as well as the air temperature. Moreover, a binary image was easily obtained and the apples could be detected by using this temperature difference informat

  2. Water-cooled U-tube grids for continuously operated neutral-beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Duffy, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    A design for water-cooled extractor grids for long-pulse and continuously operated ion sources for neutral-beam injectors is described. The most serious design problem encountered is that of minimizing the thermal deformation (bowing) of these slender grid rails, which have typical overall spans of 150 mm and diameters on the order of 1 mm. A unique U-tube design is proposed that offers the possibility of keeping the thermal bowing down to about 0.05 mm (about 2.0 mils). However, the design requires high-velocity cooling water at a Reynolds number of about 3 x 10 4 and an inlet pressure on the order of 4.67 x 10 6 Pa (677 psia) in order to keep the axial and circumferential temperature differences small enough to achieve the desired small thermal bowing. It appears possible to fabricate and assemble these U-tube grids out of molybdenum with high precision and with a reasonably small number of brazes

  3. Electrothermal efficiency, temperature and thermal conductivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study was made to evaluate the electrothermal efficiency of a DC arc plasma torch and temperature and thermal conductivity of plasma jet in the torch. The torch was operated at power levels from 4 to 20 kW in non-transferred arc mode. The effect of nitrogen in combination with argon as plasma gas on the above ...

  4. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  5. Low-Cost Temperature Logger for a Polymerase Chain Reaction Thermal Cycler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Young Park

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is a method of amplifying DNA which is normally carried out with a thermal cycler. To obtain more accurate and reliable PCR results, the temperature change within the chamber of the thermal cycler needs to be verified and calibrated regularly. Commercially available temperature loggers commonly used for temperature verification tests usually require a graphical user interface (GUI attached to the logger for convenience and straightforward understanding of the device. In this study, a host-local architecture for the temperature logger that significantly reduces the development time and cost is proposed. Employing standard computing devices as the host gives better development environment and user-friendly GUI. This paper presents the hardware and software design of the host-local temperature logger, and demonstrates the use of the local temperature logger connected to a personal computer with a Windows operating system. The probe design, thermistor resistance measurement, temperature filtering, and temperature calibration is described in detail. The thermistor self-heating problem was investigated in particular to determine the reference resistor that was serially connected to the thermistor. The temperature accuracy and temporal precision of the proposed system was 0.1 K.

  6. Thermal comfort study of hospital workers in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Y H; Chew, B T

    2009-12-01

    This article presents findings of the thermal comfort study in hospitals. A field survey was conducted to investigate the temperature range for thermal comfort in hospitals in the tropics. Thermal acceptability assessment was conducted to examine whether the hospitals in the tropics met the ASHRAE Standard-55 80% acceptability criteria. A total of 114 occupants in four hospitals were involved in the study. The results of the field study revealed that only 44% of the examined locations met the comfort criteria specified in ASHRAE Standard 55. The survey also examined the predicted percentage of dissatisfied in the hospitals. The results showed that 49% of the occupants were satisfied with the thermal environments in the hospitals. The field survey analysis revealed that the neutral temperature for Malaysian hospitals was 26.4 degrees C. The comfort temperature range that satisfied 90% of the occupants in the space was in the range of 25.3-28.2 degrees C. The results from the field study suggested that a higher comfort temperature was required for Malaysians in hospital environments compared with the temperature criteria specified in ASHRAE Standard (2003). In addition, the significant deviation between actual mean vote and predicted mean vote (PMV) strongly implied that PMV could not be applied without errors in hospitals in the tropics. The new findings on thermal comfort temperature range in hospitals in the tropics could be used as an important guide for building services engineers and researchers who are intending to minimize energy usage in heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems in hospitals operating in the tropics with acceptable thermal comfort level and to improve the performance and well-being of its workers.

  7. Experimental research on thermal comfort in the university classroom of regular semesters in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gun Joo; Oh, Geun Sug; Im, Young Bin [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sung Ki [Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima (Japan); Ahn, Young Chull [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    This research has investigated physical variables affecting indoor thermal comfort and subjective responses of thermal comfort of students in a university in Korea in which the weather is oceanic temperate climate, and has been performed to contribute to the research fields of Sustainable Thermal Standard and Adaptive Thermal Comfort (ATC). This research is based on the ISO 7730-2005 standard and the ATC theories and 4 main variables of PMV such as dry bulb temperature (Ta), relative humidity (RH), black bulb temperature (Tg), and air velocity (Va) are measured once a week during two regular semesters. A clothing insulation, a thermal sensation vote (TSV), an acceptability of thermal environment, and a preference for cooling and heating are investigated at the same time using a questionnaire. This study was carried out for 26 weeks during the spring season, from March to June 2009, and the autumn season, from September to December 2009. The main achievements of this study are as follows. Monthly Mean Outdoor Temperature (MMOT) and Operative Temperature (OT) in the classroom during research periods are 7.4{approx}23.3 .deg. C and 17.5{approx}29.0 .deg. C, respectively. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment shows over 80% when the range of OT in the classroom is 17{approx}25 .deg. C, and the range can be applicable to operative index of heating and cooling of classroom. The mean TSV of respondents is almost 'neutral (0)' when the PMV in the classroom moves to 'neutral (0)' and 'slightly cool (-1)', and the TSV is almost '+1.5' when the PMV moves to 'slightly warm (+1)'. The acceptability ratio of thermal environment is slightly different from ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. So it is necessary to more investigate standard range of acceptability of thermal environment in oceanic temperate climate region using much more databases.

  8. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus-FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met) indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  9. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus–FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  10. Fiber Bragg Gratings for High-Temperature Thermal Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L.; Fielder, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors were used as a characterization tool to study the SAFE-100 thermal simulator at the Nasa Marshal Space Flight Center. The motivation for this work was to support Nasa space nuclear power initiatives through the development of advanced fiber optic sensors for space-based nuclear power applications. Distributed high temperature measurements, up to 1150 deg. C, were made with FBG temperature sensors. Additionally, FBG strain measurements were taken at elevated temperatures to provide a strain profile of the core during operation. This paper will discuss the contribution of these measurements to meet the goals of Nasa Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center. (authors)

  11. How to correct the ambient temperature influence on the thermal response test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borinaga-Treviño, Roque; Norambuena-Contreras, Jose; Castro-Fresno, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Due to global warming and to the increasing energy demand, it is necessary to improve energy efficiency on buildings. In this context, Ground-Coupled Heat Pumps (GCHP) have proved to be the most efficient heating and cooling system. The main parameters to define a ground heat exchanger are obtained via an in situ test called Thermal Response Test (TRT). However, ambient air influence on this test is remarkable due to the exposition of the testing machine, and even the ground undisturbed temperature varies with the ambient temperature oscillations. Therefore, despite the fact that the influence of ambient conditions on the TRT results is an important topic in order to define a ground heat exchanger, there is yet a limited literature on new theoretical methods to correct the ambient temperature influence on the predicted ground thermal conductivity measured via TRT. This paper presents a new methodology to analyse and mitigate the influence of the ambient conditions on the TRT results, with the main advantage that it is not necessary to know its physical origin previously. The method is focused on reducing the mean fluid temperature oscillations caused by the ambient temperature, by analysing the influence of the chosen time interval to fit the data to the infinite line source theory formulae that finally predicts the ground thermal conductivity. With these purpose, results of two different TRTs were analysed, each of them with a different equipment and ambient exposition. Results using the proposed method showed that thermal conductivity oscillations were reduced in both tests. For the first test, the uncertainty associated to the chosen time interval for the estimation was diminished by 33%, reducing significantly its predicted value and thus avoiding the future installation possible under-designing. However, because of the equipment insulation improvements and the smoother ambient temperature variations, the method obtained similar results for the predicted

  12. Subjective thermal sensation and human body exergy consumption rate: analysis and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Dovjak, M.; Kolarik, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    , it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. There is a need to verify the human-body exergy model with the Thermal-Sensation (TS) response of subjects exposed to different combinations of indoor climate parameters (temperature, humidity, etc.). First results...... available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation showed that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to slightly cool side of thermal sensation. By applying...... the exergy concept to the built indoor environment, additional results are going to be explored. By using the data available so far of operative temperature (to), the human body exergy consumption rates increase as to increases above 24°C or decreases below 22°C at relative humidity (RH) lower than 50...

  13. Application of Markov chain model to daily maximum temperature for thermal comfort in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordin, Muhamad Asyraf bin Che; Hassan, Husna

    2015-01-01

    The Markov chain’s first order principle has been widely used to model various meteorological fields, for prediction purposes. In this study, a 14-year (2000-2013) data of daily maximum temperatures in Bayan Lepas were used. Earlier studies showed that the outdoor thermal comfort range based on physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) index in Malaysia is less than 34°C, thus the data obtained were classified into two state: normal state (within thermal comfort range) and hot state (above thermal comfort range). The long-run results show the probability of daily temperature exceed TCR will be only 2.2%. On the other hand, the probability daily temperature within TCR will be 97.8%

  14. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  15. Heat generation and temperature-rise in ordinary concrete due to capture of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, E.A.; Amin, E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work is the evaluation of the heat generation and temperature-rise in local ordinary concrete as a biological shield due to capture of total thermal and reactor thermal neutrons. The total thermal neutron fluxes were measured and calculated. The channel number 2 of the ETRR-1 reactor was used in the measurements as a neutron source. Computer code ANISN (VAX version) and neutron multigroup cross-section library EURLiB-4 was used in the calculations. The heat generation and temperature-rise in local ordinary concrete were evaluated and calculated. The results were displayed in curves to show the distribution of thermal neutron fluxes and heat generation as well as temperature-rise with the shield thickness. The results showed that, the heat generation as well as the temperature-rise have their maximum values in the first layers of the shield thickness. 4 figs., 12 refs

  16. Effect of electronic contribution on temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Yong; Park, No-Won [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji-Eun [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Hyuk [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Kwon, E-mail: sangkwonlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We investigated thermal transport of the antimony telluride thin films. • The contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity increased up to ∼77% at 300 K. • We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component. - Abstract: We study the theoretical and experimental characteristics of thermal transport of 100 nm and 500 nm-thick antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K, using four-point-probe 3-ω method. Out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film was much lesser in comparison to the bulk material in the entire temperature range, confirming that the phonon- and electron-boundary scattering are enhanced in thin films. Moreover, we found that the contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity (κ{sub e}) in total thermal conductivity (κ) linearly increased up to ∼77% at 300 K with increasing temperature. We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component of thermal conductivity towards the total thermal conductivity of the film by a modified Callaway model. Further, we find the theoretical model predictions to correspond well with the experimental results.

  17. Use and misuse of temperature normalisation in meta-analyses of thermal responses of biological traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios - Georgios Kontopoulos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There is currently unprecedented interest in quantifying variation in thermal physiology among organisms, especially in order to understand and predict the biological impacts of climate change. A key parameter in this quantification of thermal physiology is the performance or value of a rate, across individuals or species, at a common temperature (temperature normalisation. An increasingly popular model for fitting thermal performance curves to data—the Sharpe-Schoolfield equation—can yield strongly inflated estimates of temperature-normalised rate values. These deviations occur whenever a key thermodynamic assumption of the model is violated, i.e., when the enzyme governing the performance of the rate is not fully functional at the chosen reference temperature. Using data on 1,758 thermal performance curves across a wide range of species, we identify the conditions that exacerbate this inflation. We then demonstrate that these biases can compromise tests to detect metabolic cold adaptation, which requires comparison of fitness or rate performance of different species or genotypes at some fixed low temperature. Finally, we suggest alternative methods for obtaining unbiased estimates of temperature-normalised rate values for meta-analyses of thermal performance across species in climate change impact studies.

  18. Role of the Soil Thermal Inertia in the short term variability of the surface temperature and consequences for the soil-moisture temperature feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruy, Frederique; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Ait Mesbah, Sonia; Grandpeix, Jean-Yves; Wang, Fuxing

    2017-04-01

    A simple model based on the surface energy budget at equilibrium is developed to compute the sensitivity of the climatological mean daily temperature and diurnal amplitude to the soil thermal inertia. It gives a conceptual framework to quantity the role of the atmospheric and land surface processes in the surface temperature variability and relies on the diurnal amplitude of the net surface radiation, the sensitivity of the turbulent fluxes to the surface temperature and the thermal inertia. The performances of the model are first evaluated with 3D numerical simulations performed with the atmospheric (LMDZ) and land surface (ORCHIDEE) modules of the Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) climate model. A nudging approach is adopted, it prevents from using time-consuming long-term simulations required to account for the natural variability of the climate and allow to draw conclusion based on short-term (several years) simulations. In the moist regions the diurnal amplitude and the mean surface temperature are controlled by the latent heat flux. In the dry areas, the relevant role of the stability of the boundary layer and of the soil thermal inertia is demonstrated. In these regions, the sensitivity of the surface temperature to the thermal inertia is high, due to the high contribution of the thermal flux to the energy budget. At high latitudes, when the sensitivity of turbulent fluxes is dominated by the day-time sensitivity of the sensible heat flux to the surface temperature and when this later is comparable to the thermal inertia term of the sensitivity equation, the surface temperature is also partially controlled by the thermal inertia which can rely on the snow properties; In the regions where the latent heat flux exhibits a high day-to-day variability, such as transition regions, the thermal inertia has also significant impact on the surface temperature variability . In these not too wet (energy limited) and not too dry (moisture-limited) soil moisture (SM

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes Revisited: Effects of Chirality, Isotope Impurity, Tube Length, and Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2004-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality, isotope impurity, tube length and temperature by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also found that the tube length dependence o...

  20. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space borne cryogenic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1996-01-01

    Infrared sensor satellites are used to monitor the conditions in the earth's upper atmosphere. In these systems, the electronic links connecting the cryogenically cooled infrared detectors to the significantly warmer amplification electronics act as thermal bridges and, consequently, the mission lifetimes of the satellites are limited due to cryogenic evaporation. High-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials have been proposed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley's Research Center (NASA-LaRC) as an alternative to the currently used manganin wires for electrical connection. The potential for using HTS films as thermal bridges has provided the motivation for the design and the analysis of a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the performance of this superconductive technology in the space environment. The initial efforts were focused on the preliminary design of the experimental system which allows for the quantitative comparison of superconductive leads with manganin leads, and on the thermal conduction modeling of the proposed system. Most of the HTS materials were indicated to be potential replacements for the manganin wires. In the continuation of this multi-year research, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the sources of heat transfer on the thermal bridges that have been neglected in the preliminary conductive model and then to develop a methodology for the estimation of the thermal conductivities of the HTS thermal bridges in space. The Joule heating created by the electrical current through the manganin wires was incorporated as a volumetric heat source into the manganin conductive model. The radiative heat source on the HTS thermal bridges was determined by performing a separate radiant interchange analysis within a high-T(sub c) superconductor housing area. Both heat sources indicated no significant contribution on the cryogenic heat load, which validates the results obtained in the preliminary conduction

  1. The Temperature Condition of the Plate with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity and Energy Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature state of a solid body, in addition to the conditions of its heat exchange with the environment, can greatly depend on the heat release (or heat absorption processes within the body volume. Among the possible causes of these processes should be noted such as a power release in the fuel elements of nuclear reactors, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions in the solid body material, which respectively involve heat release or absorbtion, heat transfer of a part of the electric power in the current-carrying conductors (so-called Joule’s heat or the energy radiation penetrating into the body of a semitransparent material, etc. The volume power release characterizes an intensity of these processes.The extensive list of references to the theory of heat conductivity of solids offers solutions to problems to determine a stationary (steady over time and non-stationary temperature state of the solids (as a rule, of the canonical form, which act as the sources of volume power release. Thus, in general case, a possibility for changing power release according to the body volume and in solving the nonstationary problems also a possible dependence of this value on the time are taken into consideration.However, in real conditions the volume power release often also depends on the local temperature, and such dependence can be nonlinear. For example, with chemical reactions the intensity of heat release or absorption is in proportion to their rate, which, in turn, is sensitive to the temperature value, and a dependence on the temperature is exponential. A further factor that in such cases makes the analysis of the solid temperature state complicated, is dependence on the temperature and the thermal conductivity of this body material, especially when temperature distribution therein  is significantly non-uniform. Taking into account the influence of these factors requires the mathematical modeling methods, which allow us to build an adequate

  2. Rapid Thermal Annealing of Cathode-Garnet Interface toward High-Temperature Solid State Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Fu, Kun; Gong, Yunhui; Yang, Chunpeng; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Yanbin; Wang, Chengwei; Kuang, Yudi; Pastel, Glenn; Xie, Hua; Wachsman, Eric D; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-08-09

    High-temperature batteries require the battery components to be thermally stable and function properly at high temperatures. Conventional batteries have high-temperature safety issues such as thermal runaway, which are mainly attributed to the properties of liquid organic electrolytes such as low boiling points and high flammability. In this work, we demonstrate a truly all-solid-state high-temperature battery using a thermally stable garnet solid-state electrolyte, a lithium metal anode, and a V 2 O 5 cathode, which can operate well at 100 °C. To address the high interfacial resistance between the solid electrolyte and cathode, a rapid thermal annealing method was developed to melt the cathode and form a continuous contact. The resulting interfacial resistance of the solid electrolyte and V 2 O 5 cathode was significantly decreased from 2.5 × 10 4 to 71 Ω·cm 2 at room temperature and from 170 to 31 Ω·cm 2 at 100 °C. Additionally, the diffusion resistance in the V 2 O 5 cathode significantly decreased as well. The demonstrated high-temperature solid-state full cell has an interfacial resistance of 45 Ω·cm 2 and 97% Coulombic efficiency cycling at 100 °C. This work provides a strategy to develop high-temperature all-solid-state batteries using garnet solid electrolytes and successfully addresses the high contact resistance between the V 2 O 5 cathode and garnet solid electrolyte without compromising battery safety or performance.

  3. Study of TEC, slab-thickness and neutral temperature of the thermosphere in the Indian low latitude sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Venkatesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric equivalent slab-thickness is an important parameter which measures the skewness of the electron density profile of the ionosphere. In this paper, the diurnal, seasonal, day-to-day and latitudinal variations of ionospheric parameters namely total electron content (TEC, the peak ionization density of F-layer (NmF2, equivalent slab-thickness (τ and neutral temperature (Tn are presented. The simultaneous data of GPS-TEC and NmF2 from Trivandrum (8.47° N, 76.91° E, Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E and Delhi (28.58° N, 77.21° E are used to compute the slab-thickness (τ = TEC/NmF2 of the low sunspot period, 2004–2005. The day-time TEC values at Waltair are found to be greater than those at Trivandrum, while at Delhi the day-time TEC values are much lower compared to those at Trivandrum and Waltair. The trends of variation in the monthly mean diurnal variation of TEC and NmF2 are similar at Delhi, while they are different at Trivandrum and Waltair during the day-time. The slab-thickness (τ has shown a pre-sunrise peak around 05:00 LT at all the three stations, except during the summer months over Delhi. A consistent secondary peak in slab-thickness around noon hours has also been observed at Trivandrum and Waltair. During equinox and winter months a large night-time enhancement in the slab-thickness (comparable to the early morning peak in slab-thickness is observed at Delhi. The latitudinal variation of slab-thickness has shown a decrease from the equatorial station, Trivandrum to the low-mid latitude station, Delhi. The neutral temperatures (Tn computed from the slab-thickness (τ has shown a sharp increase around 05:00 LT over Trivandrum and Waltair. Whereas at Delhi, a double peaking around 05:00 and 23:00 LT is observed during winter and equinoctial months. The neutral temperatures computed are compare well with those of the MSIS-90 model derived temperatures.

  4. High-temperature stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    temperature drop was found to increase with the coating thickness of YSZ. The coatings ... thermal barrier coating system on niobium alloys for supersonic vehicles. .... Voltage (V). 75 ..... However, distribution of the other elements; such as Ni,.

  5. On-Line Temperature Estimation for Noisy Thermal Sensors Using a Smoothing Filter-Based Kalman Predictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic thermal management (DTM mechanisms utilize embedded thermal sensors to collect fine-grained temperature information for monitoring the real-time thermal behavior of multi-core processors. However, embedded thermal sensors are very susceptible to a variety of sources of noise, including environmental uncertainty and process variation. This causes the discrepancies between actual temperatures and those observed by on-chip thermal sensors, which seriously affect the efficiency of DTM. In this paper, a smoothing filter-based Kalman prediction technique is proposed to accurately estimate the temperatures from noisy sensor readings. For the multi-sensor estimation scenario, the spatial correlations among different sensor locations are exploited. On this basis, a multi-sensor synergistic calibration algorithm (known as MSSCA is proposed to improve the simultaneous prediction accuracy of multiple sensors. Moreover, an infrared imaging-based temperature measurement technique is also proposed to capture the thermal traces of an advanced micro devices (AMD quad-core processor in real time. The acquired real temperature data are used to evaluate our prediction performance. Simulation shows that the proposed synergistic calibration scheme can reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE by 1.2 ∘ C and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by 15.8 dB (with a very small average runtime overhead compared with assuming the thermal sensor readings to be ideal. Additionally, the average false alarm rate (FAR of the corrected sensor temperature readings can be reduced by 28.6%. These results clearly demonstrate that if our approach is used to perform temperature estimation, the response mechanisms of DTM can be triggered to adjust the voltages, frequencies, and cooling fan speeds at more appropriate times.

  6. On-Line Temperature Estimation for Noisy Thermal Sensors Using a Smoothing Filter-Based Kalman Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ou, Xingtao; Li, Zhi; Wei, Henglu; Zhou, Wei; Duan, Zhemin

    2018-02-02

    Dynamic thermal management (DTM) mechanisms utilize embedded thermal sensors to collect fine-grained temperature information for monitoring the real-time thermal behavior of multi-core processors. However, embedded thermal sensors are very susceptible to a variety of sources of noise, including environmental uncertainty and process variation. This causes the discrepancies between actual temperatures and those observed by on-chip thermal sensors, which seriously affect the efficiency of DTM. In this paper, a smoothing filter-based Kalman prediction technique is proposed to accurately estimate the temperatures from noisy sensor readings. For the multi-sensor estimation scenario, the spatial correlations among different sensor locations are exploited. On this basis, a multi-sensor synergistic calibration algorithm (known as MSSCA) is proposed to improve the simultaneous prediction accuracy of multiple sensors. Moreover, an infrared imaging-based temperature measurement technique is also proposed to capture the thermal traces of an advanced micro devices (AMD) quad-core processor in real time. The acquired real temperature data are used to evaluate our prediction performance. Simulation shows that the proposed synergistic calibration scheme can reduce the root-mean-square error (RMSE) by 1.2 ∘ C and increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by 15.8 dB (with a very small average runtime overhead) compared with assuming the thermal sensor readings to be ideal. Additionally, the average false alarm rate (FAR) of the corrected sensor temperature readings can be reduced by 28.6%. These results clearly demonstrate that if our approach is used to perform temperature estimation, the response mechanisms of DTM can be triggered to adjust the voltages, frequencies, and cooling fan speeds at more appropriate times.

  7. Thermal Aware Floorplanning Incorporating Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, AndreasThor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Temperature has a negative impact on metal resistance and thus wire delay. In state-of-the-art VLSI circuits, large thermal gradients usually exist due to the uneven distribution of heat sources. The difference in wire temperature can lead to performance mismatch because wires of the same length...... can have different delay. Traditional floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate wire performance. In this work, we show that this does not always produce a design with the shortest delay and we propose a floorplanning algorithm taking into account temperature dependent wire delay as one...

  8. Hybrid Vibration Control under Broadband Excitation and Variable Temperature Using Viscoelastic Neutralizer and Adaptive Feedforward Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. O. Marra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibratory phenomena have always surrounded human life. The need for more knowledge and domain of such phenomena increases more and more, especially in the modern society where the human-machine integration becomes closer day after day. In that context, this work deals with the development and practical implementation of a hybrid (passive-active/adaptive vibration control system over a metallic beam excited by a broadband signal and under variable temperature, between 5 and 35°C. Since temperature variations affect directly and considerably the performance of the passive control system, composed of a viscoelastic dynamic vibration neutralizer (also called a viscoelastic dynamic vibration absorber, the associative strategy of using an active-adaptive vibration control system (based on a feedforward approach with the use of the FXLMS algorithm working together with the passive one has shown to be a good option to compensate the neutralizer loss of performance and generally maintain the extended overall level of vibration control. As an additional gain, the association of both vibration control systems (passive and active-adaptive has improved the attenuation of vibration levels. Some key steps matured over years of research on this experimental setup are presented in this paper.

  9. Chemical characteristics of the major thermal springs of Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariner, R.H.; Presser, T.S.; Evans, W.C.

    1976-07-01

    Twenty-one thermal springs in western Montana were sampled for chemical, isotope, and gas compositions. Most of the springs issue dilute to slightly saline sodium-bicarbonate waters of neutral to slightly alkaline pH. A few of the springs issue sodium-mixed anion waters of near neutral pH. Fluoride concentrations are high in most of the thermal waters, up to 18 miligrams per litre, while F/Cl ratios range from 3/1 in the dilute waters to 1/10 in the slightly saline waters. Most of the springs are theoretically in thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to calcite and fluorite. Nitrogen is the major gas escaping from most of the hot springs; however, Hunters Hot Springs issue principally methane. The deuterium content of the hot spring waters is typical of meteoric water in western Montana. Geothermal calculations based on silica concentrations and Na-K-Ca ratios indicate that most of the springs are associated with low temperature aquifers (less than 100/sup 0/C). Chalcedony may be controlling the silica concentrations in these low temperature aquifers even in ''granitic'' terranes.

  10. Certification of temperature measuring techniques at thermal and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preobrazhenskij, V.P.; Strigina, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    Necessity for metrological certification of temperature measurement techniques (TMT) at thermal and nuclear energy plants is grounded. An order of TMT certification is stated and formulae for determining the accuracy of temperature measurements by the thermoelectric method are given. It is concluded that through there are also statistical characteristics of errors of a number of measurement properties, it is necessary to carry on statistical investigations into errors of thermoelectrode extending wires, planimeters, measurement conditions. Such kind investigation technigues have been developed. Besides, it is necessary to regulate a uniform approach to the usage of statistical characteristics of errors of means and conditions of measurements to minimize volume of work for the personnel of thermal and nuclear energy plants and provide reliable estimates of temperature measurement errors

  11. The design of high-temperature thermal conductivity measurements apparatus for thin sample size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Syamsul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the designing, constructing and validating processes of thermal conductivity apparatus using steady-state heat-transfer techniques with the capability of testing a material at high temperatures. This design is an improvement from ASTM D5470 standard where meter-bars with the equal cross-sectional area were used to extrapolate surface temperature and measure heat transfer across a sample. There were two meter-bars in apparatus where each was placed three thermocouples. This Apparatus using a heater with a power of 1,000 watts, and cooling water to stable condition. The pressure applied was 3.4 MPa at the cross-sectional area of 113.09 mm2 meter-bar and thermal grease to minimized interfacial thermal contact resistance. To determine the performance, the validating process proceeded by comparing the results with thermal conductivity obtained by THB 500 made by LINSEIS. The tests showed the thermal conductivity of the stainless steel and bronze are 15.28 Wm-1K-1 and 38.01 Wm-1K-1 with a difference of test apparatus THB 500 are −2.55% and 2.49%. Furthermore, this apparatus has the capability to measure the thermal conductivity of the material to a temperature of 400°C where the results for the thermal conductivity of stainless steel is 19.21 Wm-1K-1 and the difference was 7.93%.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Ali, Zulqurnain; Gurmani, Samia Faiz; Maqsood, Asghari

    2006-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of porous consolidated igneous rocks have been measured, simultaneously by Gustafsson's probe at room temperature and normal pressure using air as saturant. Data are presented for eleven samples of dunite, ranging in porosity from 0.130 to 0.665% by volume, taken from Chillas near Gilgit, Pakistan. The porosity and density parameters have been measured using American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards at ambient conditions. The mineral composition of samples has been analysed from their thin sections (petrography). An empirical model to predict the thermal conductivity of porous consolidated igneous rocks is also proposed. The thermal conductivities are predicted by some of the existing models along with the proposed one. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 6%

  13. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of climax stock quartz monzonite at high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been made on two samples of Climax Stock quartz monzonite at pressures between 3 and 50 MPa and temperatures between 300 and 523 0 K. Following those measurements the apparatus was calibrated with respect to the thermal conductivity measurement using a reference standard of fused silica. Corrected thermal conductivity of the rock indicates a value at room temperature of 2.60 +- 0.25 W/mK at 3 MPa increasing linearly to 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 50 MPa. These values are unchanged (+- 0.07 W/mK) by heating under 50-MPa pressure to as high as 473 0 K. The conductivity under 50-MPa confining pressure falls smoothly from 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 313 0 K to 2.15 +- 0.25 W/mK at 473 0 K. Thermal diffusivity at 300 0 K was found to be 1.2 +- 0.4 X 10 -6 m 2 /s and shows approximately the same pressure and temperature dependencies as the thermal conductivity

  14. Real-time temperature feedback for nanoparticles based tumor thermal treatment (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Idan; Tamir, Gil; Gannot, Israel

    2017-02-01

    Systemic hyperthermia therapy exploits the fact that cancer cells are more sensitive to elevated temperatures than healthy tissue. Systemic application of hyperthermia externally usually leads to low efficiency treatment. Recently, our group and others have proposed an antibody conjugated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) approach to overcome the limitation of systemic hyperthermia. MNPs can bind specifically to the tumor sites, thus delivering internal highly effective targeted hyperthermia. However, such internal mechanism requires more complicated controls and monitoring. This current work presents a deep tissue temperature monitoring method to control hyperthermia effectiveness and minimize collateral damage to surrounding tissues. A low-frequency narrowband modulation of the RF field used for MNP heating leads to the generation of diffused thermal waves which propagate to the tissue surface and captured by a thermal camera. A Fourier domain, analytical heat transfer model is used for temperature monitoring algorithm. The ill-posed thermal inverse problem is solved efficiently by iterating over the source power until both the amplitude and phase match the recorded thermal image sequence. The narrow bandwidth thermal stimulation enables acquiring deep signals with high SNR. We show that thermal transverse resolution improves as the stimulation frequency increases even slightly above DC, enabling better heat source transverse separation and margin identification in the case of distributed tumors. These results can be used as a part of an overall image and treat system for efficient detection of tumors, manipulation of MNPs and monitoring MNP based hyperthermia.

  15. Corrosion of carbon steel in neutral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Noboru; Iwahori, Toru; Kurosawa, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of materials used in the construction of heat exchanger and piping system of BWR nuclear power plants and thermal power plants have been examined in neutral water at 30, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C with two concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. In air-saturated water, the corrosion rate of carbon steel was so higher than those in deaerated conditions and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 200 deg C. The corrosion rate in deaerated water gradually increased with increasing the water temperature. Low alloy steel (2.25 Cr, 1Mo) exhibited good corrosion resistance compared with the corrosion of carbon steel under similar testing conditions. Oxide films grown on carbon steel in deaerated water at 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C for 48 and 240 hrs were attacked by dissolved oxygen in room temperature water respectively. However the oxide films formed higher than about 160 deg C showed more protective. The electrochemical behavior of carbon steel with oxide films was also similar to the effect of temperature on the stability of oxide films. (author)

  16. High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

  17. Temperature and press load stimulation on thermal transport in fibrous and porous composite insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, M.A.; Maqsood, A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal transport properties of synthetic pliable insulators are measured as a function of applied pressure at constant temperatures. Advantageous Transient Plane Source (ATPS) method is used for the simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of these materials and heat capacity per unit volume is then calculated. Three samples namely foam, closed cell foam and fiber glass are subjected to press load, taking into account the flexibility and sustainability of the samples and the requirements of the technique used. The thermal data of the samples were determined within the temperature range (300-414K) and pressure range (Normal -15kPa). These materials are used for thermal insulation and temperature control of air-conditioned space, acoustic and sound insulation, agriculture and fishery, sports and leisure goods, building and civil engineering, industrial packaging cold storage ware house, boiler work and other electric appliances, so they are helpful in reducing energy losses. (author)

  18. Thermal model to investigate the temperature in bone grinding for skull base neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihui; Tai, Bruce L; Wang, Guangjun; Zhang, Kuibang; Sullivan, Stephen; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This study develops a thermal model utilizing the inverse heat transfer method (IHTM) to investigate the bone grinding temperature created by a spherical diamond tool used for skull base neurosurgery. Bone grinding is a critical procedure in the expanded endonasal approach to remove the cranial bone and access to the skull base tumor via nasal corridor. The heat is generated during grinding and could damage the nerve or coagulate the blood in the carotid artery adjacent to the bone. The finite element analysis is adopted to investigate the grinding-induced bone temperature rise. The heat source distribution is defined by the thermal model, and the temperature distribution is solved using the IHTM with experimental inputs. Grinding experiments were conducted on a bovine cortical bone with embedded thermocouples. Results show significant temperature rise in bone grinding. Using 50°C as the threshold, the thermal injury can propagate about 3mm in the traverse direction, and 3mm below the ground surface under the dry grinding condition. The presented methodology demonstrated the capability of being a thermal analysis tool for bone grinding study. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling of the lithium based neutralizer for ITER neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, F., E-mail: franck.dure@u-psud.fr [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lifschitz, A.; Bretagne, J.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Simonin, A. [IRFM, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnetique, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul lez Durance (France); Minea, T. [LPGP, Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, CNRS-Universite Paris Sud, Orsay (France)

    2012-04-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compare different lithium based neutraliser configurations to the deuterium one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study characteristics of the secondary plasma and the propagation of the 1 MeV beam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using lithium increases the neutralisation effiency keeping correct beam focusing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using lithium also reduces the backstreaming effect in direction of the ion source. - Abstract: To achieve thermonuclear temperatures necessary to produce fusion reactions in the ITER Tokamak, additional heating systems are required. One of the main method to heat the plasma ions in ITER will be the injection of energetic neutrals (NBI). In the neutral beam injector, negative ions (D{sup -}) are electrostatically accelerated to 1 MeV, and then stripped of their extra electron via collisions with a target gas, in a structure known as neutralizer. In the current ITER specification, the target gas is deuterium. It has been recently proposed to use lithium vapor instead of deuterium as target gas in the neutralizer. This would allow to reduce the gas load in the NBI vessel and to improve the neutralization efficiency. A Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo code has been developed to study the transport of the beams and the plasma formation in the neutralizer. A comparison between Li and D{sub 2} based neutralizers made with this code is presented here, as well as a parametric study on the geometry of the Li based neutralizer. Results demonstrate the feasibility of a Li based neutralizer, and its advantages with respect to the deuterium based one.

  20. Effect of neutral particles on density limits in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, V.A.; Morozov, D.Kh.; Bachmann, P.; Suender, D.

    1993-01-01

    The global stability and confinement of a tokamak plasma are significantly influenced by the boundary plasma parameters. The onset of density disruptions, which limit the maximum plasma density, is triggered by impurity radiation in the edge plasma and can be connected with the radiative thermal instability. At the density n c the total radiative power P rad is equal to the total input power P in into the plasma (S:=P rad /P in =1). Above n c (S>1) no steady state of the plasma column exists. Contrary to predictions made elsewhere, where neutral particle kinetics is not taken into consideration, experimental results show that disruptions can occur for S R as a function of the plasma temperature T, ξ N :=N/n and ξ i :=n i /n, where N, n i , n are the densities of hydrogen atoms, impurity ions and the plasma, respectively. We investigate the influence of the neutral particles on the critical densities and the stability of the system, taking into account ionization, charge exchange and impurity cooling. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  1. An extended laser flash technique for thermal diffusivity measurement of high-temperature materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of thermal diffusivity data for high-temperature materials (solids and liquids) is very important in analyzing a number of processes, among them solidification, crystal growth, and welding. However, reliable thermal diffusivity versus temperature data, particularly those for high-temperature liquids, are still far from complete. The main measurement difficulties are due to the presence of convection and the requirement for a container. Fortunately, the availability of levitation techniques has made it possible to solve the containment problem. Based on the feasibility of the levitation technology, a new laser flash technique which is applicable to both levitated liquid and solid samples is being developed. At this point, the analysis for solid samples is near completion and highlights of the technique are presented here. The levitated solid sample which is assumed to be a sphere is subjected to a very short burst of high power radiant energy. The temperature of the irradiated surface area is elevated and a transient heat transfer process takes place within the sample. This containerless process is a two-dimensional unsteady heat conduction problem. Due to the nonlinearity of the radiative plus convective boundary condition, an analytic solution cannot be obtained. Two options are available at this point. Firstly, the radiation boundary condition can be linearized, which then accommodates a closed-form analytic solution. Comparison of the analytic curves for the temperature rise at different points to the experimentally-measured values will then provide the thermal diffusivity values. Secondly, one may set up an inverse conduction problem whereby experimentally obtained surface temperature history is used as the boundary conditions. The thermal diffusivity can then be elevated by minimizing the difference between the real heat flux boundary condition (radiation plus convection) and the measurements. Status of an experimental study directed at measuring the

  2. Experimental investigation of linear thermal expansion of pyrolytic graphite at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchenko, V. N.; Belikov, R. S.

    2017-11-01

    Using the previously described [1] experimental setup for investigation of the thermophysical properties of refractory materials under high pressure and temperature a few experiments with pyrolytic graphite were carried out. The density of the material was equal to 2.18 g/cm3. Experimental data on the linear thermal expansion in the perpendicular and parallel to the basal plane direction were obtained. Thermal expansion in the perpendicular to the basal plane direction during the heating from room temperature up to the melting point was 16.4 ± 1.6%. The results obtained allow calculating the density of pyrolytic graphite in the wide range of high temperatures up to the melting point.

  3. Pretest Calculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.S. Brodsky

    2002-01-01

    A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J · m -3 · K -1 ), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result

  4. Colour-Temperature Correspondences: When Reactions to Thermal Stimuli Are Influenced by Colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Ni; Van Doorn, George H.; Kawabe, Takahiro; Watanabe, Junji; Spence, Charles

    2014-01-01

    In our daily lives, information concerning temperature is often provided by means of colour cues, with red typically being associated with warm/hot, and blue with cold. While such correspondences have been known about for many years, they have primarily been studied using subjective report measures. Here we examined this correspondence using two more objective response measures. First, we used the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a test designed to assess the strength of automatic associations between different concepts in a given individual. Second, we used a priming task that involved speeded target discrimination in order to assess whether priming colour or thermal information could invoke the crossmodal association. The results of the IAT confirmed that the association exists at the level of response selection, thus indicating that a participant’s responses to colour or thermal stimuli are influenced by the colour-temperature correspondence. The results of the priming experiment revealed that priming a colour affected thermal discrimination reaction times (RTs), but thermal cues did not influence colour discrimination responses. These results may therefore provide important clues as to the level of processing at which such colour-temperature correspondences are represented. PMID:24618675

  5. Low-temperature thermal transport and thermopower of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Parijat; Tan, Yaohua; Klimeck, Gerhard; Shi, Junxia

    2017-10-01

    We study the low temperature thermal conductivity of single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). In the low temperature regime where heat is carried primarily through transport of electrons, thermal conductivity is linked to electrical conductivity through the Wiedemann-Franz law (WFL). Using a k.p Hamiltonian that describes the K and K{\\prime} valley edges, we compute the zero-frequency electric (Drude) conductivity using the Kubo formula to obtain a numerical estimate for the thermal conductivity. The impurity scattering determined transit time of electrons which enters the Drude expression is evaluated within the self-consistent Born approximation. The analytic expressions derived show that low temperature thermal conductivity (1) is determined by the band gap at the valley edges in monolayer TMDCs and (2) in presence of disorder which can give rise to the variable range hopping regime, there is a distinct reduction. Additionally, we compute the Mott thermopower and demonstrate that under a high frequency light beam, a valley-resolved thermopower can be obtained. A closing summary reviews the implications of results followed by a brief discussion on applicability of the WFL and its breakdown in context of the presented calculations.

  6. KNO3/NaNO3 - Graphite materials for thermal energy storage at high temperature: Part I. - Elaboration methods and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acem, Zoubir; Lopez, Jerome; Palomo Del Barrio, Elena

    2010-01-01

    Composites graphite/salt for thermal energy storage at high temperature (∼200 deg. C) have been developed and tested. As at low temperature in the past, graphite has been used to enhance the thermal conductivity of the eutectic system KNO 3 /NaNO 3 . A new elaboration method has been proposed as an alternative to graphite foams infiltration. It consists of cold-compression of a physical mixing of expanded natural graphite particles and salt powder. Two different compression routes have been investigated: uni-axial compression and isostatic compression. The first part of the paper has been devoted to the analysis of the thermal properties of these new graphite/salt composites. It is proven that cold-compression is a simple and efficient technique for improving the salt thermal conductivity. For instance, graphite amounts between 15 and 20%wt lead to apparent thermal conductivities close to 20 W/m/K (20 times greater than the thermal conductivity of the salt). Furthermore, some advantages in terms of cost and safety are expected because materials elaboration is carried out at room temperature. The second part of the paper is focused on the analyses of the phase transition properties of these graphite/salt composites materials.

  7. Debye temperature, thermal expansion, and heat capacity of TcC up to 100 GPa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, T., E-mail: songting@mail.lzjtu.cn [School of Mathematics and Physics, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); School of Material Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Ma, Q. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Tian, J.H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Liu, X.B. [School of Physics and Information Science, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui 741000 (China); Ouyang, Y.H.; Zhang, C.L.; Su, W.F. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Lanzhou Jiaotong University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • A number of thermodynamic properties of rocksalt TcC are investigated for the first time. • The quasi-harmonic Debye model is applied to take into account the thermal effect. • The pressure and temperature up to about 100 GPa and 3000 K, respectively. - Abstract: Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity of ideal stoichiometric TcC in the rocksalt structure have been studied systematically by using ab initio plane-wave pseudopotential density functional theory method within the generalized gradient approximation. Through the quasi-harmonic Debye model, in which the phononic effects are considered, the dependences of Debye temperature, thermal expansion coefficient, constant-volume heat capacity, and constant-pressure heat capacity on pressure and temperature are successfully predicted. All the thermodynamic properties of TcC with rocksalt phase have been predicted in the entire temperature range from 300 to 3000 K and pressure up to 100 GPa.

  8. Thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China-impacts of season, climate, and thermal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, H; Wang, J; Meng, Q

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a climate chamber study on the thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China. Sixty subjects from naturally ventilated buildings and buildings with split air conditioners participated in the study, and identical experiments were conducted in a climate chamber in both summer and winter. Psychological and physiological responses were observed over a wide range of conditions, and the impacts of season, climate, and thermal history on human thermal comfort were analyzed. Seasonal and climatic heat acclimatization was confirmed, but they were found to have no significant impacts on human thermal sensation and comfort. The outdoor thermal history was much less important than the indoor thermal history in regard to human thermal sensation, and the indoor thermal history in all seasons of a year played a key role in shaping the subjects' sensations in a wide range of thermal conditions. A warmer indoor thermal history in warm seasons produced a higher neutral temperature, a lower thermal sensitivity, and lower thermal sensations in warm conditions. The comfort and acceptable conditions were identified for people in the hot and humid area of China. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Exploring thermal anisotropy of cortical bone using temperature measurements in drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Khurshid

    2016-05-12

    Bone drilling is widely used in orthopaedics for fracture treatment, reconstructive surgery and bone biopsy. Heat generation in bone drilling can cause rise in bone temperature resulting in prolonged healing time or loosening of fixation. The purpose of this study was to investigate thermal anisotropy of bone by measuring the level of temperature in bone drilling with and without cooling conditions in two anatomical directions. Drilling tests were performed on bovine cortical bone. A total of fifteen specimens were used to obtain data for statistical analysis. Temperature near the cutting zone was measured in two anatomical directions. i.e. along the longitudinal and circumferential direction. Temperature distribution was also found in the two prescribed directions. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to identify significant drilling parameter affecting bone temperature. Drilling speed, feed rate and drill size were found influential parameters affecting bone temperature. Higher drilling speed, feed rate, and large drill size were found to cause elevated temperature in bone. Much lower temperature was measured in bone when cooling fluid was supplied to the drilling region. Experimental results revealed lower temperatures in the circumferential direction compared to the longitudinal direction. Thermal anisotropy for heat transport was found in the bone. This study recommends lower drilling speed and feed rate and cooling for controlling rise in bone temperature.

  10. Performance Assessment of Low-Temperature Thermal Storage with Electromagnetic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wei Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents electromagnetic-controlled thermal storage (ECTS that can be directly implemented in strategies of low-temperature waste heat recovery for energy-consuming equipment. A magnetic nanofluid (MNF prepared from fine iron ferrite ferromagnetic particles is recommended as a latent heat medium (LHM. During electromagnetic induction, local flow fluctuations are generated and thermal convection in the MNF can be enhanced. The achieved results demonstrated that ECTS has a wide operational range and an optimum storage efficiency of 84.46%. Thus, a self-perturbation mode used to enhance thermal energy transportation can be designed for numerous waste heat management applications.

  11. Impacts of convection on high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christof; Hintze, Meike; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal subsurface heat storage is increasingly used in order to overcome the temporal disparities between heat production from renewable sources like solar thermal installations or from industrial surplus heat and the heat demand for building climatisation or hot water supply. In this context, high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is a technology to efficiently store and retrieve large amounts of heat using groundwater wells in an aquifer to inject or withdraw hot or cold water. Depending on the local hydrogeology and temperature amplitudes during high-temperature ATES, density differences between the injected hot water and the ambient groundwater may induce significant convective flow components in the groundwater flow field. As a consequence, stored heat may accumulate at the top of the storage aquifer which reduces the heat recovery efficiency of the ATES system. Also, an accumulation of heat at the aquifer top will induce increased emissions of heat to overlying formations with potential impacts on groundwater quality outside of the storage. This work investigates the impacts of convective heat transport on the storage efficiency of a hypothetical high-temperature ATES system for seasonal heat storage as well as heat emissions to neighboring formations by numerical scenario simulations. The coupled groundwater flow and heat transport code OpenGeoSys is used to simulate a medium scale ATES system operating in a sandy aquifer of 20 m thickness with an average groundwater temperature of 10°C and confining aquicludes at top and bottom. Seasonal heat storage by a well doublet (i.e. one fully screened "hot" and "cold" well, respectively) is simulated over a period of 10 years with biannual injection / withdrawal cycles at pumping rates of 15 m³/h and for different scenarios of the temperature of the injected water (20, 35, 60 and 90 °C). Simulation results show, that for the simulated system significant convective heat transport sets in when

  12. Unified approach for determining the enthalpic fictive temperature of glasses with arbitrary thermal history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoju; Potuzak, M.; Mauro, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a unified routine to determine the enthalpic fictive temperature of a glass with arbitrary thermal history under isobaric conditions. The technique is validated both experimentally and numerically using a novel approach for modeling of glass relaxation behavior. The technique is applic......We propose a unified routine to determine the enthalpic fictive temperature of a glass with arbitrary thermal history under isobaric conditions. The technique is validated both experimentally and numerically using a novel approach for modeling of glass relaxation behavior. The technique...... is applicable to glasses of any thermal history, as proved through a series of numerical simulations where the enthalpic fictive temperature is precisely known within the model. Also, we demonstrate that the enthalpic fictive temperature of a glass can be determined at any calorimetric scan rate in excellent...

  13. Phylogeographic differentiation versus transcriptomic adaptation to warm temperatures in Zostera marina, a globally important seagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jueterbock, A; Franssen, S U; Bergmann, N; Gu, J; Coyer, J A; Reusch, T B H; Bornberg-Bauer, E; Olsen, J L

    2016-11-01

    Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adaptation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substitution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm temperatures along two independent thermal clines in Zostera marina, the most widely distributed seagrass in the temperate Northern Hemisphere. A North-South pair of populations was sampled along the European and North American coasts and exposed to a simulated heatwave in a common-garden mesocosm. Transcriptomic responses under control, heat stress and recovery were recorded in 99 RNAseq libraries with ~13 000 uniquely annotated, expressed genes. We corrected for phylogenetic differentiation among populations to discriminate neutral from adaptive differentiation. The two southern populations recovered faster from heat stress and showed parallel transcriptomic differentiation, as compared with northern populations. Among 2389 differentially expressed genes, 21 exceeded neutral expectations and were likely involved in parallel adaptation to warm temperatures. However, the strongest differentiation following phylogenetic correction was between the three Atlantic populations and the Mediterranean population with 128 of 4711 differentially expressed genes exceeding neutral expectations. Although adaptation to warm temperatures is expected to reduce sensitivity to heatwaves, the continued resistance of seagrass to further anthropogenic stresses may be impaired by heat-induced downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis, pathogen defence and stress tolerance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Estimation of oil reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data using inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Nian, Yong-Le; Li, Tong-Tong; Wang, Chang-Long

    2013-01-01

    Oil reservoir thermal properties not only play an important role in steam injection well heat transfer, but also are the basic parameters for evaluating the oil saturation in reservoir. In this study, for estimating reservoir thermal properties, a novel heat and mass transfer model of steam injection well was established at first, this model made full analysis on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer as well as the wellbore-formation, and the simulated results by the model were quite consistent with the log data. Then this study presented an effective inversion method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data. This method is based on the heat transfer model in steam injection wells, and can be used to predict the thermal properties as a stochastic approximation method. The inversion method was applied to estimate the reservoir thermal properties of two steam injection wells, it was found that the relative error of thermal conductivity for the two wells were 2.9% and 6.5%, and the relative error of volumetric specific heat capacity were 6.7% and 7.0%,which demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties. - Highlights: • An effective inversion method for predicting the oil reservoir thermal properties was presented. • A novel model for steam injection well made full study on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer. • The wellbore temperature field and steam parameters can be simulated by the model efficiently. • Both reservoirs and formation thermal properties could be estimated simultaneously by the proposed method. • The estimated steam temperature was quite consistent with the field data

  15. On the Kumar formulation for the temperature dependence of thermal expansivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.P.; Chauhan, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    The expression for interionic separation obtained earlier by Kumar [Physica. B, Condensed Matter 205 (1995) 175] has been corrected so as to make it compatible with the value of the thermal expansivity at the initial temperature. The values of the interionic separations as a function of temperature calculated for NaCl and KCl using the modified formulation are found to present improved agreement with the experimental data at high temperatures up to the melting temperatures

  16. Novel manufacturing method by using stainless steel pipes expanded into aluminium profiles for the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremel, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dremel@iter.org; Boissin, Jean-Claude; Déléage, Vincent; Quinn, Eamonn; Pearce, Robert

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the novel engineering and manufacturing solution of stainless steel pipe expansion into aluminium extrusion profiles for use at cryogenic temperatures up to 400 K. This fabrication method will be used for the thermal radiation shields and the cryopanels of the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps. The use of stainless steel pipes expanded into aluminium extrusion profiles is a solution that combines standard stainless steel welding procedures for the manifolds of the cooling circuits with extended aluminium structures taking advantage of the high thermal conductivity of aluminium. The cryogenic cooling circuits of the pump are a first confinement barrier in the ITER vacuum vessel and the risk of a leakage needs to be minimized as far as possible. The expansion method avoids the need of joints of dissimilar materials in the primary confinement barrier. The fabrication method and results of the prototyping of full scaled components for the ITER Neutral Beam cryopumps are outlined in this paper.

  17. Refractory porcelain enamel passive-thermal-control coating for high-temperature superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Auker, B. H.; Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    Study was conducted to match thermal expansion coefficients thereby preventing enamels from cracking. Report discusses various enamel coatings that are applied to two different high-temperature superalloys. Study may be of interest to manufacturers of chemical equipment, furnaces, and metal components intended for high-temperature applications.

  18. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P., E-mail: richard.smedley-stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rmcclarren@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  19. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes

  20. Increasing thermal drying temperature of biosolids reduced nitrogen mineralisation and soil N2O emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Sean; Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood. This will be o......Previous studies found that thermally dried biosolids contained more mineralisable organic nitrogen (N) than the raw or anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids they were derived from. However, the effect of thermal drying temperature on biosolid N availability is not well understood...

  1. The Effect of High Temperatures on the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenfeld, G.; Aharon, G.; Hochbaum, I.

    2002-01-01

    Concrete thermal conductivity is an important property for thermal analysis of nuclear accidents.Concrete compositions include water,sand,cement and aggregates of various kinds and combinations.Values of concrete's thermal conductivity for some different compositions can be found in the literature[1]but since the material composition and its temperature significantly affect this property,the exact value of a specific composition should be measured

  2. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of climax stock quartz monzonite at high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been made on two samples of Climax Stock quartz monzonite at pressures between 3 and 50 MPa and temperatures between 300 and 523{sup 0}K. Following those measurements the apparatus was calibrated with respect to the thermal conductivity measurement using a reference standard of fused silica. Corrected thermal conductivity of the rock indicates a value at room temperature of 2.60 +- 0.25 W/mK at 3 MPa increasing linearly to 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 50 MPa. These values are unchanged (+- 0.07 W/mK) by heating under 50-MPa pressure to as high as 473{sup 0}K. The conductivity under 50-MPa confining pressure falls smoothly from 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 313{sup 0}K to 2.15 +- 0.25 W/mK at 473{sup 0}K. Thermal diffusivity at 300{sup 0}K was found to be 1.2 +- 0.4 X 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s and shows approximately the same pressure and temperature dependencies as the thermal conductivity.

  3. Reference mean temperature for evaluation of performance of thermal diffusion column for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Ichiro; Kanagawa, Akira

    1987-01-01

    In order to evaluate separative performance of a thermal diffusion column, a simplification is usually made in which the temperature dependence of the relevant properties such as thermal diffusion constant is ignored and some proper mean values evaluated at a specific ''mean'' temperature are used. Adoption of weighted average of temperature distribution is common for the ''mean'' temperature, but there exists no definite way of determining mean temperature. The present paper proposes a new reference mean temperature determined by the equation governing the free convection. It is based on the fact that the multiplication effect of free convection is essential to separation by thermal diffusion column. The reference mean temperature is related to pressure difference between top and bottom of column and is higher than a mass-averaged temperature (due to gravitational force) by a contribution of viscous force. The reference mean temperature was calculated, as a reference, for an Ar isotope separating column with an inner hot radius of 0.2 mm and an outer cold radius of 5 mm. The results confirmed the validity of an approximate formula expressing effects of temperature difference and ratio of inner and outer radii of column explicitly for the temperature. The reference mean temperature calculated from pressure difference given by axisymmetric solution of equations of change was in good agreement with the analytical solution. (author)

  4. Disruption Neutral Point Experiment on Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granetz, R. S.; Nakamura, Y.

    2000-10-01

    Disruptions of single-null elongated plasmas generally result in loss of vertical position control, leading to a current quench occurring at the top or bottom of the machine, with all the attendant problems of halo and eddy currents flowing in divertor structures. On JT-60U, it has been found that if the plasma is operated with its magnetic axis at a particular height, called the neutral point, the initial vertical drift after a thermal quench is significantly slower than usual, and sometimes can even be arrested, thereby avoiding a current quench in the divertor region entirely. In an ongoing collaboration between MIT and JAERI, the neutral point concept is being tested in Alcator C-Mod, which has a significantly higher plasma elongation than JT-60U (1.65 vs 1.3). Calculations using TSC predict a neutral point at z~=+1 cm above the midplane (a=22 cm). The existence of a neutral point has now been experimentally confirmed, albeit at a height of z=+2.7 cm. The plasma has remained vertically stable for up to 9 ms after the disruption thermal quench, which in principle, is long enough for the PF control system to respond, if programmed appropriately. In addition, the physics of the neutral point stability on C-Mod appears to be somewhat different than that on JT-60U.

  5. Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems of the Kuril Island Arc (Russia): Geochemistry of the Thermal Waters and Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalacheva, E.; Taran, Y.; Voloshina, E.; Kotenko, T.; Tarasov, K.

    2017-12-01

    More than 30 active volcanoes with historical eruptions are known on 20 main islands composing the Kuril Arc. Eight islands - Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Rasshua, Ushishir, Ketoy, Urup, Iturup and Kunashir - are characterized by hydrothermal activity, complementary to the fumarole activity in the craters and volcano slopes. At Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Iturup and Kunashir most of thermal manifestations are acidic to ultra-acidic hot springs associated with hydrothermal aquifers inside volcano edifices. The most powerful of them is the ultra-acid hydrothermal system of Ebeko volcano (Paramushir island) with more than 80 t/day of the chloride output and pH of springs of 1.5. At the summit part of the Ebeko volcano there are 12 thermal fields with the total thermal area exceeding 1 km2. The measured temperatures of fumaroles are from 98º C to 500ºC. Another type of hydrothermal activity are the wide spread coastal hot and neutral springs situated as a rule within the tide zone. Four groups of this type of thermal manifestation were found on the western shore of Shiashkotan island. It have Na-Ca-Cl-SO4 composition with temperatures 50-80°C and TDS 7-8 g/L. Coastal neutral springs were found also on Russhua, Uturup and Kunashir islands. Ushishir volcano-hydrothermal system in the middle of the arc is formed by the absorption of magmatic gases by seawater. In the crater of the Pallas cone (Ketoy island) there is a small Glazok lake with acid SO4 water and pH=2.4, TDS=2g/L, T=12oC. Ketoy volcano on the same island hosts a high temperature hydrothermal system with unusual boiling Ca-Na-SO4 neutral springs and steam vents. Mendeleev and Golovnin volcanoes on Kunashir Island are the southernmost of the Kuril arc. Mendeleev edifice is a centre of a large thermal area with many manifestations of different types including steam vents, acid springs and neutral coastal springs. In a 4.2x4 km wide caldera of Golovnin volcano there are two lakes with acid Cl-SO4 water and numerous

  6. Corrosion protection method by neutral treatment for boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hisashige

    1978-01-01

    The corrosion protection method by neutral treatment has been applied in Europe mainly for boilers and nuclear reactors instead of existing all volatile treatment. The cause of corrosion of steel and copper in water and the effect of neutral treatment, that is the effect of protection film of magnetite in steel and cuprous oxide in copper alloy, are explained with the characteristic figure of PH, electromotive force and chemical formula. The experience of applying this neutral treatment to the Wedel thermal power plant and the system flow sheet, the water treatment equipment, relating instrumentations and the water examination are described in detail. Hydrogen peroxide is injected in this neutral treatment. The comparison between the existing water treatment and the neutral treatment and their merits and demerits are explained. (Nakai, Y.)

  7. Investigation of second grade fluid through temperature dependent thermal conductivity and non-Fourier heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, T.; Ahmad, Salman; Khan, M. Ijaz; Alsaedi, A.; Waqas, M.

    2018-06-01

    Here we investigated stagnation point flow of second grade fluid over a stretchable cylinder. Heat transfer is characterized by non-Fourier law of heat flux and thermal stratification. Temperature dependent thermal conductivity and activation energy are also accounted. Transformations procedure is applying to transform the governing PDE's into ODE's. Obtained system of ODE's are solved analytically by HAM. Influence of flow variables on velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction and Sherwood number are analyzed. Obtained outcome shows that velocity enhanced through curvature parameter, viscoelastic parameter and velocities ratio variable. Temperature decays for larger Prandtl number, thermal stratification, thermal relaxation and curvature parameter. Sherwood number and concentration field show opposite behavior for higher estimation of activation energy, reaction rate, curvature parameter and Schmidt number.

  8. ''Glassy'' low temperature thermal properties in crystalline solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, B.D.

    1976-05-01

    Amorphous dielectrics are known to exhibit anomalous low temperature properties. An extensive review of these properties is presented with an eye toward an understanding of low-lying excitation modes thought to exist in glasses. Work on these systems is described in which a Zr-20 percent Nb samplewhich would be expected to reduce and redistribute the proposed tunneling states. Indeed, the thermal conductivity becomes similar to that of a quenched Zr-8 percent Nb sample and the ''excess'' specific heat linear in temperature dependence is reduced to half the value found in quenched Zr-20 percent Nb. The coefficient of the T 3 term in the specific heat unexpectedly increased from 23.3 to 56.9 erg/gm K 4 and this is attributed to a softening of the lattice due to annealing. The specific heat of this sample was remeasured after it had been dunked in liquid nitrogen. The cubic term was then found to be 19.5 erg/g K 4 , smaller than that in quenched Zr-20 percent Nb, an effect which had been expected due to the chemical diffusion during annealing. Further study of this phenomenon is suggested. Among other relevant measurements performed were the specific heat of a sample of amorphous B 2 O 3 (presented by Stephens (1976)); thermal conductivities of phase-separated unleached Vycor glass and Pyrex; thermal conductivities above 1.2 0 K of polycrystalline MgO, heat-treated Pyroceram and porous Vycor (presented by Tait (1975)) and of mixed crystal KBr-KI (presented by Nathan, Lou and Tait (1976)). The last sample exhibited density fluctuations on a scale of 1000 A but exhibited thermal properties typical of dielectric crystal. Speed of sound measurements were made on both unleached and porous Vycor

  9. Aspects of Energy Metabolism in Mangalitsa Pigs Exposed at Thermic Neutral Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pârvu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies aimed the energy metabolism determination in Mangalitsa pigs exposed at thermic neutral temperature, compared to Large White pigs. The experimental period was between 80 and 100 kg liveweight. The animals had free access to standard, isoprotein and isocalory diets, with 13.5% crude protein (CP and 3100 kcal/kg metabolizable energy. Feed intake was measured on a daily basis. The energy-protein balance was calculated on the basis of comparative slaughter made at the beginning and end of the experiment. The metabolizable energy (MEc was estimated by chemical analysis (feed and excreta using mathematical modelling and the Whittemore’s formula. The metabolizable energy utilization efficiency was 0.61 at Large White and 0.53 at Mangalitsa.

  10. Low-temperature densification and excellent thermal properties of W–Cu thermal-management composites prepared from copper-coated tungsten powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lianmeng; Chen, Wenshu; Luo, Guoqiang; Chen, Pingan; Shen, Qiang; Wang, Chuanbin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High-density (98.4%) W–20 wt.%Cu composites were low-temperature fabricated. • A highly pure Cu network and a homogenous microstructure formed in the composites. • The interfaces between W and Cu are well bonded with no spaces. • The composites have excellent thermal properties. -- Abstract: High-density W–20 wt.%Cu composites containing a Cu-network structure and exhibiting good thermal properties were fabricated by low-temperature hot-press sintering from high-purity copper-coated tungsten powders. The relative density of W–20 wt.%Cu composites sintered at 950 °C–100 MPa–2 h was 98.4%. The low-temperature densification of W–Cu composites occurs because the sintering mode of the coated particles involves only sintering of Cu to Cu, rather than both Cu to W and Cu to Cu, as required for conventional powder particles. The microstructure shows that a network of high-purity Cu extends throughout the composites, and that the W is distributed homogeneously; the interfaces between W and Cu show good contact. The composites have excellent thermal conductivity (239 W/(m K)) and a relatively low coefficient of thermal expansion (7.4 × 10 −6 /K), giving them some of the best properties reported to date for thermal-management materials. The excellent performance is mainly because of their structure, which arises from the characteristics of the high-purity copper-coated tungsten powders

  11. Thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings in Maceio, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamila, Harimi

    2017-11-01

    This article presents the results from thermal comfort survey carried out in classrooms over two different seasons in Maceio, Brazil. The secondary data were collected from thermal comfort field study conducted in naturally ventilated classrooms. Objective and subjective parameters were explored to evaluate thermal comfort conditions. The potential effect of air movement on subjects' vote under neutrality was evaluated. Overall, the indoor climate of the surveyed location was classified warm and humid. Conflicting results were depicted when analyzing the effect of air movements on subjects' vote. The mean air temperature for subjects feeling hot was found to be lower than those feeling warm. A reasonable approach to tackle these two unpredictable results was suggested. Correlation matrix between selected thermal comfort variables was developed. Globe temperature recorded the highest correlation with subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale. The correlation was significant at the 0.01 level. On the other hand, the correlation between air movement and subjects' response on ASHRAE seven-point scale was weak but significant. Further field studies on the current topic were recommended.

  12. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal propertes of a course-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicate that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7 W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573 K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 /K at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  13. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal properties of a coarse-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicates that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  14. Low-temperature thermal expansion measurements in PrV2Al20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magata, A.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tsujimoto, M.; Tomita, T.; Sakai, A.; Nakatsuji, S.; Kiichler, R.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured thermal expansion of PrV 2 Al 20 and LaV 2 Al 20 from room temperature down to 2 K, using a capacitance dilatometer. Linear thermal expansion ΔL/L along [111] direction decreases monotonically on cooling in both materials. The extracted 4ƒ electrons contribution of the linear thermal expansion coefficient a clearly shows a broad peak at ∼ 30 K which may correspond to the crystal electric field excited state at 40 K suggested in the previous specific heat study. (paper)

  15. Knudsen temperature jump and the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics of granular gases driven by thermal walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V

    2008-10-01

    Thermal wall is a convenient idealization of a rapidly vibrating plate used for vibrofluidization of granular materials. The objective of this work is to incorporate the Knudsen temperature jump at thermal wall in the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamic modeling of dilute granular gases of monodisperse particles that collide nearly elastically. The Knudsen temperature jump manifests itself as an additional term, proportional to the temperature gradient, in the boundary condition for the temperature. Up to a numerical prefactor O(1) , this term is known from kinetic theory of elastic gases. We determine the previously unknown numerical prefactor by measuring, in a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, steady-state temperature profiles of a gas of elastically colliding hard disks, confined between two thermal walls kept at different temperatures, and comparing the results with the predictions of a hydrodynamic calculation employing the modified boundary condition. The modified boundary condition is then applied, without any adjustable parameters, to a hydrodynamic calculation of the temperature profile of a gas of inelastic hard disks driven by a thermal wall. We find the hydrodynamic prediction to be in very good agreement with MD simulations of the same system. The results of this work pave the way to a more accurate hydrodynamic modeling of driven granular gases.

  16. High-temperature stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The coatings before and after IR heating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, microhardness and residual stress measurements in order to understand the effect of thermal shock on the properties of the TBC. On account of these high-temperature properties, ...

  17. Determination of thermal diffusivity of dental enamel and dentin as a function of temperature, using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Thiago Martini

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was developed a software that calculates automatically, the thermal diffusivity value as a function of temperature in materials. The infrared thermography technique was used for data acquisition of temperature distribution as a function of time. These data were used to adjust a temperature function obtained from the homogeneous heat equation with specific boundary conditions. For that, an infrared camera (detecting from 8 μm to 9 μm) was calibrated to detect temperature ranging from 185 degree C up to 1300 degree C at an acquisition rate of 300 Hz. It was used, 10 samples of dental enamel and 10 samples of dentin, with 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm, which were obtained from bovine lower incisor teeth. These samples were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG pulsed laser (λ = 2,78 μm). The resulting temperature was recorded 2 s prior, 10 s during irradiation and continuing for 2 more seconds after it. After each irradiation, all obtained thermal images were processed in the software, creating a file with the data of thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature. Another file with the thermal diffusivity values was also calculated after each laser pulse. The mean result of thermal diffusivity obtained for dental enamel was 0,0084 ± 0,001 cm2/s for the temperature interval of 220-550 degree C. The mean value for thermal diffusivity obtained for dentin was 0,0015 0,0004 cm2/s in temperatures up to 360 degree C; however, this value increases for higher temperatures. According to these results, it was possible to conclude that the use of infrared thermography, associated with the software developed in this work, is an efficient method to determine the thermal diffusivity values as a function of temperature in different materials. (author)

  18. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki; Mansfield, Andrew B.; Wooldridge, Margaret S.; Im, Hong G.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  19. Characteristics of Syngas Auto-ignition at High Pressure and Low Temperature Conditions with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    KAUST Repository

    Pal, Pinaki

    2015-05-31

    Effects of thermal inhomogeneities on syngas auto-ignition at high-pressure low-temperature conditions, relevant to gas turbine operation, are investigated using detailed one-dimensional numerical simulations. Parametric tests are carried out for a range of thermodynamic conditions (T = 890-1100 K, P = 3-20 atm) and composition (Ф = 0.1, 0.5). Effects of global thermal gradients and localized thermal hot spots are studied. In the presence of a thermal gradient, the propagating reaction front transitions from spontaneous ignition to deflagration mode as the initial mean temperature decreases. The critical mean temperature separating the two distinct auto-ignition modes is computed using a predictive criterion and found to be consistent with front speed and Damkohler number analyses. The hot spot study reveals that compression heating of end-gas mixture by the propagating front is more pronounced at lower mean temperatures, significantly advancing the ignition delay. Moreover, the compression heating effect is dependent on the domain size.

  20. Modeling of thermalization phenomena in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Panneerchelvam, Premkumar; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2018-05-01

    Coaxial plasma accelerators are electromagnetic acceleration devices that employ a self-induced Lorentz force to produce collimated plasma jets with velocities ~50 km s‑1. The accelerator operation is characterized by the formation of an ionization/thermalization zone near gas inlet of the device that continually processes the incoming neutral gas into a highly ionized thermal plasma. In this paper, we present a 1D non-equilibrium plasma model to resolve the plasma formation and the electron-heavy species thermalization phenomena that take place in the thermalization zone. The non-equilibrium model is based on a self-consistent multi-species continuum description of the plasma with finite-rate chemistry. The thermalization zone is modelled by tracking a 1D gas-bit as it convects down the device with an initial gas pressure of 1 atm. The thermalization process occurs in two stages. The first is a plasma production stage, associated with a rapid increase in the charged species number densities facilitated by cathode surface electron emission and volumetric production processes. The production stage results in the formation of a two-temperature plasma with electron energies of ~2.5 eV in a low temperature background gas of ~300 K. The second, a temperature equilibration stage, is characterized by the energy transfer between the electrons and heavy species. The characteristic length scale for thermalization is found to be comparable to axial length of the accelerator thus putting into question the equilibrium magnetohydrodynamics assumption used in modeling coaxial accelerators.

  1. Simulations of planar non-thermal plasma assisted ignition at atmospheric pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, Tiernan A.

    2016-10-21

    The opportunity for ignition assistance by a pulsed applied voltage is investigated in a canonical one-dimensional configuration. An incipient ignition kernel, formed by localized energy deposition into a lean mixture of methane and air at atmospheric pressure, is subjected to sub-breakdown electric fields (E/N ≈ 100 Td) by a DC potential applied across the domain, resulting in non-thermal behavior of the plasma formed during the discharge. A two-fluid approach is employed to couple thermal neutrals and ions to the non-thermal electrons. A two-temperature plasma mechanism describing gas phase combustion, excitation of neutral species, and high-energy electron kinetics is employed to account for non-thermal effects. Charged species transported from the ignition zone drift rapidly through the domain, augmenting the magnitude of the electric field in the fresh gas during the pulse through a dynamic-electrode effect, which results in an increase in the energy of the electrons in the fresh mixture with increasing time. Enhanced fuel and oxidizer decomposition due to electron impact dissociation and interaction with excited neutrals generate a pool of radicals, mostly O and H, in the fresh gas ahead of the flame\\'s preheat zone. In the configuration considered, the effect of the nanosecond pulse is to increase the mass of fuel burned at equivalent times relative to the unsupported ignition through enhanced radical generation, resulting in an increased heat release rate in the immediate aftermath of the pulse.

  2. Nuclear grade cable thermal life model by time temperature superposition algorithm based on Matlab GUI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yanyun; Gu Shenjie; Lou Tianyang

    2014-01-01

    Background: As nuclear grade cable must endure harsh environment within design life, it is critical to predict cable thermal life accurately owing to thermal aging, which is one of dominant factors of aging mechanism. Purpose: Using time temperature superposition (TTS) method, the aim is to construct nuclear grade cable thermal life model, predict cable residual life and develop life model interactive interface under Matlab GUI. Methods: According to TTS, nuclear grade cable thermal life model can be constructed by shifting data groups at various temperatures to preset reference temperature with translation factor which is determined by non linear programming optimization. Interactive interface of cable thermal life model developed under Matlab GUI consists of superposition mode and standard mode which include features such as optimization of translation factor, calculation of activation energy, construction of thermal aging curve and analysis of aging mechanism., Results: With calculation result comparison between superposition and standard method, the result with TTS has better accuracy than that with standard method. Furthermore, confidence level of nuclear grade cable thermal life with TTS is higher than that with standard method. Conclusion: The results show that TTS methodology is applicable to thermal life prediction of nuclear grade cable. Interactive Interface under Matlab GUI achieves anticipated functionalities. (authors)

  3. Numerical simulations on the temperature gradient and thermal stress of a thermoelectric power generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yongjia; Ming, Tingzhen; Li, Xiaohua; Pan, Tao; Peng, Keyuan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An appropriate ceramic plate thickness is effective in alleviating the thermal stress. • A smaller distance between thermo-pins can help prolong lifecycle of the TE module. • Either a thicker or a thinner copper conducting strip effectively reduces thermal stress. • A suitable tin soldering thickness will alleviate thermal stress intensity and increase thermal efficiency. - Abstract: Thermoelectric generator is a device taking advantage of the temperature difference in thermoelectric material to generate electric power, where the higher the temperature difference of the hot-cold ends, the higher the efficiency will be. However, higher temperature or higher heat flux upon the hot end will cause strong thermal stress which will negatively influence the lifecycle of the thermoelectric module. This phenomenon is very common in industrial applications but seldom has research work been reported. In this paper, numerical analysis on the thermodynamics and thermal stress performance of the thermoelectric module has been performed, considering the variation on the thickness of materials; the influence of high heat flux on thermal efficiency, power output, and thermal stress has been examined. It is found that under high heat flux imposing upon the hot end, the thermal stress is so strong that it has a decisive effect on the life expectation of the device. To improve the module’s working condition, different geometrical configurations are tested and the optimum sizes are achieved. Besides, the side effects on the efficiency, power output, and open circuit voltage output of the thermoelectric module are taken into consideration

  4. Steady- and transient-state analyses of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel loaded reactor core via two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel-loaded core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model. • The model is compared to harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models. • The three thermal analysis models show ∼100 pcm differences in the k eff eigenvalue. • The three thermal analysis models show more than 70 K differences in the maximum temperature. • There occur more than 3 times differences in the maximum power for a control rod ejection accident. - Abstract: Fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel, a type of accident-tolerant fuel (ATF), consists of TRISO particles randomly dispersed in a SiC matrix. In this study, for a thermal analysis of the FCM fuel with such a high heterogeneity, a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model was applied by the authors. This model provides separate temperatures for the fuel-kernels and the SiC matrix. It also provides more realistic temperature profiles than those of harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, which are used for thermal analysis of a fuel element in VHTRs having a composition similar to the FCM fuel, because such models are unable to provide the fuel-kernel and graphite matrix temperatures separately. In this study, coupled with a neutron diffusion model, a FCM fuel-loaded reactor core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model at steady- and transient-states. The results are compared to those from harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, i.e., we compare k eff eigenvalues, power distributions, and temperature profiles in the hottest single-channel at steady-state. At transient-state, we compare total powers, reactivity, and maximum temperatures in the hottest single-channel obtained by the different thermal analysis models. The different thermal analysis models and the availability of fuel-kernel temperatures in the two-temperature homogenized thermal

  5. Thermal behavior of latent thermal energy storage unit using two phase change materials: Effects of HTF inlet temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi Benmoussa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical study of the thermal behavior of shell-and-tube latent thermal energy storage (LTES unit using two phase change materials (PCMs. The heat transfer fluid (HTF flow through the inner tube and transfer the heat to PCMs. First, a mathematical model is developed based on the enthalpy formulation and solved through the governing equations. Second, the effects of HTF inlet temperature on the unsteady temperature evolution of PCMs, the total energy stored evolution as well as the total melting time is studied. Numerical results show that for all HTF inlet temperature, melting rate of PCM1 is the fastest and that of PCM2 is the slowest; increasing the HTF inlet temperature considerably increases the temperature evolution of PCMs. The maximum energy stored is observed in PCM2 with high melting temperature and high specific heat; heat storage capacity is large for high HTF inlet temperature. When the HTF inlet temperature increases from 338 K to 353 K, decreasing degree of melting time of PCM2 is the biggest from 1870 s to 490 s, which reduces about 73.8%; decreasing degree of melting time of PCM1 is the smallest from 530 s to 270 s, which reduces about 49.1%.

  6. Estimation of thermal transmittance based on temperature measurements with the application of perturbation numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowoświat, Artur; Skrzypczyk, Jerzy; Krause, Paweł; Steidl, Tomasz; Winkler-Skalna, Agnieszka

    2018-05-01

    Fast estimation of thermal transmittance based on temperature measurements is uncertain, and the obtained results can be burdened with a large error. Nevertheless, such attempts should be undertaken merely due to the fact that a precise measurement by means of heat flux measurements is not always possible in field conditions (resentment of the residents during the measurements carried out inside their living quarters), and the calculation methods do not allow for the nonlinearity of thermal insulation, heat bridges or other fragments of building envelope of diversified thermal conductivity. The present paper offers the estimation of thermal transmittance and internal surface resistance with the use of temperature measurements (in particular with the use of thermovision). The proposed method has been verified through tests carried out on a laboratory test stand built in the open space, subjected to the influence of real meteorological conditions. The present elaboration involves the estimation of thermal transmittance by means of temperature measurements. Basing on the mentioned estimation, the authors present correction coefficients which have impact on the estimation accuracy. Furthermore, in the final part of the paper, various types of disturbance were allowed for using perturbation numbers, and the introduced by the authors "credibility area of thermal transmittance estimation" was determined.

  7. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  8. Coping with temperature at the warm edge--patterns of thermal adaptation in the microbial eukaryote Paramecium caudatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Krenek

    Full Text Available Ectothermic organisms are thought to be severely affected by global warming since their physiological performance is directly dependent on temperature. Latitudinal and temporal variations in mean temperatures force ectotherms to adapt to these complex environmental conditions. Studies investigating current patterns of thermal adaptation among populations of different latitudes allow a prediction of the potential impact of prospective increases in environmental temperatures on their fitness.In this study, temperature reaction norms were ascertained among 18 genetically defined, natural clones of the microbial eukaryote Paramecium caudatum. These different clones have been isolated from 12 freshwater habitats along a latitudinal transect in Europe and from 3 tropical habitats (Indonesia. The sensitivity to increasing temperatures was estimated through the analysis of clone specific thermal tolerances and by relating those to current and predicted temperature data of their natural habitats. All investigated European clones seem to be thermal generalists with a broad thermal tolerance and similar optimum temperatures. The weak or missing co-variation of thermal tolerance with latitude does not imply local adaptation to thermal gradients; it rather suggests adaptive phenotypic plasticity among the whole European subpopulation. The tested Indonesian clones appear to be locally adapted to the less variable, tropical temperature regime and show higher tolerance limits, but lower tolerance breadths.Due to the lack of local temperature adaptation within the European subpopulation, P. caudatum genotypes at the most southern edge of their geographic range seem to suffer from the predicted increase in magnitude and frequency of summer heat waves caused by climate change.

  9. Investigation on the ignition, thermal acceleration and characteristic temperatures of coal char combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Fu, Peifang; Liu, Yang; Yue, Fang; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Huaichun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new thermal model and measuring method for the ignition temperature are proposed. • Ignition occurs in a region but not a point with ambient conditions changing. • Ignition region is measured from the minimum to maximum ignition temperature. • T_i_g_,_m_a_x of coal char in TG-DSC is in line with the ignition temperature of EFR. - Abstract: Through using a new thermal analysis model and a method of coal/char combustion, the minimum ignition temperature and minimum ignition heat of three different ranks of pulverized coal char were measured by simultaneous Thermogravimetry and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG-DSC) experiments. The results show that the ignition of coal char occurs in the range between the minimum ignition temperature and the inflection-point temperature. The thermal acceleration and its gradient G_T increase with increasing heating rate and decrease with increasing coal char rank. The higher the G_T of the coal char, the more easily the ignition occurs and more rapidly the burning and burnout occur. The data show that the G_T of coal char of SLH lignite is 1.6 times more than that of coal char of ZCY bituminous and JWY anthracite in ignition zone, and 3.4 times in burning zone. The characteristic temperatures increase with increasing temperature of prepared char, heating rate and char rank. Moreover, the T_i_g_,_m_a_x calculated in DSC experiment is approximately in line with the ignition temperature obtained in the entrained flow reactor, which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed theory.

  10. Temperature and thermal stress analysis of a switching tube anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, S.B.

    1979-01-01

    In the design of high power density switching tubes which are subjected to cyclic thermal loads, the temperature induced stresses must be minimized in order to maximize the life expectancy of the tube. Following are details of an analysis performed for the Magnetic Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on a proposed tube. The tube configuration is given. The problem was simplified to one-dimensional approximations for both the thermal and stress analyses. The underlying assumptions and their implications are discussed

  11. Design, Fabrication, Test Report of the Material Capsule(08M-10K) with Double Thermal Media for High-temperature Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, K. N.; Kang, Y. H.; Sohn, J. M.; Shin, Y. T.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G.; Oh, S. Y.

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the restriction of the irradiation test at a high temperature of the existing material capsule with Al thermal media, a capsule suitable for the irradiation at the high temperature was developed and the performance test was undertaken. The 08M-10K capsule was designed and fabricated as that with double thermal media to verify the structural and external integrity in the high-temperature irradiation higher than 500 .deg. C. The thermal performance test was undertaken at the out-pile test facility, and the soundness of the double thermal media was confirmed with the naked eye after disassembling the capsule. Though the temperatures of the specimens reach 500±20 .deg. C as a result maintaining the capsule during 5 hours after setting the specimens temperatures in the target range, the high-temperature thermal media with double structure was confirmed to maintain the soundness. And the specimens and the thermal media were heated to 600 .deg. C for about 3 minutes, but the thermal media were maintained sound. Especially, the Al thermal media were heated for 5 hours in range of 500±20 .deg. C and for 3 minutes at the temperature of 600 .deg. C. However, the thermal media were confirmed to maintain the soundness. Whether a capsule has only Al thermal media or the high-temperature thermal media with double structure, any capsule can be used in the range of 500±20 .deg. C as the result of this experiment maintaining the specimens high-temperature

  12. Low-Temperature Bainite: A Thermal Stability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santajuana, Miguel A.; Rementeria, Rosalia; Kuntz, Matthias; Jimenez, Jose A.; Caballero, Francisca G.; Garcia-Mateo, Carlos

    2018-06-01

    The thermal stability of nanobainitic structures obtained by heat treating two different high-carbon high-silicon steels at temperatures between 200 °C and 600 °C has been investigated by means of three complementary techniques, i.e., field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and high-resolution dilatometry. Three main stages have been established, each of them characterized by a distinctive microstructure. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline structure generated by the bainite reaction confers the steel with an extraordinary tempering resistance.

  13. SATCAP-B: a program for thermal-hydraulic design of 'Saturated Temperature Capsule'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Someya, Hiroyuki; Niimi, Motoji

    1989-11-01

    As an advanced irradiation technique, the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) project is developing a 'Saturated Temperature Capsule' which water is injected in and boiled. When the water is kept at a constant pressure, the water temperature does not become higher than the saturated temperature. This type capsule is based on the conception of keeping the coolant to the saturated temperature and using the temperature control. In designing the capsule in which the inner coolant is injected, thermal performances have to be understood as exactly as possible. Then, a program (named SATCAP) was compiled to graps the thermal performance within the capsule. On the other hand, a 'Saturated Temperature Capsule' was made and irradiated in the JMTR core. It was indicated from supplied water temperatures recorded by thermo-couples attached in the capsule that heat transfer coefficients prefered models due to natural convection to models incorporated in the initial version of the program. Then, the program was revised by adding mainly heat transfer model based on natural convection. The present report describes the calculation procedure and guides of input and output for the revised program (SATCAP version-B). (author)

  14. Surface reflectance drives nest box temperature profiles and thermal suitability for target wildlife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Griffiths

    Full Text Available Thermal properties of tree hollows play a major role in survival and reproduction of hollow-dependent fauna. Artificial hollows (nest boxes are increasingly being used to supplement the loss of natural hollows; however, the factors that drive nest box thermal profiles have received surprisingly little attention. We investigated how differences in surface reflectance influenced temperature profiles of nest boxes painted three different colors (dark-green, light-green, and white: total solar reflectance 5.9%, 64.4%, and 90.3% respectively using boxes designed for three groups of mammals: insectivorous bats, marsupial gliders and brushtail possums. Across the three different box designs, dark-green (low reflectance boxes experienced the highest average and maximum daytime temperatures, had the greatest magnitude of variation in daytime temperatures within the box, and were consistently substantially warmer than light-green boxes (medium reflectance, white boxes (high reflectance, and ambient air temperatures. Results from biophysical model simulations demonstrated that variation in diurnal temperature profiles generated by painting boxes either high or low reflectance colors could have significant ecophysiological consequences for animals occupying boxes, with animals in dark-green boxes at high risk of acute heat-stress and dehydration during extreme heat events. Conversely in cold weather, our modelling indicated that there are higher cumulative energy costs for mammals, particularly smaller animals, occupying light-green boxes. Given their widespread use as a conservation tool, we suggest that before boxes are installed, consideration should be given to the effect of color on nest box temperature profiles, and the resultant thermal suitability of boxes for wildlife, particularly during extremes in weather. Managers of nest box programs should consider using several different colors and installing boxes across a range of both orientations and

  15. Anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN with large deviations from the traditional 1 /T law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Wang, Huimin; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    Efficient heat dissipation, which is featured by high thermal conductivity, is one of the crucial issues for the reliability and stability of nanodevices. However, due to the generally fast 1 /T decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase, the efficiency of heat dissipation quickly drops down at an elevated temperature caused by the increase of work load in electronic devices. To this end, pursuing semiconductor materials that possess large thermal conductivity at high temperature, i.e., slower decrease of thermal conductivity with temperature increase than the traditional κ ˜1 /T relation, is extremely important to the development of disruptive nanoelectronics. Recently, monolayer gallium nitride (GaN) with a planar honeycomb structure emerges as a promising new two-dimensional material with great potential for applications in nano- and optoelectronics. Here, we report that, despite the commonly established 1 /T relation of thermal conductivity in plenty of materials, monolayer GaN exhibits anomalous behavior that the thermal conductivity almost decreases linearly over a wide temperature range above 300 K, deviating largely from the traditional κ ˜1 /T law. The thermal conductivity at high temperature is much larger than the expected thermal conductivity that follows the general κ ˜1 /T trend, which would be beneficial for applications of monolayer GaN in nano- and optoelectronics in terms of efficient heat dissipation. We perform detailed analysis on the mechanisms underlying the anomalously temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of monolayer GaN in the framework of Boltzmann transport theory and further get insight from the view of electronic structure. Beyond that, we also propose two required conditions for materials that would exhibit similar anomalous temperature dependence of thermal conductivity: large difference in atom mass (huge phonon band gap) and electronegativity (LO-TO splitting due to strong polarization of bond). Our

  16. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human-robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as αf + ξf and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, αf + ξf has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10-6 °C-1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10-6 °C-1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C.

  17. Thermal conductivity measurements of PTFE and Al2O3 ceramic at sub-Kelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, Alexey; Reiten, Jared; Singh, Vivek; Kolomensky, Yury G.

    2017-07-01

    The design of low temperature bolometric detectors for rare event searches necessitates careful selection and characterization of structural materials based on their thermal properties. We measure the thermal conductivities of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Al2O3 ceramic (alumina) in the temperature ranges of 0.17-0.43 K and 0.1-1.3 K, respectively. For the former, we observe a quadratic temperature dependence across the entire measured range. For the latter, we see a cubic dependence on temperature above 0.3 K, with a linear contribution below that temperature. This paper presents our measurement techniques, results, and theoretical discussions.

  18. The relationship between radiant heat, air temperature and thermal comfort at rest and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéritée, Julien; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    The aims of the present work were to investigate the relationships between radiant heat load, air velocity and body temperatures with or without coincidental exercise to determine the physiological mechanisms that drive thermal comfort and thermoregulatory behaviour. Seven male volunteers wearing swimming trunks in 18°C, 22°C or 26°C air were exposed to increasing air velocities up to 3 m s(-1) and self-adjusted the intensity of the direct radiant heat received on the front of the body to just maintain overall thermal comfort, at rest or when cycling (60 W, 60 rpm). During the 30 min of the experiments, skin and rectal temperatures were continuously recorded. We hypothesized that mean body temperature should be maintained stable and the intensity of the radiant heat and the mean skin temperatures would be lower when cycling. In all conditions, mean body temperature was lower when facing winds of 3 m s(-1) than during the first 5 min, without wind. When facing winds, in all but the 26°C air, the radiant heat was statistically higher at rest than when exercising. In 26°C air mean skin temperature was lower at rest than when exercising. No other significant difference was observed. In all air temperatures, high correlation coefficients were observed between the air velocity and the radiant heat load. Other factors that we did not measure may have contributed to the constant overall thermal comfort status despite dropping mean skin and body temperatures. It is suggested that the allowance to behaviourally adjust the thermal environment increases the tolerance of cold discomfort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal stability and high temperature polymorphism of topochemically-prepared Dion–Jacobson triple-layered perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertin, Stephen L.; Josepha, Elisha A.; Montasserasadi, Dariush; Wiley, John B., E-mail: jwiley@uno.edu

    2015-10-25

    The thermal stability of six Dion–Jacobson-related triple layered perovskites, ACa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10} (A = H, NH{sub 4}, Li, Na, K, CuCl), was explored to 1000 °C. Each compound was produced topochemically by low-temperature (<500 °C) ion exchange from RbCa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. The thermal behavior of the series was examined by variable temperature X-ray powder diffraction experiments in tandem with thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Five of the species were found to be low temperature/metastable phases, decomposing below 900 °C, where the stability of the series decreased with decreasing interlayer cation size. The compounds, A = Li, Na, K, exhibited high temperature polymorphism, with a completely reversible transition evident for KCa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10}. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of topochemically prepared triple-layered perovskites studied. • Clear correlation seen between stability and identity of interlayer cation. • Several in ACa{sub 2}Nb{sub 3}O{sub 10} series (A = Li, Na, K) exhibit high temperature polymorphism.

  20. Diamond's temperature: Unruh effect for bounded trajectories and thermal time hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinetti, Pierre; Rovelli, Carlo

    2003-01-01

    We study the Unruh effect for an observer with a finite lifetime, using the thermal time hypothesis. The thermal time hypothesis maintains that: (i) time is the physical quantity determined by the flow defined by a state over an observable algebra and (ii) when this flow is proportional to a geometric flow in spacetime, the temperature is the ratio between flow parameter and proper time. An eternal accelerated Unruh observer has access to the local algebra associated with a Rindler wedge. The flow defined by the Minkowski vacuum of a field theory over this algebra is proportional to a flow in spacetime and the associated temperature is the Unruh temperature. An observer with a finite lifetime has access to the local observable algebra associated with a finite spacetime region called a 'diamond'. The flow defined by the Minkowski vacuum of a (four-dimensional, conformally invariant) quantum field theory over this algebra is also proportional to a flow in spacetime. The associated temperature generalizes the Unruh temperature to finite lifetime observers. Furthermore, this temperature does not vanish even in the limit in which the acceleration is zero. The temperature associated with an inertial observer with lifetime Τ which we denote as 'diamond's temperature', is T D = 2 h/ π k b Τ. This temperature is related to the fact that a finite lifetime observer does not have access to all the degrees of freedom of the quantum field theory. However, we do not attempt to provide any physical interpretation of our proposed assignment of a temperature

  1. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range -100 to 100 degree C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs

  2. Measuring the temperature dependent thermal diffusivity of geomaterials using high-speed differential scanning calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aulock, Felix W.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Heat diffusion in the Earth's crust is critical to fundamental geological processes, such as the cooling of magma, heat dissipation during and following transient heating events (e.g. during frictional heating along faults), and to the timescales of contact metamorphosis. The complex composition and multiphase nature of geomaterials prohibits the accurate modeling of thermal diffusivities and measurements over a range of temperatures are sparse due to the specialized nature of the equipment and lack of instrument availability. We present a novel method to measure the thermal diffusivity of geomaterials such as minerals and rocks with high precision and accuracy using a commercially available differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). A DSC 404 F1 Pegasus® equipped with a Netzsch high-speed furnace was used to apply a step-heating program to corundum single crystal standards of varying thicknesses. The standards were cylindrical discs of 0.25-1 mm thickness with 5.2-6 mm diameter. Heating between each 50 °C temperature interval was conducted at a rate of 100 °C/min over the temperature range 150-1050 °C. Such large heating rates induces temperature disequilibrium in the samples used. However, isothermal segments of 2 minutes were used during which the temperature variably equilibrated with the furnace between the heating segments and thus the directly-measured heat-flow relaxed to a constant value before the next heating step was applied. A finite-difference 2D conductive heat transfer model was used in cylindrical geometry for which the measured furnace temperature was directly applied as the boundary condition on the sample-cylinder surfaces. The model temperature was averaged over the sample volume per unit time and converted to heat-flow using the well constrained thermal properties for corundum single crystals. By adjusting the thermal diffusivity in the model solution and comparing the resultant heat-flow with the measured values, we obtain a model

  3. Subtropical Arctic Ocean temperatures during the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluijs, A.; Schouten, S.; Pagani, M.; Woltering, M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Damste, J.S.S.; Dickens, G.R.; Huber, M.; Reichart, G.-J.; Stein, R.; Matthiessen, J.; Lourens, L.J.; Pedentchouk, N.; Backman, J.; Moran, K.; Clemens, S.; Cronin, T.; Eynaud, F.; Gattacceca, J.; Jakobsson, M.; Jordan, R.; Kaminski, M.; King, J.; Koc, N.; Martinez, N.C.; McInroy, D.; Moore, T.C.; O'Regan, M.; Onodera, J.; Palike, H.; Rea, B.; Rio, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, D.C.; St John, K.E.K.; Suto, I.; Suzuki, N.; Takahashi, K.; Watanabe, M. E.; Yamamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum, ???55 million years ago, was a brief period of widespread, extreme climatic warming, that was associated with massive atmospheric greenhouse gas input. Although aspects of the resulting environmental changes are well documented at low latitudes, no data were available to quantify simultaneous changes in the Arctic region. Here we identify the Palaeocene/Eocene thermal maximum in a marine sedimentary sequence obtained during the Arctic Coring Expedition. We show that sea surface temperatures near the North Pole increased from ???18??C to over 23??C during this event. Such warm values imply the absence of ice and thus exclude the influence of ice-albedo feedbacks on this Arctic warming. At the same time, sea level rose while anoxic and euxinic conditions developed in the ocean's bottom waters and photic zone, respectively. Increasing temperature and sea level match expectations based on palaeoclimate model simulations, but the absolute polar temperatures that we derive before, during and after the event are more than 10??C warmer than those model-predicted. This suggests that higher-than-modern greenhouse gas concentrations must have operated in conjunction with other feedback mechanisms-perhaps polar stratospheric clouds or hurricane-induced ocean mixing-to amplify early Palaeogene polar temperatures. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Thermal conductivity of water-saturated rocks from the KTB pilot hole at temperatures of 25 to 300°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribnow, D.; Williams, C.F.; Sass, J.H.; Keating, R.

    1996-01-01

    The conductivitites of selected gneiss (two) and amphibolite (one) core samples have been measured under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure with a needle-probe. Water-saturated thermal conductivity measurements spanning temperatures from 25 to 300??C and hydrostatic pressures of 0.1 and 34 MPa confirm the general decrease in conductivity with increasing temperature but deviate significantly from results reported from measurements on dry samples over the same temperature range. The thermal conductivity of water-saturated amphibolite decreases with temperature at a rate approximately 40% less than the rate for dry amphibolite, and the conductivity of water-saturated gneiss decreases at a rate approximately 20% less than the rate for dry gneiss. The available evidence points to thermal cracking as the primary cause of the more rapid decrease in dry thermal conductivity with temperature. The effects of thermal cracking were also observed in the water-saturated samples but resulted in a net decrease in room-temperature conductivity of less than 3%. These results highlight the importance of duplicating in-situ conditions when determining thermal conductivity for the deep crust.

  5. The use of thermal imaging to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Filipe; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Norte, Marco; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado; Vilaça-Alves, José

    2015-11-01

    Cryotherapy has been applied on clinical injuries and as a method for exercise recovery. It is aimed to reduce edema, nervous conduction velocity, and tissue metabolism, as well as to accelerate the recovery process of the muscle injury induced by exercise. Objective: This review aim to investigate the applicability of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy. Method: Search the Web of Science database using the terms "Cryotherapy", "Thermography", "Thermal Image" and "Cooling". Results: Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria and pass the PEDro scale quality evaluation. Evidence support the use of thermal imaging as a method for monitoring the skin temperature during cryotherapy, and it is superior to other contact methods and subjective methods of assessing skin temperature. Conclusion: Thermography seems to be an efficient, trustworthy and secure method in order to monitoring skin temperature during cryotherapy application. Evidence supports the use of thermography in detriment of contact methods as well as other subjective ones.

  6. Low-temperature thermal expansion of pure and inert gas-doped fullerite C sub 6 sub 0

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksandrovskii, A N; Eselson, V B; Gavrilko, V G; Manzhelii, V G; Udovidchenko, B G; Bakai, A S; Gadd, G E; Moricca, S; Sundqvist, B

    2003-01-01

    The low temperature (2-24 K) thermal expansion of pure (single-crystal and polycrystalline) C sub 6 sub 0 and polycrystalline C sub 6 sub 0 intercalated with He, Ne, Ar, and Kr has been investigated using the high-resolution capacitance dilatometer. The investigation of the time dependence of the sample length variations DELTA L(t) on heating by DELTA T shows that the thermal expansion is determined by the sum of positive and negative contributions, which have different relaxation times. The negative thermal expansion usually prevails at helium temperatures. The positive expansion is connected with the phonon thermalization of the system. The negative expansion is caused by reorientation of the C sub 6 sub 0 molecules. It is assumed that the reorientation is of a quantum character. The inert gas impurities affect the reorientation of the C6 sub sub 0 molecules very strongly, especially at liquid helium temperatures. A temperature hysteresis of the thermal expansion coefficient of Kr- and He-C sub 6 sub 0 solu...

  7. Prediction of effective thermal conductivity of porous consolidated media as a function of temperature: a test example of limestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb; Khan, Liaqat Ali; Maqsood, Asghari

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity per unit volume of sedimentary rocks (limestones) taken from Nammal Gorge sections, Western Salt Range, Pakistan, have been measured simultaneously using the transient plane source technique. The temperature dependence of thermal transport properties was studied in the temperature range 293 to 443 K. Different relations for the estimation of thermal conductivity are applied. A proposal for the prediction of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature is also given. It is observed that the values of effective thermal conductivity predicted by the proposed model are in agreement with the experimental thermal conductivity data within 8%. Furthermore, the errors in experimental calculations of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volumetric heat capacity are around 5%, 7% and 10%, respectively

  8. Physics parameter calculations for a Tandem Mirror Reactor with thermal barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boghosian, B.M.; Lappa, D.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal barriers are localized reductions in potential between the plugs and the central cell, which effectively insulate trapped plug electrons from the central cell electrons. By then applying electron heating in the plug, it is possible to obtain trapped electron temperatures that are much greater than those of the central cell electrons. This, in turn, effects an increase in the plug potential and central cell confinement with a concomitant decrease in plug density and injection power. Ions trapped in the barrier by collisions are removed by the injection of neutral beams directed inside the barrier cell loss cone; these beam neutrals convert trapped barrier ions to neutrals by charge exchange permitting their escape. We describe a zero-dimensional physics model for this type of reactor, and present some preliminary results for Q

  9. High-temperature molten salt thermal energy storage systems for solar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, R. J.; Claar, T. D.; Ong, E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results of compatibility screening studies of 100 salt/containment/thermal conductivity enhancement (TCE) combinations for the high temperature solar thermal application range of 704 deg to 871 C (1300 to 1600 F) are presented. Nine candidate containment/HX alloy materials and two TCE materials were tested with six candidate solar thermal alkali and alkaline earth carbonate storage salts (both reagent and technical grade of each). Compatibility tests were conducted with salt encapsulated in approx. 6.0 inch x 1 inch welded containers of test material from 300 to 3000 hours. Compatibility evaluations were end application oriented, considering the potential 30 year lifetime requirement of solar thermal power plant components. Analyses were based on depth and nature of salt side corrosion of materials, containment alloy thermal aging effects, weld integrity in salt environment, air side containment oxidation, and chemical and physical analyses of the salt. A need for more reliable, and in some cases first time determined thermophysical and transport property data was also identified for molten carbonates in the 704 to 871 C temperature range. In particular, accurate melting point (mp) measurements were performed for Li2CO3 and Na2CO3 while melting point, heat of fusion, and specific heat determinations were conducted on 81.3 weight percent Na2CO3-18.7 weight percent K2CO3 and 52.2 weight percent BaCO3-47.8 weight percent Na2CO3 to support future TES system design and ultimate scale up of solar thermal energy storage (TES) subsystems.

  10. Estimation of the temperature spatial variability in confined spaces based on thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyn, Grzegorz; Jurasz, Jakub; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Korbiel, Tomasz; Mikulik, Jerzy; Pawlik, Marcin; Rumin, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In developed countries the salaries of office workers are several times higher than the total cost of maintaining and operating the building. Therefore even a small improvement in human work productivity and performance as a result of enhancing the quality of their work environment may lead to a meaningful economic benefits. The air temperature is the most commonly used indicator in assessing the indoor environment quality. What is more, it is well known that thermal comfort has the biggest impact on employees performance and their ability to work efficiently. In majority of office buildings, indoor temperature is managed by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) appliances. However the way how they are currently managed and controlled leads to the nonhomogeneous distribution of temperature in certain space. An approach to determining the spatial variability of temperature in confined spaces was introduced based on thermal imaging temperature measurements. The conducted research and obtained results enabled positive verification of the method and creation of surface plot illustrating the temperature variability.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  12. Neutrality Versus Materiality: A Thermodynamic Theory of Neutral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Tailleux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theory for constructing quasi-neutral density variables γ directly in thermodynamic space is formulated, which is based on minimising the absolute value of a purely thermodynamic quantity J n . Physically, J n has a dual dynamic/thermodynamic interpretation as the quantity controlling the energy cost of adiabatic and isohaline parcel exchanges on material surfaces, as well as the dependence of in-situ density on spiciness, in a description of water masses based on γ, spiciness and pressure. Mathematically, minimising | J n | in thermodynamic space is showed to be equivalent to maximising neutrality in physical space. The physics of epineutral dispersion is also reviewed and discussed. It is argued, in particular, that epineutral dispersion is best understood as the aggregate effect of many individual non-neutral stirring events (being understood here as adiabatic and isohaline events with non-zero buoyancy, so that it is only the net displacement aggregated over many events that is approximately neutral. This new view resolves an apparent paradox between the focus in neutral density theory on zero-buoyancy motions and the overwhelming evidence that lateral dispersion in the ocean is primarily caused by non-zero buoyancy processes such as tides, residual currents and sheared internal waves. The efficiency by which a physical process contributes to lateral dispersion can be characterised by its energy signature, with those processes releasing available potential energy (negative energy cost being more efficient than purely neutral processes with zero energy cost. The latter mechanism occurs in the wedge of instability, and its source of energy is the coupling between baroclinicity, thermobaricity, and density compensated temperature/salinity anomalies. Such a mechanism, which can only exist in a salty ocean, is speculated to be important for dissipating spiciness anomalies and neutral helicity. The paper also discusses potential

  13. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, G.R.; Heimgartner, P.; Gustafsson, S.; Irons, G.; Miller, R.

    1997-01-01

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  14. Dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) as a candidate phase change material for high temperature thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuecuekaltun, Engin [Advansa Sasa Polyester San, A.S., Adana (Turkey); Paksoy, Halime; Bilgin, Ramazan; Yuecebilgic, Guezide [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey). Chemistry Dept.; Evliya, Hunay [Cukurova Univ., Adana (Turkey). Center for Environmental Research

    2010-07-01

    Thermal energy storage at elevated temperatures, particularly in the range of 120-250 C is of interest with a significant potential for industrial applications that use process steam at low or intermediate pressures. At given temperature range there are few studies on thermal energy storage materials and most of them are dedicated to sensible heat. In this study, Dimethyl Terephthalate - DMT (CAS No: 120-61-6) is investigated as a candidate phase change material (PCM) for high temperature thermal energy storage. DMT is a monomer commonly used in Polyethylene terephtalate industry and has reasonable cost and availability. The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis and heating cooling curves show that DMT melts at 140-146 C within a narrow window. Supercooling that was detected in DSC results was not observed in the cooling curve measurements made with a larger sample. With a latent heat of 193 J/g, DMT is a candidate PCM for high temperature storage. Potential limitations such as, low thermal conductivity and sublimation needs further investigation. (orig.)

  15. Gas utilization in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T 2 allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H 2 to D 2 could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Temperature structure function in the Bolgiano regime of thermal convection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skrbek, Ladislav; Niemela, J. J.; Sreenivasan, K. R.; Donnelly, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2002), 036303/1-036303/6 ISSN 1063-651X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : thermal convection * temperature fluctuations * Bolgiano regime Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.397, year: 2002

  17. Confinement of a neutral plasma using nested electric potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    A self-consistent, two-dimensional analysis is presented on confining a region of neutral plasma with a Penning/Malmberg type plasma trap using a nested well configuration. It is found that a neutral plasma region having disparate electron and ion temperatures or having high charge state ions can be confined with static fields. For confining a neutral region comprised of electrons and equal temperature low charge state ions, a quasistatic approach appears promising. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Transport coefficients in high-temperature ionized air flows with electronic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, V. A.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2018-01-01

    Transport coefficients are studied in high-temperature ionized air mixtures using the modified Chapman-Enskog method. The 11-component mixture N2/N2+/N /N+/O2/O2+/O /O+/N O /N O+/e- , taking into account the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of molecules and electronic degrees of freedom of both atomic and molecular species, is considered. Using the PAINeT software package, developed by the authors of the paper, in wide temperature range calculations of the thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients for an equilibrium ionized air mixture and non-equilibrium flow conditions for mixture compositions, characteristic of those in shock tube experiments and re-entry conditions, are performed. For the equilibrium air case, the computed transport coefficients are compared to those obtained using simplified kinetic theory algorithms. It is shown that neglecting electronic excitation leads to a significant underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 25 000 K. For non-equilibrium test cases, it is shown that the thermal diffusion coefficients of neutral species and the self-diffusion coefficients of all species are strongly affected by the mixture composition, while the thermal conductivity coefficient is most strongly influenced by the degree of ionization of the flow. Neglecting electronic excitation causes noticeable underestimation of the thermal conductivity coefficient at temperatures higher than 20 000 K.

  19. Coincident brane nucleation and the neutralization of Λ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Megevand, Ariel

    2004-01-01

    Nucleation of branes by a four-form field has recently been considered in string motivated scenarios for the neutralization of the cosmological constant. An interesting question in this context is whether the nucleation of stacks of coincident branes is possible, and if so, at what rate does it proceed. Feng et al. have suggested that, at high ambient de Sitter temperature, the rate may be strongly enhanced, due to large degeneracy factors associated with the number of light species living on the worldsheet. This might facilitate the quick relaxation from a large effective cosmological constant down to the observed value. Here, we analyze this possibility in some detail. In four dimensions, and after the moduli are stabilized, branes interact via repulsive long range forces. Because of that, the Coleman-de Luccia (CdL) instanton for coincident brane nucleation may not exist, unless there is some short range interaction that keeps the branes together. If the CdL instanton exists, we find that the degeneracy factor depends only mildly on the ambient de Sitter temperature, and does not switch off even in the case of tunneling from flat space. This would result in catastrophic decay of the present vacuum. If, on the contrary, the CdL instanton does not exist, coincident brane nucleation may still proceed through a 'static' instanton, representing pair creation of critical bubbles--a process somewhat analogous to thermal activation in flat space. In that case, the branes may stick together due to thermal symmetry restoration, and the pair creation rate depends exponentially on the ambient de Sitter temperature, switching off sharply as the temperature approaches zero. Such a static instanton may be well suited for the 'saltatory' relaxation scenario proposed by Feng et al

  20. Thermal deoxygenation of graphite oxide at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampars, V; Legzdina, M

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of graphene via the deoxygenation of the graphite oxide (GO) is a method for the large-scale production of this nanomaterial possessing exceptional mechanical, electrical and translucent properties. Graphite oxide sheet contains at least four different oxygen atoms connected to the Csp 3 and Csp 2 atoms of the sheet in the form of hydroxyl, epoxy, carboxyl or carbonyl groups. Some of these functional groups are located at the surface but others situated at the edges of the platelets. To obtain the graphene nanoplatelets or the few-layer graphene the oxygen functionalities must be removed. Exfoliation and deoxygenation can be accomplished by the use of chemical reductants or heat. Thermal deoxygenation as greener and simpler approach is more preferable over chemical reduction approach. Usually a considerable mass loss of GO observed upon heating at temperatures starting at 200 °C and is attributed to the deoxygenation process. In order to avoid the defects of the obtained graphene sheets it is very important to find the methods for lowering the deoxygenation temperature of GO. Herein, we have investigated the way treatment of the Hummer's synthesis product with acetone and methyl tert-butyl ether under ultrasonication in order to lower the thermal stability of the graphite oxide and its deoxygenation temperature. The obtained results indicate that treatment of the graphite oxide with solvents mentioned above substantially reduces the reduction and exfoliation temperature (130 °C) under ambient atmosphere. The investigation of the composition of evolved gases by hyphenated Pyr/GC/MS method at different experimental conditions under helium atmosphere shows that without the expected H 2 O, CO and CO 2 also sulphur dioxide and acetone has been released

  1. Spin fluctuations and low temperature features of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of iron monosilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.G.; Kortov, S.V.; Povzner, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    The low temperature measurements of thermal coefficient of linear expansion of strong paramagnet FeSi are carried out. The results obtained are discussed with in the framework of spin-fluctuation theory. It is shown that electronic part of the thermal coefficient of linear expansion is negative in the range of temperatures lower that of the semiconductor-metal phase transition. In metal phase it becomes positive. This specific features of the thermal coefficient is explained by the spin-fluctuation renormalization of d-electronic states density

  2. Experimental study on thermal-hydraulic for thermal striping phenomena. Results of temperature and velocity measurement among parallel triple jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakoshi, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2003-03-01

    A quantitative evaluation on thermal striping, in which temperature fluctuation due to convective mixing among jets causes thermal fatigue in structural components, is of importance for structural integrity and also reactor safety. The treasonable and safety design could be approved by taking account of decay of temperature fluctuation in fluid, during heat transfer from fluid to structure surface and thermal conduction in the structure. In this study, water experiment was performed for vertical and parallel triple jets along wall, those are cold jet in the center and hot jets on both sides. The local temperature and velocity were measured by movable thermocouples and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The both hot jets flowed leaning to the cold jet. The lean of the jets increased as the jets approached the wall. So the convective mixing region among the jets was shifted upstream near the wall. Temperature fluctuation intensity was dependent of the distance from the wall. Under isovelocity condition, prominent frequency component was observed in the power spectrum density of the temperature fluctuation at the furthest position from the wall. The power at the prominent component decreased as the jets approached the wall. Under non-isovelocity condition, on the other hand, the power spectrum density of temperature fluctuation was independent of the distance from the wall. Comparison of the second moment between of velocity PIV and laser Doppler velocimetry showed that the PIV system had high measurement accuracy. Under non-isovelocity condition, the normal components in the second-order moments of fluctuation were smaller than those under isovelocity condition. Normal components in the second-order moments in turbulence was dependent of the distance from the wall. (author)

  3. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  4. Temperature Profile in Fuel and Tie-Tubes for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishal Patel

    2015-02-01

    A finite element method to calculate temperature profiles in heterogeneous geometries of tie-tube moderated LEU nuclear thermal propulsion systems and HEU designs with tie-tubes is developed and implemented in MATLAB. This new method is compared to previous methods to demonstrate shortcomings in those methods. Typical methods to analyze peak fuel centerline temperature in hexagonal geometries rely on spatial homogenization to derive an analytical expression. These methods are not applicable to cores with tie-tube elements because conduction to tie-tubes cannot be accurately modeled with the homogenized models. The fuel centerline temperature directly impacts safety and performance so it must be predicted carefully. The temperature profile in tie-tubes is also important when high temperatures are expected in the fuel because conduction to the tie-tubes may cause melting in tie-tubes, which may set maximum allowable performance. Estimations of maximum tie-tube temperature can be found from equivalent tube methods, however this method tends to be approximate and overly conservative. A finite element model of heat conduction on a unit cell can model spatial dependence and non-linear conductivity for fuel and tie-tube systems allowing for higher design fidelity of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  5. Phase changing nanocomposites for low temperature thermal energy storage and release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dorigato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop new elastomeric phase change materials (PCM for the thermal energy storage/release below room temperature. In particular, poly(cyclooctene (PCO/paraffin blends filled with various concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, were prepared by a melt compounding process. The microstructural, thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of the resulting materials were investigated. The microstructure of these materials was characterized by the presence of paraffin domains inside the PCO, and CNTs were located only inside the paraffin domains in forms of aggregated clusters. DSC tests evidenced the existence of two distinct crystallization peaks at –10 and at 6 °C, respectively associated to the paraffin and the PCO phases, indicating that both the polymeric constituents are thermally active below room temperature. Moreover, CNT addition did not substantially alter the melting/crystallization properties of the material. Noticeable improvements of the mechanical properties and of the electrical conductivity with respect to the neat PCO/paraffin blend could be obtained upon CNT addition, and also thermal conductivity/diffusivity values were considerably enhanced above the percolation threshold. Finite element modeling demonstrated the efficacy of the prepared nanocomposites for applications in the thermal range from –30 to 6 °C.

  6. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    it acts as an insulating medium and prevents the heat flow, hence the need of providing insulation coating on valves is ... geometry metal components (piston, liner and cylinder head) and found a satisfactory .... model. Step8: Find the radial thermal stress at all the nodal point with the use of temperature ..... Cast iron St. 70.

  7. Enhancing thermal reliability of fiber-optic sensors for bio-inspired applications at ultra-high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Donghoon; Kim, Heon-Young; Kim, Dae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of bio-(inspired) sensors has led to an improvement in modern healthcare and human–robot systems in recent years. Higher levels of reliability and better flexibility, essential features of these sensors, are very much required in many application fields (e.g. applications at ultra-high temperatures). Fiber-optic sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors in particular, are being widely studied as suitable sensors for improved structural health monitoring (SHM) due to their many merits. To enhance the thermal reliability of FBG sensors, thermal sensitivity, generally expressed as α f + ξ f and considered a constant, should be investigated more precisely. For this purpose, the governing equation of FBG sensors is modified using differential derivatives between the wavelength shift and the temperature change in this study. Through a thermal test ranging from RT to 900 °C, the thermal sensitivity of FBG sensors is successfully examined and this guarantees thermal reliability of FBG sensors at ultra-high temperatures. In detail, α f + ξ f has a non-linear dependence on temperature and varies from 6.0 × 10 −6  °C −1 (20 °C) to 10.6 × 10 −6  °C −1 (650 °C). Also, FBGs should be carefully used for applications at ultra-high temperatures due to signal disappearance near 900 °C. (paper)

  8. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  9. SATCAP: a program for thermal-hydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harayama, Yasuo; Niimi, Motoji; Someya, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Toshiki.

    1988-02-01

    For material irradiation tests at JMTR, user's technical requirements are gradually becoming more rigid, permitting only a small temperature deviation from the desired during irradiation of test materials. As specimen temperature control equipment, several conception were proposed and some of them were translated into actual machines with the capsule having electrical seath heaters in it. This system is highly reliable unless the integrity of the heaters is threatened. However, in a test with the object of achieving a high exposure of specimen to neutrons, the break of a heater or deterioration of a heater caused by irradiation lowers the reliability of the system. To cope with this drawback, as a part of the irradiation technique improvement program, ''Satulated Temperature Capsule'' has been developing. This type capsule, in which the water suplied is boiled, bases on the conception of keeping the coolant at the saturated temperature facilitates the temperature control. Though there are various types of capsules employed at JMTR, the experience of the capsule into which the coolant is injected lacks. In designing, thermal performances have to fully understood. Therefore, a program was compiled to evaluate the thermal behavior in the capsule. The present report describes the calculation procedure and guides of input and output for the program. (author)

  10. A least squares method for a longitudinal fin with temperature dependent internal heat generation and thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, A.; Bouaziz, M.N.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Analytical solutions for a rectangular fin with temperature dependent heat generation and thermal conductivity. → Graphs give temperature distributions and fin efficiency. → Comparison of analytical and numerical solutions. → Method of least squares used for the analytical solutions. - Abstract: Approximate but highly accurate solutions for the temperature distribution, fin efficiency, and optimum fin parameter for a constant area longitudinal fin with temperature dependent internal heat generation and thermal conductivity are derived analytically. The method of least squares recently used by the authors is applied to treat the two nonlinearities, one associated with the temperature dependent internal heat generation and the other due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity. The solution is built from the classical solution for a fin with uniform internal heat generation and constant thermal conductivity. The results are presented graphically and compared with the direct numerical solutions. The analytical solutions retain their accuracy (within 1% of the numerical solution) even when there is a 60% increase in thermal conductivity and internal heat generation at the base temperature from their corresponding values at the sink temperature. The present solution is simple (involves hyperbolic functions only) compared with the fairly complex approximate solutions based on the homotopy perturbation method, variational iteration method, and the double series regular perturbation method and offers high accuracy. The simple analytical expressions for the temperature distribution, the fin efficiency and the optimum fin parameter are convenient for use by engineers dealing with the design and analysis of heat generating fins operating with a large temperature difference between the base and the environment.

  11. Temperature and Thermal Expansion Analysis of the Cooling Roller Based on the Variable Heat Flux Boundary Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongkang; Yang, Yang; He, Changyan

    2018-06-01

    Planar flow casting (PFC) is a primary method for preparing an amorphous ribbon. The qualities of the amorphous ribbon are significantly influenced by the temperature and thermal expansion of the cooling roller. This study proposes a new approach to analyze the three-dimensional temperature and thermal expansion of the cooling roller using variable heat flux that acted on the cooling roller as a boundary condition. First, a simplified two-dimensional model of the PFC is developed to simulate the distribution of the heat flux in the circumferential direction with the software FLUENT. The resulting heat flux is extended to be three-dimensional in the ribbon's width direction. Then, the extended heat flux is imported as the boundary condition by the CFX Expression Language, and the transient temperature of the cooling roller is analyzed in the CFX software. Next, the transient thermal expansion of the cooling roller is simulated through the thermal-structural coupling method. Simulation results show that the roller's temperature and expansion are unevenly distributed, reach the peak value in the middle width direction, and the quasi-steady state of the maximum temperature and thermal expansion are achieved after approximately 50 s and 150 s of casting, respectively. The minimum values of the temperature and expansion are achieved when the roller has a thickness of 45 mm. Finally, the reliability of the approach proposed is verified by measuring the roller's thermal expansion on the spot. This study provides theoretical guidance for the roller's thermal expansion prediction and the gap adjustment in the PFC.

  12. Influence of Temperature to Thermal Properties of U-Zr Alloy With The Zr Content Variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslina-Br-Ginting; Masrukan; M-Husna-Al-Hasa

    2007-01-01

    Have been done thermal of characteristic covering heat stability, heat capacities, enthalpy and also phase changes from uranium, zirkonium and U-Zr alloy with the Zr content variation of Zr 2 %, 6 %, 10% and 14% weight. Change of the temperature and composition anticipated will cause the characteristic of thermal to uranium metal, zirkonium and also U-Zr alloy. Therefore at this research was conducted using analysis influence of temperature to thermal of characteristic of uranium, zirkonium and U-Zr alloy with the Zr content variation by using DTA and DSC. Result of analysis indicate that the uranium metal at temperature 662 o C stable in phase α. Above at temperature, uranium metal experience of the phase change indicated by formed the thermochemical reaction as much 3 endothermic peak. At temperature 667.16 o C, happened by the phase change of α become the phase β with the enthalpy 2,3034 cal/g, at temperature 773.05 o C happened by the phase change β becoming phase γ 2,8725 cal/g and also at temperature 1125.26 the o C uranium metal experience the phenomenon become to melt with the enthalpy 2,1316 cal/g. (author)

  13. Global Model of Time-Modulated Electronegative Discharges for Neutral Radical and Electron Temperature Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Control and reduction of neutral radical flux/ion flux ratio and electron temperature Te is required for next generation etching in the microelectronics industry. We investigate time-modulated power for these purposes using a volume-averaged (global) oxygen discharge model, We consider pressures of 10-50 mTorr and plasma densities of 10^10-10^11 cm-3. In this regime, the discharge is found to be weakly electronegative. The modulation period and the duty ratio (on-time/period) are varied to determine the optimum conditions for reduction of FR= O-atom flux/ion flux and T_e. Two chambers with different height/diameter ratios (SMART Contract SM99-10051.

  14. Kalman Filtered MR Temperature Imaging for Laser Induced Thermal Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, D.; Yung, J.; Hazle, J. D.; Weinberg, J. S.; Stafford, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comp...

  15. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    Temperature changes in PEM fuel cell stacks are considerably higher during load variations and have a negative impact as they generate thermal stresses and stack degradation. Cell hydration is also of vital importance in fuel cells and it is strongly dependent on operating temperature....... A combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM...... fuel cell system for studying temperature variations over fast load changes. A temperature dependent cell polarization and hydration model integrated with the compressor, humidifier and cooling system are simulated in dynamic condition. A feedback PID control was implemented for stack cooling...

  16. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  17. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with a soft on-site potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Nianbei; Li, Baowen

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of one-dimensional nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattices with soft on-site potential (soft-KG) are investigated systematically. Similarly to the previously studied hard-KG lattices, the existence of renormalized phonons is also confirmed in soft-KG lattices. In particular, the temperature dependence of the renormalized phonon frequency predicted by a classical field theory is verified by detailed numerical simulations. However, the thermal conductivities of soft-KG lattices exhibit the opposite trend in temperature dependence in comparison with those of hard-KG lattices. The interesting thing is that the temperature-dependent thermal conductivities of both soft- and hard-KG lattices can be interpreted in the same framework of effective phonon theory. According to the effective phonon theory, the exponents of the power-law dependence of the thermal conductivities as a function of temperature are only determined by the exponents of the soft or hard on-site potentials. These theoretical predictions are consistently verified very well by extensive numerical simulations.

  18. Numerical evaluation and optimization of depth-oriented temperature measurements for the investigation of thermal influences on groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Mandy; Haendel, Falk; Epting, Jannis; Binder, Martin; Müller, Matthias; Huggenberger, Peter; Liedl, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Increasing groundwater temperatures have been observed in many urban areas such as London (UK), Tokyo (Japan) and also in Basel (Switzerland). Elevated groundwater temperatures are a result of different direct and indirect thermal impacts. Groundwater heat pumps, building structures located within the groundwater and district heating pipes, among others, can be addressed to direct impacts, whereas indirect impacts result from the change in climate in urban regions (i.e. reduced wind, diffuse heat sources). A better understanding of the thermal processes within the subsurface is urgently needed for decision makers as a basis for the selection of appropriate measures to reduce the ongoing increase of groundwater temperatures. However, often only limited temperature data is available that derives from measurements in conventional boreholes, which differ in construction and instrumental setup resulting in measurements that are often biased and not comparable. For three locations in the City of Basel models were implemented to study selected thermal processes and to investigate if heat-transport models can reproduce thermal measurements. Therefore, and to overcome the limitations of conventional borehole measurements, high-resolution depth-oriented temperature measurement systems have been introduced in the urban area of Basel. In total seven devices were installed with up to 16 sensors which are located in the unsaturated and saturated zone (0.5 to 1 m separation distance). Measurements were performed over a period of 4 years (ongoing) and provide sufficient data to set up and calibrate high-resolution local numerical heat transport models which allow studying selected local thermal processes. In a first setup two- and three-dimensional models were created to evaluate the impact of the atmosphere boundary on groundwater temperatures (see EGU Poster EGU2013-9230: Modelling Strategies for the Thermal Management of Shallow Rural and Urban Groundwater bodies). For Basel

  19. Application of the Faddeev-Watson expansion to thermal collisions of Rydberg atoms with neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Prunele, E.

    1983-01-01

    The Faddeev-Watson expansion (FWE) for the T operator is applied to the study of thermal collisions between Rydberg atom and neutral atom. These collisions are considered as a three-body problem (the perturber, the Rydberg electron, and its parent core) and it is assumed, as already done in most theoretical works dealing with Rydberg-atom--atom collisions, that the core-perturber interaction can be neglected. Then the evaluation of the FWE first- and second-order terms is made tractable by using an appropriate separable potential for the Rydberg-electron--perturber interaction. The evaluation of the second-order term allows us to estimate the importance of taking into account explicitly the Rydberg-electron--core interaction in the expression of the (three-body) T operator for the thermal collisions considered. Detailed calculations for the process Rb(n, l = 0)+He →Rb(n',l')+He are presented and discussed. The FWE second-order term has been evaluated for the first time by taking the (two-body) t operator associated with the Rydberg atom (valence electron plus parent core) as the Coulomb potential. The contribution of the FWE second-order term to the scattering amplitude decreases as n increases and is found especially significant when both the momentum transfers involved in the collision are large and the values of l and l' are small

  20. Response of Compacted Bentonites to Thermal and Thermo-Hydraulic Loadings at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehasis Tripathy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The final disposal of high-level nuclear waste in many countries is preferred to be in deep geological repositories. Compacted bentonites are proposed for use as the buffer surrounding the waste canisters which may be subjected to both thermal and hydraulic loadings. A significant increase in the temperature is anticipated within the buffer, particularly during the early phase of the repository lifetime. In this study, several non-isothermal and non-isothermal hydraulic tests were carried on compacted MX80 bentonite. Compacted bentonite specimens (water content = 15.2%, dry density = 1.65 Mg/m3 were subjected to a temperature of either 85 or 150 °C at one end, whereas the temperature at the opposite end was maintained at 25 °C. During the non-isothermal hydraulic tests, water was supplied from the opposite end of the heat source. The temperature and relative humidity were monitored along predetermined depths of the specimens. The profiles of water content, dry density, and degree of saturation were established after termination of the tests. The test results showed that thermal gradients caused redistribution of the water content, whereas thermo-hydraulic gradients caused both redistribution and an increase in the water content within compacted bentonites, both leading to development of axial stress of various magnitudes. The applied water injection pressures (5 and 600 kPa and temperature gradients appeared to have very minimal impact on the magnitude of axial stress developed. The thickness of thermal insulation layer surrounding the testing devices was found to influence the temperature and relative humidity profiles thereby impacting the redistribution of water content within compacted bentonites. Under the influence of both the applied thermal and thermo-hydraulic gradients, the dry density of the bentonite specimens increased near the heat source, whereas it decreased at the opposite end. The test results emphasized the influence of

  1. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  2. Structural Basis for Differential Neutralization of Ebolaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Dye

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There are five antigenically distinct ebolaviruses that cause hemorrhagic fever in humans or non-human primates (Ebola virus, Sudan virus, Reston virus, Taï Forest virus, and Bundibugyo virus. The small handful of antibodies known to neutralize the ebolaviruses bind to the surface glycoprotein termed GP1,2. Curiously, some antibodies against them are known to neutralize in vitro but not protect in vivo, whereas other antibodies are known to protect animal models in vivo, but not neutralize in vitro. A detailed understanding of what constitutes a neutralizing and/or protective antibody response is critical for development of novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we show that paradoxically, a lower affinity antibody with restricted access to its epitope confers better neutralization than a higher affinity antibody against a similar epitope, suggesting that either subtle differences in epitope, or different characteristics of the GP1,2 molecules themselves, confer differential neutralization susceptibility. Here, we also report the crystal structure of trimeric, prefusion GP1,2 from the original 1976 Boniface variant of Sudan virus complexed with 16F6, the first antibody known to neutralize Sudan virus, and compare the structure to that of Sudan virus, variant Gulu. We discuss new structural details of the GP1-GP2 clamp, thermal motion of various regions in GP1,2 across the two viruses visualized, details of differential interaction of the crystallized neutralizing antibodies, and their relevance for virus neutralization.

  3. Seasonal temperature acclimatization in a semi-fossorial mammal and the role of burrows as thermal refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachlow, Janet L.; Chappell, Mark A.; Camp, Meghan J.; Johnson, Timothy R.; Shipley, Lisa A.; Paul, David R.; Forbey, Jennifer S.

    2018-01-01

    Small mammals in habitats with strong seasonal variation in the thermal environment often exhibit physiological and behavioral adaptations for coping with thermal extremes and reducing thermoregulatory costs. Burrows are especially important for providing thermal refuge when above-ground temperatures require high regulatory costs (e.g., water or energy) or exceed the physiological tolerances of an organism. Our objective was to explore the role of burrows as thermal refuges for a small endotherm, the pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), during the summer and winter by quantifying energetic costs associated with resting above and below ground. We used indirect calorimetry to determine the relationship between energy expenditure and ambient temperature over a range of temperatures that pygmy rabbits experience in their natural habitat. We also measured the temperature of above- and below-ground rest sites used by pygmy rabbits in eastern Idaho, USA, during summer and winter and estimated the seasonal thermoregulatory costs of resting in the two microsites. Although pygmy rabbits demonstrated seasonal physiological acclimatization, the burrow was an important thermal refuge, especially in winter. Thermoregulatory costs were lower inside the burrow than in above-ground rest sites for more than 50% of the winter season. In contrast, thermal heterogeneity provided by above-ground rest sites during summer reduced the role of burrows as a thermal refuge during all but the hottest periods of the afternoon. Our findings contribute to an understanding of the ecology of small mammals in seasonal environments and demonstrate the importance of burrows as thermal refuge for pygmy rabbits. PMID:29576977

  4. Low-temperature specific heat and thermal conductivity of silica aerogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleator, T.; Bernasconi, A.; Posselt, D.

    1991-01-01

    Specific-heat and thermal-conductivity measurements were made on a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. Evidence for a crossover between regimes of characteristically different excitations was observed. The data analysis indicates a "bump" in the density...

  5. Effect of Surrogate Aggregates on the Thermal Conductivity of Concrete at Ambient and Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Sup Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate assessment of the thermal conductivity of concretes is an important part of building design in terms of thermal efficiency and thermal performance of materials at various temperatures. We present an experimental assessment of the thermal conductivity of five thermally insulated concrete specimens made using lightweight aggregates and glass bubbles in place of normal aggregates. Four different measurement methods are used to assess the reliability of the thermal data and to evaluate the effects of the various sensor types. The concrete specimens are also assessed at every 100°C during heating to ~800°C. Normal concrete is shown to have a thermal conductivity of ~2.25 W m−1 K−1. The surrogate aggregates effectively reduce the conductivity to ~1.25 W m−1 K−1 at room temperature. The aggregate size is shown not to affect thermal conduction: fine and coarse aggregates each lead to similar results. Surface contact methods of assessment tend to underestimate thermal conductivity, presumably owing to high thermal resistance between the transducers and the specimens. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the stages of mass loss of the cement paste correspond to the evolution of thermal conductivity upon heating.

  6. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Taeho [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Wolfson, Johanna; Nelson, Keith A., E-mail: kanelson@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Kandyla, Maria [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens 116-35 (Greece)

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation.

  7. Insulated skin temperature as a measure of core body temperature for individuals wearing CBRN protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, V L; Wilkinson, D M; Blacker, S D; Horner, F E; Carter, J; Rayson, M P; Havenith, G

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the validity of insulated skin temperature (T is ) to predict rectal temperature (T re ) for use as a non-invasive measurement of thermal strain to reduce the risk of heat illness for emergency service personnel. Volunteers from the Police, Fire and Rescue, and Ambulance Services performed role-related tasks in hot (30 °C) and neutral (18 °C) conditions, wearing service specific personal protective equipment. Insulated skin temperature and micro climate temperature (T mc ) predicted T re with an adjusted r 2 = 0.87 and standard error of the estimate (SEE) of 0.19 °C. A bootstrap validation of the equation resulted in an adjusted r 2 = 0.85 and SEE = 0.20 °C. Taking into account the 0.20 °C error, the prediction of T re resulted in a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 91%, respectively. Insulated skin temperature and T mc can be used in a model to predict T re in emergency service personnel wearing CBRN protective clothing with an SEE of 0.2 °C. However, the model is only valid for T is over 36.5 °C, above which thermal stability is reached between the core and the skin. (paper)

  8. Field testing of prototype systems for the non-destructive measurement of the neutral temperature of railroad tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Robert; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Nucera, Claudio; Fateh, Mahmood; Choros, John

    2014-03-01

    In both high speed and freight rail systems, the modern construction method is Continuous Welded Rail (CWR). The purpose of the CWR method is to eliminate joints in order to reduce the maintenance costs for both the rails and the rolling stock. However the elimination of the joints increases the risk of rail breakage in cold weather and buckling in hot weather. In order to predict the temperature at which the rail will break or buckle, it is critical to have knowledge of the temperature at which the rail is stress free, namely, the Rail Neutral Temperature (Rail-NT).The University of California at San Diego has developed an innovative technique based on non-linear ultrasonic guided waves, under FRA research and development grants for the non-destructive measurement of the neutral temperature of railroad tracks. Through the licensing of this technology from the UCSD and under the sponsorship of the FRA Office of Research and Development, a field deployable prototype system has been developed and recently field tested at cooperating railroad properties. Three prototype systems have been deployed to the Union Pacific (UP), Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF), and AMTRAK railroads for field testing and related data acquisition for a comprehensive evaluation of the system, with respect to both performance and economy of operation. The results from these tests have been very encouraging. Based on the lessons learned from these field tests and the feedback from the railroads, it is planned develop a compact 2nd generation Rail-NT system to foster deployment and furtherance of FRA R&D grant purpose of potential contribution to the agency mission of US railroad safety. In this paper, the results of the field tests with the railroads in summer of 2013 are reported.

  9. High Temperature Exposure of HPC – Experimental Analysis of Residual Properties and Thermal Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlík Zbyšek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high temperature exposure on properties of a newly designed High Performance Concrete (HPC is studied in the paper. The HPC samples are exposed to the temperatures of 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000°C respectively. Among the basic physical properties, bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity are measured. The mechanical resistivity against disruptive temperature action is characterised by compressive strength, flexural strength and dynamic modulus of elasticity. To study the chemical and physical processes in HPC during its high-temperature exposure, Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA is performed. Linear thermal expansion coefficient is determined as function of temperature using thermodilatometry (TDA. In order to describe the changes in microstructure of HPC induced by high temperature loading, MIP measurement of pore size distribution is done. Increase of the total open porosity and connected decrease of the mechanical parameters for temperatures higher than 200 °C were identified.

  10. Metal/dielectric thermal interfacial transport considering cross-interface electron-phonon coupling: Theory, two-temperature molecular dynamics, and thermal circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zexi; Wang, Yan; Ruan, Xiulin

    2016-02-01

    The standard two-temperature equations for electron-phonon coupled thermal transport across metal/nonmetal interfaces are modified to include the possible coupling between metal electrons with substrate phonons. The previous two-temperature molecular dynamics (TT-MD) approach is then extended to solve these equations numerically at the atomic scale, and the method is demonstrated using Cu/Si interface as an example. A key parameter in TT-MD is the nonlocal coupling distance of metal electrons and nonmetal phonons, and here we use two different approximations. The first is based on Overhauser's "joint-modes" concept, while we use an interfacial reconstruction region as the length scale of joint region rather than the phonon mean-free path as in Overhauser's original model. In this region, the metal electrons can couple to the joint phonon modes. The second approximation is the "phonon wavelength" concept where electrons couple to phonons nonlocally within the range of one phonon wavelength. Compared with the original TT-MD, including the cross-interface electron-phonon coupling can slightly reduce the total thermal boundary resistance. Whether the electron-phonon coupling within the metal block is nonlocal or not does not make an obvious difference in the heat transfer process. Based on the temperature profiles from TT-MD, we construct a new mixed series-parallel thermal circuit. We show that such a thermal circuit is essential for understanding metal/nonmetal interfacial transport, while calculating a single resistance without solving temperature profiles as done in most previous studies is generally incomplete. As a comparison, the simple series circuit that neglects the cross-interface electron-phonon coupling could overestimate the interfacial resistance, while the simple parallel circuit in the original Overhauser's model underestimates the total interfacial resistance.

  11. High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage for electrification and district heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A. Schrøder; Engelbrecht, K.; Soprani, S.

    stability upon thermal cycling. The most promising material consists of basalt, diabase, and magnetite, whereas the less suited rocks contain larger proportions of quartz and mica. An HT-TES system, containing 1.5 m3 of rock pieces, was constructed. The rock bed was heated to 600 ˚C using an electric heater......The present work describes development of a High Temperature Thermal Energy Storage (HT-TES) system based on rock bed technology. A selection of rocks was investigated by thermal analysis in the range 20-800 ˚C. Subsequently, a shortlist was defined primarily based on mechanical and chemical...... to simulate thermal charging from wind energy. After complete heating of the rock bed it was left fully charged for hours to simulate actual storage conditions. Subsequently the bed discharging was performed by leading cold air through the rock bed whereby the air was heated and led to an exhaust. The results...

  12. Kinetic neutral transport effects in the pedestal of H-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Building 5700, MS-6169, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8072 (United States)]. E-mail: owenlw@ornl.gov; Groebner, R.J. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-9784 (United States); Mahdavi, M.A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-9784 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    A series of hydrogen and deuterium discharges are analyzed with fluid plasma and Monte Carlo neutrals codes. Comparison of poloidally averaged radial distributions of core neutral density and ionization with analytic solutions of 1-D plasma and neutrals continuity equations support the hypothesis that the width of the density pedestal is largely determined by the neutral source. The increased neutral penetration depth that arises from multiple charge exchange can be included in the analytic model with radially dependent scale lengths. The scale length in the analytic model depends on the neutral fluid velocity which increases across the divertor and pedestal as the neutral atoms charge exchange with the higher temperature background ions. The neutral penetration depth and corresponding density pedestal width depend sensitively on the neutral temperature and the degree of ion-neutral temperature equilibration.

  13. EFFECTS OF PAVEMENT SURFACE TEMPERATURE ON THE MODIFICATION OF URBAN THERMAL ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SARAT, Adebayo-Aminu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Urban centres continue to experience escalating average summer temperature over the last fifty years. Temperature in the urban core cites have been rising due to rapid growth of urbanization in the latter half of the twentieth century (Akbari et al., 1989. Outdoor experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of different movement of materials on the urban thermal environment. Meteorological conditions such as air temperature, pavement surface temperature, Relative humidity and wind velocity were recorded to determine temperature differences among Asphalt/concrete, interlocking bricks and grass surfaces.

  14. Thermal conditions influence changes in body temperature induced by intragastric administration of capsaicin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Noriyuki; Urata, Tomomi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Capsaicin has been reported to have unique thermoregulatory actions. However, changes in core temperature after the administration of capsaicin are a controversial point. Therefore, we investigated the effects of environmental thermal conditions on changes in body temperature caused by capsaicin in mice. We showed that intragastric administration of 10 and 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperatures in the core temperature (CT)-constant and CT-decreasing conditions. In the CT-increasing condition, 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperature. However, 10 mg/kg capsaicin increased colonic temperature. Furthermore, the amount of increase in tail temperature was greater in the CT-decreasing condition and lower in the CT-increasing condition, compared with that of the CT-constant condition. These findings suggest that the changes in core temperature were affected by the environmental thermal conditions and that preliminary thermoregulation state might be more important than the constancy of temperature to evaluate the effects of heat diffusion and thermogensis.

  15. Estimation of the temperature spatial variability in confined spaces based on thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustyn Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries the salaries of office workers are several times higher than the total cost of maintaining and operating the building. Therefore even a small improvement in human work productivity and performance as a result of enhancing the quality of their work environment may lead to a meaningful economic benefits. The air temperature is the most commonly used indicator in assessing the indoor environment quality. What is more, it is well known that thermal comfort has the biggest impact on employees performance and their ability to work efficiently. In majority of office buildings, indoor temperature is managed by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC appliances. However the way how they are currently managed and controlled leads to the nonhomogeneous distribution of temperature in certain space. An approach to determining the spatial variability of temperature in confined spaces was introduced based on thermal imaging temperature measurements. The conducted research and obtained results enabled positive verification of the method and creation of surface plot illustrating the temperature variability.

  16. Isobaric thermal expansivity behaviour against temperature and pressure of associating fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain); Romani, Luis, E-mail: romani@uvigo.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias de Ourense, Campus As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    In order to study the influence of association on the isobaric thermal expansivity, this magnitude has been experimentally determined for a set of associating fluids within the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (5 to 55) MPa by means of calorimetric measurements. The 1-alcohol series, from methanol to 1-decanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, and 1-pentylamine were selected. With a view on checking the quality of the experimental data, they are compared with available literature values; good coherence was obtained for most of the studied liquids. The analysis of the experimental results reveals that the association capability presents a strong influence not only on the value of the isobaric thermal expansivity itself, but also on its behaviour against temperature and pressure.

  17. Isobaric thermal expansivity behaviour against temperature and pressure of associating fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navia, Paloma; Troncoso, Jacobo; Romani, Luis

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the influence of association on the isobaric thermal expansivity, this magnitude has been experimentally determined for a set of associating fluids within the temperature and pressure intervals (278.15 to 348.15) K and (5 to 55) MPa by means of calorimetric measurements. The 1-alcohol series, from methanol to 1-decanol, 2-pentanol, 3-pentanol, and 1-pentylamine were selected. With a view on checking the quality of the experimental data, they are compared with available literature values; good coherence was obtained for most of the studied liquids. The analysis of the experimental results reveals that the association capability presents a strong influence not only on the value of the isobaric thermal expansivity itself, but also on its behaviour against temperature and pressure.

  18. Potential for cladding thermal failure in LWRs during high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Genk, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature increase in the fuel and the cladding during a PCM accident produces film boiling at the cladding surface which may induce zircaloy cladding failure, due to embrittlement, and fuel melting at the centerline of the fuel pellets. Molten fuel may extrude through radial cracks in the fuel and relocate in the fuel-cladding gap. Contact of extruded molten fuel with the cladding, which is at high temperature during film boiling, may induce cladding thermal failure due to melting. An assessment of central fuel melting and molten fuel extrusion into the fuel-cladding gap during a PCM accident is presented. The potential for thermal failure of the zircaloy cladding upon being contacted by molten fuel during such an accident is also analyzed and compared with the applicable experimental evidence

  19. Urban Soil: Assessing Ground Cover Impact on Surface Temperature and Thermal Comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandani, Giada; Napoli, Marco; Massetti, Luciano; Petralli, Martina; Orlandini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The urban population growth, together with the contemporary deindustrialization of metropolitan areas, has resulted in a large amount of available land with new possible uses. It is well known that urban green areas provide several benefits in the surrounding environment, such as the improvement of thermal comfort conditions for the population during summer heat waves. The purpose of this study is to provide useful information on thermal regimes of urban soils to urban planners to be used during an urban transformation to mitigate surface temperatures and improve human thermal comfort. Field measurements of solar radiation, surface temperature (), air temperature (), relative humidity, and wind speed were collected on four types of urban soils and pavements in the city of Florence during summer 2014. Analysis of days under calm, clear-sky condition is reported. During daytime, sun-to-shadow differences for , apparent temperature index (ATI), and were significantly positive for all surfaces. Conversely, during nighttime, differences among all surfaces were significantly negative, whereas ATI showed significantly positive differences. Moreover, was significantly negative for grass and gravel. Relative to the shaded surfaces, was higher on white gravel and grass than gray sandstone and asphalt during nighttime, whereas gray sandstone was always the warmest surface during daytime. Conversely, no differences were found during nighttime for ATI and measured over surfaces that were exposed to sun during the day, whereas showed higher values on gravel than grass and asphalt during nighttime. An exposed surface warms less if its albedo is high, leading to a significant reduction of during daytime. These results underline the importance of considering the effects of surface characteristics on surface temperature and thermal comfort. This would be fundamental for addressing urban environment issues toward the heat island mitigation considering also the impact of urban

  20. Evaluation of mechanical and thermal properties of insulation materials for HTS power devices at liquid nitrogen temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Diaz, Mark Angelo [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In superconducting power devices including power cables in which high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes are utilized, a reliable electrical insulation should be achieved for its maximum performance. For an efficient design of HTS superconducting devices, a comparative evaluation of the mechanical and thermal propperties for various insulation materials at cryogenic temperatures is required. Especially, in the process of the property evaluation of the sheet-shaped insulation materials, anisotropy according to the machining direction should be considered because the mechanical and thermal properties are significantly influenced by the sample orientation. In this study, the cryogenic thermal and mechanical properties of various insulation material sheets such as PPLP, Cryoflex, Teflon, and Kapton were determined considering sample orientation. All samples tested at cryogenic temperature showed significantly higher tensile strength as compared with that of room temperature. The ultimate tensile strength at both temperature conditions significantly depended upon the sample orientation. The thermal properties of the insulation materials exhibited a slight difference among samples depending on the orientation: for the PPLP and Cryoflex, the CD orientation showed larger thermal contraction up to 77 K as compared to the MD one. MD samples in PPLP and Cryoflex showed a lower CTE and thermal contraction which made it more promising as an insulation material due to its comparable CTE with HTS CC tapes.

  1. Thermal sensor based zinc oxide diode for low temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocaya, R.O. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (South Africa); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); El-Tantawy, F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Center of Nanotechnology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Farooq, W.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yakuphanoglu, F., E-mail: fyhan@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Firat University, Elazig, 23169 (Turkey)

    2016-07-25

    The device parameters of Al/p-Si/Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}O-NiO/Al Schottky diode for x = 0.005 were investigated over the 50 K–400 K temperature range using direct current–voltage (I–V) and impedance spectroscopy. The films were prepared using the sol–gel method followed by spin-coating on p-Si substrate. The ideality factor, barrier height, resistance and capacitance of the diode were found to depend on temperature. The calculated barrier height has a mean. Capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements show that the capacitance decreases with increasing frequency, suggesting a continuous distribution of interface states over the surveyed 100 kHz to 1 MHz frequency range. The interface state densities, N{sub ss}, of the diode were calculated and found to peak as functions of bias and temperature in two temperature regions of 50 K–300 K and 300 K–400 K. A peak value of approximately 10{sup 12}/eV cm{sup 2} was observed around 0.7 V bias for 350 K and at 3 × 10{sup 12}/eVcm{sup 2} around 2.2 V bias for 300 K. The relaxation time was found to average 4.7 μs over all the temperatures, but showing its lowest value of 1.58 μs at 300 K. It is seen that the interface states of the diode is controlled by the temperature. This suggests that Al/p-Si/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al diode can be used as a thermal sensors for low temperature applications. - Highlights: • Al/pSi/Zn1-xAlxO-NiO/Al Schottky diode was fabricated by sol gel method. • The interface state density of the diode is controlled by the temperature. • Zinc oxide based diode can be used as a thermal sensor for low temperature applications.

  2. Lifetime improvement of sheathed thermocouples for use in high-temperature and thermal transient operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Clift, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Premature failure of small-diameter, magnesium-oxide-insulated sheathed thermocouples occurred when they were placed within nuclear fuel rod simulators (FRSs) to measure high temperatures and to follow severe thermal transients encountered during simulation of nuclear reactor accidents in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) thermal-hydraulic test facilities. Investigation of thermally cycled thermocouples yielded three criteria for improvement of thermocouple lifetime: (1) reduction of oxygen impurities prior to and during their fabrication, (2) refinement of thermoelement grain size during their fabrication, and (3) elimination of prestrain prior to use above their recrystallization temperature. The first and third criteria were satisfied by improved techniques of thermocouple assembly and by a recovery anneal prior to thermocouple use

  3. Ultrasound elastographic imaging of thermal lesions and temperature profiles during radiofrequency ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techavipoo, Udomchai

    Manual palpation to sense variations in tissue stiffness for disease diagnosis has been regularly performed by clinicians for centuries. However, it is generally limited to large and superficial structures and the ability of the physician performing the palpation. Imaging of tissue stiffness or elastic properties via the aid of modern imaging such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, referred to as elastography, enhances the capability for disease diagnosis. In addition, elastography could be used for monitoring tissue response to minimally invasive ablative therapies, which are performed percutaneously to destruct tumors with minimum damage to surrounding tissue. Monitoring tissue temperature during ablation is another approach to estimate tissue damage. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to improve the image quality of elastograms and temperature profiles for visualizing thermal lesions during and after ablative therapies. Elastographic imaging of thermal lesions is evaluated by comparison of sizes, shapes, and volumes with the results obtained using gross pathology. Semiautomated segmentation of lesion boundaries on elastograms is also developed. It provides comparable results to those with manual segmentation. Elastograms imaged during radiofrequency ablation in vitro show that the impact of gas bubbles during ablation on the ability to delineate the thermal lesion is small. Two novel methods to reduce noise artifacts in elastograms, and an accurate estimation of displacement vectors are proposed. The first method applies wavelet-denoising algorithms to the displacement estimates. The second method utilizes angular compounding of the elastograms generated using ultrasound signal frames acquired from different insonification angles. These angular frames are also utilized to estimate all tissue displacement vector components in response to a deformation. These enable the generation of normal and shear strain elastograms and Poisson's ratio

  4. Thermal infrared remote sensing for riverscape analysis of water temperature heterogeneity: current research and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Malcolm, I.; Bergeron, N.; St-Hilaire, A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change will increase summer water temperatures in northern latitude rivers. It is likely that this will have a negative impact on fish species such as salmonids, which are sensitive to elevated temperatures. Salmonids currently avoid heat stress by opportunistically using cool water zones that arise from the spatio-temporal mosaic of thermal habitats present within rivers. However, there is a general lack of information about the processes driving this thermal habitat heterogeneity or how these spatio-temporal patterns might vary under climate change. In this paper, we document how thermal infrared imaging has previously been used to better understand the processes driving river temperature patterns. We then identify key knowledge gaps that this technology can help to address in the future. First, we demonstrate how repeat thermal imagery has revealed the role of short-term hydrometeorological variability in influencing longitudinal river temperature patterns, showing that precipitation depth is strongly correlated with the degree of longitudinal temperature heterogeneity. Second, we document how thermal infrared imagery of a large watershed in Eastern Canada has shed new light on the landscape processes driving the spatial distribution of cool water patches, revealing that the distribution of cool patches is strongly linked to channel confinement, channel curvature and the proximity of dry tributary valleys. Finally, we detail gaps in current understanding of spatio-temporal patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We explain how advances in unmanned aerial vehicle technology and deterministic temperature modelling will be combined to address these current limitations, shedding new light on the landscape processes driving geographical variability in patterns of river temperature heterogeneity. We then detail how such advances will help to identify rivers that will be resilient to future climatic warming, improving current and future strategies for

  5. Transition from L mode to high ion temperature mode in CHS heliotron/torsatron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, K.; Osakabe, M.; Tanaka, K.

    2001-01-01

    A high ion temperature mode (high T i mode) is observed for neutral beam heated plasmas in the Compact Helical System (CHS) Heliotron/torsatron. The high T i mode plasma is characterized by a high central ion temperature, T i (0), and is associated with a peaked electron density profile produced by neutral beam fueling with low wall recycling. Transition from L mode to high T i mode has been studied in CHS. The central ion temperature in the high T i mode discharges reaches to 1 keV which is 2.5 times higher than that in the L mode discharges. The ion thermal diffusivity is significantly reduced by a factor of more than 2-3 in the high T i mode plasma. The ion loss cone is observed in neutral particle flux in the energy range of 1-6 keV with a narrow range of pitch angle (90±10 degree) in the high T i mode. However, the degradation of ion energy confinement due to this loss cone is negligible. (author)

  6. High temperature underground thermal energy storage system for solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    The activities feasibility of high temperature underground thermal storage of energy was investigated. Results indicate that salt cavern storage of hot oil is both technically and economically feasible as a method of storing huge quantities of heat at relatively low cost. One particular system identified utilizes a gravel filled cavern leached within a salt dome. Thermal losses are shown to be less than one percent of cyclically transferred heat. A system like this having a 40 MW sub t transfer rate capability and over eight hours of storage capacity is shown to cost about $13.50 per KWh sub t.

  7. Influence of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Zerong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient of fireworks and crackers on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition, considering the heat transfer coefficient as the power function of temperature, mathematical thermal explosion steady state and unsteady-state model of finite cylindrical fireworks and crackers with complex shell structures are established based on two-dimensional steady state thermal explosion theory. The influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion critical ambient temperature and time to ignition are analyzed. When heat transfer coefficient is changing with temperature and in the condition of natural convection heat transfer, critical ambient temperature lessen, thermal explosion time to ignition shorten. If ambient temperature is close to critical ambient temperature, the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on time to ignition become large. For firework with inner barrel in example analysis, the critical ambient temperature of propellant is 463.88 K and the time to ignition is 4054.9s at 466 K, 0.26 K and 450.8s less than without considering the change of heat transfer coefficient respectively. The calculation results show that the influence of variable heat transfer coefficient on thermal explosion time to ignition is greater in this example. Therefore, the effect of variable heat transfer coefficient should be considered into thermal safety evaluation of fireworks to reduce potential safety hazard.

  8. MAVEN Pickup Ion Constraints on Mars Neutral Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmati, A.; Larson, D. E.; Cravens, T.; Lillis, R. J.; Dunn, P.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Thiemann, E.; Connerney, J. E. P.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Espley, J. R.; Eparvier, F. G.

    2017-12-01

    Mars is currently losing its atmosphere mainly due to the escape of neutral hydrogen and oxygen. Directly measuring the rate of escaping neutrals is difficult, because the neutral density in the Mars exosphere is dominated, up to several Martian radii, by atoms that are gravitationally bound to the planet. Neutral atoms in the Martian exosphere, however, can get ionized, picked up, and accelerated by the solar wind motional electric field and energized to energies high enough for particle detectors to measure them. The MAVEN SEP instrument detects O+ pickup ions that are created at altitudes where the escaping part of the exosphere is dominant. Fluxes of these ions reflect neutral densities in the distant exosphere of Mars, allowing us to constrain neutral oxygen escape rates. The MAVEN SWIA and STATIC instruments measure pickup H+ and O+ created closer to Mars; comparisons of these data with models can be used to constrain exospheric hot O and thermal H densities and escape rates. In this work, pickup ion measurements from SEP, SWIA, and STATIC, taken during the first 3 Earth years of the MAVEN mission, are compared to the outputs of a pickup ion model to constrain the variability of neutral escape at Mars. The model is based on data from six MAVEN instruments, namely, MAG providing magnetic field used in calculating pickup ion trajectories, SWIA providing solar wind velocity as well as 3D pickup H+ and O+ spectra, SWEA providing solar wind electron spectrum used in electron impact ionization rate calculations, SEP providing pickup O+ spectra, STATIC providing mass resolved 3D pickup H+ and O+ spectra, and EUVM providing solar EUV spectra used in photoionization rate calculations. A variability of less than a factor of two is observed in hot oxygen escape rates, whereas thermal escape of hydrogen varies by an order of magnitude with Mars season. This hydrogen escape variability challenges our understanding of the H cycle at Mars, but is consistent with other

  9. Thermoregulation and thermal perception in the cold and heat before and after intermittent heat adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issing, K.; Fuhr, E.

    1986-09-01

    Students wearing swim suits were exposed for 30 min to neutral room temperature (TR=28‡C). During the following 60 min they were subjected to gradual decreases or increases of room temperature reaching 12‡C or 45‡C, respectively. Static thermal stimuli were applied to the palms of the right (38‡C) and left (25‡C) hands. Hands and feet of all subjects were thermally isolated at 22‡C ambient temperature. General thermal comfort (GTC), local thermal comfort (LTC), skin blood flow (which is proportional to heat transport index λ) several body temperatures, oxygen-consumption(dot V_{O_2 } ), and sweat rate (S), were measured. After moderate intermittent heat exposures (7 times for 1h at TR=42.5‡C) the experiments started again. From GTC, LTC, or λ as functions of TR, no new knowledge about thermoregulatory or adaptive mechanisms was available. The high λ in the cold stimulated left hand, however, and the oscillatory thresholds (λOSC) for rhythmic vasomotion indicated the peripheral influence of skin temperature, as well as local, mean skin temperature (¯Ts) and core temperature. When exposed to moderate temperature decreases or increases the body seems to react only with increasing thermal resistance by vasoconstriction or an increase of sweat rate, respectively. Moderate heat adaptation is only able to raise sweat rate, but not the thresholds and gain of the S-function. We assume that functional studies of adaptive modifications in humans must be conducted at temperatures greatly beyond those used in these experiments.

  10. Temperature dependence of thermal properties of Ag8In14Sb55Te23 phase-change memory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Xinbing; Gan, Fuxi; Wei, Jingsong; Xiao, Mufei

    2009-01-01

    The dependence of thermal properties of Ag 8 In 14 Sb 55 Te 23 phase-change memory materials in crystalline and amorphous states on temperature was measured and analyzed. The results show that in the crystalline state, the thermal properties monotonically decrease with the temperature and present obvious crystalline semiconductor characteristics. The heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity decrease from 0.35 J/gK, 1.85 mm 2 /s, and 4.0 W/mK at 300 K to 0.025 J/gK, 1.475 mm 2 /s, and 0.25 W/mK at 600 K, respectively. In the amorphous state, while the dependence of thermal properties on temperature does not present significant changes, the materials retain the glass-like thermal characteristics. Within the temperature range from 320 K to 440 K, the heat capacity fluctuates between 0.27 J/gK and 0.075 J/gK, the thermal diffusivity basically maintains at 0.525 mm 2 /s, and the thermal conductivity decreases from 1.02 W/mK at 320 K to 0.2 W/mK at 440 K. Whether in the crystalline or amorphous state, Ag 8 In 14 Sb 55 Te 23 are more thermally active than Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , that is, the Ag 8 In 14 Sb 55 Te 23 composites bear stronger thermal conduction and diffusion than the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 phase-change memory materials. (orig.)

  11. Theoretical Research on Thermal Shock Resistance of Ultra-High Temperature Ceramics Focusing on the Adjustment of Stress Reduction Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daining Fang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal shock resistance of ceramics depends on not only the mechanical and thermal properties of materials, but also the external constraint and thermal condition. So, in order to study the actual situation in its service process, a temperature-dependent thermal shock resistance model for ultra-high temperature ceramics considering the effects of the thermal environment and external constraint was established based on the existing theory. The present work mainly focused on the adjustment of the stress reduction factor according to different thermal shock situations. The influences of external constraint on both critical rupture temperature difference and the second thermal shock resistance parameter in either case of rapid heating or cooling conditions had been studied based on this model. The results show the necessity of adjustment of the stress reduction factor in different thermal shock situations and the limitations of the applicable range of the second thermal shock resistance parameter. Furthermore, the model was validated by the finite element method.

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Neutral sheet Profile During Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trintchouk, F.; Ji, H.; Yamada, M.; Kulsrud, R.; Hsu, S.; Carter, T.

    1999-01-01

    During magnetic reconnection, a ''neutral sheet'' current is induced, heating the plasma. The resultant plasma thermal pressure forms a stationary equilibrium with the opposing magnetic fields. The reconnection layer profile holds significant clues about the physical mechanisms which control reconnection. On the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment [M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)], a quasi steady-state and axisymmetric neutral sheet profile has been measured precisely using a magnetic probe array with spatial resolution equal to one quarter of the ion gyro-radius. It was found that the reconnecting field profile fits well with a Harris-type profile [E. G. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento 23, 115 (1962)], B(x) approximately tanh(x/delta). This agreement is remarkable since the Harris theory does not take into account reconnection and associated electric fields and dissipation. An explanation for this agreement is presented. The sheet thickness delta is found to be approximately 0.4 times the ion skin depth, which agrees with a generalized Harris theory incorporating non-isothermal electron and ion temperatures and finite electric field. The detailed study of additional local features of the reconnection region is also presented

  13. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures. PMID:27455273

  14. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C, sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings, and frequency response (hundreds of kHz, are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  15. Proof-of-Concept Testing of the Passive Cooling System (T-CLIP™) for Solar Thermal Applications at an Elevated Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Jun [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Quintana, Donald L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Vigil, Gabrielle M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Perraglio, Martin Juan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Farley, Cory Wayne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Tafoya, Jose I. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology; Martinez, Adam L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Applied Engineering and Technology

    2015-11-30

    The Applied Engineering and Technology-1 group (AET-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted the proof-of-concept tests of SolarSPOT LLC’s solar thermal Temperature- Clipper, or T-CLIP™ under controlled thermal conditions using a thermal conditioning unit (TCU) and a custom made environmental chamber. The passive T-CLIP™ is a plumbing apparatus that attaches to a solar thermal collector to limit working fluid temperature and to prevent overheating, since overheating may lead to various accident scenarios. The goal of the current research was to evaluate the ability of the T-CLIP™ to control the working fluid temperature by using its passive cooling mechanism (i.e. thermosiphon, or natural circulation) in a small-scale solar thermal system. The assembled environmental chamber that is thermally controlled with the TCU allows one to simulate the various possible weather conditions, which the solar system will encounter. The performance of the T-CLIP™ was tested at two different target temperatures: 1) room temperature (70 °F) and 2) an elevated temperature (130 °F). The current test campaign demonstrated that the T-CLIP™ was able to prevent overheating by thermosiphon induced cooling in a small-scale solar thermal system. This is an important safety feature in situations where the pump is turned off due to malfunction or power outages.

  16. Studies on preparation and adaptive thermal control performance of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials with controllable Curie temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-long; Yuan, Shuai; Song, Jia-liang

    2014-01-01

    PTC (positive temperature coefficient) material is a kind of thermo-sensitive material. In this study, a series of novel PTC materials adapted to thermal control of electron devices are prepared. By adding different low-melting-point blend matrixes into GP (graphite powder)/LDPE (low density polyethylene) composite, the Curie temperatures are adjusted to 9 °C, 25 °C, 34 °C and 41 °C, and the resistance–temperature coefficients are enhanced to 1.57/°C–2.15/°C. These PTC materials remain solid in the temperature region of PTC effect, which makes it possible to be used as heating element to achieve adaptive temperature control. In addition, the adaptive thermal control performances of this kind of materials are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The result shows that the adaptive effect becomes more significant while the resistance–temperature coefficient increases. A critical heating power defined as the initial heating power which makes the equilibrium temperature reach terminal temperature is presented. The adaptive temperature control will be effective only if the initial power is below this value. The critical heating power is determined by the Curie temperature and resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials, and a higher Curie temperature or resistance–temperature coefficient will lead to a larger critical heating power. - Highlights: • A series of novel PTC (positive temperature coefficient) materials were prepared. • The Curie point of PTC material can be adjusted by choosing different blend matrixes. • The resistance–temperature coefficient of PTC materials is enhanced to 2.15/°C. • The material has good adaptive temperature control ability with no auxiliary method. • A mathematical model is established to analyze the performance and applicability

  17. Effect of Si doping on the thermal conductivity of bulk GaN at elevated temperatures – theory and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Paskov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Si doping on the thermal conductivity of bulk GaN was studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thermal conductivity of samples grown by Hydride Phase Vapor Epitaxy (HVPE with Si concentration ranging from 1.6×1016 to 7×1018 cm-3 was measured at room temperature and above using the 3ω method. The room temperature thermal conductivity was found to decrease with increasing Si concentration. The highest value of 245±5 W/m.K measured for the undoped sample was consistent with the previously reported data for free-standing HVPE grown GaN. In all samples, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature. In our previous study, we found that the slope of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity gradually decreased with increasing Si doping. Additionally, at temperatures above 350 K the thermal conductivity in the highest doped sample (7×1018 cm-3 was higher than that of lower doped samples. In this work, a modified Callaway model adopted for n-type GaN at high temperatures was developed in order to explain such unusual behavior. The experimental data was analyzed with examination of the contributions of all relevant phonon scattering processes. A reasonable match between the measured and theoretically predicted thermal conductivity was obtained. It was found that in n-type GaN with low dislocation densities the phonon-free-electron scattering becomes an important resistive process at higher temperatures. At the highest free electron concentrations, the electronic thermal conductivity was suggested to play a role in addition to the lattice thermal conductivity and compete with the effect of the phonon-point-defect and phonon-free-electron scattering.

  18. Effect of thermal cycling on the transformation temperature ranges of a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, A.S.; Canejo, J.P.H.G.; Martins, R.M.S.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) represents a class of metallic materials that has the capability of recovering a previously defined initial shape when subject to an adequate thermomechanical treatment. The present work aims to study the influence of thermal cycles on the transition temperatures of a Ni-Ti alloy. In this system, small variations around the equiatomic composition give rise to significant transformation temperature variations ranging from 173 to 373 K. SMA usually presents the shape memory effect after an annealing treatment at ca. 973 K. The optimisation of the thermomechanical treatment will allow to 'tune' the material to different transformation temperature ranges from the same starting material, just by changing the processing conditions. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to identify the transformation temperatures and the phases that are present after different thermal cycles. The results concerning a series of thermal cycles with different heating and cooling rates (from 1.67x10 -2 to 1.25x10 -1 K/s) and different holding temperatures (from 473 to 1033 K) are presented

  19. Temperature field and thermal stress analysis of the HT-7U vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao; Yao Damao; Wu Songtao; Weng Peide

    2000-01-01

    The HT-7U vacuum vessel is an all-metal-welded double-wall interconnected with toroidal and poloidal stiffening ribs. The channels formed between the ribs and walls are filled with boride water as a nuclear shielding. On the vessel surface facing the plasma are installed cable-based Ohmic heaters. Prior to plasma operation the vessel is to be baked out and discharge cleaned at about 250 degree C. During baking out the non-uniformity of temperature distribution on the vacuum vessel will bring about serious thermal stress that can damage the vessel. In order to determine and optimize the design of the HT-7U vacuum vessel, a three-dimensional finite element model was performed to analyse its temperature field and thermal stress. the maximal thermal stress appeared on the round of lower vertical port and maximal deformation located just on the region between the upper vertical port and the horizontal port. The results show that the reinforced structure has a good capability of withstanding the thermal loads

  20. C-X neutral spectra from ZT-40M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, C.; Carolan, P.G.; Bunting, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    A series of experiments have recently been completed on the ZT-40M Reversed Field Pinch at Los Alamos for which Neutral Charge Exchange (C-X) spectra have been measured using both the previously reported Time-of-Flight (TOF) system, and a 5 channel electrostatic Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA). The experiments involved measurements of ion and electron temperatures for a variety of discharge conditions including scans of flat-top current levels, different values of the toroidal field reversal parameter (F = B phi (a)/ phi >), ramped current discharges, discharges with a movable graphite paddle limiter inserted into the edge of the plasma from above, and discharges with Deuterium pellet injection. Both the TOF and NPA systems view the plasma along chords from the outside midplane, and are separated by 60 0 toroidally. Core ion temperatures are obtained by examining the asymptotic tail of the neutral particle efflux spectrum. Detailed comparisons of the neutral particle spectra obtained with these two systems for the various operating conditions will be presented

  1. Temperature dependent capacity contribution of thermally treated anode current collectors in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Li Xifei; Wang Chunlei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied the influence of the thermal treatment of current collectors on the energy capacity. ► Different current collectors show different thermal treatment effect on performance. ► The non-negligible capacity contribution is closely related to the treatment temperatures. ► Our results could be beneficial to designing battery architectures. - Abstract: Metal current collectors, offering a good connection between the active materials and the external circuit, is an important component in a rechargeable lithium ion battery. Some necessary thermal treatment in the battery fabrication and assembly procedure results in current collectors with some non-negligible reversible energy capacities; however, these energy capacities were negligible in the previous references. In this research, for the first time, we investigated the influence of the thermal treatment of current collectors (such as copper foil and stainless steel disk) on energy capacities. Our results indicate that different current collector materials have different thermal treatment effects on their electrochemical performance. The non-negligible capacity contribution is closely related to the treatment temperature.

  2. Low-temperature specific-heat and thermal-conductivity of silica aerogels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernasconi, A.; Sleator, T.; Posselt, D.

    1992-01-01

    Specific heat, C(p), and thermal conductivity, lambda, have been measured on a series of base-catalyzed silica aerogels at temperatures between 0.05 and 20 K. Results for both C(p)(T) and lambda(T) confirm that the different length-scale regions observed in the aerogel structure are reflected...

  3. Color of hot soup modulates postprandial satiety, thermal sensation, and body temperature in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maki; Kimura, Rie; Kido, Yasue; Inoue, Tomoko; Moritani, Toshio; Nagai, Narumi

    2017-07-01

    The color of food is known to modulate not only consumers' motivation to eat, but also thermal perception. Here we investigated whether the colors of hot soup can influence thermal sensations and body temperature, in addition to the food acceptability and appetite. Twelve young female participants consumed commercial white potage soup, modified to yellow or blue by adding food dyes, at 9 a.m. on 3 separated days. During the test, visual impression (willingness to eat, palatability, comfort, warmth, and anxiety) and thermal sensations were self-reported using visual analog scales. Core (intra-aural) and peripheral (toe) temperatures were continuously recorded 10 min before and 60 min after ingestion. Blue soup significantly decreased willingness to eat, palatability, comfort, and warmth ratings, and significantly increased anxiety feelings compared to the white and yellow soups. After ingestion, the blue soup showed significantly smaller satiety ratings and the tendency of lower thermal sensation scores of the whole body compared to the white and yellow soups. Moreover, a significantly greater increase in toe temperature was found with the yellow soup than the white or blue soup. In conclusion, this study provides new evidence that the colors of hot food may modulate postprandial satiety, thermal sensations and peripheral temperature. Such effects of color may be useful for dietary strategies for individuals who need to control their appetite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting Comfort Temperature in Indonesia, an Initial Step to Reduce Cooling Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Harso Karyono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has no reliable thermal comfort standard that is based on research works. The current national standard (SNI 6390:2011 states only a single range of comfort temperature that is 25.5 °C Ta, with a range of +1.5 °C Ta. Previous thermal studies in a number of different buildings in Indonesia showed that the neutral (comfort temperatures of subjects were about 27 to 28 °C, which is higher than the values stated in the standard. As a big country with various ambient temperatures, Indonesian needs a better and more reliable thermal comfort predictor which can be applied properly across the country. This study is an attempt to propose an initial Indonesian thermal predictor, in the form of a simple equation, which could predict comfort temperatures properly across the country. Reanalysing the previous comfort studies in Indonesia, a simple regression equation is constructed as to be used as the initial Indonesian comfort predictor. Using this predictor, the comfort temperatures in a lowland or coastal cities like Jakarta is found to be higher than the current comfort standard. It is expected that this predictor would help to provide a better indoor thermal environment and at the same reduce the cooling energy in air conditioning (AC building, thus reducing a building’s carbon emissions.

  5. In-Situ Real-Time Temperature Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program addresses the need for interfacial and in-depth temperature monitoring of thermal protection systems (TPS). Novel, linear drive, eddy current methods...

  6. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART considering thermal stratification at intermediate cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Because the pressurizer is in reactor vessel, the heat transfer from primary water would increase the temperatures of fluids in pressurizer to same temperature of hotleg, if no cooling equipment were supplied. Thus, heat exchanger and thermal insulator are needed to minimize heat transferred from primary water and to remove heat in pressurizer. The temperatures in cavities of pressurizer for normal operation are 70 deg C and 74 deg C for intermediate and end cavity, respectively, which considers the solubility of nitrogen gas in water. Natural convection is the mechanism of heat balance in pressurizer of SMART. In SMART, the heat exchanger in pressurizer is placed in lower part of intermediate cavity, so the heat in upper part of intermediate cavity can't be removed adequately and it can cause thermal stratification. If thermal stratification occurred, it increases heat transfers to nitrogen gas and system pressure increases as the result. Thus, proper evaluation of those effects on system pressure and ways to mitigate thermal stratification should be established. This report estimates the system pressure and temperatures in cavities of pressurizer with considering thermal stratification in intermediate cavity. The system pressure and temperatures for each cavities considered size of wet thermal insulator, temperature of upper plate of reactor vessel, parameters of heat exchanger in intermediate cavity such as flow rate and temperature of cooling water, heat transfer area, effective tube height, and location of cooling tube. In addition to the consideration of thermal stratification thermal mixing of all water in intermediate cavity also considered and compared in this report. (author). 6 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Thermal effects of an ICL-based mid-infrared CH4 sensor within a wide atmospheric temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Weilin; Zheng, Chuantao; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Girija, Aswathy V.; He, Qixin; Zheng, Huadan; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2018-03-01

    The thermal effects of an interband cascade laser (ICL) based mid-infrared methane (CH4) sensor that uses long-path absorption spectroscopy were studied. The sensor performance in the laboratory at a constant temperature of ∼25 °C was measured for 5 h and its Allan deviation was ∼2 ppbv with a 1 s averaging time. A LabVIEW-based simulation program was developed to study thermal effects on infrared absorption and a temperature compensation technique was developed to minimize these effects. An environmental test chamber was employed to investigate the thermal effects that occur in the sensor system with variation of the test chamber temperature between 10 and 30 °C. The thermal response of the sensor in a laboratory setting was observed using a 2.1 ppm CH4 standard gas sample. Indoor/outdoor CH4 measurements were conducted to evaluate the sensor performance within a wide atmospheric temperature range.

  8. Negative thermal quenching of the defects in GaInP top cell with temperature-dependent photoluminescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wang; Rui, Wu; Tiancheng, Yi; Yong, Zheng; Rong, Wang

    2018-01-01

    Temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out to investigate the irradiation effects of 1.0 MeV electrons on the n+- p GaInP top cell of GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells in the 10-300 K temperature range. The PL intensities plotted against inverse temperature in an Arrhenius plot shows a thermal quenching behavior from 10 K to 140 K and an unusual negative thermal quenching (NTQ) behavior from 150 K to 300 K. The appearance of the PL thermal quenching with increasing temperature confirms that there is a nonradiative recombination center, i.e., the H2 hole trap located at Ev + 0.55 eV, in the cell after electron irradiation. The PL negative thermal quenching behavior may tentatively be attributed to the intermediate states at an energy level of 0.05 eV within the band gap in GaInP top cell.

  9. Positron annihilation in germanium in thermal equilibrium at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Moriya, Tsuyoshi; Komuro, Naoyuki; Tanigawa, Shoichiro [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Kawano, Takao; Ikari, Atsushi

    1996-09-01

    Annihilation characteristics of positrons in Ge in thermal equilibrium at high temperature were studied using a monoenergetic positron beam. Precise measurements of Doppler broadening profiles of annihilation radiation were performed in the temperature range between 300 K and 1211 K. The line shape parameters of Doppler broadening profiles were found to be almost constant at 300-600 K. The changes in these parameters were observed to start above 600 K. This was attributed to both the decrease in the fraction of positrons annihilating with core electrons and the lowering of the crystal symmetry around the region detected by positron-electron pairs. This suggests that behaviors of positrons are dominated by some form of positron-lattice coupling in Ge at high temperatures. The temperature dependence of the diffusion length of positrons was also discussed. (author)

  10. 76 FR 81363 - Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... amended FDA's regulations for thermally processed low-acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 113 [Docket No. FDA-2007-N-0265] (formerly 2007N-0026) Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid...

  11. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Olesen, Bjarne W. [ICIEE/BYG, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Iwamatsu, Toshiya [Faculty of Urban Environmental Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Asada, Hideo [Architech Consulting Co., Tokyo (Japan); Dovjak, Mateja [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schellen, Lisje [Eindhoven University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning (Netherlands); Shukuya, Masanori [Laboratory of Building Environment, Tokyo City University, Yokohama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Application of the exergy concept to research on the built environment is a relatively new approach. It helps to optimize climate conditioning systems so that they meet the requirements of sustainable building design. As the building should provide a healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation. Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy consumption rates increase as the operative temperature increases above 24 C or decreases below 22 C. With the data available so far, a second-order polynomial relationship between thermal sensation and the exergy consumption rate was established. (author)

  12. RESEARCHES REGARDING USE OF TEXTILE MATERIALS FOR THERMAL INSULATION AT NEGATIVE TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOSUB Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using thermal insulation in negative temperature acts to reduce heat flow to the cooled space or to objects that have a temperature below ambient temperature. To achieve economic operation of the space to be cooled insulation thickness and quality is an important factor. In this article we want to compare three products used in thermal insulation at negative temperatures: expanded polystyrene, non-woven and wool coats. The materials will be tested with a mechanical vapor compression refrigerator capable of producing temperatures in the range +4 .. -35 ° C, managed by a programmer Dixel capable of recording values between +40. .. -60 °C. Refrigeration insulation enclosure was made with 100 mm expanded polystyrene. On one side of the enclosure will be a cut of 250 * 250 mm, chosen in a central position where the material will be introduced to be tested. The dimensions of the samples are 250 * 250 * 60 mm. To check the insulation properties of materials it will be used a temperature logger capable of recording with two probes temperatures between +125...-40° C. One of the probes will be inserted inside the refrigerator and the second probe will be positioned to the outside of the test material adhered to an aluminum plate, in order to read a average temperature. The difference in thickness of the insulation shall be filled with non-woven material. Hardening the assembly will be made using a 6 mm thick OSB board. The mate